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1

Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

2

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

Not Available

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

3

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

4

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

Beasley, R.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

High-temperature turbine technology program hot-gas path development test. Part II. Testing  

SciTech Connect

This topical report of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) Phase II program presents the results of testing full-scale water-cooled first-stage and second-stage turbine nozzles at design temperature and pressure to verify that the designs are adequate for operation in a full-scale turbine environment. Low-cycle fatigue life of the nozzles was demonstrated by subjecting cascade assemblies to several hundred simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycles. This testing was accomplished in the Hot-Gas Path Development Test Stand (HGPDTS), which is capable of evaluating full-scale combustion and turbine nozzle components. A three-throat cascade of the first-stage turbine nozzle was successfully tested at a nozzle inlet gas temperature of 2630/sup 0/F and a nozzle inlet pressure of 11.3 atmospheres. In addition to steady-state operation at the design firing temperature, the nozzle cascade was exposed to a simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycle by varying the firing temperature. A total of 42 h at the design point and 617 thermal cycles were accumulated during the test periods. First-stage nozzle test results show that measured metal and coolant temperatures correspond well to the predicted design values. This nozzle design has been shown to be fully satisfactory for the application (2600/sup 0/F), with growth capability to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature. A post-test metallurgical examination of sectioned portions of the tested nozzles shows a totally bonded structure, confirming the test results and attesting to the successful performance of water-cooled composite nozzle hardware.

Horner, M.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

FINAL STATUS OF GENERAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY AIR FLOW AND DUST TEST PROGRAM. PART I. PART II  

SciTech Connect

A full scale 15 deg sector of the P122 reactor configuration was constructed. The model was complete with respect to all internal cooling air passages, and reflectors, thermal shielding, and island reflector. The contract was terminated before any test data could be obtained. Investigation of the effect of atmospheric dust on performance of reactor systems using wire screen matrix fuel elements is reported. The interim conclusion is that dust would not limit aircraft performance or life. Work proposed but not completed is outlined. Appendices contain previously unpublished reports. (auth)

Venneman, W.F.; Lawrence, R.L.; Ryan, P.T.

1961-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

Spatially Variable Advection Correction of Radar Data. Part II: Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatially variable advection-correction/analysis procedure introduced in Part I is tested using analytical reflectivity blobs embedded in a solid-body vortex, and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 ...

Alan Shapiro; Katherine M. Willingham; Corey K. Potvin

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

TEST REACTORS MEETING FOR INDUSTRY, IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO, MAY 13-15, 1959. PART I. CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF TEST REACTORS. PART II. UTILIZATION OF TEST REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

Twelve papers on construction and operation of test reactors and nine papers on the utilization of test reactors are presented.(W.D.M.)

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M515 dated 9/9/13 M515 dated 9/9/13 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................... 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)..................................................................................................... 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ............................................. 9 4. FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) (REPLACED M264) ............................................................................................................................ 10 5. FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) (REPLACED M443) ......................... 10

10

Identifying Doppler Velocity Contamination Caused by Migrating Birds. Part II: Bayes Identification and Probability Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the Bayesian statistical decision theory, a probabilistic quality control (QC) technique is developed to identify and flag migrating-bird-contaminated sweeps of level II velocity scans at the lowest elevation angle using the QC ...

Shun Liu; Qin Xu; Pengfei Zhang

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Performance and Electrical Characterization Tests on a Microturbine Commercial Prototype - Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI is testing various commercial microturbine generators (MTGs) to verify performance claims, identify any critical technology issues, and assess viability of units for utility applications. This report provides test results on two commercial prototype microturbine generators. The units were identical except that the first unit could only operate in the grid-parallel mode whereas the second unit had the capability to operate in both the grid-parallel and grid-independent modes. The tests continue earli...

2000-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

12

Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses  

SciTech Connect

The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

Dethlefsen, R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

A Class of Single- and Dual-Frequency Algorithms for Rain-Rate Profiling from a Spaceborne Radar. Part II: Tests from Airborne Radar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, four single-frequency (SF) algorithms and a dual-frequency (DF) algorithm for range profiling of the rain rate from a spaceborne radar were described and tested from numerical simulations. In Part II, performances of these algorithms ...

Paul Amayenc; Jean Philippe Diguet; Mongi Marzoug; Taoufik Tani

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

A Review, Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is the second of a two-part review of methods for automated fault detection and diagnostics (FDD) and prognostics whose intent is to increase awareness of the HVAC&R research and development community to the body of FDD and prognostics developments in other fields as well as advancements in the field of HVAC&R. The first part of the review focused on generic FDD and prognostics, provided a framework for categorizing methods, described them, and identified their primary strengths and weaknesses (Katipamula and Brambley 2005). In this paper we address research and applications specific to the fields of HVAC&R, provide a brief discussion on the current state of diagnostics in buildings, and discuss the future of automated diagnostics in buildings.

Prognostics For Building Systems; Srinivas Katipamula; Phd Michael; R. Brambley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM). Part II: Formulation and Tests of the Nonhydrostatic Dynamic Core  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic core of the Ocean–Land–Atmosphere Model (OLAM), which is a new global model that is partly based on the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS), is described and tested. OLAM adopts many features of its predecessor, but its ...

Robert L. Walko; Roni Avissar

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this two-part work, the feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation through various observing system simulation experiments was demonstrated assuming a perfect forecast ...

Zhiyong Meng; Fuqing Zhang

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term -...

18

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term - Compressed Air, Pumped Hydro storage, Stationary, Flow Batteries 2 Overview * Technology Types - Batteries, flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, SMES, compressed air, and pumped hydro * Theory of Operation - Brief description of the technologies and the differences between them * State-of-the-art - Past demonstrations, existing hurdles and performance targets for commercialization * Cost and cost projections: - Prototype cost vs. fully commercialized targets Technology Choice for Discharge Time and Power Rating (From ESA) 4 Maturity Levels for Energy Storage Technologies * Mature Technologies - Conventional pumped hydro

19

Process Governance—Part II Process Governance—Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process Governance is important and necessary in all business sectors, because: 1-organizations have to protect their interest in solving whatever old and new problems they encounter; 2- Process Management has many applications (knowledge management, information system design and implementation, etc.); 3- within organizations, different units/areas express different interests in Process Management; 4- Process Management initiatives can be integrated according to the benefits they generate; 5- power over cross processes should be balanced, i.e., in Process Management there should be persons responsible and others co-responsible for certain actions; and 6- Process Management yields results for all involved; this, in the long term, will lead to disputes over responsibilities in its field of action. In order to enable organizations to create and adopt models of Process Governance, some authors on the subject define frameworks that structure the field in which Governance is conceived and operated. The main definitions and frameworks set out in the literature were discussed in Process Governance Part I published in the October BPTrends Update. Drawing on analysis of these existing Process Governance architectures, on vast experience in consulting projects in companies representing a wide diversity of industries, and on research

Rafael Paim; Raquel Flexa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Measuring solar reflectance-Part II: Review of practical methods  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Review of practical methods Title Measuring solar reflectance-Part II: Review of practical methods Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2010 Authors Levinson,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL II PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FA Level II UPD 102012 1 FA Level II UPD 102012 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL II PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________________________________ Agency Name ____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __ Major: PART B - CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

23

Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

A Severe Frontal Rainband. Part II: Tornado Parent Vortex Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By means of multiple Doppler radar analysis, Part I established the stormwide hydrodynamic structure as an intense gravity current which advances on a prefrontal low-level jet. Part II examines the initiation and evolution of a tornado parent ...

Richard E. Carbone

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Development of a Land Surface Model. Part II: Data Assimilation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I described a land surface model, its implementation in the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–National Center for Atmospheric Research Mesoscale Model (MM5), and some model evaluation results. Part II describes the indirect soil ...

Jonathan E. Pleim; Aijun Xiu

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Implementation of a Silver Iodide Cloud-Seeding Parameterization in WRF. Part II: 3D Simulations of Actual Seeding Events and Sensitivity Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four cloud-seeding cases over southern Idaho during the 2010/11 winter season have been simulated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model using the coupled silver iodide (AgI) cloud-seeding scheme that was described in Part I. The ...

Lulin Xue; Sarah A. Tessendorf; Eric Nelson; Roy Rasmussen; Daniel Breed; Shaun Parkinson; Pat Holbrook; Derek Blestrud

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Computational Efficiency and Accuracy of Methods for Asynchronously Coupling Atmosphere-Ocean Climate Models. Part II: Testing with a Seasonal Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The asynchronous coupling schemes used in the seasonal, coupled atmosphere–ocean general circulation models (A/O GCMs) of Manabe et al. 1979 and Washington et al. 1980 are tested in the seasonal, coupled atmosphere–ocean model of Harvey and ...

L. D. Danny Harvey

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Intraseasonal Oscillations in the Global Atmosphere. Part II: Southern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of this two-part article, we complete the systematic examination of oscillatory modes in the global atmosphere by studying 12 years of 500 mb geopotential heights in the Southern Hemisphere. As in Part I, for the tropics and Northern ...

Michael Ghil; Kingtse Mo

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

New Hailstone Physics. Part II: Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I the six variables for heat and mass transfer, HMT, of spherical hailstones are reduced to four without any approximations or loss of accuracy. This reduction of parameter dimensions is complemented by the volume reduction of the ...

Roland List

30

Aging Aluminum Alloy 7085 Mold Blocks Part II: Continuous ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 1, 2007 ... Aging Aluminum Alloy 7085 Mold Blocks Part II: Continuous Non-Isothermal Aging by J.T. Staley, Sr., E. Austin, D.B. Glanton, B. Godin, and G.

31

Feature: Review of the Year, Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part 1 of this Review, we got as far as the middle of the year. The economic climate was driving a lot of discussion and technology usage seemed to take second place to what was economically viable. The major event of this year took place in September, ...

Chloë Palmer

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Apartment Hunting - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down Apartment Hunting - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down August 23, 2010 - 5:17pm Addthis Kyle Rudzinski Special Assistant to the Director of Technology Advancement and Outreach, EERE I recently went looking for a new apartment. And though my parents may say I'm stingy, I like to think I'm economical. Or better yet, I'm a bargain hunter. I asked myself three main questions when looking for my new place: How far is it from public transit and community businesses? Can I keep my energy bills to a minimum? What's the rent? In the second of two entries on apartment hunting, I discuss things to look for that might help keep your energy bills low. When you think about it, energy bills can, in effect, increase your rent

33

AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to evaluate the performance of devices...

34

Physics 5556 Solid State Physics, Part II Syllabus Spring 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Physics 5556­ Solid State Physics, Part II Syllabus ­ Spring 2002 Instructor: Massimiliano Di subjects. The following sources are the most used: · Ashcroft and Mermin, "Solid State Physics" · Ziman, "Thermal Physics" · Madelung, "Introduction to Solid-State Theory" · Bassani and Pastori Parravicini

Di Ventra, Massimiliano

35

Fluctuations in an Equilibrium Convective Ensemble. Part II: Numerical Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theoretical predictions derived in Part I of this study for the equilibrium fluctuations of an idealized ensemble of noninteracting, pointlike cumulus clouds are tested against three-dimensional cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations of ...

Brenda G. Cohen; George C. Craig

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Detection of Forced Climate Signals. Part II: Simulation Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers some tests of the procedures suggested in Part I on the detection of forced climate signals embedded in natural variability. The optimal filters are constructed from simulations of signals and natural variability in a noise-...

Gerald R. North; Kwang-Y. Kim

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan Under the guidance and sponsorship of DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Pacific...

38

Pretest Predictions for Phase II Ventilation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to predict the temperatures of the ventilating air, waste package surface, and concrete pipe walls that will be developed during the Phase II ventilation tests involving various test conditions. The results will be used as inputs to validating numerical approach for modeling continuous ventilation, and be used to support the repository subsurface design. The scope of the calculation is to identify the physical mechanisms and parameters related to thermal response in the Phase II ventilation tests, and describe numerical methods that are used to calculate the effects of continuous ventilation. The calculation is limited to thermal effect only. This engineering work activity is conducted in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for: Subsurface Performance Testing for License Application (LA) for Fiscal Year 2001'' (CRWMS M&O 2000d). This technical work plan (TWP) includes an AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities'', activity evaluation (CRWMS M&O 2000d, Addendum A) that has determined this activity is subject to the YMP quality assurance (QA) program. The calculation is developed in accordance with the AP-3.12Q procedure, ''Calculations''. Additional background information regarding this activity is contained in the ''Development Plan for Ventilation Pretest Predictive Calculation'' (DP) (CRWMS M&O 2000a).

Yiming Sun

2001-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

39

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center .IX DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Pilot Program - PartOF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II C.

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Part 3, Chapter 5: Test Methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to the standard system configuration, by providing dummy loads or associated ... for Performance Criteria and Test Methods for Plug-in, Portable ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Reflectivity, Ice Scattering, and Lightning Characteristics of Hurricane Eyewalls and Rainbands. Part II: Intercomparison of Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this two-part paper treats Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar, passive microwave, and lightning observations in hurricanes individually. This paper (Part II) examines relationships between these parameters (and ...

Daniel J. Cecil; Edward J. Zipser

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

On the Differences in Storm Rainfall from Hurricanes Isidore and Lili. Part II: Water Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this two-part paper examined the satellite-derived rainfall accumulation and rain potential history of Hurricanes Isidore and Lili (2002). This paper (Part II) uses analyses from the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System ...

Haiyan Jiang; Jeffrey B. Halverson; Joanne Simpson; Edward J. Zipser

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

COURSE NOTES: Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 22, 2007 ... Citation: W. Udo Schröder, "Nuclear Science and Technology Part I/II Chm466/ 566/Phy446/546," University of Rochester, 2007. Access Course

45

Integral Scales for the Nocturnal Boundary Layer. Part II: Heat Budget, Transport and Energy Implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, external forcings such as pressure gradient, terrain roughness and imposed cooling were used to forecast the thickness and strength of an exponentially-shaped (ES) nocturnal boundary layer (NBL) temperature profile. In Part II, it is ...

Roland B. Stull

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

NMG documentation. Part II. Programmer`s guide  

SciTech Connect

This is the 2nd of a 3-part report documenting NMG, the Numerical Mathematics Guide. This part is aimed at the programmer and contains Chapter 2, how it works. (Part I is aimed at the user of the system; Part III is aimed at the maintainer of NMG and will receive only limited distribution.)

Fritsch, F.N.; Dickinson, R.P. Jr.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR WASTE TANKS - PART II  

SciTech Connect

As part of an ongoing study to evaluate the discontinuity in the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm, a study was conducted this year to assess the minimum concentrations below 1 molar nitrate, see Figure 1. Current controls on the tank farm solution chemistry are in place to prevent the initiation and propagation of pitting and stress corrosion cracking in the primary steel waste tanks. The controls are based upon a series of experiments performed with simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks, namely ASTM A537 carbon steel (A537). During FY09, an experimental program was undertaken to investigate the risk associated with reducing the minimum molar nitrite concentration required to confidently inhibit pitting in dilute solutions (i.e., less than 1 molar nitrate). The experimental results and conclusions herein provide a statistical basis to quantify the probability of pitting for the tank wall exposed to various solutions with dilute concentrations of nitrate and nitrite. Understanding the probability for pitting will allow the facility to make tank-specific risk-based decisions for chemistry control. Based on previous electrochemical testing, a statistical test matrix was developed to refine and solidify the application of the statistical mixture/amount model to corrosion of A537 steel. A mixture/amount model was identified based on statistical analysis of recent and historically collected electrochemical data. This model provides a more complex relationship between the nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the probability of pitting than is represented by the model underlying the current chemistry control program, and its use may provide a technical basis for the utilization of less nitrite to inhibit pitting at concentrations below 1 molar nitrate. FY09 results fit within the mixture/amount model, and further refine the nitrate regime in which the model is applicable. The combination of visual observations and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans indicates a potential for significant inhibitor reductions at nitrate concentrations near 1.0 M without a significant increase in corrosion risk. The complete data sets from FY08 and FY09 testing have determined the statistical basis to confidently inhibit against pitting using nitrite inhibition with the current pH controls. Future testing will complete the spectrum of nitrate concentrations around 1 molar. These results will be combined to provide a complete spectrum for corrosion controls with a risk based component.

Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

48

Pre-test evaluation of LLTR Series II Test A-6. [Large Leak Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Purpose of this report is to present pre-test predictions of pressure histories for the A6 test to be conducted in the Large Leak Test Facility (LLTF) at the Energy Technology Engineering Center. A6 is part of a test program being conducted to evaluate the effects of leaks produced by a double-ended guillotine rupture of a single tube. A6 will provide data on the CRBR prototypical double rupture disc performance.

Knittle, D.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Operational Mesogamma-Scale Analysis and Forecast System of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command. Part II: Interrange Comparison of the Accuracy of Model Analyses and Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study builds upon previous efforts to document the performance of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command’s Four-Dimensional Weather Modeling System using conventional metrics. Winds, temperature, and specific humidity were verified for ...

Yubao Liu; Thomas T. Warner; Elford G. Astling; James F. Bowers; Christopher A. Davis; Scott F. Halvorson; Daran L. Rife; Rong-Shyang Sheu; Scott P. Swerdlin; Mei Xu

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum Powder: Part II. Experimental Investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicate that cooling rate increases with the increasingthat the cooling rate increases with decreasing powder size.part I, [1] the cooling rate increases with increasing melt

Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Modeling the Flash Rate of Thunderstorms. Part II: Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this two-part paper a new method of predicting the total lightning flash rate in thunderstorms was introduced. In this paper, the implementation of this method into the convection-permitting Consortium for Small Scale Modeling (COSMO) ...

Johannes M. L. Dahl; Hartmut Höller; Ulrich Schumann

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Two-Layer Geostrophic Dynamics. Part II: Geostrophic Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this series, generalized geostrophic equations were formulated for the two-layer system on a beta plane and over a flat bottom. Here numerical experiments with these equations are carried out to study freely evolving geostrophic ...

Benyang Tang; Benoit Cushman-Roisin

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Rapidly Intensifying Hurricane Guillermo (1997). Part II: Resilience in Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the structure and evolution of a mature tropical cyclone in vertical wind shear (VWS) using airborne Doppler radar observations of Hurricane Guillermo (1997). In Part I, the modulation of eyewall convection via the rotation of ...

Paul D. Reasor; Matthew D. Eastin

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Exploring Gravity and Gravitational Wave Dynamics Part II: Gravity Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The need for a new gravity model may explain anomalous behavior exhibited by several recent experiments described in Part I. Although Newtonian gravity is adequate for predicting the motion of celestial bodies

P. A. Murad

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The Beta Drift of Baroclinic Vortices. Part II: Diabatic Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The beta drift of diabatic vortices is investigated with a three-dimensional primitive equation model with simple physical parameterizations. The vertical coupling mechanism discussed in Part I is extended to include the effects of diabatic ...

Yuqing Wang; Greg J. Holland

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Drizzle in Stratiform Boundary Layer Clouds. Part II: Microphysical Aspects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of two observational papers examining drizzle in stratiform boundary layer clouds. Part I details the vertical and horizontal structure of cloud and drizzle parameters, including some bulk microphysical variables. In this paper,...

R. Wood

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Polarimetric radar characteristics of melting hail. Part II: Practical implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of theoretical modeling in Part I of this paper series are utilized to develop practical recommendations for developing the algorithms for hail detection and determination of its size as well as attenuation correction and rainfall ...

Alexander V. Ryzhkov; Matthew R. Kumjian; Scott M. Ganson; Pengfei Zhang

60

Certification of SRM 114q: Part II (Particle size distribution)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Physical and Chemical Properties2 • Analytical Chemistry ... and Conformance Testing • Statistical Engineering ... and the requirements for sample ...

2011-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

He II Heat Exchanger Test Unit for the LHC Inner Triplet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Inner Triplet Heat Exchanger Test Unit (IT-HXTU) is a 30-m long thermal model designed at Fermilab, built in US industry, fully automated and tested at CERN as part of the US LHC program to develop the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole system. The cooling scheme of the IT-HXTU is based on heat exchange between stagnant pressurized He II in the magnet cold mass and saturated He II (two-phase) flowing in a heat exchanger located outside of and parallel to the cold mass. The purposes of this test are, among others, to validate the proposed cooling scheme and to define an optimal control strategy to be implemented in the future LHC accelerator. This paper discusses the results for the heat exchanger test runs and emphasizes the thermal and hydraulic behavior of He II for the inner triplet cooling scheme.

Blanco-Viñuela, E; Huang, Y; Nicol, T H; Peterson, T; Van Weelderen, R

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Operational CMC–MRB Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) Model. Part II: Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated forecasting and data assimilation system has been and is continuing to be developed by the Meteorological Research Branch (MRB) in partnership with the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) of Environment Canada. Part II of this two-...

Jean Côté; Jean-Guy Desmarais; Sylvie Gravel; André Méthot; Alain Patoine; Michel Roch; Andrew Staniforth

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Technical/Peer Review Draft May 2006 PART II OVERVIEW1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical/Peer Review Draft May 2006 II-1 PART II OVERVIEW1 2 Energy, Industry, and Waste Fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas) are used primarily for their concentration of chemical energy is identified as emissions from energy and emissions from industrial21 processes.22 23 Emissions by Month and

64

WIPP SEIS-II - Summary (Part 1 of 4)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, waste management, and defense testing and research. Table S-1 shows the TRU waste that comprises this inventory and its...

65

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A Linear Stochastic Dynamical Model of ENSO. Part II: Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the behavior of a linear, intermediate model of ENSO is examined under stochastic forcing. The model was developed in a companion paper (Part I) and is derived from the Zebiak–Cane ENSO model. Four variants of the model are used ...

C. J. Thompson; D. S. Battisti

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

E Ris-R-437 Part II (Appendices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Variability with Special Emphasis on the Fallout Nuclides *°Sr and ,37 Cs Asker Aarkrog Risø National SENSITIVITY AND VARIABILITY WITH SPECIAL EMPHASIS ON THE FALLOUT NUCLIDES 90 sr and 1 3 7 C. Part two measurements began 402 D.1.3.3. Calculation of the fallout-weighted mean precipitation at the state

68

DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards (Part II)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

II) II) General Compliance Supplement April 2012 1 II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION The objectives of most compliance requirements for DOE programs are generic in nature. For example, most programs have eligibility requirements. While the criteria for determining eligibility vary by program, the objective of the compliance requirement that only eligible entities participate is consistent across all programs. Rather than repeat these compliance requirements, audit objectives, and suggested audit procedures for each program, they are provided once in this part. For each program in this Compliance Supplement (this Supplement), the program-specific compliance guidance section (Part III of this guidance) contains additional information about the compliance requirements that arise from laws

69

A generalization of the Wiener rational basis functions on infinite intervals, Part II - Numerical investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I we introduced the generalized Wiener rational basis functions, and here in Part II we continue our investigation with numerical experiments. Wiener's generalized basis can utilize the fast Fourier transform for integer values of the decay parameter ... Keywords: Fast Fourier transform, Infinite intervals, Spectral methods

Akil C. Narayan; Jan S. Hesthaven

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Evaluation of Meteorological Airborne Doppler Radar. Part II: Triple-Doppler Analyses of Air Motions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Part II of a paper dealing with the capabilities and use of airborne Doppler radar to observe motions within storms. Part I deals with dual-Doppler analyses of convective storm structure, using airborne and combinations of airborne and ...

Cynthia K. Mueller; Peter H. Hildebrand

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Probabilistic Forecast Calibration Using ECMWF and GFS Ensemble Reforecasts. Part II: Precipitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilistic Forecast Calibration Using ECMWF and GFS Ensemble Reforecasts. Part II: Precipitation for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, United Kingdom JEFFREY S. WHITAKER NOAA/Earth System Research As a companion to Part I, which discussed the calibration of probabilistic 2-m temperature forecasts using large

Hamill, Tom

72

WIPP SEIS-II - Comment Response Supplement, Volume II (Part 1 of 24)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II II Public Comments September 1997 Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper COMMENT RESPONSE SUPPLEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS TC-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME II PUBLIC COMMENTS Agency Comments...............................................................................................PC - 1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Region 6 (A-001) .......................................PC - 3 State of New Mexico Environment Department (A-002)............................................PC - 4 State of Texas: Office of the Governor (A-003) .....................................................PC - 6 State of Ohio: Office of the Governor (A-004).......................................................PC - 6 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (A-005)

73

Planar LTCC transformers for high voltage flyback converters: Part II.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is a continuation of the work presented in SAND2007-2591 'Planar LTCC Transformers for High Voltage Flyback Converters'. The designs in that SAND report were all based on a ferrite tape/dielectric paste system originally developed by NASCENTechnoloy, Inc, who collaborated in the design and manufacturing of the planar LTCC flyback converters. The output/volume requirements were targeted to DoD application for hard target/mini fuzing at around 1500 V for reasonable primary peak currents. High voltages could be obtained but with considerable higher current. Work had begun on higher voltage systems and is where this report begins. Limits in material properties and processing capabilities show that the state-of-the-art has limited our practical output voltage from such a small part volume. In other words, the technology is currently limited within the allowable funding and interest.

Schofield, Daryl (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Schare, Joshua M., Ph.D.; Slama, George (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Abel, David (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Solar box-cooker: Part II-analysis and simulation  

SciTech Connect

Based on the model proposed in the companion paper (Part I), a method is outlined simulation of the solar box-cookers loaded with one, two, or four vessels. The relative importance of various heat-exchange rates in the cooker were examined. The effect of parameters such as the thickness and size of the absorber plate, emissivity of the vessel, insulation thickness, and cooking time were studied. Cookers of three sizes were simulated to assess their adequacy in cooking. The studies indicate that the black paint on the vessels could be avoided if weathered stainless steel or aluminum vessels are used. The cooker with inner dimensions of 0.6 x 0.6 x 0.1 m[sup 3] was found to be adequate to cook lunch and dinner on a clear day even in the winter months. Experimental studies carried out to obtain the heat-transfer coefficients, required for simulation, are presented.

Thulasi Das, T.C. (Univ. of Tulsa, OK (United States)); Karmakar, S. (Univ. of Akron, OH (United States)); Rao, D.P. (Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Satellite spectra for helium-like titanium. Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

K/sup ..cap alpha../ x-ray spectra of helium-like titanium, Ti XXI, from Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) plasmas have been observed with a high resolution crystal spectrometer and have been used as a diagnostic of central plasma parameters. The data allow detailed comparison with recent theoretical predictions for the Ti XXI helium-like lines and the associated satellite spectrum in the wavelength range from 2.6000 to 2.6400 A. Improved values for the excitation rate coefficients of the Ti XXI resonance line, the intercombination lines and the forbidden line, and new theoretical results on the wavelengths and transition probabilities for beryllium-like satellites due to transitions of the type 1s/sup 2/ 2lnl' - 1s2p2l'' nl'' with n = 2-4 have been calculated.

Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Zarnstorff, M.; von Goeler, S.; Hulse, R.; Johnson, L.C.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Sesnic, S.; Young, K.M.; Tavernier, M.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

PROCESS DEVELOPMENT QUARTERLY REPORT. PART II. PILOT PLANT WORK  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ABS>The stoicbiometric HNO/sub 3/ concentrations required to digest feed materials to 200g U/I, 3N excess acid are tabulated. Stoichiometrically the minimum HNO/sub 3/ concentration required to dissolve feed materials to flowsheet conditions flowsheet tests is presented. The sensitivity of the Weldon Spring TBP-extraction system to process flow rates is discussed. A series of pilot plant experiments are deserined for removing TBP from raffinate. Steam distillstion of the raffinate slurries proved to be more effective than washing with hexone in a pulse column. The flame fusion melting of UO/sub 2/ to form dense rods of relatively constant cross section continued. The rods and tubes which were extruded from micronized UO/sub 2/ had excellent surface quality and sintered densities greater than 98% of theoretical. Bomb center temperatures of 500 deg F and higher prior to fining, obtained by increasing the firing time, tended to produce low hydrogen U. A method for producing dingot U with an acceptable H/sub 2/ contact was developed. A number of solid additions to the UF/ sub 4/-Mg bomb charge were investigated. The tonnage of forged bar stock produced during this period is given. The variables affeeting diagot extrusion are discussed. An investigation of the dingot process is given. The determination of plant decontamination faetors for Ce/sup 3+/, Mg, and Al are presented. (W.L.H.)

Elliott, B. ed.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

TRUPACT-II Hydrogen G-Valve Program Test Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test plan describes the objectives, scope, participants, and components of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) Hydrogen G-Value Program (GH2P). The GH2P builds on the experience, results, and experimental setup of the TRUPACT-II Matrix Depletion Program (MDP) to establish effective hydrogen G-values (G-values) for additional waste matrices. This plan details the experimental design and test matrices for experiments to measure the G-value for additional waste matrices, including first- and second-stage sludges at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and molten salt extraction residues with varying amounts of residual moisture (i.e., unbound water). Data collected from the GH2P will be used to support an application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for G-values and corresponding wattage limits for the TRUPACT-II payloads containing these waste matrices. The testing will also evaluate the ability to determine G-values on a waste stream basis.

Mroz, Eugene J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.  

SciTech Connect

Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Norman Dombey

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Dombey, Norman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Options for reducing a coal-fired plant's carbon footprint, Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 1 of this article detailed and quantified the impacts of postcoming CO{sub 2} capture on a coal plant's net output and efficiency. Part II deals with four other CO{sub 2} reduction techniques: oxy-fuel combustion, using higher-temperature and higher-pressure boilers, cofiring biomass, and replacing some coal-fired capacity with renewable capacity. 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Zachary, J. [Bechtel Power Corp. (United States)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

82

Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 7, 2013 ... Phase-Field Simulation and Nugget Microstructure Analysis of AZ31 ... steel by carefully adjusting the nucleation scenario of austenite and the ...

83

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume II, Appendices (Part 1 of 11)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decontamination and decommissioning activities, (5) waste management programs, and (6) testing and research at facilities under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department)...

84

Test Plan for Hydrogen Getters Project - Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen levels in many transuranic (TRU) waste drums are above the compliance threshold, therefore deeming the drums non-shippable to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Hydrogen getters (alkynes and dialkynes) are known to react irreversibly with hydrogen in the presence of certain catalysts. The primary purpose of this investigation is to ascertain the effectiveness of a hydrogen getter in an environment that contains gaseous compounds commonly found in the headspace of drums containing TRU waste. It is not known whether the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) commonly found in the headspace of TRU waste drums will inhibit (''poison'') the effectiveness of the hydrogen getter. The result of this study will be used to assess the feasibility of a hydrogen-getter system, which is capable of removing hydrogen from the payload containers or the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) inner containment vessel to increase the quantity of TRU waste that can be shipped to the WIPP. Phase II for the Hydrogen Getters Project will focus on four primary objectives: Conduct measurements of the relative permeability of hydrogen and chlorinated VOCs through Tedlar (and possibly other candidate packaging materials) Test alternative getter systems as alternatives to semi-permeable packaging materials. Candidates include DEB/Pd/Al2O3 and DEB/Cu-Pd/C. Develop, test, and deploy kinetic optimization model Perform drum-scale test experiments to demonstrate getter effectiveness

Mroz, G.

1999-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

85

PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system lends to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including radiation and environmental monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support future development and testing.

Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

Category theoretic aspects of chain-valued frames: Part II: Applications to lattice-valued topology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is Part II of a two-part series dealing with category theoretic aspects of chain-valued frames. Using the categorical properties established for L-Frm in Part I for L a complete chain, this paper constructs ''upper'' free functor L and ''lower'' ... Keywords: Factorization structures, Anti-stratified/stratified spaces, Characteristic/Martin/stratification functors, Cocompleteness, Completeness, Image/preimage operators, Iota/omega functors, L-Frm, L-Loc, L-Top, L-frames, L-topological spaces, Spectrum functors, Universal/co-universal spaces, Upper/lower forgetful functors, Upper/lower free functors

A. Pultr; S. E. Rodabaugh

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Developments in Normal Mode Initialization. Part II: A New Method and its Comparison with Currently Used Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The analysis of Part I suggested that the temporal characteristics of the nonlinear terms in the equations of motion could introduce convergence problems in currently used schemes for normal mode initialization (NMI). In Part II we 1) introduce a ...

Philip J. Rasch

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Calibration of the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder. Part II: Optical Alignment, Spatial, and Pressure Modulator Calibrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I the Improved Stratospheric and Mesospheric Sounder instrument and its calibration facility were described, and the results of the radiometric and spectral calibrations were presented. In Part II the remaining prelaunch calibrations are ...

C. W. P. Palmer; P. Venters; R. J. Knight; J. Ballard; T. J. Nightingale; P. E. Morris

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

A Climatonomic Description of the Surface Energy Balance in the Central Sahel. Part II: The Evapoclimatonomy Submodel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this article we presented a study of the shortwave radiation budget in the West African Sahel, using Lettau's climatonomy model. In Part II, we apply the second of Lettau's submodels, evapoclimatonomy, to quantifying the surface ...

Sharon E. Nicholson; Andrew R. Lare

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Chinese Restaurant Game - Part II: Applications to Wireless Networking, Cloud Computing, and Online Social Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Part I of this two-part paper [1], we proposed a new game, called Chinese restaurant game, to analyze the social learning problem with negative network externality. The best responses of agents in the Chinese restaurant game with imperfect signals are constructed through a recursive method, and the influence of both learning and network externality on the utilities of agents is studied. In Part II of this two-part paper, we illustrate three applications of Chinese restaurant game in wireless networking, cloud computing, and online social networking. For each application, we formulate the corresponding problem as a Chinese restaurant game and analyze how agents learn and make strategic decisions in the problem. The proposed method is compared with four common-sense methods in terms of agents' utilities and the overall system performance through simulations. We find that the proposed Chinese restaurant game theoretic approach indeed helps agents make better decisions and improves the overall system performan...

Wang, Chih-Yu; Liu, K J Ray

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Microsoft Word - Q&A thru Jan 15 Part II  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Answers January 14, 2009 thru January 15, 2009 Part II and Answers January 14, 2009 thru January 15, 2009 Part II 1. For clarification purposes and to ensure compliance, what documents and/or information is specifically required from each subcontractor for each Volume? Is there a preference on rather or not this information is received separately from each subcontractor or submitted with the Prime's proposal? Answer: As stated in the RFP, Section L, paragraph L000B, " Subcontractors submitting proprietary information may register in IIPS and submit their information separately identifying in the subject line, the solicitation number and to whom they are a subcontractor; or they may provide a password protected document (file) to the Prime Contractor and share the password with the Contracting Officer. Regardless of the

92

Those early days as we remember them (part II) - Met Lab and Argonne's  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

History> Those early days as we remember them (Part II) History> Those early days as we remember them (Part II) About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

93

DEUTERIUM, TRITIUM, AND HELIUM DESORPTION FROM AGED TITANIUM TRITIDES. PART II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six new samples of tritium-aged bulk titanium have been examined by thermal desorption and isotope exchange chemistry. The discovery of a lower temperature hydrogen desorption state in these materials, previously reported, has been confirmed in one of the new samples. The helium release of the samples shows the more severe effects obtained from longer aging periods, i.e. higher initial He/M ratios. Several of the more aged samples were spontaneously releasing helium. Part I discussed the new results on the new lower temperature hydrogen desorption state found in one more extensively studied sample. Part II will discuss the hydrogen/helium release behavior of the remaining samples.

Shanahan, K; Jeffrey Holder, J

2006-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

94

Statistical Considerations for Climate Experiments. Part I: Scalar Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical tests used in model intercomparisons or model/climate comparisons may be either “scalar” or “multivariate” tests. The former are employed when testing a hypothesis about a single variable observed at a single location, or through a ...

F. W. Zwiers; H. J. Thiébaux

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Hinga, K.R. (ed.) ed.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Building America System Performance Test Practices: Part 1 -- Photovoltaic Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report outlines the short-term field testing used by Building America staff and includes a report on the results of an example test of a PV system with battery storage on a home in Tucson, Arizona. This report is not intended as a general recommended test procedure for wide distribution. It is intended to document current practices in Building America to inform program stakeholders and stimulate further discussion. Building America staff intend to apply this procedure until relevant standards for testing PV modules are completed.

Barker, G.; Norton, P.

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

A Midlatitude Cirrus Cloud Climatology from the Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing. Part II: Microphysical Properties Derived from Lidar Depolarization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of this series of papers describing the results of the extended time observations of cirrus clouds from the University of Utah Facility for Atmospheric Remote Sensing (FARS), the information content of laser backscatter depolarization ...

Kenneth Sassen; Sally Benson

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Mesoscale Energy Spectra of the Mei-Yu Front System. Part II: Moist Available Potential Energy Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of this study, a new formulation of the spectral energy budget of moist available potential energy (MAPE) and kinetic energy is derived. Compared to previous formulations, there are three main improvements: i) the Lorenz available ...

Jun Peng; Lifeng Zhang; Yu Luo; Chunhui Xiong

99

Time Synchronization Attack in Smart Grid-Part II: Cross Layer Detection Mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel time synchronization attack (TSA) on wide area monitoring systems in smart grid has been identified in the first part of this paper. A cross layer detection mechanism is proposed to combat TSA in part II of this paper. In the physical layer, we propose a GPS carrier signal noise ratio (C/No) based spoofing detection technique. In addition, a patch-monopole hybrid antenna is applied to receive GPS signal. By computing the standard deviation of the C/No difference from two GPS receivers, a priori probability of spoofing detection is fed to the upper layer, where power system state is estimated and controlled. A trustworthiness based evaluation method is applied to identify the PMU being under TSA. Both the physical layer and upper layer algorithms are integrated to detect the TSA, thus forming a cross layer mechanism. Experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed TSA detection algorithm.

Zhang, Zhenghao; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Li, Husheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Laboratory testing of the Sonnenschein charger, Part number DTL 12040  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of testing the Sonnenschein DTL 12040 battery charger in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) battery laboratory. The purpose of this testing was to evaluate the suitability of this charger for charging electric vehicle battery packs made up of Sonnenschein sealed lead acid batteries or possibly other similar batteries. This evaluation consists primarily of identifying the charge algorithm used and evaluating the resulting charge behavior. Other characteristics of the charger that could be significant are also noted. 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Hardin, J.E.; Martin, M.E.

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Analysis of inverter models and harmonic propagation. Part II. Harmonic propagation  

SciTech Connect

Part II of a three part study describes the harmonic propagation in the photovoltaic power system consisting of the solar cell array, the inverter, and the ac side of the inverter up to the infinite bus of the utility. Propagation of the harmonics in the utility system are not addressed. Two main problems are analyzed: power in the converter system and harmonics of the current and voltage waveforms of the single-phase, dependent inverter. Relationships between the different components of the converter power - active, reactive and disturbance - are discussed. All formulas necessary for calculating the power components are given, assuming the harmonics of the current and voltage waveforms are known. The theoretical and experimental investigation of the single-phase, dependent inverter is described. The ac and dc terminal voltage of the inverter are analyzed and their harmonics are obtained. These data determine the harmonic propagation on both the dc and ac sides and may be useful for equipment design. Part I of the study (SAND 7040/1) contains a detailed description of the microcomputer based simulator that represents the output characteristics of the five commercially available types of solar cell arrays under different environmental conditions, and Part III (SAND 7040/3) presents an analysis of the transient and steady-state processes of inverter modules.

Slonim, M.A.; Stanek, E.K.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Design of the NSLS-II Linac Front End Test Stand  

SciTech Connect

The NSLS-II operational parameters place very stringent requirements on the injection system. Among these are the charge per bunch train at low emittance that is required from the linac along with the uniformity of the charge per bunch along the train. The NSLS-II linac is a 200 MeV linac produced by Research Instruments Gmbh. Part of the strategy for understanding to operation of the injectors is to test the front end of the linac prior to its installation in the facility. The linac front end consists of a 100 kV electron gun, 500 MHz subharmonic prebuncher, focusing solenoids and a suite of diagnostics. The diagnostics in the front end need to be supplemented with an additional suite of diagnostics to fully characterize the beam. In this paper we discuss the design of a test stand to measure the various properties of the beam generated from this section. In particular, the test stand will measure the charge, transverse emittance, energy, energy spread, and bunching performance of the linac front end under all operating conditions of the front end.

Fliller III, R.; Johanson, M.; Lucas, M.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

Faith in the algorithm, part 1: beyond the turing test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the Turing test was first proposed by Alan Turing in 1950, the goal of artificial intelligence has been predicated on the ability for computers to imitate human intelligence. However, the majority of uses for the computer can be said to fall outside the domain of human abilities and it is exactly outside of this domain where computers have demonstrated their greatest contribution. Another definition for artificial intelligence is one that is not predicated on human mimicry, but instead, on human amplification, where the algorithms that are best at accomplishing this are deemed the most intelligent. This article surveys various systems that augment human and social intelligence.

Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A Radar Study of Convective Cells in Mesoscale Systems in GATE. Part II: Life Cycles of Convective Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is Part II of a two-part paper describing the vertical profile of radar reflectivity in GATE convective cells. Time-height radar life histories for 42 cells over three GATE days are examined, using data from the Quadra radar with 5-minute ...

Edward J. Szoke; Edward J. Zipser

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Aircraft Microwave Observations and Simulations of Deep Convection from 18 to 183 GHz. Part II: Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of the 29 June 1986 case study, a radiative transfer model is used to simulate the aircraft multichannel microwave brightness temperatures presented in Part I and to study the convective storm structure. Ground-based radar data are ...

Hwa-Young M. Yeh; N. Prasad; Robert A. Mack; Robert F. Adler

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The Effects of Assimilation on the Physics of an Ocean Model. Part II: Baroclinic Identical-Twin Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I has shown that a simple assimilation scheme can have a significant effect on the physics of the model. Part II concentrates on the effects of nudging assimilation in a full primitive equation model, the Free Surface Cox Code, illustrating ...

Rebecca A. Woodgate

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

DETERMINATION OF TETRAVALENT URANIUM IN THORIUM OXIDE-URANIUM OXIDE MIXTURES. PARTS I, II, AND III  

SciTech Connect

For the determination of milligram quantities of uranium(N) in thorium oxide-uranium oxide mixtures which may also contain uranium(VI), it was necessary to devise a means of dissolving the sample so as to prevent any air oxidation of the uranium(IV) to uranium(VI). For this determination, the conventional potassium dichromate volumetric method was used except that the sample was dissolved under reflux in 7 M H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ which contained an excess of standard dichromate solution. Following the dissolution of the sample, this excess was determined by back titration with a standard solution of iron(II). Barium diphenylaminesulfonate was used as the indicator. Initial tests on the dissolution of samples of thorium oxide-uranium oxide in hot HC1O/sub 4/ and hot HCI are described. (auth)

Menis, O.

1959-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Dynamical response of the "GGG" rotor to test the Equivalence Principle: theory, simulation and experiment. Part I: the normal modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the Equivalence Principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration $\\eta$ between two test bodies -of different composition, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass- if the measurement is made to the level of $\\eta\\simeq 10^{-13}$ or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments, gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the Ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following paper (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation -in particular its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)- can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes, and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus.

G. L. Comandi; M. L. Chiofalo; R. Toncelli; D. Bramanti; E. Polacco; A. M. Nobili

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

111

A novel self-excited self-regulated single phase induction generator; Part II: Experimental investigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part 1 of this paper presents the basic system, theoretical modeling and typical test results of a novel Self-Excited Regulated Induction Generator. In this part the results of a detailed experimental investigation are presented to assess its suitability for practical applications. The steady state performance of the self-excited single phase induction generator (SEIG), maintaining the terminal voltage within a close range is investigated under realistic loading conditions in the laboratory. Detailed experimental results are presented and discussed. Necessary tests to obtain machine parameters for theoretical modeling are also developed and relevant results of the prototype presented. The effects of series and shunt capacitors, prime mover speed, load and load power factor are investigated. It has been shown to exhibit better voltage waveform as compared to commercially available sets. The experimental results confirm that this new generating system can be favorably employed for use as a small portable generator driven by nearly constant speed prime movers such as oil engines or Hydro Turbines.

Murthy, S.S.; Tandon, A.K. (Indian Inst. of Tech., Delhi, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Rai, H.C. (Jamia Millia Islania, New Delhi (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

THE SNAP-II POWER CONVERSION SYSTEM. TOPICAL REPORT NO. 4. TURBINE DESIGN AND TESTING  

SciTech Connect

SNAP II is the designation for a 3 kw nuclear auxiliary power unit to be used in a satellite vehicle. The SNAP II system consist of a reactor heat source, a mercury Rankine engine, and an alternator. A two stage, full admission, axial flow turbine was chosen for this APU application. Design details and test results are presented. (auth).

Poulos, E.N.; Furman, E.R.

1960-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

113

Gravity Waves in a Horizontal Shear Flow. Part II: Interaction between Gravity Waves and Potential Vorticity Perturbations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravity Waves in a Horizontal Shear Flow. Part II: Interaction between Gravity Waves and Potential perturbations and propagating internal gravity waves in a horizon- tally sheared zonal flow is investigated. In the strong stratification limit, an initial vorticity perturbation weakly excites two propagating gravity

Farrell, Brian F.

114

Cirrus Cloud Properties Derived from High Spectral Resolution Infrared Spectrometry during FIRE II. Part III: Ground-Based HIS Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During FIRE II, cirrus clouds were observed in the wavelength range 3–19, µm with two High Resolution Interferometer Sounders as described in the Part I companion paper. One, known as AC-HIS, was mounted on the NASA ER-2 aircraft in order to look ...

A. D. Collard; S. A. Ackerman; W. L. Smith; X. Ma; H. E. Revercomb; R. O. Knuteson; S-C. Lee

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

To be published in ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 106, Part II 2000 LBNL-44479 SELECTING WHOLE-HOUSE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To be published in ASHRAE Transactions, Vol. 106, Part II 2000 LBNL-44479 SELECTING WHOLE-HOUSE VENTILATION STRATEGIES TO MEET PROPOSED ASHRAE STANDARD 62.2: ENERGY COST CONSIDERATIONS* Craig P. Wray Nance University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 April 2000 ASHRAE Standard 62.2P is being proposed to address

116

Nevada National Security Site Nuclear Testing Artifacts Become Part of U.S.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada National Security Site Nuclear Testing Artifacts Become Part Nevada National Security Site Nuclear Testing Artifacts Become Part of U.S. Cultural Archive Nevada National Security Site Nuclear Testing Artifacts Become Part of U.S. Cultural Archive April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Stanchions are among the remnants of Smoky Tower. Stanchions are among the remnants of Smoky Tower. LAS VEGAS, NV - The Nevada National Security Site's (NNSS) historic Smoky site may soon join a long list of former nuclear testing locations eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is currently working alongside the Nevada Site Office (NSO) to determine the eligibility of Smoky and a number of other EM sites slated for cleanup and closure. "In the last year, we've conducted assessments at over 30 EM sites,"

117

A Latent Heat Retrieval and Its Effects on the Intensity and Structure Change of Hurricane Guillermo (1997). Part II: Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study, a new algorithm for retrieving the latent heat field in tropical cyclones from airborne Doppler radar was presented and fields from rapidly intensifying Hurricane Guillermo (1997) were shown. In Part II, the usefulness and ...

Stephen R. Guimond; Jon M. Reisner

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

How Important are Cost Concerns?: Public Opinion on Immigrants in Southern California Part II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

II:    HOW   IMPORTANT  ARE  COST  CONCERNS?   March  24,  that  perceptions  of  immigrant  costs   have  a  strong  with  immigration  costs,  so  I  try  to  predict  what  

Haselhoff, Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

North Wind 4-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Phase II (testing and fabrication) of a program funded by the US Department of Energy to design, fabricate, and test a cost-effective wind system in the 3 to 6 kW class. During Phase II, using the design developed during Phase I, a prototype 4 kW machine was fabricated and tested in Waitsfield, Vermont. Several problems were encountered and subsequently analyzed. Design modifications, including the use of a larger alternator, are described. Test performed by North Wind and by Rockwell International (which monitored the program) demonstrated the predicted performance characteristics and the validity of the North Wind design.

Lynch, J.; Coleman, C.; Mayer, D.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

Carlsbad Field Office

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Practical Training Phase II, Part 7 of 9  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiological Control Technician Training Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Part 7 of 9 Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

122

Enertech 15-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase II report presents a description of the Enertech 15 kW prototype wind system hardware fabrication; results of component tests; and results of preliminary testing conducted at Norwich, VT and the RF Wind Energy Research Center. In addition, the assembly sequence is documented. During testing, the unit experienced several operational problems, but testing proved the design concept and demonstrated the system's ability to meet the contract design specifications for power output.

Zickefoose, C.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures  

SciTech Connect

This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Cushioned blasting. II. Preliminary studies of gallery testing  

SciTech Connect

Results of investigation of various means employed to reduce intensity of energy from explosions in boreholes are reported. Results seem to establish that gallery testing can contribute significantly to estimates of practical effects in cushioned blasting on ignition hazards in coal mines.

Testing, G.; Denues, A.R.T.

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

MCHF calculations of isotope shifts; I program implementation and test runs II large-scale active space calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new isotope shift program, part of the MCHF atomic structure package, has been written and tested. The program calculates the isotope shift of an atomic level from MCHF or CI wave functions. The program is specially designed to be used with very large CI expansions, for which angular data cannot be stored on disk. To explore the capacity of the program, large-scale isotope shift calculations have been performed for a number of low lying levels in B I and B II. From the isotope shifts of these levels the transition isotope shift have been calculated for the resonance transitions in B I and B II. The calculated transition isotope shifts in B I are in very good agreement with experimental shifts, and compare favourably with shifts obtained from a many-body perturbation calculation.

Joensson, P. [Lund Institute of Technology, Lund (Sweden); Fischer, C.F. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States)

1994-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

Predicting Particle Critical Supersaturation from Hygroscopic Growth Measurements in the Humidified TDMA. Part II: Laboratory and Ambient Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory studies are used to test the method proposed in Part I for estimating the critical supersaturation of quasi-monodisperse, dry particles from measurements of hygroscopic growth at relative humidities below 100%. An advantage of the ...

Fred J. Brechtel; Sonia M. Kreidenweis

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI). Part II: Field Measurements of Surface Heat Flux and Solar Irradiance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Skin-Layer Ocean Heat Flux Instrument (SOHFI) described by Sromovsky et al. (Part I, this issue) was field-tested in a combination of freshwater and ocean deployments. Solar irradiance monitoring and field calibration techniques were ...

L. A. Sromovsky; J. R. Anderson; F. A. Best; J. P. Boyle; C. A. Sisko; V. E. Suomi

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Advanced control strategies for HVAC&R systems—An overview: Part II: Soft and fusion control  

SciTech Connect

A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for HVAC&R is presented. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and the fusion or hybrid of hard and soft control techniques. Part I focused on hardcontrol strategies; Part II focuses on soft and fusion control and some future directions in HVA&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omissions of other works is purely unintentional.

D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

130

Ensemble Forecasting of Tropical Cyclone Motion Using a Barotropic Model. Part II: Perturbations of the Vortex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study, the technique of ensemble forecasting is applied to the problem of tropical cyclone motion prediction by perturbing the environmental flow. In this part, the focus is shifted to perturbation of the vortex structure. The ...

Kevin K. W. Cheung; Johnny C. L. Chan

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Observational Analysis of Tropical Cyclogenesis in the Western North Pacific. Part II: Budget Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of a two-part study which uses a combination of composite rawinsonde and individual FGGE case analyses to identify the important physical processes associated with tropical cyclone formation. Part I examined the structural ...

Cheng Shang Lee

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

The 29 June 2000 Supercell Observed during STEPS. Part II: Lightning and Charge Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second part of a two-part study examines the lightning and charge structure evolution of the 29 June 2000 tornadic supercell observed during the Severe Thunderstorm Electrification and Precipitation Study (STEPS). Data from the National ...

Kyle C. Wiens; Steven A. Rutledge; Sarah A. Tessendorf

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Monsoon Regimes and Processes in CCSM4. Part II: African and American Monsoon Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second part of a two part series studying simulation characteristics of the Community Climate System Model, version 4 (CCSM4) for various monsoon regimes around the global tropics. Here, the West African, East African, North American, ...

Kerry H. Cook; Gerald A. Meehl; Julie M. Arblaster

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Wave Response during Hydrostatic and Geostrophic Adjustment. Part II: Potential Vorticity Conservation and Energy Partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second part of a two-part study of the hydrostatic and geostrophic adjustment examines the potential vorticity and energetics of the acoustic waves, buoyancy waves, Lamb waves, and steady state that are generated following the prescribed ...

Jeffrey M. Chagnon; Peter R. Bannon

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Total Lightning Signatures of Thunderstorm Intensity over North Texas. Part II: Mesoscale Convective Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Total lightning data from the Lightning Detection and Ranging (LDAR II) research network in addition to cloud-to-ground flash data from the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and data from the Dallas–Fort Worth, Texas, Weather ...

Scott M. Steiger; Richard E. Orville; Lawrence D. Carey

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focuses on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report presents results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge. This report was originally published in March 2001. In January 2004, a transcription error was discovered in the value reported for the uranium metal content of KE North Loadout Pit sample FE-3. This revision of the report corrects the U metal content of FE-3 from 0.0013 wt% to 0.013 wt%.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

137

Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 2: Application to EBR-II Primary Sodium System and Related Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decontamination and decomissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidifed carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, USA. This report is Part 2 of a two-part report. This second report provides a supplement to the first report and describes the application of the humdidified carbon dioxide technique ("carbonation") to the EBR-II primary tank, primary cover gas systems, and the intermediate heat exchanger. Future treatment plans are also provided.

Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Towards an empirical method of efficiency testing of system parts: A methodological study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current usability evaluation methods are essentially holistic in nature. However, engineers that apply a component-based software engineering approach might also be interested in understanding the usability of individual parts of an interactive system. ... Keywords: Efficiency, Empirical method, HCI methodology, Log file analysis, Usability evaluation method, Usability testing

Willem-Paul Brinkman; Reinder Haakma; Don G. Bouwhuis

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

The Numerical Simulation of Nonsupercell Tornadogenesis. Part III: Parameter Tests Investigating the Role of CAPE, Vortex Sheet Strength, and Boundary Layer Vertical Shear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nonsupercell tornadogenesis has been investigated in a three-part numerical study. Building on the results of Parts I and II, Part III addresses the sensitivity of nonsupercell tornadogenesis to variations in convective available potential energy ...

Bruce D. Lee; Robert B. Wilhelmson

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 1: Laboratory Experiments and Application to EBR-II Secondary Sodium System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decommissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidified carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, U.S.A. This report is Part 1 of a two-part report. It is divided into three sections. The first section describes the chemistry of carbon dioxide-water-sodium reactions. The second section covers the laboratory experiments that were conducted in order to develop the residual sodium deactivation process. The third section discusses the application of the deactivation process to the treatment of residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary sodium cooling system. Part 2 of the report, under separate cover, describes the application of the technique to residual sodium treatment within the EBR-II primary sodium cooling system and related systems.

Steven R. Sherman

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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141

High-power testing of PEP-II RF cavity windows  

SciTech Connect

We describe the high power testing of RF cavity windows for the PEP-II B factory. The window is designed for continuous operation at 476 MHz with up to 500 kW throughput and has been tested to full power using a modified PEP Klystron. The windows use an anti-multipactor coating on the vacuum side and the application and processing of this layer is discussed. The high power test configuration, RF processing history and high power performance are described.

Neubauer, M.; Allen, M.; Fant, K.; Hill, A.; Hoyt, M.; Judkins, J.; Schwarz, H. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, CA (United States); Rimmer, R.A. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Partial- and whole-body thermal sensation and comfort, Part II: Non-uniform environmental conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and right hand cooling Journal of Thermal Biology 31, 60 –body part cooling and recovery Journal of Thermal Biologythermal sensation is affected differently by the cooling of

Arens, Edward A; Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

SOFAR Floats Reveal Midlatitude Intermediate North Atlantic General Circulation. Part II: An Eulerian Statistical View  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this paper has given a descriptive view of the trajectories of 26 SOFAR floats drifting near 700-m depth in the central North Atlantic during the mid-1980s, as part of the TOPOGULF experiment. Here an Eulerian analysis of the 53.4 ...

Michel Ollitrault; Alain Colin de Verdière

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Concentric Eyewall Formation in Typhoon Sinlaku (2008). Part II: Axisymmetric Dynamical Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study, the association between the secondary eyewall formation (SEF) and the broadening of the outer swirling wind in Typhoon Sinlaku (2008) was documented. The findings from Part I help lay the groundwork for the application of ...

Yi-Hsuan Huang; Michael T. Montgomery; Chun-Chieh Wu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Observational Analysis of the 27 May 1997 Central Texas Tornadic Event. Part II: Tornadoes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 27 May 1997 central Texas tornadic event has been investigated in a two-part observational study. As demonstrated in Part I, the 1D environment associated with this event was unfavorable for significant (?F2) tornadoes. Yet, the storm complex ...

Adam L. Houston; Robert B. Wilhelmson

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part II: Idealized Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part of a two-part study, details of the upper-ocean response within an idealized baroclinic current to a translating tropical cyclone are examined in a series of nonlinear, reduced-gravity numerical simulations. Based on ...

Eric W. Uhlhorn; Lynn K. Shay

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hurricane Isabel (2003): New Insights Into the Physics of Intense Storms. Part II: Extreme Localized Wind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An unprecedented dataset of category-5 Hurricane Isabel was collected on 12–14 September 2003. This two-part series focuses on novel dynamical and thermodynamical aspects of Isabel's inner-core structure on 13 September. In Part I, using a ...

Sim D. Aberson; Michael Black; Michael T. Montgomery; Michael Bell

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Unexplained Discontinuity in the U.S. Radiosonde Temperature Data. Part II: Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second part of this two-part article discusses the differences between observations taken at 0000 and 1200 UTC, particularly in the stratosphere, by the Vaisala RS80-57H radiosondes that are integrated within the National Weather Service's (...

Christopher R. Redder; Jim K. Luers; Robert E. Eskridge

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Tracking Atmospheric Instabilities with the Kalman Filter. Part II: Two-Layer Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sequential data assimilation schemes approaching true optimality for sizable atmospheric models are becoming a reality. The behavior of the Kalman filter (KF) under difficult conditions needs therefore to be understood. In this two-part paper the ...

Michael Ghil; Ricardo Todling

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transient Response to Localized Episodic Heating in the Tropics. Part II: Far-Field Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this investigation, we described the stochastic, near-field behavior of disturbances excited by randomly evolving tropical heating. In the present paper, we examine how these disturbances are modified as they propagate through the ...

Rolando R. Garcia; Murry L. Salby

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Multiresolution Ensemble Forecasts of an Observed Tornadic Thunderstorm System. Part II: Storm-Scale Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, the authors used a full physics, nonhydrostatic numerical model with horizontal grid spacing of 24 km and nested grids of 6- and 3-km spacing to generate the ensemble forecasts of an observed tornadic thunderstorm complex. The ...

Fanyou Kong; Kelvin K. Droegemeier; Nicki L. Hickmon

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Interaction of Katabatic Flow and Mountain Waves. Part II: Case Study Analysis and Conceptual Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Via numerical analysis of detailed simulations of an early September 1993 case night, the authors develop a conceptual model of the interaction of katabatic flow in the nocturnal boundary layer with mountain waves (MKI). A companion paper (Part I)...

Gregory S. Poulos; James E. Bossert; Thomas B. McKee; Roger A. Pielke Sr.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Retrieving Storm Electric Fields from Aircraft Field Mill Data. Part II: Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lagrange multiplier theory developed in Part I of this study is applied to complete a relative calibration of a Citation aircraft that is instrumented with six field mill sensors. When side constraints related to average fields are used, the ...

W. J. Koshak; D. M. Mach; H. J. Christian; M. F. Stewart; M. G. Bateman

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Diurnal Patterns of Rainfall in Northwestern South America. Part II: Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second paper of a three-part series documents the ability of the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to successfully replicate some known aspects of the rainfall of northwestern South America. The ...

Thomas T. Warner; Brian E. Mapes; Mei Xu

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

CTDMPLUS: A Dispersion Model for Sources near Complex Topography. Part II: Performance Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Complex Terrain Dispersion Model (CTDMPLUS), described in Part I of this paper, was evaluated using the SO2 field-study data from the Lovett generating station in southeastern New York state. For perspective, CTDMPLUS estimates were also ...

James O. Paumier; Donna J. Burns; Steven G. Perry

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Multiresolution Analysis of Radiative Transfer through Inhomogeneous Media. Part II: Validation and New Insights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multiresolution radiative transfer equations of Part I of this paper are solved numerically for the case of inhomogeneous model clouds using Meyer’s basis functions. After analyzing the properties of Meyer’s connection coefficients and ...

Nicolas Ferlay; Harumi Isaka; Philip Gabriel; Albert Benassi

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Mesoscale Convective Vortices Observed during BAMEX. Part II: Influences on Secondary Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations from the Bow Echo and Mesoscale Convective Vortex (MCV) Experiment are used to examine the role of the five mesoscale convective vortices described in Part I on heavy precipitation during the daytime heating cycle. Persistent ...

Stanley B. Trier; Christopher A. Davis

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Numerical Investigations with a Hybrid Isentropic?Sigma Model. Part II: The Inclusion of Moist Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main goals of this paper are 1) to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating a prognostic equation for water vapor and diabatic processes in the University of Wisconsin ??? model discussed in Part I, 2) to document methods applied to ...

Tom H. Zapotocny; Fred M. Reames; R. Bradley Pierce; Donald R. Johnson; Bart J. Wolf

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

The Sensitivity of Precipitation to Circulation Details. Part II: Mesoscale Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A base case and the best time-coherent, regional analog to that case, identified in Part I, were analyzed to determine the precise mechanisms responsible for the differences in precipitation amounts. This analysis was conducted using two modeling ...

Paul J. Roebber; Gerhard W. Reuter

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part II: Latent Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the recent ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Departmental Research Initiative, an aircraft was instrumented to carry out direct turbulent flux measurements in the high wind boundary layer of a hurricane. ...

William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Jeffrey R. French; Cyril McCormick; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cirrus Microphysical Properties and Air Motion Statistics Using Cloud Radar Doppler Moments. Part II: Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The algorithm described in Part I has been applied to the millimeter cloud radar observations from January 1999 to December 2005 at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) Southern Great Plains (SGP) and Tropical Western Pacific (...

Min Deng; Gerald G. Mace

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Generalized Adjoint for Physical Processes with Parameterized Discontinuities. Part II: Vector Formulations and Matching Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generalized tangent linear and adjoint equations are derived for a vector equation that contains a parameterized source term with discontinuous on/off switches controlled by a threshold condition. As an extension of Part I, the key results here ...

Qin Xu

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Post-Eemian Glacial Inception. Part II: Elements of a Cryospheric Moisture Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends the analyses of the glacial inception process described in a previous paper (“Part I: The Impact of Summer Seasonal Temperature Bias”). The analyses described therein were based upon the use of the Canadian Centre for Climate ...

G. Vettoretti; W. R. Peltier

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Atlantic Hurricanes and Climate Change. Part II: Role of Thermodynamic Changes in Decreased Hurricane Frequency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method of downscaling which isolates the effect of temperature and moisture changes on tropical cyclone (TC) activity was presented in Part I of this study. By applying thermodynamic modifications to analyzed initial and boundary conditions from ...

Megan S. Mallard; Gary M. Lackmann; Anantha Aiyyer

165

Observed Boundary Layer Wind Structure and Balance in the Hurricane Core. Part II: Hurricane Mitch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this paper presented a detailed analysis of the boundary layer of Hurricane Georges (1998), based mainly on the newly available high-resolution GPS dropsonde data. Here, similar techniques and data are used to study Hurricane Mitch (...

Jeffrey D. Kepert

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Vortex–Vortex Interactions for the Maintenance of Blocking. Part II: Numerical Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective absorption mechanism (SAM), newly proposed in Part I of this study on the maintenance mechanism of blocking, is verified through numerical experiments. The experiments were based on the nonlinear equivalent-barotropic potential ...

Akira Yamazaki; Hisanori Itoh

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Assessment of Hydrometeor Collection Rates from Exact and Approximate Equations. Part II: Numerical Bounding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past microphysical investigations, including Part I of this study, have noted that the collection equation, when applied to the interaction between different hydrometeor species, can predict large mass transfer rates, even when an exact solution ...

Brian J. Gaudet; Jerome M. Schmidt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

GFDL's CM2 Global Coupled Climate Models. Part II: The Baseline Ocean Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current generation of coupled climate models run at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) as part of the Climate Change Science Program contains ocean components that differ in almost every respect from those contained in previous ...

Anand Gnanadesikan; Keith W. Dixon; Stephen M. Griffies; V. Balaji; Marcelo Barreiro; J. Anthony Beesley; William F. Cooke; Thomas L. Delworth; Rudiger Gerdes; Matthew J. Harrison; Isaac M. Held; William J. Hurlin; Hyun-Chul Lee; Zhi Liang; Giang Nong; Ronald C. Pacanowski; Anthony Rosati; Joellen Russell; Bonita L. Samuels; Qian Song; Michael J. Spelman; Ronald J. Stouffer; Colm O. Sweeney; Gabriel Vecchi; Michael Winton; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Fanrong Zeng; Rong Zhang; John P. Dunne

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Japan Sea Thermohaline Structure and Circulation. Part II: A Variational P-Vector Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second part of this work investigates the seasonal variabilities of the Japan/East Sea (JES) circulation using the U.S. Navy Generalized Digital Environmental Model (GDEM) climatological temperature and salinity dataset (public domain) on a ...

Peter C. Chu; Jian Lan; Chenwu Fan

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Thermocline Forced by Varying Ekman Pumping. Part II: Annual and Decadal Ekman Pumping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermocline variability forced by zonally uniform Ekman pumping with annual to decadal periods is investigated. Both analytical and numerical solutions are obtained by the method of characteristics. As found in Part I, there is little thermocline ...

Zhengyu Liu

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

The Denver Cyclone. Part II: Interaction with the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of surface heating on the flow past an isolated obstacle is examined with the aid of a nonlinear numerical model. These simulations extend the results of Part I, which considered the adiabatic, stratified flow around the obstacle. When ...

N. Andrew Crook; Terry L. Clark; Mitchell W. Moncrieff

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Cloud-Environment Interface Instability: Part II: Extension to Three Spatial Dimensions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three-dimensional numerical experiments were performed with thermals rising in a stably stratified environment to study the cloud-environment boundary instability. This work extends that reported in Part I. It is shown that the analytical theory ...

Wojciech W. Grabowski; Terry L. Clark

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Modal and Nonmodal Symmetric Perturbations. Part II: Nonmodal Growths Measured by Total Perturbation Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maximum nonmodal growths of total perturbation energy are computed for symmetric perturbations constructed from the normal modes presented in Part I. The results show that the maximum nonmodal growths are larger than the energy growth produced by ...

Qin Xu; Ting Lei; Shouting Gao

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Oblique, Stratified Winds about a Shelter Fence. Part II: Comparison of Measurements with Numerical Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes (RANS) models of disturbed micrometeorological winds, steady-state computations using a second-order closure are compared with observations (see Part I) in which the surface layer wind was disturbed by ...

John D. Wilson

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Vorticity Budget for AMEX. Part II: Simulations of Monsoon Onset, Midtropospheric Lows, and Tropical Cyclone Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diagnostics from the observational dataset of the Australian Monsoon Experiment (AMEX) have revealed two interesting characteristics of convective systems over the Australian Tropics (Part I of this study). The first is a midlevel convergence ...

Noel E. Davidson

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Generation and Propagation of a Nocturnal Squall Line. Part II: Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms behind the convective regeneration that occurred at midnight on 26 May 1985 in the Kansas PRE-STORM network (described in Part I) are examined with a numerical cloud model. Three mechanisms that could have caused the regeneration ...

N. A. Crook; R. E. Carbone; M. W. Moncrieff; J. W. Conway

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Plane Parallel Albedo Biases from Satellite Observations. Part II: Parameterizations for Bias Removal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the same satellite observations as in Part I of this paper, the authors explore ways to remove the cloud albedo bias (or plane parallel albedo bias), the difference between the plane parallel homogeneous albedo and the average albedo of ...

Lazaros Oreopoulos; Roger Davies

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Estimating Watershed Evapotranspiration with PASS. Part II: Moisture Budgets during Drydown Periods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second part of the parameterization of subgrid-scale surface fluxes model (PASS2) has been developed to estimate long-term evapotranspiration rates over extended areas at a high spatial resolution by using satellite remote sensing data and ...

J. Song; M. L. Wesely; M. A. LeMone; R. L. Grossman

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A Numerical Study of a Mesoscale Convective System during TOGA COARE. Part II: Organization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, the authors presented a successful numerical simulation of the life cycle of a warm-pool mesoscale convective system (MCS) that occurred on 15 December 1992 during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response ...

Badrinath Nagarajan; M. K. Yau; Da-Lin Zhang

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Interactions between a Developing Mesoscale Convective System and Its Environment. Part II: Numerical Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19 July 1993 mesoscale convective system (MCS), discussed in Part I, was simulated using the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). The model was initialized with variable physiographic and atmospheric data with the goal of reproducing ...

Jason E. Nachamkin; William R. Cotton

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Subgrid Scale Physics in 1-Month Forecasts. Part II: Systematic Error and Blocking Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The capability of blocking prediction is investigated with respect to four models of different subgrid scale parameterization packages, which were described in Part I. In order to assess the capability, blocking indices are defined, and threat ...

K. Miyakoda; J. Sirutis

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Controlled Nonlinear Stochastic Delay Equations: Part II: Approximations and Pipe-Flow Representations  

SciTech Connect

This is the second part of a work dealing with key issues that have not been addressed in the modeling and numerical optimization of nonlinear stochastic delay systems. We consider new classes of models, such as those with nonlinear functions of several controls (such as products), each with is own delay, controlled random Poisson measure driving terms, admissions control with delayed retrials, and others. Part I was concerned with issues concerning the class of admissible controls and their approximations, since the classical definitions are inadequate for our models. This part is concerned with transportation equation representations and their approximations. Such representations of nonlinear stochastic delay models have been crucial in the development of numerical algorithms with much reduced memory and computational requirements. The representations for the new models are not obvious and are developed. They also provide a template for the adaptation of the Markov chain approximation numerical methods.

Kushner, Harold J., E-mail: hjk@dam.brown.edu [Brown University, Applied Math (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Cumulonimbus Vertical Velocity Events in GATE. Part II: Synthesis and Model Core Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of convective drafts and cores are presented in Part I. By our definition a convective updraft must have a positive vertical velocity for 0.5 km, and exceed 0.5 m s?1 for 1 s; a convective updraft core must exceed 1 m s?1 for 0.5 ...

E. J. Zipser; M. A. LeMone

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

The Monsoon over the Indian Ocean During Summer 1975. Part II: Break and Active Monsoons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the second part of this paper we examine the active and break cycle of the monsoon during summer 1975. The time evolution of the flow over the Arabian Sea shocks that three main accelerations of the circulation occurred during the 1975 ...

Daniel Cadet

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

An Observational Examination of Long-Lived Supercells. Part II: Environmental Conditions and Forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The local and larger-scale environments of 184 long-lived supercell events (containing one or more supercells with lifetimes ?4 h; see Part I of this paper) are investigated and subsequently compared with those from 137 moderate-lived events (...

Matthew J. Bunkers; Jeffrey S. Johnson; Lee J. Czepyha; Jason M. Grzywacz; Brian A. Klimowski; Mark R. Hjelmfelt

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Diurnal Winds in the Himalayan Kali Gandaki Valley. Part II: Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Penn State–NCAR mesoscale model MM5 is used to simulate and better understand the wind observations in the Kali Gandaki Valley reported in the first part of this paper. The Kali Gandaki River originates in Nepal near Tibet, flows southward ...

Günther Zängl; Joseph Egger; Volkmar Wirth

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Raman Lidar Measurements during the International H2O Project. Part II: Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NASA GSFC Scanning Raman Lidar (SRL) participated in the International H2O Project (IHOP) that occurred in May and June 2002 in the midwestern part of the United States. The SRL system configuration and methods of data analysis were described ...

D. N. Whiteman; B. Demoz; G. Schwemmer; B. Gentry; P. Di Girolamo; D. Sabatino; J. Comer; I. Veselovskii; K. Evans; R-F. Lin; Z. Wang; A. Behrendt; V. Wulfmeyer; E. Browell; R. Ferrare; S. Ismail; J. Wang

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A Numerical Investigation of Squall Lines. Part II: The Mechanics of Evolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physical processes involved in the evolution of the model squall line presented in Part I of this study are examined. It is found that both the thermal and dynamic effects are important in the development of the midlevel meso-?-scale low ...

Kit Kong Szeto; Han-Ru Cho

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Genesis of Pre–Hurricane Felix (2007). Part II: Warm Core Formation, Precipitation Evolution, and Predictability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of a two-part study examining the simulated formation of Atlantic Hurricane Felix (2007) in a cloud-representing framework. Here several open issues are addressed concerning the formation of the storm’s warm core, the evolution ...

Zhuo Wang; M. T. Montgomery; T. J. Dunkerton

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Numerical Simulation of Transient Boundary-Forced Radiation. Part II: The Modon Regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of the present work we studied the transient Rossby wave radiation excited in the far field by a northern boundary forcing. We proposed as a possible mechanism responsible for transient pulses of Rossby waves the sudden growth to finite ...

Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli; Roberta E. Young; Dale B. Haidvogel

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Life Cycle of Numerically Simulated Shallow Cumulus Clouds. Part II: Mixing Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a two-part series in which life cycles of six numerically simulated shallow cumulus clouds are systematically examined. The six clouds, selected from a single realization of a large-eddy simulation, grow as a series of ...

Ming Zhao; Philip H. Austin

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

An Overview of Analog Feedback Part II: Amplifier Configurations in Generic Device Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second installment of a two part paper that overviews analog feedback circuits, computationally efficient and general feedback analysis techniques applicable to virtually all three and four terminal device technologies are formulated. As developed ... Keywords: closed loop, compensation, damping, feedback, global feedback, local feedback, loop gain, return ratio, signal flow theory

G. Palumbo; J. Choma, Jr.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

An Analog Light Scattering Experiment of Hexagonal Icelike Particles. Part II: Experimental and Theoretical Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering properties of hexagonal icelike crystals as measured in the analog manner by the experimental apparatus described in Part I are presented. The crystals are made out of sodium fluoride (NaF), which has an index of refraction similar ...

Brian Barkey; K. N. Liou; Yoshihide Takano; Werner Gellerman; Pierre Sokolsky

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Failure analysis expert system for onshore pipelines. Part-II: End-User interface and algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to develop a Failure Analysis Expert System (FAES), with application for onshore pipeline transporting oil and gas products, the work was split in two parts. Previously failure database and knowledge acquisition method were described in the ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Expert system, Failure analysis, Knowledge acquisition, Onshore pipelines

V. Castellanos; A. Albiter; P. Hernández; G. Barrera

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Long-Lived Mesoscale Convective Complex. Part II: Evolution and Structure of the Mature Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An eight-day episode in August 1977 is described, wherein 14 mesoscale convective complexes (MCCs) developed in the central United States, including one to the immediate Ice of the Rocky Mountains on each day of the episode. In Part I of this ...

Peter J. Wetzel; William R. Cotton; Ray L. McAnelly

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A Model of the Asian Summer Monsoon.Part II: Cross-Equatorial Flow and PV Behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The model developed and tested in Part I of this paper is used to investigate the mechanisms that sustain the low-level East African jet. The East African Highlands and a land/sea contrast in surface friction are shown to be essential for the ...

Mark J. Rodwell; Brian J. Hoskins

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

Doss, E.D. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [ed.] [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

Gregg Ruskuaff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

200

Internal Wave–Wave Interactions. Part II: Spectral Energy Transfer and Turbulence Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral transfer of internal wave energy toward high vertical wavenumber kz and turbulence production ? is examined by ray tracing small-scale test waves in a canonical Garrett and Munk background wave field. Unlike previous ray-tracing ...

Haili Sun; Eric Kunze

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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201

Methods for Fault Detection, Diagnostics and Prognostics for Building Systems - A Review Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides the second part of an overview of fault detection, diagnostics, and prognostics (FDD&P) starting with descriptions of the fundamental processes and some important definitions. This is followed by a review of FDD&P research in the HVAC&R field, and the paper concludes with discussions of the current state of applications in buildings and likely contributions to operating and maintaining buildings in the future.

Katipamula, Srinivas; Brambley, Michael R.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Uncertainties in field-line tracing in the magnetosphere. Part II: the complete internal geomagnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geomagnetic field D. M. Willis1, *, J. Robin Singh 1,2 , K. S. C. Freeman1 1 Rutherford Appleton Laboratory coefficients that define the axisymmetric part of the internal geomagnetic field (i.e. g0 n 6 g0 n). Numerical geomagnetic field (i.e. gm n 6 gm n and hm n 6 hm n ). An algorithm is formulated that greatly reduces

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

203

An Experimental Evaluation of HVAC-Grade Carbon-Dioxide Sensors: Part 2, Performance Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second paper in a four-part series reporting on the test and evaluation of typical carbon-dioxide sensors used in building HVAC applications. Fifteen models of NDIR HVAC-grade CO2 sensors were tested and evaluated to determine the accuracy, linearity, repeatability, and hysteresis of each sensor. This paper describes the performance of the sensors and provides a comparison with the manufacturers specifications. The sensors were tested at 40% relative humidity, 73oF (22.8oC) temperature, 14.70 psia (101.35 kPa) pressure, and at five different CO2 concentrations (400 ppm, 750 ppm, 1100 ppm, 1450 ppm, and 1800 ppm). The test results showed a wide variation in sensor performance among the various manufacturers and in some cases a wide variation among sensors of the same model. In all, 45 sensors were evaluated: three from each of the 15 models. Among the 15 models tested, eight models have a single-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, four models have a dual-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, and three models have a single-lamp, dual-wavelength configuration.

Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory [Iowa State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Quasi-Fixed Points and Periodic Orbits in the Zebiak–Cane ENSO Model with Applications in Kalman Filtering. Part II. Periodic Orbits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part II of this study on the application of the interactive Kalman filter to higher-dimensional systems, a modification suited to periodically forced systems is introduced. As in Part I, the object of study here is the ENSO model of Zebiak and ...

Gerd Bürger; Stephen E. Zebiak; Mark A. Cane

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A Field-Coherence Technique for Meteorological Field-Program Design for Air Quality Studies. Part II: Evaluation in the San Joaquin Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper, a field-coherence technique (FCT) was developed to provide objective guidance for cost-effective siting of meteorological observations on the mesoscale for air quality applications. The FCT is evaluated here in Part II ...

Saffet Tanrikulu; David R. Stauffer; Nelson L. Seaman; Andrew J. Ranzieri

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

208

A PDF-Based Model for Boundary Layer Clouds. Part II: Model Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new single-column model for the cloudy boundary layer, described in a companion paper, is tested for a variety of regimes. To represent the subgrid-scale variability, the model uses a joint probability density function (PDF) of vertical ...

Jean-Christophe Golaz; Vincent E. Larson; William R. Cotton

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Surface Meteorological Observations in Severe Thunderstorms. Part II: Field Experiments with TOTO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The TOTO (Totable Tornado Observatory) device was field tested in the Southern Plains by a severe-storm intercept team from the University of Oklahoma from late May through early June 1981. The results from two intercept missions and a gust-front ...

Howard B. Bluestein

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 16H ANNULUS SAMPLES PART II: LEACHING RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na{sub 8}(Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}), sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}), gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}), hydrated sodium bicarbonate (Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O), and muscovite (KAl{sub 2}(AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 10})(OH){sub 2}). Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and approximately 1/3 of the {sup 99}Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The oxalic acid leaching test result indicate approximately 34-47% of the solids in the four annulus samples will dissolve after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of acid to solids at 45 C. The same sodium salts found in the water leaching test comprise the majority of dissolved material in the oxalic acid leaching test. However, the oxalic acid was somewhat more effective in dissolving radionuclides than the water leach. In contrast to the water leaching results, most constituents continued to dissolve during subsequent cycles of oxalic acid leaching. The somewhat higher dissolution found in the oxalic acid leaching test versus the water leaching test might be offset by the tendency of the oxalic acid solutions to take on a gel-like consistency. The filtered solids left behind after three oxalic acid contacts were sticky and formed large clumps after drying. These two observations could indicate potential processing difficulties with solutions and solids from oxalic acid leaching. The gel formation might be avoided by using larger volumes of the acid. Further testing would be recommended before using oxalic acid to dissolve the Tank 16H annulus waste to ensure no processing difficulties are encountered in the full scale process.

Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Full Scale Cyclic Testing of Foundation Support Systems for Highway Bridges. Part II: Abutment Backwalls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the push direction. Plywood wing walls hor. LVDT Vert.hor. LVDT Actuator 5 – hor. Plywood wing walls Figure 3.3.backfill. Side panels of plywood were erected to simulate

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

The ERICA IOP 5 Storm. Part II: Sensitivity Tests and Further Diagnosis Based on Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper continues the study of the ERICA IOP 5 storm begun in a companion paper. The latter documented the storm development, utilizing both conventional and special observations, and presented the results of a successful simulation of the ...

Richard J. Reed; Georg A. Grell; Ying-Hwa Kuo

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Testing Lagrangian Theories of Internal Wave Spectra. Part II: Varying the Number of Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been proposed by Allen and Joseph, Hines, and Chunchuzov that the kinematic advection produced by superpositions of sinusoidal Lagrangian gravity waves confined to lower vertical wavenumbers m provides an explanation for the quasi-...

G. P. Klaassen

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Full Scale Cyclic Testing of Foundation Support Systems for Highway Bridges. Part II: Abutment Backwalls  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Geotech. Engrg. ASCE, 120(8), 1307-1323. Gadre, A. andJ. Geotech. & Geoenv. Engrg. ASCE, 124(11), 1128-1138. Goel,Geotech. & Geoenv. Engrg. ASCE, 127(2), 0185-0192. Narain,

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Numerical Investigation of Spectral Evolution of Wind Waves. Part II: Dissipation Term and Evolution Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of the wind-wave spectrum evolution are conducted by means of new observation-based wind-input and wave dissipation functions obtained in the Lake George field experiment. This experiment allowed simultaneous measurements of ...

Alexander V. Babanin; Kakha N. Tsagareli; I. R. Young; David J. Walker

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Landfill methane recovery. Part II: gas characterization. Final report, December 1981-December 1982  

SciTech Connect

This study addresses field sampling, analytical testing, and data generation for the characterization of both raw and processed landfill gas. Standardized protocols were developed for the sampling and analysis of the landfill gas for trace constituents and are presented as Appendices A-C. A nationwide survey was conducted in which gas samples were collected at nine landfill sites and tested for trace volatile organic compounds (VOC), trace volatile mercury, and human pathogenic viruses and bacteria. Surface-gas flux measurements at the landfill surface were also made. Repetitive sampling and analysis for each of the nice sites porvided the opportunity to evaluate agreement (or variations) within a laboratory and between two analytical laboratories. Sampling and analytical protocols used by both laboratories were identical, however, the analytical hardware and interpretive computer hardware and software were different.

Lytwynyshyn, G.R.; Zimmerman, R.E.; Flynn, N.W.; Wingender, R.; Olivieri, V.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

SOLERAS Program: engineering field test of a solar cooling system. Phase I and II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rationale for selecting the engineering field test site and the building cooling requirements are described. Descriptions of the Phase I activities are presented and descriptions of the overall cooling system and its major subsystems and components are provided. The preliminary design analyses conducted to select collector/storage, chiller module and thermal distribution components; operating features and estimated system performance are included. Economic analyses and the results obtained are described including an assessment of the commercialization potential for the solar cooling system. Phase II activities are presented and detailed design, construction and installation features of the solar system at the test site are described. Testing documentation is provided by the checkout and acceptance tests and their results are described.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Some Electrical Properties of Ion-Implanted Urania--Part II: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's effort to evaluate the use of UO2 as a material for photovoltaic (e.g., solar cell) applications, single-crystal UO2 samples were characterized as to their electrical and electro-optical properties. Samples of UO2 were ion implanted with boron and sulfur dopants, as well as with boron and sulfur co-dopants, at the Ion Beam Materials Laboratory facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Activation energies for electrical conduction were measured to be from 0.13 to 0.26 eV, when temperatures varied from 180 to 450 K. Dark current was measured followed by light current under 1-sun illumination. In general, the dark and light currents were about an order of magnitude greater than those reported earlier for polycrystalline UO2. Optical and infrared absorption and transmission data were also obtained and are reported. Transmission data on the single-crystal samples revealed a complex structure that made it difficult to resolve a single optical bandgap.

von Roedern, B.; Meek, T. T.; Haire, M. J.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J. [US Steel Research & Technological Center, Monroeville, PA (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

An Ansatz Regarding Relativistic Space Travel Part II-Propulsion Realities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Travel to the stars can involve a perilous journey in an unfriendly space-time continuum that can include singularities, nonlinear events, gravity as a function of both position and vehicle velocity, and extra dimensional effects discussed in Part I. Such a device may possibly use field propulsion technology. Although several field propulsion schemes exist, a proposed candidate is based upon using an electromagnetic drive that uses a rotating magnetic field superimposed on the spacecraft's stationary or static electric field. This is comparable to a Searl generator and the field interaction would generate an electromagnetic vortex to create nonlinear gravitational effects possibly due to an inverse Gertsenshtein relationship to push against the intrinsic gravitational field of a planet. Moreover, changing alignment of the magnetic field axis with the electric field will induce a margin of lateral controllability. Issues such as assessing this combined effect of using both electric and magnetic fields are discussed. Finally, the need for experimental data is stressed to validate these otherwise very speculative theoretical notions.

Murad, Paul A

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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221

Cancer incidence in atomic bomb survivors. Part II: Solid tumors, 1958-1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, for the first time, comprehensive data on the incidence of solid cancer and risk estimates for A-bomb survivors in the extended Life Span Study (LSS-E85) cohort. Among 79,972 individuals, 8613 first primary solid cancers were diagnosed between 1958 and 1987. As part of the standard registration process of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki tumor registries, cancer cases occurring among members of the LSS-E85 cohort were identified using a computer linkage system supplemented by manual searches. Special efforts were made to ensure complete case ascertainment, data quality and data consistency in the two cities. For all sites combined, 75% of the cancers were verified histologically, 6% were diagnosed by direct observation, 8% were based on a clinical diagnosis, and 12.6% were ascertained by death certificate only. A standard set of analyses was carried out for each of the organs and organ systems considered. Depending on the cancer site, Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) organ or kerma doses were used for computing risk estimates. Analyses were based on a general excess relative risk model (the background rate times one plus the excess relative risk). Analyses carried out for each site involved fitting the background model with no dose effect, a linear dose-response model with no effect modifiers, a linear-quadratic dose-response model with no effect modifiers, and a series of linear dose-response models that included each of the covariates (sex, age at exposure, time since exposure, attained age and city) individually as effect modifiers. Because the tumor registries ascertain cancers in the registry catchment areas only, an adjustment was made for the effects of migration. In agreement with prior LSS findings, a statistically significant excess risk for all solid cancers was demonstrated. 116 refs., 8 figs., 78 tabs.

Thompson, D.E. (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan) George Washington Univ., Rockville, MD (United States) Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Soda, Midori (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Nagasaki (Japan)); Izumi, Shizue; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)); Ron, E.; Tokunaga, Masayoshi (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan) National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)); Ochikubo, Sachio (Hiroshima City Medical Association (Japan)); Sugimoto, Sumio (Hiroshima Prefectural Medical Association (Japan)); Ikeda, Takayoshi (Nagasaki Univ. Medical School (Japan)); Terasaki, Masayuki (Nagasaki City Medical Association (Japan)) (and others)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Climate variability in a coupled GCM. Part II: The Indian Ocean and monsoon  

SciTech Connect

We have investigated the seasonal cycle and the interannual variability of the tropical Indian Ocean circulation and the Indian summer monsoon simulated by a coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model in a 26-year integration. Although the model exhibits significant climate drift, overall, the coupled GCM simulates realistically the seasonal changes in the tropical Indian Ocean and the onset and evolution of the Indian summer monsoon. The amplitudes of the seasonal changes, however, are underestimated. The coupled GCM also simulates considerable interannual variability in the tropical Indian Ocean circulation, which is partly related to the El Nino/Southern Oscillation phenomenon and the associated changes in the Walker circulation. Changes in the surface wind stress appear to be crucial in forcing interannual variations in the Indian Ocean SST. As in the Pacific Ocean, the net surface heat flux acts as a negative feedback on the SST anomalies. The interannual variability in monsoon rainfall, simulated by the coupled GCM, is only about half as strong as observed. The reason for this is that the simulated interannual variability in the Indian monsoon appears to be related to internal processes within the atmosphere only. In contrast, an investigation based on observations shows a clear lead-lag relationship between interannual variations in the monsoon rainfall and tropical Pacific SST anomalies. Furthermore, the atmospheric GCM also fails to reproduce this lead-lag relationship between monsoon rainfall and tropical Pacific SST when run in a stand-alone integration with observed SSTs prescribed during the period 1970-1988. These results indicate that important physical processes relating tropical Pacific SST to Indian monsoon rainfall are not adequately modeled in our atmospheric GCM. Monsoon rainfall predictions appear therefore premature. 24 refs., 13 figs, 2 tabs.

Latif, M.; Sterl, A.; Assenbaum, M.; Junge, M.M.; Maier-Reimer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fatigue Testing of Metallurgically-Bonded EBR-II Superheater Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on 2¼Cr-1Mo steel specimens machined from ex-service Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) superheater duplex tubes. The tubes had been metallurgically bonded with a 100 µm thick Ni interlayer; the specimens incorporated this bond layer. Tests were performed at room temperature in air and at 400°C in air and humid Ar; cracks were grown at varied levels of constant ?K. Crack growth tests at a range of ?K were also performed on specimens machined from the shell of the superheater. In all conditions the presence of the Ni interlayer was found to result in a net retardation of growth as the crack passed through the interlayer. The mechanism of retardation was identified as a disruption of crack planarity and uniformity after passing through the porous interlayer. Full crack arrest was only observed in a single test performed at near-threshold ?K level (12 MPa?m) at 400°C. In this case the crack tip was blunted by oxidation of the base steel at the steel-interlayer interface.

Terry C. Totemeier

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Quarterly Status Report on the Space Electric Power R and D Program for the Period Ending July 31, 1968 Part II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported with respect to ZrH{sub x}-moderated thermionic reactors, thermionic fuel studies, EBR-II and OWR isothermal irradiator tests and tri-layer assembly development.

none,

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

225

DOE/NETL's Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Mercury Removal Technology Field-Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Mercury Removal Technology Field-Testing Air Quality III September 12, 2002 Arlington, Va Scott Renninger, Project Manager for Mercury Control Technology Enviromental Projects Division Presentation Outline * Hg Program goals & objectives * Focus on Future Hg control R&D * Q&As President Bush's Clear Skies Initiative Current Mid-Term 2008-2010 2018 SO 2 11 million tons 4.5 million tons 3 million tons NOx 5 million tons 2.1 million tons 1.7 million tons Mercury 48 tons 26 tons 15 tons Annual U.S. Power Plant Emissions Mercury Control * Developing technologies ready for commercial demonstration: - By 2005, reduce emissions 50-70% - By 2010, reduce emissions by 90% - Cost 25-50% less than current estimates 2000 Year 48 Tons $2 - 5 Billion @ 90% Removal w/Activated

226

Large-diameter, high-plutonium metallic fuel testing in EBR-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The integral fast reactor (IFR) concept makes use of U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel alloys because of favorable core behavior characteristics and compatibility with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing scheme. Advanced reactor designs use U-x Pu-10 Zr (where 20 {le} x {le} 28). Most of the IFR fuel performance database was obtained with fuel containing {le}20 wt% Pu having a 0.439-cm diameter irradiated in cladding tubes having a 0.584-cm o.d. However, commercial implementations of the IFR concept (e.g., the advanced liquid-metal reactor by General Electric) will likely use fuel of larger diameter and plutonium contents {ge}20 wt%. The HT9 advanced driver fuel test, irradiated in Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II), was initiated to obtain irradiation performance data from larger diameter fuel cast with a range of plutonium compositions and clad in the reference cladding alloy HT9.

Crawford, D.C.; Hayes, S.L.; Pahl, R.G. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

STARTUP AND INITIAL TESTING OF SM-1 CORE II WITH SPECIAL COMPONENTS  

SciTech Connect

The loading operation for SM-1 Core II is described. Results of startup physics measurements (Test A-300 (Series) and fission product iodine monitoring in the primary coolant are given. The SM-1 Core II initial loading progressed satisfactorily, fulfilling the predictions of the zero power experiment performed at the Alco Criticality Facility. The initial cold clean five rod bank position was 6.53 in.; the initial hot, no xenon, five rod bank position was 9.62 in.; the initial hot, equilibrium xenon, five rod bank position was 11.41 in.; and the initial hot, peak xenon, five rod bank position was 12.14 in. Rods A and B were 19.00 in. in all four measurements. Stuck rod measurements indicated that an adequate shutdown margin was available with 20% of the rods fully withdrawn. All rod calibrations indicated a distinct shift and broadening of the peaks when compared with similar Core I calibrations. The temperature coefficient for Core II was 3.5 cents/ deg F at 440 deg F. Equilibrium xenon was worth approximately - 00 while peak xenon was worth - 43, both relative to the hot, no xenon core condition. During the period June 2, 1961 through September 30, 1961, the reactor operated at a total of 935.68 deg Fdays which is equivalent to 1.34 MWYR of energy release and represents an average load factor of 44% typical of training periods. The estimated reactivity in the core at startup is .00. A core life of 12.2 MWYR is predicted for the original configuration of Core II. The results of gross fission product iodine monitoring showed that those levels were about one-third to one-half of those found at the end of Core I Operation. (auth)

Moote, F.G.; Schrader, E.W.

1962-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

229

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

230

Notes from DOE/EPRI Meeting on Phase II Mercury Field Test Needs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Notes Notes DOE/EPRI meeting on Phase II Mercury Field Test Needs Washington DC June 5, 2002 Attendees (phone/e-mail at end of notes) AEP - Gary Spitznogle EPRI - Stu Dalton DOE - Scott Renninger EPRI - George Offen DOE - Tom Feeley GRE - Mark Strohfus Duke - Tim Shawver Southern - Larry Monroe EPA - Jim Kilgroe TVA - Tom Burnett TXU - David Lamb DOE and EPRI jointly convened this meeting to obtain feedback from deeply involved industry members on the needs, scope, schedule, etc. for a second phase of full-scale, longer-term field tests of mercury controls on power plants. The program objectives would be to determine performance and costs of the major near-term control approaches with the hope of using this information both to inform the regulatory (MACT) and legislative (Clear Skies Initiative, CSI) processes as well as industry selections of

231

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

... 122 80. DEAR 970.5223-4 WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES (DEC 2010) (REPLACED M443) ......

232

PART II ? CONTRACT CLAUSES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(SEP 2006) (a) Except as provided in (b) of this clause, the Contractor shall not enter into any agreement with an actual or prospective subcontractor, nor otherwise act in...

233

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

... 85 50. FAR 52.251-2 INTERAGENCY FLEET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (IFMS) VEHICLES AND RELATED SERVICES (JAN 1991) ......

234

DESIGN AND PRELIMINARY TEST OF THE 1500 MHZ NSLS-II PASSIVE SUPERCONDUCTING RF CAVITY  

SciTech Connect

NSLS-II is a new ultra-bright 3 GeV 3rd generation synchrotron radiation light source. The performance goals require operation with a beam current of 500mA and a bunch current of at least 0.5mA. Ion clearing gaps are required to suppress ion effects on the beam. The natural bunch length of 3mm is planned to be lengthened by means of a third harmonic cavity in order to increase the Touschek limited lifetime. Earlier work described the design alternatives and the geometry selected for a copper prototype. We subsequently have iterated the design to lower the R/Q of the cavity and to increase the diameter of the beam pipe ferrite HOM dampers to reduce the wakefield heating. A niobium cavity and full cryomodule including LN2 shield, magnetic shield and insulating vacuum vessel have been fabricated and installed. A passive SRF 3rd harmonic cavity consisting of two tightly coupled cells has been designed and fabricated for NSLS-II. Initial cold tests of this cavity are very promising. These tests have verified that the cavity frequency and mode separation between the 0 and {pi}-modes can be set at manufacture. Further, the frequency separation can be maintained over wide tuning ranges necessary for operation. Future work includes HOM damper and motorized tuner development.

Rose, J.; Gash, W.; Kosciuk, B.; Ravindranath, V.; Sikora, B.; Sharma, S.; Towne, N.; Grimm, T.L.; Boulware, C.H.; Krizmanich, C.; Kuhlman, B.; Miller, N.; Siegel, B.; Winowski, M.

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

235

Evaluation of a Decoupling-Based Fault Detection and Diagnostic Technique - Part II: Field Evaluation and Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing methods addressing automated fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) for vapor compression air conditioning system have good performance for faults that occur individually, but they have difficulty in handling multiple-simultaneous faults. The decoupling-based (DB) FDD method explicitly addresses diagnostics for multiple-simultaneous faults for the first time. This paper is the second part of a two-part evaluation of the decoupling-based (DB) fault detection and diagnosis (FDD) technique whose intent is to validate the DB FDD performance and demonstrate its applications. The first part focuses on sensitivity and robustness evaluation through controlled field emulation testing. In this paper, the technique is applied to a number of field sites in California. Detailed results are given for a single site and summary results are given for the other sites. In sum, about 70% of the investigated systems are impacted by faults and about 40% have more than one fault. Service is justified for about 40% of the units. Most of the diagnosed faults are verified through field visits.

Li, H.; Braun, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Gaussian Jet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Gaussian Jet NIKOLAOS A. BAKAS AND BRIAN F. FARRELL Harvard University Interaction between the midlatitude jet and gravity waves is examined, focusing on the nonnormality

Farrell, Brian F.

237

Modeling the Atmospheric Response to Irrigation in the Great Plains. Part II: The Precipitation of Irrigated Water and Changes in Precipitation Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rapid expansion of irrigation in the Great Plains since World War II has resulted in significant water table declines, threatening the long-term sustainability of the Ogallala Aquifer. As discussed in Part I of this paper, the Weather Research ...

Keith J. Harding; Peter K. Snyder

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Retrofit of waste-to-energy facilities equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Volume II: Field and laboratory reports, Part 2 of 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II (part 2 of 2) of ''Retrofit of Waste-to-energy Facilities Equipped with Electrostatic Precipitators'' contains the field and laboratory reports, including: (1) field reports, (2) analytic laboratory reports, (3) chain of custody forms, and (4) TCLP laboratory reports.

Rigo, H.G. [Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc., Berea, OH (US); Chandler, A.J. [A.J. Chandler & Associates, Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Retrofit of waste-to-energy facilities equipped with electrostatic precipitators. Volume II: Field and Laboratory Reports, Part 1 of 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II (part 1 of 2) of ''Retrofit of Waste-to-energy Facilities Equipped with Electrostatic Precipitators'' contains the documentation and raw data, including: (1) field reports, (2) analytic laboratory reports, (3) chain of custody forms, and (4) TCLP laboratory reports.

Rigo, H.G. [Rigo & Rigo Associates, Inc., Berea, OH (US); Chandler, A.J. [A.J. Chandler & Associates, Ltd., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Part I. An investigation of shock strengthening in a conical, convergent channel. Part II. Spectroscopic investigation of strong shockwaves in a conical, convergent channel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??NOTE: Text or symbols not renderable in plain ASCII are indicated by [...]. Abstract is included in .pdf document. ABSTRACT OF PART I: The behavior… (more)

Storm, Erik

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth, Texas, Tornadic Thunderstorms. Part II: Impact of Radial Velocity Analysis via 3DVAR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this two-part paper, the impact of level-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) radar reflectivity and radial velocity data on the prediction of a cluster of tornadic thunderstorms in the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS)...

Ming Hu; Ming Xue; Jidong Gao; Keith Brewster

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

II.  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

or as proposed for for small, highly valued energy services-consumer the Solar Enterprise Zone at the Nevada Test Site. devices, yard, security, and accent lighting, sensing...

243

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

244

Performance testing of the Ford/GE Second Generation Single-Shaft Electric Propulsion (ETX-II) System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

System-level-operational testing of the ETX-II test-bed electric vehicle is described and the results discussed. Because the traction battery is a major factor in the performance of an electric vehicle, previously reported work on the sodium-sulfur battery designed for use with the ETX-II is reviewed in detail. Chassis dynamometer performance of the test-bed vehicle met or exceeded design goals and compared reasonably well with SIMPLEV computer modeling results. Areas are identified wherein further work is needed to establish a firmer basis for comparison of the simulation and the observed results.

MacDowall, R.D.; Burke, A.F.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Hindcasting the January 2009 Arctic Sudden Stratospheric Warming with Unified Parameterization of Orographic Drag in NOGAPS. Part II: Short-Range Data-Assimilated Forecast and the Impacts of Calibrated Radiance Bias Correction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study is Part II of the effort to improve the forecasting of sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) events by using a version of the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) that covers the full stratosphere. In Part I, ...

Young-Joon Kim; William Campbell; Benjamin Ruston

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Evaluation of the Fenton Hill Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir. Part I. Heat extraction performance and modeling. Part II. Flow characteristics and geochemistry. Part III. Reservoir characterization using acoustic techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On May 28, 1977, as the production well GT-2 at Fenton Hill was being redrilled along a planned trajectory, it intersected a low-impedance hydraulic fracture in direct communication with the injection well, EE-1. Thus, a necessary prerequisite for a full-scale test of the LASL Hot Dry Rock Concept, that of establishing a high flow rate between wells at low wellhead differential pressures, was satisified. Full-scale operation of the loop occurred for 75 days from January 27 to April 12, 1978. This test is referred to as Phase 1, Segment 2 and was designed to examine the thermal drawdown, flow characteristics, water losses, and fluid geochemistry of the system in detail. Results of these studies are the major topic of this paper which is divided into three separate parts covering first the heat extraction performance, second the flow characteristics and geochemistry and third the use of acoustic techniques to describe the geometry of the fracture system. In the third section, dual-well acoustic measurements used to detect fractures are described. These measurements were made using modified Dresser Atlas logging tools. Signals intersecting hydraulic fractures in the reservoir under both hydrostatic and pressurized conditions were simultaneously detected in both wells. Signal attenuation and characteristic waveforms can be used to describe the extent of fractured rock in the reservoir.

Murphy, H.D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Tester, J.W.; Albright, J.N.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Microphysics of Clouds with the Relaxed Arakawa–Schubert Scheme (McRAS). Part II: Implementation and Performance in GEOS II GCM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prognostic cloud scheme named the Microphysics of Clouds with the Relaxed Arakawa–Schubert Scheme (McRAS) and the Simple Biosphere Model have been implemented in a version of the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) II GCM at a 4° latitude × 5°...

Y. C. Sud; G. K. Walker

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Modeling the Effect of Land Surface Evaporation Variability on Precipitation Variability. Part II: Time- and Space-Scale structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of a two-part article investigating the impact of variations of land surface evaporability on the interannual variability of precipitation. The first goal of this part is to analyze the relationship between the atmospheric ...

Oreste Reale; Paul Dirmeyer; Adam Schlosser

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Multi-PRI Signal Processing for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar. Part II: Range–Velocity Ambiguity Mitigation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple pulse-repetition interval (multi-PRI) transmission is part of an adaptive signal transmission and processing algorithm being developed to combat range–velocity (RV) ambiguity for the Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR). In Part I of ...

John Y. N. Cho

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti, Part 2: Results from the Controlled Cooking Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five charcoal cookstoves were tested using a Controlled Cooking Test (CCT) developed from cooking practices in Haiti. Cookstoves were tested for total burn time, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and the ratio of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide (CO/CO{sub 2}). These results are presented in this report along with LBNL testers’ observations regarding the usability of the stoves.

Lask, Kathleen; Jones, Jennifer; Booker, Kayje; Ceballos, Cristina; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Radar Data Assimilation with WRF 4D-Var. Part I: System Development and Preliminary Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major goal of this two-part study is to assimilate radar data into the high-resolution Advanced Research Weather Research and Forecasting Model (ARW-WRF) for the improvement of short-term quantitative precipitation forecasting (QPF) using a ...

Hongli Wang; Juanzhen Sun; Xin Zhang; Xiang-Yu Huang; Thomas Auligné

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Numerical Modeling of Hailstorms and Hailstone Growth. Part I: Preliminary Model Verification and Sensitivity Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the first in a three part series describing numerical simulations of hailstorms and hailstone growth using a two-dimensional, time-dependent cloud model. In this model. cloud water, cloud ice and rain are treated via standard ...

R. D. Farley; H. D. Orville

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

An Experimental Evaluation of HVAC-Grade Carbon-Dioxide Sensors: Part 3, Humidity, Temperature, and Pressure Sensitivity Test Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the third paper in a four-part series reporting on the test and evaluation of typical carbon-dioxide sensors used in building HVAC applications. Fifteen models of NDIR HVAC-grade CO2 sensors were tested and evaluated to determine the humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of the sensors. This paper reports the performance of the sensors at various relative humidity, temperature, and pressure levels common to building HVAC applications and provides a comparison with manufacturer specifications. Among the 15 models tested, eight models have a single-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, four models have a dual-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, and three models have a single-lamp, dual-wavelength configuration. The sensors were tested in a chamber specifically fabricated for this research. A description of the apparatus and the method of test are described in Part 1 (Shrestha and Maxwell 2009). The test result showed a wide variation in humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of CO2 sensors among manufacturers. In some cases, significant variations in sensor performance exist between sensors of the same model. Even the natural variation in relative humidity could significantly vary readings of some CO2 sensor readings. The effects of temperature and pressure variation on NDIR CO2 sensors are unavoidable without an algorithm to compensate for the changes. For the range of temperature and pressure variation in an air-conditioned space, the effect of pressure variation is more significant compared to the effect of temperature variation.

Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory [Iowa State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

257

TESTING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AS THE SOURCE OF ENHANCED STRONG Mg II ABSORPTION TOWARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sixty percent of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) reveal strong Mg II absorbing systems, which is a factor of {approx}2 times the rate seen along lines of sight to quasars. Previous studies argue that the discrepancy in the strong Mg II covering factor is most likely to be the result of either quasars being obscured due to dust or the consequence of many GRBs being strongly gravitationally lensed. We analyze observations of quasars that show strong foreground Mg II absorption. We find that GRB lines of sight pass closer to bright galaxies than would be expected for random lines of sight within the impact parameter expected for strong Mg II absorption. While this cannot be explained by obscuration in the GRB sample, it is a natural consequence of gravitational lensing. Upon examining the particular configurations of galaxies near a sample of GRBs with strong Mg II absorption, we find several intriguing lensing candidates. Our results suggest that lensing provides a viable contribution to the observed enhancement of strong Mg II absorption along lines of sight to GRBs, and we outline the future observations required to test this hypothesis conclusively.

Rapoport, Sharon; Onken, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tucker, Brad E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyithe, J. Stuart B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The 1997/98 Summer Rainfall Season in Southern Africa. Part II: Model Simulations and Coupled Model Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of a two-part investigation of rainfall in southern Africa during the strong El Niño of 1997/98. In Part I it was shown that widespread drought in southern Africa, typical of past El Niño events occurring between 1950 and 2000, ...

Bradfield Lyon; Simon J. Mason

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

North American Climate in CMIP5 Experiments. Part II: Evaluation of Historical Simulations of Intra-Seasonal to Decadal Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second part of a three-part paper on North American climate in CMIP5 that evaluates the 20th century simulations of intra-seasonal to multi-decadal variability and teleconnections with North American climate. Overall, the multi-model ...

Justin Sheffield; Baird Langenbrunner; Joyce E. Meyerson; J. David Neelin; Suzana J. Camargo; Rong Fu; Qu Hu; Xianan Jiang; Kristopher B. Karnauskas; Seo Tae Kim; Sanjiv Kumar; Jim Kinter; Eric D. Maloney; Annarita Mariotti; Zaitao Pan; Alfredo Ruiz-Barradas; Sumant Nigam; Richard Seager; Yolande L. Serra; De-Zheng Sun; Chunzai Wang; Jin-Yi Yu; Nathaniel Johnson; Shang-Ping Xie; Tao Zhang; Ming Zhao

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Numerical Aspects of the Application of Recursive Filters to Variational Statistical Analysis. Part II: Spatially Inhomogeneous and Anisotropic General Covariances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part of a two-part study of recursive filter techniques applied to the synthesis of covariances in a variational analysis, methods by which non-Gaussian shapes and spatial inhomogeneities and anisotropies for the covariances may be ...

R. James Purser; Wan-Shu Wu; David F. Parrish; Nigel M. Roberts

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Hidden Error Variance Theory. Part II: An Instrument That Reveals Hidden Error Variance Distributions from Ensemble Forecasts and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study, a model of the distribution of true error variances given an ensemble variance is shown to be defined by six parameters that also determine the optimal weights for the static and flow-dependent parts of hybrid error ...

Craig H. Bishop; Elizabeth A. Satterfield; Kevin T. Shanley

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Data Constraints Applied to Models of the Ocean General Circulation. Part II: The Transient, Eddy-Resolving Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of the present work we performed assimilation experiments with a multilayer, quasi-geostrophic (QG) eddy-resolving model of the ocean general circulation. In Part I we studied the quasi-linear, steady state and the assimilated data were ...

Paola Malanotte-Rizzoli; William R. Holland

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Aerosol Retrievals from Individual AVHRR Channels. Part II: Quality Control, Probability Distribution Functions, Information Content, and Consistency Checks of Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This second part of a two-part study evaluates retrievals of aerosol optical depths, ?1 and ?2, in Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) channels 1 and 2 centered at ?1 = 0.63 and ?2 = 0.83 ?m, and an effective Ångström exponent, ?, ...

Alexander Ignatov; Larry Stowe

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

A Three-Dimensional Radiative Transfer Model to Investigate the Solar Radiation within a Cloudy Atmosphere. Part II: Spectral Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part of a two-part paper, the spectral response of the interaction between gases, cloud droplets, and solar radiation is investigated using a Monte Carlo-based three-dimensional (3D) radiative transfer model with a spectral ...

William O’Hirok; Catherine Gautier

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.  

SciTech Connect

Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

GRI testing of ARI-LO-CAT II (trade name) for the direct treatment of high-pressure natural gas at NGPL`s Kermit, Texas site. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the GRI liquid redox pilot unit program is to gather data on the direct treatment of high-pressure natural gas using commercially-available liquid redox processes and emerging processes with good near-term potential to reduce sulfur recovery costs for the natural gas industry. ARI-LO-CAT II(Trademark) was the second technology tested as part of the program.

Holloway, C.S.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Gas Gun Impact Testing of PZT 95/5, Part 1: Unpoled State  

SciTech Connect

In the present study, 10 impact tests were conducted on unpoled PZT 95/5, with 9% porosity and 2 at% Nb doping. These tests were instrumented to obtain time-resolved loading, unloading and span signatures. As well, PVDF gauges allowed shock timing to be established explicitly. The ferroelectric/antiferroelectric phases transition was manifested as a ramp to 0.4 GPa. The onset of crushup produced the most visible signature: a clear wave separation at 2.2 GPa followed by a highly dispersive wave. The end states also reflected crushup, and are consistent with earlier data and with related poled experiments. A span strength value of 0.17 GPa was measured for a shock stress of 0.5 GPa, this decreased to a very small value (no visible pullback signature) for a shock strength of 1.85 GPa.

FURNISH,MICHAEL D.; SETCHELL,ROBERT E.; CHHABILDAS,LALIT C.; MONTGOMERY,STEPHEN T.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Batteries for stationary standby and cycling applications :Part 5: maintenance and testing standards.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing IEEE stationary battery maintenance and testing standards fall into two basic categories: those associated with grid-tied standby applications and those associated with stand-alone photovoltaic cycling applications. These applications differ in several significant ways, which in turn influence their associated standards. A review of the factors influencing the maintenance and testing of stationary battery systems provides the reasons for the differences between these standards and some of the hazards of using a standard inappropriate to the application. This review also provides a background on why these standards will need to be supplemented in the future to support emerging requirements of other applications, such as grid-tied cycling and photovoltaic hybrid applications.

Chamberlin, Jay L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Batteries for stationary standby and cycling applications. Part 5, Maintenance and testing standards.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existing IEEE stationary battery maintenance and testing standards fall into two basic categories: those associated with grid-tied standby applications and those associated with stand-alone photovoltaic cycling applications. These applications differ in several significant ways, which in turn influence their associated standards. A review of the factors influencing the maintenance and testing of stationary battery systems provides the reasons for the differences between these standards and some of the hazards of using a standard inappropriate to the application. This review also provides a background on why these standards will need to be supplemented in the future to support emerging requirements of other applications, such as grid-tied cycling and photovoltaic hybrid applications.

Chamberlin, Jay L.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Assistance in MSD Research and Development: Part 1, Small scale research, development and testing: Final report  

SciTech Connect

The development and testing of a simple mechanical stemming aid is described. The aid comprises a solid unit placed in the stemming above the explosive column and is designed to improve blasting efficiency and reduce drilling and blasting costs. It is designed to work with back filled drill cuttings or any other suitable stemming material. To date it has consisted of the testing of the aid in small diameter (1.5 and 1.625 inch) holes in Jefferson City Dolomite for both bench and crater blasting configurations. Full scale field trials are being conducted nearby in similar rock in an aggregate quarry. The data acquisition equipment used in Phase 1 included both a Spin Physics SP2000 high speed video motion analysis system and acoustic and seismic monitoring units. Measurements for each test included peak air over pressure, ground surface ppv, stemming displacement and velocity and face movement and extent. The results illustrate that the concept is sound and that its successful application to production blasting at full scale will be a function of manufacturing cost, the development of suitable insertion techniques for large diameter boreholes and the selection of a suitable low cost material for the aid. 17 refs., 20 figs.

Worsey, P.N.; Canon, C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Principal Component Image Analysis of MODIS for Volcanic Ash. Part II: Simulation of Current GOES and GOES-M Imagers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper the infrared bands of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) were analyzed using principal component image analysis for volcanic ash signals. The analyses performed determined that several of the thermal ...

Donald W. Hillger; James D. Clark

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Scattering of Internal Waves at Finite Topography in Two Dimensions. Part II: Spectral Calculations and Boundary Mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of internal gravity waves at finite topography is studied theoretically and numerically for a two-dimensional finite-depth ocean. In Part I a single incident plane wave was considered. Here a random superposition of incident waves ...

Peter Müller; Xianbing Liu

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Multiscale Ensemble Filtering System for Hydrologic Data Assimilation. Part II: Application to Land Surface Modeling with Satellite Rainfall Forcing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this series of studies developed procedures to implement the multiscale filtering algorithm for land surface hydrology and performed assimilation experiments with rainfall ensembles from a climate model. However, a most important ...

Ming Pan; Eric F. Wood

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

An Air–Sea Interaction Theory for Tropical Cyclones. Part II: Evolutionary Study Using a Nonhydrostatic Axisymmetric Numerical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this study an analytical model for a steady-state tropical cyclone is constructed on the assumption that boundary-layer air parcels are conditionally neutral to displacements along the angular momentum surfaces of the hurricane ...

Richard Rotunno; Kerry A. Emanuel

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

A Semigeostrophic Eady-Wave Frontal Model Incorporating Momentum Diffusion. Part II: Kinetic Energy and Enstrophy Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Momentum diffusion has been introduced into a semigeostrophic Eady-wave frontal model by Blumen (Part I). This model is used to determine the kinetic energy and enstrophy dissipations within a frontal zone that extends from the ground to a ...

William Blumen

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Electrification of Stratiform Regions in Mesoscale Convective Systems. Part II: Two-Dimensional Numerical Model Simulations of a Symmetric MCS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model simulations of a symmetric mesoscale convective system (MCS; observations discussed in Part I) were conducted using a 2D, time-dependent numerical model with bulk microphysics. A number of charging mechanisms were considered based on ...

Terry J. Schuur; Steven A. Rutledge

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Structure and Evolution of Hurricane Claudette on 7 September 1991 from Airborne Doppler Radar Observations. Part II: Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, the kinematic and precipitating fields of Hurricane Claudette have been analyzed, using airborne Doppler radar data collected on 7 September 1991 by the two National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) WP-3D research ...

Nicolas Viltard; Frank Roux

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Cloudiness and Marine Boundary Layer Dynamics in the ASTEX Lagrangian Experiments. Part II: Cloudiness, Drizzle, Surface Fluxes, and Entrainment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Analysis of the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) Lagrangians started in Part I is continued, presenting measurements of sea surface temperature, surface latent and sensible heat fluxes from bulk aerodynamic formulas, cloud ...

Christopher S. Bretherton; Philip Austin; Steven T. Siems

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Classification of Tropical Precipitating Systems Using Wind Profiler Spectral Moments. Part II: Statistical Characteristics of Rainfall Systems and Sensitivity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated precipitation algorithm to classify tropical precipitating systems has been described in a companion paper (Part I). In this paper, the algorithm has been applied to 18 months of lower atmospheric wind profiler measurements to study ...

T. Narayana Rao; N. V. P. Kirankumar; B. Radhakrishna; D. Narayana Rao; K. Nakamura

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Inert Trace Constituent Transport in Sigma and Hybrid Isentropic–Sigma Models. Part II: Twelve Semi-Lagrangian Algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this paper examined nine trace constituent advection algorithms as applied in channel versions of the University of Wisconsin hybrid isentropic–sigma (?–?) and sigma (?) models. This paper examines the performance of 12 semi-Lagrangian ...

Fred M. Reames; Tom H. Zapotocny

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Numerical Simulations of the Genesis of Hurricane Diana (1984). Part II: Sensitivity of Track and Intensity Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine numerous simulations that probe the dynamics governing the intensification and track of Tropical Cyclone Diana (1984) simulated in Part I. The development process is fundamentally dependent on a preexisting upper-tropospheric ...

Christopher Davis; Lance F. Bosart

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Numerical Investigation of Collision-Induced Breakup of Raindrops. Part II: Parameterizations of Coalescence Efficiencies and Fragment Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of numerically investigated binary collisions of 32 drop pairs presented in Part I of this study are used to parameterize coalescence efficiencies and size distributions of breakup fragments of large raindrops.

Winfried Straub; Klaus Dieter Beheng; Axel Seifert; Jan Schlottke; Bernhard Weigand

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Relationship between the Scavenging Coefficient for Pollutants in Precipitation and the Radar Reflectivity Factor. Part II: Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power-law dependences between the scavenging coefficient ? for pollutants in precipitation and the radar reflectivity factor Z, theoretically derived in Part I, are discussed here from the point of view of applications. Possible problems in ...

Kirsti Jylhä

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

A Zonally Averaged Ocean Model for the Thermohaline Circulation. Part II: Interocean Circulation in the Pacific-Atlantic Basin System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The zonally averaged, latitude-depth ocean model, developed in Part I, is extended to a two-basin system representing the Atlantic and Pacific. Steady states are calculated under two different surface boundary conditions to study a possible ...

Thomas F. Stocker; Daniel G. Wright

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Short-Term Climate Variability and Atmospheric Teleconnections from Satellite-Observed Outgoing Longwave Radiation. Part II: Lagged Correlations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a sequel to Part I of this study, lagged relationships in atmospheric teleconnections associated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are investigated using Lagged Cross Correlations (LCC). The feasibility of extratropical seasonal-to-...

Ka-Ming Lau; Paul H. Chan

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

A Global Multilevel Atmospheric Model Using a Vector Semi-Lagrangian Finite-Difference Scheme. Part II: Version with Physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Full physical parameterzations have been incorporated into the global model using a two-time-level, semi-Lagrangian, semi-implicit finite-difference integration scheme that was described in Part I of this work. Virtual temperature effects have ...

S. Moorthi; R. W. Higgins; J. R. Bates

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

The Hybrid Multicellular–Supercellular Storm—an Efficient Hail Producer. Part II. General Characteristics and Implications for Hail Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the second of a two part series describing what are termed hybrid storms because their characteristics are intermediate to classical multicellular and supercellular storms. Storms that possess this structure are worthy of special ...

Stephan P. Nelson

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Influence of the Rocky Mountains on the 13–14 April 1986 Severe Weather Outbreak. Part II: Evolution of a Prefrontal Bore and Its Role in Triggering a Squall Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, Part II of a series, the evolution of a prefrontal bore on the leeside of the Rockies and its subsequent propagation and initiation of convection farther downstream over eastern Colorado and western Nebraska are investigated. The ...

V. Mohan Karyampudi; Steven E. Koch; Chaing Chen; James W. Rottman; Michael L. Kaplan

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products, Part 3: LED Environmental Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the third part of a larger U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project to assess the life-cycle environmental and resource impacts in the manufacturing, transport, use, and disposal of light-emitting diode (LED) lighting products in relation to incumbent lighting technologies. All three reports are available on the DOE website (www.ssl.energy.gov/tech_reports.html). • Part 1: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent and LED Lamps; • Part 2: LED Manufacturing and Performance; • Part 3: LED Environmental Testing. Parts 1 and 2 were published in February and June 2012, respectively. The Part 1 report included a summary of the life-cycle assessment (LCA) process and methodology, provided a literature review of more than 25 existing LCA studies of various lamp types, and performed a meta-analysis comparing LED lamps with incandescent and compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs). Drawing from the Part 1 findings, Part 2 performed a more detailed assessment of the LED manufacturing process and used these findings to provide a comparative LCA taking into consideration a wider range of environmental impacts. Both reports concluded that the life-cycle environmental impact of a given lamp is dominated by the energy used during lamp operation—the upstream generation of electricity drives the total environmental footprint of the product. However, a more detailed understanding of end-of-life disposal considerations for LED products has become increasingly important as their installation base has grown. The Part 3 study (reported herein) was undertaken to augment the LCA findings with chemical analysis of a variety of LED, CFL, and incandescent lamps using standard testing procedures. A total of 22 samples, representing 11 different models, were tested to determine whether any of 17 elements were present at levels exceeding California or Federal regulatory thresholds for hazardous waste. Key findings include: • The selected models were generally found to be below thresholds for Federally regulated elements; • All CFLs and LED lamps and most incandescent lamps exceeded California thresholds for Copper; • Most CFL samples exceeded California thresholds for Antimony and Nickel, and half of the LED samples exceeded California thresholds for Zinc; • The greatest contributors were the screw bases, drivers, ballasts, and wires or filaments; • Overall concentrations in LED lamps were comparable to cell phones and other types of electronic devices, and were generally attributable to components other than the internal LED light sources; • Although the life-cycle environmental impact of the LED lamps is favorable when compared to CFLs and incandescent lamps, recycling will likely gain importance as consumer adoption increases. This study was exploratory in nature and was not intended to provide a definitive indication of regulatory compliance for any specific lamp model or technology. Further study would be needed to more broadly characterize the various light source technologies; to more accurately and precisely characterize a specific model; or to determine whether product redesign would be appropriate.

Tuenge, Jason R.; Hollomon, Brad; Dillon, Heather E.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Flow sheet development for the dissolution of unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes in F-Canyon, Part II  

SciTech Connect

Two dissolution flow sheets were tested for the desorption of unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes. Both the aluminum (from the can, cladding, and fuel core) and the plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) are dissolved simultaneously, i.e., a co-dissolution flow sheet. In the first series of tests, 0.15 and 0.20 molar (M) potassium fluoride (KF) solutions were used and the dissolution extended over several days. In the other series of tests, solutions with higher concentrations of fluoride (0.25 to 0.30 M) were used. Calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) was used in those tests as the fluoride source.

Murray, A.M.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

Summer 2012 Testing and Analysis of the Chemical Mixture Methodology -- Part I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the key findings made by the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) project team during the first stage of their summer 2012 testing and analysis of the CMM. The study focused on answering the following questions: o What is the percentage of the chemicals in the CMM Rev 27 database associated with each Health Code Number (HCN)? How does this result influence the relative importance of acute HCNs and chronic HCNs in the CMM data set? o What is the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? Which Modes of Action and Target Organ Effects tend to be important in determining the HCN-based Hazard Index (HI) for a chemical mixture? o What are some of the potential issues associated with the current HCN-based approach? What are the opportunities for improving the performance and/or technical defensibility of the HCN-based approach? How would those improvements increase the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? o What is the Target Organ System Effect approach and how can it be used to improve upon the current HCN-based approach? How does the benefits users would derive from using the Target Organ System Approach compare to the benefits available from the current HCN-based approach?

Glantz, Clifford S.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Coggin, Rebekah L.; Ponder, Lashaundra A.; Booth, Alexander E.; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Horn, Sarah M.; Yao, Juan

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Correction of Radar Reflectivity and Differential Reflectivity for Rain Attenuation at X Band. Part II: Evaluation and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the attenuation-correction methodology presented in Part I is applied to radar measurements observed by the multiparameter radar at the X-band wavelength (MP-X) of the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster ...

S-G. Park; M. Maki; K. Iwanami; V. N. Bringi; V. Chandrasekar

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Analysis of Tropical Cyclone Tracks in the Western North Pacific through Data Mining. Part II: Tropical Cyclone Landfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second paper of a two-part series of papers on the analysis of tropical cyclone (TC) tracks in the western North Pacific Ocean. In this paper, TC landfalls in the South China Sea and western North Pacific basins are investigated ...

Wei Zhang; Yee Leung; Johnny C. L. Chan

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Reflection of Hydrostatic Gravity Waves in a Stratified Shear Flow. Part II: Application to Downslope Surface Windstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of continuous partial reflection of hydrostatic gravity waves, developed in Part I, is applied to the Klemp and Lilly model of downslope surface windstorms. It is shown how the magnitude and the location of the downslope winds both depend ...

William Blumen; Craig S. Hartsough

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Estimating Monthly Mean Water and Energy Budgets over the Central U.S. Great Plains. Part II: Evapoclimatonomy Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evapoclimatonomy model of Lettau (as implemented in Part I by Pinker and Corio) was designed to be applied on climatic time scales. The validity of the model on shorter time scales could extend its usefulness beyond what it was intended for. ...

L. A. Corio; R. T. Pinker

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Analysis of SWADE Discus N Wind Speed and Wave Height Time Series. Part II: Quantitative Growth Rates during a Storm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, wind speed and wave height time series obtained from the Discus N buoy during two storm events recorded in the SWADE experiment were analyzed using discrete wavelet packet transforms. One result of the analysis is that distinct tightly ...

Jorge F. Willemsen

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Prediction and Diagnosis of Tropical Cyclone Formation in an NWP System. Part II: A Diagnosis of Tropical Cyclone Chris Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of a three-part investigation into tropical cyclone (TC) genesis in the Australian Bureau of Meteorology’s Tropical Cyclone Limited Area Prediction System (TC-LAPS). The primary TC-LAPS vortex enhancement mechanism (convergence/...

K. J. Tory; M. T. Montgomery; N. E. Davidson; J. D. Kepert

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Ten Years of Measurements of Tropical Upper-Tropospheric Water Vapor by MOZAIC. Part II: Assessing the ECMWF Humidity Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent publication (Part I), the authors introduced a data source—Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor by Airbus In-Service Aircraft (MOZAIC)—for monitoring and studying upper-tropospheric water vapor (UTWV) and analyzed 10 yr (1994–2004) of ...

Zhengzhao Luo; Dieter Kley; Richard H. Johnson; Herman Smit

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

PIV Measurements in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer within and above a Mature Corn Canopy. Part II: Quadrant-Hole Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quadrant-hole (Q-H) analysis is applied to PIV data acquired just within and above a mature corn canopy. The Reynolds shear stresses, transverse components of vorticity, as well as turbulence production and cascading part of dissipation rates are ...

W. Zhu; R. van Hout; J. Katz

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Weakening Trend in the Atmospheric Heat Source over the Tibetan Plateau during Recent Decades. Part II: Connection with Climate Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I the authors have shown that heating sources in spring over the Tibetan Plateau (TP), and in particular the sensible heat flux (SHF), exhibit a significant weakening trend since the mid-1980s that is induced mainly by decreased surface ...

Anmin Duan; Guoxiong Wu

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

An Experiment with an Advanced Surface Parameterization in a Mesobeta-Scale Model. Part II: The 16 June 1986 Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part, we report on a one-day simulation with the French Weather Service limited-area model PERIDOT, including the new parameterization of land-surface energy budget. The emphasis is put on the assessment of the general quality of ...

P. Bougeault; B. Bret; P. Lacarrère; J. Noilhan

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Vortex Rossby Waves in a Numerically Simulated Tropical Cyclone. Part II: The Role in Tropical Cyclone Structure and Intensity Changes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, the author analyzed the asymmetric structure in the inner core of a numerically simulated tropical cyclone and found that the asymmetry near the eyewall in the mid–lower troposphere is dominated by wavenumber-1 and -2 vortex Rossby ...

Yuqing Wang

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Infragravity-Frequency (0.005–0.05 Hz) Motions on the Shelf. Part II: Free Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, the energy levels of ocean surface waves at infragravity frequencies (nominally 0.005–0.05 Hz) locally forced by swell in 13-m water depth were shown to be predicted accurately by second-order nonlinear wave theory. However, forced ...

T. H. C. Herbers; Steve Elgar; R. T. Guza; W. C. O'Reilly

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Cirrus Cloud Microphysical Property Retrieval Using Lidar and Radar Measurements. Part II: Midlatitude Cirrus Microphysical and Radiative Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lidar–radar algorithm described in Part I of this set of papers is applied to 1000 h of Raman lidar and millimeter wave cloud radar (MMCR) data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program Southern Great Plains Clouds and ...

Zhien Wang; Kenneth Sassen

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Precipitation Regimes during Cold-Season Central U.S. Inverted Trough Cases. Part II: A Comparative Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second of two papers that examine the organization of the precipitation field during central U.S. cold-season cyclones involving inverted troughs (ITs). The first paper (Part I) used a climatology and composites to find synoptic-scale ...

Philip N. Schumacher; Gregory Frosig; Jason L. Selzler; Robert A. Weisman

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 3 - Case Study on an ITEquipment-testing Center (No. 20)  

SciTech Connect

The data center in this study had a total floor area of 3,024 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 147 racks, and was located in a 96,000 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but was served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally it was served by only a single electrical supply with no provision for backup power in the event of a power outage. The Data Center operated on a 24 hour per day, year-round cycle, and users had full-hour access to the data center facility. The study found that data center computer load accounted for 15% of the overall building electrical load, while the total power consumption attributable to the data center including allocated cooling load and lighting was 22% of the total facility load. The density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the data center was 61 W/ft{sup 2}. Power consumption density for all data center allocated load (including cooling and lighting) was 88 W/ft{sup 2}, approximately eight times the average overall power density in rest of the building (non-data center portion). The building and its data center cooling system was provided with various energy optimizing systems that included the following: (1) Varying chilled water flow rate through variable speed drives on the primary pumps. (2) No energy losses due to nonexistence of UPS or standby generators. (3) Minimized under-floor obstruction that affects the delivery efficiency of supply air. (4) Elimination of dehumidification/humidification within the CRAH units. For the data center, 70% of the overall electric power was the rack critical loads, 14% of the power was consumed by chillers, 12% by CRAH units, 2% by lighting system, and about 2% of the power was consumed by chilled water pumps. General recommendations for improving overall data center energy efficiency include improving the lighting control, airflow optimization, control of mechanical systems serving the data center in actual operation.. This includes chilled water system, airflow management and control in the data center. Additional specific recommendations or considerations to improve energy efficiency are provided in this report.

Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 4 - Case Study on aComputer-testing Center (No. 21)  

SciTech Connect

The data center in this study had a total floor area of 8,580 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 440 racks, and was located in a 208,240 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally, it was served by a single electrical supply with no provision for backup power. The data center operated on a 24 hour per day, year-round cycle, and users had all hour full access to the data center facility. The study found that data center computer load accounted for 23% of the overall building electrical load, while the total power consumption attributable to the data center including allocated cooling load and lighting was 30% of the total facility load. The density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the data center was 63 W/ft{sup 2}. Power consumption density for all data center allocated load (including cooling and lighting) was 84 W/ft{sup 2}, approximately 12 times the average overall power density in rest of the building (non-data center portion). For the data center, 75% of the overall electric power was the rack critical loads, 11% of the power was consumed by chillers, 9% by CRAH units, 1% by lighting system, and about 4% of the power was consumed by pumps. The ratio of HVAC to IT power demand in the data center in this study was approximately 0.32. General recommendations for improving overall data center energy efficiency include improving the lighting control, airflow optimization, and control of mechanical systems serving the data center in actual operation. This includes chilled water system, airflow management and control in data centers. Additional specific recommendations or considerations to improve energy efficiency are provided in this report.

Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches. The detailed assumptions and methods behind these models are described in Part I of this article pair.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

An Approach for the Representation of Surface Heterogeneity in Land Surface Models. Part II: Validation and Sensitivity Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses a series of sensitivity experiments aimed at testing the surface heterogeneity representation proposed in the companion paper by Giorgi. When driven by observed climatic forcings at three locations and run in point mode, the ...

Filippo Giorgi

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Moisture Mode in the Quasi-Equilibrium Tropical Circulation Model. Part II: Nonlinear Behavior on an Equatorial ? Plane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical calculations of a simplified quasi-equilibrium tropical circulation model (QTCM) on the equatorial ? plane have been performed to explore the nonlinear regime of the moisture mode. Sensitivity tests have examined the effects of ...

Masahiro Sugiyama

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

PHYSICS RESULTS OF THE NSLS-II LINAC FRONT END TEST STAND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Linac Front End Test Stand (LFETS) was installed at the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) in the fall of 2011 in order to test the Linac Front End. The goal of these tests was to test the electron source against the specifications of the linac. In this report, we discuss the results of these measurements and the effect on linac performance.

Fliller R. P.; Gao, F.; Yang, X.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Piel, C

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

314

Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following well test data are included: final report of field test data, IGT compiled data, ERMI raw data, Gas Producer's Associated tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, IGT combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids, well test analysis, sampling and chemical analysis procedures, and scale and corrosion evaluation. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done to support several different programs that desire access to the ground surface above expended underground nuclear tests. The programs include: the Borehole Management Program, the Environmental Restoration Program, and the National Center for Nuclear Security Gas-Migration Experiment. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Evaluation of cavity collapse and crater formation is input into the safety decisions. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who participated in weapons testing activities perform these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. The evaluations do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011 was published on March 2, 2011. This report, considered Part 2 of work undertaken in calendar year 2011, compiles evaluations requested after the March report. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 6 LLNL test locations in Yucca Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Pahute Mesa. They include: Baneberry in U8d; Clearwater in U12q; Wineskin in U12r, Buteo in U20a and Duryea in nearby U20a1; and Barnwell in U20az.

Pawloski, G A

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

Biological effects of underground nuclear testing on marine organisms. II. Observed effects of Amchitka Island, Alaska, tests on marine fauna  

SciTech Connect

>From conference on the environmental effects of explosives and explosions; White Oak, Maryland, USA (30 May 1973). The biological effects of the Longshot, Milrow, and Cannikin underground nuclear tests at Amchitka lsland, Alaska, on marine mammals, fishes, and birds are summarized. The biological effects observed were related to the water-borne shock waves produced by the explosions. (CH)

Isakson, J.S.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A Double-Moment Multiple-Phase Four-Class Bulk Ice Scheme. Part II: Simulations of Convective Storms in Different Large-Scale Environments and Comparisons with other Bulk Parameterizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this study described a detailed four-class bulk ice scheme (4ICE) developed to simulate the hydro-meteor profiles of convective and stratiform precipitation associated with mesoscale convective systems. In Part II, the 4ICE scheme is ...

Brad Schoenberg Ferrier; Wei-Kuo Tao; Joanne Simpson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Sea Ice Brightness Temperature as a Function of Ice Thickness, Part II: Computed curves for thermodynamically modelled ice profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice thickness is an important variable for climate scientists and is still an unsolved problem for satellite remote sensing specialists. There has been some success detecting the thickness of thin ice from microwave radiometers, and with this in mind this study attempts to model the thickness-radiance relation of sea ice at frequencies employed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) radiometer and the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer (AMSR): between 1.4 and 89 GHz. In the first part of the study, the salinity of the ice was determined by a pair of empirical relationships, while the temperature was determined by a thermodynamic model. Because the thermodynamic model can be used as a simple ice growth model, in this, second part, the salinities are determined by the growth model. Because the model uses two, constant-weather scenarios representing two extremes ("fall freeze-up" and "winter cold snap"), brine expulsion is modelled with a single correction-step founded on mass conservation. The growt...

Mills, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

The development of a Software and Hardware-in-the-Loop Test System for ITU-PSAT II nano satellite ADCS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, we present the operational concept of ITU-PSAT II, the reconfigurable fault-tolerant ADCS architecture and the associated Software and Hardware-in-the-Loop Test System for three-axis active control. ADCS of ITU PSAT II consists of three ...

N. Kemal Ure; Yigit Bekir Kaya; Gokhan Inalhan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Modeling and optimization of operating parameters for a test-cell option of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II tandem mirror design  

SciTech Connect

Models of tandem mirror devices operated with a test-cell insert have been used to calculate operating parameters for FPD-II+T, an upgrade of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II device. Two test-cell configurations were considered, one accommodating two 1.5 m blanket test modules and the other having four. To minimize the cost of the upgrade, FPD-II+T utilizes the same coil arrangement and machine dimensions outside of the test cell as FPD-II, and the requirements on the end cell systems have been held near or below those for FPD-II. The maximum achievable test cell wall loading found for the short test-cell was 3.5 MW/m/sup 2/ while 6.0 MW/m/sup 2/ was obtainable in the long test-cell configuration. The most severe limitation on the achievable wall loading is the upper limit on test-cell beta set by MHD stability calculations. Modification of the shape of the magnetic field in the test-cell by improving the magnet design could raise this beta limit and lead to improved test-cell performance.

Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

1985-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

West Texas geothermal resource assessment. Part II. Preliminary utilization assessment of the Trans-Pecos geothermal resource. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The utilization potential of geothermal resources in Trans-Pecos, Texas was assessed. The potential for both direct use and electric power generation were examined. As with the resource assessment work, the focus was on the Hueco Tanks area in northeastern El Paso County and the Presidio Bolson area in Presidio County. Suitable users of the Hueco Tanks and Presidio Bolson resource areas were identified by matching postulated temperature characteristics of the geothermal resource to the need characteristics of existing users in each resource area. The amount of geothermal energy required and the amount of fossil fuel that geothermal energy would replace were calculated for each of the users identified as suitable. Current data indicate that temperatures in the Hueco Tanks resource area are not high enough for electric power generation, but in at least part of the Presidio Bolson resource area, they may be high enough for electric power generation.

Gilliland, M.W.; Fenner, L.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Coastal zone wind energy. Part II: Validation of the coastal zone wind power potential. A summary of the field experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Procedures have been developed to determine the wind power potential of the coastal region from Maine to Texas. The procedures are based upon a climatological analysis and a mesoscale numerical model. The results of this procedure are encouraging but need to be tested. In January to February 1980 a field measurement program was carried out over the Delmarva Peninsula centered on Wallops Island and extending into the Atlantic Ocean and Chesapeake Bay to provide an observational basis on which to test our wind assessment methods. The field experiment is described. Listings of the measurements made by aircraft, tethered balloon, rawinsonde kites, tower mounted anemometry and surface thermometry are given together with sample results. The analysis of these data and the comparison between them and the model predicted fields are presented.

Garstang, M.; Pielke, R.A.; Snow, J.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Ice in Clouds Experiment–Layer Clouds. Part II: Testing Characteristics of Heterogeneous Ice Formation in Lee Wave Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterogeneous ice nucleation is a source of uncertainty in models that represent ice clouds. The primary goal of the Ice in Clouds Experiment–Layer Clouds (ICE-L) field campaign was to determine if a link can be demonstrated between ice ...

P. R. Field; A. J. Heymsfield; B. J. Shipway; P. J. DeMott; K. A. Pratt; D. C. Rogers; J. Stith; K. A. Prather

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Identification of the impacts of maintenance and testing upon the safety of LWR power plants. Part II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning overview of literature relating to radiation exposure and operating experience; details of LWR-MTC3 classification system; histograms for individual BWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; histograms for individual PWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; and Fortran program for M and T data clustering.

Husseiny, A. A.; Sabri, Z. A.; Turnage, J. J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Mindlin second-gradient elastic properties from dilute two-phase Cauchy-elastic composites Part II: Higher-order constitutive properties and application cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from a Cauchy elastic composite with a dilute suspension of randomly distributed inclusions and characterized at first-order by a certain discrepancy tensor (see part I of the present article), it is shown that the equivalent second-gradient Mindlin elastic solid: (i.) is positive definite only when the discrepancy tensor is negative defined; (ii.) the non-local material symmetries are the same of the discrepancy tensor, and (iii.) the nonlocal effective behaviour is affected by the shape of the RVE, which does not influence the first-order homogenized response. Furthermore, explicit derivations of non-local parameters from heterogeneous Cauchy elastic composites are obtained in the particular cases of: (a) circular cylindrical and spherical isotropic inclusions embedded in an isotropic matrix, (b) n-polygonal cylindrical voids in an isotropic matrix, and (c) circular cylindrical voids in an orthortropic matrix.

Bacca Mattia; Bigoni Davide; Dal Corso Francesco; Veber Daniele

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

326

Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included in appendices: field test data, field non-edited data, raw data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, analysis of solids samples from primary zone, chemical analysis procedures, scale and corrosion evaluation, laboratory report on scale deposits, and sand detector strip charts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fort Hood Solar Total Energy Project. Volume II. Preliminary design. Part 2. System performance and supporting studies. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design developed for the Solar Total Energy System to be installed at Fort Hood, Texas, is presented. System performance analysis and evaluation are described. Feedback of completed performance analyses on current system design and operating philosophy is discussed. The basic computer simulation techniques and assumptions are described and the resulting energy displacement analysis is presented. Supporting technical studies are presented. These include health and safety and reliability assessments; solar collector component evaluation; weather analysis; and a review of selected trade studies which address significant design alternatives. Additional supporting studies which are generally specific to the installation site are reported. These include solar availability analysis; energy load measurements; environmental impact assessment; life cycle cost and economic analysis; heat transfer fluid testing; meteorological/solar station planning; and information dissemination. (WHK)

None,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part II: Prismatic Reactor Cross Section Generation  

SciTech Connect

The deep-burn prismatic high temperature reactor is made up of an annular core loaded with transuranic isotopes and surrounded in the center and in the periphery by reflector blocks in graphite. This disposition creates challenges for the neutronics compared to usual light water reactor calculation schemes. The longer mean free path of neutrons in graphite affects the neutron spectrum deep inside the blocks located next to the reflector. The neutron thermalisation in the graphite leads to two characteristic fission peaks at the inner and outer interfaces as a result of the increased thermal flux seen in those assemblies. Spectral changes are seen at least on half of the fuel blocks adjacent to the reflector. This spectral effect of the reflector may prevent us from successfully using the two step scheme -lattice then core calculation- typically used for light water reactors. We have been studying the core without control mechanisms to provide input for the development of a complete calculation scheme. To correct the spectrum at the lattice level, we have tried to generate cross-sections from supercell calculations at the lattice level, thus taking into account part of the graphite surrounding the blocks of interest for generating the homogenised cross-sections for the full-core calculation. This one has been done with 2 to 295 groups to assess if increasing the number of groups leads to more accurate results. A comparison with a classical single block model has been done. Both paths were compared to a reference calculation done with MCNP. It is concluded that the agreement with MCNP is better with supercells, but that the single block model remains quite close if enough groups are kept for the core calculation. 26 groups seems to be a good compromise between time and accu- racy. However, some trials with depletion have shown huge variations of the isotopic composition across a block next to the reflector. It may imply that at least an in- core depletion for the number density calculation may be necessary in the complete calculation scheme.

Vincent Descotes

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Southern hemisphere tropical cyclone intensity forecast methods used at the Joint Typhoon Warning Center, Part II: statistical – dynamical forecasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development and performance of a statistical- dynamical tropical cyclone intensity forecast model, which was developed for the United States of America’s Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC), is described. This model, called the Southern Hemisphere Statistical Typhoon Intensity Prediction Scheme (SH STIPS), mirrors similar capabilities created for use in the western North Pacific and North Indian Ocean tropical cyclone basins. The model is created by fitting an optimal combination of factors related to climatology and persistence, intensification potential, vertical wind shear, dynamic size/intensity forecasts and atmospheric stability. All of these factors except the climatology and persistence information are derived from global forecast model analyses and forecasts. In July 2005 the SH STIPS model began a real-time evaluation period. The forecasts from the SH STIPS model have outperformed the combined climatology and persistence based forecast and thus are skillful in independent testing since that time. Since October 2006, SH STIPS has been the primary member in an operational consensus forecast of tropical cyclone intensity change provided to the JTWC. Documentation

John A. Knaff; Charles R. Sampson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Geothermal fracture stimulation technology. Volume II. High-temperature proppant testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data were obtained from a newly built proppant tester, operated at actual geothermal temperatures. The short term test results show that most proppants are temperature sensitive, particularly at the higher closure stresses. Many materials have been tested using a standard short-term test, i.e., fracture-free sand, bauxite, and a resin-coated sand retained good permeability at the high fluid temperatures in brine over a range of closure stresses. The tests were designed to simulate normal closure stress ranges for geothermal wells which are estimated to be from 2000 to 6000 psi. Although the ultra high closure stresses in oil and gas wells need not be considered with present geothermal resources, there is a definite need for chemically inert proppants that will retain high permeability for long time periods in the high temperature formations.

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Test plan for phase II of the Retained Gas Sampler system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Retained Gas Sampler (RGS) system is being developed to permit characterization of the gas phase component of waste tank core samples. Several laboratory experiments have been conducted which have affirmed the proof-of-principle for separating the gas phase materials from waste tank material in a quantitative manner. However, experiments conducted thus far have dealt only with representative materials and simulated hardware mock-ups. This test plan deals with the operation and testing of actual devices in the hot cell environment. This test plan coves all aspects of the RGS system including: sampler load-in, extrusion, gas extraction, quantitative separation, sample collection, and quantitative analysis. Sample material used in this test plan will be waste tank simulants and will not be radioactive. The work environment, however, will be an operating hot cell facility and will have radioactive contaminated surfaces. Operation of the system will therefore require an official radiation work permit (RWP).

Hey, B.E.

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

332

Aquifer Testing Recommendations for Supporting Phase II of the T Area Technetium-99 Data Objectives Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aquifer characterization needs are currently being assessed to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies within the 200-ZP-1 operable unit, specifically for the immediate area of the 241-T Tank Farm. This report provides a general discussion of the six identified hydrologic test methods for possible subsequent characterization within the 241-T Tank Farm area and details for implementing the large-scale recovery test after terminating pumping at the 241-Tank Farm extraction well locations.

Spane, Frank A.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

333

Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system  

SciTech Connect

A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

Moreno, J.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Enertech 2-kW high-reliability wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and testing  

SciTech Connect

A high-reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW in a 9 m/s wind has been developed. Activities are summarized that are centered on the fabrication and testing of prototypes of the wind machine. The test results verified that the wind machine met the power output specification and that the variable-pitch rotor effectively controlled the rotor speed for wind speeds up to 50 mph. Three prototypes of the wind machine were shipped to the Rocky Flats test center in September through November of 1979. Work was also performed to reduce the start-up wind speed. The start-up wind speed to the Enertech facility has been reduced to 4.5 m/s.

Cordes, J.A.; Johnson, B.A.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Near-term electric test vehicle ETV-2. Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A unique battery-powered passenger vehicle has been developed that provides a significant improvement over conventional electric vehicle performance, particularly during stop-and-go driving. The vehicle is unique in two major respects: (1) the power system incorporates a flywheel that stores energy during regenerative braking and makes possible the acceleration capability needed to keep up with traffic without reducing range to unacceptable values; and (2) lightweight plastic materials are used for the vehicle unibody to minimize weight and increase range. These features were analyzed and demonstrated in an electric test vehicle, ETV-2. Characteristics of this vehicle are summarized. Information is presented on: vehicle design, fabrication, safety testing, and performance testing; power system design and operation; flywheel; battery pack performance; and controls and electronic equipment. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Giromill wind tunnel test and analysis. Volume II. Technical discussion. Final report, June 1976--October 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A wind tunnel test of a Giromill rotor was conducted. The objective of this test was to substantiate the performance computed by the Larsen cyclogiro vortex theory. Additional objectives were to obtain performance comparison data between the Giromill, a sinusoidal blade modulation Giromill, a Darrieus rotor, and a modified Darrieus rotor that flips the blades a few degrees. A three bladed Giromill rotor having a diameter of 2.13 m (7 ft) and a span of 1.52 m (5 ft) was tested in the McDonnell Aircraft Company 15 x 20 ft Mini Speed Wind Tunnel. The blade modulations were accomplished through use of a cam and push rod arrangement. Replaceable cams provided the desired blade modulation at the various operating points. Various operating conditions were achieved by adjusting the rotor RPM and tunnel speed. The results show that the Giromill has good performance, equal to or much better than that predicted by theory, and outperforms the other types of vertical axis wind turbines tested.

Moran, W.A.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect

AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. A simulant of the DWPF SB4 feed was successfully fed and melted in a small pilot-scale CCIM system during two test series. The OGSE tests provide initial results that (a) provide melter operating conditions while feeding a DWPF SB4 simulant feed, (b) determine the fate of feed organic and metal feed constituents and metals partitioning, and (c) characterize the melter off-gas source term to a downstream off-gas system. The INL CCIM test system was operated continuously for about 30 hours during the parametric test series, and for about 58 hours during the OGSE test. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter. The glass drain was operated periodically on-demand. A cold cap of unmelted feed was controlled by adjusting the feedrate and melter power levels to obtain the target molten glass temperatures with varying cold cap levels. Three test conditions were performed per the test plan, during which the melter was operated with a target melt temperature of either 1,250oC or 1,300oC, and with either a partial or complete cold cap of unmelted feed on top of the molten glass. Samples of all input and output streams including the starting glass, the simulant feed, the off-gas particulate matter, product glass, and deposits removed from the crucible and off-gas pipe after the test were collected for analysis.

Nick Soelberg

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Planning, drilling, logging, and testing of energy extraction hole EE-1, Phases I and II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy Extraction Hole No. 1 (EE-1) is the second deep hole drilled into the Precambrian-age granitic rocks of the Jemez Mountains of north-central New Mexico. EE-1 was drilled to intersect a hydraulic fracture extending outward from near the bottom of previously drilled hole GT-2, thus completing the underground circulation loop required for the hot dry rock geothermal energy extraction experiment. Directional drilling techniques were used to intersect the fracture zone. In addition, high-temperature instrumentation and equipment development, hydraulic fracturing experiments, pressure-flow testing of the fracture systems, and fracture mapping and borehole-ranging technique activities were conducted. The drilling, logging, and testing operations in EE-1 are described.

Pettitt, R.A.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A New Chicane Experiment In PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings, and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of future colliders [1-3]. The effect is expected to be particularly severe in magnetic field regions. To test possible mitigation methods in magnetic fields, we have installed a new 4-dipole chicane experiment in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC with both bare and TiN-coated aluminum chambers. In particular, we have observed a large variation of the electron flux at the chamber wall as a function of the chicane dipole field. We infer this is a new high order resonance effect where the energy gained by the electrons in the positron beam depends on the phase of the electron cyclotron motion with respect to the bunch crossing, leading to a modulation of the secondary electron production. Presumably the cloud density is modulated as well and this resonance effect could be used to reduce its magnitude in future colliders. We present the experimental results obtained during January 2008 until the April final shut-down of the PEP-II machine.

Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Arnett, D.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Lipari, J.J.; Munro, M.; Olszewski, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; Smith, B.; Spencer, C.M.; Wang, L.; Wittmer, W.; Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

City of North Bonneville, Washington: Geothermal Exploration Project, production test well, Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Based on discussions with the City of North Bonneville, the production test well was drilled to a depth that would also explore for ground water temperatures near 130/sup 0/F (54.4/sup 0/C). Depth projections to a 130/sup 0/F bottom hole temperature were made by assuming a constant ground water temperature rise greater than 50/sup 0/C per kilometer, and by assuming that essentially homogeneous or equivalent conductive rock units would be encountered. Minimum water production requirements were not set, although the City determined that about 800 gpm would be acceptable. Large upper casing diameters of 16 and 12 inches were installed in order to provide the future use of either a vertical turbine or submersible pump, as desired by the city. The scope of work included interpretation of well characteristics, evaluation of ground water as a geothermal resource, geologic analysis of data from drilling and testing, drilling supervision, daily drilling cost accounting, and preparation of a final report. The report includes geologic evaluation of the drilling and test data, ground water and geothermal potential.

Not Available

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Development and testing of a high-pressure downhole pump for jet-assist drilling. Topical report, Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of jet-assisted drilling is to increase the rate of penetration (ROP) in deeper gas and oil wells, where the rocks become harder and more difficult to drill. Increasing the ROP can result in fewer drilling days, and therefore, lower drilling cost. In late 1993, FlowDril and the Gas Research Institute (GRI) began a three-year development of a down hole pump (DHP{reg_sign}) capable of producing 30,000 psi out pressure to provide the high-pressure flow for high-pressure jet-assist of the drill bit. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) through its Morgantown, WV (DOE-Morgantown) field office, joined with GRI and FlowDril to develop and test a second prototype designed for drilling in 7-7/8 inch holes. This project, {open_quotes}Development and Testing of a High-Pressure Down Hole Pump for Jet-Assist Drilling,{close_quotes} is for the development and testing of the second prototype. It was planned in two phases. Phase I included an update of a market analysis, a design, fabrication, and an initial laboratory test of the second prototype. Phase II is continued iterative laboratory and field developmental testing. This report summarizes the results of Phase II. In the downhole pump approach shown in the following figure, conventional drill pipe and drill collars are used, with the DHP as the last component of the bottom hole assembly next to the bit. The DHP is a reciprocating double ended, intensifier style positive displacement, high-pressure pump. The drive fluid and the high-pressure output fluid are both derived from the same source, the abrasive drilling mud pumped downhole through the drill string. Approximately seven percent of the stream is pressurized to 30,000 psi and directed through a high-pressure nozzle on the drill bit to produce the high speed jet and assist the mechanical action of the bit to make it drill faster.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Part II, General Compliance Supplement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A. ACTIVITIES ALLOWED OR UNALLOWED Compliance Requirements The specific requirements for activities allowed or unallowed are unique to each DOE Federal award or program and are found in the laws, regulations, and the provisions of contract or grant agreements pertaining to the program. In addition, ARRA has established a cross-cutting unallowable activity for all ARRA-funded awards. Pursuant to Section 1604 of ARRA, none of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available in ARRA may be used by any State or local government, or any private entity, for any casino or other gambling establishment, aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool. Source of Governing Requirements The requirements for activities allowed or unallowed are contained in program legislation or, as

345

Orbitron. Part II. Magnetic levitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper devoted to proof the existence of stable quasi-periodic motions of the magnetic dipole that is under the action of the external magnetic field and homogeneous field of gravity. For proof this we used the group-theoretic methods of Hamiltonian mechanics, viz energy-momentum method. Numerical simulation shows the possibility of realization of stable motions with physically reasonable parameters of the system.

Stanislav S. Zub

2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

346

Desiccant solar air conditioning in tropical climates: II-field testing in Guadeloupe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of the experimental investigation of a solar desiccant air conditioning device exposed to the sun in Guadeloupe to test that adaptability of a silicagel compact bed, the most simple technology, in a tropical climate. It has been shown that it is possible to make use of solar flat plate collectors with a balancing water tank, to produce heat for the regeneration of a solid desiccant as silicagel, with solar energy. Second, the compact bed system proposed gives the foreseen cooling power, but considerable losses appear, particularly in the sorption process, which is not close enough to the reversible adiabatic one.

Dupont, M.; Celestine, B.; Beghin, B. (Solar Energy Lab., Pointe-a-Pitre (Guadeloupe))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Feasibility test on compounding the internal combustion engine for automotive vehicles, Task II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The organic Rankine bottoming cycle can be considered for various automobile and truck applications. The most attractive use, however, is in large, heavy-duty diesel trucks for long distance hauling. Here, the engine load and speed requirements are nearly constant over a large portion of the operating hours, and high mileages are accumulated. Thus, the potential fuel savings are sufficient to justify the added cost of a bottoming cycle system. A conceptual design study of compounding the diesel truck engine with an ORCS was made and the results of the study are presented. Based on the results of the conceptual design study which showed a 15 percent fuel economy improvement potential over the duty cycle, an early feasibility demonstration test of the system was initiated. The demonstration system uses a Mack ENDT 676 diesel engine with existing but nonoptimum ORCS hardware made available from an earlier automotive Rankine-cycle program. The results of these feasibility demonstration tests, both steady-state and transient, over the operating range of the diesel engine, are presented.

Not Available

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

3DVAR and Cloud Analysis with WSR-88D Level-II Data for the Prediction of the Fort Worth, Texas, Tornadic Thunderstorms. Part I: Cloud Analysis and Its Impact  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this two-part paper, the impact of level-II Weather Surveillance Radar-1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) reflectivity and radial velocity data on the prediction of a cluster of tornadic thunderstorms in the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) ...

Ming Hu; Ming Xue; Keith Brewster

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191.

G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milli-Sievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191. (authors)

Shott, G.J.; Yucel, V.; Desotell, L. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Pyles, G.; Carilli, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

An Operational Multifield Analog/Anti-Analog Prediction System for United States Seasonal Temperatures. Part II: Spring, Summer, Fall and Intermediate 3-Month Period Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expanded version of the multifield analog prediction system developed by Barnett and Preisendorfer (1978) was described and applied to the winter season in Part I of this two-part series (Livezey and Barnston 1988). This second part reviews ...

Anthony G. Barnston; Robert E. Livezey

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

Xiang-Dong Peng

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Fault detection and isolation in aircraft gas turbine engines. Part 2: validation on a simulation test bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

319 Fault detection and isolation in aircraft gas turbine engines. Part 2: validation of fault detection and isolation (FDI) in aircraft gas turbine engines. The FDI algorithms are built upon,onasimulationtestbed.Thetestbedisbuiltuponanintegratedmodelofageneric two-spool turbofan aircraft gas turbine engine including the engine control system. Keywords: aircraft

Ray, Asok

354

Advanced Testing Technique II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 20, 2010... Vikas Tomar, Purdue University; Jianyu Huang, Sandia National Laboratories; Frederic Sansoz, The University of Vermont; Christoph Eberl, ...

355

Assimilation of Stratospheric Chemical Tracer Observations Using a Kalman Filter. Part II: ?2-Validated Results and Analysis of Variance and Correlation Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Kalman filter system designed for the assimilation of limb-sounding observations of stratospheric chemical tracers, which has four tunable covariance parameters, was developed in Part I of this two-part paper. The assimilation results of CH4 ...

Richard Ménard; Lang-Ping Chang

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

History of Operational Use of Weather Radar by U.S. Weather Services. Part II: Development of Operational Doppler Weather Radars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second part of a history of the use of storm surveillance radars by operational military and civil weather services in the United States is presented. This part describes the genesis and evolution of two operational Doppler weather radars, ...

Roger C. Whiton; Paul L. Smith; Stuart G. Bigler; Kenneth E. Wilk; Albert C. Harbuck

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Shale gas in the southern central area of New York State: Part II. Experience of locating and drilling four shale-gas wells in New York State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four shale-gas wells have been located and drilled in the south-central area of New York State as part of this project. The four wells that were drilled are: the Rathbone well, in Steuben County, was located on the north side of a graben, in an old shale-gas field; it penetrated the Rhinestreet, Geneseo and Marcellus shales. Artificial stimulation was performed in the Rhinestreet, without marked success, and in the Marcellus; the latter formation has a calculated open flow of 110 Mcf/day and appears capable of initial production of 100 Mcf/day against a back-pressure of 500 psi. The Dansville well, in Livingston County, tested the Geneseo and Marcellus shales at shallower depth. Artificial stimulation was performed in the Marcellus. The calculated open flow is 95 Mcf/day, and the well appears capable of initial production of 70 Mcf/day against a back-pressure of 300 psi. The Erwin and N. Corning wells, both near Corning in Steuben County, were designed to test the possibility of collecting gas from a fractured conduit layer connecting to other fracture systems in the Rhinestreet shale. The N. Corning well failed; the expected conduit was found to be only slightly fractured. The Erwin well encountered a good initial show of gas at the conduit, but the gas flow was not maintained; even after artificial stimulation the production is only 10 Mcf/day. The present conclusion is that the most likely source of shale gas in south-central New York is the Marcellus shale formation. Important factors not yet established are the decline rate of Marcellus production and the potential of the Geneseo after stimulation.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Performance oriented packaging testing of the six-foot flexible linear shaped charge box for packing group II hazardous materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The wood box (Drawing 53711-6665109) for six-foot flexible linear shaped charges was tested for conformance to Performance Oriented Packaging standards specified by the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 49 CFR, Parts 107 through 178, dated 31 December 1991. The box was tested with a gross weight of 14 kilograms and met all the requirements.

Libbert, K.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Chemical characteristics of material released during Source Term Experiments Project (STEP) in-pile tests: Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of four experiments aimed at characterizing the radiological source term associated with postulated severe light water reactor (LWR) accidents has been conducted at Argonne's Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). The STEP tests drove fuel elements to the point of severe cladding disruption in steam environments by fission heating and oxidation of the Zircaloy cladding. The released fission products and volatile cladding constituents entrained in the steam/hydrogen flows were captured by the test vehicles' sampling systems and analyzed by SEM/EDX. The principal constituents of the deposits were fission product cesium, molybdenum and rubidium, and tin from the cladding. Iodine was generally seen collocated with cesium, although lone iodine deposits were observed indicating that the iodine was not completely transported as CsI. Structural material was also observed. The composition information in conjunction with counted particle distributions were used to determine the particle loading of that portion of the material released during the first test that was transported in aerosol form.

Schlenger, B.J.; Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Simms, R.; Horton, E.L.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Model test on underground coal gasification (UCG) with low-pressure fire seepage push-through. Part I: Test conditions and air fire seepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The technology of a pushing-through gallery with oxygen-enriched fire-seepage combustion was studied during shaft-free UCG in this article, and the main experiment parameters were probed. The test results were analyzed in depth. The patterns of variation and development were pointed out for the fire source moving speed, temperature field, leakage rate, the expanding diameter for the gasification gallery, and blasting pressure. Test results showed that, with the increase in the wind-blasting volume, the moving velocity for the fire source speeded up, and the average temperature for the gallery continuously rose. Under the condition of oxygen-enriched air blasting, when O{sub 2} contents stood at 90%, the moving speed for the fire source was 4-5 times that of air blasting. In the push-through process, the average leakage rate for the blasting was 82.23%, with the average discharge volume of 3.43 m{sup 3}/h and average gallery diameter of 7.87 cm. With the proceeding of firepower seepage, the extent of dropping for the leakage rate increased rapidly, and the drop rate for the blasting pressure gradually heightened.

Yang, L.H. [China University of Mining & Technology, Xuzhou (China)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Gas Explosion Tests on Pacific Gas and Electric Company Round Manhole Covers with the Swiveloc CPR-II - Controlled Pressure Release Manhole Cover Restraint System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents findings from the continuing research and development effort to manage and mitigate the effects of underground distribution manhole events. Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) approached the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to investigate the performance of several manhole covers, including the native PG&E solid and vented covers and new covers built by Swiveloc, LLC and designated as CPR-II. The tests were conducted at the EPRI-Lenox manhole research facility in Lenox, Massachus...

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

A Regional Model Simulation of the 1991 Severe Precipitation Event over the Yangtze–Huai River Valley. Part II: Model Bias  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second part of a study investigating the 1991 severe precipitation event over the Yangtze–Huai River valley (YHRV) in China using both observations and regional model simulations. While Part I reported on the Mei-yu front and its ...

Wei Gong; Wei-Chyung Wang

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

The Effect of Topographic Variability on Initial Condition Sensitivity of Low-Level Wind Forecasts. Part II: Experiments Using Real Terrain and Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study by Bieringer et al., which is Part I of this two-part study, demonstrated analytically using the shallow-water equations and numerically in controlled experiments that the presence of terrain can result in an enhancement of sensitivities ...

Paul E. Bieringer; Peter S. Ray; Andrew J. Annunzio

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Convectively Generated Internal Gravity Waves in the Lower Atmosphere of Venus. Part II: Mean Wind Shear and Wave–Mean Flow Interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the second of a two-part study that numerically investigates internal gravity wave generation by convection in the lower atmosphere of Venus. Part I of this study considers gravity wave generation and propagation in the absence of ...

R. David Baker; Gerald Schubert; Philip W. Jones

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Refinements to Ice Particle Mass Dimensional and Terminal Velocity Relationships for Ice Clouds. Part II: Evaluation and Parameterizations of Ensemble Ice Particle Sedimentation Velocities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This two-part study addresses the development of reliable estimates of the mass and fall speed of single ice particles and ensembles. Part I of the study reports temperature-dependent coefficients for the mass-dimensional relationship, m = aDb, ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Gerd-Jan van Zadelhoff; David P. Donovan; Frederic Fabry; Robin J. Hogan; Anthony J. Illingworth

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Large-Scale Circulation and Heat Sources over the Tibetan Plateau and Surrounding Areas during the Early Summer of 1979. Part II: Heat and Moisture Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large-scale heat and moisture budgets over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding area during a 40-day period from late May to early July 1979 are studied using the FGGE Level II-b data. During this period the general circulation over East Asia ...

Huibang Luo; Michio Yanai

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

The UVES Large Program for Testing Fundamental Physics II: Constraints on a Change in ? Towards Quasar HE 0027-1836  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an accurate analysis of the H2 absorption lines from the zabs ~ 2.4018 damped Ly{\\alpha} system towards HE 0027-1836 observed with the Very Large Telescope Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (VLT/UVES) as a part of the European Southern Observatory Large Programme "The UVES large programme for testing fundamental physics" to constrain the variation of proton-to-electron mass ratio, {\\mu} = mp/me. We perform cross-correlation analysis between 19 individual exposures taken over three years and the combined spectrum to check the wavelength calibration stability. We notice the presence of a possible wavelength dependent velocity drift especially in the data taken in 2012. We use available asteroids spectra taken with UVES close to our observations to confirm and quantify this effect. We consider single and two component Voigt profiles to model the observed H2 absorption profiles. We use both linear regression analysis and Voigt profile fitting where {\\Delta}{\\mu}/{\\mu} is explicitly considered as an additional fitting parameter. The two component model is marginally favored by the statistical indicators and we get {\\Delta}{\\mu}/{\\mu} = (-2.5 +/- 8.1(stat) +/- 6.2(sys)) ppm. When we apply the correction to the wavelength dependent velocity drift we find {\\Delta}{\\mu}/{\\mu} = (-7.6 +/- 8.1(stat) +/- 6.3(sys)) ppm. It will be important to check the extent to which the velocity drift we notice in this study is present in UVES data used for previous {\\Delta}{\\mu}/{\\mu} measurements.

H. Rahmani; M. Wendt; R. Srianand; P. Noterdaeme; P. Petitjean; P. Molaro; J. B. Whitmore; M. T. Murphy; M. Centurion; H. Fathivavsari; S. D'Odorico; T. M. Evans; S. A. Levshakov; S. Lopez; C. J. A. P. Martins; D. Reimers; G. Vladilo

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

368

Transformed Eulerian-Mean Theory. Part II: Potential Vorticity Homogenization and the Equilibrium of a Wind- and Buoyancy-Driven Zonal Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equilibrium of a modeled wind- and buoyancy-driven, baroclinically unstable, flow is analyzed using the transformed Eulerian-mean (TEM) approach described in Part I. Within the near-adiabatic interior of the flow, Ertel potential vorticity is ...

Allen Kuo; R. Alan Plumb; John Marshall

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Modeling, Error Analysis, and Evaluation of Dual-Polarization Variables Obtained from Simultaneous Horizontal and Vertical Polarization Transmit Radar. Part II: Experimental Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second article in a two-part work, the biases of weather radar polarimetric variables from simultaneous horizontally and vertically transmit (SHV) data are investigated. The biases are caused by cross coupling of the simultaneously ...

J. C. Hubbert; S. M. Ellis; M. Dixon; G. Meymaris

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Global Evaluation of the ISBA-TRIP Continental Hydrological System. Part II: Uncertainties in River Routing Simulation Related to Flow Velocity and Groundwater Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the companion paper to this one (Part I), the Interactions between Soil, Biosphere, and Atmosphere–Total Runoff Integrating Pathways (ISBA-TRIP) continental hydrological system of the Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques is evaluated ...

B. Decharme; R. Alkama; H. Douville; M. Becker; A. Cazenave

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

The Mesoscale Forcing of a Midlatitude Upper-Tropospheric Jet Streak by a Simulated Convective System. Part II: Kinetic Energy and Resolution Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A kinetic energy (KE) analysis of the forcing of a mesoscale upper-tropospheric jet streak by organized diabaaic processes within the simulated convective system (SCS) that was discussed in Part I is presented in this study. The relative ...

Bart J. Wolf; Donald R. Johnson

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Spectral Retrieval of Latent Heating Profiles from TRMM PR Data. Part II: Algorithm Improvement and Heating Estimates over Tropical Ocean Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectral latent heating (SLH) algorithm was developed for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR) in Part I of this study. The method uses PR information [precipitation-top height (PTH), precipitation rates at ...

Shoichi Shige; Yukari N. Takayabu; Wei-Kuo Tao; Chung-Lin Shie

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A Model Predicting the Evolution of Ice Particle Size Spectra and Radiative Properties of Cirrus Clouds. Part II: Dependence of Absorption and Extinction on Ice Crystal Morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study builds upon the microphysical modeling described in Part I by deriving formulations for the extinction and absorption coefficients in terms of the size distribution parameters predicted from the microphysical model. The optical depth ...

David L. Mitchell; W. Patrick Arnott

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Estimation of the Impact of Sampling Errors in the VOS Observations on Air–Sea Fluxes. Part II: Impact on Trends and Interannual Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the same approach as in Part I, here it is shown how sampling problems in voluntary observing ship (VOS) data affect conclusions about interannual variations and secular changes of surface heat fluxes. The largest uncertainties in linear ...

Sergey Gulev; Thomas Jung; Eberhard Ruprecht

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Radiative Flux Estimation from a Broadband Radiometer Using Synthetic Angular Models in the EarthCARE Mission Framework. Part II: Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The instantaneous top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance-to-flux conversion for the broadband radiometer (BBR) on board the Earth Clouds, Aerosols, and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) was assessed in Part I of this paper, by developing theoretical ...

Carlos Domenech; Ernesto Lopez-Baeza; David P. Donovan; Tobias Wehr

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Measurements of the Effects of Gravity Waves in the Middle Atmosphere Using Parametric Models of Density Fluctuations. Part II: Energy Dissipation and Eddy Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this series demonstrated the advantages of parametric models in estimating the gravity wave spectrum from density fluctuation measurements using a large power-aperture-product Rayleigh-scatter lidar. The spectra calculated using the ...

R. J. Sica

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Numerical Integration of the Shallow-Water Equations on a Twisted Icosahedral Grid. Part II. A Detailed Description of the Grid and an Analysis of Numerical Accuracy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The finite-difference scheme for the Laplace and flux-divergence operators described in the companion paper (Part I) is consistent when applied on a grid consisting of perfect hexagons. The authors describe a necessary and sufficient condition ...

Ross Heikes; David A. Randall

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

A Bayesian Algorithm for Reconstructing Climate Anomalies in Space and Time. Part II: Comparison with the Regularized Expectation–Maximization Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I presented a Bayesian algorithm for reconstructing climate anomalies in space and time (BARCAST). This method involves specifying simple parametric forms for the spatial covariance and temporal evolution of the climate field as well as “...

Martin P. Tingley; Peter Huybers

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

On Intermediate Models for Barotropic Continental Shelf and Slope Flow Fields. Part II: Comparison of Numerical Model Solutions in Doubly Periodic Domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a program to improve understanding of the dynamics of the complicated, vigorous eddy and jet flow fields recently observed over the continental shelf and slope, we investigate the potential of intermediate models for use in both ...

J. A. Barth; J. S. Allen; P. A. Newberger

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Sensitivity of a Cloud-Resolving Model to Bulk and Explicit Bin Microphysical Schemes. Part II: Cloud Microphysics and Storm Dynamics Interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Part I of this paper compares two simulations, one using a bulk and the other a detailed bin microphysical scheme, of a long-lasting, continental mesoscale convective system with leading convection and trailing stratiform region. Diagnostic ...

Xiaowen Li; Wei-Kuo Tao; Alexander P. Khain; Joanne Simpson; Daniel E. Johnson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report: Saldana well No. 2, Zapata County, Texas. Volume II. Well test data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included: field test data, compiled and edited raw data, time/pressure data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, smoothing with weighted moving averages, chemical analysis procedures, scale monitoring report, sand detector strip charts, and analyses of water and gas samples. (MHR)

Not Available

382

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

383

Planning and design of additional East Mesa Geothermal Test Facilities. Phase 1B. Volume II. Procurement package  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Procurement packages of technical specifications and construction drawings for eleven test facility additions to the ERDA East Mesa Geothermal Component Test Facility are presented. Each of the specifications includes all of the technical requirements needed for procurement and construction starting with Division 2. The information is presented under the following subject headings: injection pump system: 52-2 injection pipeline; control and instrumentation spools; calibration test bench; test pad modifications; test pad piping headers; production and injection wells; well 5-2 modifications; well 8-1 down-hole pump; well 6-1 down-hole pump; and well 8-1 booster pump. (JGB)

Pearson, R.O.

1976-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Numerical Study of the Evolving Convective Boundary Layer and Orographic Circulation around the Santa Catalina Mountains in Arizona. Part II: Interaction with Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the second part of a study that examines the daytime evolution of the thermally forced boundary layer (BL) circulation over a relatively isolated mountain, about 30 km in diameter and 2 km high, and its interaction with locally initiated ...

J. Cory Demko; Bart Geerts

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

An Idealized Two-Dimensional Framework to Study the West African Monsoon. Part II: Large-Scale Advection and the Diurnal Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idealized 2D model developed in Part I of this study is used to study the West African monsoon sensitivity to large-scale forcing. Using ECWMF reanalyses, a large-scale forcing is introduced in the 2D model in terms of temperature and ...

Philippe Peyrillé; Jean-Philippe Lafore

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

A Two-Scale Approximation for Efficient Representation of Nonlinear Energy Transfers in a Wind Wave Spectrum. Part II: Application to Observed Wave Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this series, a new method for estimating nonlinear transfer rates in wind waves, based on a two-scale approximation (TSA) to the full Boltzmann integral (FBI) for quadruplet wave–wave interactions, was presented, and this new method ...

William Perrie; Donald T. Resio

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Radar Data Assimilation with WRF 4D-Var. Part II: Comparison with 3D-Var for a Squall Line over the U.S. Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF) four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4D-Var) system described in Part I of this study is compared with its corresponding three-dimensional variational data assimilation (3D-Var) system ...

Juanzhen Sun; Hongli Wang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Ensemble-Based Exigent Analysis. Part II: Using Ensemble Regression to Estimate Conditions Antecedent to Worst-Case Forecast Damage Scenarios  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this series on ensemble-based exigent analysis, a Lagrange multiplier minimization technique is used to estimate the exigent damage state (ExDS), the “worst case” with respect to a user-specified damage function and confidence level. ...

Daniel Gombos; Ross N. Hoffman

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

Zuidema, Paquita

390

Retrieval of Model Initial Fields from Single-Doppler Observations of a Supercell Thunderstorm. Part II: Thermodynamic Retrieval and Numerical Prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this two-part study, a single-Doppler parameter retrieval technique is developed and applied to a real-data case to provide model initial conditions for a short-range prediction of a supercell thunderstorm. The technique consists of the ...

Stephen S. Weygandt; Alan Shapiro; Kelvin K. Droegemeier

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Path Density of Interhemispheric Surface-to-Surface Transport. Part II: Transport through the Troposphere and Stratosphere Diagnosed from NCEP Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interhemispheric transport from the earth’s surface north of 32.4°N (region ?N) to the surface south of 32.4°S (region ?S) is quantified using the path-density diagnostic developed in Part I of this study. The path density is computed using the ...

Mark Holzer

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

An Ensemble-Based Four-Dimensional Variational Data Assimilation Scheme. Part II: Observing System Simulation Experiments with Advanced Research WRF (ARW)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ensemble-based four-dimensional variational data assimilation (En4DVAR) algorithm and its performance in a low-dimension space with a one-dimensional shallow-water model have been presented in Part I. This algorithm adopts the standard ...

Chengsi Liu; Qingnong Xiao; Bin Wang

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Effects of Downdrafts and Mesoscale Convective Organization on the Heat and Moisture Budgets of Tropical Cloud Clusters. Part II: Effects of Convective-Scale Downdrafts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diagnostic cumulus ensemble model presented in Part I of this paper is applied to the data taken during Phase III of the GARP Tropical Atlantic Experiment (GATE) to examine the effects of convective-scale downdrafts on the large-scale heat ...

Ming-Dean Cheng

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Numerical Simulation and Analysis of a Prefrontal Squall Line. Part II: Propagation of the Squall Line as an Internal Gravity Wave  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study of the squall line that occurred on 17–18 June 1978 was described in Part I of this paper. The squall line was collocated with a surface front during its initial development (at 0000 UTC 18 June 1978), but then propagated faster ...

Jennifer M. Cram; Roger A. Pielke; William R. Cotton

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

GFDL’s ESM2 Global Coupled Climate–Carbon Earth System Models. Part II: Carbon System Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe carbon system formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbon–climate Earth System Models (ESM), ESM2M and ESM2G. These models demonstrate good climate fidelity as described in part I of this study ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Lori T. Sentman; Alistair J. Adcroft; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Matthew J. Harrison; Hiram Levy; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Peter J. Phillips; Niki Zadeh

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Determination of the Optical Thickness and Effective Particle Radius of Clouds from Reflected Solar Radiation Measurements. Part II: Marine Stratocumulus Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multispectral scanning radiometer has been used to obtain measurements of the reflection function of marine stratocumulus clouds at 0.75, 1.65 and 2.16 ?m. These observations were obtained from the NASA ER-2 aircraft as part of the First ISCCP [...

Teruyuki Nakajima; Michael D. King; James D. Spinhirne; Lawrence F. Radke

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Analysis and Design of a Test Apparatus for Resolving Near-Field Effects Associated With Using a Coarse Sun Sensor as Part of a 6-DOF Solution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though the Aerospace industry is moving towards small satellites and smaller sensor technologies, sensors used for close-proximity operations are generally cost (and often size and power) prohibitive for University-class satellites. Given the need for low-cost, low-mass solutions for close-proximity relative navigation sensors, this research analyzed the expected errors due to near-field effects using a coarse sun sensor as part of a 6-degree-of-freedom (6-dof) solution. To characterize these near-field effects, a test bed (Characterization Test Apparatus or CTA) was proposed, its design presented, and the design stage uncertainty analysis of the CTA performed. A candidate coarse sun sensor (NorthStarTM) was chosen for testing, and a mathematical model of the sensor’s functionality was derived. Using a Gaussian Least Squares Differential Correction (GLSDC) algorithm, the model parameters were estimated and a comparison between simulated NorthStarTM measurements and model estimates was performed. Results indicate the CTA is capable of resolving the near-field errors. Additionally, this research found no apparent show stoppers for using coarse sun sensors for 6-dof solutions.

Stancliffe, Devin Aldin

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a companion paper, the authors presented a formulation and evaluation of an urban parameterization designed to represent the urban energy balance in the Community Land Model. Here the robustness of the model is tested through sensitivity ...

K. W. Oleson; G. B. Bonan; J. Feddema; M. Vertenstein

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Quantifying the Predictive Skill in Long-Range Forecasting. Part II: Model Error in Coarse-Grained Markov Models with Application to Ocean-Circulation Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An information-theoretic framework is developed to assess the predictive skill and model error in imperfect climate models for long-range forecasting. Here, of key importance is a climate equilibrium consistency test for detecting false predictive ...

Dimitrios Giannakis; Andrew J. Majda

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

A Three-Layer Model for Wind-Driven Circulation in a Subtropical–Subpolar Basin. Part II: The Supercritical and Hypercritical States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-layer model, in which both the second and third layers are allowed to outcrop for strong wind forcing, is studied numerically. A broad range of parameters has been tested to explore possible flow patterns.

Rui Xin Huang

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Extending the Constant Power Speed Range of the Brushless DC Motor through Dual Mode Inverter Control -- Part II: Laboratory Proof-of-Principle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous theoretical work has shown that when all loss mechanisms are neglected the constant power speed range (CPSR) of a brushless dc motor (BDCM) is infinite when the motor is driven by the dual-mode inverter control (DMIC) [1,2]. In a physical drive, losses, particularly speed-sensitive losses, will limit the CPSR to a finite value. In this paper we report the results of laboratory testing of a low-inductance, 7.5-hp BDCM driven by the DMIC. The speed rating of the test motor rotor limited the upper speed of the testing, and the results show that the CPSR of the test machine is greater than 6:1 when driven by the DMIC. Current wave shape, peak, and rms values remained controlled and within rating over the entire speed range. The laboratory measurements allowed the speed-sensitive losses to be quantified and incorporated into computer simulation models, which then accurately reproduce the results of lab testing. The simulator shows that the limiting CPSR of the test motor is 8:1. These results confirm that the DMIC is capable of driving low-inductance BDCMs over the wide CPSR that would be required in electric vehicle applications.

Lawler, J.S.

2001-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

402

Geopressured-Geothermal Drilling and Testing Plan, Volume II, Testing Plan; Dow Chemical Co. - Dept. of Energy Dow-DOE Sweezy No. 1 Well, Vermilion Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Dow/D.O.E. L. R. Sweezy No. 1 geopressured geothermal production well was completed in August of 1981. The well was perforated and gravel packed in approximately 50 feet of sand from 13,344 feet to 13,395 feet. Permeabilities of 6 to 914 millidarcies were measured with porosity of 25 to 36%. Static surface pressure after well clean-up was 5000 psi. At 1000 B/D flow rate the drawdown was 50 psi. The water produced in clean-up contained 100,000 ppm TDS. This report details the plan for testing this well with the goal of obtaining sufficient data to define the total production curve of the small, 939 acre, reservoir. A production time of six to nine months is anticipated. The salt water disposal well is expected to be completed and surface equipment installed such that production testing will begin by April 1, 1982. The program should be finished and reports written by February 28, 1983. The brine will be produced from the No.1 well, passed through a separator where the gas is removed, then reinjected into the No.2 (SWD) well under separator pressure. Flow rates of up to 25,000 B/D are expected. The tests are divided into a two-week short-term test and six to nine-month long-term tests with periodic downhole measurement of drawdown and buildup rates. Data obtained in the testing will be relayed by phoneline computer hookup to Otis Engineering in Dallas, Texas, where the reservoir calculations and modeling will be done. At the point where sufficient data has been obtained to reach the objectives of the program, production will be ended, the wells plugged and abandoned, and a final report will be issued.

None

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, Phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Semi-annual report on the project to design and experimentally test an improved geothermal drill bit, phase II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The test facilities (the geothermal drilling vessel and the geothermal drill-bit seal tester) were completed and de-bugged, and the first tests were run on full-scale research drill bits and drill-bit seals. In addition, more materials information was gathered, and a number of additional seals of high-temperature elastomer materials were obtained for testing. Maurer Engineering, on a subcontract basis, has also been active in the design and procurement of candidate high-temperature drill-bit seals for testing, and has done a literature and patent search on the problem of drill-bit insert retention. Reed Tool Co. has cooperated in the fabrication of drill bits for testing, and has offered consultation on certain seal designs.

Barker, L.M.; Green, S.J.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume II. Well test data: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following are included in the appendices: field test data, combined and edited raw data, time/pressure data, sample log, reservoir fluid study, gas data, sample collection and analysis procedure, scale monitoring and water analysis, sand detector and strip charts, and Horner-type plot data. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Sweet Lake Geopressured-geothermal Project, Magma Gulf-Technadril/DOE Amoco Fee. Volume II. Surface installations reservoir testing. Annual report, February 28, 1981-February 10, 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Magma Gulf-Technadril/Department of Energy Amoco Fee No. 1 (production) and salt water disposal wells were drilled in the period from August, 1980 to February 1981. Surface facilities were designed and constructed during March-June 1981. Flow testing began in June 1981 and continued until February, 1982. The Miogypsinoides interval contains seven discrete sands in the test well. These sands have been numbered 1 to 7, beginning at the top of the sequence. Data from wireline logs and core samples suggested that the first zone to be perforated should be Sand 5. Because of its high porosity and permeability, Sand 5 was thought to contain almost 50% of the total hydraulic capacity of the well. Flow testing of Sand 5 was performed in three stages, each of which is fully described in this report. Phase I was designed as an initial clean-up flow and a reservoir confirmation test. Phase II consisted of the reservoir limit determination test and lasted 17 days. Boundaries were confirmed which suggest that the Sweet Lake reservoir is fairly narrow, with boundaries on three sides, but is open in one direction with no closure for at least 4-1/4 miles. These boundaries approximate the shape of the graben in which the test well was drilled, but may or may not be directly related to the major faults forming the graben. Phase III testing was planned to be a long-term test at commercial design rates. Although Sand 5 alone would not support such rates, long-term production was demonstrated. Additional research not supported by DOE funding was also performed during the period covered by this report. This research, consisting of mud logging, micropaleontology, organic geochemistry, core analysis, and rock mechanics, is summarized in this report.

Hoffman, K.S. (ed.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

A Combined Local and Nonlocal Closure Model for the Atmospheric Boundary Layer. Part II: Application and Evaluation in a Mesoscale Meteorological Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new combined local and nonlocal closure atmospheric boundary layer model called the Asymmetric Convective Model, version 2, (ACM2) was described and tested in one-dimensional form and was compared with large-eddy simulations and field data in ...

Jonathan E. Pleim

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Environmentally Acceptable Transformer Fluids: Phase I State-of-the-Art Review; Phase II Laboratory Testing of Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of this investigation were to identify, obtain, and test environmentally acceptable dielectric fluids for power transformers. In addition, the report provides a resource guide to the environmental qualities and performances of conventional transformer oils and environmentally acceptable alternatives. A literature review was conducted to identify appropriate candidates and, once identified, samples of the oil were obtained and tested. The findings of the literature review and the laboratory...

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

410

No moving parts safe and arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and arm scheme with no moving parts. The safe and arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe and arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activated the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel.

Hendrix, J.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

No moving parts safe & arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and m scheme with no moving parts. The safe & arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe & arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activates the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel, and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel. Simultaneous event channels may also be utilized by optically splitting a single event channel. The built-in-test may be performed anytime prior to ordnance ignition.

Hendrix, James L. (Overland Park, KS)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

No moving parts safe & arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and arm scheme with no moving parts. The safe & arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe & arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activates the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel, and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel. Simultaneous event channels may also be utilized by optically splitting a single event channel. The built-in-test may be performed anytime prior to ordnance ignition. 6 figures.

Hendrix, J.L.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

413

An elastoplastic framework for granular materials becoming cohesive through mechanical densification. Part II - the formulation of elastoplastic coupling at large strain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The two key phenomena occurring in the process of ceramic powder compaction are the progressive gain in cohesion and the increase of elastic stiffness, both related to the development of plastic deformation. The latter effect is an example of `elastoplastic coupling', in which the plastic flow affects the elastic properties of the material, and has been so far considered only within the framework of small strain assumption (mainly to describe elastic degradation in rock-like materials), so that it remains completely unexplored for large strain. Therefore, a new finite strain generalization of elastoplastic coupling theory is given to describe the mechanical behaviour of materials evolving from a granular to a dense state. The correct account of elastoplastic coupling and of the specific characteristics of materials evolving from a loose to a dense state (for instance, nonlinear --or linear-- dependence of the elastic part of the deformation on the forming pressure in the granular --or dense-- state) makes the use of existing large strain formulations awkward, if even possible. Therfore, first, we have resorted to a very general setting allowing general transformations between work-conjugate stress and strain measures; second, we have introduced the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient and, third, employing isotropy and hyperelasticity of elastic response, we have obtained a relation between the Biot stress and its `total' and `plastic' work-conjugate strain measure. This is a key result, since it allows an immediate achievement of the rate elastoplastic constitutive equations. Knowing the general form of these equations, all the specific laws governing the behaviour of ceramic powders are finally introduced as generalizations of the small strain counterparts given in Part I of this paper.

Andrea Piccolroaz; Davide Bigoni; Alessandro Gajo

2010-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

414

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: comparison of geotemp predictions to field data and evaluation of flow variables. Part II report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A better understanding of temperatures in a well is needed to improve casing selection, cement design, drilling fluid formulation, packer selection, and many other aspects of well design. Two applications of GEOTEMP are presented which provide the calculations needed. First, the results of testing GEOTEMP predictions with analytical solutions and with field temperature data are presented. And second, sensitivity studies establish the importance of certain well variables on downhole temperatures. (MHR)

Wooley, G.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Evaluation of Land Surface Models in Reproducing Satellite Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the Earth System Models (ESMs) since it strongly affects land-surface boundary conditions and the exchange of matter and energy with the atmosphere. Observations and data products derived from satellite remote sensing are important for the validation and evaluation of ESMs from regional to global scales. Several decades ’ worth of satellite data products are now available at global scale which represents a unique opportunity to contrast observations against model results. The objective of this study is to assess whether ESMs correctly reproduce the spatial variability of LAI when compared with satellite data and to compare the length of the growing season in the different models with the satellite data. To achieve this goal we analyse outputs from 11 coupled carbon-climate models that are based on the set of new global model simulations planned in support of the IPCC Fifth Assessment Report. We focus on the average LAI and the length of the growing season on Northern Hemisphere over the period 1986–2005. Additionally we compare the results with previous analyses (Part I) of

Ro Anav; Guillermo Murray-tortarolo; Pierre Friedlingstein; Stephen Sitch; Shilong Piao; Zaichun Zhu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Phase II Documentation Overview of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject to assess and evaluate radiologic groundwater contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. These activities are overseen by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended March 2010). For Frenchman Flat, the UGTA Subproject addresses media contaminated by the underground nuclear tests, which is limited to geologic formations within the saturated zone or 100 meters (m) or less above the water table. Transport in groundwater is judged to be the primary mechanism of migration for the subsurface contamination away from the Frenchman Flat underground nuclear tests. The intent of the UGTA Subproject is to assess the risk to the public from the groundwater contamination produced as a result of nuclear testing. The primary method used to assess this risk is the development of models of flow and contaminant transport to forecast the extent of potentially contaminated groundwater for the next 1,000 years, establish restrictions to groundwater usage, and implement a monitoring program to verify protectiveness. For the UGTA Subproject, contaminated groundwater is that which exceeds the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) the State of Nevada’s groundwater quality standard to protect human health and the environment. Contaminant forecasts are expected to be uncertain, and groundwater monitoring will be used in combination with land-use control to build confidence in model results and reduce risk to the public. Modeling forecasts of contaminant transport will provide the basis for negotiating a compliance boundary for the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This compliance boundary represents a regulatory-based distinction between groundwater contaminated or not contaminated by underground testing. Transport modeling simulations are used to compute radionuclide concentrations in time and space within the CAU for the 1,000-year contaminant boundary. These three-dimensional (3-D) concentration simulations are integrated into probabilistic forecasts of the likelihood of groundwater exceeding or remaining below the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) defined as the contaminant boundary. Contaminant boundaries are not discrete predictions of the location or concentration of contaminants, but instead are spatial representations of the probability of exceeding Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards. The forecasts provide planning tools to facilitate regulatory decisions designed to protect the health and safety of the public.

Greg Ruskauff

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

419

Ex parte Communication | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Communication Ex parte Communication Ex parte communication on AHAM's development of an ice maker energy test procedure Ex parte Communication More Documents & Publications...

420

Fractionally distilled SRC-I, SRC-II, EDS, H-Coal and ITSL direct coal liquefaction process materials: a comparative summary of chemical analysis and biological testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reports and compares the results compiled from chemical analyses and biological testing of coal liquefaction process materials which were fractionally distilled, after production, into various comparable boiling-point range cuts. Comparative analyses were performed on solvent refined coal (SRC)-I, SRC-II, H-Coal, EDS an integrated two-stage liquefaction (ITSL) distillate materials. Mutagenicity and carcinogenicity assays were conducted in conjunction with chromatographic and mass spectrometric analyses to provide detailed, comparative, chemical and biological assessments. Where possible, results obtained from the distillate cuts are compared to those from coal liquefaction materials with limited boiling ranges. Work reported here was conducted by investigators in the Biology and Chemistry Department at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, WA. 38 refs., 16 figs., 27 tabs.

Wright, C.W.; Later, D.W.; Dauble, D.D.; Wilson, B.W.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part II. Rates of reduction of composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace simulator  

SciTech Connect

A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO{sub 2} generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O{sub 3}-to-Fe3O{sub 4} transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O{sub 4}. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Praxair Technological Center

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

John McCord

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Study and testing of direct contact heat exchangers for geothermal brines. Phase II, August 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analytical and experimental studies completed under this project have explored several aspects of geothermal binary power cycles and column type direct contact heat exchangers between geothermal brine and isobutane. A major improvement of the heat exchanger was developed by the combination of the preheater and boiler into a single continuous column. At East Mesa, this new direct contact heat exchanger was tested on geothermal brine in order to correlate the experimental heat transfer data with the theoretical model for use in designing larger plants. Experiments also involved a small radial inflow turbine to produce electricity which marked the first generation of electricity from geothermal brine using a binary cycle. In analytical studies, a comparison of the relationship between column diameter and droplet size was made for both Minard--Johnson and Sakiadis--Johnson model. The Letan--Kehat model for relating column height and temperature profile was analyzed and compared with experimental data. It appears that the experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical models. A detailed design of a 250 Kw pilot plant incorporating the direct contact heat exchanger was completed. This design with estimated costs for it and a 500 Kw pilot plant is incorporated.

Suratt, W.B.; Lee, C.O.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

DOE/NETL's phase II mercury control technology field testing program: preliminary economic analysis of activated carbon injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on results of field testing conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), this article provides preliminary costs for mercury control via conventional activated carbon injection (ACI), brominated ACI, and conventional ACI coupled with the application of a sorbent enhancement additive (SEA) to coal prior to combustion. The economic analyses are reported on a plant-specific basis in terms of the cost required to achieve low (50%), mid (70%), and high (90%) levels of mercury removal 'above and beyond' the baseline mercury removal achieved by existing emission control equipment. In other words, the levels of mercury control are directly attributable to ACI. Mercury control costs via ACI have been amortized on a current dollar basis. Using a 20-year book life, levelized costs for the incremental increase in cost of electricity (COE), expressed in mills per kilowatt-hour (mills/kWh), and the incremental cost of mercury control, expressed in dollars per pound of mercury removed ($/lb Hg removed), have been calculated for each level of ACI mercury control. For this analysis, the increase in COE varied from 0.14 mills/kWh to 3.92 mills/kWh. Meanwhile, the incremental cost of mercury control ranged from $3810/lb Hg removed to $166 000/lb Hg removed. 13 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Andrew P. Jones; Jeffrey W. Hoffmann; Dennis N. Smith; Thomas J. Feeley III; James T. Murphy [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Cloud Detection with MODIS. Part II: Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An assessment of the performance of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) cloud mask algorithm for Terra and Aqua satellites is presented. The MODIS cloud mask algorithm output is compared with lidar observations from ground [...

S. A. Ackerman; R. E. Holz; R. Frey; E. W. Eloranta; B. C. Maddux; M. McGill

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Form 101 Part II: Research Proposal - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n = 10 variables and degree d = 50, we will need p > 509, a 51 bit prime whereas ..... The research area of each team member below includes computer algebra.

428

DEPARTMENT OF MATERIALS PART II PROJECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

specialize in a particular field, such as nanomaterials, or in the development of specific products to generate power. They may work on the nucle- ar fuel cycle--the production, handling, and use of nuclear fuel and the safe disposal of waste produced by the generation of nuclear energy--or on the development

Paxton, Anthony T.

429

Generalized Stability Theory. Part II: Nonautonomous Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extension of classical stability theory to address the stability of perturbations to time-dependent systems is described. Nonnormality is found to play a central role in determining the stability of systems governed by nonautonomous operators ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Transilient Turbulence Theory. Part II: Turbulent Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent adjustment is a scheme where dynamic instabilities in the flow are eliminated by turbulence. It is a form of first-order turbulence closure that is applicable to numerical forecast models of the atmosphere. The responsive form of ...

Roland B. Stull; Takehiko Hasegawa

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Equatorial Velocity Profiles. Part II: Zonal Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical profiles of horizontal velocity made along 53°E in the western Indian Ocean, during and after he onset of the southwest monsoon in 1976, show features in zonal velocity of relatively small vertical scale. Persistence of the features over ...

Kathleen O'Neill; James R. Luyten

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH PART II  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in physics Premature Higgs (2011) Cold Fusion (1989) Element X (2002) Molecular Transistors (2001) 11;1989 : Cold Fusion Pons and Fleischmann announce Cold Fusion Electrolysis of heavy water Deuterium enters palladium cathode See temperature rise Detect fusion products like Helium in water 11/1/12 12 #12;Big

Shahriar, Selim

433

Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the experimental technique developed for determination of specific impulses from plasma plume imaging with an intensified CCD camera.

Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane [Department of Physics, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Information Systems Laboratories, Inc., Brownsboro, Alabama, 35741 (United States)

2004-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

TK-Part II.qxd  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... producers, and distributors and marketers internationally, while ... structure Identification of market barriers and ... Marketing section of the business plan ...

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

435

Second A Measurement Assurance Programs Part II ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... it must embody the quantity of interest, and it must produce a signal, (such as the deflection of a pointer on a scale or an electrical impulse) whiCh is ...

2002-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

436

Marine Stratocumulus Layers. Part II: Turbulence Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the turbulence profiles and budgets for two days of radiation, dynamical and thermodynamical observations by the NCAR Electra in shallow marine stratocumulus off the California coast in June 1976.

R. A. Brost; J. C. Wyngaard; D. H. Lenschow

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Atlantic Subtropical Storms. Part II: Climatology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 45-yr climatology of subtropical cyclones (ST) for the North Atlantic is presented and analyzed. The STs pose a warm-season forecasting problem for subtropical locations such as Bermuda and the southern United States because of the potentially ...

Mark P. Guishard; Jenni L. Evans; Robert E. Hart

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Spirals in Potential Vorticity. Part II: Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of the linear stability of spiral-shaped potential vorticity (PV) filaments is constructed by using the Kolmogorov capacity as a time-independent characterization of their structure, assuming that the dynamics is essentially barotropic. ...

John Methven

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

A Parameterization for Land–Atmosphere-Cloud Exchange (PLACE): Documentation and Testing of a Detailed Process Model of the Partly Cloudy Boundary Layer over Heterogeneous Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a general description of, and demonstrates the capabilities of, the Parameterization for Land–Atmosphere–Cloud Exchange (PLACE). The PLACE model is a detailed process model of the partly cloudy atmospheric boundary layer and ...

Peter J. Wetzel; Aaron Boone

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A study of coal particle shape and three-body wear: Part 1, Design and development of a new three-body wear testing machine: Part 2, Particle shape and three-body wear  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three-body wear involves two surfaces and an intermediate particle trapped between the two surfaces. A machine has been constructed to measure normal and frictional forces due to three-body wear. This machine accurately positions specimens a predetermined distance apart from each other and introduces particles to the interface between the specimens. Different types of specimen combinations have been tested to give a variety of data. Loads that result from the wear test are sampled and stored. Wear coefficients and rates of wear have been calculated for all specimens. (VC)

Clark, N.N.; Means, K.H.; James, R.; Thompson, T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Honda Insight Fleet and Accelerated Reliability Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012 Two model year 2010 Honda Generation II Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July 2009 in...

443

Test Plan for Composite Hydrogen Getter Materials  

SciTech Connect

The intent of this test plan is to provide details of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) effort to evaluate composite getter materials for eventual use in expanding the wattage limits for transportation of contact-handled transuranic waste (CH-TRU). This effort is funded by the Mixed Waste Focus Area (MWFA) under Technical Task Plan (TTP) SR-1-9-MW-45 and is the result of a competitive process initiated by a MWFA request for proposals. In response to this request, SRTC presented data on several composite getter materials that demonstrated good potential for application in transportation of transuranic wastes. The tests outlined in the SRTC proposal for composite getter materials should demonstrate compliance with functional requirements provided by the MWFA in a Statement of Work (SOW) which accompanied the request for proposals. Completion of Phase 1 testing, as defined in the TTP, should provide sufficient data to determine if composite getters should progress to Phase s 2 and 3. These test results will provide support for future safety reviews as part of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) certification process to utilize getter technology. This test plan provides details of the test descriptions, test objectives, required measurements, data quality objectives, data analysis, and schedule information relevant to Phase 1 of the TTP. The results of these tests are expected to help identify any potential weaknesses in the use of composite getter for transportation of CH-TRU wastes. Where a potential weakness is identified, this will be addressed as part of Phase 2 of the proposed effort. It is also important to recognize that these tests are focused on the individual composite getter materials and not the engineered system that would eventually be used in a TRUPACT-II. However, these test results will be very helpful in establishing the requirements for the design of a TRUPACT-II getter system that is included as part of the propo sed Phase 3 effort.

Livingston, R.R.

2000-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

444

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

445

The Operational Mesogamma-Scale Analysis and Forecast System of the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command. Part III: Forecasting with Secondary-Applications Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Output from the Army Test and Evaluation Command’s Four-Dimensional Weather System’s mesoscale model is used to drive secondary-applications models to produce forecasts of quantities of importance for daily decision making at U.S. Army test ...

Robert D. Sharman; Yubao Liu; Rong-Shyang Sheu; Thomas T. Warner; Daran L. Rife; James F. Bowers; Charles A. Clough; Edward E. Ellison

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Cryogenic Treatment of Metal Parts  

SciTech Connect

Cryogenic treatment and its variables have been described. Results of eight engineering tests carried out on cryotreated parts have been presented. Cryogenic treatment of metal parts enhances useful properties which in turn, improves various strengths. Our tests viz. Abrasion, Torsion, Fatigue, Tensile, Shear, Hardness and Impact on Mild steel, Cast Iron, Brass and Copper show that the cryogenic treatment improved useful properties of mild steel parts appreciably but did not show promise with brass and copper parts.

Chillar, Rahul [S. P. College of Engineering, Andheri (W), Mumbai - 400 058 (India); Agrawal, S. C. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Colaba, Mumbai - 400 005 (India)

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Part Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Functions served by parts...Mechanical power Shafts, connecting rods, gears Electricity Wires, lightbulb elements, resistors Provide a barrier (for example: reflect, cover, enclose,

448

1396 JOURNAL OF APPLIED METEOROLOGY AND CLIMATOLOGY VOLUME 46 A Combined Local and Nonlocal Closure Model for the Atmospheric Boundary Layer. Part II: Application and Evaluation in a Mesoscale Meteorological Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new combined local and nonlocal closure atmospheric boundary layer model called the Asymmetric Convective Model, version 2, (ACM2) was described and tested in one-dimensional form and was compared with large-eddy simulations and field data in Part I. Herein, the incorporation of the ACM2 into the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University–NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) is described. Model simulations using the MM5 with the ACM2 are made for the summer of 2004 and evaluated through comparison with surface meteorological measurements, rawinsonde profile measurements, and observed planetary boundary layer (PBL) heights derived from radar wind profilers. Overall model performance is as good as or better than similar MM5 evaluation studies. The MM5 simulations with the ACM2 compare particularly well to PBL heights derived from radar wind profilers during the afternoon hours. The ACM2 is designed to simulate the vertical mixing of any modeled quantity realistically for both meteorological models and air quality models. The next step, to be described in a subsequent article, is to incorporate the ACM2 into the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model for testing and evaluation. 1.

Jonathan E. Pleim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Evaluating water-based drill-in fluids for horizontal completions. Part 1: Results of eight extensive lab tests are presented for use when assessing and selecting these special fluids  

SciTech Connect

The use of horizontal wells to obtain more cost-effective production from unconsolidated sandstones has become very popular. Since these wells employ open hole completions, success often depends on the fluid system used during drilling and completion. A lab study of three drill-in fluid systems was performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of each. Intent of the study was not to recommend one fluid over another, but to make available the data necessary for picking the optimum fluid for a particular application. Parameters evaluated and discussed in Part 1 include rheology, lubricity, size distribution of bridging particles, API fluid loss, high-temperature fluid loss, filter cake characteristics, SEM analysis of filter cake and static breaker tests. Part 2 will describe return permeability tests. All were evaluated with 9, 10.5 and 14 ppg muds.

Ali, S.A. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Dearing, H.L. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Carlink II: Research Approach and Early Findings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Focus Group Protocol Homebased Users Palo Alto, Californiaasking for input as Homebased Users Questions & Answers PartII FOCUS GROUP ONE: HOMEBASED USERS Cubberley Community

Shaheen, Susan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The Use of Finite-Volume Methods for Atmospheric Advection of Trace Species. Part I: Test of Various Formulations in a General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the context of advection of trace species by 3D atmospheric flows, a comparative test of a hierarchy of finite volume transport schemes initially derived by B. Van Leer is presented. Those schemes are conservative by construction and Van Leer ...

Frédéric Hourdin; Alexandre Armengaud

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

H. R. 2092(Report No. 99-121, Parts I, II, and III): a bill to amend the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 to authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1986 and 1987, and for other purposes. Introduced in the House of Representatives, Nineth-Ninth Congress, First Session, April 17, 1985  

SciTech Connect

Parts I, II, and III of the House report amend the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 to preclude discriminatory tax treatment by states and local governments imposing an overvalued assessment against interstate gas transmission for ad valorem taxes. The amendment clarifies assessment terms and stipulates that federal courts may intervene if tax assessments exceed five per cent of true market value. The bill also authorizes the fiscal year 1986 and 1987 appropriations.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Effect of mechanical cleaning on seawater corrosion of candidate OTEC heat exchanger materials. Part 1. Tests with M. A. N. brushes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion evaluations were conducted on 3003 Alclad, 5052 aluminum, C7 0600 copper-nickel, AL-6X stainless steel, and commercially-pure titanium in natural seawater under simulated OTEC heat exchanger conditions to investigate the erosion-corrosion effects of mechanical tube cleaning. Test conditions of M.A.N. brush cleaning and M.A.N. brush cleaning + chlorination were compared with no mechanical cleaning over a seven month period. M.A.N. brushing significantly accelerated corrosion of 5052 aluminum and C7 0600 copper-nickel. Chlorination significantly accelerated erosion-corrosion of 3003 Alclad and 5052 aluminium. Chlorination somewhat decreased erosion-corrosion of C7 0600 copper-nickel. There was no detectable effect of M.A.N. brushing or chlorination on AL-6X stainless steel or titanium, although AL-6X exhibited crevice corrosion at tubing connections. 3003 Alclad and 5052 aluminum exhibited piting corrosion in all 3 test environments.

Tipton, D G

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Jeff Wurtz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

PART I  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DE-AC02-09CH11466 DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section D i PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. D.1 - PACKAGING D-1 D.2 - MARKING D-1 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section D D-1 PART I SECTION D - PACKAGING AND MARKING D.1 - PACKAGING Preservation, packaging, and packing for shipment or mailing of all work delivered hereunder shall be in accordance with good commercial practice and adequate to ensure acceptance by common carrier and safe transportation at the most economical rates. D.2 - MARKING Each package, report or other deliverable shall be accompanied by a letter or other document which: (a) Identifies the contract number under which the item is being delivered. (b) Identifies the contract requirement or other instruction which requires the

456

Equatorial Velocity Profiles. Part I: Meridional Component  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time series or vertical profiles of horizontal velocity was collected in the western equatorial Indian Ocean during late spring of 1976. The meridional velocity component is examined here, the zonal component in Part II of this paper. The ...

Kathleen O'Neill

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

II.AdvancedTcl Advanced Tcl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

119 P A R T II.AdvancedTcl II Advanced Tcl Part II describes advanced programming techniques that support sophisticated applications. The Tcl interfaces remain simple, so you can quickly construct pow- erful applications. Chapter 10 describes eval, which lets you create Tcl programs on the fly

Chen, Yuanzhu Peter

459

Next Generation Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3 machine rooms (safety, security, power, & A/C). Supports COOP ... ii. Developing methods and technologies for next generation biometric testing. ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Rooting Characteristics of Vegetation Near Areas 3 and 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site--Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy emplaced high-specific-activity low-level radioactive wastes and limited quantities of classified transuranic wastes in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1984 to 1989. The boreholes are located at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada. The boreholes were backfilled with native alluvium soil. The surface of these boreholes and trenches is expected to be colonized by native vegetation in the future. Considering the long-term performance of the disposal facilities, bioturbation (the disruption of buried wastes by biota) is considered a primary release mechanism for radionuclides disposed in GCD boreholes as well as trenches at both Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. This report provides information about rooting characteristics of vegetation near Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. Data from this report are being used to resolve uncertainties involving parameterization of performance assessment models used to characterize the biotic mixing of soils and radionuclide transport processes by biota. The objectives of this study were to: (1) survey the prior ecological literature on the NTS and identify pertinent information about the vegetation, (2) conduct limited field studies to describe the current vegetation in the vicinity of Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs so as to correlate findings with more extensive vegetation data collected at Yucca Mountain and the NTS, ( 3 ) review prior performance assessment documents and evaluate model assumptions based on current ecological information, and (4) identify data deficiencies and make recommendations for correcting such deficiencies.

D. J. Hansen

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation (OTEC) power system development (PDS) II. Preliminary design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results and conclusions of the PDS II, Phase I, preliminary design of a 10 MWe OTEC power system, using enhanced plate type heat exchangers, and of representative 0.2 MWe test articles. It further provides the documentation (specifications, drawings, trade studies, etc.) resulting from the design activities. The data and discussions of the technical concepts are organized to respond to the PDS II, Phase II proposal evaluation criteria. This volume, which specifically addresses the three evaluation categories (heat exchangers, rotating machinery, and power system configuration and performance) is an integral part of the Phase II plans (proposal) which describe the technical approach to delivering test articles to OTEC-1. In addition, there is a section which addresses power system cost and net energy analysis and another which discusses the results of stainless steel feasibility studies. Supporting documentation is contained in two appendix volumes.

Not Available

1979-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

462

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

too rapidly to see): a. Loading -PARS II is loading the report definition and data query. b. Downloading (generating report) c. Opening Excel d. Formatting report Report...

463

IIS5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1) enabled/disabled, (1) Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager GUI: Right Click on Server > Properties > Home Directory tab > Read, Chapter 2 ...

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

464

Synoptic Circulation and Land Surface Influences on Convection in the Midwest U.S. “Corn Belt” during the Summers of 1999 and 2000. Part II: Role of Vegetation Boundaries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this observational study inquiring into the relative influences of “top down” synoptic atmospheric conditions and “bottom up” land surface mesoscale conditions in deep convection for the humid lowlands of the Midwest U.S. Central ...

Andrew M. Carleton; David J. Travis; Jimmy O. Adegoke; David L. Arnold; Steve Curran

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

A High-Resolution Coupled Riverine Flow, Tide, Wind, Wind Wave, and Storm Surge Model for Southern Louisiana and Mississippi. Part II: Synoptic Description and Analysis of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hurricanes Katrina and Rita were powerful storms that impacted southern Louisiana and Mississippi during the 2005 hurricane season. In Part I, the authors describe and validate a high-resolution coupled riverine flow, tide, wind, wave, and storm ...

J. C. Dietrich; S. Bunya; J. J. Westerink; B. A. Ebersole; J. M. Smith; J. H. Atkinson; R. Jensen; D. T. Resio; R. A. Luettich; C. Dawson; V. J. Cardone; A. T. Cox; M. D. Powell; H. J. Westerink; H. J. Roberts

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Performance oriented packaging testing of nine Mk 3 Mod 0 signal containers in PPP-B-621 wood box for packing group II solid hazardous materials. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A PPP-B-621 wood box containing nine Mk 3 Mod 0 Signal containers was tested for conformance to Performance Oriented Packaging criteria established by Code of Federal Regulations Title 49 CFR. The container was tested with a gross weight of 123.3 pounds (56 kilograms) and met all requirements.

Libbert, K.J.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

ISLSCP II Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ISLSCP II The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project, Initiative II (ISLSCP II) Overview ISLSCP II Logo The International Satellite Land Surface Climatology...

468

A Large-Droplet Mode and Prognostic Number Concentration of Cloud Droplets in the Colorado State University Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS). Part II: Sensitivity to a Colorado Winter Snowfall Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is the second in a two-part series describing recent additions to the microphysics module of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) at Colorado State University. These changes include the addition of a large-cloud-droplet mode ...

Stephen M. Saleeby; William R. Cotton

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Transient Climate Response in a Two-Layer Energy-Balance Model. Part II: Representation of the Efficacy of Deep-Ocean Heat Uptake and Validation for CMIP5 AOGCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part of a series of two articles analyzing the global thermal properties of atmosphere–ocean coupled general circulation models (AOGCMs) within the framework of a two-layer energy-balance model (EBM), the role of the efficacy of ...

O. Geoffroy; D. Saint-Martin; G. Bellon; A. Voldoire; D. J. L. Olivié; S. Tytéca

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

A Diagnostic Study of the Intensity of Three Tropical Cyclones in the Australian Region. Part II: An Analytic Method for Determining the Time Variation of the Intensity of a Tropical Cyclone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The observed features discussed in Part I of this paper, regarding the intensification and dissipation of Tropical Cyclone Kathy, have been integrated in a simple mathematical model that can produce a reliable 15–30-h forecast of (i) the central ...

France Lajoie; Kevin Walsh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

PARS II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peck 1.1 5102010 Exercise 6 -Monthly Status screen updated to PARS II 4152010 Version 30-31 Replaced screens and changed text. J. Peck 1.1 5102010 Ex 8 and 9 36-38...

472

Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells: Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well, St. Mary Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following data tables are included: pressure buildup, pressure survey, geothermal field test, analyses of reservoir brine, recombination analysis, analyses of separator gas, analyses of scale samples, H/sub 2/S in separator gas, and analysis of reservoir data. (MHR)

Willits, M.H.; McCoy, R.L.; Dobson, R.J.; Hartsock, J.H.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

HGP-A Wellhead Generator Proof-of-Feasibility Project (Well Test) at HGP-A Site Puna, Hawaii. Volume II. Technical Specifications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to provide and secure the well test system complete and ready for use. The project comprises the construction of a chemical treatment system (including caustic and hydrogen peroxide handling systems), new condensate piping, wellhead steam piping modifications, ancillary electrical systems and equipment, instrumentation, site improvements and utilities distribution.

None

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

On-line tests of organic additives for the inhibition of the precipitation of silica from hypersaline geothermal brine II. Tests of nitrogen-containing compounds, silanes, and additional ethoxylated compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several new classes of organic compounds have been screened as potential geothermal scale control agents by examining their effect on the precipitation of silica from Magmamax No. 1 brine. The substances were tested using the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Brine Treatment Test System at the Niland, California, Test Site. Solutions of the test substances were injected into flowing brine at 210{sup 0}C, the brine was flashed to 125{sup 0}C, and then the kinetics of solids and silica precipitation from effluent brine held at 90{sup 0}C were measured. Three new types of compounds were shown to have activity as precipitation inhibitors: polyethylene imines, polyethyloxazalines, and quaternary ammonium compounds containing polyoxyethylene. Among the latter, Ethoquad 18/25, which is methyl-polyoxyethylene(15) octadecylammonium chloride, is the leading candidate antiscalant. It is a more powerful inhibitor of silica precipitation than the pure polyoxyethylene polymers, and it apparently has no high temperature solubility limitations. Measurements were made of the concentrations of monomeric silica and the effect of addition of inhibitor at various points in the Brine Treatment Test System. Five different silane compounds showed no activity toward silica.

Harrar, J.E.; Locke, F.E.; Otto, C.H. Jr.; Lorensen, L.E.; Frey, W.P.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Evidence for a tektosilicate structure and dominance of Fe(III) over Fe(II) in silicic volcanic glasses of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

More than 400 individual analyses have been obtained by electron microprobe for silicic glasses in 58 samples of tuff and lava from the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These samples comprise a wide range in chemical and petrographic types, including calc-alkaline and peralkaline rock types, and include most of the volcanic units of the NTS. Locations and brief petrographic descriptions are given for representative samples.

Warren, R.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Test and evaluation of hot-gas cleanup devices, Phase I and II (Task 1). Technical progress report, September 1, 1981 - November 30, 1981  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the status of the work performed on a program for test and evaluation of gas cleanup devices for PFBC combined cycle systems. The work was performed during the period September 1, 1981 through November 30, 1981. This is the second quarterly report since the start of the program. Work has continued to restore the pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) technology plant at Wood-Ridge, N.J. to an operational status. Preliminary designs to incorporate each of three advanced gas cleanup devices following a first stage low pressure drop inertial type separator were previously completed. The advanced devices provided by suppliers under a separate DOE contract include a ceramic bag filter, an electrostatic precipitator and an electrostatically enhanced inertial separator. The final design activity necessary to modify the facility for the test of the ceramic bag filter has been completed. Testing of each hot gas cleanup device concurrently with a DOE supplied advanced concept particle sampling system and an alkali metal content measurement system is planned to start in April 1982.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

478

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

479

Development of hardware simulators for tests of solar cooling/heating subsystems and systems. Phase II. Unsteady state hardware simulation of residential absorption chiller  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The main work involves the experimental study to determine transient and cycling performance characteristics of an advanced solar absorption chiller. Laboratory tests of the second generation Arkla chiller (Solaire 36, model WF36), using the BNL simulator, have been performed. Chiller performance has also been measured against fast and slow cycling periods under both the conventional and modified control modes. The degree of performance improvement under the modified control mode, as a function of the cycle period and such effects on the integrated chiller performance, have been thoroughly investigated.

Auh, P.C.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

NSLS-II Transport Line Progress  

SciTech Connect

The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part II. The effects of temperature and humidity on free formaldehyde, extractable formaldehyde, formaldehyde emission, and physical characteristics of the foam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of testing with two products of urea-formaldehyde based foams are described. Results of three products have previously been reported. Methods for detection and quantitative determination of formaldehyde, design of the experimental chambers, and the procedures are described. Samples of Product D were monitored for about 29 days and samples of Product E were monitored for 60 days in chambers and results are tabulated for formaldehyde emission. Additional tests performed on the two products are: extractable formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); free formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); comparison of free formaldehyde concentration; density (high and low temperature conditions); shrinkage (high and low temperature conditions). Control panels were constructed to simulate a wall in a home and observations were made and compared with results of the experimental products.

Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

A sodium-sulfur battery for the ETX-II propulsion system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Canadian built 52 kWh sodium-sulphur battery is being integrated with the ETX-II powertrain. The propulsion system thus formed is being installed in a Ford Aerostar compact-size van for test and development purposes. The selection and design of the traction battery, as an integral part of the propulsion system, will be outlined in this paper along with the projected performance of the test bed vehicle under both highway and urban driving conditions. The results of a battery optimization study will also be discussed. Braking energy recovery (regeneration) is an important part of the ETX-II system capability and needs to be carefully managed when used with sodium-sulphur batteries. This will be discussed to show its effect on the system performance.

Altmejd, M. (Powerplex Technologies, Inc., Downsview, ON (Canada)); Dzieciuch, M. (Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

A sodium-sulfur battery for the ETX-II propulsion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Canadian built 52 kWh sodium-sulphur battery is being integrated with the ETX-II powertrain. The propulsion system thus formed is being installed in a Ford Aerostar compact-size van for test and development purposes. The selection and design of the traction battery, as an integral part of the propulsion system, will be outlined in this paper along with the projected performance of the test bed vehicle under both highway and urban driving conditions. The results of a battery optimization study will also be discussed. Braking energy recovery (regeneration) is an important part of the ETX-II system capability and needs to be carefully managed when used with sodium-sulphur batteries. This will be discussed to show its effect on the system performance.

Altmejd, M. [Powerplex Technologies, Inc., Downsview, ON (Canada); Dzieciuch, M. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United S