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1

Americium/Curium Vitrification Pilot Tests - Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes of americium (Am) and curium (Cm) were produced in the past at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for research, medical, and radiological applications. These highly radioactive and valuable isotopes have been stored in an SRS reprocessing facility for a number of years. Vitrification of this solution will allow the material to be more safely stored until it is transported to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation for use in research and medical applications. A previous paper described operation results from the Am-Cm Melter 2A pilot system, a full-scale non-radioactive pilot facility. This paper presents the results from continued testing in the Pilot Facility and also describes efforts taken to look at alternative vitrification process operations and flowsheets designed to address the problems observed during melter 2A pilot testing.

Marra, J.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Baich, M.A.; Fellinger, A.P.; Hardy, B.J.; Herman, D.T.; Jones, T.M.; Miller, C.B.; Miller, D.H.; Snyder, T. K.; Stone, M.E.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

Beasley, R.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

degraded). As in Part I, where the perfect model assumption was utilized, most analysis error reduction of significant model errors due to physical parameterizations by assimilating synthetic sounding and surfaceTests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II

Meng, Zhiyong

4

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Multilayer Broken Clouds. Part II: Validation Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second part of our two-part paper we estimated the accuracy and robustness of the approximated equations for the mean radiance that were derived in Part I. In our analysis we used the three-dimensional (3D) cloud fields provided by (i) the stochastic Boolean model, (ii) large-eddy simulation model and (iii) satellite cloud retrieval. The accuracy of the obtained equations was evaluated by comparing the ensemble-averaged radiative properties that were obtained by the numerical averaging method (reference) and the analytical averaging method (approximation). The robustness of these equations was estimated by comparing the domain-averaged radiative properties obtained by using (i) the full 3D cloud structure (reference) and (ii) the bulk cloud statistics (approximation). It was shown that the approximated equations could provide reasonable accuracy ({approx}15%) for both the ensemble-averaged and domain-averaged radiative properties.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

6

Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

Trimble, V

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

Dethlefsen, R.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) |GContract115I,I

9

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 4. The Vehicle Fleet Is Dominated by Newer Vehicles______________ 8 5. More Recent Vehicle Models

Denver, University of

10

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12;22 Math & Computational Sciences Division generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic computations by eliminating three existing

Perkins, Richard A.

11

Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

HSWA Part II Permit Modification  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICEACMEFUTURE MOBILITY INPROCEEDINGS, R ePART

13

Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

DOE/EH 0434 Part II: Procedures Manual (Revised 2012)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE-VPP Part II: Procedures Manual Onsite Review 15 space entry, machine guarding, lockouttagout, electrical equipment, power tools and welding) for appropriate analysis and...

15

Seamless Energy Management Systems Part II: Development of Prototype  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seamless Energy Management Systems Part II: Development of Prototype Core Elements Final Project System #12;#12;Seamless Energy Management Systems Part II: Development of Prototype Core Elements Final Center (PSERC) research project entitled "Seamless Energy Management Systems" (S-53G for 2013

16

analysis part ii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

& H Schiler Page 2 Hans Peter Schwefel PHD Schwefel, Hans-Peter 6 Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis Engineering...

17

area part ii: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Derived Leaf Area Index over the High-Latitude Northern Hemisphere. Part II: Earth System Models CiteSeer Summary: Abstract: Leaf Area Index (LAI) is a key parameter in the...

18

LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MIGRATION· PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS Alan Jaymay vary even though replacement fi~~d the pa~ameter value PIe N - P ;, RT I r:. fILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS. I.lan ~1ar

Jay Smith, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012 Two model year 2010 Honda Generation II Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July...

20

DEPARTMENT OF MATERIALS PART II PROJECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as polymeric solar cells, or flexible displays, is limited by the performance of transparent flexible gas. This will include the `Ca test method' which is already set-up, and also the encapsulation of photovoltaic devices

Paxton, Anthony T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MPH Program Student Writing Tutorial: Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminar Work on title page and abstract 19 Test for Class B Complete title page and abstract 20 Complete _____________________________________ Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. 1 Work on article Bowling with Trevor and Lilly 2 Work Soccer Lunch with Mr. Smith Think about potential paper topic 4 Work Think about potential paper topic 5 Work

22

Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Survey Part II. A Framework for Soil and Vegetation Dynamics Arlene Tugel, Soil Scientist Liaison to ARS, USDA-NRCS Las Cruces, NM and the Soils-ESD Advisory Group #12;What makes a site a site? Soil forming factors: climate, parent, material, biotic factors

23

AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

None

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

24

AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

25

PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF BINARY ALLOYS R.A. Jones Produced and temperatures. In this work a neural network method was employed to study how the rate of corrosion of Fe accordance with the literature. 1. Introduction The atmosphere is the corrosive environment to which alloys

Cambridge, University of

26

Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on management (states) (1) (2) (3) (4) (6) (5) #12;State and transition models, by definition, include soil #12;Part II. Ecological sites and state and transition models: A framework for soil and vegetation dynamics and management #12;The soil survey is the foundation of the ecological site inventory process

27

Fast and Robust Algorithm for Compositional Modeling: Part II--  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

later) we have noticed that compositional modeling of a rich-retrograde gas condensate het- erogeneous of our study, stability analysis testing in the reduced space was formulated, and its robustness- sitional modeling, stability analysis testing in the reduction method was presented.1 In this paper, Part

Firoozabadi, Abbas

28

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

29

PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

An International Round-Robin Study, Part II: Thermal Diffusivity, Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For bulk thermoelectrics, figure-of-merit, ZT, still needs to improve from the current value of 1.0 - 1.5 to above 2 to be competitive to other alternative technologies. In recent years, the most significant improvements in ZT were mainly due to successful reduction of thermal conductivity. However, thermal conductivity cannot be measured directly at high temperatures. The combined measurements of thermal diffusivity and specific heat and density are required. It has been shown that thermal conductivity is the property with the greatest uncertainty and has a direct influence on the accuracy of the figure of merit. The International Energy Agency (IEA) group under the implementing agreement for Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT) has conducted two international round-robins since 2009. This paper is Part II of the international round-robin testing of transport properties of bulk bismuth telluride. The main focuses in Part II are on thermal diffusivity, specific heat and thermal conductivity.

Wang, Hsin [ORNL; Porter, Wallace D [ORNL; Bottner, Harold [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Konig, Jan [Fraunhofer-Institute, Freiburg, Germany; Chen, Lidong [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Bai, Shengqiang [Chinese Academy of Sciences; Tritt, Terry M. [Clemson University; Mayolett, Alex [Corning, Inc; Senawiratne, Jayantha [Corning, Inc; Smith, Charlene [Corning, Inc; Harris, Fred [ZT-Plus; Gilbert, Partricia [Marlow Industries, Inc; Sharp, J [Marlow Industries, Inc; Lo, Jason [CANMET - Materials Technology Laboratory, Natural Resources of Canada; Keinke, Holger [University of Waterloo, Canada; Kiss, Laszlo I. [University of Quebec at Chicoutimi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

Xu, Xianfan

32

T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Theoretical and Experimental Simulation of Accident Scenarios of the JET Cryogenic Components Part II: The JET LHCD Cryopump  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical and Experimental Simulation of Accident Scenarios of the JET Cryogenic Components Part II: The JET LHCD Cryopump

34

Technical/Peer Review Draft May 2006 PART II OVERVIEW1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Since22 humans began taking advantage of fossil-fuel resources for energy, we have been releasing to theTechnical/Peer Review Draft May 2006 II-1 PART II OVERVIEW1 2 Energy, Industry, and Waste Fossil fuels (coal, oil, and natural gas) are used primarily for their concentration of chemical energy

35

Probabilistic Forecast Calibration Using ECMWF and GFS Ensemble Reforecasts. Part II: Precipitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Probabilistic Forecast Calibration Using ECMWF and GFS Ensemble Reforecasts. Part II: Precipitation for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts, Reading, United Kingdom JEFFREY S. WHITAKER NOAA/Earth System Research As a companion to Part I, which discussed the calibration of probabilistic 2-m temperature forecasts using large

Hamill, Tom

36

Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

37

Unbonded Post Tensioned Concrete Slabs in Fire – Part II – Modelling Tendon Response and the Consequences of Localized Heating   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is Part II of a two part paper dealing with the current state of knowledge of the fire-safe structural design and construction of unbonded post-tensioned (UPT) flat plate concrete structures. Part I provided ...

Gales, John; Bisby, Luke; Gillie, Martin

38

Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part II - Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the initial experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix is obtained at essentially no cost during the normal simulation for criticality calculations. It can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode power distribution, the reactor dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode spatial eigenfunctions. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. Numerous examples are presented. A companion paper (Part I - Theory) describes the theoretical basis for the fission matrix method. (authors)

Carney, S. E. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brown, F. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kiedrowski, B. C. [University of Michigan, NERS Department, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Martin, W. R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Planar LTCC transformers for high voltage flyback converters: Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is a continuation of the work presented in SAND2007-2591 'Planar LTCC Transformers for High Voltage Flyback Converters'. The designs in that SAND report were all based on a ferrite tape/dielectric paste system originally developed by NASCENTechnoloy, Inc, who collaborated in the design and manufacturing of the planar LTCC flyback converters. The output/volume requirements were targeted to DoD application for hard target/mini fuzing at around 1500 V for reasonable primary peak currents. High voltages could be obtained but with considerable higher current. Work had begun on higher voltage systems and is where this report begins. Limits in material properties and processing capabilities show that the state-of-the-art has limited our practical output voltage from such a small part volume. In other words, the technology is currently limited within the allowable funding and interest.

Schofield, Daryl (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Schare, Joshua M., Ph.D.; Slama, George (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD); Abel, David (NASCENTechnology, Inc., Watertown, SD)

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Sensitivity of Climate to Diapycnal Diffusivity: Part I. Equilibrium State; Part II. Global Warming Scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part I: The diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean is one of the least known parameters in current climate models. Measurements of this diffusivity are sparse and insufficient for compiling a global map. Inferences from inverse ...

Dalan, Fabio.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Code validation with EBR-II test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive system of computer codes is used at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze whole-plant transient behavior of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2. Three of these codes, NATDEMO/HOTCHAN, SASSYS, and DSNP have been validated with data from reactor transient tests. The validated codes are the foundation of safety analyses and pretest predictions for the continuing design improvements and experimental programs in EBR-II, and are also valuable tools for the analysis of innovative reactor designs.

Herzog, J.P.; Chang, L.K.; Dean, E.M.; Feldman, E.E.; Hill, D.J.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Code validation with EBR-II test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive system of computer codes is used at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze whole-plant transient behavior of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2. Three of these codes, NATDEMO/HOTCHAN, SASSYS, and DSNP have been validated with data from reactor transient tests. The validated codes are the foundation of safety analyses and pretest predictions for the continuing design improvements and experimental programs in EBR-II, and are also valuable tools for the analysis of innovative reactor designs.

Herzog, J.P.; Chang, L.K.; Dean, E.M.; Feldman, E.E.; Hill, D.J.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

PHASE II VAULT TESTING OF THE ARGONNE RFID SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (Environmental Management [EM], Office of Packaging and Transportation [EM-45]) Packaging and Certification Program (DOE PCP) has developed a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tracking and monitoring system, called ARG-US, for the management of nuclear materials packages during transportation and storage. The performance of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system has been fully tested in two demonstration projects in April 2008 and August 2009. With the strong support of DOE-SR and DOE PCP, a field testing program was completed in Savannah River Site's K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) Facility, an active Category I Plutonium Storage Facility, in 2010. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault for operational testing. This latest version (Mark III) of the Argonne RFID system now has the capability to measure radiation dose and dose rate. This paper will report field testing progress of the ARG-US RFID equipment in KAMS, the operability and reliability trend results associated with the applications of the system, and discuss the potential benefits in enhancing safety, security and materials accountability. The purpose of this Phase II K Area test is to verify the accuracy of the radiation monitoring and proper functionality of the ARG-US RFID equipment and system under a realistic environment in the KAMS facility. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system leads to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including environmental condition monitoring and radiation monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support a future development and testing. This will increase Operation efficiency and cost effectiveness for vault operation. As the next step (Phase II) of continued vault testing for the ARG-US system, the Savannah River Site K Area Material Storage facility has placed the ARG-US RFIDs into the 910B storage vault. Deploying the ARG-US RFID system lends to a reduced need for manned surveillance and increased inventory periods by providing real-time access to status and event history traceability, including radiation and environmental monitoring. The successful completion of the testing program will provide field data to support future development and testing.

Willoner, T.; Turlington, R.; Koenig, R.

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

45

Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; ? Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 25 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation parameters and off-gas chemistry. In order to generate off-gas data in support of the flammability model development for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet, vapor space steady state testing in the range of ~300-750°C was conducted under the following conditions, (i) 100% (nominal and excess antifoam levels) and 125% stoichiometry feed and (ii) with and without argon bubbling. Adjustments to feed rate, heater outputs and purge air flow were necessary in order to achieve vapor space temperatures in this range. Surge testing was also completed under nominal conditions for four days with argon bubbling and one day without argon bubbling.

Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

47

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume II, Appendices (Part 1 of 11)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOEI ChaptersII

48

Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part II: Idealized Numerical Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part II: Idealized Numerical horizontal pressure gradient, wind energy transfer to the mixed layer can be more efficient in such a regime as compared to the case of an initially horizontally homogeneous ocean. However, nearly all energy is removed

Miami, University of

49

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capacity fade of Sony 18650 cells cycled at elevated temperatures Part II. Capacity fade analysis P August 2002 Abstract A complete capacity fade analysis was carried out for Sony 18650 cells cycled the other losses. # 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Capacity fade; Sony 18650

Popov, Branko N.

50

CURE MONITORING AND SHM OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED PART II : MULTI-PHYSICAL CORRELATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURE MONITORING AND SHM OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER PART II : MULTI-PHYSICAL CORRELATIONS. The material (made of T700 carbon /M21 epoxy prepegs) is here used as a sensor but could be also used]. The electrical resistivity of CFRP composites depends on the type and the orientation of the fiber

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

51

The problem of teaching object-oriented programming Part II: Environments1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The problem of teaching object-oriented programming Part II: Environments1 Michael Kölling School aspect: the importance of the environment. In short: a suitable programming environment is crucial-orientation, problems with the environment used were the most frequent and the most severe. Because of this importance

Kent, University of

52

Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

( l Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation S. A. GEDEON and T. W. EAGAR Dynamic inspection monitoring of the weld current, voltage, resistance of material variations and weld process parameter modifications on resistance spot welding of coated

Eagar, Thomas W.

53

COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF PHYSICS PART II: MEDIATED ACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF PHYSICS PART II: MEDIATED ACTION Valerie K. Otero School "context." One of the fundamental features of the socio- cultural perspective is the notion that cognition theoretical perspectives of cognition where learning is viewed as the process of doing and participating

Colorado at Boulder, University of

54

PDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems -Part II: SOH Identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehi- cles and renewable energy resources is battery energy storage. Advanced battery systems representPDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems - Part II: SOH Identification S sensing and actuation exists to monitor and control the internal state of these systems. As such, battery

Krstic, Miroslav

55

How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How Does the Eye Warm? Part II: Sensitivity to Vertical Wind Shear and a Trajectory Analysis DANIEL of vertical wind shear on the structure of warming and descent in the eye; results are compared with the no environment, time-averaged eye descent is maximized at 12­13-km height. Warming is not generally maximized

56

Cold drawn steel wires--processing, residual stresses and ductility Part II: Synchrotron and neutron diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold drawn steel wires--processing, residual stresses and ductility Part II: Synchrotron Received in final form 29 September 2005 ABSTRACT Cold drawing of steel wires leads to an increase proposed that cold drawing would induce a phase transformation of the steel, possibly a martensitic

57

Channel State Prediction in Cognitive Radio, Part II: Single-User Prediction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Channel State Prediction in Cognitive Radio, Part II: Single-User Prediction Zhe Chen, Nan Guo-user prediction of channel state is proposed to minimize the negative impact of response delays caused by hardware-SU) prediction is proposed and examined. In order to have convincing performance evaluation results, real- world

Qiu, Robert Caiming

58

Analytical solutions for sequentially coupled one-dimensional reactive transport problems Part II: Special cases,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical solutions for sequentially coupled one-dimensional reactive transport problems ­ Part II solutions to multi-species reactive transport equations coupled through sorption and sequential first special-case transport scenarios involving zero initial condition, identical retardation factors and zero

Clement, Prabhakar

59

Isogeometric Segmentation. Part II: On the segmentability of contractible solids with non-convex edges  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

method works by searching a sufficiently connected edge graph of the solid for a cycle of verticesIsogeometric Segmentation. Part II: On the segmentability of contractible solids with non a contractible boundary-represented solid into a small number of topological hexahedra. A satisfactory

Jüttler, Bert

60

Single-cycle mixed-fluid LNG process Part II: Optimal operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-cycle mixed-fluid LNG process Part II: Optimal operation Jørgen Bauck Jensen and Sigurd of work that goes into the design of LNG processes, there is surprisingly little attention simple LNG process, namely the PRICO process. Keywords: PRICO, LNG, operation 1 Introduction The process

Skogestad, Sigurd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Estimating Central Equatorial Pacific SST Variability over the Past Millennium. Part II: Reconstructions and Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Central Equatorial Pacific SST Variability over the Past Millennium. Part II boundary conditions. Wavelet coherence analysis reveals a robust antiphasing between solar forcing and Ni@usc.edu 1 APRIL 2013 E M I L E - G E A Y E T A L . 2329 DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00511.1 Ã? 2013 American

Wittenberg, Andrew

62

STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS of Climate/Hydrologic Extremes (3) Unified Approach (Extremes/Non-Extremes) (4) Complex Extreme Climate Design -- No longer only need for extreme value theory · Complex Extreme Events -- e. g., heat waves

Katz, Richard

63

Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part II: Experimental results and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part II: Experimental results-92322 Ch^atillon, France Abstract Measurements of CO2 emission spectra at high temperature in the 2.7 µm emission measurements using a microwave post-discharge in CO2 flow as emission source. The measurements

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

64

Space-qualified, abuttable packaging for LBNL p-channel CCDs, Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-qualified, abuttable packaging for LBNL p-channel CCDs, Part II R.W. Besuner1 , C. Baltay2 for 10.5 m pixel, 3.5k x 3.5k p-channel LBNL CCDs. These packages are built around a silicon carbide of 36.8mm square may be packed on a detector pitch as small as 44mm. LBNL-developed Front End

California at Berkeley, University of

65

Slag-Metal Reactions during Welding: Part II. Theory ) U. MITRA and T.W. EAGAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slag-Metal Reactions during Welding: Part II. Theory ) U. MITRA and T.W. EAGAR A kinetic model-shielded welding. The model ac~o~nts .for changes i~ ~lloy r~covery based on the geometry of the resulting weld bead. It also dtstmgUJshes compos1t1onal dtfferences be- tween single-pass and multiple-pass weld beads

Eagar, Thomas W.

66

Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Hinga, K.R. (ed.) ed.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

NOx control subsystem test plan: LEBS Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is planned that NO{sub x} control subsystem testing in support of Phase II of the Low-Emissions Boiler Systems (LEBS) Project occur in ABB Power Plant Laboratories` (PPL) pilot scale Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF). This work will be performed to provide necessary design and operational information for inclusion of an optimized NO, control subsystem in the Proof-of-Concept Test Facility (POCTF) and Commercial Generating Unit (CGU) designs. The BSF is a 50 to 90x10{sup 6} BTU/hr (15 to 26 MWt) coal, oil or natural gas fired tangential furnace designed to replicate the residence time/temperature history of a utility scale tangentially fired boiler. All major aspects of a typical utility boiler are duplicated in the BSF including the lower furnace, the ash hopper, multiple burner elevations, the arch section, superheater/reheater panels, and the convective heat transfer surfaces. The furnace walls and heat transfer surfaces are cooled by a surrounding water jacket. Steam generated is vented off at atmospheric pressure so that a constant sink temperature of 100{degrees}C (212{degrees}C) is maintained. The lower furnace water walls are selectively refractory lined to maintain an appropriate furnace gas temperature history. Refractory is required because the sink temperature (100{degrees}C) is cooler than that of a typical, utility boiler, and the surface-to-volume ratio of the BSF is greater than that of a utility boiler due to scale effects. For the subject testing, the BSF will be configured as a coal fired boiler. Design and planning activities associated with the construction of the NO{sub x} control subsystem test unit will continue through June, 1995. Additionally, the schedule for specification of certain low NO{sub x} firing system components was set to allow for precursor, internal and LEBS development activities to occur and subsequently provide necessary design parameters.

NONE

1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

Experimental investigation of an oscillating circular piston positive displacement flowmeter: II - Leakage flows and wear tests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental data from an oscillating circular piston positive displacement flowmeter are described which focused on leakage flows and wear. This is the second part of a two part paper on the experimental tests, the first part concerned piston...

Morton, Charlotte E; Baker, Roger C; Hutchings, Ian M

69

E-Print Network 3.0 - antidepressivos parte ii Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

White Electrician II Gardner Rudasill Maintenance Foreman II Timothy... Mildred Mayes Landscape Maintenance Crew Leader Joshua Smith Grounds Keeper II ... Source: Behmer,...

70

Time Synchronization Attack in Smart Grid-Part II: Cross Layer Detection Mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A novel time synchronization attack (TSA) on wide area monitoring systems in smart grid has been identified in the first part of this paper. A cross layer detection mechanism is proposed to combat TSA in part II of this paper. In the physical layer, we propose a GPS carrier signal noise ratio (C/No) based spoofing detection technique. In addition, a patch-monopole hybrid antenna is applied to receive GPS signal. By computing the standard deviation of the C/No difference from two GPS receivers, a priori probability of spoofing detection is fed to the upper layer, where power system state is estimated and controlled. A trustworthiness based evaluation method is applied to identify the PMU being under TSA. Both the physical layer and upper layer algorithms are integrated to detect the TSA, thus forming a cross layer mechanism. Experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed TSA detection algorithm.

Zhang, Zhenghao; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Li, Husheng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Seismic risk analysis for General Electric Plutonium Facility, Pleasanton, California. Final report, part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second of a two part study addressing the seismic risk or hazard of the special nuclear materials (SNM) facility of the General Electric Vallecitos Nuclear Center at Pleasanton, California. The Part I companion to this report, dated July 31, 1978, presented the seismic hazard at the site that resulted from exposure to earthquakes on the Calaveras, Hayward, San Andreas and, additionally, from smaller unassociated earthquakes that could not be attributed to these specific faults. However, while this study was in progress, certain additional geologic information became available that could be interpreted in terms of the existance of a nearby fault. Although substantial geologic investigations were subsequently deployed, the existance of this postulated fault, called the Verona Fault, remained very controversial. The purpose of the Part II study was to assume the existance of such a capable fault and, under this assumption, to examine the loads that the fault could impose on the SNM facility. This report first reviews the geologic setting with a focus on specifying sufficient geologic parameters to characterize the postulated fault. The report next presents the methodology used to calculate the vibratory ground motion hazard. Because of the complexity of the fault geometry, a slightly different methodology is used here compared to the Part I report. This section ends with the results of the calculation applied to the SNM facility. Finally, the report presents the methodology and results of the rupture hazard calculation.

Not Available

1980-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

72

PULSE COMBUSTOR DESIGN QUALIFICATION TEST AND CLEAN COAL FEEDSTOCK TEST - VOLUME I AND VOLUME II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For this Cooperative Agreement, the pulse heater module is the technology envelope for an indirectly heated steam reformer. The field of use of the steam reformer pursuant to this Cooperative Agreement with DOE is for the processing of sub-bituminous coals and lignite. The main focus is the mild gasification of such coals for the generation of both fuel gas and char--for the steel industry is the main focus. An alternate market application for the substitution of metallurgical coke is also presented. This project was devoted to qualification of a 253-tube pulse heater module. This module was designed, fabricated, installed, instrumented and tested in a fluidized bed test facility. Several test campaigns were conducted. This larger heater is a 3.5 times scale-up of the previous pulse heaters that had 72 tubes each. The smaller heater has been part of previous pilot field testing of the steam reformer at New Bern, North Carolina. The project also included collection and reduction of mild gasification process data from operation of the process development unit (PDU). The operation of the PDU was aimed at conditions required to produce char (and gas) for the Northshore Steel Operations. Northshore Steel supplied the coal for the process unit tests.

Unknown

2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

73

Faith in the algorithm, part 1: beyond the turing test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the Turing test was first proposed by Alan Turing in 1950, the goal of artificial intelligence has been predicated on the ability for computers to imitate human intelligence. However, the majority of uses for the computer can be said to fall outside the domain of human abilities and it is exactly outside of this domain where computers have demonstrated their greatest contribution. Another definition for artificial intelligence is one that is not predicated on human mimicry, but instead, on human amplification, where the algorithms that are best at accomplishing this are deemed the most intelligent. This article surveys various systems that augment human and social intelligence.

Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC; ,

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

New Praxis II Test for Subject Matter Spanish Majors Students who are matriculated into education programs for certification must take a Praxis II Spanish.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Praxis II Test for Subject Matter Spanish Majors Students who are matriculated into education Knowledge: Test # 10191. If a student is matriculated in a Subject Matter Spanish program and has ALREADY taken Praxis II Spanish Content Knowledge: Test # 10191, AND PASSED they are grandfathered. Those

Rusu, Adrian

76

North Wind 4-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Phase II (testing and fabrication) of a program funded by the US Department of Energy to design, fabricate, and test a cost-effective wind system in the 3 to 6 kW class. During Phase II, using the design developed during Phase I, a prototype 4 kW machine was fabricated and tested in Waitsfield, Vermont. Several problems were encountered and subsequently analyzed. Design modifications, including the use of a larger alternator, are described. Test performed by North Wind and by Rockwell International (which monitored the program) demonstrated the predicted performance characteristics and the validity of the North Wind design.

Lynch, J.; Coleman, C.; Mayer, D.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

Carlsbad Field Office

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Enertech 15-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II report presents a description of the Enertech 15 kW prototype wind system hardware fabrication; results of component tests; and results of preliminary testing conducted at Norwich, VT and the RF Wind Energy Research Center. In addition, the assembly sequence is documented. During testing, the unit experienced several operational problems, but testing proved the design concept and demonstrated the system's ability to meet the contract design specifications for power output.

Zickefoose, C.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Kaman 40-kW wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and tests. Volume II. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A program is underway to design, fabricate and test a horizontal axis Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) capable of producing 40 kW electrical output power in a 20 mph wind. Results are presented of the program effort covering fabrication and testing of the Wing Turbine Generator designed earlier. A minimum of difficulties were experienced during fabrication and, after successful completion of Contractor tests through 20 mph winds, the WTG was shipped to Rocky Flats, assembled and operated there. The 40 kW WTG is presently undergoing extended tests at Rockwell's Rocky Flats test facility.

Howes, H; Perley, R

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall, was presented at the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, on August 13, 2014.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Gravity Waves in a Horizontal Shear Flow. Part II: Interaction between Gravity Waves and Potential Vorticity Perturbations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravity Waves in a Horizontal Shear Flow. Part II: Interaction between Gravity Waves and Potential perturbations and propagating internal gravity waves in a horizon- tally sheared zonal flow is investigated. In the strong stratification limit, an initial vorticity perturbation weakly excites two propagating gravity

Farrell, Brian F.

82

JOINT ACOUSTIC-VIDEO FINGERPRINTING OF VEHICLES, PART II , F. Guo, A. C. Sankaranarayanan, and R. Chellappa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

JOINT ACOUSTIC-VIDEO FINGERPRINTING OF VEHICLES, PART II V. Cevher , F. Guo, A. C. Sankaranarayanan, and R. Chellappa Center for Automation Research, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 {volkan the wheelbase length of a vehicle using line metrology in video. We then address the vehi- cle fingerprinting

Cevher, Volkan

83

Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 Unraveling the conundrum of river response to rising sea level from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 1 Unraveling the conundrum of river to Sedimentology, May, 2006 2 deltas is adapted to describe the response of the Fly-Strickland River system, Papua of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 3 Pleistocene-Holocene eustatic sea level rise of some 120 m

Parker, Gary

84

Electrodynamics II Exam 1. Part A (176 pts.) Closed Book Radiation and Scattering Name KSU 2006/02/21  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) (24) Determine the scattered electric field Esc in the radiation zone. d) (24) Averaging over incidentElectrodynamics II Exam 1. Part A (176 pts.) Closed Book Radiation and Scattering Name KSU 2006) when the sources J(r, t) and (r, t) have harmonic time dependence? 2. (12) In radiation problems

Wysin, Gary

85

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution, pressure drop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by externally humidified air and hydrogen gas streams, must be present within the fuel cell to maintain 4 5 6 #12;a fuel cell blocks gas transport pathways in the catalyst layers, gas diffusion layersWater management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution

Kandlikar, Satish

86

Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase II. Verification testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work done under Phase II, the verification testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The main objective of the test program was to determine failure modes and wear rates. Only minor auxiliary equipment malfunctions were encountered. Wear rates indicate useful life expectancy of from 1 to 5 years for wear-exposed components. Recommendations are made for adapting the equipment for pilot plant and commercial applications. 3 references, 20 figures, 12 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

87

Results and implications of the EBR-II inherent safety demonstration tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On April 3, 1986 two milestone tests were conducted in Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-II). The first test was a loss of flow without scram and the second was a loss of heat sink without scram. Both tests were initiated from 100% power and in both tests the reactor was shut down by natural processes, principally thermal expansion, without automatic scram, operator intervention or the help of special in-core devices. The temperature transients during the tests were mild, as predicted, and there was no damage to the core or reactor plant structures. In a general sense, therefore, the tests plus supporting analysis demonstrated the feasibility of inherent passive shutdown for undercooling accidents in metal-fueled LMRs. The results provide a technical basis for future experiments in EBR-II to demonstrate inherent safety for overpower accidents and provide data for validation of computer codes used for design and safety analysis of inherently safe reactor plants.

Planchon, H.P.; Golden, G.H.; Sackett, J.I.; Mohr, D.; Chang, L.K.; Feldman, E.E.; Betten, P.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Code validation with EBR-II test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive system of computer codes is used at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze whole-plant transient behavior of the Experiment Breeder Reactor 2. Three of these codes, NATDEMO/HOTCHAN, SASSYS, and DSNP have been validated with data from reactor transient tests. The validated codes are the foundation of safety analyses and pretest predictions for the continuing design improvements and experimental programs in EBR-2, and are also valuable tools for the analysis of innovative reactor designs. 29 refs., 6 figs.

Herzog, J.P.; Chang, L.K.; Dean, E.M.; Feldman, E.E.; Hill, D.J.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Appropriate Energy Technology Resource Center .IX DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Pilot Program - PartIX DOE Appropriate Energy Technology Pilot Program - Part I;

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Expedient methods of respiratory protection. II. Leakage tests. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following readily-available materials were tested on a manikin connected to a breathing simulator to determine the fraction of an approximately 2-..mu..m-diameter aerosol that would leak around the seal of the materials to the manikin's face: cotton/polyester shirt material, cotton handkerchief material, toweling (a wash cloth), a surgical mask (Johnson and Johnson Co., model HRI 8137), and a NIOSH-approved disposable face mask (3M, model number 8710). The leakage tests were performed to supplement the measurements of penetration through the materials, conducted as the first phase of this investigation. The leakage tests were performed with the materials held on to the face by three methods, leakage fractions being determined from comparisons with the penetration of the same aerosol for the materials fully taped to the face. At a breathing rate of 37 liters per minute, mean leakages ranged from 0.0 percent to 63 percent. Mean penetrations exclusive of leakage ranged from 0.6 percent to 39 percent. Use of nylon hosiery material (panty hose) to hold the handkerchief material or the disposable face mask to the face was found to be very effective in preventing leakage. Such a combination could be expected to reduce leakage around the handkerchief to about ten percent or less in practice, and around the mask to less than one percent, offering substantial protection from accidentally generated aerosols. The reduction in leakage around the mask provided by the hosiery material suggests the adaptation and use of such an approach in regular industrial hygiene practice. The third and final phase of this investigation is underway, in which the penetration of the materials by particles with diameters between 0.05 and 0.5 ..mu..m is being measured and the effectiveness of the methods for dose reduction in the presence of radioactive aerosols is being modeled.

Cooper, D.W.; Hinds, W.C.; Price, J.M.; Weker, R.; Yee, H.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focuses on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report presents results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge. This report was originally published in March 2001. In January 2004, a transcription error was discovered in the value reported for the uranium metal content of KE North Loadout Pit sample FE-3. This revision of the report corrects the U metal content of FE-3 from 0.0013 wt% to 0.013 wt%.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

93

Evaluation of a Decoupling-Based Fault Detection and Diagnostic Technique - Part II: Field Evaluation and Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intent is to validate the DB FDD performance and demonstrate its applications. The first part focuses on sensitivity and robustness evaluation through controlled field emulation testing. In this paper, the technique is applied to a number of field sites...

Li, H.; Braun, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

DOE program guide for universities and other research groups. Part I. DOE Research and Development Programs; Part II. DOE Procurement and Assistance Policies/Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide addresses the DOE responsibility for fostering advanced research and development of all energy resources, both current and potential. It is intended to provide, in a single publication, all the fundamental information needed by an institution to develop a potential working relationship with DOE. Part I describes DOE research and development programs and facilities, and identifies areas of additional research needs and potential areas for new research opportunities. It also summarizes budget data and identifies the DOE program information contacts for each program. Part II provides researchers and research administrators with an introduction to the DOE administrative policies and procedures for submission and evaluation of proposals and the administration of resulting grants, cooperative agreements, and research contracts. (RWR)

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Advanced control strategies for HVAC&R systems—An overview: Part II: Soft and fusion control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for HVAC&R is presented. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and the fusion or hybrid of hard and soft control techniques. Part I focused on hardcontrol strategies; Part II focuses on soft and fusion control and some future directions in HVA&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omissions of other works is purely unintentional.

D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

DOE ZERH Webinar: Going Green and Building Strong: Building FORTIFIED Homes Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Part 1 of this series introduced the basic concepts of building and wind interactions and how the FORTIFIED building programs can reduce property damage and loss.  In Part 2, IBHS will discuss the...

97

High Power Testing of RF Cavities for the PEP II B Factory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the process of conditioning and high-power testing of RF cavities for PEP-II. Procedures for vacuum assembly, bakeout and automated processing are described. Interlocks and safety precautions for protection of equipment and personnel are discussed and performance data of tested cavity assemblies are reported. Performance of ancillary components such as windows, couplers and tuners is also discussed. Comments are included on handling, alignment, installation and commissioning issues where appropriate.

Rimmer, R.A.; /LBL, Berkeley; Allen, M.; Fant, K.; Hill, A.; Hoyt, M.; Judkins, J.; Neubauer, Mark Stephen; Schwarz, H.; /SLAC

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

E-Print Network 3.0 - areas-part ii implementation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

40 CFR 191 COMPLIANCE DETERMINATION FOR THE WASTE ISOLATION Summary: Report Rev 3 (DOECAO-95- 1121) 696 II-A-26 101596 EPA ReportEPA-402-R-96-010, Implementation......

99

A Testing Strategy for the Mass Production of CDMS II Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the mass production of our detectors. First, the critical temperatures of the tungsten and other basicA Testing Strategy for the Mass Production of CDMS II Detectors D. Driscoll , D.S. Akerib , D germanium or silicon with a thin film of aluminum and tungsten patterned on the surface. This presentation

California at Berkeley, University of

100

A Testing Strategy for the Mass Production of CDMS II Detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Testing Strategy for the Mass Production of CDMS II Detectors D. Driscoll #3; , D.S. Akerib #3­thick, 7­cm­diameter crystals of either germanium or silicon with a thin film of aluminum and tungsten facilities is to provide quality control for the mass production of our detectors. First, the critical

California at Berkeley, University of

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101

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone.

Lambert, W.E.; Samet, J.M.; Hunt, W.C.; Skipper, B.J.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

Gregg Ruskuaff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part II. Dual-energy imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) uses an iodinated contrast agent in combination with digital mammography (DM) to evaluate lesions on the basis of tumor angiogenesis. In DE imaging, low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) images are acquired after contrast administration and their logarithms are subtracted to cancel the appearance of normal breast tissue. Often there is incomplete signal cancellation in the subtracted images, creating a background “clutter” that can impair lesion detection. This is the second component of a two-part report on anatomical noise in CEDM. In Part I the authors characterized the anatomical noise for single-energy (SE) temporal subtraction CEDM by a power law, with model parameters ? and ?. In this work the authors quantify the anatomical noise in DE CEDM clinical images and compare this with the noise in SE CEDM. The influence on the anatomical noise of the presence of iodine in the breast, the timing of imaging postcontrast administration, and the x-ray energy used for acquisition are each evaluated.Methods: The power law parameters, ? and ?, were measured from unprocessed LE and HE images and from DE subtracted images to quantify the anatomical noise. A total of 98 DE CEDM cases acquired in a previous clinical pilot study were assessed. Conventional DM images from 75 of the women were evaluated for comparison with DE CEDM. The influence of the imaging technique on anatomical noise was determined from an analysis of differences between the power law parameters as measured in DM, LE, HE, and DE subtracted images for each subject.Results: In DE CEDM, weighted image subtraction lowers ? to about 1.1 from 3.2 and 3.1 in LE and HE unprocessed images, respectively. The presence of iodine has a small but significant effect in LE images, reducing ? by about 0.07 compared to DM, with ? unchanged. Increasing the x-ray energy, from that typical in DM to a HE beam, significantly decreases ? by about 2 × 10{sup ?5} mm{sup 2}, and lowers ? by about 0.14 compared to LE images. A comparison of SE and DE CEDM at 4 min postcontrast shows equivalent power law parameters in unprocessed images, and lower ? and ? by about 3 × 10{sup ?5} mm{sup 2} and 0.50, respectively, in DE versus SE subtracted images.Conclusions: Image subtraction in both SE and DE CEDM reduces ? by over a factor of 2, while maintaining ? below that in DM. Given the equivalent ? between SE and DE unprocessed CEDM images, and the smaller anatomical noise in the DE subtracted images, the DE approach may have an advantage over SE CEDM. It will be necessary to test this potential advantage in future lesion detectability experiments, which account for realistic lesion signals. The authors' results suggest that LE images could be used in place of DM images in CEDM exam interpretation.

Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Mainprize, James G. [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Sunnybrook Research Institute, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Carton, Ann-Katherine; Saab-Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, R?zvan; Muller, Serge [GE Healthcare, 283 rue de la Minière, Buc 78530 (France)] [GE Healthcare, 283 rue de la Minière, Buc 78530 (France); Jong, Roberta A. [Breast Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)] [Breast Imaging, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, 2075 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Dromain, Clarisse [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulin, Villejuif 94805 (France)] [Department of Radiology, Institut Gustave Roussy, 39 rue Camille Desmoulin, Villejuif 94805 (France)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards (Part II)  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Deliciouscritical_materials_workshop_presentations.pdf MoreProgram | Department of Energy DOE Appoints StephenII)

108

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 5, MAY 2003 1239 Analysis of CMOS Photodiodes--Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 5, MAY 2003 1239 Analysis of CMOS Photodiodes of quantum efficiency for CMOS photodiode was illustrated. In this part of the paper, the lateral photoresponse in CMOS photodiode arrays is investigated with test linear photodiode arrays and numerical device

Hornsey, Richard

109

Code of Federal Regulations Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing procedural rules to be used in applying its substantive regulations and orders relating to nuclear safety. These procedural rules are intended to be an essential part of the framework through which DOE deals with its contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers to ensure its nuclear facilities are operated in a manner that protects public and worker safety and the environment. In particular, this part sets forth the procedures to implement the provisions of the Price- Anderson Amendments Act of 1988 (PAAA) which subjects DOE contractors to potential civil and criminal penalties for violations of DOE rules, regulations and orders relating to nuclear safety (DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements).

110

DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards (Part II)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power Systems EngineeringDepartmentSmartDepartment of Energy 2010 Federalup toDepartmentI)II)

111

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing Mousavi: FSM-Based Testing Part II #12;Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Outline Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Mousavi

Mousavi, Mohammad

112

Fatigue Testing of Metallurgically-Bonded EBR-II Superheater Tubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on 2¼Cr-1Mo steel specimens machined from ex-service Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) superheater duplex tubes. The tubes had been metallurgically bonded with a 100 µm thick Ni interlayer; the specimens incorporated this bond layer. Tests were performed at room temperature in air and at 400°C in air and humid Ar; cracks were grown at varied levels of constant ?K. Crack growth tests at a range of ?K were also performed on specimens machined from the shell of the superheater. In all conditions the presence of the Ni interlayer was found to result in a net retardation of growth as the crack passed through the interlayer. The mechanism of retardation was identified as a disruption of crack planarity and uniformity after passing through the porous interlayer. Full crack arrest was only observed in a single test performed at near-threshold ?K level (12 MPa?m) at 400°C. In this case the crack tip was blunted by oxidation of the base steel at the steel-interlayer interface.

Terry C. Totemeier

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 17, NO. 2, MARCH/APRIL 2011 261 Green Optical Communications--Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

consumption of the switching infrastructure is larger than the energy consumption of the trans- port consumption in optical commu- nications. Part I covers energy consumption in optical transport. Part II explores the lower bound on energy consumption in optical switches and networks, analyzes the energy

Tucker, Rod

114

Dosimetric characterization and output verification for conical brachytherapy surface applicators. Part II. High dose rate {sup 192}Ir sources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Historically, treatment of malignant surface lesions has been achieved with linear accelerator based electron beams or superficial x-ray beams. Recent developments in the field of brachytherapy now allow for the treatment of surface lesions with specialized conical applicators placed directly on the lesion. Applicators are available for use with high dose rate (HDR){sup 192}Ir sources, as well as electronic brachytherapy sources. Part I of this paper discussed the applicators used with electronic brachytherapy sources. Part II will discuss those used with HDR {sup 192}Ir sources. Although the use of these applicators has gained in popularity, the dosimetric characteristics have not been independently verified. Additionally, there is no recognized method of output verification for quality assurance procedures with applicators like these. Methods: This work aims to create a cohesive method of output verification that can be used to determine the dose at the treatment surface as part of a quality assurance/commissioning process for surface applicators used with HDR electronic brachytherapy sources (Part I) and{sup 192}Ir sources (Part II). Air-kerma rate measurements for the {sup 192}Ir sources were completed with several models of small-volume ionization chambers to obtain an air-kerma rate at the treatment surface for each applicator. Correction factors were calculated using MCNP5 and EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes in order to determine an applicator-specific absorbed dose to water at the treatment surface from the measured air-kerma rate. Additionally, relative dose measurements of the surface dose distributions and characteristic depth dose curves were completed in-phantom. Results: Theoretical dose distributions and depth dose curves were generated for each applicator and agreed well with the measured values. A method of output verification was created that allows users to determine the applicator-specific dose to water at the treatment surface based on a measured air-kerma rate. Conclusions: The novel output verification methods described in this work will reduce uncertainties in dose delivery for treatments with these kinds of surface applicators, ultimately improving patient care.

Fulkerson, Regina K., E-mail: rmkenned@gmail.com; Micka, John A.; DeWerd, Larry A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Part II AH-1G ROTOR IN LOW SPEED DESCENT FLIGHT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, results are presented for a two-bladed AH-1G rotor in a low-speed descent condition. In low speed forward and Acoustics Test (TAAT) was conducted on an AH-1G Cobra. It used highly instrumented rotor blades direction. The inner Navier-Stokes zone includes about 39% of the total grid points. The rotor has

116

Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and are connected to a fan coil unit by flexible ductwork asvariable air volume fan coil units typically used in

Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A generic grid interface for parallel and adaptive scientific Part II: implementation and tests in DUNE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as the finite element, finite volume, and finite difference method as well as various gridless methods. For each, C++, finite ele- ments, finite volumes 1 Introduction Partial Differential Equations (PDEs) are abundant in science and engineering. There is a large body of methods to numerically solve PDEs

Bastian, Peter

118

Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wall: Door @ South wall: [Btu*h -1 *ft -2 *°F -1 ] [W(m²K)]plenum top: SA plenum bottom: [Btu*h -1 *°F -1 ] [W °K -1 ]and U-value of 2.8 W/(m²K) (0.5 Btu/(hft²°F)). However, this

Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Future use of BI-GAS facility. Final report, Part II. [Other possible uses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 120 tpd BI-GAS pilot plant, intended to produce SNG at high pressure, was completed in 1976. For the next three and a half years, the operator, Stearns-Roger Inc., was engaged in operating the plant while overcoming a series of mechanical problems that have prevented the plant from running at design capacity and pressure. Since July 1980, these problems have apparently been corrected and considerable progress was made. In late 1979, the Yates Congressional Committee directed DOE to investigate the possibility of establishing an entrained-bed gasifier test facility at the site. In January 1981, the DOE established a study group composed of DOE and UOP/SDC personnel to determine how best to use the BI-GAS facility. The group considered four possibilities: Continue operation of the facility in accordance with the technical program plan developed by DOE and Stearns-Roger; modify the plant into an entrained-bed facility for testing components and processes; mothball the facility, or dismantle the facility. The group took the view that modifying the plant into a test facility would increase substantially the amount of engineering data available to the designers of commercial gasification plants. Since it appears that syngas plants will be of commercial interest sooner than SNG plants will, it was decided that the facility should test syngas production components and processes at high pressure. Consequently, it was recommended that: Operation of the plant be continued, both to collect data and to prove the BI-GAS process, as long as the schedule of the technical program plan is met; Begin at once to prepare a detailed design for modifying the BI-GAS plant to a high-pressure, entrained flow syngas test facility; and Implement the modification plan as soon as the BI-GAS process is proven or it becomes apparent that progress is unsatisfactory.

Not Available

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

ART CCIM Phase II-A Off-Gas System Evaluation Test Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This test plan defines testing to be performed using the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) engineering-scale cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) test system for Phase II-A of the Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) CCIM Project. The multi-phase ART-CCIM Project is developing a conceptual design for replacing the joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) with a cold crucible induction melter. The INL CCIM test system includes all feed, melter off-gas control, and process control subsystems needed for fully integrated operation and testing. Testing will include operation of the melter system while feeding a non-radioactive slurry mixture prepared to simulate the same type of waste feed presently being processed in the DWPF. Process monitoring and sample collection and analysis will be used to characterize the off-gas composition and properties, and to show the fate of feed constituents, to provide data that shows how the CCIM retrofit conceptual design can operate with the existing DWPF off-gas control system.

Nick Soelberg; Jay Roach

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J. [US Steel Research & Technological Center, Monroeville, PA (United States)

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Electric Vehicle Communications Standards Testing and Validation - Phase II: SAE J2931/1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vehicle to grid communication standards enable interoperability among vehicles, charging stations and utility providers and provide the capability to implement charge management. Several standards initiatives by the Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE), International Standards Organization and International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC), and ZigBee/HomePlug Alliance are developing requirements for communication messages and protocols. Recent work by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with SAE and automobile manufacturers has identified vehicle to grid communication performance requirements and developed a test plan as part of SAE J2931/1 committee work. This laboratory test plan was approved by the SAE J2931/1 committee and included test configurations, test methods, and performance requirements to verify reliability, robustness, repeatability, maximum communication distance, and authentication features of power line carrier (PLC) communication modules at the internet protocol layer level. The goal of the testing effort was to select a communication technology that would enable automobile manufacturers to begin the development and implementation process. The EPRI/Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) testing teams divided the testing so that results for each test could be presented by two teams, performing the tests independently. The PNNL team performed narrowband PLC testing including the Texas Instruments (TI) Concerto, Ariane Controls AC-CPM1, and the MAXIM Tahoe 2 evaluation boards. The scope of testing was limited to measuring the vendor systems communication performance between Electric Vehicle Support Equipment (EVSE) and plug-in electric vehicles (PEV). The testing scope did not address PEV’s CAN bus to PLC or PLC to EVSE (Wi-Fi, cellular, PLC Mains, etc.) communication integration. In particular, no evaluation was performed to delineate the effort needed to translate the IPv6/SEP2.0 messages to PEV’s CAN bus. The J2931/1 laboratory test results were presented to the SAE membership on March 20-22, 2012. The SAE committee decided to select HomePlug GreenPHY (HPGP) as the communication technology to use between the PEV and EVSE. No technology completely met all performance requirements. Both the MAXIM Tahoe 2 and TI Concerto met the 100Kbps throughput requirement, are estimated to meet the latency measurement performance, and met the control pilot impairment requirements. But HPGP demonstrated the potential to provide a data throughput rate of 10x of the requirement and either met or showed the potential to meet the other requirements with further development.

Pratt, Richard M.; Gowri, Krishnan

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

125

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fioml7aa AMY yII

126

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Gaussian Jet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II structures that dominate wave momentum and energy transport. When the interior of a typical midlatitude jet and energy at jet interior critical levels. Longer waves transport momentum and energy away from the jet

Farrell, Brian F.

127

M.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part II, HCII 2009, LNCS 5618, pp. 342351, 2009. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part II, HCII 2009, LNCS 5618, pp. 342 media consumption. Keywords: categorical data, visualization, multi-dimensional analysis. 1 Introduction The visualization of categorical data occurs in various fields, such as mass media and marketing research

Misue, Kazuo

128

A Study of Educational Simulations Part II Interface W. K. Adams, S. Reid, R. LeMaster, S. B. McKagan, K. K. Perkins, M. Dubson and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

simulations for teaching and learning physic, chemistry and physical science. 2 #12;Team, 2006). This analysis on the general features of a simulation that are most important for achieving engagement and learning. HereA Study of Educational Simulations Part II ­ Interface Design W. K. Adams, S. Reid, R. LeMaster, S

Colorado at Boulder, University of

129

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

14 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 (4) Environmentally preferable and energy efficient electronics including desktop computers, laptops and monitors are at...

130

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

procurement for FEMP designated products (4) Environmentally preferable and energy efficient electronics including desktop computers, laptops and monitors are at...

131

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL

132

W-1 SLSF post-test data analysis. Part 1. Thermal hydraulic analysis. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four types of tests were performed: (1) a decay heat transient test, (2) Loss-of-Piping-Integrity (LOPI) tests, (3) Boiling Window Tests (BWT), and (4) a fuel pin dryout and failure test. In addition, preliminary tests were run to check systems performance, instrumentation performance and test section heat balance. The objective of the decay heat test was to determine the decay heat transfer characteristics of fresh fuel pins with subcooled sodium. The objective of the LOPI experiments was to test the thermal behavior of fuel pins with four different fuel conditions subjected to the same transient. The transient was designed to simulate a rapid flow decrease as a result of pipe rupture followed by a reactor scram. The objective of the Boiling Window Tests was to study boiling initiation and progression of boiling within the fuel pin bundle.

Knight, D.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Electrodril system field test program. Phase II: Task C-1-deep drilling system demonstration. Final report for Phase II: Task C-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electrodril Deep Drilling System field test demonstrations were aborted in July 1979, due to connector problems. Subsequent post test analyses concluded that the field replacable connectors were the probable cause of the problems encountered. The designs for both the male and female connectors, together with their manufacturing processes, were subsequently modified, as was the acceptance test procedures. A total of nine male and nine female connectors were manufactured and delivered during the 2nd Quarter 1980. Exhaustive testing was then conducted on each connector as a precursor to formal qualification testing conducted during the month of October 1980, at the Brown Oil Tool test facility located in Houston, Texas. With this report, requirements under Phase II, Task C-1 are satisfied. The report documents the results of the connector qualification test program which was successfully completed October 28, 1980. In general, it was concluded that connector qualification had been achieved and plans are now in progress to resume the field test demonstration program so that Electrodril System performance predictions and economic viability can be evaluated.

Taylor, P D

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The MOG Weak Field approximation II. Observational test of Chandra X-ray Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the weak field approximation limit of the covariant Scalar-Tensor-Vector Gravity (STVG) theory, so-called MOdified gravity (MOG), to the dynamics of clusters of galaxies by using only baryonic matter. The MOG effective gravitational potential in the weak field approximation is composed of an attractive Newtonian term and a repulsive Yukawa term with two parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\mu$. The numerical values of these parameters have been obtained by fitting the predicted rotation curves of galaxies to observational data, yielding the best fit result: $\\alpha = 8.89 \\pm 0.34$ and $\\mu= 0.042\\pm 0.004$ kpc$^{-1}$~\\cite{rah13}. We extend the observational test of this theory to clusters of galaxies, using data for the ionized gas and the temperature profile of nearby clusters obtained by the Chandra X-ray telescope. Using the MOG virial theorem for clusters, we compare the mass profiles of clusters from observation and theory for eleven clusters. The theoretical mass profiles for the inner parts of clusters exceed the observational data. However, the observational data for the inner parts of clusters (i.e., $r<0.1 r_{500}$) is scattered, but at distances larger than $\\sim 300$ kpc, the observed and predicted mass profiles converge. Our results indicate that MOG as a theory of modified gravity is compatible with the observational data from the the solar system to Mega parsec scales without invoking dark matter.

J. W. Moffat; S. Rahvar

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

TESTING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AS THE SOURCE OF ENHANCED STRONG Mg II ABSORPTION TOWARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixty percent of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) reveal strong Mg II absorbing systems, which is a factor of {approx}2 times the rate seen along lines of sight to quasars. Previous studies argue that the discrepancy in the strong Mg II covering factor is most likely to be the result of either quasars being obscured due to dust or the consequence of many GRBs being strongly gravitationally lensed. We analyze observations of quasars that show strong foreground Mg II absorption. We find that GRB lines of sight pass closer to bright galaxies than would be expected for random lines of sight within the impact parameter expected for strong Mg II absorption. While this cannot be explained by obscuration in the GRB sample, it is a natural consequence of gravitational lensing. Upon examining the particular configurations of galaxies near a sample of GRBs with strong Mg II absorption, we find several intriguing lensing candidates. Our results suggest that lensing provides a viable contribution to the observed enhancement of strong Mg II absorption along lines of sight to GRBs, and we outline the future observations required to test this hypothesis conclusively.

Rapoport, Sharon; Onken, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tucker, Brad E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyithe, J. Stuart B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

An Experimental Evaluation of HVAC-Grade Carbon-Dioxide Sensors: Part 3, Humidity, Temperature, and Pressure Sensitivity Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the third paper in a four-part series reporting on the test and evaluation of typical carbon-dioxide sensors used in building HVAC applications. Fifteen models of NDIR HVAC-grade CO2 sensors were tested and evaluated to determine the humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of the sensors. This paper reports the performance of the sensors at various relative humidity, temperature, and pressure levels common to building HVAC applications and provides a comparison with manufacturer specifications. Among the 15 models tested, eight models have a single-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, four models have a dual-lamp, single-wavelength configuration, and three models have a single-lamp, dual-wavelength configuration. The sensors were tested in a chamber specifically fabricated for this research. A description of the apparatus and the method of test are described in Part 1 (Shrestha and Maxwell 2009). The test result showed a wide variation in humidity, temperature, and pressure sensitivity of CO2 sensors among manufacturers. In some cases, significant variations in sensor performance exist between sensors of the same model. Even the natural variation in relative humidity could significantly vary readings of some CO2 sensor readings. The effects of temperature and pressure variation on NDIR CO2 sensors are unavoidable without an algorithm to compensate for the changes. For the range of temperature and pressure variation in an air-conditioned space, the effect of pressure variation is more significant compared to the effect of temperature variation.

Shrestha, Som S [ORNL; Maxwell, Dr. Gregory [Iowa State University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8ADARECORDS-RevisionF sAGA 12, Part

144

Statistical Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40 CFR Part 1065  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage » SearchEnergyDepartmentScopingOverviewFranklin M.Engine Dynamometer Test Cell

145

Revision of the orchid bee subgenus Euglossella (Hymenoptera: Apidae), part II: The viridis and mandibularis species groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The second and final part of a revision of the subgenus Euglossella Moure in the orchid bee genus Euglossa Latreille (Apinae: Euglossini) is presented here, redefining the species groups within it to comply with current ...

Hinojosa-Dí az, Ismael A.; Engel, Michael S.

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

146

Modeling the probability of excitation and the defective part level as testing progresses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-at fault at Point P 10 Example circuit with OR bridge between points P and 9 . The probability of excitation decreases as testing progresses. 12 16 Variation in probability of excitation between vector sets for c2670. . 18 Variation in probability... of excitation between vector sets for c5315. . 19 Probability of excitation curve for c2670. Probability of excitation curve for c5315. 21 21 The defect level. 24 10 12 13 14 15 C432 MPG-D prediction: r = 4. 275 A = 0. 663 . C499 MPG-D prediction: r...

Dworak, Jennifer Lynn

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Flow sheet development for the dissolution of unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes in F-Canyon, Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two dissolution flow sheets were tested for the desorption of unirradiated Mark 42 fuel tubes. Both the aluminum (from the can, cladding, and fuel core) and the plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) are dissolved simultaneously, i.e., a co-dissolution flow sheet. In the first series of tests, 0.15 and 0.20 molar (M) potassium fluoride (KF) solutions were used and the dissolution extended over several days. In the other series of tests, solutions with higher concentrations of fluoride (0.25 to 0.30 M) were used. Calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) was used in those tests as the fluoride source.

Murray, A.M.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nondestructive Evaluation Quality Procedure: Personnel Qualification and Certification Radiographic Testing-Levels I& II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Operational Procedure establishes the minimum requirements for the qualification and certification/recertification of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) personnel in the nondestructive testing (NDT) radiographic testing (RT) method. This document is in accordance with the American Society for Nondestructive Testing Recommended Practice SNT-TC-1A, 1996, except as amended herein.

Dolan, K; Rikard, R D; Rodriquez, J

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Vitrification and testing of a Hanford high-level waste sample. Part 1: Glass fabrication, and chemical and radiochemical analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford radioactive tank waste will be separated into low-activity waste and high-level waste that will both be vitrified into borosilicate glasses. To demonstrate the feasibility of vitrification and the durability of the high-level waste glass, a high-level waste sample from Tank AZ-101 was processed to glass in a hot cell and analyzed with respect to chemical composition, radionuclide content, waste loading, and the presence of crystalline phases and then tested for leachability. The glass was analyzed with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, ? energy spectrometry, ? spectrometry, and liquid scintillation counting. The WISE Uranium Project calculator was used to calculate the main sources of radioactivity to the year 3115. The observed crystallinity and the results of leachability testing of the glass will be reported in Part 2 of this paper.

Hrma, Pavel R.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Bates, Derrick J.; Bredt, Paul; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Smith, H D.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Part I. Halichondrin B: Studies on the total synthesis. Part II. Levuglandins: Generation from PGH sub 2 and binding with proteins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Halichondrins are a new family of extremely bioactive marine natural products present in minute quantities in a sponge, Halichondria Okadai Kadota. Halichondrin B is the most biologically active member of this family and shows remarkably effective in vivo antitumor activity. A practical synthesis would allow clinical testing of this rare molecule. The C6-C12 fragment corresponds to a heptulose which might cyclize to the required polyheterocycle in analogy with the presumed biosynthesis of halichondrin B. The key heptulose intermediate was prepared from D-ribose. A novel mixed ethyl dimethoxybenzyl acetal of formylmethylenetriphenylphosphorane stereoselectively gave a cis alkene upon reaction with the aldehyde obtained from oxidation of methyl isopropylidene D-riboside. Osmium tetraoxide-catalyzed vicinal hydroxylation of the resulting cis alkene, protection of the diol as an acetonide, and hydrolysis of the acetal under neutral conditions using DDQ delivered two diastereomers of the desired aldehyde in excellent yield. Absolute stereochemical characterization of these diastereomers was achieved by correlation with derivatives of D-allose and L-talose. An effective new method was developed for purification of the prostaglandin endoperoxide PGH{sub 2} based on centrifugal partition chromatography and a novel aprotic two phase ternary solvent system. Recent studies showed that solvent-induced decomposition of PGH{sub 2} produces levuglandins, {gamma}-ketoaldehydes with 10,11-seco prostanoic acid (levuglandin E{sub 2} LGE{sub 2}) or 9,10-seco prostanoic acid (levuglandin D{sub 2},LGD{sub 2}) structures. The abundant supply of pure PGH{sub 2} now available and a simple HPLC assay procedure developed for detection of levuglandins allowed a reexamination of the silica gel-catalyzed decomposition of PGH{sub 2}.

Jirousek, M.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Summer 2012 Testing and Analysis of the Chemical Mixture Methodology -- Part I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the key findings made by the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) project team during the first stage of their summer 2012 testing and analysis of the CMM. The study focused on answering the following questions: o What is the percentage of the chemicals in the CMM Rev 27 database associated with each Health Code Number (HCN)? How does this result influence the relative importance of acute HCNs and chronic HCNs in the CMM data set? o What is the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? Which Modes of Action and Target Organ Effects tend to be important in determining the HCN-based Hazard Index (HI) for a chemical mixture? o What are some of the potential issues associated with the current HCN-based approach? What are the opportunities for improving the performance and/or technical defensibility of the HCN-based approach? How would those improvements increase the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? o What is the Target Organ System Effect approach and how can it be used to improve upon the current HCN-based approach? How does the benefits users would derive from using the Target Organ System Approach compare to the benefits available from the current HCN-based approach?

Glantz, Clifford S.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Coggin, Rebekah L.; Ponder, Lashaundra A.; Booth, Alexander E.; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Horn, Sarah M.; Yao, Juan

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Conversion of CESR to Operate as the Test Accelerator, CesrTA, Part 1: Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it ideal for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper outlines the motivation, design and conversion of CESR to a test accelerator, CesrTA, enhanced to study such subjects as low emittance tuning methods, electron cloud (EC) effects, intra-beam scattering, fast ion instabilities as well as general improvements to beam instrumentation. While the initial studies of CesrTA focussed on questions related to the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring design, CesrTA is a very flexible storage ring, capabl...

Billing, M G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Optimal supply chain design and management over a multi-period horizon under demand uncertainty. Part II: A Lagrangean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industry, or more specifically the electric motor industry as was illustrated in part 1 (Rodriguez et al to an LP to improve solution efficiency while providing a valid lower bound. An initialization scheme-level inventory is important (bound capital). Moreover, it is critical that a spare motor can be obtained as soon

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

154

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches. The detailed assumptions and methods behind these models are described in Part I of this article pair.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S. (US Geological Survey, Western Fisheries Research Center, Columbia River Research Laboratory, Cook, WA)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011, Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done to support several different programs that desire access to the ground surface above expended underground nuclear tests. The programs include: the Borehole Management Program, the Environmental Restoration Program, and the National Center for Nuclear Security Gas-Migration Experiment. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Evaluation of cavity collapse and crater formation is input into the safety decisions. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who participated in weapons testing activities perform these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. The evaluations do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011 was published on March 2, 2011. This report, considered Part 2 of work undertaken in calendar year 2011, compiles evaluations requested after the March report. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 6 LLNL test locations in Yucca Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Pahute Mesa. They include: Baneberry in U8d; Clearwater in U12q; Wineskin in U12r, Buteo in U20a and Duryea in nearby U20a1; and Barnwell in U20az.

Pawloski, G A

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

157

Non-linear and quantum optics of a type II OPO containing a birefringent element Part 1: Classical operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe theoretically the main characteristics of the steady state regime of a type II Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) containing a birefringent plate. In such a device the signal and idler waves are at the same time linearly coupled by the plate and nonlinearly coupled by the $\\chi^{(2)}$ crystal. This mixed coupling allows, in some well-defined range of the control parameters, a frequency degenerate operation as well as phase locking between the signal and idler modes. We describe here a complete model taking into account all possible effects in the system, \\emph{i.e.} arbitrary rotation of the waveplate, non perfect phase matching, ring and linear cavities. This model is able to explain the detailed features of the experiments performed with this system.

Laurent Longchambon; Julien Laurat; Thomas Coudreau; Claude Fabre

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

PART II -Core Leader Competencies (what a leader does): Works to lead others; develops themselves, their subordinates and organizations to achieve mission accomplishment 1. Character: A person's moral and ethical qualities which give a leader motivation t  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PART II - Core Leader Competencies (what a leader does): Works to lead others; develops themselves or consequences 4. SELFLESS-SERVICE: Places welfare of others and Army priorities before self 6. INTEGRITY: Does that are an inherent part of an individual's total core, physical, and intellectual aspects. Attributes shape how one

Maxwell, Bruce D.

159

A Procedure for the Performance Evaluation of a New Commercial Building: Part II – Overall Methodology and Comparison of Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.e., boiler) (LBNL 1993). Table 3 shows the plant model at normal oper- ation conditions for the as-built simulation. According to the © 2008, American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (www.ashrae.org). Published... Transactions Vol. 114, Part 2. 394 ASHRAE Transactions 2 (LBNL 1993). In this study, the DOE-2 default efficiency was first adjusted with manufacturer’s data and then measured data to account for the actual HVAC performance at normal operation conditions...

Song, S.; Haberl, J.S.

160

Stability of the Minimizers of Least Squares with a Non-Convex Regularization. Part II: Global Behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We address estimation problems where the sought-after solution is definedas the minimizer of an objective function composed of a quadratic data-fidelity term and a regularization term. We especially focus on non-convex and possibly non-smooth regularization terms because of their ability to yield good estimates.This work is dedicated to the stability of the minimizers of such piecewise C{sup m}, with m {>=} 2, non-convex objective functions. It is composed of two parts. In the previous part of this work we considered general local minimizers. In this part we derive results on global minimizers. We show that the data domain contains an open, dense subset such that for every data point therein, the objective function has a finite number of local minimizers, and a unique global minimizer. It gives rise to a global minimizer function which is C{sup m-1} everywhere on an open and dense subset of the data domain.

Durand, S. [LAMFA UMR 6140, Universite de Picardie, 33 rue Saint-Leu, 90039 Amien Cedex (France)], E-mail: sdurand@cmla.ens-cachan.fr; Nikolova, M. [CMLA UMR 8536, ENS de Cachan, 61 av. du President Wilson, 94235 Cachan Cedex (France)], E-mail: nikolova@cmla.ens-cachan.fr

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Pre-asymptotic Error Analysis of CIP-FEM and FEM for Helmholtz Equation with High Wave Number. Part II: $hp$ version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, which is part II in a series of two, the pre-asymptotic error analysis of the continuous interior penalty finite element method (CIP-FEM) and the FEM for the Helmholtz equation in two and three dimensions is continued. While part I contained results on the linear CIP-FEM and FEM, the present part deals with approximation spaces of order $p \\ge 1$. By using a modified duality argument, pre-asymptotic error estimates are derived for both methods under the condition of $\\frac{kh}{p}\\le C_0\\big(\\frac{p}{k}\\big)^{\\frac{1}{p+1}}$, where $k$ is the wave number, $h$ is the mesh size, and $C_0$ is a constant independent of $k, h, p$, and the penalty parameters. It is shown that the pollution errors of both methods in $H^1$-norm are $O(k^{2p+1}h^{2p})$ if $p=O(1)$ and are $O\\Big(\\frac{k}{p^2}\\big(\\frac{kh}{\\sigma p}\\big)^{2p}\\Big)$ if the exact solution $u\\in H^2(\\Om)$ which coincide with existent dispersion analyses for the FEM on Cartesian grids. Here $\\si$ is a constant independent of $k, h, p$, and t...

Zhu, Lingxue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

Moreno, J.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Aquifer Testing Recommendations for Supporting Phase II of the T Area Technetium-99 Data Objectives Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aquifer characterization needs are currently being assessed to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies within the 200-ZP-1 operable unit, specifically for the immediate area of the 241-T Tank Farm. This report provides a general discussion of the six identified hydrologic test methods for possible subsequent characterization within the 241-T Tank Farm area and details for implementing the large-scale recovery test after terminating pumping at the 241-Tank Farm extraction well locations.

Spane, Frank A.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

164

Phase II test plan for the evaluation of the performance of container filling systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The PHMC will provide tank wastes for final treatment by BNFL from Hanford's waste tanks. Concerns about the ability for ''grab'' sampling to provide large volumes of representative waste samples has led to the development of a nested, fixed-depth sampling system. Preferred concepts for filling sample containers that meet RCRA organic sample criteria were identified by a PHMC Decision Board. These systems will replace the needle based sampling ''T'' that is currently on the sampling system. This test plan document identifies cold tests with simulants that will demonstrate the preferred bottle filling concepts abilities to provide representative waste samples and will meet RCRA criteria. Additional tests are identified that evaluate the potential for cross-contamination between samples and the ability for the system to decontaminate surfaces which have contacted tank wastes. These tests will be performed with kaolid/water and sand/water slurry simulants in the test rig that was used by AEAT to complete Phase 1 tests in FY 1999.

BOGER, R.M.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

165

Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Siekmann, Adam [ORNL

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Identification of the impacts of maintenance and testing upon the safety of LWR power plants. Part II. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning overview of literature relating to radiation exposure and operating experience; details of LWR-MTC3 classification system; histograms for individual BWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; histograms for individual PWR facilities depicting frequency of M and T mode and frequency of systems and components involved with M and T problems; and Fortran program for M and T data clustering.

Husseiny, A. A.; Sabri, Z. A.; Turnage, J. J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Enertech 2-kW high-reliability wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW in a 9 m/s wind has been developed. Activities are summarized that are centered on the fabrication and testing of prototypes of the wind machine. The test results verified that the wind machine met the power output specification and that the variable-pitch rotor effectively controlled the rotor speed for wind speeds up to 50 mph. Three prototypes of the wind machine were shipped to the Rocky Flats test center in September through November of 1979. Work was also performed to reduce the start-up wind speed. The start-up wind speed to the Enertech facility has been reduced to 4.5 m/s.

Cordes, J A; Johnson, B A

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Near-term electric test vehicle ETV-2. Phase II. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique battery-powered passenger vehicle has been developed that provides a significant improvement over conventional electric vehicle performance, particularly during stop-and-go driving. The vehicle is unique in two major respects: (1) the power system incorporates a flywheel that stores energy during regenerative braking and makes possible the acceleration capability needed to keep up with traffic without reducing range to unacceptable values; and (2) lightweight plastic materials are used for the vehicle unibody to minimize weight and increase range. These features were analyzed and demonstrated in an electric test vehicle, ETV-2. Characteristics of this vehicle are summarized. Information is presented on: vehicle design, fabrication, safety testing, and performance testing; power system design and operation; flywheel; battery pack performance; and controls and electronic equipment. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Final Report on Utilization of TRU TRISO Fuel as Applied to HTR Systems Part II: Prismatic Reactor Cross Section Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deep-burn prismatic high temperature reactor is made up of an annular core loaded with transuranic isotopes and surrounded in the center and in the periphery by reflector blocks in graphite. This disposition creates challenges for the neutronics compared to usual light water reactor calculation schemes. The longer mean free path of neutrons in graphite affects the neutron spectrum deep inside the blocks located next to the reflector. The neutron thermalisation in the graphite leads to two characteristic fission peaks at the inner and outer interfaces as a result of the increased thermal flux seen in those assemblies. Spectral changes are seen at least on half of the fuel blocks adjacent to the reflector. This spectral effect of the reflector may prevent us from successfully using the two step scheme -lattice then core calculation- typically used for light water reactors. We have been studying the core without control mechanisms to provide input for the development of a complete calculation scheme. To correct the spectrum at the lattice level, we have tried to generate cross-sections from supercell calculations at the lattice level, thus taking into account part of the graphite surrounding the blocks of interest for generating the homogenised cross-sections for the full-core calculation. This one has been done with 2 to 295 groups to assess if increasing the number of groups leads to more accurate results. A comparison with a classical single block model has been done. Both paths were compared to a reference calculation done with MCNP. It is concluded that the agreement with MCNP is better with supercells, but that the single block model remains quite close if enough groups are kept for the core calculation. 26 groups seems to be a good compromise between time and accu- racy. However, some trials with depletion have shown huge variations of the isotopic composition across a block next to the reflector. It may imply that at least an in- core depletion for the number density calculation may be necessary in the complete calculation scheme.

Vincent Descotes

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Development and Testing of a Screw Compressor Supermarket Refrigeration System: Phase II, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory prototype screw compressor refrigeration system was designed, fabricated and tested under various evaporator and ambient conditions. The design is based on a Dunham-Bush vertical hermetic screw compressor and other standard refrigeration components. Results indicate that a screw compressor rack with vapor injection can increase the thermodynamic efficiency of low temperature refrigeration in supermarkets by 20 to 28% compared to multiple reciprocating compressor racks. The payback period of the screw compressor refrigeration system relative to multiple reciprocating compressor systems is 1.1 to 1.5 years and the net present value savings range from 15 to 22 thousand dollars.

Borhanian, H. Hamed; Toscano, William M.; Lee, Kang P.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Software_Design_Document,Testing,Deployment_and_Configuration_Management,and_Use_Manual_of_the_UUIS--a_Team_2_COMP5541-W10_Project_Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Software Design Document has three part: 1. Overview of System Architecture;2. System Architecture;3. Database Layer and two Appendix I: Deployment and Configuration; II: Test cases

Ahmad, Omer Shahid; Jason,; Chen,; Ilham, Najah; Lu, Jianhai; Sun, Yiwei; Wang, Tong; Zhu, Yongxin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

PHURBAS: AN ADAPTIVE, LAGRANGIAN, MESHLESS, MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS CODE. II. IMPLEMENTATION AND TESTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an algorithm for simulating the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics and other systems of differential equations on an unstructured set of points represented by sample particles. The particles move with the fluid, so the time step is not limited by the Eulerian Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy condition. Full spatial adaptivity is required to ensure the particles fill the computational volume and gives the algorithm substantial flexibility and power. A target resolution is specified for each point in space, with particles being added and deleted as needed to meet this target. We have parallelized the code by adapting the framework provided by GADGET-2. A set of standard test problems, including 10{sup -6} amplitude linear magnetohydrodynamics waves, magnetized shock tubes, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities is presented. Finally, we demonstrate good agreement with analytic predictions of linear growth rates for magnetorotational instability in a cylindrical geometry. This paper documents the Phurbas algorithm as implemented in Phurbas version 1.1.

McNally, Colin P.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Maron, Jason L., E-mail: cmcnally@amnh.org, E-mail: jmaron@amnh.org, E-mail: mordecai@amnh.org [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, New York, NY (United States)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Historical estimates of external gamma exposure and collective external gamma exposure from testing at the Nevada Test Site. I. Test series through HARDTACK II, 1958  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1959, the Test Manager's Committee to Establish Fallout Doses calculated estimated external gamma exposure at populated locations based upon measurements of external gamma-exposure rate. Using these calculations and estimates of population, we have tabulated the collective estimated external gamma exposures for communities within established fallout patterns. The total collective estimated external gamma exposure is 85,000 person-R. The greatest collective exposures occurred in three general areas: Saint George, Utah; Ely, Nevada; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Three events, HARRY (May 19, 1953), BEE (March 22, 1955), and SMOKY (August 31, 1957), accounted for over half of the total collective estimated external gamma exposure. The bases of the calculational models for external gamma exposure of ''infinite exposure,'' ''estimated exposure,'' and ''one year effective biological exposure'' are explained. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Church, B.W.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

HSWA Part II Permit Modification  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kansas City, Kansas, this 24th day of August , 2012. Final Original signed by John J. Smith for Rebecca Weber Director Air and Waste Management Division August 24, 2012 Date...

177

Part II, General Compliance Supplement  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the page; find the Recipient Reported Data Search section 36 - Click on -Go (do not enter the name of the Agency, StateTerritory or the amount) to be taken to the -Advanced...

178

REGENTS' POLICY PART II -ADMINISTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and management of the university's educational programs. The president will recommend the structure real and personal property, effective controls over all funds received or receivable and other assets by and report to the president. The position will oversee the university's educational programs, and be assisted

Pantaleone, Jim

179

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191.

G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

UPC. ETSEIB. Geometria. Codi: A Examen final 15 de juny del 2011. Part I: test. Puntuacio: 3 punts. Temps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aquest instant. 5. Trobeu l'equaci´o impl´icita del pla tal que (i) passa per P = (1, -1, 2), (ii) ´es ortogonal al pla x - y - z = 2, (iii) i ´es paral·lel a la recta tangent a (t) = (e2t , t2 - t, et - 1) en simetria especular) que porti el pla x - 2y + 2z = 3 sobre el pla z = 0. Calculeu la imatge de P = (1, -1

Casanellas, Marta

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High temperature turbine technology program. Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work performed on the High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Phase II - Technology Test and Support Studies during the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979 is summarized. Objectives of the program elements as well as technical progress and problems encountered during this Phase II annual reporting period are presented. Progress on design, fabrication and checkout of test facilities and test rigs is described. LP turbine cascade tests were concluded. 350 hours of testing were conducted on the LP rig engine first with clean distillate fuel and then with fly ash particulates injected into the hot gas stream. Design and fabrication of the turbine spool technology rig components are described. TSTR 60/sup 0/ sector combustor rig fabrication and testing are reviewed. Progress in the design and fabrication of TSTR cascade rig components for operation on both distillate fuel and low Btu gas is described. The new coal-derived gaseous fuel synthesizing facility is reviewed. Results and future plans for the supporting metallurgical programs are discussed.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Fault detection and isolation in aircraft gas turbine engines. Part 2: validation on a simulation test bed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and model-based information. As aircraft gas turbine engines consist of multiple interconnected compo- nents319 Fault detection and isolation in aircraft gas turbine engines. Part 2: validation of fault detection and isolation (FDI) in aircraft gas turbine engines. The FDI algorithms are built upon

Ray, Asok

183

Assessment of susceptibility to chloride stress corrosion cracking of highly alloyed stainless steels. Part 2: A new immersion test method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new method for assessment of susceptibility to chloride stress corrosion cracking under severe evaporative conditions has been developed. The basic idea is to test under submerged conditions simulating the electrolyte composition and concentration of sea water during evaporation. Two duplex and one austenitic stainless steel were tested loaded to the yield point at the test temperature. Time to failure, potential and temperature were recorded continuously. The results showed cracking of the austenitic material UNS S31254 at 110 C by long term testing. For the duplex stainless steels UNS S31803 and UNS S32750 cracking was observed at 100 C. The time to cracking was longest for the last mentioned and highest alloyed duplex material.

Drugli, J.M.; Steinsmo, U. [SINTEF Materials Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Cost analysis of revisions to 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix J, leak tests for primary and secondary containments of light-water-cooled nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report examines the differences between the existing and proposed Appendix J and identifies eleven substantive areas where quantifiable impacts will likely result. The analysis indicated that there are four areas of change which tend to dominate all others in terms of cost impacts. The applicable paragraph numbers from Draft E2 of the Appendix J revision and the nature of the change follows: III.A(4) and III.A(6) - Test Pressure and Testing at Reduced Pressure No Longer Allowed; III.A(7)(b)(i) Acceptance Criteria 1.0 L/sub a/ Acceptable ''As Found'' Leakage; III.A(8)(2) Retesting Following Failure of ''As Found'' Type A Test - Corrective Action Plan, and III.A(8)(b)(ii) Option To Do More Frequent Type B and C Testing Rather Than More Type A Penalty Tests. The best estimate is that the proposed Appendix J would result in a cost savings ranging from about $100 million to $160 million, and increase routing occupational exposure on the order of 10,000 person-rem. These estimates capture the total impact to industry and the NRC over the assumed operating life of all existing and planned future power reactors. All dollar impacts projected to occur in future years have been present worthed at discount rates ranging from 5% to 10%.

Sciacca, F.; Nelson, W.; Simpkins, B.; Riordan, B.; Godfrey, P.; Cohen, S.; Beal, S.; Goldin, D.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for automated rotating/flipping/aligning system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

measurements with x-ray optics. Part 1: Review of LTP errorsprecise reflective X-ray optics,” Nucl. Inst. and Meth. Ameasurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for

Ali, Zulfiqar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 12. Single annulus transient test program data tables: Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The single annulus test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the fuel assemblies used in the Savannah River Site production reactors. Data files were transmitted from Columbia University to Savannah River Site in a DOS compatible format. This report provides a hardcopy version of the electronic media data files.

Coutts, D.A.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Sustainable gasificationbiochar systems? A case-study of rice-husk gasification in Cambodia, Part II: Field trial results, carbon abatement,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II: Field trial results, carbon abatement, economic assessment and conclusions Simon Shackley a trials using the RHC, and provide an estimate of the carbon abatement and economic evaluation). The carbon abatement from the RHC addition is approximately 0.42 t CO2 tÃ?1 rice husk; including energy

Haszeldine, Stuart

188

ESP (electrostatic precipitator) tests at Toronto: Test results: Part 3. [Hydrate Addition at Low Temperature for the removal of SO/sub 2/  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Hydrate Addition at Low Temperature'' or HALT is a dry calcium-based hydrate injection process for the removal of SO/sub 2/ from flue gases off a sulfur bearing fuel. In this process the hydrate is pneumatically conveyed and injected into the flue gas stream as a dry particulate. The flue gas is cooled downstream of the hydrate injection location by spraying the gas with a stream of finely atomized water droplets. The flue gas is cooled to as low a temperature as possible by spraying water on it, maintaining an approach to saturation temperature of 20/degree/F or higher. Temperatures lower than this could cause potential problems with moisture condensation on cold duct walls, the particulate removal devices as ESP/baghouse. The waste product from this process is the dry disposable solids which differed considerably from the wet cake solids obtained from a wet FGD process. Tests performed on the electrostatic precipitator are described. The primary tasks performed were: (1) measurement of the particle size distribution, resistivity, and mass concentration of the fly ash or ash-sorbent mixture entering the ESP, (2) measurement of the collection efficiency of the ESP, (3) recording the electrical operating conditions and the voltage-current characteristics of the ESP, and (4) determination of the utilization of sorbent entering the ESP, and the additional utilization/SO/sub 2/ removal occurring within the precipitator. Chemical analyses were performed on fly ash and ash-sorbent mixtures. 30 figs., 22 tabs.

Gooch, J.; Beittel, R.; DuBard, J.; Marchant, G. Jr.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

Thomas, P.A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume II. Well test data: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are included in the appendices: field test data, combined and edited raw data, time/pressure data, sample log, reservoir fluid study, gas data, sample collection and analysis procedure, scale monitoring and water analysis, sand detector and strip charts, and Horner-type plot data. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

A New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part II: Single-Column Modeling of Arctic Clouds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the arctic bound- ary layer, the presence of leads (cracks) in the sea ice surface, the persistence of mixed-phaseA New Double-Moment Microphysics Parameterization for Application in Cloud and Climate Models. Part- dicted cloud boundaries and total cloud fraction compare reasonably well with observations. Cloud phase

Shupe, Matthew

192

Advanced industrial gas turbine technology readiness demonstration program. Phase II. Final report: compressor rig fabrication assembly and test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a component technology demonstration program to fabricate, assemble and test an advanced axial/centrifugal compressor are presented. This work was conducted to demonstrate the utilization of advanced aircraft gas turbine cooling and high pressure compressor technology to improve the performance and reliability of future industrial gas turbines. Specific objectives of the compressor component testing were to demonstrate 18:1 pressure ratio on a single spool at 90% polytropic efficiency with 80% fewer airfoils as compared to current industrial gas turbine compressors. The compressor design configuration utilizes low aspect ratio/highly-loaded axial compressor blading combined with a centrifugal backend stage to achieve the 18:1 design pressure ratio in only 7 stages and 281 axial compressor airfoils. Initial testing of the compressor test rig was conducted with a vaneless centrifugal stage diffuser to allow documentation of the axial compressor performance. Peak design speed axial compressor performance demonstrated was 91.8% polytropic efficiency at 6.5:1 pressure ratio. Subsequent documentation of the combined axial/centrifugal performance with a centrifugal stage pipe diffuser resulted in the demonstration of 91.5% polytropic efficiency and 14% stall margin at the 18:1 overall compressor design pressure ratio. The demonstrated performance not only exceeded the contract performance goals, but also represents the highest known demonstrated compressor performance in this pressure ratio and flow class. The performance demonstrated is particularly significant in that it was accomplished at airfoil loading levels approximately 15% higher than that of current production engine compressor designs. The test results provide conclusive verification of the advanced low aspect ratio axial compressor and centrifugal stage technologies utilized.

Schweitzer, J. K.; Smith, J. D.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Theory versus experiment for vacuum Rabi oscillations in lossy cavities. II. Direct test of uniqueness of vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper continues the analysis of vacuum Rabi oscillations we started in part I [Phys. Rev. A 79, 033836 (2009)]. Here we concentrate on experimental consequences for cavity QED of two different classes of representations of harmonic-oscillator Lie algebras. The zero-temperature master equation, derived in part I for irreducible representations of the algebra, is reformulated in a reducible representation that models electromagnetic fields by a gas of harmonic-oscillator wave packets. The representation is known to introduce automatic regularizations that in irreducible representations would have to be justified by ad hoc arguments. Predictions based on this representation are characterized in thermodynamic limit by a single parameter {sigma}, responsible for collapses and revivals of Rabi oscillations in exact vacuum. Collapses and revivals disappear in the limit {sigma}{yields}{infinity}. Observation of a finite {sigma} would mean that cavity quantum fields are described by a non-Wightmanian theory, where vacuum states are zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates of a N-particle bosonic oscillator gas and, thus, are nonunique. The data collected in the experiment of Brune et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1800 (1996)] are consistent with any {sigma}>400.

Wilczewski, Marcin; Czachor, Marek [Katedra Fizyki Teoretycznej i Informatyki Kwantowej, Politechnika Gdanska, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Krajowe Centrum Informatyki Kwantowej, 81-824 Sopot (Poland) and Centrum Leo Apostel (CLEA), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Theory versus experiment for vacuum Rabi oscillations in lossy cavities (II): Direct test of uniqueness of vacuum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper continues the analysis of vacuum Rabi oscillations we started in Part I [Phys. Rev. A {\\bf 79}, 033836 (2009)]. Here we concentrate on experimental consequences for cavity QED of two different classes of representations of harmonic oscillator Lie algebras. The zero-temperature master equation, derived in Part I for irreducible representations of the algebra, is reformulated in a reducible representation that models electromagnetic fields by a gas of harmonic oscillator wave packets. The representation is known to introduce automatic regularizations that in irreducible representations would have to be justified by ad hoc arguments. Predictions based on this representation are characterized in thermodynamic limit by a single parameter $\\varsigma$, responsible for collapses and revivals of Rabi oscillations in exact vacuum. Collapses and revivals disappear in the limit $\\varsigma\\to\\infty$. Observation of a finite $\\varsigma$ would mean that cavity quantum fields are described by a non-Wightmanian theory, where vacuum states are zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates of a finite-particle bosonic oscillator gas and, thus, are non-unique. The data collected in the experiment of Brune {\\it et al.} [Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf{76}}, 1800 (1996)] are consistent with any $\\varsigma>400$.

Marcin Wilczewski; Marek Czachor

2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

195

Phase II Documentation Overview of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject to assess and evaluate radiologic groundwater contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. These activities are overseen by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended March 2010). For Frenchman Flat, the UGTA Subproject addresses media contaminated by the underground nuclear tests, which is limited to geologic formations within the saturated zone or 100 meters (m) or less above the water table. Transport in groundwater is judged to be the primary mechanism of migration for the subsurface contamination away from the Frenchman Flat underground nuclear tests. The intent of the UGTA Subproject is to assess the risk to the public from the groundwater contamination produced as a result of nuclear testing. The primary method used to assess this risk is the development of models of flow and contaminant transport to forecast the extent of potentially contaminated groundwater for the next 1,000 years, establish restrictions to groundwater usage, and implement a monitoring program to verify protectiveness. For the UGTA Subproject, contaminated groundwater is that which exceeds the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) the State of Nevada’s groundwater quality standard to protect human health and the environment. Contaminant forecasts are expected to be uncertain, and groundwater monitoring will be used in combination with land-use control to build confidence in model results and reduce risk to the public. Modeling forecasts of contaminant transport will provide the basis for negotiating a compliance boundary for the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This compliance boundary represents a regulatory-based distinction between groundwater contaminated or not contaminated by underground testing. Transport modeling simulations are used to compute radionuclide concentrations in time and space within the CAU for the 1,000-year contaminant boundary. These three-dimensional (3-D) concentration simulations are integrated into probabilistic forecasts of the likelihood of groundwater exceeding or remaining below the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) defined as the contaminant boundary. Contaminant boundaries are not discrete predictions of the location or concentration of contaminants, but instead are spatial representations of the probability of exceeding Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards. The forecasts provide planning tools to facilitate regulatory decisions designed to protect the health and safety of the public.

Greg Ruskauff

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-freezer. Phase II. Field test. Volume III. Executive summary and task reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase of the development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezer is described. Following the successful completion of Phase I (design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 16 ft/sup 3/ high efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype), Phase II was initiated to evaluate sales potential and in-home performance as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. Twenty-five pilot production 18 ft/sup 3/ units using prototype tooling were produced on the assembly line to confirm the feasibility of full-scale production. These units were then used in a market and field test program in which consumer appeal and in-home performance were assessed. The market evaluation confirmed that refrigerators incorporating high-efficiency features at added cost are saleable and that large capacity, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezers will continue to capture a large portion of the market in the years ahead, The field test confirmed the in-home energy saving potential of a high efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-frezer utilizing advanced design features such as optimized, thick-wall, foam an average energy savings of 60% compared to a baseline unit of conventional design.

Topping, R.F.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy Efficient Aluminum Production - Pilot-Scale Cell Tests - Final Report for Phase I and Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cermet anode that produces oxygen and a cathode material that is wetted by aluminum can provide a dimensionally stable inter-electrode distance in the Hall-Heroult cell. This can be used to greatly improve the energy and/or productivity efficiencies. The concept, which was developed and tested, uses a system of vertically interleaved anodes and cathodes. The major advantage of this concept is the significant increase in electrochemical surface area compared to a horizontal orientation of anode and cathode that is presently used in the Hall-Heroult process. This creates an additional advantage for energy reduction of 1.3 kWh/lb or a 20% productivity improvement. The voltages obtained in an optimized cell test met the energy objectives of the project for at least two weeks. An acceptable current efficiency was never proven, however, during either pilot scale or bench scale tests with the vertical plate configuration. This must be done before a vertical cell can be considered viab le. Anode corrosion rate must be reduced by at least a factor of three in order to produce commercial purity aluminum. It is recommended that extensive theoretical and bench scale investigations be done to improve anode materials and to demonstrate acceptable current efficiencies in a vertical plate cell before pilot scale work is continued.

R. A. Christini

1999-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

198

Conversion of hydrocarbons for fuel-cell applications. Part I. Autothermal reforming of sulfur-free and sulfur-containing hydrocarbon liquids. Part II. Steam reforming of n-hexane on pellet and monolithic catalyst beds. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental autothermal reforming (ATR) results obtained in the previous phase of this work with sulfur-free pure hydrocarbon liquids are summarized. Catalyst types and configuration used were the same as in earlier tests with No. 2 fuel oil to facilitate comparisons. Fuel oil has been found to form carbon in ATR at conditions much milder than those predicted by equilibrium. Reactive differences between paraffins and aromatics in ATR, and thus the formation of different carbon precursors, have been shown to be responsible for the observed carbon formation characteristics (fuel-specific). From tests with both light and heavy paraffins and aromatics, it is concluded that high boiling point hydrocarbons and polynuclear aromatics enhance the propensity for carbon formation in ATR. Effects of olefin (propylene) addition on the ATR performance of benzene are described. In ATR tests with mixtures of paraffins and aromatics (n-tetradecane and benzene) synergistic effects on conversion characteristics were identified. Comparisons of the No. 2 fuel oil data with the experimental results from this work with pure (and mixed) sulfur-free hydrocarbons indicate that the sulfur content of the fuel may be the limiting factor for efficient ATR operation. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in conventional reformers is heat transfer limited. Steam reforming tasks performed have included performance comparisons between conventional pellet beds and honeycomb monolith catalysts. Metal-supported monoliths offer higher structural stability than ceramic supports, and have a higher thermal conductivity. Data from two metal monoliths of different catalyst (nickel) loading were compared to pellets under the same operating conditions.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Voecks, G.E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Plutonium working group report on environmental, safety and health vulnerabilities associated with the Department`s plutonium storage. Volume II, part 7: Mound working group assessment team report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the report of a visit to the Mound site by the Working Group Assessment Team (WGAT) to assess plutonium vulnerabilities. Purposes of the visit were: to review results of the site`s self assessment of current practices for handling and storing plutonium; to conduct an independent assessment of these practices; to reconcile differences and assemble a final list of vulnerabilities; to calculate consequences and probability for each vulnerability; and to issue a report to the Working Group. This report, representing completion of the Mound visit, will be compiled along with those from all other sites with plutonium inventories as part of a final report to the Secretary of Energy.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

John McCord

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

No moving parts safe & arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and arm scheme with no moving parts. The safe & arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe & arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activates the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel, and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel. Simultaneous event channels may also be utilized by optically splitting a single event channel. The built-in-test may be performed anytime prior to ordnance ignition. 6 figures.

Hendrix, J.L.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

202

No moving parts safe & arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and m scheme with no moving parts. The safe & arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe & arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activates the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel, and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel. Simultaneous event channels may also be utilized by optically splitting a single event channel. The built-in-test may be performed anytime prior to ordnance ignition.

Hendrix, James L. (Overland Park, KS)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Photochemistry of 9,10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate in solution. Part II. Effects of inorganic anions; quenching vs. radical formation at moderate and high anion concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The chemical aspects of the interactions between excited 9, 10-anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (AQS) and various inorganic anions are examined. The anions which quench triplet AQS can be divided into two groups: Cl/sup -/, Br/sup -/, I/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/ (Group I) photoreduce the quinone to AQS/sup -/ only at concentrations higher than that required for complete triplet quenching. The effect increases with concentration and passes through a maximum with highest quantum yields of radical formation reaching approx. 1 for Cl/sup -/ and NCS/sup -/; NO/sub 2//sup -/, SO/sub 3//sup 2 -/ and N/sub 3//sup -/ (Group II) reduce AQS in parallel to triplet quenching. The nature of the high-concentration effect shown by Group I is analyzed. Some results obtained with mixtures of anions support the conclusion that triplet AQS is also responsible for this effect and it is suggested that triple exciplexes of the type /sup 3/(AQS/sup -/.X/sub 2//sup -/) are involved. With this view and the recently proposed intra-radical-spin-orbit-coupling (IRSOC) model, a quantitative interpretation of the results is presented.

Loeff, I.; Treinin, A.; Linschitz, H.

1983-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

204

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Using a dual plasma process to produce cobalt--polypyrrole catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells -- part II: analysing the chemical structure of the films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemical structure of cobalt--polypyrrole -- produced by a dual plasma process -- is analysed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX) and extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS).It is shown that only nanoparticles of a size of 3\\,nm with the low temperature crystal structure of cobalt are present within the compound. Besides that, cobalt--nitrogen and carbon--oxygen structures are observed. Furthermore, more and more cobalt--nitrogen structures are produced when increasing the magnetron power. Linking the information on the chemical structure to the results about the catalytic activity of the films -- which are presented in part I of this contribution -- it is concluded that the cobalt--nitrogen structures are the probable catalytically active sites. The cobalt--nitrogen bond length is calculated as 2.09\\,\\AA\\ and the carbon--nitrogen bond length as 1.38\\,\\AA.

Walter, Christian; Vyalikh, Denis; Brüser, Volker; Quade, Antje; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; 10.1149/2.043209jes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Intercomparison of model simulations of mixed-phase clouds observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. Part II: Multi-layered cloud  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from an intercomparison of single-column and cloud-resolving model simulations of a deep, multi-layered, mixed-phase cloud system observed during the ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment. This cloud system was associated with strong surface turbulent sensible and latent heat fluxes as cold air flowed over the open Arctic Ocean, combined with a low pressure system that supplied moisture at mid-level. The simulations, performed by 13 single-column and 4 cloud-resolving models, generally overestimate the liquid water path and strongly underestimate the ice water path, although there is a large spread among the models. This finding is in contrast with results for the single-layer, low-level mixed-phase stratocumulus case in Part I of this study, as well as previous studies of shallow mixed-phase Arctic clouds, that showed an underprediction of liquid water path. The overestimate of liquid water path and underestimate of ice water path occur primarily when deeper mixed-phase clouds extending into the mid-troposphere were observed. These results suggest important differences in the ability of models to simulate Arctic mixed-phase clouds that are deep and multi-layered versus shallow and single-layered. In general, models with a more sophisticated, two-moment treatment of the cloud microphysics produce a somewhat smaller liquid water path that is closer to observations. The cloud-resolving models tend to produce a larger cloud fraction than the single-column models. The liquid water path and especially the cloud fraction have a large impact on the cloud radiative forcing at the surface, which is dominated by the longwave flux for this case.

Morrison, H; McCoy, R B; Klein, S A; Xie, S; Luo, Y; Avramov, A; Chen, M; Cole, J; Falk, M; Foster, M; Genio, A D; Harrington, J; Hoose, C; Khairoutdinov, M; Larson, V; Liu, X; McFarquhar, G; Poellot, M; Shipway, B; Shupe, M; Sud, Y; Turner, D; Veron, D; Walker, G; Wang, Z; Wolf, A; Xu, K; Yang, F; Zhang, G

2008-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

208

Differential Geometry Tools for Multidisciplinary Design Optimization, Part I: Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for understanding, evaluating, and developing MDO methods; in Part I, we discuss the use of these tools and in Part II, we provide a specific application....

Bakker, Craig; Parks, Geoffrey T.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

In-situ subaqueous capping of mercury-contaminated sediments in a fresh-water aquatic system, Part II-evaluation of sorption materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The function and longevity of traditional, passive, isolation caps can be augmented through the use of more chemically active capping materials which have higher sorptive capacities, ideally rendering metals non-bioavailable. In the case of Hg, active caps also mitigate the rate and extent of methylation. This research examined low cost, readily available, capping materials for their ability to sequester Hg and MeHg. Furthermore, selected capping materials were evaluated to inhibit the methylation of Hg in an incubation study as well as the capacity of a selected capping material to inhibit translocation of Hg and MeHg with respect to ebullition-facilitated contaminant transport in a column study. Results indicated that bauxite had a better capacity for mercury sorption than the other test materials. However, bauxite as well as soil capping materials did not decrease methylation to a significant extent. Materials with larger surface areas, higher organic matter and acid volatile sulfide (AVS) content displayed a larger partitioning coefficient. In the incubation experiments, the presence of a carbon source (lactate), electron acceptor (sulfate) and the appropriate strains of SRB provided the necessary conditions for Hg methylation to occur. The column study showed effectiveness in sequestering Hg and MeHg and retarding transport to the overlying water column; however, disturbances to the soil capping material resulting from gas ebullition negated its effectiveness.

Randall, Paul M., E-mail: randall.paul@epa.gov [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Risk Management Research Laboratory, 26 W. Martin Luther King Drive, Cincinnati, OH 45268 (United States); Yates, Brian J.; Lal, Vivek; Darlington, Ramona [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States)] [Battelle, 505 King Avenue, Columbus, OH 43201 (United States); Fimmen, Ryan [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States)] [Geosyntec Consultants, 150 E. Wilson Bridge Road, Suite 232, Worthington, OH 43085 (United States)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part II. Rates of reduction of composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO{sub 2} generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O{sub 3}-to-Fe3O{sub 4} transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O{sub 4}. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Praxair Technological Center

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

211

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

212

Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

214

2 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS, PACKAGING, AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY--PART B, VOL. 20, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1997 A Novel Test Technique for MCM Substrates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, FEBRUARY 1997 A Novel Test Technique for MCM Substrates Bruce Kim, Member, IEEE, Madhavan Swaminathan-- This paper describes a novel and low-cost test technique that is capable of detecting process related defects such as opens and shorts in multichip module (MCM) substrates. This method is an alternative to existing test

Swaminathan, Madhavan

215

RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in physics Premature Higgs (2011) Cold Fusion (1989) Element X (2002) Molecular Transistors (2001) 11;1989 : Cold Fusion Pons and Fleischmann announce Cold Fusion Electrolysis of heavy water Deuterium enters palladium cathode See temperature rise Detect fusion products like Helium in water 11/1/12 12 #12;Big

Shahriar, Selim

216

Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15, 2010Energy6 Frontera STAT. 1867NOTE TO: CynthiaForm MayLiaison

217

Survey of Kansas Tort Law - Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 225 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 226 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 227 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 228 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 229 2001-2002 Hein...Online -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 230 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 231 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 232 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 233 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 234 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L...

Westerbeke, William E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

relations aspects of executive positions as found in official correspondence and documentation, as well as, formal and informal verbal communications, and it describes the major...

219

TECHNOECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF AREA II HYDROGEN PRODUCTION -PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage medium for hydrogen produced by the ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plantships [16 Florida Solar Energy Center Cocoa, FL 32922-5703, ali@fsec.ucf.edu Abstract The aim of this analysis power interface, 3) Ammonia and ammonia adducts as hydrogen energy storers for fuel cell applications

220

Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. • Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases “well portion of the objective function” and “head portion of the objective function” are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

John McCord

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A study of coal particle shape and three-body wear: Part 1, Design and development of a new three-body wear testing machine: Part 2, Particle shape and three-body wear  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three-body wear involves two surfaces and an intermediate particle trapped between the two surfaces. A machine has been constructed to measure normal and frictional forces due to three-body wear. This machine accurately positions specimens a predetermined distance apart from each other and introduces particles to the interface between the specimens. Different types of specimen combinations have been tested to give a variety of data. Loads that result from the wear test are sampled and stored. Wear coefficients and rates of wear have been calculated for all specimens. (VC)

Clark, N.N.; Means, K.H.; James, R.; Thompson, T.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieving nsls ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Design 12;1-ii Part 3: Conventional Facilities NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 4. SUSTAINABLE... ;1-iv Part 3: Conventional Facilities NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report 11.4...

223

Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1 PRESS KIT/December 2014 www.nasa.gov NP-2014-11-020-JSC National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12;#12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Contents Section Page ........................................................................................... 28 i #12;Orion Flight Test ii December 2014 #12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Flight Overview

Waliser, Duane E.

224

LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Risk perspectives for TOPAZ II flight mission  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to present a preliminary estimate of the nuclear-related public health risk presented by launching and operating the Russian TOPAZ II space reactor as part of the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP). This risk is then compared to the risks from the operation of commercial nuclear power reactors and previously planned and/or launched space nuclear power missions. For the current mission profile, the initial estimate of the risk posed by launching and operating TOPAZ II is significantly less (at least two orders of magnitude) than that estimated for prior space nuclear missions. Even allowing for the large uncertainties in this estimate, it does not appear that the NEPSTP mission will present a significant health risk to the public.

Payne, A.C. Jr. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Haskin, F.E. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Jeff Wurtz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Part 1, Use of seismic experience and test data to show ruggedness of equipment in nuclear power plants; Part 2, Review procedure to assess seismic ruggedness of cantilever bracket cable tray supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1980, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) designated Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Plants'' as an Unresolved Safety Issue (USI), A-46. The objective of USI A-46 is to develop alternative seismic qualification methods and acceptance criteria that can be used to assess the capability of mechanical and electrical equipment in operating nuclear power plants to perform the intended safety functions. A group of affected utilities formed the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) to work with the NRC in developing a program methodology to enable resolution of the A-46 issue. To assist in developing a program methodology, SQUG and the NRC jointly selected and supported a five-member Senior Seismic Review and Advisory Panel (SSRAP) in June 1983 to make an independent assessment of whether certain classes of equipment in operating nuclear power plants in the United States have demonstrated sufficient ruggedness in past earthquakes so as to render an explicit seismic qualification unnecessary. SSRAP operated as an independent review body with all of its findings submitted concurrently to both SQUG and the NRC. During their period of involvement, SSRAP issued several draft reports on their conclusions. This document contains the final versions of these reports; namely, Use of Seismic Experience and Test Data to Show Ruggedness of Equipment in Nuclear Power Plants,'' dated February 1991 and Review Procedure to Assess Seismic Ruggedness of Cantilever Bracket Cable Tray Supports,'' dated March 1, 1991.

Kennedy, R.P. (Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States)); von Riesemann, W.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Wyllie, L.A. Jr. (Degenkolb (H.J.) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States)); Schiff, A.J. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States)); Ibanez, P. (Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States))

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Part 1, Use of seismic experience and test data to show ruggedness of equipment in nuclear power plants; Part 2, Review procedure to assess seismic ruggedness of cantilever bracket cable tray supports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1980, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) designated ``Seismic Qualification of Equipment in Operating Plants`` as an Unresolved Safety Issue (USI), A-46. The objective of USI A-46 is to develop alternative seismic qualification methods and acceptance criteria that can be used to assess the capability of mechanical and electrical equipment in operating nuclear power plants to perform the intended safety functions. A group of affected utilities formed the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) to work with the NRC in developing a program methodology to enable resolution of the A-46 issue. To assist in developing a program methodology, SQUG and the NRC jointly selected and supported a five-member Senior Seismic Review and Advisory Panel (SSRAP) in June 1983 to make an independent assessment of whether certain classes of equipment in operating nuclear power plants in the United States have demonstrated sufficient ruggedness in past earthquakes so as to render an explicit seismic qualification unnecessary. SSRAP operated as an independent review body with all of its findings submitted concurrently to both SQUG and the NRC. During their period of involvement, SSRAP issued several draft reports on their conclusions. This document contains the final versions of these reports; namely, ``Use of Seismic Experience and Test Data to Show Ruggedness of Equipment in Nuclear Power Plants,`` dated February 1991 and ``Review Procedure to Assess Seismic Ruggedness of Cantilever Bracket Cable Tray Supports,`` dated March 1, 1991.

Kennedy, R.P. [Structural Mechanics Consulting, Inc., Yorba Linda, CA (United States); von Riesemann, W.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wyllie, L.A. Jr. [Degenkolb (H.J.) Associates, San Francisco, CA (United States); Schiff, A.J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Ibanez, P. [Anco Engineers, Inc., Culver City, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Aviation turbine fuels from tar sands bitumen and heavy oils. Part 2. Laboratory sample production. Technical report, 1 April 1984-31 May 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase II work performed on small bench-scale laboratory units was to validate the process variables identified in Phase I. As a part of this effort, samples (quantity 500 ML to 1000 ML) of JP4, JP8, were produced and submitted to AFWAL for their evaluation. Detailed characterizations of the tar sand feedstocks and product samples were performed. From the data generated in Phase II, specific goals and tests were outlined for Phase III of the program.

Moore, H.F.; Johnson, C.A.; Fabry, D.A.; Chaffin, M.H.; Sutton, W.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Part II Presentations TT/kjh/06.4.10 Part II Presentations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.15 Robert McGHEE MAN AJW Comparison of experimental fatigue initiation to a crystal plasticity model 4 in silicon 11.00 Olufemi FADUGBA STC BWL / SCB Creating a quantum memory system 11.15 Joshua TSANG STA JY / R

Paxton, Anthony T.

231

Rooting Characteristics of Vegetation Near Areas 3 and 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site--Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy emplaced high-specific-activity low-level radioactive wastes and limited quantities of classified transuranic wastes in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1984 to 1989. The boreholes are located at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada. The boreholes were backfilled with native alluvium soil. The surface of these boreholes and trenches is expected to be colonized by native vegetation in the future. Considering the long-term performance of the disposal facilities, bioturbation (the disruption of buried wastes by biota) is considered a primary release mechanism for radionuclides disposed in GCD boreholes as well as trenches at both Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. This report provides information about rooting characteristics of vegetation near Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. Data from this report are being used to resolve uncertainties involving parameterization of performance assessment models used to characterize the biotic mixing of soils and radionuclide transport processes by biota. The objectives of this study were to: (1) survey the prior ecological literature on the NTS and identify pertinent information about the vegetation, (2) conduct limited field studies to describe the current vegetation in the vicinity of Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs so as to correlate findings with more extensive vegetation data collected at Yucca Mountain and the NTS, ( 3 ) review prior performance assessment documents and evaluate model assumptions based on current ecological information, and (4) identify data deficiencies and make recommendations for correcting such deficiencies.

D. J. Hansen

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Standard test method for uranium by Iron (II) reduction in phosphoric acid followed by chromium (VI) titration in the presence of vanadium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.1 This test method, commonly referred to as the Modified Davies and Gray technique, covers the titration of uranium in product, fuel, and scrap materials after the material is dissolved. The test method is versatile and has been ruggedness tested. With appropriate sample preparation, this test method can give precise and unbiased uranium assays over a wide variety of material types (1, 2). Details of the titration procedure in the presence of plutonium with appropriate modifications are given in Test Method C1204. 1.2 Uranium levels titrated are usually 20 to 50 mg, but up to 200 mg uranium can be titrated using the reagent volumes stated in this test method. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012) | DepartmentC PART

234

PART III  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002OpticsPeriodical: Volume 5, Issue 32012)J TOC PART III List

235

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-Glycoprotein Structure andPALMB i PART I

236

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-Glycoprotein Structure andPALMB i PART I

237

Testing, data analysis and engineering services on lead-acid load leveling batteries. Phase II. Final contract report, January 1, 1984-June 30, 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preprototype 3100 Ah load-leveling cells, developed on ANL Contract 31-109-38-4951, have been cycled at 40 +- 5/sup 0/C on an 80% DoD, 2 cycles per day regime for 2340 cycles. Three of four competing designs continue to cycle, meeting all capacity and voltage requirements. This data at 40 +- 5/sup 0/C are compared to emerging cycle data from similar cells on test at ANL National Battery Test Laboratory at 50 and 60/sup 0/C. Cycle life goals at 40 and 50/sup 0/C have been met. Tests are continuing in an effort to demonstrate their equivalency to 4000 cycles at 25/sup 0/C on the same regime.

Chreitzberg, A.M.

1985-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Directed random testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Random testing can quickly generate many tests, is easy to implement, scales to large software applications, and reveals software errors. But it tends to generate many tests that are illegal or that exercise the same parts ...

Pacheco, Carlos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Photosystem II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

James Barber

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR.

Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

243

LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab II - 1 It is often useful to study physical. An electric circuit illustrates how energy can be transformed within a system, transferred to different parts it is the electric charge that transports the energy from one place in the system to another

Minnesota, University of

244

Solutions to Test 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test 1. STAT 47201. Fall 2014. October 7, 2014. 1. You are given: i. Mortality follows the illustrative life table ii. 6% i = Calculate: a. The actuarial present value

Microsoft account

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part II. The effects of temperature and humidity on free formaldehyde, extractable formaldehyde, formaldehyde emission, and physical characteristics of the foam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of testing with two products of urea-formaldehyde based foams are described. Results of three products have previously been reported. Methods for detection and quantitative determination of formaldehyde, design of the experimental chambers, and the procedures are described. Samples of Product D were monitored for about 29 days and samples of Product E were monitored for 60 days in chambers and results are tabulated for formaldehyde emission. Additional tests performed on the two products are: extractable formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); free formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); comparison of free formaldehyde concentration; density (high and low temperature conditions); shrinkage (high and low temperature conditions). Control panels were constructed to simulate a wall in a home and observations were made and compared with results of the experimental products.

Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Output power characteristics and performance of TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element No. 24  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A final report on the output power characteristics and capabilities of single cell TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) No. 24 is presented. Thermal power tests were conducted for over 3000 hours to investigate converter performance under normal and adverse operating conditions. Experiments conducted include low power testing, high power testing, air introduction to the interelectrode gap, collector temperature optimization, thermal modeling, and output power characteristic measurements. During testing, no unexpected degradation in converter performance was observed. The TFE has been removed from the test stand and returned to Scientific Industrial Association {open_quote}{open_quote}LUCH{close_quote}{close_quote} for materials analysis and report. This research was conducted at the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Facility at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) as a part of the Topaz International Program (TIP) by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Luchau, D.W.; Bruns, D.R. [Team Specialty Services, Inc., TOPAZ International Program, 901 University Blvd., SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Izhvanov, O.; Androsov, V. [JV INERTEK, Scientific Industrial Association ``Luch``, 24 Zheleznodorozhnaya, Podolsk, (Russia) 142100

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Plasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PART A7: PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS X. Introduction 75 XI. Remote diagnostics 75 1. Optical spectroscopy 2 and rotational excitation IV. Heavy particle collisions 142 V. Gas phase kinetics 143 PART B5: PLASMA DIAGNOSTICSPlasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE I. What is a plasma? 1 II. Plasma

Chen, Francis F.

248

Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures part II: Experimental comparisons and verification of methods. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research reported herein continued to concentrate on in situ conductivity measurements for development into an accelerated screening method for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The work reported herein was performed in two phases. In the first phase, sealed tubes were prepared with steel catalysts and mixtures of CFC-12, HCFC-22, HFC-134a, and HFC-32/HFC-134a (zeotrope 30:70) refrigerants with oils as described in ANSI/ASHRAE Method 97-1989. In the second phase of work, modified sealed tubes, with and without steel catalysts present, were used to perform in situ conductivity measurements on mixtures of CFC-12 refrigerant with oils. The isothermal in situ conductivity measurements were compared with conventional tests, e.g., color measurements, gas chromatography, and trace metals to evaluate the capabilities of in situ conductivity for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Other sets of tests were performed using ramped temperature conditions from 175{degrees}C (347{degrees}F) to 205{degrees}C (401{degrees}F) to evaluate the capabilities of in situ conductivity for detecting the onset of rapid degradation in CFC-12, HCFC-22 and HFC-134a refrigerant mixtures with naphthenic oil aged with and without steel catalysts present.

Kauffman, R. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Research Inst.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Startup control of the TOPAZ-II space nuclear reactor. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Russian designed and manufactured TOPAZ-II Thermionic Nuclear Space Reactor has been supplied to the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization for study as part of the TOPAZ International Program. A Preliminary Nuclear Safety Assessment investigated the readiness to use the TOPAZ-II in support of a Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Mission (NEPSTP). Among the anticipated system modifications required for launching the TOPAZ-II system within safety goals is for a U.S. designed Automatic Control System. The requirements and desired features of such a control system are developed based upon U.S. safety standards. System theory and design are presented in order to establish the basis for development of a hybrid control model from available simulations. The model is verified and then used in exploration of various control schemes and casualty analysis providing groundwork for future Automatic Control System design.

Astrin, C.D.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Fracture strength and elastic modulus as a function of porosity for hydroxyapatite and other brittle materials Part I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Porous brittle materials are used as filters, catalyst supports, solid oxide fuel cells and biomedical materials. However the literature on the Weibull modulus, m, versus volume fraction porosity, P, is extremely limited despite the importance of m as a gauge of mechanical reliability. In Part I of this study, m is determined for 441 sintered hydroxyapatite (HA) specimens fractured in biaxial flexure for 0.08 P 0.62. In this study, we analyze a combined data set collected from the literature that represents work from a total of 17 different research groups (including the present authors), eight different materials and more than 1560 oxide and non-oxide specimens, the m versus P plot is Ushaped with a wide band of m values for P < 0.1 (Region I) and P > 0.55 (Region III), and a narrower band of m values in the intermediate porosity region of 0.1 < P < 0.55 (Region II). The limited range of m ( 4 < m < 11) in Region II has important implications since Region II includes the P range for the majority of the applications of porous brittle materials. Part II of this study focuses on the P dependence of the mean fracture strength,< f >, and the Young s modulus E for the HA specimens tested in Part I along with literature data for other brittle materials. Both < f > and E are power law functions of the degree of densification, , where = 1 P/PG and PG is the green (unfired) porosity.

Fan, Xiaofeng [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Case, Eldon D [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Ren, Fei [ORNL; Shu, Yutian [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Baumann, Melissa [Michigan State University, East Lansing

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61 4.3 Carbon capture andPart II: Policy Analysis Page 5 R12: Carbon capture andstorage If carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies

Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61 4.3 Carbon capture andPart II: Policy Analysis Page 5 R12: Carbon capture andstorage If carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

An integrated approach to offshore wind energy assessment: Great Lakes 3D Wind Experiment. Part I. Calibration and testing RJ Barthelmie1, SC Pryor1, CM Smith1, P Crippa1, H Wang1, R. Krishnamurthy2, R. Calhoun2, D Valyou3, P Marzocca3, D Matthiesen4, N.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An integrated approach to offshore wind energy assessment: Great Lakes 3D Wind Experiment. Part I Government or any agency thereof." Introduction An experiment to test wind and turbulence measurement strategies was conducted at a northern Indiana wind farm in May 2012. The experimental design focused

Polly, David

254

Artificial Photosynthesis II -  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

255

OPTI 500E-Photonic Communications Engineering II E Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering (PCE) consists of two parts (I and II). PCE I covers optical fiber light guiding and wave, communications systems and fiber optics networks and the Internet. PCE II builds upon this knowledge

Arizona, University of

256

OPTI 500F-Photonic Communications Engineering II F Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering (PCE) consists of two parts (I and II). PCE I covers optical fiber light guiding and wave, communications systems and fiber optics networks and the Internet. PCE II builds upon this knowledge

Arizona, University of

257

OPTI 500D-Photonic Communications Engineering II D Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering (PCE) consists of two parts (I and II). PCE I covers optical fiber light guiding and wave, communications systems and fiber optics networks and the Internet. PCE II builds upon this knowledge

Arizona, University of

258

Home energy rating system building energy simulation test (HERS BESTEST). Volume 2, Tier 1 and Tier 2 tests reference results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Building Energy Simulation Test (BESTEST) is a method for evaluating the credibility of software used by HERS to model energy use in buildings. The method provides the technical foundation for ''certification of the technical accuracy of building energy analysis tools used to determine energy efficiency ratings,'' as called for in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Title I, Subtitle A, Section 102, Title II, Part 6, Section 271). Certification is accomplished with a uniform set of test cases that Facilitate the comparison of a software tool with several of the best public-domain, state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs available in the United States. The HERS BESTEST work is divided into two volumes. Volume 1 contains the test case specifications and is a user's manual for anyone wishing to test a computer program. Volume 2 contains the reference results and suggestions for accrediting agencies on how to use and interpret the results.

Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Experience with automatic reactor control at EBR-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Satisfactory operation of the ACRDS has extended the capabilities of EBR-II to a transient test facility, achieving automatic transient control. Test assemblies can now be irradiated in transient conditions overlapping the slower transient capability of the TREAT reactor.

Lehto, W.K.; Larson, H.A.; Christensen, L.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Online Analysis of Wind and Solar Part II: Transmission Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To facilitate wider penetration of renewable resources without compromising system reliability concerns arising from the lack of predictability of intermittent renewable resources, a tool for use by California Independent System Operator (CAISO) power grid operators was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with CAISO with funding from California Energy Commission. The tool analyzes and displays the impacts of uncertainties in forecasts of loads and renewable generation on: (1) congestion, (2)voltage and transient stability margins, and (3)voltage reductions and reactive power margins. The impacts are analyzed in the base case and under user-specified contingencies.A prototype of the tool has been developed and implemented in software.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Theoretical Foundations of Spatially-Variant Mathematical Morphology Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to represent a function by a set or an equivalent class of sets: the umbra approach and the threshold sets approach. The umbra approach, which was introduced by Sternberg [3], relies on the fact that the points the umbra approach has a nice geometrical interpretation of the morphological gray- level operations

Schonfeld, Dan

262

A Brief History of the Chemistry Department -Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geniuses during the great #12;A brief history, continued porn poge I the world, among them -Barcelona

Kounaves, Samuel P.

263

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar on Nov. 18, 2014, continued the series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

264

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar will continue our series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar...

265

AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY OF GRASP PART II: APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Glover, 1989, 1990; Glover and Laguna, 1997), genetic algorithms (Goldberg, 1989), variable neighbor

Resende, Mauricio G. C.

266

QER Public Meeting: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy will convene a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review. The purpose of the meeting is to examine energy infrastructure constraints in New England and regional approaches to addressing them

267

Current Estate Planning Topics - Marital Deduction Pitfalls: Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article addresses the deduction for marital transfers under the United States estate tax. This is by far the most important deduction under the estate tax, and loss of the deduction can be very damaging to families. ...

Dickinson, Martin B. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Centralized Authorization Using a Direct Service, Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Authorization is the process of deciding if entity X is allowed to have access to resource Y. Determining the identity of X is the job of the authentication process. One task of authorization in computer networks is to define and determine which user has access to which computers in the network. On Linux, the tendency exists to create a local account for each single user who should be allowed to logon to a computer. This is typically the case because a user not only needs login privileges to a computer but also additional resources like a home directory to actually do some work. Creating a local account on every computer takes care of all this. The problem with this approach is that these local accounts can be inconsistent with each other. The same user name could have a different user ID and/or group ID on different computers. Even more problematic is when two different accounts share the same user ID and group ID on different computers: User joe on computer1 could have user ID 1234 and group ID 56 and user jane on computer2 could have the same user ID 1234 and group ID 56. This is a big security risk in case shared resources like NFS are used. These two different accounts are the same for an NFS server so that these users can wipe out each other's files. The solution to this inconsistency problem is to have only one central, authoritative data source for this kind of information and a means of providing all your computers with access to this central source. This is what a ''Directory Service'' is. The two directory services most widely used for centralizing authorization data are the Network Information Service (NIS, formerly known as Yellow Pages or YP) and Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP).

Wachsmann, A

2004-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Realistic Industrial Scale Energy Optimization: Part II - Analytic Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as distillation path optimization, reaction path optimization and heat exchange optimization. These techniques are being supported by other workers in the area of efficiency measurement, availability analysis and exergy analysis which will serve to guide... and exergy analysis are all examples of targeting tech niques. They are all effective at describing where your process lies in the efficiency domain but do not really help you in telling you where you should be going. These techniques are being discussed...

Kleinschrodt, F. J., III

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~~"-' ,m . I 'f'-~I I ,/:? :RIlNG SET r -t j IS) iO" 1C. ~ETNR(LSIZEt>ClIISS)/ '.I~RllNG LJ.J 8DGO Ot\\ YS ~~:\\ j3 1 :in ~ill particular a batch lng OD aEriv~l phenomenon r by

Jay Smith, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Apartment Hunting - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

apartment hunting, I discuss things to look for that might help keep your energy bills low. When you think about it, energy bills can, in effect, increase your rent each month....

272

Department of Materials MS Part II Course Handbook 201011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

silicon imaging devices AIK / GM Helen DUGDALE MAN Understanding crack growth in nuclear reactors SL ............................................................................................................. 22 Lab Books

Paxton, Anthony T.

273

WIPP SEIS-II - Summary (Part 1 of 4)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOE

274

Young People's Day in Court: Part II 29 April 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ocean and Arctic drilling, long-wall coal mining, hydro-fracking ­ all practices that will become more invasive

Hansen, James E.

275

Electromagnetic scattering from grassland Part II: Measurement and modeling results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-InvestigatoronmanyprojectssponsoredbyNASA,JPL,ARO,ONR,ARL, and GM all related in one way or the other to microwave and millimeter wave radar remote sensing. He has published many book chapters and more than 80 papers in refereed journals on electromagnetic scattering, random media modeling, microwave measurement...LecturerAwardfromtheGerman Federal Ministry for Education, Science, and Technology. FawwazT.Ulaby(M’68–SM’74–F’80)receivedthe B.S.degreeinphysicsfromtheAmericanUniversity of Beirut, Lebanon, in 1964, and the M.S.E.E. and Ph.D.degreesinelectricalengineeringfromtheUni- versity...

Stiles, James Marion; Ulaby, F. T.; Sarabandi, K.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Part II: Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's ImpactAppendix Al Statement of Work for Evergreen,B

277

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev next >researchNew Construction - August

278

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev next >researchNew Construction -

279

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 < prev next >researchNew Construction -New

280

ONTOLOGY OF TEST Larisa Soldatova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ONTOLOGY OF TEST Larisa Soldatova Post doctoral researcher Riichiro Mizoguchi Professor ISIR, Osaka In the present paper design of test generation systems (TGS) based on test ontology and student's knowledge model parts: domain independent- and domain-dependant knowledge. Suggested test ontology allows analyzing test

Mizoguchi, Riichiro

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management J¨org Meyer, E. Wes Bethel). This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, Office of Environmental of California. ii #12;Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management Joerg Meyer, E. Wes

282

Test Series 2. 3 detailed test plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Test Series 2.3 is chronologically the second of the five sub-series of tests which comprise Test Series 2, the second major Test Series as part of the combustion research phase to be carried out at the Grimethorpe Experimental Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion Facility. Test Series 2.3 will consist of 700 data gathering hours which is expected to require some 1035 coal burning hours. The tests will be performed using US supplied coal and dolomite. This will be the first major series of tests on the Facility with other than the UK datum coal and dolomite. The document summarises the background to the facility and the experimental program. Described are modifications which have been made to the facility following Test Series 2.1 and a series of Screening Tests. Detailed test objectives are specified as are the test conditions for the experiments which comprise the test series. The test results will provide information on the effects of the bed temperature, excess air level, Ca/S ratio, number of coal feed lines, and combustion efficiency and sulphur retention. A significant aspect of the test series will be part load tests which will investigate the performance of the facility under conditions of turn down which simulate load following concepts specified for two combined cycle concepts, i.e., their CFCC combined cycle and a turbo charged combined cycle. The material test plan is also presented. The principal feature of the materials programme is the planned exposure of a set of static turbine blade specimens in a cascade test loop to the high temperature, high pressure flue gas. A schedule for the programme is presented as are contingency plans.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Microgrid Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Part removal of 3D printed parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D printing using a patent ...

Peña Doll, Mateo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

Bullard, K.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Marutzky, Sam

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessor-blinded phase ii Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONSEQUENCES OF FERTILITY TREATMENTS Summary: of IVF and ICSI: a price-elasticity of demand assessment 25 Part II 35 Chapter 4 Assessing long... within many health...

288

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

289

TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the various system components.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

BBF RFC 106: A Standard Type IIS Syntax for Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we define a standard syntax for assembling standard parts for expression in plant cells, extensible to all other eukaryotes. Variations of the Type IIS mediated cloning method known as Golden Gate Cloning, most notably ...

Rutten, Virginia

2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

291

Matlab-II: Computing, Programming and Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis 10 min break Part II Graphing Programming Q & A #12;Matlab I: Basic Concepts Everything A = logm(B) expm(A) = B #12;Matlab Computation Compound Matrix Expressions · Created by the user o fromMatlab-II: Computing, Programming and Data Analysis Division of Statistics and Scientific

Mankoff, Jennifer

292

Part I: SST for NWP Part II: Decadal Strategic Plan for USGCRP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Subcommittee on Global Climate Research (SGCR) also U.S. Global Change Research Program (USGCRP) National for Meteorological Satellites (CGMS) 3-7 October 2011, Saint Petersburg, Russia #12;3 Hurricanes form only in oceanic Coordination Office USGCRP (Brief) History ·National Climate Program Act of 1978 ·Presidential initiative

Maryland at College Park, University of

293

Ex Parte Communication Following Meeting Between DOE and the...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

& Publications 2014-05-08 Issuance: Test Procedures for Battery Chargers; Notice of Data Availability Ex parte communication Memorandum Memorandum to DOE re Battery Chargers...

294

Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 All Issues submit Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear testing experience The nuclear weapons designers who developed their skills during...

295

Statistical Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40 CFR Part 1065 Engine Dynamometer Test Cell Statistical Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40 CFR Part 1065 Engine...

296

Bomb tests attack the food chain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ciguatera poisoning, the most common type of fish poisoning in the world, has become a major public health problem in some parts of the South Pacific. This area has always been the site of periodic outbreaks, especially after severe storms or natural disasters that damage core reefs. But since World War II it has become evident that military activities and major construction projects that wreak havoc on corals also lead to ciguatera outbreaks. Extraordinarily high rates of ciguatera poisoning have occurred on the small Pacific islands that have been used for nuclear tests and on the islands that host the military infrastructures and activities that accompany the tests. This is true for both the Marshall Islands near Bikini and Eniwetok, where U.S. tests took place, and in French Polynesia, in the area around Moruroa Atoll where the French government continues to test. Ciguatera poisoning has a disastrous effect on people who depend on fishing as a way of life and on fish as the major source of protein. 10 refs.

Ruff, T. (Monash Medical School, Melbourne (Australia))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

WIPP SEIS-II - Comment Response Supplement, Volume II (Part 1 of 24)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOE WIPPForIII

298

Topaz II preliminary safety assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz II space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safety assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the U.S. with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

Marshall, A.C. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)); Standley, V. (Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States)); Voss, S.S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)); Haskin, E. (Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, Institute for Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87110 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

299

Home energy rating system building energy simulation test (HERS BESTEST): Volume 1, Tier 1 and Tier 2 tests user's manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Building Energy Simulation Test (BESTEST) is a method for evaluating the credibility of software used by HERS to model energy use in buildings. The method provides the technical foundation for ''certification of the technical accuracy of building energy analysis tools used to determine energy efficiency ratings,'' as called for in the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (Title I, subtitle A,l Section 102, Title II, Part 6, Section 271). Certification is accomplished with a uniform set of test cases that facilitate the comparison of a software tool with several of the best public-domain, state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs available in the United States. This set of test cases represents the Tier 1 and Tier 2 Tests for Certification of Rating Tools as described in DOE 10 CFR Part 437 and the HERS Council Guidelines for Uniformity (HERS Council). A third Tier of tests not included in this document is also planned.

Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ACRA-II  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

302

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Surfaces · Plane · Quadratic. CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane and Intersection CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Plane Equations · General plane equation ax+by+cz+d=0 · Normal of the plane n=[a, b, c] CSC6870 Computer Graphics II

Hua, Jing

303

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The technetium-loaded Sn(II)apatite was also subjected to water leach tests. The loaded sample (0.2 g of Sn(II)apatite was loaded with 0.342 mg of Tc-99) was placed in a 200-mL distilled water column and sparged with air. Samples were taken weekly over a 6-week period, and the dissolved oxygen ranged from 8.4 to 8.7 mg/L (average 8.5 mg/L); all samples recorded less than the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L Tc-99. The mechanism by which TcO{sub 2} is sequestered and hence protected from re-oxidation appears to be an exchange with phosphate in the apatite lattice, as the phosphorus that appeared in solution after reaction with technetium was essentially the same moles of technetium that were taken up by the Sn(II)apatite (Table 6). Overall, the reduction of the mobile pertechnetate (+7) to the less mobile technetium dioxide (+4) by Sn(II)apatite and subsequent sequestration of the technetium in the material indicates that Sn(II)apatite is an excellent candidate for long-term immobilization of technetium. The indications are that the Sn(II)apatite will lend itself to sequestering and inhibiting the reoxidation to the mobile pertechnetate species, thus keeping the radionuclide out of the environment.

DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 such as dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). *Work

Brookhaven National Laboratory

306

Part 2 : Scientific Information Main applicant: Nierstrasz, Oscar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the development process. -- Agile Modeling. A key bottleneck to effective software assessment is the rapidPart 2 : Scientific Information Main applicant: Nierstrasz, Oscar Project title: Agile Software 30, 2012 @ 12:07 i #12;SNF Proposal -- Agile Software Assessment ii 1 Summary of the research plan

Jäger, Gerhard

307

Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Soil Desiccation Pilot Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes results of a pilot test of soil desiccation conducted as part of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test program. The report is written in CERCLA treatabilty test report format.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Johnson, Christian D.; Greenwood, William J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Part I, DAA Overview  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSalesOE0000652 Srivastava,Pacific1ofDepartmentb. Part B 1 Part

309

Belle-II Experiment Network Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of ~;;400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1 ab-1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle-II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and neworking requirements of the Belle-II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle-II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration?s work.

Belle-II Experiment Collaboration; Asner, David; Bell, Greg; Carlson, Tim; Cowley, David; Dart, Eli; Erwin, Brock; Godang, Romulus; Hara, Takanori; Johnson, Jerry; Johnson, Ron; Johnston, Bill; Dam, Kerstin Kleese-van; Kaneko, Toshiaki; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Kuhr, Thomas; McCoy, John; Miyake, Hideki; Monga, Inder; Nakamura, Motonori; Piilonen, Leo; Pordes, Ruth; Ray, Douglas; Russell, Richard; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Jim; Sevior, Martin; Singh, Surya; Suzuki, Soh; Sasaki, Takashi; Williams, Jim

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Topaz II preliminary safety assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) decided to investigate the possibility of launching a Russian Topaz 11 space nuclear power system. A preliminary safety assessment was conducted to determine whether or not a space mission could be conducted safely and within budget constraints. As part of this assessment, a safety policy and safety functional requirements were developed to guide both the safely assessment and future Topaz II activities. A review of the Russian flight safety program was conducted and documented. Our preliminary safety assessment included a top level event tree, neutronic analysis of normal and accident configurations, an evaluation of temperature coefficients of reactivity, a reentry and disposal analysis, and analysis of postulated launch abort impact accidents, and an analysis of postulated propellant fire and explosion accidents. Based on the assessment, it appears that it will be possible to safely launch the Topaz II system in the US with some possible system modifications. The principal system modifications will probably include design changes to preclude water flooded criticality and to assure intact reentry.

Marshall, A.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Standley, V. (Air Force Phillips Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Voss, S.S. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Haskin, E. (New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Final Report -Public Part -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

objective of the PSO 6385 project was to develop stack materials, components and stack technology including and Demonstration of SOFC Stacks PSO Project No. 2006-1-6385 (part 3) 01.03.2006-29.02.2008 Topsoe Fuel Cell A.....................................................................................................................4 3. PROJECT RESULTS

313

Combustion 2000: Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of the program are to develop a coal-fired high performance power generation system (HIPPS) that is capable of: thermal efficiency (HHV) {ge} 47%; NOx, SOx, and particulates {le} 10% NSPS (New Source Performance Standard); coal providing {ge} 65% of heat input; all solid wastes benign; and cost of electricity {le} 90% of present plants. Phase 1, which began in 1992, focused on the analysis of various configurations of indirectly fired cycles and on technical assessments of alternative plant subsystems and components, including performance requirements, developmental status, design options, complexity and reliability, and capital and operating costs. Phase 1 also included preliminary R and D and the preparation of designs for HIPPS commercial plants approximately 300 MWe in size. This Phase, Phase 2, had as its initial objective the development of a complete design base for the construction and operation of a HIPPS prototype plant to be constructed in Phase 3. As part of a descoping initiative, the Phase 3 program has been eliminated and work related to the commercial plant design has been ended. The rescoped program retained a program of engineering research and development focusing on high temperature heat exchangers, e.g. HITAF development (Task 2); a rescoped Task 6 that is pertinent to Vision 21 objectives and focuses on advanced cycle analysis and optimization, integration of gas turbines into complex cycles, and repowering designs; and preparation of the Phase 2 Technical Report (Task 8). This rescoped program deleted all subsystem testing (Tasks 3, 4,and 5) and the development of a site-specific engineering design and test plan for the HIPPS prototype plant (Task 7). Work reported herein is from: Task 2.1 HITAF Combustors; Task 2.2 HITAF Air Heaters; and Task 6 HIPPS Commercial Plant Design Update.

Unknown

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Lectures on Applied Mathematics Part 1: Linear Algebra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?????????.. 531 Section 6.8 Singular Value Decompositions??????? 537 Section 6.9 The Polar Decomposition Theorem?????.. 561 INDEX?????????????????????????.. vii v PART I1 NUMERICAL ANALYSIS Selected Readings for Part II???????????????? PART... is unimportant and shall always be written as in (1.1.3). The elements 1 2, ,...,i i iNA A A are the elements of the ith row of A , and the elements 1 2, ,...,k k NkA A A are the elements of the k th column. The convention is that the first index denotes...

Bowen, Ray M.

2014-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

315

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

316

Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Böcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jürg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

317

PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARS II More Documents & Publications PARS II TRAINING PARS II TRAINING PARS II 104 Contractor Monthly...

318

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Regression Test Selection Technique for Graphical User Interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regression testing is a quality control measure to ensure that the newly modified part of the software still complies with its specified requirements and that the unmodified part has not been affected by the maintenance activity. Regression testing...

Chesser, Carl

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker2014DepartmentI325 8ADARECORDS-RevisionF sAGA 12,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Hypersonic flight testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the design process for a hypersonic vehicle, it is necessary to predict the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic environment for flight conditions. This involves combining results obtained from ground testing with analytical modeling to predict the aerodynamics and heating for all conditions of interest. The question which always arises is, how well will these models predict what is actually seen in a flight environment This paper will briefly address ground-testing and analytical modeling and discuss where each is appropriate, and the associated problems with each area. It will then describe flight test options as well as instrumentation currently available and show how flight tests can be used to validate or improve models. Finally, several results will be shown to indicate areas where ground testing and modeling alone are inadequate to accurately predict hypersonic aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics.

Williamson, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A review of experiments and results from the transient reactor test (TREAT) facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TREAT Facility was designed and built in the late 1950s at Argonne National Laboratory to provide a transient reactor for safety experiments on samples of reactor fuels. It first operated in 1959. Throughout its history, experiments conducted in TREAT have been important in establishing the behavior of a wide variety of reactor fuel elements under conditions predicted to occur in reactor accidents ranging from mild off normal transients to hypothetical core disruptive accidents. For much of its history, TREAT was used primarily to test liquid-metal reactor fuel elements, initially for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), then for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), the British Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), and finally, for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Both oxide and metal elements were tested in dry capsules and in flowing sodium loops. The data obtained were instrumental in establishing the behavior of the fuel under off-normal and accident conditions, a necessary part of the safety analysis of the various reactors. In addition, TREAT was used to test light-water reactor (LWR) elements in a steam environment to obtain fission-product release data under meltdown conditions. Studies are now under way on applications of TREAT to testing of the behavior of high-burnup LWR elements under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions using a high-pressure water loop.

Deitrich, L. W.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

324

Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

Yoder, JR.G.L.

2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

325

Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Course Information://www.cs.wayne.edu/~jinghua/6870/csc6870.htm) CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Textbooks · REQUIRED TEXTBOOK: Interactive Computer Graphics: A Top-Down Approach with Shader-Based OpenGL (6th Edition) Edward Angel, Dave Shreiner ISBN-10

Hua, Jing

326

Part III - Section J  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS/%2A en10 CFR Part

327

Part III - Section J  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF CIVIL RIGHTS/%2A en10 CFR PartM280

328

Part 10 of 11  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on2005-74LaboratoriesCERCLAConcentratingPart

329

Part 11 of 11  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on2005-74LaboratoriesCERCLAConcentratingPart3.4

330

Part 2 of 11  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartment ofOil's Impact on2005-74LaboratoriesCERCLAConcentratingPart3.4(

331

PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-Glycoprotein Structure andPALMB i PART

332

PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeedingOptimizing I/OP-Glycoprotein Structure andPALMB i028 i PART

333

HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

In-Situ Test Thermal Response Tests Interpretations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In-Situ Test Thermal Response Tests Interpretations OG&E Ground Source Heat Exchange Study Richard are connected to ground source heat pumps to cool and heat homes. The TRT study is the first part of a larger exchanges heat with the surrounding soil or rock. The double U-tube layout (Figure 2) is connected so

335

JUPITER-II Molten Salt Flibe Research: An Update On Tritium, Mobilization and Redox Chemistry Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second Japan/US Program on Irradiation Tests for Fusion Research (JUPITER-II) began on April 1, 2001. Part of the collaborative research centers on studies of the molten salt 2LiF2–BeF2 (also known as Flibe) for fusion applications. Flibe has been proposed as a self-cooled breeder in both magnetic and inertial fusion power plant designs over the last 25 years. The key feasibility issues associated with the use of Flibe are the corrosion of structural material by the molten salt, tritium behavior and control in the molten salt blanket system, and safe handling practices and releases from Flibe during an accidental spill. These issues are all being addressed under the JUPITER-II program at the Idaho National Laboratory in the Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility. In this paper, we review the program to date in the area of tritium/deuterium behavior, Flibe mobilization under accident conditions and testing of Be as a redox agent to control corrosion. Future activities planned through the end of the collaboration are also presented.

D.A. Petti; D. A. Petti; G. R. Smolik; Michael F. Simpson; John P. Sharpe; R. A. Anderl; S. Fukada; Y. Hatano; Masanori Hara; Y. Oya; T. Terai; D.-K. Sze; S. Tanaka

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Testing from the ground up Software Hut 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing from the ground up Software Hut 2008 Tell me about testing · How do you test? · What do you test? · Why do you test? Why do we test? · Nobody writes perfect code. · The client wants to be sure. · Marks ­ one of the parts of the XP process mark is evidence of regular testing. Question 1

Holcombe, Mike

338

FINAL REPORT - HYBRID-MIXING TESTS SUPPORTING THE CONCENTRATE RECEIPT VESSEL (CRV-VSL-00002A/2B) CONFIGURATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has performed scaled physical modeling of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems applicable to the Concentrate Receipt Vessel (CRV) of Hanford's Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) as part of the overall effort to validate pulse jet mixer (PJM) mixing in WTP vessels containing non-Newtonian fluids. The strategy developed by the Pulse Jet Mixing Task Team was to construct a quarter-scale model of the CRV, use a clear simulant to understand PJM mixing behavior, and down-select from a number of PJM configurations to a ''best design'' configuration. This ''best design'' would undergo final validation testing using a particulate simulant that has rheological properties closely similar to WTP waste streams. The scaled PJM mixing tests were to provide information on the operating parameters critical for the uniform movement (total mobilization) of these non-Newtonian slurries. Overall, 107 tests were performed during Phase I and Phase II testing.

GUERRERO, HECTORN.

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

TRUPACT-II 157 Examination Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of examination and recovery activities performed on the TRUPACT-II 157 shipping container. The container was part of a contact-handled transuranic waste shipment being transported on a truck to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico when an accident occurred. Although the transport vehicle sustained only minor damage, airborne transuranic contamination was detected in air samples extracted from inside TRUPACT-II 157 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Consequently, the shipping container was rejected, resealed, and returned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory where the payload was disassembled, examined, and recovered for subsequent reshipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report documents the results of those activities.

Barry H. O'Brien; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Kip E. Archibald

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Versant tests are automated spoken language tests that are taken on the telephone or computer. If you would like to listen to a sample test, purchase a practice test, or view the test score after taking the test (if applicable), please visit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Versant tests are automated spoken language tests that are taken on the telephone or computer. If you would like to listen to a sample test, purchase a practice test, or view the test score after taking the test (if applicable), please visit www.VersantTest.com PART INSTRUCTIONS · Carefully read

Blei, Ron

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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341

Test Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

342

Prematurely terminated slug tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A solution of the well response to a prematurely terminated slug test (PTST) is presented. The advantages of a PTST over conventional slug tests are discussed. A systematized procedure of a PTST is proposed, where a slug test is terminated in the midpoint of the flow point, and the subsequent shut-in data is recorded and analyzed. This method requires a downhole shut-in device and a pressure transducer, which is no more than the conventional deep-well slug testing. As opposed to slug tests, which are ineffective when a skin is present, more accurate estimate of formation permeability can be made using a PTST. Premature termination also shortens the test duration considerably. Because in most cases no more information is gained by completing a slug test to the end, the author recommends that conventional slug tests be replaced by the premature termination technique. This study is part of an investigation of the feasibility of geologic isolation of nuclear wastes being carried out by the US Department of Energy and the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland.

Karasaki, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

FAKULTT II MATHEMATIK UND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF A NETWORK CREATION GAME WITH EXPONENTIAL PAYOFF by NADINE BAUMANN SEBASTIAN STILLER No. 2007/19 #12;The Price of Anarchy of a Network Creation Game with Exponential Payoff Nadine Baumann Sebastian Stiller May/5-3. Technische Universität Berlin, Fakultät II, Stra�e des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Email: stiller

Nabben, Reinhard

344

Atmospheric Dynamics II Instructor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AT602 Atmospheric Dynamics II 2 credits Instructor: David W. J. Thompson davet: An Introduction to Dynamic Meteorology, 5th Edition, Academic Press (recommended) · Marshall, J., and Plumb, R. A., 2008: Atmosphere, Ocean, and Climate Dynamics: An Introductory Text, Academic Press. · Vallis, G. K

345

National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Upton, New York 11973 #12;NSLS-II PROJECT DIRECTOR'S ASSESSMENT JUNE 2010 2 OVERALL ASSESSMENT and schedule performances. Overall, the project is on schedule and on budget with no major technical issues production components such as vacuum chambers, girders, BPM and power supply parts, injector transfer lines

Ohta, Shigemi

346

Scoping Study for Demand Respose DFT II Project in Morgantown, WV  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This scoping study describes the underlying data resources and an analysis tool for a demand response assessment specifically tailored toward the needs of the Modern Grid Initiatives Demonstration Field Test in Phase II in Morgantown, WV. To develop demand response strategies as part of more general distribution automation, automated islanding and feeder reconfiguration schemes, an assessment of the demand response resource potential is required. This report provides the data for the resource assessment for residential customers and describes a tool that allows the analyst to estimate demand response in kW for each hour of the day, by end-use, season, day type (weekday versus weekend) with specific saturation rates of residential appliances valid for the Morgantown, WV area.

Lu, Shuai; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This paper provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; W. J. Carmack; H. Tsai

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior.

Jon Carmack; S. L. Hayes; M. K. Meyer; H. Tsai

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

II International Summer Senior University DARWIN AWARD TO THE BEST DIDACTIC INITIATIVE FOR THE PARTICIPANTS IN THE II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II International Summer Senior University DARWIN AWARD TO THE BEST DIDACTIC INITIATIVE for Seniors (UOM) announces an award for the best didactic initiative presented by students of different" are eligible to take part in this award. 2. All didactic proposals entered in the award must be related

Oro, Daniel

350

Beryllium Testing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Beryllium is a naturally occurring metal and is not radioactive. Because of its properties, beryllium has been part of the atomic energy and nuclear weapons industries since the 1940s.

351

Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) ; Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned low enriched uranium conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part… (more)

Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Fluorescence of [Fe II] in H II regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of [Fe II] lines at various positions within the H II regions M42 and M43 is presented. The relative intensities of selected optical [Fe II] lines are shown to be correlated with the intensity of the apparent nebular continuous spectrum. Since the continuum of H II regions is known to be mostly stellar radiation scattered by dust intermixed with the emitting gas, these correlations provide direct evidence for the existence of fluorescent excitation in the formation process of the [Fe II] lines, irrespective of the prevailing physical state.

M. Rodriguez

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

353

SWAMI II technology transfer plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

Ribosomal Database Project II  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

355

Hydrates detection by cone penetration testing: cone penetration tests through ice layers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDRATES DETECTION BY CONE PENETRATION TESTING: PART I: CONE PENETRATION TESTS THROUGH ICE LAYERS A Thesis by PHILIPPE HENRI JEANJEAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ABcM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering HYDRATES DETECTION BY CONE PENETRATION TESTING: PART I: CONE PENETRATION TESTS THROUGH ICE LAYERS A Thesis by PHILIPPE HENRI JEANJEAN Approved as to style...

Jeanjean, Philippe Henri

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARSIIUserGuideV1.0Draft.pdf...

357

SRC-II process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive laboratory and pilot plant experimental work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process has led to the development of an improved version of the process known as SRC-II. This work has shown considerable promise and plans are being made to demonstrate the SRC-II process using commercial size equipment in a 6000 T/D plant to be located near Morgantown, West Virginia. On the basis of recent economic studies, the products (both liquid and gas) from a future large-scale commercial plant are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.00 to 5.00 per million Btu (first quarter 1980 basis). The major product of the primary process is distillate fuel oil of less than 0.3% sulfur for use largely as a non-polluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam, especially in the east where utilities and industry are presently using petroleum products. For the longer term, the major growth opportunity for SRC-II fuel oil in the generation of electric power will probably be through advanced combustion turbine units with heat recovery boilers (combined cycle units). The light liquid fractions (naphtha and middle distillate) produced by the SRC-II process can be upgraded to a high octane unleaded gasoline to supplement petroleum-derived supplies. Significant quantities of pipeline gas are also produced at a cost which should be competitive with SNG from direct coal gasification. Light hydrocarbons (ethane, propane) from the process may be effectively converted to ethylene in conventional cracking plants to offset ethylene demand from petroleum-derived naphtha and gas oil, both of which could otherwise be used for other refinery products. In addition, certain fraction of the fuel oil might also be used in medium speed diesel engines and automotive gas turbines.

Schmid, B.K.; Jackson, D.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

; r : : ~ I f ~ ACCEPTABLE PARTS LIST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Specifications H. Subcontractor's Non-Standard Part Approval Request I. Limited Usage Parts ATTACHMENTS: (I

Rathbun, Julie A.

359

Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know, but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. Our study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. In Chap. 2 we will study kinetic theory — the simplest of all formalisms for analyzing systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the frame-independent laws it

unknown authors

360

Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know, but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. Our study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. In Chap. 2 we will study kinetic theory — the simplest of all formalisms for analyzing systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the frame-independent laws it

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Part I STATISTICAL PHYSICS 1 Statistical Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this first part of the book we shall study aspects of classical statistical physics that every physicist should know but are not usually treated in elementary thermodynamics courses. This study will lay the microphysical (particle-scale) foundations for the continuum physics of Parts II—VI. Throughout, we shall presume that the reader is familiar with elementary thermodynamics, but not with other aspects of statistical physics. As a central feature of our approach, we shall emphasize the intimate connections between the relativistic formulation of statistical physics and its nonrelativistic limit, and between quantum statistical physics and the classical theory. Chapter 2 will deal with kinetic theory, which is the simplest of all formalisms for studying systems of huge numbers of particles (e.g., molecules of air, or neutrons diffusing through a nuclear reactor, or photons produced in the big-bang origin of the Universe). In kinetic theory the key concept is the “distribution function ” or “number density of particles in phase space”, N; i.e., the number of particles per unit 3-dimensional volume of ordinary space and per unit 3-dimensional volume of momentum space. Despite first appearances, N turns out to be a geometric, frame-independent entity. This N and the laws it obeys provide

unknown authors

362

The Hierarchical Rater Model for Rated Test Items and its Application to Large-Scale Educational Assessment Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ended (or "constructed response") test items have become a standard part of the educational assessment

363

Evaluation of Fluid Conduction and Mixing within a Subassembly of the Actinide Burner Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid, including axial and radial heat conduction and subchannel mixing, that are not currently represented with internal code models. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor.

Cliff B. Davis

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Boiler - tuning basics, part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tuning power plant controls takes nerves of steel and an intimate knowledge of plant systems gained only by experience. Tuning controls also requires equal parts art and science, which probably is why there are so few tuning experts in the power industry. In part 1 of a two-part series, the author explores a mix of the theoretical and practical aspects of tuning boiler control. 5 figs.

Leopold, T. [ABB Inc. (United States)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Bibliography of reports on studies of the geology, hydrogeology and hydrology at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, from 1951--1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established in 1951 as a proving ground for nuclear weapons. The site had formerly been part of an Air Force bombing and gunnery range during World War II. Sponsor-directed studies of the geology, hydrogeology, and hydrology of the NTS began about 1956 and were broad based in nature, but were related mainly to the effects of the detonation of nuclear weapons. These effects included recommending acceptable media and areas for underground tests, the possibility of off-site contamination of groundwater, air blast and surface contamination in the event of venting, ground-shock damage that could result from underground blasts, and studies in support of drilling and emplacement. The studies were both of a pure scientific nature and of a practical applied nature. The NTS was the site of 828 underground nuclear tests and 100 above-ground tests conducted between 1951 and 1992 (U.S. Department of Energy, 1994a). After July 1962, all nuclear tests conducted in the United States were underground, most of them at the NTS. The first contained underground nuclear explosion was detonated on September 19, 1957, following extensive study of the underground effect of chemical explosives. The tests were performed by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration. As part of a nationwide complex for nuclear weapons design, testing and manufacturing, the NTS was the location for continental testing of new and stockpiled nuclear devices. Other tests, including Project {open_quotes}Plowshare{close_quotes} experiments to test the peaceful application of nuclear explosives, were conducted on several parts of the site. In addition, the Defense Nuclear Agency tested the effect of nuclear detonations on military hardware.

Seaber, P.R.; Stowers, E.D.; Pearl, R.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Relationship between fuel composition and properties. III. Physical properties of US Navy Shale-II fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Naval Research Laboratory and the Naval Air Propulsion Center are currently participating in a program to characterize the products from the Shale-II refining process conducted by the Standard Oil Company of Ohio at their refinery in Toledo, Ohio. This paper is concerned with a part of this program and is a summary of the work on the physical and related properties of three military type fuels derived from shale: JP-5 and JP-8 jet turbine fuels, and diesel fuel marine (DFM). The shale derived fuels which were used in these studies were derived from Paraho crude shale oil. The boiling range distribution of a representative sample of each of the three fuels was determined by gas chromatography. Data for specific gravity, freezing point, pour point, flammability, ignition and electrostatic properties and copper corrosion tests were also obtained. Conclusions from this study are: physical properties of the Shale-II fuels are similar to that of equivalent fuels derived from petroleum; and differences observed could be minimized by modest changes in refining steps.

Affens W.A. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC); Hall, J.M.; Beal, E.; Hazlett, R.N.; Nowack, C.J.; Speck, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Situational Effects in Ability Testing 1 Running head: SITUATIONAL EFFECTS IN ABILITY TESTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for entry into the French Aircraft Pilot Training, gathered on a set of three tests (visual perception stability of broad cognitive abilities within a short time interval like one year. Broad cognitive abilities Testing 4 2. broad abilities (also named "stratum II"), defined as very general abilities like fluid

Boyer, Edmond

369

Hydrocal II process for superior naphthenic lube oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HydroCall II Process is an advanced technology process to produce superior napthenic base lube oil stocks and specialty products. All products will be unlabeled and cover the full viscosity range of 30 to 4000 SUS at 100/sup 0/F. The process features high pressure, multiple stages, a multiple catalyst system and plurality of reactors and catalyst beds to achieve selective conversion of specific aromatic types contained in typical naphthenic lube oil feedstocks. Calumet's new HydroCall II oils will be available to the industry the latter part of 1987.

Rausch, M.K.; Love, G.A.; Tollefsen, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ARM - RHUBC II Instruments  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstruments Related Links RHUBC-II Home RHUBC

371

Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

Converse, S.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Test Comparability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Direct Energy Conversion Fission Reactor, Gaseous Core Reactor with Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) Generator; Final Report - Part I and Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report focuses on the power conversion cycle and efficiency. The technical issues involving the ionization mechanisms, the power management and distribution and radiation shielding and safety will be discussed in future reports.

Samim Anghaie; Blair Smith; Travis Knight

2002-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

374

Epigraphical cones II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the second part of a work devoted to the theory of epigraphical cones ..... Such a definition of characteristic function is discussed in the book [7, Chapter1] and in many .... some norm g, generalizes the classical Laplace density function.

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

375

PROGRAMA FISICA II. INTRODUCCI O  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROGRAMA F´ISICA II. INTRODUCCI ´O I ELECTRICITAT I.1 Camp electrost`atic I.2 Potencial i energia I.4 `Optica #12;BIBLIOGRAFIA B`asica 1. Tipler, P.A. F´isica. Vol. II, ed. Revert´e, 1992. 2. Purcell Blum, R. F´isica: Electricidad, Mag- netismo y Luz. Vol. II, ed. Revert´e, 1986. Complement`aria 1

Batiste, Oriol

376

The Majorana Parts Tracking Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Bertrand, F E; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Combs, D C; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Gusev, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Hegai, A; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Kochetov, O; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J Diaz; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Petersburg, R; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Pushkin, K; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Shanks, B; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Snyder, N; Soin, A; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Thompson, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Zhitnikov, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Majorana Parts Tracking Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

The Majorana Collaboration; N. Abgrall; E. Aguayo; F. T. Avignone III; A. S. Barabash; F. E. Bertrand; V. Brudanin; M. Busch; D. Byram; A. S. Caldwell; Y-D. Chan; C. D. Christofferson; D. C. Combs; C. Cuesta; J. A. Detwiler; P. J. Doe; Yu. Efremenko; V. Egorov; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; J. Esterline; J. E. Fast; P. Finnerty; F. M. Fraenkle; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. K. Giovanetti; J. Goett; M. P. Green; J. Gruszko; V. E. Guiseppe; K. Gusev; A. L. Hallin; R. Hazama; A. Hegai; R. Henning; E. W. Hoppe; S. Howard; M. A. Howe; K. J. Keeter; M. F. Kidd; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; B. D. LaFerriere; J. Diaz Leon; L. E. Leviner; J. C. Loach; J. MacMullin; R. D. Martin; S. J. Meijer; S. Mertens; M. L. Miller; L. Mizouni; M. Nomachi; J. L. Orrell; C. O'Shaughnessy; N. R. Overman; R. Petersburg; D. G. Phillips II; A. W. P. Poon; K. Pushkin; D. C. Radford; J. Rager; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; E. Romero-Romero; M. C. Ronquest; B. Shanks; T. Shima; M. Shirchenko; K. J. Snavely; N. Snyder; A. Soin; A. M. Suriano; D. Tedeschi; J. Thompson; V. Timkin; W. Tornow; J. E. Trimble; R. L. Varner; S. Vasilyev; K. Vetter; K. Vorren; B. R. White; J. F. Wilkerson; C. Wiseman; W. Xu; E. Yakushev; A. R. Young; C. -H. Yu; V. Yumatov; I. Zhitnikov

2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing Introduction Test Selection Test Minimization Test Prioritization Summary Software Testing and Maintenance 2 What is it? Regression testing refers to the portion of the test cycle in which a program is tested to ensure that changes do not affect

Lei, Jeff Yu

379

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

Mousavi, Mohammad

380

UPPAAL TutorialUPPAAL TutorialUPPAAL Tutorial CoVerCoVer TestTest--Case Selection andCase Selection and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pettersson RTSS'05 Testing Primary validation technique used in industry Part of system development life-cycle

David, Alexandre

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Cobra Judy II Conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The strategic community relies heavily on the Cobra Judy (CJ1) instrumentation to provide high-quality radar and telemetry data for ballistic missile system testing and development. The current CJ1 platform, USNS Observation ...

Gregor, Jeffrey

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Control of parts : parts making in the building industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis advances a diagramming tool called PAct. Each diagram is a model of a "value adding" enterprise, representing materials processing, parts manipulation and assembly, and the agents involved. Its purpose is to ...

Kendall, Stephen Holmes

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

NAWIPS/GEMPAK Migration to AWIPS-II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tools, integrated pan and zoom · Challenges ­ Concurrent Raytheon development ­ Development Environment ­ Eclipse-II system as delivered by Raytheon · Break down existing functionality into small pieces · Trac wiki to have one-on-one TIMs w/ Raytheon · Continue to work closely with the NWS AWIPS Program Office · Testing

384

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

Peters, Dennis

385

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Brainstorming Session II | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

RD PI Meeting files Brainstorming Session II Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Test Facility Discussion (Raubenheimer) .pdf file (124KB) Testbed Discussion (Murphy) .pdf...

387

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curve CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Cubic Bezier Curves · Curve: · Control points · Basis functions: = = 3 0 3 )()( i ii uBpuc ip CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Bezier Curves (degree n) · Curve: · Control points · Basis functions

Hua, Jing

388

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Geometric Modeling CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Overview 3D Shape, subdivision surfaces, implicit surfaces, particles. · Solids CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Basic Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer Graphics II Fundamental Shapes CSC6870 Computer

Hua, Jing

389

Risk assessment in decision making related to land-use planning (LUP) as required by the Seveso II directive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Risk assessment in decision making related to land-use planning (LUP) as required by the Seveso II the requirement of the Seveso II directive and an analysis of the use of LUP as part of a risk management policy management policy combining several tools. To describe the risk management policy implemented in France

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

390

National Synchrotron Light Source II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

Steve Dierker

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

391

MATLAB: Introduction Part 1 Assignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB: Introduction Part 1 ­ Assignment Bruno Abreu Calfa Assigned: September 8th , 2011 Due Calculate the value of the function y(x) = |x| sin x2 for values of x = 3 and 6 . Hint 1: Use the MATLAB

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

392

Crane Test  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phases on &gamma;-Al2O3.Winter (Part 2) | DepartmentCrane

393

Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures, Part 1: Method assessment. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a literature search performed to identify analytical techniques suitable for accelerated screening of chemical and thermal stabilities of different refrigerant/lubricant combinations. Search focused on three areas: Chemical stability data of HFC-134a and other non-chlorine containing refrigerant candidates; chemical stability data of CFC-12, HCFC-22, and other chlorine containing refrigerants; and accelerated thermal analytical techniques. Literature was catalogued and an abstract was written for each journal article or technical report. Several thermal analytical techniques were identified as candidates for development into accelerated screening tests. They are easy to operate, are common to most laboratories, and are expected to produce refrigerant/lubricant stability evaluations which agree with the current stability test ANSI/ASHRAE (American National Standards Institute/American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers) Standard 97-1989, ``Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems.`` Initial results of one accelerated thermal analytical candidate, DTA, are presented for CFC-12/mineral oil and HCFC-22/mineral oil combinations. Also described is research which will be performed in Part II to optimize the selected candidate.

Kauffman, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Integral testing of relays and circuit breakers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among all equipment types considered for seismic qualification, relays have been most extensively studied through testing due to a wide variation of their designs and seismic capacities. A temporary electrical discontinuity or ``chatter`` is the common concern for relays. A chatter duration of 2 milliseconds is typically used as an acceptance criterion to determine the seismic capability of a relay. Many electrical devices, on the other hand, receiving input signals from relays can safely tolerate a chatter level much greater than 2 ms. In Phase I of a test program, Brookhaven National Laboratory performed testing of many relay models using the 2-ms chatter criterion. In Phase II of the program, the factors influencing the relay chatter criterion, and impacts of relay chatter on medium and low voltage circuit breakers and lockout relays were investigated. This paper briefly describes the Phase II tests and presents the important observations.

Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Summary of NREL's Recent Class 8 Tractor Trailer Platooning Testing (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes NREL's recent class 8 tractor trailer platooning testing, including analysis of SAE J1321 Type II fuel consumption testing, fuel consumption improvement, fuel economy and platooning position accuracy.

Lammert, M.; Kelly, K.; Walkowicz, K.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

Seitz, R.

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

397

ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT – CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

Seitz, Roger; Freshley, Mark D.; Dixon, Paul; Hubbard, Susan S.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Flach, Gregory P.; Faybishenko, Boris; Gorton, Ian; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Moulton, John D.; Steefel, Carl I.; Marble, Justin

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

398

Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

399

ORNL tests energy-efficient technologies for expeditionary military...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the summer, ORNL researchers tested the performance of various tent configurations and HVAC units in an outdoor environment as part of the Transformative Reductions in Operational...

400

Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center | Y-12 National Security...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detection and ... Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center As part of our increased global nuclear nonproliferation efforts, Y-12 commissioned the Nuclear Detection and Sensor...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Soil Remediation Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

PARS II KNOWN ISSUES AND SUGGESTED WORKAROUNDS  

Energy Savers [EERE]

screen, the following workaround is suggested: Close all browser windows (PARS II and web applications). Reopen a browser and proceed with the PARS II log-in. PARS II does...

403

Hybrid Electric Vehicle End-Of-Life Testing On Honda Insights, Gen I Civics And Toyota Gen I Priuses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report details the end-of-life fuel efficiency and battery testing on two model year 2001 Honda Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), two model year 2003 Honda Civic HEVs, and two model year 2002 Toyota Prius HEVs. The end-of-life testing was conducted after each vehicle has been operated for approximately 160,000 miles. This testing was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). The AVTA is part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. SAE J1634 fuel efficiency testing was performed on the six HEVs with the air conditioning (AC) on and off. The AC on and off test results are compared to new vehicle AC on and off fuel efficiencies for each HEV model. The six HEVs were all end-of-life tested using new-vehicle coast down coefficients. In addition, one of each HEV model was also subjected to fuel efficiency testing using coast down coefficients obtained when the vehicles completed 160,000 miles of fleet testing. Traction battery pack capacity and power tests were also performed on all six HEVs during the end-of-life testing in accordance with the FreedomCAR Battery Test Manual For Power-Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles procedures. When using the new-vehicle coast down coefficients (Phase I testing), 11 of 12 HEV tests (each HEV was tested once with the AC on and once with the AC off) had increases in fuel efficiencies compared to the new vehicle test results. The end-of-life fuel efficiency tests using the end-of-life coast down coefficients (Phase II testing) show decreases in fuel economies in five of six tests (three with the AC on and three with it off). All six HEVs experienced decreases in battery capacities, with the two Insights having the highest remaining capacities and the two Priuses having the lowest remaining capacities. The AVTA’s end-of-life testing activities discussed in this report were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory; the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications, and by Exponent Failure Analysis Associates.

James Francfort; Donald Karner; Ryan Harkins; Joseph Tardiolo

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Implementation and Test of Numerical Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance tests, and it is found that libopti is fast compared to scripting based solutions, and as much in its class. #12;ii #12;Summary (Danish) MÃ¥let for denne afhandling er at beskrive dobbelt-dimensional problems, their solution time is very large.[JN00] Because of this, optimization as we know it today did

405

DOE underground storage tank waste remediation chemical processing hazards. Part I: Technology dictionary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document has been prepared to aid in the development of Regulating guidelines for the Privatization of Hanford underground storage tank waste remediation. The document has been prepared it two parts to facilitate their preparation. Part II is the primary focus of this effort in that it describes the technical basis for established and potential chemical processing hazards associated with Underground Storage Tank (UST) nuclear waste remediation across the DOE complex. The established hazards involve those at Sites for which Safety Analysis Reviews (SARs) have already been prepared. Potential hazards are those involving technologies currently being developed for future applications. Part I of this document outlines the scope of Part II by briefly describing the established and potential technologies. In addition to providing the scope, Part I can be used as a technical introduction and bibliography for Regulatory personnel new to the UST waste remediation, and in particular Privatization effort. Part II of this document is not intended to provide examples of a SAR Hazards Analysis, but rather provide an intelligence gathering source for Regulatory personnel who must eventually evaluate the Privatization SAR Hazards Analysis.

DeMuth, S.F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

CDF Run IIb silicon: Stave design and testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF Silicon Vertex Detectors (SVX) have been shown to be excellent tools for heavy flavor physics, with the secondary vertex detection and good vertex resolution.The CDF RunIIb Silicon Vertex Detector (SVXIIb) was designed to be a radiation tolerant replacement for the current SVXII which was not anticipated to survive the projected Run II luminosity dose. The outer five layers use identical structural elements, called staves, to support six silicon sensors on each side. The stave is composed of carbon fiber skins on a foam core with a built-in cooling tube. Copper on Kapton bus cable carriers power and data/control signals underneath three silicon modules on each side of the stave. A Hybrid equipped with four new SVX4 chips are used to readout two silicon sensors on each module which can be readout and tested independently. This new design concept leads to a very compact mechanical and electrical detecting unit, allowing streamline production and ease of testing and installation. A description of the design and mechanical performance of the stave is given. They also present here results on the electrical performance obtained using prototype staves as well as results with the first pre-production parts.

Rong-Shyang Lu

2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

407

Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes

Dierker, S.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement Webinar: Systems Performance Advancement II Funding Opportunity Announcement January 22, 2015 2:00PM to...

410

Regulation of ERK5 by insulin and angiotensin-II in vascular smooth muscle cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ERK5 is involved in proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). The proliferative actions of insulin and angiotensin-II (A-II) in VSMC are mediated in part by ERK1/2. We hypothesized that insulin and A-II also regulate ERK5 activity in VSMC. Acute treatment (<60 min) with insulin or A-II increased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 at 15 min and ERK5 at 5 min. Chronic treatment ({<=}8 h) with insulin increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation by 4 h and ERK5 by 8 h. A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK1/2 by 8 h and ERK5 by 4 h. The EC{sub 50} for insulin treatment effecting ERK1/2 and ERK5 phosphorylation was 1.5 and 0.1 nM, whereas the EC{sub 50} for A-II was 2 nM, each. Insulin plus A-II induced an additive effect only on ERK5 phosphorylation. Inhibition of insulin- and A-II-stimulated phosphorylation of ERK5 and ERK1/2 by PD98059 and Wortmannin exhibited differential and time-dependent effects. Taken together, these data indicate that insulin and A-II regulate the activity of ERK5, but different from that seen for ERK1/2.

Sharma, Girish [University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Goalstone, Marc Lee [University of Colorado at Denver and Health Sciences Center, Aurora, CO (United States); Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Denver, CO 80220 (United States); E-mail: Marc.Goalstone@uchsc.edu

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

411

Ground-based testing of space nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small nuclear power plants for space applications are evaluated according to their testability in this two part report. The first part introduces the issues involved in testing these power plants. Some of the concerns include oxygen embrittlement of critical components, the test environment, the effects of a vacuum environment on materials, the practically of racing an activated test chamber, and possible testing alternative the SEHPTR, king develop at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

McDonald, T.G.

1990-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

412

US advanced battery consortium in-vehicle battery testing procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes test procedures to be used as part of a program to monitor the performance of batteries used in electric vehicle applications. The data will be collected as part of an electric vehicle testing program, which will include battery packs from a number of different suppliers. Most data will be collected by on-board systems or from driver logs. The paper describes the test procedure to be implemented for batteries being used in this testing.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Options Study - Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Super KEKB / Belle II Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the status of the KEKB collider and the Belle detector upgrade, along with several examples of physics measurements to be performed with Belle II at Super KEKB.

B. Golob

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

415

Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seinfeld, J. H. and Pandis, S. N. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: From Air Pollution to Climate ChangeSYLLABUS FOR Environmental Chemistry II (Atmospheric Chemistry) FCH 511 Fall 2013 Theodore S

Dibble, Theodore

416

TEELINDUSTRIAL OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS & PARTS MANUAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-stage zoning applications in hydronic heating and cooling systems for residential, commercial and/or inTEELINDUSTRIAL SERIES OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS & PARTS MANUAL WATER CIRCULATING PUMPS MODELS 1P899A INSTRUCTIONS CAREFULLY BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO INSTALL, OPERATE, OR SERVICE TEEL PUMPS. PROTECT YOURSELF

Kleinfeld, David

417

DATE: __________________ NVLAP LAB CODE: _________________ Test Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_____ 30/DISC00A ANSI/INCITS 423.1 (2008) Information Technology - Conformance Testing Methodology Standard _____ 30/DISC01A ANSI/INCITS 423.2 (2008) Information Technology - Conformance Testing Methodology Standard - Part 2: Finger minutiae data _____ 30/DISC03A ANSI/INCITS 423.3 (2009) Information Technology

418

Prototype to Test WHY prototype to test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prototype to Test METHOD WHY prototype to test HOW to prototype to test Prototyping to test or design space. The fundamental way you test your prototypes is by letting users experience them and react to them. In creating prototypes to test with users you have the opportunity to examine your solution

Prinz, Friedrich B.

419

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit Running a test case: 1 Get the component to a known state (set up). 2 Cause some event (the test case). 3 Check the behaviour. · Record pass/fail · Track statistics · Typically we want to do a lot of test cases so it makes sense to automate. · Test cases

Peters, Dennis

420

SINGLE HEATER TEST FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Single Heater Test is the first of the in-situ thermal tests conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of its program of characterizing Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site for a proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. The Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) contained an extensive plan of in-situ thermal tests aimed at understanding specific aspects of the response of the local rock-mass around the potential repository to the heat from the radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. With the refocusing of the Site Characterization Plan by the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan'' (DOE 1994), a consolidated thermal testing program emerged by 1995 as documented in the reports ''In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (DOE 1995) and ''Updated In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (CRWMS M&O 1997a). The concept of the Single Heater Test took shape in the summer of 1995 and detailed planning and design of the test started with the beginning fiscal year 1996. The overall objective of the Single Heater Test was to gain an understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are anticipated to occur in the local rock-mass in the potential repository as a result of heat from radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. This included making a priori predictions of the test results using existing models and subsequently refining or modifying the models, on the basis of comparative and interpretive analyses of the measurements and predictions. A second, no less important, objective was to try out, in a full-scale field setting, the various instruments and equipment to be employed in the future on a much larger, more complex, thermal test of longer duration, such as the Drift Scale Test. This ''shake down'' or trial aspect of the Single Heater Test applied not just to the hardware, but also to the teamwork and cooperation between multiple organizations performing their part in the test.

J.B. Cho

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MODULATION OF COX I AND COX II-MEDIATED FORMATION OF VARIOUS ARACHIDONIC ACID METABOLITES IN VITRO AND IN VIVO BY DIETARY POLYPHENOLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for formation of compound I (~ 2 X 10 7 mol -1 s -1 ) versus soluble peroxides such as ethylhydroperoxide and have lower apparent K M values (~ 10 µM versus 300 µM for H 2 O 2 ) for the peroxidase reaction as measured by rates of oxidation of reducing... of compound I to compound 7 II/intermediate II is considerably more rapid for COX II (Lu et al., 1999). This partly accounts for the fact that for COX II, intermediate II is formed more rapidly and at lower peroxide concentrations. There is no obvious...

Bai, Hyoungwoo

2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L L

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

423

Modelling, Simulation, Testing, and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling, Simulation, Testing, and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains By Jeffrey of the author. #12;ii Modelling, Simulation, Testing and Optimization of Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Powertrains prototypes. A comprehensive survey of the state of the art of commercialized hybrid vehicle powertrains

Victoria, University of

424

Beam Position Monitor Test Stand Christopher D. Chan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electron beams will demand better accuracy in measuring the position of the beam. Current BPM designs with improved accuracy may not be enough and entirely new designs of BPMs may be needed. This BPM test stand will help with current BPM testing and future BPM design efforts. II. CURRENT BEAM POSTION MONITORING

Hoffstaetter, Georg

425

NRC Transportation Security (Part 73 SNF Update and Part 37 Category...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

NRC Transportation Security (Part 73 SNF Update and Part 37 Category 1 and 2 Materials) NRC Transportation Security (Part 73 SNF Update and Part 37 Category 1 and 2 Materials) NRC...

426

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Energy For Composting Toilets ..The toilet is a Mullbank composting toilet. CBB 801-127T;:Ee: Award: SOLAR ENERGY FOR COMPOSTING TOILETS Applicant

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Special Publication No. 3, Ticks and Tickborne Diseases, II. Hosts, Part 1. A-F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., (1959E), 1-63) (Banvayo, Ivory Coast) Haemaphysalis parmata (Morel, P. C., (1963A), 33- 40) (Ivory Coast) Hyalomma truncatum (Morel, P. C. & Mouchet, J., (1965A), 477-496) (Cameroun) Rhipicephalus guilhoni (Morel, P. C. & Mouchet, J. , (1965A), 477..., ?., (1967A), 281-405) (Ta'l, Ivory Coast) "AGOUTI" Mamm. Rodentia Amblyomma cayennense (Floch, ?. , (1956b), 1-235) (Inini) Amblyomma oblongoguttatum (Floch, H. & Abonnenc, ?. , (1940A), 1 -46) (r?gion de l'Approuague, French Guiana) AGOUTI Mamm...

Doss, Mildred A.; Farr, Marion M.; Roach, Katharine F.; Anastos, George

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

E-Print Network 3.0 - acceso parte ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

lpiz y bolgrafo. LUGAR: Aulario ... Source: Escolano, Francisco - Departamento de Ciencia de la Computacin e Inteligencia Artificial, Universitat d'Alacant Collection:...

429

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar is the second in the series on designing and constructing high performance building enclosures, and will focus on effective strategies to address moisture and thermal needs.

430

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Date/Time:  August 13, 2014; 3:00-4:30 PM EDTDescription: The webinar is the second in the series on designing and constructing high performance building enclosures, and will focus on effective...

431

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and agriculture systems, hydroelectric devices, geothermalbiomass, and low-head hydroelectric technologies. Therefor~Pelton impulse wheel hydroelectric system for a small farm.

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Part II: Bilateral Consultative Arrangements North America United States-Mexico Fisheries Cooperation Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(SAGARPA) informally agreed in 1983 to meet annually to review the broad range of issues involved-Golfo research program, (2) MEXUS-Pacífico research program, and (3) information exchange. Implementing Ambiente (PROFEPA), the Secretaría de Comercio, the Secretaría de Salud, and the Secretaría de Relaciones

433

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmosphere part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

particles (Duce, 2005). Atmospheric... and thus influence atmospheric carbon dioxide con- centrations and climate. As a result, studies of aerosol... in surface waters of...

434

Power Line Communications: An Overview Part II Muhammad Salman Yousuf 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) \\in the frequency range of 50-60 Hz. It is a fact that power transmission towers and lines are some

Rizvi, Syed Z.

435

PART II, Tackling Grand Challenges in Geochemistry: Q&A with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for scientific research and industrial development, and HFIR is a powerful reactor-based source. We use these in a couple of ways. One way (at HFIR) relies on the fact that...

436

GEOMETRIA II. RELACI ON DE PROBLEMAS 3 ESPACIOS VECTORIALES EUCLIDEOS (PRIMERA PARTE)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Calcular una base ortonormal de (U,gU), donde U es el subespacio de R4 dado por: U = {(x,y,z,t) R4 /2x+4y matrices en la base usual son: A = 1 -1 1 -1 5 0 1 0 3 , C = 2 1 1 1 -5 -1 1 -1 0 , D = +4 -2 2 -2 +1 -1 2 -1 +1 . 5. Dados dos vectores cualesquiera u y v de un espacio vectorial eucl´ideo (V

Rosales, César

437

The Collegiate Wind Competition is Next Week: Meet the Teams Part II  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Next week, 10 student teams representing colleges and universities across the country will compete in the Energy Department’s first-ever Collegiate Wind Competition, which is designed to prepare talented young people for careers in the wind energy industry and enable academic institutions to showcase the ingenuity of their students. Meet five of these talented, creative teams.

438

E-Print Network 3.0 - aids part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Forest Research Agency of the UK Forestry Commission Collection: Renewable Energy 8 CERDI, Etudes et Documents, E 2007.07 Document de travail de la srie Summary: with...

439

E-Print Network 3.0 - asociados parte ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Universidad de Murcia Collection: Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 27 METODOS NUMERICOS EN INGENIERIA Y CIENCIAS APLICADAS E. Onate, F. Zarate, G. Ayala, S....

440

E-Print Network 3.0 - adults part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Pennsylvania State University, Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Electrochemical Engine Center; Schacter, Daniel - Department of Psychology, Harvard...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Electronic Resource Management Systems, Part II: Offerings from Serial Vendors and Serial Data Vendors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the September 2004 issue, I reported on the Electronic Resource Management (ERM) offerings of the major ILS vendors, and promised to follow with a second article covering the ERM tools offered by other kinds of companies, ...

Duranceau, Ellen

2005-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

442

Attack Detection and Identification in Cyber-Physical Systems -- Part II: Centralized and Distributed Monitor Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cyber-physical systems integrate computation, communication, and physical capabilities to interact with the physical world and humans. Besides failures of components, cyber-physical systems are prone to malicious attacks so that specific analysis tools and monitoring mechanisms need to be developed to enforce system security and reliability. This paper builds upon the results presented in our companion paper [1] and proposes centralized and distributed monitors for attack detection and identification. First, we design optimal centralized attack detection and identification monitors. Optimality refers to the ability of detecting (respectively identifying) every detectable (respectively identifiable) attack. Second, we design an optimal distributed attack detection filter based upon a waveform relaxation technique. Third, we show that the attack identification problem is computationally hard, and we design a sub-optimal distributed attack identification procedure with performance guarantees. Finally, we illustr...

Pasqualetti, Fabio; Bullo, Francesco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Tropical Cyclogenesis Associated with Rossby Wave Energy Dispersion of a Preexisting Typhoon. Part II: Numerical Simulations*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for background wind and moisture fields is crucial for maintaining a continuous vorticity growth through in a 3D model. A new TC with realistic dynamic and thermodynamic structures forms in the wake development. This oscillatory growth is also seen in the observed rainfall and cloud-top temperature fields

Wang, Bin

444

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Assessment Model The TENCompetence Assessment Model... , 60 2009 Sofia Service Oriented Architecture of Assessment Model1 Adelina Aleksieva... Assessment Model. To achieve...

445

Origins of Analysis Methods Used to Design High Performance Commercial Buildings: Part II, Solar Energy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PV, solar thermal, passive solar analysis programs are reivewed using a new comprehensive genealogy chart. In companion papers, the origins of the analysis methods of whole-building energy and daylighting simulation programs are reviewed (Oh... analysis programs evaluate the performance of solar systems that are designed to collect and use solar radiation for thermal or electricity conversion. These programs are used for simulations and design methods: Computer simulations estimate the time...

Oh, S.; Haberl, J.S.

446

Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part II: The Enduring Research Themes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-produced fish. Finally, the fishery products used in pet foods are important as they relate to the health of millions of pets. In past years, I reviewed many reports of the fisheries chemists of the 1930's and 1940's not be said of botulism and several other unpleasant diseases related to fishery consumption

447

ORIGINAL PAPER Sustainability metrics for eco-technologies assessment, Part II.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a sustainability analysis of CO2 reuse to produce dimethyl carbonate (DMC) via eth- ylene oxide (ROUTE A) and via-to-gate in assessing pro- cess sustainability during LCA. Keywords Sustainability metrics Á CO2 sequestration Á LCA for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) production. The study aimed to assess sustainability and pointed towards routes

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

448

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demonstrating solar energy and energy conservation retro-toilet, energy efficient conservation devices, passive solar

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Part II - The effect of data on waste behaviour: The South African waste information system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This empirical study explores the relationship between data and resultant waste knowledge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The study shows that 'Experience, Data and Theory' account for 54.1% of the variance in knowledge. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A strategic framework for Municipalities emerged from this study. - Abstract: Combining the process of learning and the theory of planned behaviour into a new theoretical framework provides an opportunity to explore the impact of data on waste behaviour, and consequently on waste management, in South Africa. Fitting the data to the theoretical framework shows that there are only three constructs which have a significant effect on behaviour, viz experience, knowledge, and perceived behavioural control (PBC). Knowledge has a significant influence on all three of the antecedents to behavioural intention (attitude, subjective norm and PBC). However, it is PBC, and not intention, that has the greatest influence on waste behaviour. While respondents may have an intention to act, this intention does not always manifest as actual waste behaviour, suggesting limited volitional control. The theoretical framework accounts for 53.7% of the variance in behaviour, suggesting significant external influences on behaviour not accounted for in the framework. While the theoretical model remains the same, respondents in public and private organisations represent two statistically significant sub-groups in the data set. The theoretical framework accounts for 47.8% of the variance in behaviour of respondents in public waste organisations and 57.6% of the variance in behaviour of respondents in private organisations. The results suggest that respondents in public and private waste organisations are subject to different structural forces that shape knowledge, intention, and resultant waste behaviour.

Godfrey, Linda [CSIR, Natural Resources and the Environment, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE - Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Scott, Dianne [University of KwaZulu-Natal, School of Development Studies, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Difford, Mark [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Trois, Cristina, E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE - Centre for Research in Environmental, Coastal and Hydrological Engineering, School of Engineering, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Volcanic particle aggregation in explosive eruption columns. Part II: Numerical experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Germany c Department of Geological Engineering and Sciences, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI USA d Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, UK Received 16 September 2004; received eruptions without interaction of external water. Ice is highly dominant in comparison to liquid water (N99

Rose, William I.

451

Regularity and Variationality of Solutions to Hamilton-Jacobi Equations. Part II: Variationality, Existence, Uniqueness  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We formulate an Hamilton-Jacobi partial differential equation H(x, Du(x))=0 on a n dimensional manifold M, with assumptions of convexity of the sets {l_brace}p:H(x,p){<=}0) is a subset of T{sub x}*M, for all x.We reduce the above problem to a simpler problem; this shows that u may be built using an asymmetric distance (this is a generalization of the 'distance function' in Finsler geometry); this brings forth a 'completeness' condition, and a Hopf-Rinow theorem adapted to Hamilton-Jacobi problems. The 'completeness' condition implies that u is the unique viscosity solution to the above problem.

Mennucci, Andrea C. G., E-mail: a.mennucci@sns.it [Scuola Normale Superiore Piazza dei Cavalieri 7 (Italy)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

E-Print Network 3.0 - anniversary part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Materials Science 85 GKSS-Research Centre Max-Planck-Strae 1 D21502 Geesthacht Summary: Anniversary of the PhD-Degree of Professor Hans von Storch, Director of the...

453

Analysis of residuum desulfurization by size exclusion chromatography with element specific detection. Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heavy crude residua are analyzed by side exclusion chromatography with element specific detection (SEC-ICP), to elucidate structural information about the S-containing compounds. These compounds appear to fall into two categories: those which are 1) moderately small components (probably thiophenic), and 2) larger components associated with apparent precursors of asphaltenes. The effects of thermal hydroprocessing on the S-containing compounds were also examined. High and moderate thermal severity appear to, in addition to removing S: 1) remove the larger S-containing compounds, 2) shift the total S profile to smaller molecular size, and 3) form S-containing compounds not existent in the feed. Low thermal severity appears to only partially remove the larger S-containing compounds. These results indicate the S-containing compounds behave similarly to the metal-containing compounds under the same processing conditions. Possible binding site relationships between some of the S- and metal-containing compounds in heavy crudes and residua are discussed. The authors observed S and V correlations in both feeds and products, suggesting a relationship between the S and V at the molecular level.

Reynolds, J.G.; Biggs, W.R.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

E-Print Network 3.0 - assembly part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 15, NO. 3, JUNE 1999 Conformational Switching in Self-Assembling Summary: assembly occurs via the sequential mating of a random pair of...

455

Scanning ARM Cloud Radars Part II: Data Quality Control and Processing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Scanning ARM Cloud Radars (SACR’s) are the primary instruments for documenting the four-dimensional structure and evolution of clouds within a 20-30 km radius from the ARM fixed and mobile sites. Here, the post-processing of the calibrated SACR measurements is discussed. First, a feature mask algorithm that objectively determines the presence of significant radar returns is described. The feature mask algorithm is based on the statistical properties of radar receiver noise. It accounts for atmospheric emission and is applicable even for SACR profiles with few or no signal-free range gates. Using the nearest-in-time atmospheric sounding, the SACR radar reflectivities are corrected for gaseous attenuation (water vapor and oxygen) using a line-by-line absorption model. Despite having a high pulse repetition frequency, the SACR has a narrow Nyquist velocity limit and thus Doppler velocity folding is commonly observed. An unfolding algorithm that makes use of a first guess for the true Doppler velocity using horizontal wind measurements from the nearest sounding is described. The retrieval of the horizontal wind profile from the Hemispherical Sky – Range Height Indicator SACR scan observations and/or nearest sounding is described. The retrieved horizontal wind profile can be used to adaptively configure SACR scan strategies that depend on wind direction. Several remaining challenges are discussed, including the removal of insect and second-trip echoes. The described algorithms significantly enhance SACR data quality and constitute an important step towards the utilization of SACR measurements for cloud research.

Kollias, Pavlos; Jo, Ieng; Borque, Paloma; Tatarevic, Aleksandra; Lamer, Katia; Bharadwaj, Nitin; Widener, Kevin B.; Johnson, Karen; Clothiaux, Eugene E.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Proving the Value of Library Collections Part II: An Interdisciplinary Study Using Citation Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journals Eighty-one percent of the Psychology citations were for journals. KU owned 92% of these: 20% in electronic format and 22% in print (Figure 13). Fifty-nine percent were duplicated in print and electronic formats. Sixty-seven percent were... percent were e-books, while 80% were available only in print. Thirteen percent of the books were duplicated in print and electronic formats. The top publishers were Cambridge and Wiley-Blackwell. Ninety percent of 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80...

Monroe-Gulick, Amalia; Currie, Lea

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

457

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

o o o o Projects: Arizona California CA-173. Solar AquaDomeFrancisco, California Project Txpe: Award: SOLAR AQUADOMEOccidental, California P_roject T;:Ee: Award: SOLAR ENERGY

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Analysis of SPDEs Arising in Path Sampling Part II: The Nonlinear Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the development of practical algorithms for sam- pling infinite dimensional problems. The resulting SPDEs provide sampling in the nonlinear case, via a change of measure. Keywords: Path sampling, stochastic PDEs introduced Stochastic Partial Differential Equation (SPDE) based approach to infinite dimensional sampling

Hairer, Martin

459

FFT-based Galerkin method for homogenization of periodic media -Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, w L2 per = 1 2 A-1 w# , w# L2 per Thus AeffE, E Rd = max w#RdÃ?J 2 w# , E L2 per - A-1 w# , w# L2 per

Savicky, Petr

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - agree ii part Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Information Sciences Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 21 Residence Contract of the TIGP Student Dormitory Terms and Conditions Summary: an application is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

U.S. DOE TAP Webinar Part II - Case Studies Financing Energy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Becky, thank you very much. I think Becky's presentation and the case study that Manitoba Hydro so generously kind of allowed us to write on their programs that's in the report,...

462

MOBBED (Mobile Brain-Body-Environment Decision-making) Part II: User Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design is available as TR-2013-005. This report was revised 7/4/2013 to reflect the addition of data cursors and a revised commit strategy. This report was revised 8/12/2013 to reflect the addition of double precision fetches and some minor revisions of table names. This report was revised 8/25/2013 to remove

Texas at San Antonio, University of

463

Monte Carlo modeling and analyses of YALINA- booster subcritical assembly Part II : pulsed neutron source.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most reliable experimental methods for measuring the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly is the Sjoestrand method applied to the reaction rate generated from a pulsed neutron source. This study developed a new analytical methodology for characterizing the kinetic parameters of a subcritical assembly using the Sjoestrand method, which allows comparing the analytical and experimental time dependent reaction rates and the reactivity measurements. In this methodology, the reaction rate, detector response, is calculated due to a single neutron pulse using MCNP/MCNPX computer code or any other neutron transport code that explicitly simulates the fission delayed neutrons. The calculation simulates a single neutron pulse over a long time period until the delayed neutron contribution to the reaction is vanished. The obtained reaction rate is superimposed to itself, with respect to the time, to simulate the repeated pulse operation until the asymptotic level of the reaction rate, set by the delayed neutrons, is achieved. The superimposition of the pulse to itself was calculated by a simple C computer program. A parallel version of the C program is used due to the large amount of data being processed, e.g. by the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The new calculation methodology has shown an excellent agreement with the experimental results available from the YALINA-Booster facility of Belarus. The facility has been driven by a Deuterium-Deuterium or Deuterium-Tritium pulsed neutron source and the (n,p) reaction rate has been experimentally measured by a {sup 3}He detector. The MCNP calculation has utilized the weight window and delayed neutron biasing variance reduction techniques since the detector volume is small compared to the assembly volume. Finally, this methodology was used to calculate the IAEA benchmark of the YALINA-Booster experiment.

Talamo, A.; Gohar, M. Y. A.; Rabiti, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

464

Lattice Boltzmann Computation of Plasma Jet Behaviors : part II Argon-Nitrogen Mixture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the applications to simulating flows with temperature-dependent diffusion parameters (viscosity and diffusivity. Argon and Nitrogen are two gases of the most ones used in plasma spraying. The mixture is used when spraying. Our numerical results based on the centerline temperature and velocity profiles, its

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

465

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

walled pool covered with a PVC framed, polyethelene dome;through 2000 feet of 1~ 11 PVC pipe, giving a head of 208the maintenance. CBB 801-129 PVC Piping Descending to the

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Special Publication No. 3, Ticks and Tickborne Diseases, II. Hosts, Part 3. Q-Z  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. & Anastos, G., (1965A), 26-91) (Virginia) ^??^?^3 Afford, C. M., Anastos, G., & ^?. ?., (1961?), 215-237) (Maryland) Boophilus australis (Mahajan, M. R., (1935b), 2-3, 38- 42) (Hyderabad) Boophilus microplus (Riek, R.F., (1959?), 614-619) (exper...-136) (central Illinois) "RABBIT". --Continued Ixodes sculptus (Gregson, J. D. , (1956A), 1-92) (British Columbia &: Saskatchewan) Margaropus annulatus australis (Sugimoto, ?. , (1937A), 303-340) Ornithodoros sp. (Macchiavello Varas, A. , (1958a), 484...

Doss, Mildred A.; Farr, Marion M.; Roach, Katharine F.; Anastos, George

467

Indoor humidity and human health: part II--buildings and their systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Northwest homes. Healthy Buildings: Proceeding of IAQ ’91,inside an HVAC system compatible with a healthy building?Healthy Buildings: Proceeding of IAQ ’91, September,

Arens, Edward A; Baughman, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

U.S. DOE TAP Webinar: New Energy Savings Performance Contracting Resources Part II  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

This month, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) is excited to offer a webinar reviewing new resources on energy saving performance contracting (ESPC).

469

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Digester for Small Farms HI-11 Solar Heating for a RuralFor Hawaiian Pig Farm Energy Needs. 29 HI~22 Solar Beeswax

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

SUPERSYMMETRY, PART II (EXPERIMENT) Updated August, 2009 by J.-F. Grivaz (LAL -Orsay).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as the stabi- lization of the Higgs boson mass or gauge coupling unification, while not being in contradiction± and charged Higgs bosons mix to form the two chargino mass eigenstates ~± i (i = 1, 2). Similarly, there are four neutralinos ~0 i (i = 1, 4) associated to the B, W0, and neutral Higgs bosons. Full details

471

SUPERSYMMETRY, PART II (EXPERIMENT) Written March 2012 by O. Buchmueller (Imperial College Lon-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cancellation of quadratic divergences in radiative corrections to the Higgs boson mass [10­15]. Furthermore

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - alloys part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

au Journal de Physique 111,Volume 3, dkcembre 1993 Summary: Development of oxidation resistant high temperature NbTiAl alloys and intermetallics M. Allouard, Y. Bienvenu......

473

The Santa Cruz Eddy. Part II: Mechanisms of Formation CRISTINA L. ARCHER AND MARK Z. JACOBSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

greater vorticity, wind speed, horizontal and vertical extents, and lifetime than the second eddy thermal gradients at ground level. In all cases, vertical vorticity was still created by the tilting," with horizontal resolution of 5 km, 150 120 grid points, 29 vertical levels, and 15-s time step), which covers

474

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

problems. ) The solar water heater is a small on-siteThe existing electric water heater system provides storagebreadbox solar hot water heaters. Originally the tribe

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Predictors of plasticity in bituminous coals. Technical progress report No. 4, Part I of II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have substantially enlarged the analytical database developed from the first 37 coals obtained for this study. Pyrolysis/GC has now been completed for 30 coals, and THF and DMF quantitative extractions for 23 coals. FT-IR spectra have been obtained and disc-stored for all coals; differential analysis of these data is now commencing. The first statistical trial runs have been made. ASTM maximum fluidity can be predicted by a simple two-variable regression equation with R = 0.95. This initial success encourages us to undertake a more sophisticated examination of the interdependencies which are becoming evident as the database is built. Under the original work plan we are to enter an intensive Phase 2 study of six selected coals by January 1983.

Lloyd, W.G.; Reasoner, J.W.; Hower, J.C.; Yates, L.P.; Bowling, C.C.; Davis, E.; Jones, T.M.; Whitt, J.M.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0007749 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review ofElectronicNORTH LAS VEGASElyRecentXXXXXX Section J,

477

EcoCAR 2: Meet the Teams Part II | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTanklessDOJ TitleDr. Steven Chu AboutAboutDepartment ofYear 1EcoCAR

478

WIPP SEIS-II - Comment Response Supplement, Volume I (Part 1 of 37)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOE WIPPForI

479

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume I, Chapters 1-6 (Part 1 of 7)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOEI Chapters

480

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume III, Comment Response Document (Part 1 of 8)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory inApprovedRegionalDOEI

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481

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home High-Performance Home Sales Training Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTSof EnergyAlliance |DepartmentSystemsCustomFORTIFIED Home

482

Minutes of the 28th Annual Plutonium Sample Exchange Meeting. Part II: metal sample exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents of this publication include the following list of participating laboratories; agenda; attende