Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Americium/Curium Vitrification Pilot Tests - Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isotopes of americium (Am) and curium (Cm) were produced in the past at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for research, medical, and radiological applications. These highly radioactive and valuable isotopes have been stored in an SRS reprocessing facility for a number of years. Vitrification of this solution will allow the material to be more safely stored until it is transported to the DOE Oak Ridge Reservation for use in research and medical applications. A previous paper described operation results from the Am-Cm Melter 2A pilot system, a full-scale non-radioactive pilot facility. This paper presents the results from continued testing in the Pilot Facility and also describes efforts taken to look at alternative vitrification process operations and flowsheets designed to address the problems observed during melter 2A pilot testing.

Marra, J.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Baich, M.A.; Fellinger, A.P.; Hardy, B.J.; Herman, D.T.; Jones, T.M.; Miller, C.B.; Miller, D.H.; Snyder, T. K.; Stone, M.E.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

Beasley, R.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

High-temperature turbine technology program hot-gas path development test. Part II. Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This topical report of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) Phase II program presents the results of testing full-scale water-cooled first-stage and second-stage turbine nozzles at design temperature and pressure to verify that the designs are adequate for operation in a full-scale turbine environment. Low-cycle fatigue life of the nozzles was demonstrated by subjecting cascade assemblies to several hundred simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycles. This testing was accomplished in the Hot-Gas Path Development Test Stand (HGPDTS), which is capable of evaluating full-scale combustion and turbine nozzle components. A three-throat cascade of the first-stage turbine nozzle was successfully tested at a nozzle inlet gas temperature of 2630/sup 0/F and a nozzle inlet pressure of 11.3 atmospheres. In addition to steady-state operation at the design firing temperature, the nozzle cascade was exposed to a simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycle by varying the firing temperature. A total of 42 h at the design point and 617 thermal cycles were accumulated during the test periods. First-stage nozzle test results show that measured metal and coolant temperatures correspond well to the predicted design values. This nozzle design has been shown to be fully satisfactory for the application (2600/sup 0/F), with growth capability to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature. A post-test metallurgical examination of sectioned portions of the tested nozzles shows a totally bonded structure, confirming the test results and attesting to the successful performance of water-cooled composite nozzle hardware.

Horner, M.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

degraded). As in Part I, where the perfect model assumption was utilized, most analysis error reduction of significant model errors due to physical parameterizations by assimilating synthetic sounding and surfaceTests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II

Meng, Zhiyong

5

Stochastic Radiative Transfer in Multilayer Broken Clouds. Part II: Validation Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the second part of our two-part paper we estimated the accuracy and robustness of the approximated equations for the mean radiance that were derived in Part I. In our analysis we used the three-dimensional (3D) cloud fields provided by (i) the stochastic Boolean model, (ii) large-eddy simulation model and (iii) satellite cloud retrieval. The accuracy of the obtained equations was evaluated by comparing the ensemble-averaged radiative properties that were obtained by the numerical averaging method (reference) and the analytical averaging method (approximation). The robustness of these equations was estimated by comparing the domain-averaged radiative properties obtained by using (i) the full 3D cloud structure (reference) and (ii) the bulk cloud statistics (approximation). It was shown that the approximated equations could provide reasonable accuracy ({approx}15%) for both the ensemble-averaged and domain-averaged radiative properties.

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Marchand, Roger T.; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12 generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling, and in nondestructive testing. The objective of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic

Perkins, Richard A.

7

A concrete performance test for delayed ettringite formation: Part II validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Delayed ettringite formation (DEF) is a rare problem of concrete, whose reaction mechanisms have been investigated by a large number of studies. In order to develop a performance test, the authors have conducted a feasibility study and an optimization study followed by this validation study. A performance test was previously developed to evaluate the risk of expansion as a result of DEF for a given “concrete/heating” combination to be evaluated. This paper presents the results of the validation study and explains the necessary conditions that must be applied for this test to be used as part of a rigorous preventive procedure. Data has been collected to reproduce the heat development in concrete under actual conditions on site or in a prefabrication factory. Concrete/heating combinations were studied for which 10 or 20 years' experience of the use of the concrete in wet environments existed. After nearly 300 days of testing, all the laboratory results reproduced the behaviour observed in-situ. On the basis of these macroscopic measurements and microscopic observations, DEF susceptible concretes can be distinguished from concretes that have never caused problems, despite being heated to 80 °C in early age. This test program therefore, confirms the reliability of the proposed performance test.

Alexandre Pavoine; Loïc Divet; Stéphane Fenouillet

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

M515 dated 9/9/13 M515 dated 9/9/13 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012) (REPLACED M473) ............................................................... 8 2. FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984)..................................................................................................... 8 3. FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984) ............................................. 9 4. FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) (REPLACED M264) ............................................................................................................................ 10 5. FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) (REPLACED M443) ......................... 10

9

Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part II: Project Summaries Part II Project Summaries #12;22 Math & Computational Sciences Division generally cannot be achieved for reasonable computational cost. Applications that require modeling of this project is to advance the state of the art in electromagnetic computations by eliminating three existing

Perkins, Richard A.

10

Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II. II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term - Compressed Air, Pumped Hydro storage, Stationary, Flow Batteries 2 Overview * Technology Types - Batteries, flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, SMES, compressed air, and pumped hydro * Theory of Operation - Brief description of the technologies and the differences between them * State-of-the-art - Past demonstrations, existing hurdles and performance targets for commercialization * Cost and cost projections: - Prototype cost vs. fully commercialized targets Technology Choice for Discharge Time and Power Rating (From ESA) 4 Maturity Levels for Energy Storage Technologies * Mature Technologies - Conventional pumped hydro

12

Multiperiod Multiproduct Advertising Budgeting. Part II: Stochastic Optimization Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiperiod Multiproduct Advertising Budgeting. Part II: Stochastic Optimization Modeling C for the Multiperiod Multiproduct Advertising Budgeting problem, so that the expected profit of the advertising of standard opti- mization software. The model has been tested for planning a realistic advertising campaign

Beltran-Royo, Cesar

13

Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL II PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FA Level II UPD 102012 1 FA Level II UPD 102012 1 ACQUISITION CERTIFICATION - FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE LEVEL II PART A - EMPLOYEE INFORMATION Name (Last, First, Middle initial)_____________________________________________ Email Address____________________________________________________________ Phone___________________________________________________________________ Agency Name ____________________________________________________________ Agency Address__________________________________________________________ Title, Series, Grade________________________________________________________ Education: Please specify degree and major: Degree: Associates: __; Bachelors __; Masters: __; Doctorate: __ Major: PART B - CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

15

Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE/EH 0434 Part II: Procedures Manual (Revised 2012)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

DOE-VPP Part II: Procedures Manual Onsite Review 15 space entry, machine guarding, lockouttagout, electrical equipment, power tools and welding) for appropriate analysis and...

17

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Honda Gen II Insight HEV Accelerated Testing - August 2012 Two model year 2010 Honda Generation II Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) entered Accelerated testing during July...

18

Part II: Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M801 Section B - ii PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service...

19

The Spectrum of Fluorine (F1). Part II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2 January 1928 research-article The Spectrum of Fluorine (F1). Part II Herbert Dingle The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings...

1928-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Co(II) Based Magnetic Systems. Part I Spin Crossover Systems and Dendritic Frameworks. Part II Co(II) Single Molecule Magnets.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work comprises two main parts. The first part outlines our efforts to expand on the recent work of Gütlich et.al. by synthesizing Co(II) based… (more)

Farghal, Ahmed M. S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MPH Program Student Writing Tutorial: Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Seminar Work on title page and abstract 19 Test for Class B Complete title page and abstract 20 Complete _____________________________________ Sun. Mon. Tues. Wed. Thur. Fri. Sat. 1 Work on article Bowling with Trevor and Lilly 2 Work Soccer Lunch with Mr. Smith Think about potential paper topic 4 Work Think about potential paper topic 5 Work

22

SciTech Connect: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reader, Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary You are...

23

AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to evaluate the performance of devices...

24

Apartment Hunting - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down Apartment Hunting - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down August 23, 2010 - 5:17pm Addthis Kyle Rudzinski Special Assistant to the Director of Technology Advancement and Outreach, EERE I recently went looking for a new apartment. And though my parents may say I'm stingy, I like to think I'm economical. Or better yet, I'm a bargain hunter. I asked myself three main questions when looking for my new place: How far is it from public transit and community businesses? Can I keep my energy bills to a minimum? What's the rent? In the second of two entries on apartment hunting, I discuss things to look for that might help keep your energy bills low. When you think about it, energy bills can, in effect, increase your rent

25

AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

None

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

26

PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - PART II TECHNIQUES PROJECT MODELLING OF THE CORROSION OF BINARY ALLOYS R.A. Jones Produced and temperatures. In this work a neural network method was employed to study how the rate of corrosion of Fe accordance with the literature. 1. Introduction The atmosphere is the corrosive environment to which alloys

Cambridge, University of

27

AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) Under the guidance and sponsorship of DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery...

28

Part II Presentations TT/kjh/06.4.10 Part II Presentations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOWNES TRI NG Filling of CNTs with metals 2.45 Evan WANG STC GADB / JHW Fabrication of isolated carbon testing 9.15 James ROBINSON SEH SGR Micromechanics of temper embrittlement 9.30 Hugh TAYLOR STC SS in silicon 11.00 Olufemi FADUGBA STC BWL / SCB Creating a quantum memory system 11.15 Joshua TSANG STA JY / R

Paxton, Anthony T.

29

E-Print Network 3.0 - approach part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: information available in Appendix II-A of Part II of the Chemical Hygiene Plan (CHP) at www.uos.harvard.eduehsihCHPPartII... Instructions for use of the Chemical...

30

PREREM: an interactive data preprocessing code for INREM II. Part I: user's manual. Part II: code structure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

PREREM is an interactive computer code developed as a data preprocessor for the INREM-II (Killough, Dunning, and Pleasant, 1978a) internal dose program. PREREM is intended to provide easy access to current and self-consistent nuclear decay and radionuclide-specific metabolic data sets. Provision is made for revision of metabolic data, and the code is intended for both production and research applications. Documentation for the code is in two parts. Part I is a user's manual which emphasizes interpretation of program prompts and choice of user input. Part II stresses internal structure and flow of program control and is intended to assist the researcher who wishes to revise or modify the code or add to its capabilities. PREREM is written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 System and much of the code will require revision before it can be run on other machines. The source program length is 950 lines (116 blocks) and computer core required for execution is 212 K bytes. The user must also have sufficient file space for metabolic and S-factor data sets. Further, 64 100 K byte blocks of computer storage space are required for the nuclear decay data file. Computer storage space must also be available for any output files produced during the PREREM execution. 9 refs., 8 tabs.

Ryan, M.T.; Fields, D.E.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Test cell modeling and optimization for FPD-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fusion Power Demonstration, Configuration II (FPD-II), will ba a DT burning tandem mirror facility with thermal barriers, designed as the next step engineering test reactor (ETR) to follow the tandem mirror ignition test machines. Current plans call for FPD-II to be a multi-purpose device. For approximately the first half of its lifetime, it will operate as a high-Q ignition machine designed to reach or exceed engineering break-even and to demonstrate the technological feasibility of tandem mirror fusion. The second half of its operation will focus on the evaluation of candidate reactor blanket designs using a neutral beam driven test cell inserted at the midplane of the 90 m long cell. This machine called FPD-II+T, uses an insert configuration similar to that used in the MFTF-..cap alpha..+T study. The modeling and optimization of FPD-II+T are the topic of the present paper.

Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

1985-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Introduction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation is the Introduction to the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, held on August 13, 2014.

33

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 4. Hanna II, Phases II and III field test research report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phases II and III, were conducted during the winter of 1975 and the summer of 1976. The two phases refer to linking and gasification operations conducted between two adjacent well pairs as shown in Figure 1 with Phase II denoting operations between Wells 5 and 6 and Phase III operations between Wells 7 and 8. All of the other wells shown were instrumentation wells. Wells 7 and 8 were linked in November and December 1975. This report covers: (1) specific site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operation tests; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 16 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

Xu, Xianfan

35

PROBABILITY BASED CORROSION CONTROL FOR WASTE TANKS - PART II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an ongoing study to evaluate the discontinuity in the corrosion controls at the SRS tank farm, a study was conducted this year to assess the minimum concentrations below 1 molar nitrate, see Figure 1. Current controls on the tank farm solution chemistry are in place to prevent the initiation and propagation of pitting and stress corrosion cracking in the primary steel waste tanks. The controls are based upon a series of experiments performed with simulated solutions on materials used for construction of the tanks, namely ASTM A537 carbon steel (A537). During FY09, an experimental program was undertaken to investigate the risk associated with reducing the minimum molar nitrite concentration required to confidently inhibit pitting in dilute solutions (i.e., less than 1 molar nitrate). The experimental results and conclusions herein provide a statistical basis to quantify the probability of pitting for the tank wall exposed to various solutions with dilute concentrations of nitrate and nitrite. Understanding the probability for pitting will allow the facility to make tank-specific risk-based decisions for chemistry control. Based on previous electrochemical testing, a statistical test matrix was developed to refine and solidify the application of the statistical mixture/amount model to corrosion of A537 steel. A mixture/amount model was identified based on statistical analysis of recent and historically collected electrochemical data. This model provides a more complex relationship between the nitrate and nitrite concentrations and the probability of pitting than is represented by the model underlying the current chemistry control program, and its use may provide a technical basis for the utilization of less nitrite to inhibit pitting at concentrations below 1 molar nitrate. FY09 results fit within the mixture/amount model, and further refine the nitrate regime in which the model is applicable. The combination of visual observations and cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans indicates a potential for significant inhibitor reductions at nitrate concentrations near 1.0 M without a significant increase in corrosion risk. The complete data sets from FY08 and FY09 testing have determined the statistical basis to confidently inhibit against pitting using nitrite inhibition with the current pH controls. Future testing will complete the spectrum of nitrate concentrations around 1 molar. These results will be combined to provide a complete spectrum for corrosion controls with a risk based component.

Hoffman, E.; Edwards, T.

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

36

T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 March 1922 research-article Researches on the Chemistry of Coal. Part II. The Resinic Constituents and Coking Propensitie of Coals William A. Bone A. R. Pearson E. Sinkinson W. E. Stockings The Royal Society is...

1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Photo-Chemical Researches. Part II. Phenomena of Photo-Chemical Induction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 January 1857 research-article Photo-Chemical Researches. Part II. Phenomena of Photo-Chemical Induction Professor Bunsen Henry Enfield Roscoe The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Philosophical...

1857-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Photo-Chemical Researches. -- Part II. Phenomena of Photo-Chemical Induction.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1856-1857 research-article Photo-Chemical Researches. -- Part II. Phenomena of Photo-Chemical Induction. Prof. Bunsen Henry Enfield Roscoe The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings...

1856-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Palladium as Catalyst in a Polycondensed Matrix, Part ii  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Part I of this series results on the formation of Pd-organic amine adducts, their polymerization, and the catalytic behavior of the catalyst formed were reported [1]. In the...2...adsorption measurements are d...

József Petró; Krisztina László; János T. Kiss…

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DOE Audit Guidance for For-Profit Financial Assistance Awards (Part II)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

II) II) General Compliance Supplement April 2012 1 II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION The objectives of most compliance requirements for DOE programs are generic in nature. For example, most programs have eligibility requirements. While the criteria for determining eligibility vary by program, the objective of the compliance requirement that only eligible entities participate is consistent across all programs. Rather than repeat these compliance requirements, audit objectives, and suggested audit procedures for each program, they are provided once in this part. For each program in this Compliance Supplement (this Supplement), the program-specific compliance guidance section (Part III of this guidance) contains additional information about the compliance requirements that arise from laws

42

Even-Hole-Free Graphs Part II: Recognition Algorithm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Computer Studies, University of Leeds, Leeds LS29JT, United Kingdom. This work was supported in part by NSF, University of Waterloo on an NSERC Canada International Fellowship. Ajai Kapoor was supported by a grant from recognition algorithm for even-hole-free graphs. The algorithm builds on a structural theorem proved in [4

Cornuejols, Gerard P.

43

Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

A Unified Convection Scheme (UNICON). Part II: Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A unified convection scheme (UNICON) is implemented into the Community Atmosphere Model, version 5 (CAM5), and tested in single-column and global simulations forced by observed sea surface temperature. Compared to CAM5, UNICON substantially ...

Sungsu Park

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

WIPP SEIS-II - Comment Response Supplement, Volume II (Part 1 of 24)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II II Public Comments September 1997 Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper COMMENT RESPONSE SUPPLEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS TC-1 TABLE OF CONTENTS VOLUME II PUBLIC COMMENTS Agency Comments...............................................................................................PC - 1 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: Region 6 (A-001) .......................................PC - 3 State of New Mexico Environment Department (A-002)............................................PC - 4 State of Texas: Office of the Governor (A-003) .....................................................PC - 6 State of Ohio: Office of the Governor (A-004).......................................................PC - 6 Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (A-005)

46

Code validation with EBR-II test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive system of computer codes is used at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze whole-plant transient behavior of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2. Three of these codes, NATDEMO/HOTCHAN, SASSYS, and DSNP have been validated with data from reactor transient tests. The validated codes are the foundation of safety analyses and pretest predictions for the continuing design improvements and experimental programs in EBR-II, and are also valuable tools for the analysis of innovative reactor designs.

Herzog, J.P.; Chang, L.K.; Dean, E.M.; Feldman, E.E.; Hill, D.J.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Code validation with EBR-II test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive system of computer codes is used at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze whole-plant transient behavior of the Experimental Breeder Reactor 2. Three of these codes, NATDEMO/HOTCHAN, SASSYS, and DSNP have been validated with data from reactor transient tests. The validated codes are the foundation of safety analyses and pretest predictions for the continuing design improvements and experimental programs in EBR-II, and are also valuable tools for the analysis of innovative reactor designs.

Herzog, J.P.; Chang, L.K.; Dean, E.M.; Feldman, E.E.; Hill, D.J.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

Massoudi, Mehrdad [National Energy Technology Laboratory; Wang, Ping

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

49

Sensitivity of Climate to Diapycnal Diffusivity: Part I. Equilibrium State; Part II. Global Warming Scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Part I: The diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean is one of the least known parameters in current climate models. Measurements of this diffusivity are sparse and insufficient for compiling a global map. Inferences from inverse ...

Dalan, Fabio.

50

Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Seawater feed reverse osmosis preheating appraisal, Part II: system performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work evaluates the seawater feed Reverse Osmosis (RO) preheating system process. In this respect, the basic transport equations, which describe the system elements, are used for determining the performance of the process operating parameters and for assessing the feed preheating process. A seawater membrane, FTSW30HR-380, was used to perform this study. In Part I of the work, the leading element, which governs the whole system, was studied. Also, the limitations of the leading element operating parameters were determined. In the recent work, a computer program is developed using the RO-governing process equations to obtain the system design and projection for the seawater feed preheating assessment, which enabled the determination of the whole system by solving the system elements, one by one. Also, an evaluation of the power needed for freshwater production. The RO system feed preheating is studied for feed temperatures ranging from 15°C to 45°C. The study shows that the permeate salt concentration increases as the feed temperature increases and the system salt rejection decreases. The present study concluded that the permeate productivity decreases with the increase in the feed temperature. Results also show that the product's specific power consumption is dependent on the number of elements used, and energy recovery. In the case of the maximum available number of elements, it is found that the feed temperature increases as the specific power consumption increases, with or without brine pressure energy recovery. However, in the case of a constant number of elements, seven elements, the specific power consumption decreases as the feed temperature increases.

Aly Karameldin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; ? Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 25 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation parameters and off-gas chemistry. In order to generate off-gas data in support of the flammability model development for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet, vapor space steady state testing in the range of ~300-750°C was conducted under the following conditions, (i) 100% (nominal and excess antifoam levels) and 125% stoichiometry feed and (ii) with and without argon bubbling. Adjustments to feed rate, heater outputs and purge air flow were necessary in order to achieve vapor space temperatures in this range. Surge testing was also completed under nominal conditions for four days with argon bubbling and one day without argon bubbling.

Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

53

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Dombey, Norman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

Norman Dombey

2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

PDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems -Part II: SOH Identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehi- cles and renewable energy resources is battery energy storage. Advanced battery systems representPDE Estimation Techniques for Advanced Battery Management Systems - Part II: SOH Identification S examines identification algorithms for state- of-health (SOH) related parameters in advanced batteries

Krstic, Miroslav

56

Cold drawn steel wires--processing, residual stresses and ductility Part II: Synchrotron and neutron diffraction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cold drawn steel wires--processing, residual stresses and ductility Part II: Synchrotron Received in final form 29 September 2005 ABSTRACT Cold drawing of steel wires leads to an increase proposed that cold drawing would induce a phase transformation of the steel, possibly a martensitic

57

COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF PHYSICS PART II: MEDIATED ACTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COGNITIVE PROCESSES AND THE LEARNING OF PHYSICS PART II: MEDIATED ACTION Valerie K. Otero School "context." One of the fundamental features of the socio- cultural perspective is the notion that cognition theoretical perspectives of cognition where learning is viewed as the process of doing and participating

Colorado at Boulder, University of

58

Accounting for Ecosystem Services in Life Cycle Assessment, Part II: Toward an Ecologically Based LCA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accounting for Ecosystem Services in Life Cycle Assessment, Part II: Toward an Ecologically Based LCA ... Accounting for the role of ecosystem services is essential for LCA to guide decisions toward sustainability; Eco-LCA is a step in this direction. ... This article presents a step toward including the direct and indirect role of ecosystems in LCA, and a hierarchical scheme to interpret their contribution. ...

Yi Zhang; Anil Baral; Bhavik R. Bakshi

2010-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

59

Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of material variations and weld process parameter modifications on resistance spot welding of coated( l Resistance Spot Welding of Galvanized Steel: Part II. Mechanisms of Spot Weld Nugget Formation S. A. GEDEON and T. W. EAGAR Dynamic inspection monitoring of the weld current, voltage, resistance

Eagar, Thomas W.

60

Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part II: Experimental results and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrared emission spectroscopy of CO2 at high temperature. Part II: Experimental results-92322 Ch^atillon, France Abstract Measurements of CO2 emission spectra at high temperature in the 2.7 µm emission measurements using a microwave post-discharge in CO2 flow as emission source. The measurements

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CURE MONITORING AND SHM OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED PART II : MULTI-PHYSICAL CORRELATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CURE MONITORING AND SHM OF CARBON FIBER REINFORCED POLYMER PART II : MULTI-PHYSICAL CORRELATIONS. The material (made of T700 carbon /M21 epoxy prepegs) is here used as a sensor but could be also used]. The electrical resistivity of CFRP composites depends on the type and the orientation of the fiber

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

62

European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part II: pharmacological treatment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part II of TS and other tic disorders between 1970 and November 2010. We present a summary of the current experience and opinion, since rigorous experimental studies are scarce. Keywords Tics Á Tourette Á

Paschou, Peristera

63

Bistatic radar imaging of the marine environment. Part II: simulation and results analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

operational interest for instance to detect oil spills or ship wakes [5]­[7]. Since a large coverage1 Bistatic radar imaging of the marine environment. Part II: simulation and results analysis present a bistatic, polarimetric and real aper- ture Marine Radar Simulator (MaRS) producing pseudo

Boyer, Edmond

64

Estimating Central Equatorial Pacific SST Variability over the Past Millennium. Part II: Reconstructions and Implications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating Central Equatorial Pacific SST Variability over the Past Millennium. Part II boundary conditions. Wavelet coherence analysis reveals a robust antiphasing between solar forcing and Ni@usc.edu 1 APRIL 2013 E M I L E - G E A Y E T A L . 2329 DOI: 10.1175/JCLI-D-11-00511.1 Ã? 2013 American

Wittenberg, Andrew

65

STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 STATISTICS OF EXTREMES IN CLIMATOLOGY AND HYDROLOGY PART II: RECONCILING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS of Climate/Hydrologic Extremes (3) Unified Approach (Extremes/Non-Extremes) (4) Complex Extreme Climate Design -- No longer only need for extreme value theory · Complex Extreme Events -- e. g., heat waves

Katz, Richard

66

Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part II: Idealized Numerical Simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Loop Current Mixed Layer Energy Response to Hurricane Lili (2002). Part II: Idealized Numerical horizontal pressure gradient, wind energy transfer to the mixed layer can be more efficient in such a regime as compared to the case of an initially horizontally homogeneous ocean. However, nearly all energy is removed

Miami, University of

67

Hanna, Wyoming underground coal gasification data base. Volume 3. The Hanna II, Phase I field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is part of a seven-volume series on the Hanna, Wyoming, underground coal gasification field tests. Volume 1 is a summary of the project, and each of Volumes 2 through 6 describes a particular test. Volume 7 is a compilation of all the data for the tests in Volumes 2 through 6. Hanna II, Phase I was conducted during the spring and summer of 1975, at a site about 700 feet up dip (to the southwest) of the Hanna I test. The test was conducted in two stages - Phase IA and IB. Phase IA consisted of linking and gasification operations between Wells 1 and 3 and Phase IB of linking from the 1-3 gasification zone to Well 2, followed by a short period of gasification from Well 2 to Well 3 over a broad range of air injection rates, in order to determine system turndown capabilities and response times. This report covers: (1) site selection and characteristics; (2) test objectives; (3) facilities description; (4) pre-operational testing; (5) test operations summary; and (6) post-test activity. 7 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

Bartke, T.C.; Fischer, D.D.; King, S.B.; Boyd, R.M.; Humphrey, A.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Microsoft Word - Q&A thru Jan 15 Part II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Answers January 14, 2009 thru January 15, 2009 Part II and Answers January 14, 2009 thru January 15, 2009 Part II 1. For clarification purposes and to ensure compliance, what documents and/or information is specifically required from each subcontractor for each Volume? Is there a preference on rather or not this information is received separately from each subcontractor or submitted with the Prime's proposal? Answer: As stated in the RFP, Section L, paragraph L000B, " Subcontractors submitting proprietary information may register in IIPS and submit their information separately identifying in the subject line, the solicitation number and to whom they are a subcontractor; or they may provide a password protected document (file) to the Prime Contractor and share the password with the Contracting Officer. Regardless of the

69

Those early days as we remember them (part II) - Met Lab and Argonne's  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

History> Those early days as we remember them (Part II) History> Those early days as we remember them (Part II) About Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us Nuclear Energy Why Nuclear Energy? Why are some people afraid of Nuclear Energy? How do nuclear reactors work? Cheaper & Safer Nuclear Energy Helping to Solve the Nuclear Waste Problem Nuclear Reactors Nuclear Reactors Early Exploration Training Reactors Basic and Applied Science Research LWR Technology Development BORAX-III lighting Arco, Idaho (Press Release) Heavy Water and Graphite Reactors Fast Reactor Technology Integral Fast Reactor Argonne Reactor Tree CP-1 70th Anniversary CP-1 70th Anniversary Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy

70

Statistical Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40 CFR Part 1065 Engine Dynamometer Test Cell  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Effects of "new" engine testing procedures (40 CFR Part 1065) with respect to repeatability of transient engine dynamometer tests were examined as well as the effects of calibration and measurement methods

71

Experimental investigation of an oscillating circular piston positive displacement flowmeter: II - Leakage flows and wear tests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental data from an oscillating circular piston positive displacement flowmeter are described which focused on leakage flows and wear. This is the second part of a two part paper on the experimental tests, the first part concerned piston...

Morton, Charlotte E; Baker, Roger C; Hutchings, Ian M

72

Sludge-grown algae for culturing aquatic organisms: Part II. Sludge-grown algae as feeds for aquatic organisms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This project investigated the feasibility of using sewage sludge to culture microalgae (Chlorella...-HKBU) and their subsequent usage as feeds for rearing different organisms. Part II of the project evaluated the...

M. H. Wong; K. M. Hung; S. T. Chiu

73

Mesoscale Energy Spectra of the Mei-Yu Front System. Part II: Moist Available Potential Energy Spectra  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Part II of this study, a new formulation of the spectral energy budget of moist available potential energy (MAPE) and kinetic energy is derived. Compared to previous formulations, there are three main improvements: (i) the Lorenz available ...

Jun Peng; Lifeng Zhang; Yu Luo; Chunhui Xiong

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Mechanical and Thermal Prototype Testing for a Rotatable Collimator for the LHC Phase II Collimation Upgrade  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phase II upgrade to the LHC collimation system calls for complementing the robust Phase I graphite collimators with high Z, low impedance Phase II collimators. The design for the collimation upgrade has not been finalized. One option is to use metallic rotatable collimators and testing of this design will be discussed here. The Phase II collimators must be robust in various operating conditions and accident scenarios. A prototype collimator jaw has been tested for both mechanical and thermal compliance with the design goals. Thermal expansion bench-top tests are compared to ANSYS simulation results.

Smith, Jeffrey Claiborne; Doyle, Eric; Keller, Lewis; Lundgren, Steven; Markiewicz, Thomas Walter; /SLAC; ,

2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

New Praxis II Test for Subject Matter Spanish Majors Students who are matriculated into education programs for certification must take a Praxis II Spanish.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Praxis II Test for Subject Matter Spanish Majors Students who are matriculated into education Knowledge: Test # 10191. If a student is matriculated in a Subject Matter Spanish program and has ALREADY taken Praxis II Spanish Content Knowledge: Test # 10191, AND PASSED they are grandfathered. Those

Rusu, Adrian

76

North Wind 4-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of Phase II (testing and fabrication) of a program funded by the US Department of Energy to design, fabricate, and test a cost-effective wind system in the 3 to 6 kW class. During Phase II, using the design developed during Phase I, a prototype 4 kW machine was fabricated and tested in Waitsfield, Vermont. Several problems were encountered and subsequently analyzed. Design modifications, including the use of a larger alternator, are described. Test performed by North Wind and by Rockwell International (which monitored the program) demonstrated the predicted performance characteristics and the validity of the North Wind design.

Lynch, J.; Coleman, C.; Mayer, D.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

Carlsbad Field Office

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Enertech 15-kW wind-system development. Phase II. Fabrication and test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II report presents a description of the Enertech 15 kW prototype wind system hardware fabrication; results of component tests; and results of preliminary testing conducted at Norwich, VT and the RF Wind Energy Research Center. In addition, the assembly sequence is documented. During testing, the unit experienced several operational problems, but testing proved the design concept and demonstrated the system's ability to meet the contract design specifications for power output.

Zickefoose, C.R.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Use of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in reactor design verification Part II: Flux measurement analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As for any new reactor design, the ACR-1000® design has to go through a comprehensive design verification process. One of the activities for supporting the ACR physics design calculations using the ACR physics code toolset, namely WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP, is to compare the flux distributions resulting from the calculation using this toolset at various power calibration monitor (PCM) detector locations against the flux measurement data from the Japanese Advanced Thermal Reactor (ATR) FUGEN. The discussion of this particular design verification exercise will be presented in a two-part paper. The usage of data from the FUGEN reactor qualifies this exercise as design verification by alternate analysis. In order to have meaningful results at the end of the design verification process, the similarity between the ACR-1000 and FUGEN reactors has to be demonstrated. It is accomplished through the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using the TSUNAMI (Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation) methodology. The results from the similarity comparison have been presented in Part I of the paper. In Part II, results from flux distribution comparison will be presented. Favourable results from this design verification exercise give a high level of confidence that using the same physics toolset in calculating the flux distribution for ACR-1000 reactor will produce results with acceptable fidelity. In addition, the results will also give an indication of expected margins in the design calculations, not only at the locations of the PCM detectors but also at the derived bundle and channel powers obtained through the flux mapping calculation.

Doddy Kastanya; Mohamed Dahmani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase II. Verification testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work done under Phase II, the verification testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The main objective of the test program was to determine failure modes and wear rates. Only minor auxiliary equipment malfunctions were encountered. Wear rates indicate useful life expectancy of from 1 to 5 years for wear-exposed components. Recommendations are made for adapting the equipment for pilot plant and commercial applications. 3 references, 20 figures, 12 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation, Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall, was presented at the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, on August 13, 2014.

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - analysis part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

52.25.Fi i-i... ii i "- i - " i - i. .. ', ... Source: National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Institute for Condensed Matter Physics Collection: Physics 11 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING...

83

X-0557 modified Steven tests : series I and II /.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-velocity mechanical impact leading to unintentional reaction is of concern in accident scenarios involving the handling, transport, and storage of high explosives (HE). These have been investigated using different experimental techniques, from small- to large-scale, including, but not limited to the drop weight impact, Taylor anvil impact, Susan,1 and more recently, the Steven and Modified Steven tests.2-8 Ideally, the data will be used to further advance 3-D finite element analysis predictive capability with improved bulk constitutive HE models for the assessment of HE response to mechanical insult. Our overall objectives for these experiments were to (1) evaluate the HE reaction threshold behavior for two different lots of X-0557, and (2) characterize the degree of reaction violence relative to a detonation. This report summarizes our single impact test results on the two different lots of X-0557 in Modified Steven targets.

Straight, J. W. (James W.); Osborn, M. A. (Michael A.); Coulter, W. L. (William L.); Mang, J. T. (Joseph T.); Anderson, M. C. (Mark C.); Idar, D. J. (Deanne J.)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Code validation with EBR-II test data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An extensive system of computer codes is used at Argonne National Laboratory to analyze whole-plant transient behavior of the Experiment Breeder Reactor 2. Three of these codes, NATDEMO/HOTCHAN, SASSYS, and DSNP have been validated with data from reactor transient tests. The validated codes are the foundation of safety analyses and pretest predictions for the continuing design improvements and experimental programs in EBR-2, and are also valuable tools for the analysis of innovative reactor designs. 29 refs., 6 figs.

Herzog, J.P.; Chang, L.K.; Dean, E.M.; Feldman, E.E.; Hill, D.J.; Mohr, D.; Planchon, H.P.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Effects of Environmental Conditions on the Sorption of VOCs on Building Materials-Part II: Model Evaluation (RP-1097)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Effects of Environmental Conditions on the Sorption of VOCs on Building Materials-Part II: Model, Ph.D. Member ASHRAE 1 ABSTRACT: Sorption data obtained by using small environmental chambers under to evaluate the linear Langmuir model and the diffusion model for VOC sorption by different building materials

Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

86

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution, pressure drop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by externally humidified air and hydrogen gas streams, must be present within the fuel cell to maintain 4 5 6 #12;a fuel cell blocks gas transport pathways in the catalyst layers, gas diffusion layersWater management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part II: Ex situ investigation of flow maldistribution

Kandlikar, Satish

87

Nevada National Security Site Nuclear Testing Artifacts Become Part of U.S.  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nevada National Security Site Nuclear Testing Artifacts Become Part Nevada National Security Site Nuclear Testing Artifacts Become Part of U.S. Cultural Archive Nevada National Security Site Nuclear Testing Artifacts Become Part of U.S. Cultural Archive April 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Stanchions are among the remnants of Smoky Tower. Stanchions are among the remnants of Smoky Tower. LAS VEGAS, NV - The Nevada National Security Site's (NNSS) historic Smoky site may soon join a long list of former nuclear testing locations eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is currently working alongside the Nevada Site Office (NSO) to determine the eligibility of Smoky and a number of other EM sites slated for cleanup and closure. "In the last year, we've conducted assessments at over 30 EM sites,"

88

Expedient methods of respiratory protection. II. Leakage tests. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following readily-available materials were tested on a manikin connected to a breathing simulator to determine the fraction of an approximately 2-..mu..m-diameter aerosol that would leak around the seal of the materials to the manikin's face: cotton/polyester shirt material, cotton handkerchief material, toweling (a wash cloth), a surgical mask (Johnson and Johnson Co., model HRI 8137), and a NIOSH-approved disposable face mask (3M, model number 8710). The leakage tests were performed to supplement the measurements of penetration through the materials, conducted as the first phase of this investigation. The leakage tests were performed with the materials held on to the face by three methods, leakage fractions being determined from comparisons with the penetration of the same aerosol for the materials fully taped to the face. At a breathing rate of 37 liters per minute, mean leakages ranged from 0.0 percent to 63 percent. Mean penetrations exclusive of leakage ranged from 0.6 percent to 39 percent. Use of nylon hosiery material (panty hose) to hold the handkerchief material or the disposable face mask to the face was found to be very effective in preventing leakage. Such a combination could be expected to reduce leakage around the handkerchief to about ten percent or less in practice, and around the mask to less than one percent, offering substantial protection from accidentally generated aerosols. The reduction in leakage around the mask provided by the hosiery material suggests the adaptation and use of such an approach in regular industrial hygiene practice. The third and final phase of this investigation is underway, in which the penetration of the materials by particles with diameters between 0.05 and 0.5 ..mu..m is being measured and the effectiveness of the methods for dose reduction in the presence of radioactive aerosols is being modeled.

Cooper, D.W.; Hinds, W.C.; Price, J.M.; Weker, R.; Yee, H.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

DOE-HDBK-1122-99 Radiological Control Technical Training, Practical Training Phase II, Part 7 of 9  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiological Control Technician Training Radiological Control Technician Training Practical Training Phase II Part 7 of 9 Coordinated and Conducted for Office of Environment, Safety & Health U.S. Department of Energy DOE-HDBK-1122-99 ii This page intentionally left blank. DOE-HDBK-1122-99 iii Course Developers William Egbert Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dave Lent Coleman Research Michael McNaughton Los Alamos National Laboratory Bobby Oliver Lockheed Martin Energy Systems Richard Cooke Argonne National Laboratory Brian Thomson Sandia National Laboratory Michael McGough Westinghouse Savannah River Company Brian Killand Fluor Daniel Hanford Corporation Course Reviewers Technical Standards Managers U.S. Department of Energy

90

Evaluation of a Decoupling-Based Fault Detection and Diagnostic Technique - Part II: Field Evaluation and Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intent is to validate the DB FDD performance and demonstrate its applications. The first part focuses on sensitivity and robustness evaluation through controlled field emulation testing. In this paper, the technique is applied to a number of field sites...

Li, H.; Braun, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Technical Information on the Carbonation of the EBR-II Reactor, Summary Report Part 2: Application to EBR-II Primary Sodium System and Related Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residual sodium is defined as sodium metal that remains behind in pipes, vessels, and tanks after the bulk sodium metal has been melted and drained from such components. The residual sodium has the same chemical properties as bulk sodium, and differs from bulk sodium only in the thickness of the sodium deposit. Typically, sodium is considered residual when the thickness of the deposit is less than 5-6 cm. This residual sodium must be removed or deactivated when a pipe, vessel, system, or entire reactor is permanently taken out of service, in order to make the component or system safer and/or to comply with decontamination and decomissioning regulations. As an alternative to the established residual sodium deactivation techniques (steam-and-nitrogen, wet vapor nitrogen, etc.), a technique involving the use of moisture and carbon dioxide has been developed. With this technique, sodium metal is converted into sodium bicarbonate by reacting it with humid carbon dioxide. Hydrogen is emitted as a by-product. This technique was first developed in the laboratory by exposing sodium samples to humidifed carbon dioxide under controlled conditions, and then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) secondary cooling system, followed by the primary cooling system, respectively. The EBR-II facility is located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in southeastern Idaho, USA. This report is Part 2 of a two-part report. This second report provides a supplement to the first report and describes the application of the humdidified carbon dioxide technique ("carbonation") to the EBR-II primary tank, primary cover gas systems, and the intermediate heat exchanger. Future treatment plans are also provided.

Steven R. Sherman; Collin J. Knight

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

DOE ZERH Webinar: Going Green and Building Strong: Building FORTIFIED Homes Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Part 1 of this series introduced the basic concepts of building and wind interactions and how the FORTIFIED building programs can reduce property damage and loss.  In Part 2, IBHS will discuss the...

93

Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

Gregg Ruskuaff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II- Compact Buried Ducts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This presentation is part of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America webinar held on November 18, 2014.

95

Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

Doss, E.D. [ed.] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sikes, W.C. [ed.] [Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Standard-II and extended tests of the Swiss LCT-coil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Swiss contribution to the international Large Coil Task was a D-shaped 2.5 x 3.5 m . m bore, superconducting toroidal field coil of 8 T. The conductor was made from copper stabilized fully transposed NbTi filaments, cabled in three stages and cooled with pressurized supercritical helium. The testing of the six coils was successfully finished last year at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Results of the single-coil and the full-array Standard-I tests were reported earlier. This paper presents the data of the ac loss measurements taken during the Standard-II tests. The results are compared with predictions made while designing the coil. Next the results of the Extended Condition tests are discussed. Finally the recently analyzed quench data, taken during the whole test period, are presented.

Zichy, J.A.; Jakob, B.; Kwasnitza, K.; Sborchia, C.; Vecsey, G.; Lubell, M.S.; Shen, S.S.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone.

Lambert, W.E.; Samet, J.M.; Hunt, W.C.; Skipper, B.J.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Results of the European Commission Marina II Study Part II—effects of discharges of naturally occurring radioactive material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Enhanced levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) are produced through various industrial operations and may lead to discharges to the marine environment. A recent study, called MARINA II, carried out for the European Commission considered discharges of radionuclides from the NORM industries to north European marine waters and their consequences. There are two main sources that were considered in the study. The use of phosphogypsum during the production of phosphoric acid by the fertiliser industry and the pumping of oil and gas from the continental shelf in the North Sea which produces large quantities of water contaminated with enhanced levels of naturally occurring radionuclides. Discharges of alpha emitting radionuclides from these two industries have contributed significantly to the total input of alpha emitters to north European waters over the period 1981–2000 (data were not available prior to 1981). Discharges due to the use of phosphogypsum have declined since the early 1990s and are now very low. Discharges from the oil and gas industries stabilised in the second half of the 1990s and are now the major contributor to alpha discharges to the region. As most European countries do not report discharges of radioactivity with the water produced during extraction, there is considerable uncertainty in the discharges used in the study. The impact of the discharges has been estimated both in terms of the effect on non-human biota and the radiological impact for people. In the 1980s the radiation dose rates to marine biota in the region around a phosphate plant on the north-west coast of England were as high due to the discharges from the phosphate plant as those near to the Sellafield reprocessing plant due to its discharges. In recent years the additional dose to marine biota in this region due to the past NORM discharges is of the same order of magnitude as the natural background. The collective dose rate was estimated to determine the radiological impact on people. The peak collective dose rate from the NORM industries occurred in 1984 and was just over 600 manSv y?1. The collective dose rate fell with time as discharges from the phosphate industry reduced and was estimated as under 200 manSv y?1 in 2000.

M. Betti; L. Aldave de las Heras; A. Janssens; E. Henrich; G. Hunter; M. Gerchikov; M. Dutton; A.W. van Weers; S. Nielsen; J. Simmonds; A. Bexon; T. Sazykina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Local Mass Conservation and Velocity Splitting in PV-Based Balanced Models. Part II: Numerical Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are the plain and hyperbalance PBMs defined in Part I. More precisely, they are the plain- , plain- , and plain. As proved in Part I, except for the leading-order plain- each plain PBM violates local mass conservation. Each hyperbalance PBM results from enforcing local mass conservation on the corresponding plain PBM

Cambridge, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing Mousavi: FSM-Based Testing Part II #12;Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Outline Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Mousavi

Mousavi, Mohammad

103

Spiral Rainbands in a Numerical Simulation of Hurricane Bill (2009). Part II: Propagation of Inner Rainbands  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is the second part of a study that examines spiral rainbands in a numerical simulation of Hurricane Bill (2009). This paper evaluates whether the propagation of inner rainbands in the Hurricane Bill simulation is consistent with previously ...

Yumin Moon; David S. Nolan

104

Impact of Sea Spray on Air–Sea Fluxes. Part II: Feedback Effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents estimations for the transfer of momentum, heat, and water mass between the air and the sea. The results from Lagrangian stochastic simulations of sea spray drops (see Part I), along with two sea spray generation functions, are ...

James A. Mueller; Fabrice Veron

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Neutron scattering in concrete and wood: Part II—oblique incidence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Scientific and Technical Notes Neutron scattering in concrete and wood: Part...radiotherapy rooms. (b) Geometry of neutron scattering simulations. Another empirical...due to capture gamma rays. NEUTRON SCATTERING-MONTE CARLO SIMULATION RESULTS......

A. Facure; A. X. Silva; J. C. Rivera; R. C. Falcão

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Modal and Nonmodal Symmetric Perturbations. Part II: Nonmodal Growths Measured by Total Perturbation Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Maximum nonmodal growths of total perturbation energy are computed for symmetric perturbations constructed from the normal modes presented in Part I. The results show that the maximum nonmodal growths are larger than the energy growth produced by ...

Qin Xu; Ting Lei; Shouting Gao

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Japan Sea Thermohaline Structure and Circulation. Part II: A Variational P-Vector Method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The second part of this work investigates the seasonal variabilities of the Japan/East Sea (JES) circulation using the U.S. Navy Generalized Digital Environmental Model (GDEM) climatological temperature and salinity dataset (public domain) on a ...

Peter C. Chu; Jian Lan; Chenwu Fan

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Multiple-taper spectral analysis of terrestrial free oscillations: part II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......8 3.2 I I SUR p , 30 m i 4 7 2 2.5 150.4 2.8 I '* CUK p,, 10 o.81472 2 0 611.4 3 2 *'Ilic\\c oIi\\crv~~iions wcrc iniitlc using the five Iowcs~-or~Icr cigcntnpcrs witli[j :0,v-0.OI. I N =Xn Thcolhcr, uc~rc111311......

Craig R. Lindberg; Jeffrey Park

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

TEST & EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE HEDGEHOG-II PACKAGING SYSTEMS DOT-7A TYPE A CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the US. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A compliance test and evaluation results for the Hedgehog-II packaging systems. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations provide primary and secondary containment. The approved packaging configurations described within this report are designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be in solid or liquid form. Liquids transported in the approved 1 L glass bottle assembly shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 1.6. Liquids transported in all other approved configurations shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 2.0. The solid contents, including packaging, are limited in weight to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations described in this report may be transported by air, and have been evaluated as meeting the applicable International Air Transport Association/International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA/ICAO) Dangerous Goods Regulations in addition to the DOT requirements.

KELLY, D.L.

2003-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

110

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 5, MAY 2003 1239 Analysis of CMOS Photodiodes--Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ELECTRON DEVICES, VOL. 50, NO. 5, MAY 2003 1239 Analysis of CMOS Photodiodes of quantum efficiency for CMOS photodiode was illustrated. In this part of the paper, the lateral photoresponse in CMOS photodiode arrays is investigated with test linear photodiode arrays and numerical device

Hornsey, Richard

111

Optimal Ranking Regime Analysis of Intra- to Multidecadal U.S. Climate Variability. Part II: Precipitation and Streamflow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Part I of this paper, the optimal ranking regime (ORR) method was used to identify intradecadal to multidecadal (IMD) regimes in U.S. climate division temperature data during 1896–2012. Here, the method is used to test for annual and seasonal ...

Steven A. Mauget; Eugene C. Cordero

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

DOE/NETL's Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Mercury Removal Technology Field-Testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Phase II Plans for Full-Scale Mercury Removal Technology Field-Testing Air Quality III September 12, 2002 Arlington, Va Scott Renninger, Project Manager for Mercury Control Technology Enviromental Projects Division Presentation Outline * Hg Program goals & objectives * Focus on Future Hg control R&D * Q&As President Bush's Clear Skies Initiative Current Mid-Term 2008-2010 2018 SO 2 11 million tons 4.5 million tons 3 million tons NOx 5 million tons 2.1 million tons 1.7 million tons Mercury 48 tons 26 tons 15 tons Annual U.S. Power Plant Emissions Mercury Control * Developing technologies ready for commercial demonstration: - By 2005, reduce emissions 50-70% - By 2010, reduce emissions by 90% - Cost 25-50% less than current estimates 2000 Year 48 Tons $2 - 5 Billion @ 90% Removal w/Activated

113

Code of Federal Regulations Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy (DOE) is issuing procedural rules to be used in applying its substantive regulations and orders relating to nuclear safety. These procedural rules are intended to be an essential part of the framework through which DOE deals with its contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers to ensure its nuclear facilities are operated in a manner that protects public and worker safety and the environment. In particular, this part sets forth the procedures to implement the provisions of the Price- Anderson Amendments Act of 1988 (PAAA) which subjects DOE contractors to potential civil and criminal penalties for violations of DOE rules, regulations and orders relating to nuclear safety (DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements).

114

Economically Efficient Operation of CO2 Capturing Process Part II: Control Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

* Department of Chemical Engineering, Norwegian University of Science and Technology(NTNU), 7491 Trondheim regions of a post-combustion CO2 capturing process using the top-down steady-state economic part regions without the need for switching the control loops. Keywords Plantwide control, stability

Skogestad, Sigurd

115

THE SECRET OF THE GLACIAL DRIFTS PART II. APPLICATIONS TO YORKSHIRE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...up much as does the spoil- bank of a colliery when fed by conveyors (Figs, lc and Id). This 1 The little gravel I have seen...Considerations which point to a trans- ported mass, part and parcel of the general englacial detritus, but in view of its size...

116

OPTICAL, ELECTROMAGNETIC, AND SATELLITE OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ALTITUDE NUCLEAR DETONATIONS—PART II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-ALTITUDE NUCLEAR DETONATIONS—PART...of the explosion of a nuclear device at very high...might accompany the nuclear explosions and might...temperature-limited vacuum noise diode and the...synchro- tron particle accelerator. The generation of...

Allen M. Peterson

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Theory of the D+D Reactions Part II. Relation to the Internucleonic Forces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adequacy of current ideas about the internucleonic forces in accounting for the observations as analyzed in Part I is investigated. In particular, the adequacy of the spin-orbit coupling provided by the tensor forces is examined. To this end, a "minimal" formulation of the four-body problem is attempted. The interaction responsible for the reaction is derived. Some order-of-magnitude comparisons with the experimental data are presented.

J. R. Pruett; F. M. Beiduk; E. J. Konopinski

1950-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and are connected to a fan coil unit by flexible ductwork asvariable air volume fan coil units typically used in

Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Double Clear glass the SHGC was 0.70 and 0.66, respectively.west facing low-e window with SHGC of 0.27 in Kansas City at

Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control), one that resets supply plenum pressure set point from room temperatureControl strategy (CAV/VAV/open loop) Room setpoint Room supply air temperaturecontrol mode; i.e. , uncontrolled at a given entering airflow and supply temperature.

Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Notes from DOE/EPRI Meeting on Phase II Mercury Field Test Needs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Notes Notes DOE/EPRI meeting on Phase II Mercury Field Test Needs Washington DC June 5, 2002 Attendees (phone/e-mail at end of notes) AEP - Gary Spitznogle EPRI - Stu Dalton DOE - Scott Renninger EPRI - George Offen DOE - Tom Feeley GRE - Mark Strohfus Duke - Tim Shawver Southern - Larry Monroe EPA - Jim Kilgroe TVA - Tom Burnett TXU - David Lamb DOE and EPRI jointly convened this meeting to obtain feedback from deeply involved industry members on the needs, scope, schedule, etc. for a second phase of full-scale, longer-term field tests of mercury controls on power plants. The program objectives would be to determine performance and costs of the major near-term control approaches with the hope of using this information both to inform the regulatory (MACT) and legislative (Clear Skies Initiative, CSI) processes as well as industry selections of

122

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Part II AH-1G ROTOR IN LOW SPEED DESCENT FLIGHT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, results are presented for a two-bladed AH-1G rotor in a low-speed descent condition. In low speed forward and Acoustics Test (TAAT) was conducted on an AH-1G Cobra. It used highly instrumented rotor blades direction. The inner Navier-Stokes zone includes about 39% of the total grid points. The rotor has

123

Dynamic modeling of steam power cycles: Part II – Simulation of a small simple Rankine cycle system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the second part of the work concerning the dynamic simulation of small steam cycle plants for power generation. The work is part of the preliminary study for a 600 kWe biomass fired steam power plant for which the complete open-loop, lumped parameter dynamic model of the steam cycle has been developed using the SimECS software described in Part I of this work. For these low-power plants, a dynamic simulation tool is especially useful because these systems must be designed to operate in transient mode for most of the time. The plant model presented here consists of the following components: feedwater pump, economizer, evaporator, superheater, impulse turbine, electrical generator and condenser. The primary heat source is modeled as a flue gas flow and no combustion models are incorporated yet to model the furnace. A description of the various components forming the complete steam cycle is given to illustrate the capabilities and modularity of the developed modeling technique. The model is first validated quantitatively against steady-state values obtained using a well known, reliable steady-state process modeling software. Subsequently, the dynamic validation is presented. Results can only be discussed based on the qualitative assessment of the observed trends because measurements are not available, being the plant in the preliminary design phase. The qualitative validation is based on four dynamic simulations involving three small step disturbances of different magnitude imposed on the pump rotational speed and on the flue gas mass flow and a single large ramp disturbance on the flue gas mass flow.

H. van Putten; P. Colonna

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M. (Energy Systems)

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

125

On improving wave energy conversion, part II: Development of latching control technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the first part of the investigation, a new latching control technology is proposed, and it has been shown that the new latching control technique is capable of greatly improving wave energy conversion in regular waves. In this part of the research, a new analysis technique is developed for studying the latching control technology. A ‘time-out’ method is developed and employed for ‘re-packing’ the dynamic system, hence the analysis of the latching control technology can be changed from a complete nonlinear dynamics into a simple linear dynamic system, and it is further proven that the ‘re-packed’ dynamic system can be transformed back to frequency domain for further analysis. In the research, we could prove how the phase optimal condition can be attained. Further on, the new latching control technology will be used in irregular waves. Unlike many other latching control technologies, the new latching control does not need the detailed future information. In the development of the technology, we will show how we can obtain the latching duration for irregular waves for improving wave power extraction. As a result, we could remove one barrier in implementing latching control strategy while the wave energy conversion can still be much improved.

Wanan Sheng; Raymond Alcorn; Anthony Lewis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Dynamics of reverse osmosis in a standalone cogenerative nuclear reactor (Part II: load changes)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The coupling of desalination units with nuclear power plants has been studied in the present work â?? in this respect, the dynamic behaviour of the pressurised water reactor safety features, represented by the integrity of the fuel cladding, under some transient cases caused by secondary circuit load changes. A cosine-shaped heating through the reactor fuel is taken with its corresponding coolant lumps, to simulate realistic cases encountered in nuclear reactors. As an example, the mathematical model for the Westinghouse 3411 MWth pressurised water reactor, a familiar design with widely published design data was developed. The model consists of two parts; the first one is concerned with the dynamics of the primary side of the reactor; and the second, with the secondary side of the plant. To study the dynamics of the reactor, a 17-lumped parameters model was used. This is a first-order differential equation deduced from the first principles considering six groups of delayed neutrons. A computer program was developed using the Runge-Kutta method to solve these equations and to predict the behaviour of the state variables with time. Two case studies were considered as examples for normal transients. The developed model, which describes the dynamic response of the reactor, primary circuit and secondary circuit, has been analysed and verified with the relevant models. The first case, represented in Part 1 of this study, is concerned with the effect of changes of primary side transient reactivity, including the movement of the reactor control rods. The second one, represented in Part 2 of this study, considers the effect of the secondary side transient reactivity, as the load changes, on the system behaviour. As an example for the secondary side transient, load perturbations, such as load variations in standalone RO desalination units, are selected to study the effect of changing the secondary side conditions on the plant behaviour. The results showed that the reactor components and the fuel matrix should not be affected, and the fuel-cladding integrity is maintained within the safe limits, in all scram cases of RO desalination units coupled with nuclear power plants in the case of either a planned shutdown or an accidental shutdown.

Aly Karameldin; M.M. Shamloul; M.R. Shaalan; M.H. Esawy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

II II c )3 c F r c L LI L rr c - r I P- c OAK RlDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY h U W -l\ &?ir;; ITi' m . 8 ORNL/RASA-92/l Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley M . S. Uziel MANAGED BY MARTIN MARIETTA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC. FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORNLJRASA-92/l /- HEALTH AND SAFETY RESEARCH DIVISION Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Non-Defense Programs (Activity No. EX 20 20 01 0; ADS317OOOO) Results of the Radiological Survey at the Former Chapman Valve Manufacturing Company, Indian Orchard, Massachusetts (cIooo1) R. D. Foley and M. S. Uziel Date Issued - July 1992 Investigation learn R. E. Swaja - Measurement Applications and Development Manager

128

Ash chemistry and mineralogy of an Indonesian coal during combustion: Part II — Pilot scale observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reports on combustion experiments carried out in a pilot scale furnace as a follow-up to research previously carried out using a drop-tube furnace to investigate the combustion behaviour of an Indonesian coal, in particular the effects of additives on ash chemistry, mineralogy and ash deposit formation. Combustion experiments were carried out in a pilot scale furnace to test the effectiveness of bauxite addition in reducing ash build-up. Samples collected from deposits on the slagging panels and fouling probe tubes, electrostatic precipitator fly ash, the furnace ash and tunnel ash were fully characterized using various analytical techniques. Experimental results substantiated earlier drop-tube observations suggesting that the use of raw coal with an addition of 3 wt.% bauxite would appear to offer the best performance with respect to slagging and fouling propensity in comparison to use of the raw coal alone. Observations on the reduction in glass content resulting from the addition of bauxite during PSF test runs support the earlier findings of the drop-tube tests. The reduction in glass content found in the slagging panel and fouling probe samples is comparable to that found in ash formation experiments conducted at 1400 °C despite the observed differences in mineralogy. Although deposits are still likely to form as indicated by the PSF runs they appear to be more friable and hence amenable to removal by conventional methods such as frequent soot blowing. These findings demonstrate how the results of laboratory experiments can be combined with those of pilot scale trials to provide data for full-scale trials on the effects of additives in the remediation of ash problems associated with the firing low-rank coals.

H.B. Vuthaluru; D. French

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A robust approach to battery fuel gauging, part II: Real time capacity estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, the second of a series on battery fuel gauging, we present an approach for real time capacity estimation. In part I of this series, we presented a real time parameter estimation approach for various battery equivalent models. The proposed capacity estimation scheme has the following novel features: it employes total least squares (TLS) estimation in order to account for uncertainties in both model and the observations in capacity estimation. The TLS method can adaptively track changes in battery capacity. We propose a second approach to estimate battery capacity by exploiting rest states in the battery. This approach is devised to minimize the effect of hysteresis in capacity estimation. Finally, we propose a novel approach for optimally fusing capacity estimates obtained through different methods. Then, the proposed algorithm was validated using hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) data collected from commercially available Li-ion batteries. The proposed approach performs within 1% or better accuracy in terms of capacity estimation based on both simulated as well as HIL evaluations.

B. Balasingam; G.V. Avvari; B. Pattipati; K.R. Pattipati; Y. Bar-Shalom

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

II  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

: " + ; . .Z + II . ? 8 . " ~. . . . a a' .; ,. ?> , . ' . : . ., ! , Environmental i r .,' : % , ~ ~ 9 . / ; i.3. -\ ,- I - 'I ' , 2 " .r: 1; . . , ~ . ,&- c . . a , ,, .,I;< . .' , , ? $ ; 1- !'I' . '...~ - .. :, , .I Closure Report for CAU No. 416 1: ' . Project Shoal Area I:' c!';,: .. 7. .. , . ~ 1 I' ,. Controlled Copy No. UNCONTROLLED { -* .. 4'. . 1 " . .. *. *" '.. . . , , ,I +' , ,.f.' I , I" I ', ', ctk;' . , I , '. :C, , I: : , . p . ? .,; . s . " . , k - ,

131

Analysis of a kinetic multi-segment foot model part II: Kinetics and clinical implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinematic multi-segment foot models have seen increased use in clinical and research settings, but the addition of kinetics has been limited and hampered by measurement limitations and modeling assumptions. In this second of two companion papers, we complete the presentation and analysis of a three segment kinetic foot model by incorporating kinetic parameters and calculating joint moments and powers. The model was tested on 17 pediatric subjects (ages 7–18 years) during normal gait. Ground reaction forces were measured using two adjacent force platforms, requiring targeted walking and the creation of two sub-models to analyze ankle, midtarsal, and 1st metatarsophalangeal joints. Targeted walking resulted in only minimal kinematic and kinetic differences compared with walking at self selected speeds. Joint moments and powers were calculated and ensemble averages are presented as a normative database for comparison purposes. Ankle joint powers are shown to be overestimated when using a traditional single-segment foot model, as substantial angular velocities are attributed to the mid-tarsal joint. Power transfer is apparent between the 1st metatarsophalangeal and mid-tarsal joints in terminal stance/pre-swing. While the measurement approach presented here is limited to clinical populations with only minimal impairments, some elements of the model can also be incorporated into routine clinical gait analysis.

Dustin A. Bruening; Kevin M. Cooney; Frank L. Buczek

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Flammability tests on D0 Run II muon PDT Gas and P-10 Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have done a series of measurements with mixtures of Argon, CF4 and CH4 to demonstrate that the mixture chosen for RunII (84% Argon, 8% CH4, 8% CF4) is not flammable. The tests were conducted in the Meson Detector Building in a test cell similar in construction to a cell of a Muon PDT. In order to establish the viability of the test set-up, they first repeated the demonstration that P-10 gas (90% Argon, 10% CH4) is in fact flammable, contrary to the classification by the US DOT. US DOT regulation 173.115 defines flammable gas as: (1) is ignitable (at 14.7 psi) when in a mixture of 13% or less with air; or (2) has a flammability range (at 14.7 psi) with air of at least 12% regardless of the lower explosive limit (LEL). P-10 has a LEL of about 40% and a flammability range of about 10%, so P-10 is not flammable according to the US DOT definition. The point here is that the DOT classifications are to serve the DOT's function to ensure transportation safety, and are not necessarily appropriate for other situations. The first configuration of their test cell, however, apparently failed to ignite P-10. With the guidance of Bill Nuttall of CERN, they modified their test cell to make it more like the standard flammability testing setups, with a large viewing window and a spark gap in the middle of the cell. In this second configuration P-10 was easily and reliably ignitable. After becoming more familiar with the visible indicators of combustion of P-10 (water vapor cloud formation, pressure changes and gas venting) they retested with the initial configuration, and found that the mixture actually had been burning, and that they had just missed all the indications. The data from CERN showed that P-10 burns rather slowly, with about a one second rise time for the pressure to reach the maximum of four atmospheres overpressure. In the tests they saw no signs of any flame, but only a water vapor cloud. Some preliminary tests with the same cell using Argon-Ethane and air had a much more impressive burn, with rapid venting and a red flash clearly visible.

Herman F. Haggerty; James L. Priest and Tom Marshall

2001-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Comments on the future activities of the RERTR program - part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the last RERTR meeting an historical overview was given and the status and consequences of enrichment reduction were discussed. At that time and somewhat more today many doubts are raised that enrichment reduction, as a tool for reducing the proliferation risk, is being done in the most efficient and convincing manner. The informations presented in this report were taken from IAEA, US-DOE, US-GAO publications and from proceedings of the RERTR meetings. The data presented should be compared only on a relative basis. It was not the intention for many reasons to present quantitative exact values as some figures used for developing the conclusions are being confidential. Others are available in the above mentioned publications and proceedings. But nevertheless conclusions drawn and recommendations developed are believed to be worth to be taken into account by research reactor operators, their funding organizations and administrators when they are faced with decisions about the future of their facilities. All of the international effort on reducing the enrichment on research and test reactors has their only justification from the INFCE (International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation) conclusions to reduce the proliferation risk worldwide to a large extent. Worldwide is important. IAEA and others have to convince operators and organizations upon the necessity in doing so. One of the best way convincing people is giving convincing examples. At present none of the nations having a military nuclear weapons program is giving such a convincing example. Even in cases where the qualified fuel and all other necessary tools for converting specific research reactors are existing only small or no progress can be seen. Only non-weapon states are being pressed today.

Krull, W. [GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH (Germany)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mod II Stirling engine overviews  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mod II engine is a second-generation automotive Stirling engine (ASE) optimized for part-power operation. It has been designed specifically to meet the fuel economy and exhaust emissions objectives of the ASE development program. The design, test experience, performance, and comparison of data to analytical performance estimates of the Mod II engine to date are reviewed. Estimates of Mod II performance in its final configuration are also given. 12 references.

Farrell, R.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Gaussian Jet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II structures that dominate wave momentum and energy transport. When the interior of a typical midlatitude jet and energy at jet interior critical levels. Longer waves transport momentum and energy away from the jet

Farrell, Brian F.

136

ii Part # 15026486 Rev. A This document and its contents are proprietary to Illumina, Inc. and its affiliates ("Illumina"), and are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ii Part # 15026486 Rev. A This document and its contents are proprietary to Illumina, Inc in connection with the use of the product(s) described herein and for no other purpose. This document and its parties by this document. The instructions in this document must be strictly and explicitly followed

Kopp, Artyom

137

ii Part # 15026495 Rev. A This document and its contents are proprietary to Illumina, Inc. and its affiliates ("Illumina"), and are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;ii Part # 15026495 Rev. A This document and its contents are proprietary to Illumina, Inc in connection with the use of the product(s) described herein and for no other purpose. This document and its parties by this document. The instructions in this document must be strictly and explicitly followed

Kopp, Artyom

138

M.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part II, HCII 2009, LNCS 5618, pp. 342351, 2009. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.J. Smith and G. Salvendy (Eds.): Human Interface, Part II, HCII 2009, LNCS 5618, pp. 342 media consumption. Keywords: categorical data, visualization, multi-dimensional analysis. 1 Introduction The visualization of categorical data occurs in various fields, such as mass media and marketing research

Misue, Kazuo

139

PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

with the same force and effect as if they were given in full text. Upon request, the Contracting Officer will make their full text available. Also, the full text of a clause may be...

140

_Part II - Contract Clauses  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

14 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 (4) Environmentally preferable and energy efficient electronics including desktop computers, laptops and monitors are at...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Influence of relative humidity and loading frequency on the PA6.6 thermomechanical cyclic behavior: Part II. Energy aspects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, we investigated the influence of relative humidity (RH) and loading rate on the energy response of PA6.6 matrix specimens. The latter were subjected to oligocyclic tensile-tensile tests at 3 different RH and 2 loading rates. Infrared thermography was used to obtain a direct estimate of heat sources using the heat diffusion equation. Using the mechanical and thermal responses discussed in the first part of this work, complete energy rate balances were drawn up. In particular, the time courses of deformation, and dissipated and stored energy rates are discussed. The strong influence of the loading frequency and RH on the energy storage mechanisms is also highlighted.

Adil Benaarbia; André Chrysochoos; Gilles Robert

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

The MOG Weak Field approximation II. Observational test of Chandra X-ray Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply the weak field approximation limit of the covariant Scalar-Tensor-Vector Gravity (STVG) theory, so-called MOdified gravity (MOG), to the dynamics of clusters of galaxies by using only baryonic matter. The MOG effective gravitational potential in the weak field approximation is composed of an attractive Newtonian term and a repulsive Yukawa term with two parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\mu$. The numerical values of these parameters have been obtained by fitting the predicted rotation curves of galaxies to observational data, yielding the best fit result: $\\alpha = 8.89 \\pm 0.34$ and $\\mu= 0.042\\pm 0.004$ kpc$^{-1}$~\\cite{rah13}. We extend the observational test of this theory to clusters of galaxies, using data for the ionized gas and the temperature profile of nearby clusters obtained by the Chandra X-ray telescope. Using the MOG virial theorem for clusters, we compare the mass profiles of clusters from observation and theory for eleven clusters. The theoretical mass profiles for the inner parts of clusters exceed the observational data. However, the observational data for the inner parts of clusters (i.e., $r<0.1 r_{500}$) is scattered, but at distances larger than $\\sim 300$ kpc, the observed and predicted mass profiles converge. Our results indicate that MOG as a theory of modified gravity is compatible with the observational data from the the solar system to Mega parsec scales without invoking dark matter.

J. W. Moffat; S. Rahvar

2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

143

W-1 SLSF post-test data analysis. Part 1. Thermal hydraulic analysis. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Four types of tests were performed: (1) a decay heat transient test, (2) Loss-of-Piping-Integrity (LOPI) tests, (3) Boiling Window Tests (BWT), and (4) a fuel pin dryout and failure test. In addition, preliminary tests were run to check systems performance, instrumentation performance and test section heat balance. The objective of the decay heat test was to determine the decay heat transfer characteristics of fresh fuel pins with subcooled sodium. The objective of the LOPI experiments was to test the thermal behavior of fuel pins with four different fuel conditions subjected to the same transient. The transient was designed to simulate a rapid flow decrease as a result of pipe rupture followed by a reactor scram. The objective of the Boiling Window Tests was to study boiling initiation and progression of boiling within the fuel pin bundle.

Knight, D.D.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

TESTING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AS THE SOURCE OF ENHANCED STRONG Mg II ABSORPTION TOWARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixty percent of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) reveal strong Mg II absorbing systems, which is a factor of {approx}2 times the rate seen along lines of sight to quasars. Previous studies argue that the discrepancy in the strong Mg II covering factor is most likely to be the result of either quasars being obscured due to dust or the consequence of many GRBs being strongly gravitationally lensed. We analyze observations of quasars that show strong foreground Mg II absorption. We find that GRB lines of sight pass closer to bright galaxies than would be expected for random lines of sight within the impact parameter expected for strong Mg II absorption. While this cannot be explained by obscuration in the GRB sample, it is a natural consequence of gravitational lensing. Upon examining the particular configurations of galaxies near a sample of GRBs with strong Mg II absorption, we find several intriguing lensing candidates. Our results suggest that lensing provides a viable contribution to the observed enhancement of strong Mg II absorption along lines of sight to GRBs, and we outline the future observations required to test this hypothesis conclusively.

Rapoport, Sharon; Onken, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tucker, Brad E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyithe, J. Stuart B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

An overview of the behaviour of biomass during combustion: Part II. Ash fusion and ash formation mechanisms of biomass types  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract An extended overview of the phase–mineral transformations of organic and inorganic matter during biomass combustion was conducted in Part I of the present work. The ash fusion and ash formation mechanisms of biomass types and sub-types during combustion are described in the present Part II. For that purpose the identified systematic associations based on the occurrence, content and origin of elements and phases in the biomass ash (BA) system, namely (1) Si–Al–Fe–Na–Ti (mostly glass, silicates and oxyhydroxides); (2) Ca–Mg–Mn (commonly carbonates, oxyhydroxides, glass, silicates and some phosphates and sulphates); and (3) K–P–S–Cl (normally phosphates, sulphates, chlorides, glass and some silicates and carbonates); were used as classification of \\{BAs\\} into four types (“S”, “C”, “K” and “CK”) and six sub-types with high, medium and low acid tendencies and their description was given. Then, topics related to ash fusion behaviour such as: some general considerations and observations about ash melting; ash fusion temperatures (AFTs) of biomass and their comparisons with coal; relationships between \\{AFTs\\} and inorganic composition of biomass and coal; and ash fusion mechanisms of biomass and coal are characterized. Further, issues connected with the ash formation mechanisms of BA types and sub-types are discussed. Subsequently, aspects related to potential applications of ash formation mechanisms for BA types and sub-types, namely some key technological problems (fusion, slagging and fouling predictions, low ash fusion temperatures, co-combustion and application of BA) and environmental risks (volatilization, capture and water leaching of hazardous elements) are described. Finally, it is emphasized that the application of this new classification approach based on combined phase–mineral and chemical composition of biomass and BA has not only fundamental importance, but also has potential applications in prediction of behaviour and properties connected with the innovative and sustainable utilization of biomass and BA. It is also demonstrated that the definitive utilization, technological and environmental advantages and challenges related to biomass and BA associate preferentially with their specific types and sub-types and they could be predictable to some extent by using the above or similar combined chemical and phase–mineral classification approaches.

Stanislav V. Vassilev; David Baxter; Christina G. Vassileva

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In April 2010, a team of scientists and engineers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (LBNL) and UC Berkeley, with support from the Darfur Stoves Project (DSP), undertook a fact-finding mission to Haiti in order to assess needs and opportunities for cookstove intervention. Based on data collected from informal interviews with Haitians and NGOs, the team, Scott Sadlon, Robert Cheng, and Kayje Booker, identified and recommended stove testing and comparison as a high priority need that could be filled by LBNL. In response to that recommendation, five charcoal stoves were tested at the LBNL stove testing facility using a modified form of version 3 of the Shell Foundation Household Energy Project Water Boiling Test (WBT). The original protocol is available online. Stoves were tested for time to boil, thermal efficiency, specific fuel consumption, and emissions of CO, CO{sub 2}, and the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2}. In addition, Haitian user feedback and field observations over a subset of the stoves were combined with the experiences of the laboratory testing technicians to evaluate the usability of the stoves and their appropriateness for Haitian cooking. The laboratory results from emissions and efficiency testing and conclusions regarding usability of the stoves are presented in this report.

Booker, Kayje; Han, Tae Won; Granderson, Jessica; Jones, Jennifer; Lsk, Kathleen; Yang, Nina; Gadgil, Ashok

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

PHYSICS RESULTS OF THE NSLS-II LINAC FRONT END TEST STAND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Linac Front End Test Stand (LFETS) was installed at the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) in the fall of 2011 in order to test the Linac Front End. The goal of these tests was to test the electron source against the specifications of the linac. In this report, we discuss the results of these measurements and the effect on linac performance.

Fliller R. P.; Gao, F.; Yang, X.; Rose, J.; Shaftan, T.; Piel, C

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Modeling and optimization of operating parameters for a test-cell option of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II tandem mirror design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models of tandem mirror devices operated with a test-cell insert have been used to calculate operating parameters for FPD-II+T, an upgrade of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II device. Two test-cell configurations were considered, one accommodating two 1.5 m blanket test modules and the other having four. To minimize the cost of the upgrade, FPD-II+T utilizes the same coil arrangement and machine dimensions outside of the test cell as FPD-II, and the requirements on the end cell systems have been held near or below those for FPD-II. The maximum achievable test cell wall loading found for the short test-cell was 3.5 MW/m/sup 2/ while 6.0 MW/m/sup 2/ was obtainable in the long test-cell configuration. The most severe limitation on the achievable wall loading is the upper limit on test-cell beta set by MHD stability calculations. Modification of the shape of the magnetic field in the test-cell by improving the magnet design could raise this beta limit and lead to improved test-cell performance.

Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

1985-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

153

Determination of the effect of part orientation to the strength value on additive manufacturing FDM for end-use parts by physical testing and validation via three-dimensional finite element analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Determining the mechanical properties of the parts manufactured from additive manufacturing (AM) technology is important for manufacture end-use functional parts, known as rapid manufacturing (RM). It is important, within RM design, to verify to some degree of confidence that a part designed to be manufactured using this technology will be suitable and fit to function as intended, prior to committing to manufacture. The method of doing this is to perform physical testing on fabricated parts and validate via finite element analysis (FEA) on the parts.

R.H. Hambali; P. Smith; A.E.W. Rennie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Decadal Relationship Between European Blocking and North Atlantic Oscillation during 1978-2011. Part II: A Theoretical Model Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Part I of this study, it is revealed that decadal variations of European blocking in its intensity, duration and position during 1978-2011 are modulated by decadal changes in the frequency of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) events associated ...

Dehai Luo; Yao Yao; Aiguo Dai

155

Investigation of Thermal Decomposition as the Kinetic Process That Causes the Loss of Crystalline Structure in Sucrose Using a Chemical Analysis Approach (Part II)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of Thermal Decomposition as the Kinetic Process That Causes the Loss of Crystalline Structure in Sucrose Using a Chemical Analysis Approach (Part II) ... In the fast heating method, initial decomposition components, glucose (0.365%) and 5-HMF (0.003%), were found in the sucrose sample coincident with the onset temperature of the first endothermic peak. ... Three sample pans of sucrose were loaded in the DSC cell; one pan was placed on the sample platform, and the others were placed on the bottom of the DSC cell. ...

Joo Won Lee; Leonard C. Thomas; John Jerrell; Hao Feng; Keith R. Cadwallader; Shelly J. Schmidt

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

156

Prairie Canal Well No. 1, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. Volume II. Well test data. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are included in appendices: field test data, field non-edited data, raw data, tentative method of testing for hydrogen sulfide in natural gas using length of stain tubes, combined sample log, report on reservoir fluids study, well test analysis, analysis of solids samples from primary zone, chemical analysis procedures, scale and corrosion evaluation, laboratory report on scale deposits, and sand detector strip charts. (MHR)

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Summer 2012 Testing and Analysis of the Chemical Mixture Methodology -- Part I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the key findings made by the Chemical Mixture Methodology (CMM) project team during the first stage of their summer 2012 testing and analysis of the CMM. The study focused on answering the following questions: o What is the percentage of the chemicals in the CMM Rev 27 database associated with each Health Code Number (HCN)? How does this result influence the relative importance of acute HCNs and chronic HCNs in the CMM data set? o What is the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? Which Modes of Action and Target Organ Effects tend to be important in determining the HCN-based Hazard Index (HI) for a chemical mixture? o What are some of the potential issues associated with the current HCN-based approach? What are the opportunities for improving the performance and/or technical defensibility of the HCN-based approach? How would those improvements increase the benefit of using the HCN-based approach? o What is the Target Organ System Effect approach and how can it be used to improve upon the current HCN-based approach? How does the benefits users would derive from using the Target Organ System Approach compare to the benefits available from the current HCN-based approach?

Glantz, Clifford S.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Coggin, Rebekah L.; Ponder, Lashaundra A.; Booth, Alexander E.; Petrocchi, Achille J.; Horn, Sarah M.; Yao, Juan

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Optimal supply chain design and management over a multi-period horizon under demand uncertainty. Part II: A Lagrangean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industry, or more specifically the electric motor industry as was illustrated in part 1 (Rodriguez et al to an LP to improve solution efficiency while providing a valid lower bound. An initialization scheme-level inventory is important (bound capital). Moreover, it is critical that a spare motor can be obtained as soon

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

159

Dynamics and Energy Balance of the Hadley Circulation and the Tropical Precipitation Zones. Part II: Sensitivity to Meridional SST Distribution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of GCM experiments is performed in order to examine the dynamics of the time-averaged distribution of precipitation and Hadley circulation in low-latitude areas. As an extension to Part I of this study, the sensitivity to the latitudinal ...

Atusi Numaguti

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches. The detailed assumptions and methods behind these models are described in Part I of this article pair.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

Moreno, J.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

PART II -Core Leader Competencies (what a leader does): Works to lead others; develops themselves, their subordinates and organizations to achieve mission accomplishment 1. Character: A person's moral and ethical qualities which give a leader motivation t  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PART II - Core Leader Competencies (what a leader does): Works to lead others; develops themselves or consequences 4. SELFLESS-SERVICE: Places welfare of others and Army priorities before self 6. INTEGRITY: Does that are an inherent part of an individual's total core, physical, and intellectual aspects. Attributes shape how one

Maxwell, Bruce D.

163

Non-linear and quantum optics of a type II OPO containing a birefringent element Part 1: Classical operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe theoretically the main characteristics of the steady state regime of a type II Optical Parametric Oscillator (OPO) containing a birefringent plate. In such a device the signal and idler waves are at the same time linearly coupled by the plate and nonlinearly coupled by the $\\chi^{(2)}$ crystal. This mixed coupling allows, in some well-defined range of the control parameters, a frequency degenerate operation as well as phase locking between the signal and idler modes. We describe here a complete model taking into account all possible effects in the system, \\emph{i.e.} arbitrary rotation of the waveplate, non perfect phase matching, ring and linear cavities. This model is able to explain the detailed features of the experiments performed with this system.

Laurent Longchambon; Julien Laurat; Thomas Coudreau; Claude Fabre

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

Enertech 2-kW high-reliability wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-reliability wind machine rated for 2 kW in a 9 m/s wind has been developed. Activities are summarized that are centered on the fabrication and testing of prototypes of the wind machine. The test results verified that the wind machine met the power output specification and that the variable-pitch rotor effectively controlled the rotor speed for wind speeds up to 50 mph. Three prototypes of the wind machine were shipped to the Rocky Flats test center in September through November of 1979. Work was also performed to reduce the start-up wind speed. The start-up wind speed to the Enertech facility has been reduced to 4.5 m/s.

Cordes, J A; Johnson, B A

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

EVLA Memo 94 L/S/C Converter Plate Phase Stability Test II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

connections and 2 Storm cables for the constant chamber signal connections, foam insulation pads, 3 power, for the cables to and from the L/S/C converter plates were not insulated. During the second temperature chamber test, cable entry/exit holes were insulated well. #12;Methods The same methods as those described

Groppi, Christopher

166

Pre-asymptotic Error Analysis of CIP-FEM and FEM for Helmholtz Equation with High Wave Number. Part II: $hp$ version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, which is part II in a series of two, the pre-asymptotic error analysis of the continuous interior penalty finite element method (CIP-FEM) and the FEM for the Helmholtz equation in two and three dimensions is continued. While part I contained results on the linear CIP-FEM and FEM, the present part deals with approximation spaces of order $p \\ge 1$. By using a modified duality argument, pre-asymptotic error estimates are derived for both methods under the condition of $\\frac{kh}{p}\\le C_0\\big(\\frac{p}{k}\\big)^{\\frac{1}{p+1}}$, where $k$ is the wave number, $h$ is the mesh size, and $C_0$ is a constant independent of $k, h, p$, and the penalty parameters. It is shown that the pollution errors of both methods in $H^1$-norm are $O(k^{2p+1}h^{2p})$ if $p=O(1)$ and are $O\\Big(\\frac{k}{p^2}\\big(\\frac{kh}{\\sigma p}\\big)^{2p}\\Big)$ if the exact solution $u\\in H^2(\\Om)$ which coincide with existent dispersion analyses for the FEM on Cartesian grids. Here $\\si$ is a constant independent of $k, h, p$, and t...

Zhu, Lingxue

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

ART CCIM PHASE II-A OFF-GAS SYSTEM EVALUATION TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. A simulant of the DWPF SB4 feed was successfully fed and melted in a small pilot-scale CCIM system during two test series. The OGSE tests provide initial results that (a) provide melter operating conditions while feeding a DWPF SB4 simulant feed, (b) determine the fate of feed organic and metal feed constituents and metals partitioning, and (c) characterize the melter off-gas source term to a downstream off-gas system. The INL CCIM test system was operated continuously for about 30 hours during the parametric test series, and for about 58 hours during the OGSE test. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter. The glass drain was operated periodically on-demand. A cold cap of unmelted feed was controlled by adjusting the feedrate and melter power levels to obtain the target molten glass temperatures with varying cold cap levels. Three test conditions were performed per the test plan, during which the melter was operated with a target melt temperature of either 1,250oC or 1,300oC, and with either a partial or complete cold cap of unmelted feed on top of the molten glass. Samples of all input and output streams including the starting glass, the simulant feed, the off-gas particulate matter, product glass, and deposits removed from the crucible and off-gas pipe after the test were collected for analysis.

Nick Soelberg

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

West Texas geothermal resource assessment. Part II. Preliminary utilization assessment of the Trans-Pecos geothermal resource. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The utilization potential of geothermal resources in Trans-Pecos, Texas was assessed. The potential for both direct use and electric power generation were examined. As with the resource assessment work, the focus was on the Hueco Tanks area in northeastern El Paso County and the Presidio Bolson area in Presidio County. Suitable users of the Hueco Tanks and Presidio Bolson resource areas were identified by matching postulated temperature characteristics of the geothermal resource to the need characteristics of existing users in each resource area. The amount of geothermal energy required and the amount of fossil fuel that geothermal energy would replace were calculated for each of the users identified as suitable. Current data indicate that temperatures in the Hueco Tanks resource area are not high enough for electric power generation, but in at least part of the Presidio Bolson resource area, they may be high enough for electric power generation.

Gilliland, M.W.; Fenner, L.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Development and Testing of a Screw Compressor Supermarket Refrigeration System: Phase II, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A laboratory prototype screw compressor refrigeration system was designed, fabricated and tested under various evaporator and ambient conditions. The design is based on a Dunham-Bush vertical hermetic screw compressor and other standard refrigeration components. Results indicate that a screw compressor rack with vapor injection can increase the thermodynamic efficiency of low temperature refrigeration in supermarkets by 20 to 28% compared to multiple reciprocating compressor racks. The payback period of the screw compressor refrigeration system relative to multiple reciprocating compressor systems is 1.1 to 1.5 years and the net present value savings range from 15 to 22 thousand dollars.

Borhanian, H. Hamed; Toscano, William M.; Lee, Kang P.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Improved Titanium Billet Inspection Sensitivity through Optimized Phased Array Design, Part II: Experimental Validation and Comparative Study with Multizone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The inspection of critical rotating components of aircraft engines has made important advances over the last decade. The development of Phased Array (PA) inspection capability for billet and forging materials used in the manufacturing of critical engine rotating components has been a priority for Honeywell Aerospace. The demonstration of improved PA inspection system sensitivity over what is currently used at the inspection houses is a critical step in the development of this technology and its introduction to the supply base as a production inspection. As described in Part I (in these proceedings), a new phased array transducer was designed and manufactured for optimal inspection of eight inch diameter Ti-6Al-4V billets. After confirming that the transducer was manufactured in accordance with the design specifications a validation study was conducted to assess the sensitivity improvement of the PAI over the current capability of Multi-zone (MZ) inspection. The results of this study confirm the significant ({approx_equal} 6 dB in FBH number sign sensitivity) improvement of the PAI sensitivity over that of MZI.

Hassan, W.; Vensel, F.; Knowles, B. [Honeywell Aerospace, 111 S. 34th Street, M/S 503-118 Phoenix, AZ 85034, Phoenix, AZ 85034 (United States); Lupien, V. [Acoustic Ideas Inc., 27 Eaton Street, Wakefield, MA 01880 (United States)

2006-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

172

Offshore floating vertical axis wind turbines, dynamics modelling state of the art. Part II: Mooring line and structural dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The need to exploit enhanced wind resources far offshore as well as in deep waters requires the use of floating support structures to become economically viable. The conventional three-bladed horizontal axis wind turbine may not continue to be the optimal design for floating applications. Therefore it is important to assess alternative concepts in this context that may be more suitable. Vertical axis wind turbines (VAWTs) are a promising concept, and it is important to first understand the coupled and relatively complex dynamics of floating \\{VAWTs\\} to assess their technical feasibility. As part of this task, a series of articles have been developed to present a comprehensive literature review covering the various areas of engineering expertise required to understand the coupled dynamics involved in floating VAWTs. This second article focuses on the modelling of mooring systems and structural behaviour of floating VAWTs, discussing various mathematical models and their suitability within the context of developing a model of coupled dynamics. Emphasis is placed on computational aspects of model selection and development as computational efficiency is an important aspect during preliminary design stages. This paper has been written both for researchers new to this research area, outlining underlying theory whilst providing a comprehensive review of the latest work, and for experts in this area, providing a comprehensive list of the relevant references where the details of modelling approaches may be found.

Michael Borg; Maurizio Collu; Athanasios Kolios

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Historical estimates of external gamma exposure and collective external gamma exposure from testing at the Nevada Test Site. I. Test series through HARDTACK II, 1958  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1959, the Test Manager's Committee to Establish Fallout Doses calculated estimated external gamma exposure at populated locations based upon measurements of external gamma-exposure rate. Using these calculations and estimates of population, we have tabulated the collective estimated external gamma exposures for communities within established fallout patterns. The total collective estimated external gamma exposure is 85,000 person-R. The greatest collective exposures occurred in three general areas: Saint George, Utah; Ely, Nevada; and Las Vegas, Nevada. Three events, HARRY (May 19, 1953), BEE (March 22, 1955), and SMOKY (August 31, 1957), accounted for over half of the total collective estimated external gamma exposure. The bases of the calculational models for external gamma exposure of ''infinite exposure,'' ''estimated exposure,'' and ''one year effective biological exposure'' are explained. 4 figs., 7 tabs.

Anspaugh, L.R.; Church, B.W.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Surrogate formulations for thermal treatment of low-level mixed waste, Part II: Selected mixed waste treatment project waste streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the formulation of surrogate waste packages, representing the major bulk constituent compositions for 12 waste stream classifications selected by the US DOE Mixed Waste Treatment Program. These waste groupings include: neutral aqueous wastes; aqueous halogenated organic liquids; ash; high organic content sludges; adsorbed aqueous and organic liquids; cement sludges, ashes, and solids; chloride; sulfate, and nitrate salts; organic matrix solids; heterogeneous debris; bulk combustibles; lab packs; and lead shapes. Insofar as possible, formulation of surrogate waste packages are referenced to authentic wastes in inventory within the DOE; however, the surrogate waste packages are intended to represent generic treatability group compositions. The intent is to specify a nonradiological synthetic mixture, with a minimal number of readily available components, that can be used to represent the significant challenges anticipated for treatment of the specified waste class. Performance testing and evaluation with use of a consistent series of surrogate wastes will provide a means for the initial assessment (and intercomparability) of candidate treatment technology applicability and performance. Originally the surrogate wastes were intended for use with emerging thermal treatment systems, but use may be extended to select nonthermal systems as well.

Bostick, W.D.; Hoffmann, D.P.; Chiang, J.M.; Hermes, W.H.; Gibson, L.V. Jr.; Richmond, A.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)] [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Mayberry, J. [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [Science Applications International Corp., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Frazier, G. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)] [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Analysis and Design of a Test Apparatus for Resolving Near-Field Effects Associated With Using a Coarse Sun Sensor as Part of a 6-DOF Solution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. .......................................................... 59 Figure 33 Four beacon array configuration. ............................................................ 60 Figure 34 Illustration of LED test setup. ................................................................. 61 Figure 35 Coordinate system... containing the light source PV Photovoltaic di Distance from the sensor origin to the i th PV cell Ii Intensity on the i th PV cell ci Relative radiant intensity on the i th PV cell ? angle off LED boresight NSSH NorthStarTM sensor head NS North...

Stancliffe, Devin Aldin

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Generated using V3.1.2 of the official AMS LATEX templatejournal page layout FOR AUTHOR USE ONLY, NOT FOR SUBMISSION! Hadley circulation response to orbital precession. Part II: Subtropical continent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, NOT FOR SUBMISSION! Hadley circulation response to orbital precession. Part II: Subtropical continent Timothy M and annual-mean Hadley circulation to orbital precession is examined in an idealized atmospheric general precession does not affect annual-mean insolation, the annual-mean Hadley circulation does respond to orbital

Heaton, Thomas H.

177

Comparison between conventional and digital nuclear power plant main control rooms: A task complexity perspective, Part II: Detailed results and analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Part II of this study aims to provide detailed, diagnostic information about the complexity difference between conventional and digital main control rooms (MCRs) in nuclear power plants. Complexity factors were classified according to task components and complexity dimensions. The effects of operator experience and plant type on complexity factors were statistically analyzed from three levels, i.e., task components, complexity dimensions, and individual factors. Interface management complexity factors were compared with other factors in digital MCRs. The results suggest that generally operator experience had effects on several task components and complexity dimensions only in abnormal/emergency situations. Plant type affected several task component and complexity dimensions in both abnormal/emergency and normal situations. Complexity factors in the affected task components and complexity dimensions had higher frequency, complexity, or impact in digital \\{MCRs\\} than those in conventional MCRs. Factors related to crew activity and the dimensions of overabundance, temporal demand, and variability had relatively high frequency, complexity, or impact. Compared with other factors, interface management complexity factors had marginally higher frequency, but significantly lower complexity and impact. Relevance to industry This study quantitatively addresses the complexity difference between conventional and digital \\{MCRs\\} in detail. It may provide rich information for how to improve operator working environments in NPPs. It may also contribute to other applied domains, such as human reliability analysis and interface design.

Peng Liu; Zhizhong Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Part II, General Compliance Supplement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A. ACTIVITIES ALLOWED OR UNALLOWED Compliance Requirements The specific requirements for activities allowed or unallowed are unique to each DOE Federal award or program and are found in the laws, regulations, and the provisions of contract or grant agreements pertaining to the program. In addition, ARRA has established a cross-cutting unallowable activity for all ARRA-funded awards. Pursuant to Section 1604 of ARRA, none of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available in ARRA may be used by any State or local government, or any private entity, for any casino or other gambling establishment, aquarium, zoo, golf course, or swimming pool. Source of Governing Requirements The requirements for activities allowed or unallowed are contained in program legislation or, as

179

HSWA Part II Permit Modification  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kansas City, Kansas, this 24th day of August , 2012. Final Original signed by John J. Smith for Rebecca Weber Director Air and Waste Management Division August 24, 2012 Date...

180

A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191.

G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

High temperature turbine technology program. Phase II. Technology test and support studies. Annual technical progress report, January 1, 1979-December 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work performed on the High Temperature Turbine Technology Program, Phase II - Technology Test and Support Studies during the period from January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979 is summarized. Objectives of the program elements as well as technical progress and problems encountered during this Phase II annual reporting period are presented. Progress on design, fabrication and checkout of test facilities and test rigs is described. LP turbine cascade tests were concluded. 350 hours of testing were conducted on the LP rig engine first with clean distillate fuel and then with fly ash particulates injected into the hot gas stream. Design and fabrication of the turbine spool technology rig components are described. TSTR 60/sup 0/ sector combustor rig fabrication and testing are reviewed. Progress in the design and fabrication of TSTR cascade rig components for operation on both distillate fuel and low Btu gas is described. The new coal-derived gaseous fuel synthesizing facility is reviewed. Results and future plans for the supporting metallurgical programs are discussed.

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Five years experience with a new method of field testing cross and quadrature polarized MHO distance relays. Part I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1981, the Saskatchewan Power Corporation (SaskPower) has used a new method to field test cross and quadrature polarized mho distance relays. Experience gained from the use of this new method to test distance relays from different manufacturers over the last five years is presented. The test method has been used successfully to predict and improve distance relay discrimination and to solve unexplained relay operations which was not possible with the previous test method. Discussions on the problems that arise from using this new method are also included. It is shown that unless the test procedures are properly designed, based on an understanding of the relay architecture, the distance relay can give erroneous results without malfunctioning. The test method described in this paper deals with circular relay characteristics, the type most commonly used by SaskPower.

Kennedy, W.O.; Gruell, B.J.; Shih, C.H.; Yee, L. (Saskatchewan Power Corp., Regina, Saskatchewan (CA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

At-sea test and demonstration of coal-oil mixture as a marine boiler fuel. part I: shoreside testing. Final report Nov 81-Mar 82  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents laboratory and wear-loop experimental evaluations and a combustion test using a full-scale Marine burner and fuel-supply equipment using a coal/oil mixture (COM). Laboratory work led to selection of a fuel acceptable for use in a shipboard demonstration from six candidate COMs. Significant variations were discovered among these samples, and an appropriate final selection was made for the shipboard tests. This COM was further evaluated during a land-based combustion test using a Marine burner (30 million-Btu/hr scale) installed in an industrial package boiler. Comparative tests using No. 6 fuel oil and the selected COM were performed along with a general shakedown and test run of the pump and heating set designed for the at-sea demonstration. Combustion tests indicated that the replacement of No. 6 fuel oil with the proper COM is quite feasible. However, close attention must be given to the handling and atomization of this fuel. A modified T-jet atomizer performed with acceptable levels of wear, plugging, and ash disposition problems. It was concluded that an at-sea demonstration of the COM should be pursued.

Wagoner, C.L.; Eckhart, C.F.; Clark, G.A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Five years experience with a new method of field testing cross and quadrature polarized MHO distance relays. Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses three case studies where the new test method described in allowed the Saskatchewan Power Corporation (SaskPower), using ''off the shelf'' test equipment, to accurately predict the relay operating characteristic, improve relay performance and more accurately set the distance relay for phase to phase (LL) and single line to ground (SLG) faults.

Kennedy, W.O.; Gruell, B.J.; Shih, C.H.; Yee, L. (Saskatchewan Power Corp., Regina, Saskatchewan (CA))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Cost analysis of revisions to 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix J, leak tests for primary and secondary containments of light-water-cooled nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report examines the differences between the existing and proposed Appendix J and identifies eleven substantive areas where quantifiable impacts will likely result. The analysis indicated that there are four areas of change which tend to dominate all others in terms of cost impacts. The applicable paragraph numbers from Draft E2 of the Appendix J revision and the nature of the change follows: III.A(4) and III.A(6) - Test Pressure and Testing at Reduced Pressure No Longer Allowed; III.A(7)(b)(i) Acceptance Criteria 1.0 L/sub a/ Acceptable ''As Found'' Leakage; III.A(8)(2) Retesting Following Failure of ''As Found'' Type A Test - Corrective Action Plan, and III.A(8)(b)(ii) Option To Do More Frequent Type B and C Testing Rather Than More Type A Penalty Tests. The best estimate is that the proposed Appendix J would result in a cost savings ranging from about $100 million to $160 million, and increase routing occupational exposure on the order of 10,000 person-rem. These estimates capture the total impact to industry and the NRC over the assumed operating life of all existing and planned future power reactors. All dollar impacts projected to occur in future years have been present worthed at discount rates ranging from 5% to 10%.

Sciacca, F.; Nelson, W.; Simpkins, B.; Riordan, B.; Godfrey, P.; Cohen, S.; Beal, S.; Goldin, D.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Classification of child stuttering: Part II. Persistent late onset male stuttering, and treatment issues for persistent stutterers-psychotherapy or speech therapy, or both?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is the second of a two-part study. Part I of this study presented child stuttering as a psychologically heterogeneous population so classified: transient developmental, neurogenic acquired; and persist...

Ralph J. Gemelli MD

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysical applications ii Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II & Part III in Astrophysics 2011 -2012 Undergraduate Courses at the Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge Summary: Part II & Part III in Astrophysics 2011 - 2012...

188

Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

Thomas, P.A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

A Theoretical Study on the Spontaneous Radiation of Inertia-gravity Waves Using the Renormalization Group Method. Part II: Verification of the Theoretical Equations by Numerical Simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The renormalization group equations (RGEs) describing spontaneous inertia-gravity wave (GW) radiation from part of a balanced flow through a quasi-resonance that were derived in a companion paper by Yasuda et al. are validated through numerical ...

Yuki Yasuda; Kaoru Sato; Norihiko Sugimoto

190

Study of the comprehensive risk analysis of dam-break flooding based on the numerical simulation of flood routing. Part II: Model application and results  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present model and methodology described in Part I of this work are applied to perform a comprehensive risk analysis of the dam-break flood of five reservoirs in the Haihe River ... The results indicate that t...

Zhengyin Zhou; Xiaoling Wang; Ruirui Sun; Xuefei Ao; Xiaopei Sun…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Theory versus experiment for vacuum Rabi oscillations in lossy cavities. II. Direct test of uniqueness of vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper continues the analysis of vacuum Rabi oscillations we started in part I [Phys. Rev. A 79, 033836 (2009)]. Here we concentrate on experimental consequences for cavity QED of two different classes of representations of harmonic-oscillator Lie algebras. The zero-temperature master equation, derived in part I for irreducible representations of the algebra, is reformulated in a reducible representation that models electromagnetic fields by a gas of harmonic-oscillator wave packets. The representation is known to introduce automatic regularizations that in irreducible representations would have to be justified by ad hoc arguments. Predictions based on this representation are characterized in thermodynamic limit by a single parameter {sigma}, responsible for collapses and revivals of Rabi oscillations in exact vacuum. Collapses and revivals disappear in the limit {sigma}{yields}{infinity}. Observation of a finite {sigma} would mean that cavity quantum fields are described by a non-Wightmanian theory, where vacuum states are zero-temperature Bose-Einstein condensates of a N-particle bosonic oscillator gas and, thus, are nonunique. The data collected in the experiment of Brune et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1800 (1996)] are consistent with any {sigma}>400.

Wilczewski, Marcin; Czachor, Marek [Katedra Fizyki Teoretycznej i Informatyki Kwantowej, Politechnika Gdanska, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Krajowe Centrum Informatyki Kwantowej, 81-824 Sopot (Poland) and Centrum Leo Apostel (CLEA), Vrije Universiteit Brussel, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Phase II Documentation Overview of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject to assess and evaluate radiologic groundwater contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. These activities are overseen by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended March 2010). For Frenchman Flat, the UGTA Subproject addresses media contaminated by the underground nuclear tests, which is limited to geologic formations within the saturated zone or 100 meters (m) or less above the water table. Transport in groundwater is judged to be the primary mechanism of migration for the subsurface contamination away from the Frenchman Flat underground nuclear tests. The intent of the UGTA Subproject is to assess the risk to the public from the groundwater contamination produced as a result of nuclear testing. The primary method used to assess this risk is the development of models of flow and contaminant transport to forecast the extent of potentially contaminated groundwater for the next 1,000 years, establish restrictions to groundwater usage, and implement a monitoring program to verify protectiveness. For the UGTA Subproject, contaminated groundwater is that which exceeds the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) the State of Nevada’s groundwater quality standard to protect human health and the environment. Contaminant forecasts are expected to be uncertain, and groundwater monitoring will be used in combination with land-use control to build confidence in model results and reduce risk to the public. Modeling forecasts of contaminant transport will provide the basis for negotiating a compliance boundary for the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This compliance boundary represents a regulatory-based distinction between groundwater contaminated or not contaminated by underground testing. Transport modeling simulations are used to compute radionuclide concentrations in time and space within the CAU for the 1,000-year contaminant boundary. These three-dimensional (3-D) concentration simulations are integrated into probabilistic forecasts of the likelihood of groundwater exceeding or remaining below the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) defined as the contaminant boundary. Contaminant boundaries are not discrete predictions of the location or concentration of contaminants, but instead are spatial representations of the probability of exceeding Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards. The forecasts provide planning tools to facilitate regulatory decisions designed to protect the health and safety of the public.

Greg Ruskauff

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Assessment of NASA GISS CMIP5 and Post-CMIP5 Simulated Clouds and TOA Radiation Budgets Using Satellite Observations. Part II: TOA Radiation Budget and CREs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Part I of this study (Stanfield et al. 2014), the NASA GISS CMIP5 (C5) and Post-CMIP5 (P5) simulated cloud properties were assessed utilizing multiple satellite observations, with a particular focus on the southern mid-latitudes (SMLs). This ...

Ryan E. Stanfield; Xiquan Dong; Baike Xi; Anthony D. Del Genio; Patrick Minnis; David Doelling; Norman Loeb

194

GFDL’s ESM2 Global Coupled Climate–Carbon Earth System Models. Part II: Carbon System Formulation and Baseline Simulation Characteristics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The authors describe carbon system formulation and simulation characteristics of two new global coupled carbon–climate Earth System Models (ESM), ESM2M and ESM2G. These models demonstrate good climate fidelity as described in part I of this study ...

John P. Dunne; Jasmin G. John; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; John P. Krasting; Sergey L. Malyshev; P. C. D. Milly; Lori T. Sentman; Alistair J. Adcroft; William Cooke; Krista A. Dunne; Stephen M. Griffies; Robert W. Hallberg; Matthew J. Harrison; Hiram Levy; Andrew T. Wittenberg; Peter J. Phillips; Niki Zadeh

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-freezer. Phase II. Field test. Volume III. Executive summary and task reports  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The second phase of the development of a high-efficiency, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezer is described. Following the successful completion of Phase I (design, construction, and laboratory testing of a 16 ft/sup 3/ high efficiency refrigerator-freezer prototype), Phase II was initiated to evaluate sales potential and in-home performance as a necessary step in creating a product that was both manufacturable and marketable. Twenty-five pilot production 18 ft/sup 3/ units using prototype tooling were produced on the assembly line to confirm the feasibility of full-scale production. These units were then used in a market and field test program in which consumer appeal and in-home performance were assessed. The market evaluation confirmed that refrigerators incorporating high-efficiency features at added cost are saleable and that large capacity, automatic-defrosting, refrigerator-freezers will continue to capture a large portion of the market in the years ahead, The field test confirmed the in-home energy saving potential of a high efficiency, automatic-defrosting refrigerator-frezer utilizing advanced design features such as optimized, thick-wall, foam an average energy savings of 60% compared to a baseline unit of conventional design.

Topping, R.F.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Experimental study on vortex-induced motions of a semi-submersible platform with four square columns, Part II: Effects of surface waves, external damping and draft condition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aiming to complete the results presented before by Gonçalves et al. (2012d. Ocean Eng. 54, 150–169) the present work brings new experimental results on VIM of a semi-submersible platform with four square columns, particularly concerning changes in three different aspects: simultaneous presence of current and surface waves in the same direction, external damping level, and draft conditions. The VIM tests were performed in the presence of regular and irregular waves, both conditions with simultaneous current presence, to understand the wave effects. Considerable differences between the presences of regular and irregular waves were observed. The motion amplitudes in the transverse direction, in the tests with regular waves, were markedly lower than those with irregular waves, and the VIM behavior was not observed. In the sea state tests, the amplitudes are lower than current-only ones, yet a periodic motion characterized by VIM was observed. Furthermore, the effects of the lower draft condition and damping level were addressed, showing they are important for model tests because they contribute to decreasing VIM amplitudes.

Rodolfo T. Gonçalves; Guilherme F. Rosetti; André L.C. Fujarra; Allan C. Oliveira

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Conversion of hydrocarbons for fuel-cell applications. Part I. Autothermal reforming of sulfur-free and sulfur-containing hydrocarbon liquids. Part II. Steam reforming of n-hexane on pellet and monolithic catalyst beds. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental autothermal reforming (ATR) results obtained in the previous phase of this work with sulfur-free pure hydrocarbon liquids are summarized. Catalyst types and configuration used were the same as in earlier tests with No. 2 fuel oil to facilitate comparisons. Fuel oil has been found to form carbon in ATR at conditions much milder than those predicted by equilibrium. Reactive differences between paraffins and aromatics in ATR, and thus the formation of different carbon precursors, have been shown to be responsible for the observed carbon formation characteristics (fuel-specific). From tests with both light and heavy paraffins and aromatics, it is concluded that high boiling point hydrocarbons and polynuclear aromatics enhance the propensity for carbon formation in ATR. Effects of olefin (propylene) addition on the ATR performance of benzene are described. In ATR tests with mixtures of paraffins and aromatics (n-tetradecane and benzene) synergistic effects on conversion characteristics were identified. Comparisons of the No. 2 fuel oil data with the experimental results from this work with pure (and mixed) sulfur-free hydrocarbons indicate that the sulfur content of the fuel may be the limiting factor for efficient ATR operation. Steam reforming of hydrocarbons in conventional reformers is heat transfer limited. Steam reforming tasks performed have included performance comparisons between conventional pellet beds and honeycomb monolith catalysts. Metal-supported monoliths offer higher structural stability than ceramic supports, and have a higher thermal conductivity. Data from two metal monoliths of different catalyst (nickel) loading were compared to pellets under the same operating conditions.

Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.; Voecks, G.E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Safety analysis report for the TRUPACT-II shipping package (condensed version). Volume 1, Rev. 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The condensed version of the TRUPACT-II Contact Handled Transuranic Waste Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) contains essential material required by TRUPACT-II users, plus additional contents (payload) information previously submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. All or part of the following sections, which are not required by users of the TRUPACT-II, are deleted from the condensed version: (i) structural analysis, (ii) thermal analysis, (iii) containment analysis, (iv) criticality analysis, (v) shielding analysis, and (vi) hypothetical accident test results.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Wellbore and soil thermal simulation for geothermal wells: comparison of geotemp predictions to field data and evaluation of flow variables. Part II report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A better understanding of temperatures in a well is needed to improve casing selection, cement design, drilling fluid formulation, packer selection, and many other aspects of well design. Two applications of GEOTEMP are presented which provide the calculations needed. First, the results of testing GEOTEMP predictions with analytical solutions and with field temperature data are presented. And second, sensitivity studies establish the importance of certain well variables on downhole temperatures. (MHR)

Wooley, G.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Ex parte Communication | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

parte Communication Ex parte communication on AHAM's development of an ice maker energy test procedure Ex parte Communication More Documents & Publications Memorandum from VP...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Leakage diagnostics, sealant longevity, sizing and technologytransfer in residential thermal distribution systems: Part II.Residential thermal Distribution Systesm, Phase VI FinalReport  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report builds on and extends our previous efforts as described in "Leakage Diagnostics, Sealant Longevity, Sizing and Technology Transfer in Residential Thermal Distribution Systems- CIEE Residential Thermal Distribution Systems Phase V Final Report, October 1997". New developments include defining combined duct and equipment efficiencies in a concept called "Tons At the Register" and on performance issues related to field use of the aerosol sealant technology. Some of the key results discussed in this report include: o Register, boot and air handler cabinet leakage can often represent a significant fraction of the total duct leakage in new construction. Because of the large range of pressures in duct systems an accurate characterization may require separating these components through improved leakage testing. o Conventional duct tape failed our accelerated longevity testing and is not, therefore, considered generally acceptable for use in sealing duct systems. Many other tapes and sealing approaches are available and practical and have passed our longevity tests. o Simulations of summer temperature pull-down time have shown that duct system improvements can be combined with equipment downsizing to save first cost, energy consumption, and peak power and still provide equivalent or superior comfort. o Air conditioner name plate capacity ratings alone are a poor indicator of how much cooling will actually be delivered to the conditioned space. Duct system efficiency can have as large an impact on performance as variations in SEER. o Mechanical duct cleaning techniques do not have an adverse impact on the ducts sealed with the Aerosol sealant. The material typically used in Aerosol sealing techniques does not appear to present a health or safety hazard. Results from this study were used by the California Energy Commission in the formation of the current Energy Efficiency Standards for Low-Rise Residential Buildings (CEC, (1998)), often referred to as Title 24. Current information on ducts and thermal distribution research can be found at http://ducts.lbl.gov

Buchanan, C.; Modera, M.; Sherman, M.; Siegel, J.; Walker, I.; Wang, D.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Using a dual plasma process to produce cobalt--polypyrrole catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells -- part II: analysing the chemical structure of the films  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The chemical structure of cobalt--polypyrrole -- produced by a dual plasma process -- is analysed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX) and extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS).It is shown that only nanoparticles of a size of 3\\,nm with the low temperature crystal structure of cobalt are present within the compound. Besides that, cobalt--nitrogen and carbon--oxygen structures are observed. Furthermore, more and more cobalt--nitrogen structures are produced when increasing the magnetron power. Linking the information on the chemical structure to the results about the catalytic activity of the films -- which are presented in part I of this contribution -- it is concluded that the cobalt--nitrogen structures are the probable catalytically active sites. The cobalt--nitrogen bond length is calculated as 2.09\\,\\AA\\ and the carbon--nitrogen bond length as 1.38\\,\\AA.

Walter, Christian; Vyalikh, Denis; Brüser, Volker; Quade, Antje; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; 10.1149/2.043209jes

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Integration of biomass into urban energy systems for heat and power. Part II: Sensitivity assessment of main techno-economic factors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The paper presents the application of a mixed integer linear programming (MILP) methodology to optimize multi-biomass and natural gas supply chain strategic design for heat and power generation in urban areas. The focus is on spatial and temporal allocation of biomass supply, storage, processing, transport and energy conversion (heat and CHP) to match the heat demand of residential end users. The main aim lies on the assessment of the trade-offs between centralized district heating plants and local heat generation systems, and on the decoupling of the biomass processing and biofuel energy conversion steps. After a brief description of the methodology, which is presented in detail in Part I of the research, an application to a generic urban area is proposed. Moreover, the influence of energy demand typologies (urban areas energy density, heat consumption patterns, buildings energy efficiency levels, baseline energy costs and available infrastructures) and specific constraints of urban areas (transport logistics, air emission levels, space availability) on the selection of optimal bioenergy pathways for heat and power is assessed, by means of sensitivity analysis. On the basis of these results, broad considerations about the key factors influencing the use of bioenergy into urban energy systems are proposed. Potential further applications of this model are also described, together with main barriers for development of bioenergy routes for urban areas.

Antonio M. Pantaleo; Sara Giarola; Ausilio Bauen; Nilay Shah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part II: Spatial and temporal structure of response  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high-resolution (2.75{degrees} lat x 3.75{degrees} long) coupled ocean-atmosphere model has been used to simulate the transient response of climate to a gradual increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Although the radiative forcing increases linearly, there is a delay of about 30 yr before the ocean warms appreciably. This {open_quotes}cold start{close_quotes} is, at least partly, an artifact of the experimental design. At the time of doubling (after 70 yr), the patterns of change are similar to those found in comparable studies of the equilibrium response, except in the high latitudes of the Southern Ocean and the North Atlantic, where the warming is considerably reduced. The mechanisms leading to this reduction are discussed. After two to three decades, the pattern of warming is well established. The warming over land is substantially larger than that over the sea, with a consequent lowering of surface pressure over the northern continents in summer. The patterns of changes in precipitation and soil moisture take longer to establish themselves, although locally there are consistent changes after the third decade. 55 refs., 30 figs., 6 tabs.

Murphy, J.M.; Mitchell, J.F.B. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Berkshire (United Kingdom)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Testing of the EURATOM LCT coil in the toroidal arrangement of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility without external pulsed fields (standard-1) and with them (standard II) and an extended single-coil test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Testing of the European LCT coil, a forced-flow NbTi coil, with the five other coils in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) has been in progress since the beginning of 1986. By the end of July 1987, the Euratom-LCT coil had passed a single-coil test, a test in toroidal configuration with and without poloidal field transients, and an extended single-coil test up to its design limits. In this test, the coil reached, in stable operation, a field of 9 T at 140% of rated current. It reached the short-sample values of the strands used in the cable. The coil was operated up to 8 T with and without poloidal field transients in a toroidal configuration. The mass flow rate was reduced by a factor of 5 compared with the design value without any visible impact on stability. Averaged ac losses (winding, 14 W; case, 7 W) were measured under LCT specified poloidal field pulses, and the findings agreed with those of the short-sample measurements. The mechanical properties behaved as predicted by calculations. No global movement of the winding in the coil case was found, although the coil has already experienced 50% (14MN) of the maximum out-of-plane force. The operating limits were determined by measuring the current-sharing temperature. It was found that the helium mass flow rate had an impact on the hot-spot temperature of a normal region. All results obtained demonstrate that the applied technology has achieved reliable engineering standards.

Friesinger, G.; Gauss, S.; Komarek, P.; Lubell, M.S.; McManamy, T.J.; Maurer, W.; Shen, S.S.; Siewerdt, L.; Ulbricht, A.; Wuchner, F.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part II. Rates of reduction of composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace simulator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO{sub 2} generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O{sub 3}-to-Fe3O{sub 4} transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O{sub 4}. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Praxair Technological Center

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Towards controlling PCDD/F production in a multi-fuel fired BFB boiler using two sulfur addition strategies. Part II: Thermodynamic analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A staged equilibrium process model was developed for a bubbling fluidized bed boiler firing SRF, bark and sludge. The model was used to study the influence of sulfur addition strategies (S-pellet additive and peat co-firing) on the behavior of copper, bromine, and alkalis. Aerosol samples collected from the backpass of the boiler were used to validate the chemistry predicted by the model. The model revealed that Cu existed as Cu2S(s3) in the reducing zone, and CuCl(g) (for all test cases) and CuO(s) (during peat co-firing) in the oxidation zones. CuBr3(g) was also present after the introduction of tertiary air. However the model failed to predict the formation of CuSO4, an important passive species of Cu necessary for PCDD/F abatement. The modes of occurrence of Cu were classified as either active or passive with respect to de novo synthesis and an active/passive species molar ratio (APR) was introduced. APR showed high correlation with the PCDD/F production levels. Sensitivity analysis revealed that excessive Cu in the fuel mixture decreased the volatility of the element due to the formation of CuO(s). Simulation for peat co-firing with low Cu content showed that PCDD/F concentration is decreased and is comparable to that of S-pellet addition. Sensitivity analysis revealed that increasing the energy share of sludge can likewise lower PCDD/F production.

Cyril Jose E. Bajamundi; Pasi Vainikka; Merja Hedman; Jukka Konttinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Phase II Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

Schuknecht, Nate [Project Manager; White, David [Principle Investigator; Hoste, Graeme [Research Engineer

2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

209

Guidelines Volume II  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

II II Sector-Specific Issues and Reporting Methodologies Supporting the General Guidelines for the Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 Part 4: Transportation Sector Part 5: Forestry Sector Part 6: Agricultural Sector Transportation Sector-Page 4.iii Contents of Volume II This volume, the second of two such volumes, contains sector-specific guidance in support of the General Guidelines for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions and carbon sequestration. This voluntary reporting program was authorized by Congress in Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The General Guidelines, bound separately from this volume, provide the overall rationale for the program, discuss in general how to analyze emissions and emission reduction/carbon sequestration projects, and

210

Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

211

Survey of Kansas Tort Law - Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 225 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 226 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 227 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 228 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 229 2001-2002 Hein...Online -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 230 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 231 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 232 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 233 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L. Rev. 234 2001-2002 HeinOnline -- 50 U. Kan. L...

Westerbeke, William E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in physics Premature Higgs (2011) Cold Fusion (1989) Element X (2002) Molecular Transistors (2001) 11;1989 : Cold Fusion Pons and Fleischmann announce Cold Fusion Electrolysis of heavy water Deuterium enters palladium cathode See temperature rise Detect fusion products like Helium in water 11/1/12 12 #12;Big

Shahriar, Selim

213

Part II. Detector at a -Factory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the tagging method along with specification of the fiducial regions, and...designed to have the following specifications: 1. The inner and outer radii...geometrically thick structure due to thermal insulation (20-30 em); the impact......

T. Ohshima; J. Shirai; H. Sakamoto; S. Schenetzer; K. Ueno

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1 PRESS KIT/December 2014 www.nasa.gov NP-2014-11-020-JSC National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12;#12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Contents Section Page ........................................................................................... 28 i #12;Orion Flight Test ii December 2014 #12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Flight Overview

Waliser, Duane E.

215

LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

Jeff Wurtz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A depth-averaged debris-flow model that includes the effects of evolving dilatancy. II. Numerical predictions and experimental tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Numerical predictions and experimental tests David L. George Richard M. Iverson e-mail...software package we call D-Claw. As tests of D-Claw, we compare model output with...our numerical solution technique, and tests of numerical predictions against experimental...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Test results of a combined distributed ion pump/non-evaporable getter pump design developed as a proposed alternative pumping system for the PEP-II asymmetric B-Factory collider  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have built and tested an all-in-one combination plate-type distributed ion pump/non-evaporable getter pump design (DIP/NEG) considered as a proposed alternative pumping system for the PEP-II B-Factory High Energy Ring (HER). The DIP portion of the design used a Penning cell hole size of 12 mm in a mostly uniform magnetic field of 0.18 T. The NEG portion of the design used commercially available non-evaporable getter material type St-707{trademark}. A detailed description of the design is presented along with results of pumping speed measurements.

Holdener, F.; Behne, D.; Hathaway, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

219

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

i PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. G.1- DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER G-1 G.2 - DOE CONTRACTING OFFICER'S REPRESENTATIVE (COR) G-1 G.3 - CONTRACT...

220

Part IV: Section G: Contract Administration  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

G - Page ii PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 Contracting Officer's Representative(s) 1 G.2 Contract Administration 1 G.3 Modification...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Photosystem II  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

James Barber

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Waste tank vapor project: Vapor characterization of Tank 241-C-103: Data report for OVS samples collected from Sample Job 7b, Parts I and II, received 5/18/94 and 5/24/94  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On 5/18/94, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) delivered samples to Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) that were collected from waste Tank 241-C-103 on 5/16/94. These samples were from Sample Job (SJ) 7b, Part 1. On 5/24/94, WHC delivered samples to PNL that were collected from waste Tank 241-C-103 on 5/18/94. These samples were from SJ7b, Part 2. A summary of data derived from the sampling of waste Tank 241-C-103 for gravimetric (H{sub 2}O) and normal paraffin hydrocarbon (NPH) concentrations are shown for SJ7b. Gravimetric analysis was performed on the samples within 24 hours of receipt by PNL. The NPH concentration of 10 samples collected for Part 1 was slightly higher than the average concentration for 15 samples collected in Part 2, 812 ({+-} 133) mg/m{sup 3} and 659 ({+-} 88) mg/m{sup 3}, respectively. The higher concentrations measured in Part 1 samples may be because the samples in Part 1 were collected at a single level, 0.79 meters above the air-liquid interface. Part 2 samples were collected at three different tank levels, 0.79, 2.92, and 5.05 m above the air-liquid interface. In Part 2, the average NPH concentrations for 5 samples collected at each of three levels was similar: 697 (60) mg/m{sup 3} at the low level, 631 (51) mg/m{sup 3} at the mid level, and 651 (134) mg/m{sup 3} at the high level. It is important to note that the measured tridecane to dodecane concentration remained constant in all samples collected in Parts 1 and 2. That ratio is 1.2 {+-} 0.05. This consistent ratio indicates that there were no random analytical biases towards either compound.

Clauss, T.R.; Edwards, J.A.; Fruchter, J.S.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

224

PART I  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DE-AC02-09CH11466 DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section D i PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. D.1 - PACKAGING D-1 D.2 - MARKING D-1 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section D D-1 PART I SECTION D - PACKAGING AND MARKING D.1 - PACKAGING Preservation, packaging, and packing for shipment or mailing of all work delivered hereunder shall be in accordance with good commercial practice and adequate to ensure acceptance by common carrier and safe transportation at the most economical rates. D.2 - MARKING Each package, report or other deliverable shall be accompanied by a letter or other document which: (a) Identifies the contract number under which the item is being delivered. (b) Identifies the contract requirement or other instruction which requires the

225

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

226

Experience with advanced driver fuels in EBR-II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) is a complete nuclear power plant, incorporating a pool-type liquid-metal reactor (LMR) with a fuel-power thermal output of 62.5 MW and an electrical output of 20 MW. Initial criticality was in 1961, utilizing a metallic driver fuel design called the Mark-I. The fuel design has evolved over the last 30 yr, and significant progress has been made on improving performance. The first major innovations were incorporated into the Mark-II design, and burnup then increased dramatically. This design performed successfully, and fuel element lifetime was limited by subassembly hardware performance rather than the fuel element itself. Transient performance of the fuel was also acceptable and demonstrated the ability of EBR-II to survive severe upsets such as a loss of flow without scram. In the mid 1980s, with renewed interest in metallic fuels and Argonne's integral fast reactor (IFR) concept, the Mark-II design was used as the basis for new designs, the Mark-III and Mark-IV. In 1987, the Mark-III design began qualification testing to become a driver fuel for EBR-II. This was followed in 1989 by the Mark-IIIA and Mark-IV designs. The next fuel design, the Mark-V, is being planned to demonstrate the utilization of recycled fuel. The fuel cycle facility attached to EBR-II is being refurbished to produce pyroprocessed recycled fuel as part of the demonstration of the IFR.

Lahm, C.E.; Koenig, J.F.; Pahl, R.G.; Porter, D.L.; Crawford, D.C. (Argonne National Lab.-West, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Solutions to Test 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test 1. STAT 47201. Fall 2014. October 7, 2014. 1. You are given: i. Mortality follows the illustrative life table ii. 6% i = Calculate: a. The actuarial present value

Microsoft account

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

228

NSLS-II Transport Line Progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

Start II, red ink, and Boris Yeltsin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Apart from the vulnerability implied by the START II treaty, it will bear the burden of the general political opposition to the Yeltsin administration. START II will be seen as part of an overall Yeltsin-Andrei Kozyrev foreign policy that is under fire for selling out Russian national interests in Yugoslavia, the Persian Gulf, and elsewhere. This article discusses public opinion concerning START II, the cost of its implementation, and the general purpose of the treaty.

Arbatov, A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic stack test fixture, part III: Stability and microstructure of Ce-(Mn,Co)-spinel coating, AISI441 interconnect, alumina coating, cathode and anode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing under realistic conditions. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell's degradation. After 6000 h test, the spinel coating showed densification with some diffusion of Cr. At the metal interface, segregation of Si and Ti was observed, however, no continuous layer formed. The alumina coating for perimeter sealing areas appeared more dense and thick at the air side than the fuel side. Both the spinel and alumina coatings remained bonded. EDS analysis of Cr within the metal showed small decrease in concentration near the coating interface and would expect to cause no issue of Cr depletion. Inter-diffusion of Ni, Fe, and Cr between spot-welded Ni wire and AISI441 interconnect was observed and Cr-oxide scale formed along the circumference of the weld. The microstructure of the anode and cathode was discussed relating to degradation of the top and middle cells. Overall, the Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, alumina coating, and AISI441 steel showed the desired long-term stability and the developed generic stack fixture proved to be a useful tool to validate candidate materials for SOFC.

Yeong-Shyung Chou; Jeffry W. Stevenson; Jung-Pyung Choi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Output power characteristics and performance of TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element No. 24  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A final report on the output power characteristics and capabilities of single cell TOPAZ II Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) No. 24 is presented. Thermal power tests were conducted for over 3000 hours to investigate converter performance under normal and adverse operating conditions. Experiments conducted include low power testing, high power testing, air introduction to the interelectrode gap, collector temperature optimization, thermal modeling, and output power characteristic measurements. During testing, no unexpected degradation in converter performance was observed. The TFE has been removed from the test stand and returned to Scientific Industrial Association {open_quote}{open_quote}LUCH{close_quote}{close_quote} for materials analysis and report. This research was conducted at the Thermionic System Evaluation Test (TSET) Facility at the New Mexico Engineering Research Institute (NMERI) as a part of the Topaz International Program (TIP) by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory (PL). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

Luchau, D.W.; Bruns, D.R. [Team Specialty Services, Inc., TOPAZ International Program, 901 University Blvd., SE, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87106 (United States); Izhvanov, O.; Androsov, V. [JV INERTEK, Scientific Industrial Association ``Luch``, 24 Zheleznodorozhnaya, Podolsk, (Russia) 142100

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Residential Clothes Washers Test Procedure Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

19:12 Sep 20, 2010 19:12 Sep 20, 2010 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00001 Fmt 4717 Sfmt 4717 E:\FR\FM\21SEP2.SGM 21SEP2 srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with PROPOSALS2 Tuesday, September 21, 2010 Part II Department of Energy 10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Residential Clothes Washers; Proposed Rule VerDate Mar2010 19:12 Sep 20, 2010 Jkt 220001 PO 00000 Frm 00002 Fmt 4701 Sfmt 4702 E:\FR\FM\21SEP2.SGM 21SEP2 srobinson on DSKHWCL6B1PROD with PROPOSALS2 57556 Federal Register / Vol. 75, No. 182 / Tuesday, September 21, 2010 / Proposed Rules DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 430 [Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-TP-0021] RIN 1904-AC08 Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Residential Clothes Washers AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and

233

Mod II engine performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Automotive Stirling Engine Program (ASE) is directed at the development of a kinematic Stirling engine for automotive use. This program is sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) and managed by the NASA-Lewis Research Center (NASA-LeRC). Following proof-of-concept testing and development of promising performance values with early versions of the Stirling engine, a production-type automotive design, the Mod II engine, was developed. The design of this engine and its systems has been previously presented. Based on this design, the first engine has been built and development testing has started. Projections for this first engine build are presented in this paper. Results of initial tests are also given including identification of development items and formulation of plans for resolution of existing deficiencies.

Richey, A.E.; Huang, S.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A multi-level simulation platform of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell–gas turbine hybrid generation system – Part II. Balancing units model library and system simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following our integrated hierarchical modeling framework of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC), this paper firstly introduces the model libraries of main balancing units, including some state-of-the-art achievements and our specific work. Based on gPROMS programming code, flexible configuration and modular design are fully realized by specifying graphically all unit models in each level. Via comparison with the steady-state experimental data of Siemens–Westinghouse demonstration system, the in-house multi-level SOFC–gas turbine (GT) simulation platform is validated to be more accurate than the advanced power system analysis tool (APSAT). Moreover, some units of the demonstration system are designed reversely for analysis of a typically part-load transient process. The framework of distributed and dynamic modeling in most of units is significant for the development of control strategies in the future.

Cheng Bao; Ningsheng Cai; Eric Croiset

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Transportation Association Conference Transportation Association Conference Vancouver, Canada December 2005 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Jim Francfort U.S. Department of Energy - FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity INL/CON-05-00964 Presentation Outline * Background & goals * Testing partners * Hybrid electric vehicle testing - Baseline performance testing (new HEV models) - 1.5 million miles of HEV fleet testing (160k miles per vehicle in 36 months) - End-of-life HEV testing (rerun fuel economy & conduct battery testing @ 160k miles per vehicle) - Benchmark data: vehicle & battery performance, fuel economy, maintenance & repairs, & life-cycle costs * WWW information location Background * Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - part of the

236

Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures part II: Experimental comparisons and verification of methods. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1993--March 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research reported herein continued to concentrate on in situ conductivity measurements for development into an accelerated screening method for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The work reported herein was performed in two phases. In the first phase, sealed tubes were prepared with steel catalysts and mixtures of CFC-12, HCFC-22, HFC-134a, and HFC-32/HFC-134a (zeotrope 30:70) refrigerants with oils as described in ANSI/ASHRAE Method 97-1989. In the second phase of work, modified sealed tubes, with and without steel catalysts present, were used to perform in situ conductivity measurements on mixtures of CFC-12 refrigerant with oils. The isothermal in situ conductivity measurements were compared with conventional tests, e.g., color measurements, gas chromatography, and trace metals to evaluate the capabilities of in situ conductivity for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. Other sets of tests were performed using ramped temperature conditions from 175{degrees}C (347{degrees}F) to 205{degrees}C (401{degrees}F) to evaluate the capabilities of in situ conductivity for detecting the onset of rapid degradation in CFC-12, HCFC-22 and HFC-134a refrigerant mixtures with naphthenic oil aged with and without steel catalysts present.

Kauffman, R. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Research Inst.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Ii1  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-r -r Ii1 5uitc 79% 955 L%fan~Plu,S.W.. Worhingm. D.C.200242134, 7117-03.87.cdy.43 23 September 1987 Mr. Andrew Wallo, III, NE-23 Division of Facility & Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy Germantown, Maryland 20545 Dear Mr. Wallo: ELIMINATION RECOMMENDATION -- COLLEGES AND UNIVtRSITIES The attached elimination recommendation was prepared in accordance.)l- flL.o* with your suggestion during our meeting on 22 September, The recommendat:on y0.0-02 includes 26 colleges and universities identified.in Enclosure 4 to Aerospace letter subject: Status of Actions - FUSRAP Site List, dated i 27 May 1987; three institutions (Tufts College, University of Virginia, ! and the University of Washington) currently identified on the FUSRAP

238

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout April 12, 2010 Contents Basic Storage Ring Parameters Basic and Advanced Source Parameters Brightness Flux Photon Source Size and Divergence Power Infrared Sources Distribution of Sources Available for User Beamlines Floor Layout This document provides a summary of the current NSLS-II source and floor layout parameters. For a more complete description of the NSLS-II accelerator properties planned for NSLS-II, see the NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report Basic NSLS-II Storage Ring Parameters at NSLS-II website. We note that this document summarizes the present status of the design, but that the design continues to be refined and that these parameters may change as part of this process. NSLS-II is designed to deliver photons with high average spectral brightness in the 2 keV to 10 keV

239

II. GENERAL COMPLIANCE SUPPLEMENT INTRODUCTION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Rather than repeat these compliance requirements, audit objectives, and suggested audit procedures for each program, they are provided once in this part. For each program in this Compliance Supplement (this Supplement), the program-specific compliance guidance section (Part III of this guidance) contains additional information about the compliance requirements that arise from laws and regulations applicable to each program, including the requirements specific to each program that should be tested using the guidance in this part. Compliance Requirements, Audit Objectives, and Suggested Audit Procedures At the end of this General Compliance Supplement is a matrix that outlines the compliance requirements, including special tests and provisions, that are applicable to programs performed under

240

Integrated assessment of Hadley Center (HadCM2) climate-change impacts on agricultural productivity and irrigation water supply in the conterminous United States: Part II. Regional agricultural production in 2030 and 2095  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A national assessment (NA) evaluated the potential consequences of climate change and variability on the agriculture, water resources, as well as other economic and natural resource sectors in the United States. As part of this process, we used scenarios of the HadCM2 GCM and the EPIC agroecosystem model to evaluate climate-change impacts on crop yields and ecosystem processes. Baseline climate data were obtained from national records for 1961–1990. The scenario runs for 2025–2034 and 2090–2099 were extracted from a HadCM2 run. EPIC was run on 204 representative farms under current climate and two 10-year periods centered on 2030 and 2095, each at CO2 concentrations of 365 and 560 ppm. Crops were simulated under both dryland and irrigated management, with irrigation water supply estimates taken from the HUMUS simulations in Paper 1. Texas, New Mexico, Colorado, Utah, Arizona, and California are projected to experience significant temperature increases by 2030. Slight cooling is expected by 2030 in Alabama, Florida, Maine, Montana, Idaho, and Utah. Larger areas are projected to experience increased warming by 2095. Uniform precipitation increases are expected by 2030 in the northeast. These increases are predicted to expand to the eastern half of the country by 2095. Regionally, dryland corn yields could increase, decrease or remain unchanged under the two scenarios. EPIC simulated yield increases for the Great Lakes, Corn Belt and Northeast regions. Simulated yields of irrigated corn were predicted to increase in almost all regions. Soybean yields could decrease in the Northern and Southern Plains, the Corn Belt, Delta, Appalachian, and Southeast regions and increase in the Lakes and Northeast regions. Simulated wheat yields exhibited upward trends under scenarios of climate-change. Evapotranspiration in dryland corn is expected to increase in both future periods while water-use efficiency will decrease. National corn production in 2030 and 2095 could be affected by changes in three major producing regions. In 2030, corn production could increase in the Corn Belt and Lakes regions but decrease in the Northern Plains leading to an overall decrease in national production. National wheat production is expected to increase during both future periods. A proxy indicator was developed to provide a sense of where in the country, and when water would be available to satisfy change in irrigation demand for corn and alfalfa production as these are influenced by the HadCM2 scenarios and CO2-fertilization. Irrigation requirement by irrigated crops declines under these scenarios as transpiration is suppressed.

R.César Izaurralde; Norman J. Rosenberg; Robert A. Brown; Allison M. Thomson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61 4.3 Carbon capture andPart II: Policy Analysis Page 5 R12: Carbon capture andstorage If carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies

Farrell, Alexander; Sperling, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61 4.3 Carbon capture andPart II: Policy Analysis Page 5 R12: Carbon capture andstorage If carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

OPTI 500E-Photonic Communications Engineering II E Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering (PCE) consists of two parts (I and II). PCE I covers optical fiber light guiding and wave, communications systems and fiber optics networks and the Internet. PCE II builds upon this knowledge

Arizona, University of

244

OPTI 500F-Photonic Communications Engineering II F Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering (PCE) consists of two parts (I and II). PCE I covers optical fiber light guiding and wave, communications systems and fiber optics networks and the Internet. PCE II builds upon this knowledge

Arizona, University of

245

OPTI 500D-Photonic Communications Engineering II D Course Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering (PCE) consists of two parts (I and II). PCE I covers optical fiber light guiding and wave, communications systems and fiber optics networks and the Internet. PCE II builds upon this knowledge

Arizona, University of

246

ONTOLOGY OF TEST Larisa Soldatova  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ONTOLOGY OF TEST Larisa Soldatova Post doctoral researcher Riichiro Mizoguchi Professor ISIR, Osaka In the present paper design of test generation systems (TGS) based on test ontology and student's knowledge model parts: domain independent- and domain-dependant knowledge. Suggested test ontology allows analyzing test

Mizoguchi, Riichiro

247

Calculus For Technology II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MA 22200, Spring 2012. Calculus For Technology II ... Other Information. Emergency procedures · Exam info (A Hoffman) ...

248

LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~~"-' ,m . I 'f'-~I I ,/:? :RIlNG SET r -t j IS) iO" 1C. ~ETNR(LSIZEt>ClIISS)/ '.I~RllNG LJ.J 8DGO Ot\\ YS ~~:\\ j3 1 :in ~ill particular a batch lng OD aEriv~l phenomenon r by

Jay Smith, Alan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar on Nov. 18, 2014, continued the series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

250

Current Estate Planning Topics - Marital Deduction Pitfalls: Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This article addresses the deduction for marital transfers under the United States estate tax. This is by far the most important deduction under the estate tax, and loss of the deduction can be very damaging to families. ...

Dickinson, Martin B. Jr.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Seismology in Australia and Around the World - Part II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...seismoaraphs are in operation at the observatory...Mountain area are fairly cold. In the rugged area...Hallo Lagoon are in operation. Vol. XXI EARTHQUAKE...ionosphere specialists, a weather man, three glaciologists...comfortably at 70 by oil heaters. The men slapt two...every type. Hot and cold running water ware...

Dean S. Carder

252

Exponential smoothing: The state of the art—Part II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Gardner [Gardner, E. S., Jr. (1985). Exponential smoothing: The state of the art. Journal of Forecasting 4, 1–28], I reviewed the research in exponential smoothing since the original work by Brown and Holt. This paper brings the state of the art up to date. The most important theoretical advance is the invention of a complete statistical rationale for exponential smoothing based on a new class of state-space models with a single source of error. The most important practical advance is the development of a robust method for smoothing damped multiplicative trends. We also have a new adaptive method for simple smoothing, the first such method to demonstrate credible improved forecast accuracy over fixed-parameter smoothing. Longstanding confusion in the literature about whether and how to renormalize seasonal indices in the Holt–Winters methods has finally been resolved. There has been significant work in forecasting for inventory control, including the development of new predictive distributions for total lead-time demand and several improved versions of Croston's method for forecasting intermittent time series. Regrettably, there has been little progress in the identification and selection of exponential smoothing methods. The research in this area is best described as inconclusive, and it is still difficult to beat the application of a damped trend to every time series.

Everette S. Gardner Jr.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Online Analysis of Wind and Solar Part II: Transmission Tool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To facilitate wider penetration of renewable resources without compromising system reliability concerns arising from the lack of predictability of intermittent renewable resources, a tool for use by California Independent System Operator (CAISO) power grid operators was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with CAISO with funding from California Energy Commission. The tool analyzes and displays the impacts of uncertainties in forecasts of loads and renewable generation on: (1) congestion, (2)voltage and transient stability margins, and (3)voltage reductions and reactive power margins. The impacts are analyzed in the base case and under user-specified contingencies.A prototype of the tool has been developed and implemented in software.

Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

254

Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The webinar will continue our series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar...

255

Solar energy Part II—The greenhouse effect  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The performance of flat plate collectors is discussed among the topics considered are heat gain and loss and overall efficiency.(AIP)

Matthew Young

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part II)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation by Matthew Hooks of TIAX at the Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis, May 8-9, 2007

257

Review of Liquid Phases in Gas Chromatography, Part II: Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......in the carrier gas; this sharpens...oxygen) and water (20,22,23...in the carrier gas, from leaks in...tochromic (12) and solubility parameter (36...Eon. Expanded solubility param eter treatment...for capillary gas chromatography...capillaries and a nitrogen selective detector......

J.A. Yancey

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Certification of SRM 114q: Part II (Particle size distribution)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Physics · Optical Technology · Ionizing Radiation · Time and Frequency1 · Quantum Physics1 ManufacturingAccess · Convergent Information Systems · Information Services and Computing · Software Diagnostics and Conformance and engineering; and improve public health, safety, and the environment. One of the agency's basic functions

Bentz, Dale P.

259

Review of Liquid Phases in Gas Chromatography, Part II: Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......reported by Jones (19). B. Poly(ethylene glycol) or PEG PEG is the second most...PEG degrades to form acetaldehyde and ethylene oxide (20,22), and the acetaldehyde...J. Laub, B.H. Luh- mann, A. Price, W . L Roberts, T.J. Shaw, and C......

J.A. Yancey

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

The Subthermocline Lens D1. Part II: Kinematics and Dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dynamics of a subthermocline lens observed during the POLYMODE Local Dynamics Experiment are examined using density data and measurements of the velocity field obtained by an absolute velocity profiler. It is shown that the momentum balance ...

B. A. Elliott; T. B. Sanford

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

QER Public Meeting: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints Part II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Energy will convene a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review. The purpose of the meeting is to examine energy infrastructure constraints in New England and regional approaches to addressing them

262

Paradigm shifts in surface metrology. Part II. The current shift  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specifying metrology instrumentation...requirement for a standard for areal...areal three-dimensional surface roughness...capabilities by a consortium formed by...points using standard functions...of surface metrology has been...by multi-dimensional technology...fabrication, metrology, assembly...characterizing three-dimensional surface topography...roughness standards. Elstner...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

EcoCAR 2: Meet the Teams Part II  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

As college graduation season draws near, so too does EcoCAR 2, the Energy Department competition that challenges the next generation of engineers and scientists to reduce the environmental impact of a Chevrolet Malibu without compromising performance, safety and consumer acceptability. Meet five of the 15 teams.

264

ZERH WEBINAR: HIGH-PERFORMANCE HOME SALES TRAINING PART II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

265

WIPP SEIS-II - Summary (Part 1 of 4)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper DOEEIS-0026-S-2 This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available...

266

Hadley Circulation Response to Orbital Precession. Part II: Subtropical Continent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of the monsoonal and annual-mean Hadley circulation to orbital precession is examined in an idealized atmospheric general circulation model with a simplified representation of land surface processes in subtropical latitudes. When ...

Timothy M. Merlis; Tapio Schneider; Simona Bordoni; Ian Eisenman

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Shippingport Station Decommissioning Project decommissioning plan. Volume VI, Part II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document comprises the following: report of remaining contractor work, predecessor/successor logic report, contractor interface report (incoming and outgoing interfaces), and activity specification Barchart plot. (DLC)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

INVESTIGATION OF OXYGEN REDUCTION MECHANISMS USING CATHODE MICROELECTRODES, PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of elementary oxygen reduc- tion reaction steps. This discrepancy indicates to a lack of fundamental understanding of oxygen reduction process(es) at the LSM/YSZ interface at the molecular level. #12;Electrical resistances and capacitances in the SOFC behavior. All implications presented in Refs. 2-7 have been based

Yildiz, Bilge

269

Seamless Energy Management Systems Part II: Development of Prototype  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

models in operations and planning, and to tie these models to PMU data 3. Repetitiveness of simulations measurement units (PMU) 2. The difficulty in comparing application results due to the utilization of different

270

Persistent Contrails and Contrail Cirrus. Part II: Full Lifetime Behavior  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

More than 200 large-eddy simulations of long-lived contrails from several-seconds age until their demise have been performed and their lifetime-integrated behavior has been analyzed. The simulations employ size-resolved microphysics and include ...

D. C. Lewellen

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessor-blinded phase ii Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CONSEQUENCES OF FERTILITY TREATMENTS Summary: of IVF and ICSI: a price-elasticity of demand assessment 25 Part II 35 Chapter 4 Assessing long... within many health...

272

Plasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasma Physics PART Al: INTRODUCTION TO PLASMA SCIENCE I. What is a plasma? 1 II. Plasma fundamentals 3 1. Quasineutrality and Debye length 2. Plasma frequency and acoustic velocity 3. Larmor radius; magnetic buckets Cross section data 21 PART A3: PLASMA SOURCES I IV. Introduction to plasma sources 25 1

Chen, Francis F.

273

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management J¨org Meyer, E. Wes Bethel). This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management, Office of Environmental of California. ii #12;Visual Data Analysis as an Integral Part of Environmental Management Joerg Meyer, E. Wes

274

Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

Bullard, K.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Test Cell Location  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] 3250 Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Revision Number 1 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3250 31.2 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.462 0.014 Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package - Manual Transmission - All tests completed in ECO mode - EPA shift schedule modified based on vehicle shift light activity Revision Number 1 Notes: Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE Gasoline Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package

276

TRUPACT-II Operating and Maintenance Instructions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to provide the technical requirements for preparation for use, operation, inspection, and maintenance of a Transuranic Package Transporter Model II (TRUPACT-II) Shipping Package and directly related components. This document complies with the minimum requirements as specified in the TRUPACT-II Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Certificate of Compliance (C of C) 9218. In the event there is a conflict between this document and the TRUPACT-II SARP, the TRUPACT-II SARP shall govern. TRUPACT-II C of C number 9218 states, ''... each package must be prepared for shipment and operated in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 7.0, Operating Procedures, of the application.'' It further states, ''... each package must be tested and maintained in accordance with the procedures described in Chapter 8.0, Acceptance Tests and Maintenance Program of the application.'' Chapter 9 of the TRUPACT-II SARP charges the Westinghouse Electric Corporation Waste Isolation Division (WID) with assuring that the TRUPACT-II is used in accordance with the requirements of the C of C. To meet this requirement and verify consistency of operations when loading and unloading the TRUPACT-II on the trailer, placing a payload in the packaging, unloading the payload from the packaging, or performing maintenance, the U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office (U.S. DOE/CAO) finds it necessary to implement the changes that follow. This TRUPACT-II maintenance document represents a change to previous philosophy regarding site specific procedures for the use of the TRUPACT-II. This document details the instructions to be followed to consistently operate and maintain the TRUPACT-II. The intent of these instructions is to ensure that all users of the TRUPACT-II follow the same or equivalent instructions. Users may achieve this intent by any of the following methods: (1) Utilizing these instructions as is, or (2) Attaching a site-specific cover page/letter to this document stating that these are the instructions to be used at their location, or (3) Sites may prepare their own document using the steps in this document word-for-word, in-sequence, including Notes and Cautions. Site specific information may be included as deemed necessary. Submit the document to WID National TRU Programs for approval. Any revision made subsequent to WID TRU Program's approval shall be reviewed and approved by WID TRU Programs. A copy of the approval letter from WID National TRU Programs should be available for audit purposes. Users shall develop site-specific procedures addressing leak testing, preoperational activities, quality assurance, hoisting and rigging, and radiation health physics to be used in conjunction with the instructions contained in this document. Users desiring to recommend changes to this document may submit their recommendations to the WID National TRU Programs for evaluation. If approved, the change(s) will be incorporated into this document for use by all TRUPACT-II users. User sites will be audited to this document to ensure compliance within one year from the effective date of this revision. This document discusses operating instructions, required inspections and maintenance for the following: TRUPACT-II packaging, and Miscellaneous packaging, special tools, and equipment. Packaging and payload handling equipment and transport trailers have been specifically designed for use with the TRUPACT-II Packaging. This document discusses the required instructions for use of the following equipment in conjunction with the TRUPACT-II Packaging: TRUPACT-II Mobile Loading Unit (MLU), Adjustable Center-of-Gravity Lift Fixture (ACGLF), and TRUPACT-II Transport Trailer. Attachment E contains the various TRUPACT-II packaging interface control drawings, leak-test and vent-port tool drawings, ACGLF drawings, and tie-down drawings that identify the various system components.

Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Waste Isolation Division

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

PARS II TRAINING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i 10 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting i Project Assessment and Reporting System PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook (PARS II Release 1.1) Department of Energy September 13, 2010 September 13,, 2010 (V1.1) PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1: Find and View a Project ............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3

278

Matlab-II: Computing, Programming and Data Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis 10 min break Part II Graphing Programming Q & A #12;Matlab I: Basic Concepts Everything A = logm(B) expm(A) = B #12;Matlab Computation Compound Matrix Expressions · Created by the user o fromMatlab-II: Computing, Programming and Data Analysis Division of Statistics and Scientific

Mankoff, Jennifer

279

Part removal of 3D printed parts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D printing using a patent ...

Peña Doll, Mateo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

NONE

1995-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Abstracts ii Schedule....................................................................................................................................................... iii  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.........................................................................................88 Dark Matter & Dark Energy ...............................................................................................3 HAD II Special: Neptune after One Orbit: Reflections on the Discovery of a Planet

Ciotti, Luca

282

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone in the brain and gastrointestinal system that helps stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with 8 amino acid residues) by cleaving the hormone into 5- and 3-residue chains, inactivating it.

283

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is implicated in numerous cellular processes including the degradation of the endogenous satiety agent cholecystokinin-8, making TPP II a target in the treatment of obesity. To gain insight into this molecular machine's mechanisms of activation and proteolysis, researchers from Berkeley Lab, the University of California, Berkeley, and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry combined single-particle cryo-electron microscopy and x-ray crystallography at ALS Beamline 8.2.2. Treating Obesity with Satiety Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a hormone in the brain and gastrointestinal system that helps stimulate the digestion of fat and protein and acts as a satiety agent, suppressing hunger and inhibiting food intake. Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II) is known to partly regulate CCK-8 (a CCK with 8 amino acid residues) by cleaving the hormone into 5- and 3-residue chains, inactivating it.

284

Part III - Section J  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of Chapter II cancelled per DOE O 231.1) DOE 5480.19, Chg. 2 dated 102301 7990 Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities DOE 5480.20A, Chg. 1 dated 71201...

285

Student led part Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Overview Student led part Introduction Mathematical Biology ­ Matrix Population Projection Models;Overview Student led part Introduction The second lecture focuses on matrix (P)opulation (P)rojection (M)odels­ Stuart Townley Math Bio ­ Matrix PPMs 2/ 5 #12;Overview Student led part Introduction The second lecture

Knobloch,Jürgen

286

Statistical Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40 CFR Part 1065 Engine Dynamometer Test Cell Statistical Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40 CFR Part 1065 Engine...

287

DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Going Green and Building Strong: Building a FORTIFIED Home-- Part 2 Webinar (Text Version)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Here is the text version of the webinar, Going Green and Building Strong: Building a FORTIFIED Home -- Part II, presented in June 2014.

288

Bomb tests attack the food chain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ciguatera poisoning, the most common type of fish poisoning in the world, has become a major public health problem in some parts of the South Pacific. This area has always been the site of periodic outbreaks, especially after severe storms or natural disasters that damage core reefs. But since World War II it has become evident that military activities and major construction projects that wreak havoc on corals also lead to ciguatera outbreaks. Extraordinarily high rates of ciguatera poisoning have occurred on the small Pacific islands that have been used for nuclear tests and on the islands that host the military infrastructures and activities that accompany the tests. This is true for both the Marshall Islands near Bikini and Eniwetok, where U.S. tests took place, and in French Polynesia, in the area around Moruroa Atoll where the French government continues to test. Ciguatera poisoning has a disastrous effect on people who depend on fishing as a way of life and on fish as the major source of protein. 10 refs.

Ruff, T. (Monash Medical School, Melbourne (Australia))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

A 9I AppliLcrtion for Extension of Time ' r ~File an I If you are filing for an Automatic 3-Month Extension, complete only Part Iand check this box ..........................................................  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................... If you are filing for an Additional (Not Automatic) 3-Month Extension, complete only Part II(on page 2

Ravikumar, B.

290

Paraho environmental data. Part I. Process characterization. Par II. Air quality. Part III. Water quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 1973 to 1978, Development Engineering, Inc. (DEI), a subsidiary of Paraho Development Corporation, demostrated the Paraho technology for surface oil shale retorting at Anvil Points, Colorado. A considerable amount of environmentally-related research was also conducted. This body of data represents the most comprehensive environmental data base relating to surface retorting that is currently available. In order to make this information available, the DOE Office of Environment has undertaken to compile, assemble, and publish this environmental data. The compilation has been prepared by DEI. This report includes the process characterization, air quality, and water quality categories.

Heistand, R.N.; Atwood, R.A.; Richardson, K.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 All Issues submit Passing good judgment, part 1: weapons designers with nuclear testing experience The nuclear weapons designers who developed their skills during...

292

PhaseII1.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stakeholder Meeting Stakeholder Meeting DOE-NETL Proposed Phase II Large Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program September 12, 2002 Meeting Summary A meeting was held in Arlington, VA on September 12 on DOE-NETL's plans to go forward with a second phase of field testing of advanced mercury control technology. The meeting was held in conjunction with the Air Quality III Conference and was attended by approximately 53 representatives from the coal and electric-utility industries, technology developers, EPA, and other interested parties (see attached attendees list). Scott Renninger provided a brief overview of DOE-NETL's current mercury field testing program. A summary of the results from an earlier stakeholder meeting held in Washington on June 4 were also presented as a starting point for discussion to help

293

I IIII1IiI II1Ii  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

* * 'I I IIII1IiI II1Ii 1111 1111 I - I' p. r. * *: * * * .** I I ,e L 'I r - I OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH ADEC ?Date ______ Time - Location /oie_ / I C 4'.'-?- 1D& Reason for Photo ' 1 By _________ Ro1 # 7'93 Frame' # ,'9 I *.' ' .- - . *c *\ I '' . *. , * " . ... *l; .; . '' N 1 * ' ' * ' '" ), q . L *" ' r 'I . I ' , * I ", * _; . ':. -* - - ! .) f' '' . . * 'i; . ,- , . F) .* :-- .' *, 'I 1 - . '.. ' t; , çv ' . ,* I i * #' *. '3 "' i * '- *1 '4 *' ,:- - a 4 t ' - * ', % & ; 1 ¶ * :' *.' ,. : -A r ;v ' :" - .r " 'a - -" -; & ' * - * - - ) : S , ,,, --- S *J %I *' * S .. c .* - Z '- .- '- .., ' . -" ' I * . * ' * S- * , * - 4 .- a * , . V . ,. * i .-- 4. * -Y * / -, *. .' *' ,t r A. _-. *, , *' ** l. . * '' .4 "1 j. ' 1. - ' ' * 4 I - . * - - , _% * I-. , 4 .r- ( J -: '- , *, ' v - I 9 , ' , 1 ** , . * -"J * -" I * - c-- . ;- . '--- - A ... * ' ' - * 'A r? -: * '; ' ' - ' .: 1', - '. *, , .. I ,, *,, . * .t 1- ) ' , ** J' * *I :* : - - I j-- - - * I- , -j -. -** :- * * . *' ' _, 9 ;* 3 . . -. . 5 4 - 9. - .** -.* . - *- .c .- * -. :. .- - - - 4, N 9 - * 9 t * - - 4 2

294

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume II, Appendices (Part 1 of 11)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper DOEEIS-0026-S-2 This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available...

295

Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. EPA has issued a final regulation for control of mercury from coal-fired power plants. An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. These adulterated by-products, both ashes and FGD material, represent the greatest challenge to the DOE goal of increased utilization of by-products. The degree of stability of capture by-products and their potential for release of mercury can have a large economic impact on material sales or the approach to disposal. One of the considerations for mercury control technology is the potential trade-off between effective but temporary mercury capture and less effective but more permanent sequestration. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed aqueous leaching procedures on a select subset of the available sample pairs. This report describes batch leaching results for mercury, arsenic, and selenium.

Hesbach, P.A.; Kachur, E.K.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Building Public Trust: Part 3  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3: Righting Past Wrongs 3: Righting Past Wrongs Overview The ACHRE report reviewed in detail several case studies of government- supported human radiation research including: the injections of plutonium into 18 hospital patients during and after World War II, research with prisoners, and research on patients who were exposed to total body irradiation in clinical settings. The Advisory Committee also considered issues related to certain radiation exposures associated with government activities that the Advisory Committee concluded should not be considered "human experiments." These exposures were sustained as a result of government activity undertaken for purposes other than human radiation research. The exposed populations include atomic veterans, uranium miners, and residents of the Marshall Islands exposed to fallout from U. S. weapons testing.

297

PARS II TRAINING  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 Viewing and Reporting 1 Viewing and Reporting Training Workbook V1.0 Department of Energy May 10, 2010 May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 ii May 10, 2010 PARS II 101 Viewing and Reporting V1.0 iii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 Find and View a Project ............................................................................................. 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ....................................................................................................................... 3

298

Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

b. Part B 1 Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements and Funding Information Gray highlights are instructions. Remove the instructions from the interagency...

299

NMG documentation, part 1: user`s guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first of a three-part report documenting NMG, the Numerical Mathematics Guide. Part I is aimed at the user of the system. It contains an introduction, with an outline of the complete report, and Chapter 1, User`s Point of View. Part II is aimed at the programmer and contains Chapter 2, How It Works. Part III is aimed at the maintainer of NMG and contains Chapter 3, Maintenance, and Chapter 4, Validation. Each chapter has its own page numbering and table of contents.

Fritsch, F.N.; Dickinson, R.P. Jr.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ACRA-II  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

National Synchrotron Light Source II Project Progress Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, power supply procurement, BPM electronics testing, and controls system design. With details of technical'S ASSESSMENT FEBRUARY 2010 OVERALL ASSESSMENT The National Synchrotron Light Source II project maintained excellent technical progress and satisfactory cost and schedule performance. The DOE Independent Project

Ohta, Shigemi

303

PARS II FAQ  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 V1.4.1 (June 25, 2011) 1 PARS II Project Assessment and Reporting System Frequently Asked Questions (Click on a Question to go to Its Answer) General PARS II Project Information Q: What is the motivation, purpose and expected benefit from the PARS II system? Q: Where can I go to find out information on PARS II? Accessing and Using PARS II Q: Where can I go to access PARS II? Q: How do I obtain a PARS II User ID and Password? Q: PARS II will not allow me to log-in, it just keeps displaying the login window for User ID and Password. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I do not see a list of my projects. What should I do? Q: I am a FPD tracking a project and it does not appear on my project list. What should I do? Q: Upon log-in, I receive a white screen. What should I do?

304

EBR-II axial temperature distributions measured during in-vessel natural circulation experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor II is located in a cylindrical pool of liquid sodium which is part of the cold-leg of the primary flow circuit. A vertical string of 32 thermocouples spans the 8 m tank height, at each of two diametrically opposed locations in the primary tank. Local temperatures were measured with these 64 thermocouples during dynamic tests. The instantaneous spacial temperature distribution obtained from a string of thermocouples can be viewed on a personal computer. The animation which results from displaying successive spacial distributions provides a very effective way to quickly obtain physical insights. The design of the two strings of thermocouples, the software used to create the animation, measured data from three different types of tests -- two unprotected reactor transients, and one with the reactor at decay power levels and the reactor cover lifted, are discussed.

Ragland, W.A.; Feldman, E.E.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

UL Ex Parte communications | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UL Ex Parte communications UL Ex Parte communications UL Ex Parte communications On December 27, I was contacted by Ms. Ashley Armstrong, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program and asked if I would be willing to meet with her and certain US DOE staff to discuss UL's "different testing and certification offerings as they relate to electric motors". Ex parte comm_1_7_2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EERE-2010-BT-STD-0027 Ex Parte Letter NEMA Motor Training re DOE Motors Rule 15 July 2013. Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0027 Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors: Public Meeting and Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document 77 Fed. Reg. 43015 (July 23,

306

Property:PartOf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PartOf PartOf Jump to: navigation, search Property Name PartOf Property Type Page Description Similar to Property:TypeOf, this property identifies pages that represent a larger concept that encompasses the subject page. This is most commonly used in geospatial relationships, to say that a city is PartOf a state. This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 2 subproperties: G GRR/Section 4-FD-a - Exploration Permit BLM N User:Nlangle/test3 Pages using the property "PartOf" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 2 2-M Probe Survey + Glossary + A Aaronsburg, Pennsylvania + Centre County, Pennsylvania +, Pennsylvania + Abbeville County, South Carolina + South Carolina + Abbeville, Alabama + Henry County, Alabama +, Alabama +, Alabama's 2nd congressional district +

307

UL Ex Parte communications | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

UL Ex Parte communications UL Ex Parte communications UL Ex Parte communications On December 27, I was contacted by Ms. Ashley Armstrong, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Building Technologies Program and asked if I would be willing to meet with her and certain US DOE staff to discuss UL's "different testing and certification offerings as they relate to electric motors". Ex parte comm_1_7_2013.pdf More Documents & Publications EERE-2010-BT-STD-0027 Ex Parte Letter NEMA Motor Training re DOE Motors Rule 15 July 2013. Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-STD-0027 Energy Conservation Standards for Commercial and Industrial Electric Motors: Public Meeting and Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document 77 Fed. Reg. 43015 (July 23,

308

H5Part at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

H5Part H5Part Description and Overview H5Part is a simplified 'veneer' API that sits on top of HDF5 and supports several commonly used data models. The main components are: H5Part...

309

LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The technetium-loaded Sn(II)apatite was also subjected to water leach tests. The loaded sample (0.2 g of Sn(II)apatite was loaded with 0.342 mg of Tc-99) was placed in a 200-mL distilled water column and sparged with air. Samples were taken weekly over a 6-week period, and the dissolved oxygen ranged from 8.4 to 8.7 mg/L (average 8.5 mg/L); all samples recorded less than the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L Tc-99. The mechanism by which TcO{sub 2} is sequestered and hence protected from re-oxidation appears to be an exchange with phosphate in the apatite lattice, as the phosphorus that appeared in solution after reaction with technetium was essentially the same moles of technetium that were taken up by the Sn(II)apatite (Table 6). Overall, the reduction of the mobile pertechnetate (+7) to the less mobile technetium dioxide (+4) by Sn(II)apatite and subsequent sequestration of the technetium in the material indicates that Sn(II)apatite is an excellent candidate for long-term immobilization of technetium. The indications are that the Sn(II)apatite will lend itself to sequestering and inhibiting the reoxidation to the mobile pertechnetate species, thus keeping the radionuclide out of the environment.

DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Presented at Synchrotron Environmental Science II (SES-II) Argonne National Laboratory - 6 such as dioxins and furans, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). *Work

Brookhaven National Laboratory

311

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

US tests antimissile laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... It is destined to fly on board a modified Boeing 747 aeroplane as part of a US air defence fleet. The test, which lasted ... Grumman Space Technology, based in Redondo Beach, California, for the Airborne Laser team at Boeing Integrated Defense Systems in St Louis, Missouri. ...

Mark Peplow

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume II P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted P-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this volume (II), all P-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver. P-wave measurements were performed over the depth range of 360 to 1400 ft, typically in 10-ft intervals. However, in some interbeds, 5-ft depth intervals were used, while below about 1180 ft, depth intervals of 20 ft were used. Compression (P) waves were generated by moving the base plate of T-Rex for a given number of cycles at a fixed frequency as discussed in Section 2. This process was repeated so that signal averaging in the time domain was performed using 3 to about 15 averages, with 5 averages typically used. In addition to the LBNL 3-D geophone, called the lower receiver herein, a 3-D geophone from Redpath Geophysics was fixed at a depth of 22 ft in Borehole C4996, and a 3-D geophone from the University of Texas was embedded near the borehole at about 1.5 ft below the ground surface. This volume is organized into 12 sections as follows: Section 1: Introduction, Section 2: Explanation of Terminology, Section 3: Vp Profile at Borehole C4996, Sections 4 to 6: Unfiltered P-wave records of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass, and reference receiver, Sections 7 to 9: Filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, reaction mass and reference receiver, Section 10: Expanded and filtered P-wave signals of lower vertical receiver, and Sections 11 and 12: Waterfall plots of unfiltered and filtered lower vertical receiver signals.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

314

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Part 2 : Scientific Information Main applicant: Nierstrasz, Oscar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the development process. -- Agile Modeling. A key bottleneck to effective software assessment is the rapidPart 2 : Scientific Information Main applicant: Nierstrasz, Oscar Project title: Agile Software 30, 2012 @ 12:07 i #12;SNF Proposal -- Agile Software Assessment ii 1 Summary of the research plan

Jäger, Gerhard

316

Jan Hendrik Bruinier II Anna von Pippich Fabrizio Andreatta -Milan, Italy II Massimo Bertolini -Essen, Germany II Siegfried Bcherer -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massimo Bertolini - Essen, Germany II Siegfried Böcherer - Mannheim, Germany II Thanasis Bouganis - Durham II Jay Jorgenson - New York, USA II Winfried Kohnen - Heidelberg, Germany II Jürg Kramer - Berlin, Germany II Siddarth Sankaran - Bonn, Germany II Maryna Viazovska - Bonn, Germany II Tonghai Yang - Madison

Haller-Dintelmann, Robert

317

Little Climates -- Part One  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Part One Part One Nature Bulletin No. 478-A January 27, 1973 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation LITTLE CLIMATES -- Part One: Weather in the Soi. Climate vitally affects our lives. Wherever we live, climate has largely determined the plant and animal life in that region, the development of civilization there and what people do. The climate of any region represents its overall weather picture: the sum of its weather today, tomorrow, and during past centuries. We are accustomed to think of climate as a set of conditions occurring entirely in the atmosphere above the earth's surface, and it may sound silly when we say that there are climates underground -- little climates just as real as those above -- but it's true, There are special kinds of weather in the soil.

318

41146_R01_Volume II.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN VOLUME II: BENCH-SCALE FBC TERSTING FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOLIERS ALSTOM Power Inc. May 15, 2003 GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE 1 - A PRELIMINARY SYSTEMS EVALUATION FINAL REPORT VOLUME I EVALUATION OF ADVANCED COAL COMBUSTION & GASIFICATION POWER PLANTS WITH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL VOLUME II BENCH-SCALE FLUIDIZED BED COMBUSTION TESTING SUBMITTED BY ALSTOM POWER INC. POWER PLANT LABORATORIES 2000 DAY HILL ROAD WINDSOR, CT 06095 (860) 688-1911 PREPARED FOR NETL AAD DOCUMENT CONTROL BLDG. 921 US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY P.O. BOX 10940 PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA 15236-0940

319

Hypersonic flight testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the design process for a hypersonic vehicle, it is necessary to predict the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic environment for flight conditions. This involves combining results obtained from ground testing with analytical modeling to predict the aerodynamics and heating for all conditions of interest. The question which always arises is, how well will these models predict what is actually seen in a flight environment This paper will briefly address ground-testing and analytical modeling and discuss where each is appropriate, and the associated problems with each area. It will then describe flight test options as well as instrumentation currently available and show how flight tests can be used to validate or improve models. Finally, several results will be shown to indicate areas where ground testing and modeling alone are inadequate to accurately predict hypersonic aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics.

Williamson, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Random Testing versus Partition Testing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The difference between Partition Testing and Random Testing has been thoroughlyinvestigated theoretically. In this thesis we present a practical study ofthe differences between random… (more)

Oftedal, Kristian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Final Report -Public Part -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Demonstration of SOFC Stacks PSO Project No. 2006-1-6385 (part 3) 01.03.2006-29.02.2008 Topsoe Fuel Cell A...................................................................................................8 3.1.2 Cost reductions and quality improvements in cell ands stack production ..................................................................................................................................................7 3.1 MATURING OF CELL AND STACK PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY

322

A review of experiments and results from the transient reactor test (TREAT) facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The TREAT Facility was designed and built in the late 1950s at Argonne National Laboratory to provide a transient reactor for safety experiments on samples of reactor fuels. It first operated in 1959. Throughout its history, experiments conducted in TREAT have been important in establishing the behavior of a wide variety of reactor fuel elements under conditions predicted to occur in reactor accidents ranging from mild off normal transients to hypothetical core disruptive accidents. For much of its history, TREAT was used primarily to test liquid-metal reactor fuel elements, initially for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), then for the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP), the British Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR), and finally, for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Both oxide and metal elements were tested in dry capsules and in flowing sodium loops. The data obtained were instrumental in establishing the behavior of the fuel under off-normal and accident conditions, a necessary part of the safety analysis of the various reactors. In addition, TREAT was used to test light-water reactor (LWR) elements in a steam environment to obtain fission-product release data under meltdown conditions. Studies are now under way on applications of TREAT to testing of the behavior of high-burnup LWR elements under reactivity-initiated accident (RIA) conditions using a high-pressure water loop.

Deitrich, L. W.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

_PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

and nuclear weapons testing, to assist with stockpile stewardship activities, and to train or mentor replacement Section B - H, Page 52 Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344 scientists...

324

Part 11 of 11  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

backs kin m-2.2.5 Complete design of backs kin modification machine m-2.2.6 Complete identification of pick and place robot m-2 .2.7 Complete testing of redesigned hot zone...

325

Part 9 of 11  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

backs kin m-2.2.5 Complete design of backskin modification machine m-2.2.6 Complete identification of pick and place robot m-2.2 .7 Complete testing of redesigned hot zone...

326

Part 5 of 11  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

backs kin m-2.2.5 Complete design of backs kin modification machine m-2.2.6 Complete identification of pick and place robot m-2.2 .7 Complete testing of redesigned hot zone...

327

Part B | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Part BLegal Abstract RCRA Full Permit Part B, current through August 7, 2014. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation RCRA Full Permit Part B (EPA 2014) DOI...

328

HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Testing from the ground up Software Hut 2008  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing from the ground up Software Hut 2008 Tell me about testing · How do you test? · What do you test? · Why do you test? Why do we test? · Nobody writes perfect code. · The client wants to be sure. · Marks ­ one of the parts of the XP process mark is evidence of regular testing. Question 1

Holcombe, Mike

330

Part A | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Abstract RCRA Hazardous Waste Part A Permit Application, current through August 7, 2014. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014 Legal Citation RCRA Hazardous Waste Part...

331

EXEMPT POSTING JOB TITLE: Research Engineer I/II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and work with technicians and senior engineers to ensure the high quality of testing results and analysis analysis of the key test results to ensure quality. Develop independently and/or with senior engineer newEXEMPT POSTING JOB TITLE: Research Engineer I/II DEPARTMENT: NRDC ­ Mechanics Group SUPERVISOR

Demirel, Melik C.

332

Clause Matrix Part 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

23 23 K Clause Matrix for Department Of Energy Management and Operating Contracts Part I - FAR Clauses (Thru FAC 05-08 and DEAR Final Rule dated November 25, 2005) (1/10/2006) KEY: R = Required A = Required when applicable O = Optional M&O = Management and Operating contract UCF = Uniform Contract Format General instruction: Set forth below are clauses prescribed in FAR Part 52 (identified in the FAR Matrix for use in CR R&D, CR SVC, or CR CON contracts) which are to be used in DOE M&O contracts. This listing does not include solicitation provisions. FAR Clause Number Title Secondary DEAR Clause Citation M&O For Profit M&O Non- Profit UCF Prescribed In FAR Prescription/Notes 52.202-1 Definitions

333

Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Mobile Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobile apps are everywhere. Some apps entertain and others enable business transactions. Apps increasingly interact with complex IT landscapes. For example, a banking app on a mobile device acts as a front end that invokes services on a back-end server ... Keywords: mobile apps, mobile devices, software quality management, software testing, test automation, test strategy

Klaus Haller

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

PARS II | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II Operational Management » Information Systems » PARS II PARS II Welcome to PARS II PARS II is the Department's official "System of Record" for capital asset project performance information. Because PARS II uses the same data as maintained in our contractors' project management systems, everyone from the Federal Project Director's staff to the Secretary of Energy will have easy access to the same data. The PARS II software application is managed by the MA Office of Engineering and Construction Management and is used by federal and contractor personnel across the nation to record and track the progress of major construction and environmental cleanup projects. Questions or comments about PARS II should be directed to the PARS II Help Desk via email at i-Manage.eas@hq.doe.gov or by calling 301-903-2500

336

Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study-II Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study-II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Study-II Study-II Neutrino Factory Feasibility Study-II Editors Meeting January 29-31 2 0 0 1 a t B N L Editors Meeting January 29-31 2 0 0 1 a t B N L Elevation Plan Ring Layout Study-II Challenge: Storage Ring Footprint For Study-II it is important to find a solution that gives a very compact arc.* *Here arc definition includes all regions with dipoles. B. Parker 29-Jan-01 * For given straight section decay ratio a shorter arc reduces the site footprint. * For given straight section length a shorter arc increases ν production efficiency. C =1753 m Storage Ring Footprint: Ring Scaling Part 1 First consider energy scaling from 50 to 20 GeV B. Parker 29-Jan-01 C = 700 m C = 840 m C = 530 m Overly naive scaling gives: 1753 m x (2/5) ≈ 700 m * 250% larger emittance at 20 GeV drives larger

337

PARS II Course Descriptions | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Descriptions Descriptions PARS II Course Descriptions Sign up for PARS 102 or PARS 103, depending on your project assessment role and function. PARS 104 will be offered to site contractors as part of Dekker's Contractor deployment training. # Course Name Course Description Intended Audience PARS 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting Duration: 4 hrs Introduction to PARS II, finding and selecting projects in your domain, viewing Oversight and Assessment (OA) data, viewing Contractor Project Performance (CPP) dashboards, updating your monthly status assessment, adding attachments, and running standard, pre-built reports. Individuals who do not require monthly update training will be excused approximately one half hour early. FPD and Program staff who update the OA Monthly Status, but not other OA data.

338

TRUPACT-II 157 Examination Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of examination and recovery activities performed on the TRUPACT-II 157 shipping container. The container was part of a contact-handled transuranic waste shipment being transported on a truck to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico when an accident occurred. Although the transport vehicle sustained only minor damage, airborne transuranic contamination was detected in air samples extracted from inside TRUPACT-II 157 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Consequently, the shipping container was rejected, resealed, and returned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory where the payload was disassembled, examined, and recovered for subsequent reshipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report documents the results of those activities.

Barry H. O'Brien; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Kip E. Archibald

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Beryllium Testing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Beryllium is a naturally occurring metal and is not radioactive. Because of its properties, beryllium has been part of the atomic energy and nuclear weapons industries since the 1940s.

340

Part 4 of 11  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

0-2 .2.6 Report on design of backs kin Task 16 modification machine 0-2 .2.7 Report on identification of pick and Task 18 place robot 0-2.2.8 Report on testing of redesigned hot...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SYSTEMATIC SYNTHESIS METHOD FOR ANALOGUE CIRCUITS PART III ALL-TRANSISTOR CIRCUIT SYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SYSTEMATIC SYNTHESIS METHOD FOR ANALOGUE CIRCUITS ­ PART III ALL-TRANSISTOR CIRCUIT SYNTHESIS David papers (subtitled Parts I and II) together present a systematic synthesis method for analogue circuits. This paper illustrates the synthesis method by deriving and analysing some known all- transistor circuits

Papavassiliou, Christos

342

Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

August 2013 August 2013 Synchrophasor Technologies Page ii Table of Contents 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1 2. Synchrophasor Technologies .......................................................................................... 1 3. Advanced Applications Software and their Benefits ........................................................ 4 3.1 Online (Near Real-Time Applications) ........................................................................... 5 3.2 Offline (Not real-time) Applications ............................................................................. 8 4. Recovery Act Synchrophasor Projects ............................................................................. 8

343

FAKULTT II MATHEMATIK UND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF A NETWORK CREATION GAME WITH EXPONENTIAL PAYOFF by NADINE BAUMANN SEBASTIAN STILLER No. 2007/19 #12;The Price of Anarchy of a Network Creation Game with Exponential Payoff Nadine Baumann Sebastian Stiller May/5-3. Technische Universität Berlin, Fakultät II, Stra�e des 17. Juni 136, 10623 Berlin, Germany. Email: stiller

Nabben, Reinhard

344

APPENDIX II WESTFLISCHE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - APPENDIX II WESTF�LISCHE WILHELMS-UNIVERSIT�T M�NSTER Instructions for the experiment ,,Stock information about how the experiment works. Please keep general questions until the end of the introduction either 100 or 0 monetary units (MU). Due to the fact that the outcome of the event is uncertain during

Greer, Julia R.

345

CONTENTS JIP Leg II Discovery .......................1 Alaska Seep Studies .....................6  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JIP Leg II Discovery .......................1 JIP Leg II Discovery .......................1 Alaska Seep Studies .....................6 Gas Hydrates Offshore Mexico 10 Alaska Reservoir Testing ...........12 Naval Research Laboratory Methane Hydrate Research .....17 Announcements ...................... 21 * Call for Papers * 2009 Hydrate Fellows * USGS Mendenhall Fellowship * AGU Annual Meeting * Moscow Conference * Gordon Research Conference Spotlight on Research .......... 24 Dan McConnell CONTACT Ray Boswell Technology Manager-Methane Hydrates, Strategic Center for Natural Gas & Oil 304-285-4541 ray.boswell@netl.doe.gov

346

BNL/SBU NSLS-II Workshop, May 18, 2011  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BNL Hosts Internal Workshop on Future of NSLS-II BNL Hosts Internal Workshop on Future of NSLS-II About 125 Brookhaven Laboratory and Stony Brook University scientists and staff participated in an internal workshop to learn about the status and plans for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) on Wednesday, May 18, 2011, at BNL. The workshop's purpose was to help us identify strategies for developing and enhancing research programs in the different areas of science at BNL and SBU that will benefit from NSLS-II's capabilities. Attendees heard overview talks on the Laboratory's general vision and strategy, including the role of NSLS-II, a summary of NSLS-II status and plans, and a summary of the current state of the Lab's and SBU's science and technology (S&T) research interests (and collaborations) in using NSLS-II. During subsequent breakout sessions, workshop leaders solicited input for inclusion in the emerging strategies for developing, evolving, and positioning research programs to take maximum advantage of NSLS-II. Development of these strategies is being facilitated by a working group drawn from across BNL and SBU, including Allen Orville (ELS), Lisa Miller (PSD), Ron Pindak (PSD), Qun Shen (PSD), John Hill (BES), Jason Graetz (ST), Jose Rodriguez (BES), Lynne Ecker (GARS), Jeff Fitts (ELS), Ben Hsiao (SBU), Bob Haltiwanger (SBU), John Parise (SBU) and Doon Gibbs. The working group subsequently gathered the input from the breakout sessions and developed strategies for the further refinement of the developing NSLS-II based research programs as a part of the Laboratory's strategy for achieving its S&T missions. The results are presented here.

347

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior. This paper provides a summary of the X501 fabrication, characterization, irradiation, and post irradiation examination.

M. K. Meyer; S. L. Hayes; W. J. Carmack; H. Tsai

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The EBR-II X501 Minor Actinide Burning Experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The X501 experiment was conducted in EBR-II as part of the IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) program to demonstrate minor actinide burning through the use of a homogeneous recycle scheme. The X501 subassembly contained two metallic fuel elements loaded with relatively small quantities of americium and neptunium. Interest in the behavior of minor actinides (MA) during fuel irradiation has prompted further examination of existing X501 data, and generation of new data where needed in support of the U.S. waste transmutation effort. The X501 experiment is one of the few minor actinide-bearing fuel irradiation tests conducted worldwide and knowledge can be gained by understanding the changes in fuel behavior due to addition of MA’s. Of primary interest are the affect of the MA’s on fuel-cladding-chemical-interaction, and the redistribution behavior of americium. The quantity of helium gas release from the fuel and any effects of helium on fuel performance are also of interest. It must be stressed that information presented at this time is based on the limited PIE conducted in 1995-1996, and currently represents a set of observations rather than a complete understanding of fuel behavior.

Jon Carmack; S. L. Hayes; M. K. Meyer; H. Tsai

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) ; Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned low enriched uranium conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part… (more)

Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

_PART I - THE SCHEDULE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

15 dated 9/9/13 Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 15 dated 9/9/13 Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Part I - The Schedule Sections B through H TABLE OF CONTENTS B-1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED ...................................................................................... 4 B-2 CONTRACT TYPE AND VALUE (Rev. M218, M222, M236, M241, M261, M266, M288, M293, M312, M319, M344, M365, M400, M404, M443, M448, M473, M484, M0512, A0514) ............................................................................................................................ 4 B-3 AVAILABILITY OF APPROPRIATED FUNDS ................................................................. 8 B-9999 AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT WORK VALUES (Added M331; Modified: A335, A336, A340, A341, A342, A346, A347, A348, A349, A350,

351

Ex Parte Memorandum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Tuesday, April 10, 2012, members of the Office of Security Policy and Office of Tuesday, April 10, 2012, members of the Office of Security Policy and Office of Physical Protection, both within the Department of Energy's Office of Health, Safety and Security, met with members of senior management team from the contractor providing protective force services for the Department of Energy Headquarters Forrestal and Germantown buildings. Participants to the meeting were as follows: Bill Dwyer, DOE Office of Physical Protection John Cronin, DOE Office of Security Policy Dave Dietz, DOE Office of Security Policy Mark Jamsay, Paragon Technical Services Terry Cuba, Paragon Technical Services DOE staff provided opening remarks. DOE noted that since the public comment period for the proposed amendments to 10 CFR Part 1046 is still open, areas of specific concern

352

Part III - Information Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This part enters into the main territory of enterprise architecture for information systems which is as rich in technology specialties as the IT ecosystem is diverse. Most organizations fail to recognize the need for diverse specialization within architecture because they fail to understand the depth of complexity and the costs associated with mediocrity within each area of specialization. They also believe that a general practioner, which we will call a solution architect, is qualified and appropriate to address the complexities across a wide array of technology areas. In reality, this is equivalent to staffing a medical center primarily with general practioners that act as the specialists. A healthy organization maintains top specialists with which the general practioners can participate in getting expertise that is in alignment with a future state vision that reduces complexity and costs.

James V. Luisi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ex Parte Memorandum  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wednesday, March 14, 2012, members of the Protective Forces Career Options Wednesday, March 14, 2012, members of the Protective Forces Career Options Committee (PFCOC) met to discuss proposed changes to 10 CFR part 1046, which was published in the Federal Register on March 6, 2012 (77 FR 13206). 1 Participants to the meeting were as follows: Donald Barnes, DOE Office of Nuclear Energy Jason Brown, NCSP Oak Ridge John Cronin, DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security Jeffrey Cutler, Wohlner, Kaplon, Phillips, Young & Cutler (on behalf of NCSP) Dave Dietz, DOE Office of Health, Safety and Security Ken Freeman, DOE, Los Alamos National Laboratory Doug Fremont, DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Steve Gibbs, WSI Rex A. Harding, NCSP, UPPSR Local 12S Martin Hewitt, NCSP, UPPSR Local 12S Rod Johnson, Pantex

354

ISAC SC-LINAC PHASE-II HELIUM REFRIGERATOR COMMISSIONING AND FIRST OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AT TRIUMF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ISAC Phase-II is an upgrade of the radioactive isotope superconducting linear accelerator, SC-linac, at TRIUMF. The Phase-I section of the accelerator, medium-beta, is operational and is cooled with a 600 W helium refrigerator, commissioned in March 2005. An identical refrigerator is being used with the Phase-II segment of the accelerator; which is now under construction. The second refrigerator has been commissioned and tested with the Phase-I section of the linac and is used for Phase-II linac development, including new SC-cavity performance tests. The commissioning of the Phase-II refrigeration system and recent operational experience is presented.

Sekachev, I.; Kishi, D.; Laxdal, R. E. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A3 (Canada)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

355

SWAMI II technology transfer plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

RHIC II Science Workshop  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working Groups and Convenors Working Groups and Convenors The purpose of these Working Groups is to provide an organized way for the community to refine the science agenda for the RHIC II upgrades, and make a compelling case for these upgrades to the broad nuclear physics community. A document summarizing the Working Group results, with a sharp focus on the science case for RHIC II, will be produced early in 2006. Electromagnetic Probes Convenors: Ralf Rapp, Zhangbu Xu, Gabor David Email list info Website Heavy Flavor Convenors: Ramona Vogt, Thomas Ullrich, Tony Frawley Email list info Website High pT Convenors: Denes Molnar, Saskia Mioduszewski, Kirill Filimonov Internal working group web page Email list info Equation of State Convenors: Steffen Bass, Julia Velkovska, Helen Caines Email list info

357

NSLS II: Life Sciences  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biological and Medical Imaging Biological and Medical Imaging Overview The high brightness of NSLS-II will make it possible to tightly focus the beam to create very intense nanoprobes for high-resolution cellular imaging and sensitive trace element mapping in biological specimens. The brightness will also provide highly collimated beams of high intensity and large transverse dimensions for novel forms of medical imaging and tomography. NSLS-II will also provide the broadest range of wavelengths to users in a single facility, extending from hard X-rays to the far-infrared and enabling a wide array of analytical techniques, including: X-ray microscopy (hard and soft; scanning and full-field), diffraction imaging, X-ray tomography, X-ray microprobe, diffraction-enhanced imaging (DEI), and infrared imaging. These diverse imaging tools will span the resolution scale from nanometers to millimeters, allowing non-destructive analysis of biological subjects ranging from sub-cellular structures to humans.

358

PARS II TRAINING | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

TRAINING PARS II TRAINING BASICS TRAINING WORKBOOK PARS II TRAINING More Documents & Publications PARS II PARS II Training Workbook (Course 103) PARSIIUserGuideV1.0Draft.pdf...

359

Completion of NDCX-II Facility and Initial Tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work was supported by the Director, Office of Science,by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Fusion EnergyOffice of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S. Department of

Kwan, Joe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Relay testing at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is conducting a seismic test program on relays. The purpose of the test program is to investigate the influence of various designs, electrical and vibration parameters on the seismic capacity levels. The first series of testing has been completed and performed at Wyle Laboratories. The major part of the test program consisted of single axis, single frequency sine dwell tests. Random multiaxis, multifrequency tests were also performed. Highlights of the test results as well as a description of the testing methods are presented in this paper. 10 figs.

Bandyopadhyay, K.; Hofmayer, C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Grouping Parts for Multiple Parts Production in Additive Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Rapid prototyping (RP) has evolved to Additive Manufacturing (AM) in recent years. It can produce functional or end-use parts with small or even medium quantities. And further, due to its unique layer-by-layer construction principle, it can produce different parts at the same time in a same AM machine. To improve the productivity and machine utilization of AM processes under multiple parts production context, this paper propose the conception of ‘Grouping parts’. Based on the Group Technology (GT) used in traditional processing technologies, a modified Group Technology for AM under multiple parts manufacturing context is presented. To group parts, a set of key attributes affecting the AM production time, cost, quality and work preparation are identified to represent the parts, and then a Grey Clustering method is adopted to conduct the similarity analysis. A simple case study is presented in the end to illustrate the proposed conception and its methodology.

Yicha Zhang; Alain Bernard

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Opportunities for Energy Conservation and Improved Comfort From Wind Washing Retrofits in Two-Story Homes - Part I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of wind washing found in this study. Repairs and energy monitoring were completed in six of these homes to evaluate retrofit methods and cost effectiveness of retrofit solutions. These results are discussed in Part II of this paper....

Withers, C. R. Jr.; Cummings, J. B.

363

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NOVERFLO (SMART CABLE) NOVERFLO (SMART CABLE) LIQUID LEAK DETECTION SYSTEM FEBRUARY 12, 1996 FC9535/96ET3 RMOTC TEST REPORT NOVERFLO LIQUID LEAK DETECTION SYSTEM (SMART CABLE) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: RALPH SCHULTE RMOTC Project Engineer February 12, 1996 650200/9535:jb CONTENTS Page Summary 1 Introducation 1 NPR-3 Map 2 Description of Operations 3 1 st Test 3 2 nd Test 3 3 rd Test 4 4 th Test 5 Concluding Remarks 5 Acknowledgements 6 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center Technical Report Noverflo Liquid Leak Detection System (Smart Cable) Summary As part of RMOTC's continuing mission to support and strengthen the domestic oil and gas industry by allowing testing by individual inventors and commercial companies to evaluate their products and technology, RMOTC

364

Chapter 7 - Test Cell Cooling Water and Exhaust Gas Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Part 1 considers the thermodynamics of water cooling systems, water quality, typical cooling water circuits, and engine coolant control units. Also covered are the commissioning cooling circuits, thermal shock, and chilled water systems. Part 2 covers the design of test cell exhaust systems, exhaust silencers, exhaust gas volume flow, exhaust silencers, and exhaust cowls. Part 3 briefly covers the testing of turbochargers.

A.J. Martyr; M.A. Plint

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Classroom Projects -- Part One  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

One One Nature Bulletin No. 609 September 17, 1960 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist CLASSROOM PROJECTS -- PART ONE The essence, the fundamental purpose, of the outdoor education program conducted by our department is stated briefly in the introductory words of a book -- Natural Science Through the Seasons, by J. A. Partridge -- which we use and recommend for teachers: "To initiate children into the romance and wonder of science, and to enhance their natural desire to get to know the world around them and find an explanation of its phenomena. In this bulletin are a few examples of many projects that appeal to younsters and have proven successful in giving pupils more insight into their surroundings, including the flora and fauna, than can be obtained solely from books. These brief outlines are offered as starting points in areas of exploration and study. They may be supplemented by use of our nature bulletins, Partridge's book, the Golden Nature Guides, and publications by agencies such as the Illinois State Museum and the Illinois Office of Public Instruction.

366

Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2000 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm -1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Room temperature Ω-cm -1 -20 o C Ω-cm -1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability Hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c o C -20 -30 -40 Thermal cyclability in presence of condensed water yes yes yes Notes: a) Status is present day 80 o C unless otherwise noted; targets are for new membranes/CCMs b) Tested in CCM c) Indicates temperature from which bootstrapping stack must be achieved

367

Automatic CNC Part Programming for through Hole Drilling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes a novel method for automatic generation of process plans and numerical control (NC) part programs from STEP data files. Using proposed system, it is possible to achieve fully automation of recognition of through hole features, generation of process plans and NC part programs. Thus, it becomes possible to go from neutral file to finished product in a fully automated fashion. The algorithms have been implemented on mini-computer to process product data, and display recognized hole features, process plans and creates output files containing NC part programs. These NC part programs are tested through BMV45TC24 CNC Vertical Machining Centers. The results are satisfactory.

B.R. Borkar; Y.M. Puri; A.M. Kuthe; P.S. Deshpande

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Integrated Electrorefining Efficiency Test for Pyrochemical Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pyrochemical processing plays an important role in the development of next generation nuclear reactors and closed nuclear fuel cycle technology. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has implemented a pyrochemical process for the treatment of sodium-bonded spent fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). A successful demonstration of the technology was performed from 1996 to 1999 for the Department of Energy (DOE) [1]. Processing of the spent fuel and associated research and development activities have been integrated into DOE’s Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiatives (AFCI) program since 2003. Electrorefining can be considered to be the signature or central technology for pyrochemical processing. In order to assess the efficiencies involved in the electrorefining process, an integrated electrorefining efficiency test was performed in the Mk-IV electrorefiner. This paper summarizes the observations and results obtained from the test. EXPERIMENT AND RESULTS The primary goal of the integrated processing efficiency test is to demonstrate the integrated actinide dissolution and recovery efficiencies typical for the fixed operating parameters that have been applied to Mk-IV electrorefiner (ER) and cathode processor (CP) to treat spent EBR-II driver fuel during the last three years. The findings are of importance for scaling-up the pyroprocess to recover and recycle valuable actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The test was performed in the Mk-IV electrorefiner. The ER is located in the hot cell of the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex. Descriptions of the major components of the ER and the process in general have been provided elsewhere [2]. Salt and cadmium levels were measured, and multiple samples were obtained prior to performing the integrated test to establish an ER baseline for assessing the test results. The test consisted of four electrorefining batches of spent driver fuel with approximately 50 kg heavy metal. Typically, three to four ER runs are required to complete a batch. Fig. 1 shows pictures of the cathodes produced by three electrorefining runs during the second batch. The cathode No.3 in the figure has clearly different morphology than that of the first two. The cathodes produced by the other three batches have the similar morphology as those pictured. The first and second cathodes are ordinary uranium dendrite, and the third and fourth cathode show typically high Zr content morphology [3]. The end-point for each batch was determined by weighing each anode basket and assuring a net residue mass being equal or less than 3.0 kg. The 3.0 kg residue included any un-dissolved fuel constituents and adhering salt. Previous operating experience has shown that uranium dissolution in excess of 99.7 wt% was achieved when using this established end-point. Cladding hull samples were taken from each basket after it was removed from the ER. The actinide dissolution efficiency will be evaluated when the analytical results become available. Cathode No. 1 Cathode No. 2 Cathode No. 3 Fig.1 Three cathodes produced through electrorefining the second batch of spent EBR-II driver fuel As a part of the integrated efficiency test, the cat

S. X. Li; T. A. Johnson; R. W. Benedict; D. Vaden; B. R. Westphal

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Test Comparability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Bibliography of reports on studies of the geology, hydrogeology and hydrology at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, from 1951--1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established in 1951 as a proving ground for nuclear weapons. The site had formerly been part of an Air Force bombing and gunnery range during World War II. Sponsor-directed studies of the geology, hydrogeology, and hydrology of the NTS began about 1956 and were broad based in nature, but were related mainly to the effects of the detonation of nuclear weapons. These effects included recommending acceptable media and areas for underground tests, the possibility of off-site contamination of groundwater, air blast and surface contamination in the event of venting, ground-shock damage that could result from underground blasts, and studies in support of drilling and emplacement. The studies were both of a pure scientific nature and of a practical applied nature. The NTS was the site of 828 underground nuclear tests and 100 above-ground tests conducted between 1951 and 1992 (U.S. Department of Energy, 1994a). After July 1962, all nuclear tests conducted in the United States were underground, most of them at the NTS. The first contained underground nuclear explosion was detonated on September 19, 1957, following extensive study of the underground effect of chemical explosives. The tests were performed by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration. As part of a nationwide complex for nuclear weapons design, testing and manufacturing, the NTS was the location for continental testing of new and stockpiled nuclear devices. Other tests, including Project {open_quotes}Plowshare{close_quotes} experiments to test the peaceful application of nuclear explosives, were conducted on several parts of the site. In addition, the Defense Nuclear Agency tested the effect of nuclear detonations on military hardware.

Seaber, P.R.; Stowers, E.D.; Pearl, R.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Situational Effects in Ability Testing 1 Running head: SITUATIONAL EFFECTS IN ABILITY TESTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for entry into the French Aircraft Pilot Training, gathered on a set of three tests (visual perception stability of broad cognitive abilities within a short time interval like one year. Broad cognitive abilities Testing 4 2. broad abilities (also named "stratum II"), defined as very general abilities like fluid

Boyer, Edmond

372

Manufacturing and testing VLPC hybrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To insure that the manufacture of VLPC devices is a reliable, cost-effective technology, hybrid assembly procedures and testing methods suitable for large scale production have been developed. This technology has been developed under a contract from Fermilab as part of the D-Zero upgrade program. Each assembled hybrid consists of a VLPC chip mounted on an AlN substrate. The VLPC chip is provided with bonding pads (one connected to each pixel) which are wire bonded to gold traces on the substrate. The VLPC/AlN hybrids are mated in a vacuum sealer using solder preforms and a specially designed carbon boat. After mating, the VLPC pads are bonded to the substrate with an automatic wire bonder. Using this equipment we have achieved a thickness tolerance of {+-}0.0007 inches and a production rate of 100 parts per hour. After assembly the VLPCs are tested for optical response at an operating temperature of 7K. The parts are tested in a custom designed continuous-flow dewar with a capacity 15 hybrids, and one Lake Shore DT470-SD-11 calibrated temperature sensor mounted to an AlN substrate. Our facility includes five of these dewars with an ultimate test capacity of 75 parts per day. During the course of the Dzero program we have assembled more than 4,000 VLPC hybrids and have tested more than 2,500 with a high yield.

Adkins, L. R.; Ingram, C. M.; Anderson, E. J. [Guidance, Navigation and Sensors, Boeing (United States)

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

373

Docket No. EERE-2012-BT-TP-0046 Ex Parte Communication | Department...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

a summary of an October 1, 2013, meeting with DOE officials concerning potential test procedures and energy conservation standards for set-top boxes. Ex Parte for 10012013...

374

Long-Term Column Leaching of Phase II Mercury Control Technology By-Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An NETL research, development and demonstration program under DOE/Fossil Energy Innovations for Existing Plants is directed toward the improvement of the performance and economics of mercury control from coal-fired plants. The current Phase II of the RD&D program emphasizes the evaluation of performance and cost of control technologies through slip-stream and full scale field testing while continuing the development of novel concepts. One of the concerns of the NETL program is the fate of the captured flue gas mercury which is transferred to the condensed phase by-product stream. The stability of mercury and any co-captured elements in the by-products could have a large economic impact if it reduced by-product sales or increasing their disposal costs. As part of a greater characterization effort of Phase II facility baseline and control technology sample pairs, NETL in-house laboratories have performed continuous leaching of a select subset of the available sample pairs using four leachants: water (pH=5.7), dilute sulfuric acid (pH=1.2), dilute acetic acid (pH=2.9), and sodium carbonate (pH=11.1). This report describes results obtained for mercury, arsenic, and selenium during the 5-month leaching experiments.

Schroeder, K.T.; Cardone, C.R.; White, Fredrick; Rohar, P.C.; Kim, A.G

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Relationship between fuel composition and properties. III. Physical properties of US Navy Shale-II fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Naval Research Laboratory and the Naval Air Propulsion Center are currently participating in a program to characterize the products from the Shale-II refining process conducted by the Standard Oil Company of Ohio at their refinery in Toledo, Ohio. This paper is concerned with a part of this program and is a summary of the work on the physical and related properties of three military type fuels derived from shale: JP-5 and JP-8 jet turbine fuels, and diesel fuel marine (DFM). The shale derived fuels which were used in these studies were derived from Paraho crude shale oil. The boiling range distribution of a representative sample of each of the three fuels was determined by gas chromatography. Data for specific gravity, freezing point, pour point, flammability, ignition and electrostatic properties and copper corrosion tests were also obtained. Conclusions from this study are: physical properties of the Shale-II fuels are similar to that of equivalent fuels derived from petroleum; and differences observed could be minimized by modest changes in refining steps.

Affens W.A. (Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC); Hall, J.M.; Beal, E.; Hazlett, R.N.; Nowack, C.J.; Speck, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

Mousavi, Mohammad

377

Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing Introduction Test Selection Test Minimization Test Prioritization Summary Software Testing and Maintenance 2 What is it? Regression testing refers to the portion of the test cycle in which a program is tested to ensure that changes do not affect

Lei, Jeff Yu

378

Hydrocal II process for superior naphthenic lube oils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The HydroCall II Process is an advanced technology process to produce superior napthenic base lube oil stocks and specialty products. All products will be unlabeled and cover the full viscosity range of 30 to 4000 SUS at 100/sup 0/F. The process features high pressure, multiple stages, a multiple catalyst system and plurality of reactors and catalyst beds to achieve selective conversion of specific aromatic types contained in typical naphthenic lube oil feedstocks. Calumet's new HydroCall II oils will be available to the industry the latter part of 1987.

Rausch, M.K.; Love, G.A.; Tollefsen, G.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Geothermal Evaluation of The Hosston Formation Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas Phase II Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a phased program to test the geothermal characteristics of the Hosston Formation at Lackland Air Force Base, San Antonio, Texas. The geothermal resource evaluation was made possible through drilling and preliminary testing of a large diameter well, Lackland AFB No.1, at the south portion of the base. Phase I of the program had 3 major components: (1) compilation and interpretation of surface and subsurface geologic data to site the well; (2) design of the well; and (3) permitting the well. Phase II consisted of well drilling and preliminary development. The goal of the program was to identify water temperature, water quality, and productivity characteristics of the Hosston aquifer, which preliminary studies suggested might be favorable for direct applications on the base. Results reported herein suggest that heat pumps or other engineering alternatives might be needed for such applications. Results of the well drilling give data on water productivity, quality and temperature. Air-lift testing shows that, although the well does not flow to surface, good artesian pressure exists. Water quality appears acceptable, with about 2200 parts per million total dissolved solids. Equilibrated reservoir temperatures appear to be slightly less than 108 F (42 C).

Zeisloft, Jon; Foley, Duncan

1984-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

test | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

test test test test More Documents & Publications 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 Final ECR 2008 Report Environmental Conflict Resolution...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

PNE WIND USA II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PNE WIND USA II PNE WIND USA II 1 PNE Wind USA Tribal Energy Partnerships Cherokee & Chilocco Wind Parks Buchholz wind farm, Germany André De Rosa Managing Director Andre.DeRosa@PNEWind.com p. (312) 919-8042 Hot Springs NP M is s i s s i ppi M iss is s i pp i Mis si ss ip p i M ississippi M iss iss ippi M i ss i ss i pp i M is s issippi Missis sip pi M i s s is s ip p i Bonny State Park Bonny State Park Buffalo River State Park Buffalo River State Park Caprock Caprock Canyons Canyons State Park State Park Robbers Cave State Park Robbers Cave State Park Clinton State Park Clinton State Park Hillsdale State Park Hillsdale State Park Indian Cave State Park Indian Cave State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake Murray State Park Lake of Lake of the Ozarks the Ozarks St Park St Park Little River State Park Little River State Park Palo Duro

382

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

Peters, Dennis

383

Boiler - tuning basics, part 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tuning power plant controls takes nerves of steel and an intimate knowledge of plant systems gained only by experience. Tuning controls also requires equal parts art and science, which probably is why there are so few tuning experts in the power industry. In part 1 of a two-part series, the author explores a mix of the theoretical and practical aspects of tuning boiler control. 5 figs.

Leopold, T. [ABB Inc. (United States)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

Phifer, M.A.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Wilton Wind Energy Center II II Facility Wilton Wind Energy Center II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Basin Electric Location Burleigh County ND Coordinates 47.142638°, -100.730567° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.142638,"lon":-100.730567,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

386

Information Resources: Three-Part TINSSL Webinar Series: Understanding and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Three-Part TINSSL Webinar Series: Understanding and Evaluating LM-79 & LM-80 Reports for SSL Technology Three-Part TINSSL Webinar Series: Understanding and Evaluating LM-79 & LM-80 Reports for SSL Technology This three-day webinar series focused on the fundamentals of LM-79 and LM-80 luminaire testing requirements and the use of a checklist procedure for analyzing test reports. Participants also had the opportunity to walk through sample test reports and apply principles to practice. Topics covered included understanding the terminology and test procedures, developing a guideline for analyzing test reports, and identifying red flags and the differences between a good and bad report. Understanding and Evaluating LM-79 Reports August 10, 2010 View the presentation slides PDF View the webcast (WMV 11 MB) Download Windows Media Player or iTunes. View the text-alternative version

387

Thermal-hydraulic analysis of TFE verification test UFAC-1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Experimental Breeder Reactor No. II (EBR-II) irradiation test Uninstrumented Fueled Accelerated (UFAC)-1 of seven encapsulated thermionic test pins was analyzed with the code COBRA-SFS. The model predicted coolant and material temperatures for three conditions of interest: steady state full power, response to the unlikely loss of flow transient, and decay heat cooling by forced down flow of argon. Modeling assumptions and a summary of results are included. 1 ref., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

McWethy, L.M.; Pearce, K.L.; Rector, D.R.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Test Cell Location  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chrysler 300 Chrysler 300 Test Cell Location 2WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 8/7/2013 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 4250 38.61 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.8894 0.01105 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Revision Number 3 Notes: Test Fuel Information 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Fuel type Tier II EEE HF437 3.6L VVT Port-injected V-6 8 speed Transmission Fuel density [g/ml] Fuel Net HV [BTU/lbm] 0.743 18490 T e s t I D [ # ] C y c l e C o l d s t a r t ( C S t ) H o t s t a r t [ H S t ] D a t e T e s t C e l l T e m p [ C ] T e s t C e l l R H [ % ] T e s t C e l l B a r o [ i n / H g ] V e h i c l e c o o l i n g f a n s p e e d : S p e e d M a t c h [ S M ] o r c o n s t a n t s p e e d [ C S ] S

389

Disposition of fuel elements from the Aberdeen and Sandia pulse reactor (SPR-II) assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe the disposition of fuel from the Aberdeen (APR) and the Sandia Pulse Reactors (SPR-II) which were used to provide intense neutron bursts for radiation effects testing. The enriched Uranium - 10% Molybdenum fuel from these reactors was shipped to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size reduction prior to shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition in the H Canyon facility. The Shipper/Receiver Agreements (SRA), intra-DOE interfaces, criticality safety evaluations, safety and quality requirements and key materials management issues required for the successful completion of this project will be presented. This work is in support of the DOE Consolidation and Disposition program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has operated pulse nuclear reactor research facilities for the Department of Energy since 1961. The Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) was a bare metal Godiva-type reactor. The reactor facilities have been used for research and development of nuclear and non-nuclear weapon systems, advanced nuclear reactors, reactor safety, simulation sources and energy related programs. The SPR-II was a fast burst reactor, designed and constructed by SNL that became operational in 1967. The SPR-ll core was a solid-metal fuel enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. The uranium was alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum to ensure the phase stabilization of the fuel. The core consisted of six fuel plates divided into two assemblies of three plates each. Figure 1 shows a cutaway diagram of the SPR-II Reactor with its decoupling shroud. NNSA charged Sandia with removing its category 1 and 2 special nuclear material by the end of 2008. The main impetus for this activity was based on NNSA Administrator Tom D'Agostino's six focus areas to reenergize NNSA's nuclear material consolidation and disposition efforts. For example, the removal of SPR-II from SNL to DAF was part of this undertaking. This project was in support of NNSA's efforts to consolidate the locations of special nuclear material (SNM) to reduce the cost of securing many SNM facilities. The removal of SPR-II from SNL was a significant accomplishment in SNL's de-inventory efforts and played a key role in reducing the number of locations requiring the expensive security measures required for category 1 and 2 SNM facilities. A similar pulse reactor was fabricated at the Y-12 National Security Complex beginning in the late 1960's. This Aberdeen Pulse Reactor (APR) was operated at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) located at the Aberdeen Test Center (ATC) in Maryland. When the APRF was shut down in 2003, a portion of the DOE-owned Special Nuclear Material (SNM) was shipped to an interim facility for storage. Subsequently, the DOE determined that the material from both the SPR-II and the APR would be processed in the H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the SRS receipt requirements some of the material was sent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size-reduction prior to shipment to the SRS for final disposition.

Mckerley, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bustamante, Jacqueline M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Drypolcher, Anthony F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hickey, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Interoperability testing for shop floor measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Manufactured parts are typically measured to ensure quality. Measurement involves equipment and software from many different vendors, and interoperability is a major problem faced by manufacturers. The I++ Dimensional Measuring Equipment (DME) specification ... Keywords: interoperability, measurement, software testing

Fred Proctor; Bill Rippey; John Horst; Joe Falco; Tom Kramer

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

II.1 Itic  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

i! il i! il II.1 Itic ihl j' ieil - Department of Emrgy \ Washington, DC20585 1 ' . The Honorable Bill. Johnson 30 Church Street Rochester, New York, 14614, Dear Mayor Johnion: I. ,Se$retary of EnergL Hazel.O'Leary has annouqced a .new appro the Department of Energy (DOE) and its communications with' .,support of this initiative, we are pleased to forward ttie e related to the, former Eastman Kodak Research Laboratoryisit jurisdiction that performed work for DOE or its predecesior information is provided for yourinformation, use', and tete \ I DOE's.Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action,Prdgram is re identification. of sites used by DOE's predecessor age~ncies, currelt radiological cqndition and, where it has authority, reaiedral action to @et current radiological'protectionlreq

392

MS, II-J  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

I' ; ,' I' ; ,' Departm&th of Energy 1 MS, II-J Washington. DC 20585 ' . I I The Honorable John Gallagher ,)fl', /',' ' 103 E. Michigan Avenue .i., ,.' Battle Creek, Michigan 49016 _. Dear Mayor Gallagheri d,---, " '/ approachto openness i.n: with the: public. In (FUSRAP)i.is responsible agencies, determining ~author~ity, performing remedial action to cleanup sites to meet current radiological protection requirements.. A conservative set of technical evaluation guidelines is used in these investigations to assure protection of public health,,~safety and then environment. Where.DQE does not,have .authority for proceeding; the available site information is forwarded to the appropriate Federal or State Agency. DOE studied the historical records of the former Oliver Corp. site, and it

393

L I II C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-- -- - L I II C rr u c c c 7 i' :- ' r' ' 7 i ' -- A' t i ()lL.H~ ORAU 89/i-29 Prepared by Oak Ridge Associated Universities Prepared for Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects U.S. Department of Energy VERIFICATION OF REMEDIAL ACTIONS ALBANYRESEARCHCENTER ALBANY, OREGON P. R. C O lTEN Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program Energy/Environment Systems Division FINAL REPORT OCTOBER 1989 NOTICES Tha opiniona l xprSaaJd harJln do not n acoaa~rlly ranKI thy oplnioru of thJ l ponaorfng lnrtitutiona ot Oak RidgJ AaaociJ:d IJnivaraltiJa. This raport WJJ prsp~rad as an account ot work sponsorad by thJ Unttad Stslaa Govarnmant. Naithar the UnltSd Strtas Govammanl northa U.S. Daplrtmant of Enargy, norJny ofthairamployaa& makac anywarmnty, l xpraaa or impliad, oraaaumas my Iogrl liabillly

394

BEPC-II Magnet Project | Superconducting Magnet Division  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BEPC-II Magnet Project BEPC-II Magnet Project Project Overview The BEPC-II magnets are Interaction Region magnets to be used as part of an upgrade to the Beijing Electron Positron Collider. Two magnets will be produced, both of which will be inserted within the solenoidal detector at one of the collision points. Since the best use of the quadrupole focusing in this case requires placing the magnet as close to the collision point as possible, these magnets will be used within the magnetic field of the detector. This constrains the materials that can be used for construction to only non-magnetic materials. It also places severe demands on the structure of the magnet and it's holding supports due to the reaction forces between the solenoid and the magnet. To create the coil pattern for the final magnet, the coils will be

395

Brainstorming Session II | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

RD PI Meeting files Brainstorming Session II Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Test Facility Discussion (Raubenheimer) .pdf file (124KB) Testbed Discussion (Murphy) .pdf...

396

Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

397

Integral testing of relays and circuit breakers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Among all equipment types considered for seismic qualification, relays have been most extensively studied through testing due to a wide variation of their designs and seismic capacities. A temporary electrical discontinuity or ``chatter`` is the common concern for relays. A chatter duration of 2 milliseconds is typically used as an acceptance criterion to determine the seismic capability of a relay. Many electrical devices, on the other hand, receiving input signals from relays can safely tolerate a chatter level much greater than 2 ms. In Phase I of a test program, Brookhaven National Laboratory performed testing of many relay models using the 2-ms chatter criterion. In Phase II of the program, the factors influencing the relay chatter criterion, and impacts of relay chatter on medium and low voltage circuit breakers and lockout relays were investigated. This paper briefly describes the Phase II tests and presents the important observations.

Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Kinematic Viscosity of Helium II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By observing the time of formation of the meniscus in a cylindrical vessel suddenly given a rotation, it has been found possible to determine, directly, the kinematic viscosity of both He I and He II. At the angular velocities used (?15 rev/sec) it appears that, for He II, all the liquid rotates rather than the normal component alone.

R. J. Donnelly; G. V. Chester; R. H. Walmsley; C. T. Lane

1956-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Computed tomography on small explosive parts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have investigated three small explosive parts for the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas using computed tomography (CT). A medium resolution, fan beam system was used to test imaging capabilities for small holes drilled into one of the parts, and to identify any inhomogeneities, cracks, voids, and inclusions if present in the other two parts. This system provides volumetric imaging. Its information is qualitative in that is allows us to see interior features but it cannot provide quantitative attenuation data. A second part of the investigation was to perform effective atomic number computed tomography on the parts using energy dispersive spectroscopy methods. We wanted to experimentally identify the {open_quotes}average{close_quotes} chemical composition of the materials in the explosive and its shell and to detect any possible inhomogeneities in composition. A single beam, nuclear spectroscopy based system was used for this work. The radiation source was a silver anode x-ray tube. By measuring x-ray attenuation at specific energies (characteristic lines and narrow bands of continuum) we are able to quantitatively determine linear attenuation coefficients. By using ratios of such measurements, density cancels out and we effectively have ratios of mass attenuation coefficients. Through a look-up scheme of mass attenuation coefficients for different elements, we can determine the weighted average chemical composition, as averaged by x-ray attenuation. We call this averaged composition the effective atomic number ({open_quotes}Z{sub eff}{close_quotes}). We thereby obtain cross sectional images of a parameter related to the averaged chemistry of the object. Such images and the underlying data can reveal, for instance, segregation of explosive and binder.

Ryon, R.W.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

The Majorana Parts Tracking Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Bertrand, F E; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Combs, D C; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Gusev, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Hegai, A; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Kochetov, O; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J Diaz; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Petersburg, R; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Pushkin, K; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Shanks, B; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Snyder, N; Soin, A; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Thompson, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Zhitnikov, I

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Majorana Parts Tracking Database  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

The Majorana Collaboration; N. Abgrall; E. Aguayo; F. T. Avignone III; A. S. Barabash; F. E. Bertrand; V. Brudanin; M. Busch; D. Byram; A. S. Caldwell; Y-D. Chan; C. D. Christofferson; D. C. Combs; C. Cuesta; J. A. Detwiler; P. J. Doe; Yu. Efremenko; V. Egorov; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; J. Esterline; J. E. Fast; P. Finnerty; F. M. Fraenkle; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. K. Giovanetti; J. Goett; M. P. Green; J. Gruszko; V. E. Guiseppe; K. Gusev; A. L. Hallin; R. Hazama; A. Hegai; R. Henning; E. W. Hoppe; S. Howard; M. A. Howe; K. J. Keeter; M. F. Kidd; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; B. D. LaFerriere; J. Diaz Leon; L. E. Leviner; J. C. Loach; J. MacMullin; R. D. Martin; S. J. Meijer; S. Mertens; M. L. Miller; L. Mizouni; M. Nomachi; J. L. Orrell; C. O'Shaughnessy; N. R. Overman; R. Petersburg; D. G. Phillips II; A. W. P. Poon; K. Pushkin; D. C. Radford; J. Rager; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; E. Romero-Romero; M. C. Ronquest; B. Shanks; T. Shima; M. Shirchenko; K. J. Snavely; N. Snyder; A. Soin; A. M. Suriano; D. Tedeschi; J. Thompson; V. Timkin; W. Tornow; J. E. Trimble; R. L. Varner; S. Vasilyev; K. Vetter; K. Vorren; B. R. White; J. F. Wilkerson; C. Wiseman; W. Xu; E. Yakushev; A. R. Young; C. -H. Yu; V. Yumatov; I. Zhitnikov

2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

402

ORNL tests energy-efficient technologies for expeditionary military...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the summer, ORNL researchers tested the performance of various tent configurations and HVAC units in an outdoor environment as part of the Transformative Reductions in Operational...

403

Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center | Y-12 National Security...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Detection and ... Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center As part of our increased global nuclear nonproliferation efforts, Y-12 commissioned the Nuclear Detection and Sensor...

404

A Mix Testing Process Integrating Two Manual Testing Approaches: Exploratory Testing and Test Case Based Testing.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Software testing is a key phase in software development lifecycle. Testing objectives corresponds to the discovery and detection of faults, which can be attained by… (more)

Shah, Syed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 msup 3 of cold...

406

MHK Technologies/Triton II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Triton II Triton II < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Triton II.jpg Technology Profile Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description Triton II Is a patented novel on shore operating wave power converter that can be installed on low value coast lines breakwater walls piers and even near shore platforms etc The converter is of the floating type the power transmission and conversion systems being mounted above still water level on solid fundament This architecture yields increased power production due to wave reflection almost doubling the incident wave height on the breakwater frontage and high reliability and operational safety Each sea wave converter unit is composed of three main parts A The floats moving up down following the vertical movements of the waves B The mechanism which converts the vertical movements to horizontal C The mechanism which converts the horizontal movements to rotational conveyed to an electrical generator The floats the only parts moving in the water are protected during their up down motions in cages which are installed inside recesses on the breakwater Safety

407

Implementation and Test of Numerical Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performance tests, and it is found that libopti is fast compared to scripting based solutions, and as much in its class. #12;ii #12;Summary (Danish) MÃ¥let for denne afhandling er at beskrive dobbelt-dimensional problems, their solution time is very large.[JN00] Because of this, optimization as we know it today did

408

Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

Fish Passage Center

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hybrid Electric Vehicle End-Of-Life Testing On Honda Insights, Gen I Civics And Toyota Gen I Priuses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This technical report details the end-of-life fuel efficiency and battery testing on two model year 2001 Honda Insight hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), two model year 2003 Honda Civic HEVs, and two model year 2002 Toyota Prius HEVs. The end-of-life testing was conducted after each vehicle has been operated for approximately 160,000 miles. This testing was conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). The AVTA is part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. SAE J1634 fuel efficiency testing was performed on the six HEVs with the air conditioning (AC) on and off. The AC on and off test results are compared to new vehicle AC on and off fuel efficiencies for each HEV model. The six HEVs were all end-of-life tested using new-vehicle coast down coefficients. In addition, one of each HEV model was also subjected to fuel efficiency testing using coast down coefficients obtained when the vehicles completed 160,000 miles of fleet testing. Traction battery pack capacity and power tests were also performed on all six HEVs during the end-of-life testing in accordance with the FreedomCAR Battery Test Manual For Power-Assist Hybrid Electric Vehicles procedures. When using the new-vehicle coast down coefficients (Phase I testing), 11 of 12 HEV tests (each HEV was tested once with the AC on and once with the AC off) had increases in fuel efficiencies compared to the new vehicle test results. The end-of-life fuel efficiency tests using the end-of-life coast down coefficients (Phase II testing) show decreases in fuel economies in five of six tests (three with the AC on and three with it off). All six HEVs experienced decreases in battery capacities, with the two Insights having the highest remaining capacities and the two Priuses having the lowest remaining capacities. The AVTA’s end-of-life testing activities discussed in this report were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory; the AVTA testing partner Electric Transportation Applications, and by Exponent Failure Analysis Associates.

James Francfort; Donald Karner; Ryan Harkins; Joseph Tardiolo

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Control of parts : parts making in the building industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The thesis advances a diagramming tool called PAct. Each diagram is a model of a "value adding" enterprise, representing materials processing, parts manipulation and assembly, and the agents involved. Its purpose is to ...

Kendall, Stephen Holmes

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

CDF Run IIb silicon: Stave design and testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CDF Silicon Vertex Detectors (SVX) have been shown to be excellent tools for heavy flavor physics, with the secondary vertex detection and good vertex resolution.The CDF RunIIb Silicon Vertex Detector (SVXIIb) was designed to be a radiation tolerant replacement for the current SVXII which was not anticipated to survive the projected Run II luminosity dose. The outer five layers use identical structural elements, called staves, to support six silicon sensors on each side. The stave is composed of carbon fiber skins on a foam core with a built-in cooling tube. Copper on Kapton bus cable carriers power and data/control signals underneath three silicon modules on each side of the stave. A Hybrid equipped with four new SVX4 chips are used to readout two silicon sensors on each module which can be readout and tested independently. This new design concept leads to a very compact mechanical and electrical detecting unit, allowing streamline production and ease of testing and installation. A description of the design and mechanical performance of the stave is given. They also present here results on the electrical performance obtained using prototype staves as well as results with the first pre-production parts.

Rong-Shyang Lu

2003-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

413

NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes

Dierker, S.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

II"ve  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

J)£- J)£- II"ve /"/L 6 Ie- Cp~:A July 26, 2006 (J established 1959 Task Order ST06-120 Control Number: IOOO-T06-1573 Mr. Arthur W. Kleinrath Mound Site Manager U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management 955 Mound Road Miamisburg, OH 4534 2 SUBJECT: Contract No. DE-ACOI-0 2GJ79 491 Deliverable - Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project Dear Mr. Kleinrath: In response to the CPAF Deliverable, submittal of the Draft Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Ashtabula Closure Project is enclosed. If you have any question s, please call Karen Williams of my staff at (937) 847-8350, Extension 307. Donna Gallaher Stoller Mound Site Manager DGljp Enclosure cc: S. Marutzky, Stoller K. Williams, Stoller cc wlo enclosures Correspondence Control File (Thru B. Bonnett) The S.M. Stoller Corpora tion 955 Mound Road Miamisburg.

415

Sílabo del curso de Redes II.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??El curso de Redes II, es de naturaleza Teórico–Práctica, pertenece al área de infraestructura de tecnologías de información Redes II es un curso que aporta… (more)

[No author

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

i i ii TABLE OF CONTENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................................................................II EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................................................... 4 COMPLIANCE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................................................... 6 COMPREHENSIVE ENVIRONMENTAL RESPONSE, COMPENSATION, AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) .................... 6

417

Plumbing Manufacturer's Institute Ex Parte Communication Regarding...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Plumbing Manufacturer's Institute Ex Parte Communication Regarding Showerheads Plumbing Manufacturer's Institute Ex Parte Communication Regarding Showerheads Letter to Department...

418

Secure SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results Secure SCADA Communication ProtocolPerformance Test Results The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked to evaluate the cryptographic implementation and performance impact of the Secure SCADA Communication Protocol (SSCP) upon supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) communications. This report presents performance test data derived from proof of concept implementations of the SSCP. Secure SCADA Communication Protocol Performance Test Results More Documents & Publications AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan Hallmark Project Commercialization of the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol, a cryptographic security solution for device-to-device

419

MATLAB: Introduction Part 1 Assignment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MATLAB: Introduction Part 1 ­ Assignment Bruno Abreu Calfa Assigned: September 8th , 2011 Due Calculate the value of the function y(x) = |x| sin x2 for values of x = 3 and 6 . Hint 1: Use the MATLAB

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

420

part5ug.pdf  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

OF THE MODEL PART5 is a Fortran program for use in the analysis of the particulate air pollution impact of in-use gasoline-fueled and diesel-fueled motor vehicles which...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

US advanced battery consortium in-vehicle battery testing procedure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article describes test procedures to be used as part of a program to monitor the performance of batteries used in electric vehicle applications. The data will be collected as part of an electric vehicle testing program, which will include battery packs from a number of different suppliers. Most data will be collected by on-board systems or from driver logs. The paper describes the test procedure to be implemented for batteries being used in this testing.

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

DOE underground storage tank waste remediation chemical processing hazards. Part I: Technology dictionary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document has been prepared to aid in the development of Regulating guidelines for the Privatization of Hanford underground storage tank waste remediation. The document has been prepared it two parts to facilitate their preparation. Part II is the primary focus of this effort in that it describes the technical basis for established and potential chemical processing hazards associated with Underground Storage Tank (UST) nuclear waste remediation across the DOE complex. The established hazards involve those at Sites for which Safety Analysis Reviews (SARs) have already been prepared. Potential hazards are those involving technologies currently being developed for future applications. Part I of this document outlines the scope of Part II by briefly describing the established and potential technologies. In addition to providing the scope, Part I can be used as a technical introduction and bibliography for Regulatory personnel new to the UST waste remediation, and in particular Privatization effort. Part II of this document is not intended to provide examples of a SAR Hazards Analysis, but rather provide an intelligence gathering source for Regulatory personnel who must eventually evaluate the Privatization SAR Hazards Analysis.

DeMuth, S.F.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit Running a test case: 1 Get the component to a known state (set up). 2 Cause some event (the test case). 3 Check the behaviour. · Record pass/fail · Track statistics · Typically we want to do a lot of test cases so it makes sense to automate. · Test cases

Peters, Dennis

424

DATE: __________________ NVLAP LAB CODE: _________________ Test Method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

_____ 30/DISC00A ANSI/INCITS 423.1 (2008) Information Technology - Conformance Testing Methodology Standard _____ 30/DISC01A ANSI/INCITS 423.2 (2008) Information Technology - Conformance Testing Methodology Standard - Part 2: Finger minutiae data _____ 30/DISC03A ANSI/INCITS 423.3 (2009) Information Technology

425

Penascal II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Penascal II Penascal II Jump to: navigation, search Name Penascal II Facility Penascal II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Developer Iberdrola Renewables Location Kenedy County TX Coordinates 27.003108°, -97.584014° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":27.003108,"lon":-97.584014,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

426

Cimarron II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Cimarron II Facility Cimarron II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Duke Energy Developer CPV Renewable Energy Energy Purchaser Kansas City Power & Light Location Cimarron KS Coordinates 37.90154236°, -100.3934097° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.90154236,"lon":-100.3934097,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

427

Limon II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Limon II Limon II Jump to: navigation, search Name Limon II Facility Limon II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Limon CO Coordinates 39.33323523°, -103.5521507° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.33323523,"lon":-103.5521507,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

428

Category II Dixon Recreation Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Category II Dixon Recreation Center BB or VB court $30 RB/Squash court $23 Multipurpose Room $30 for any rental that is cancelled with less than seven days notice Department of Recreational Sports

Escher, Christine

429

Super KEKB / Belle II Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the status of the KEKB collider and the Belle detector upgrade, along with several examples of physics measurements to be performed with Belle II at Super KEKB.

B. Golob

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

430

Aegir II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Jump to: navigation, search Name Aegir II Facility Aegir II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Offshore Wind Facility Status Proposed Location Lake Michigan MI Coordinates 43.098°, -86.597° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.098,"lon":-86.597,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

431

PARS II 102 Training Workbook  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 Monthly Updating and Reporting 2 Monthly Updating and Reporting Training Workbook V8.0.20101108 Department of Energy March 30, 2011 March 30, 2011 PARS II 102 Monthly Updating and Reporting V8.0.20101108 ii Table of Contents OVERSIGHT and ASSESSMENT ........................................................................................................ 1 Exercise 1 - Find and View a Project............................................................................................ 1 Sort the Project List ................................................................................................................. 3 Select a Project ........................................................................................................................ 4 View a Project ......................................................................................................................... 4

432

Urban bus driver ride and road-friendliness. Part I: Model development and role of operating parameters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study explores the driver-ride and road-friendliness characteristics of an urban bus through model derivation and validation, sensitivity analysis, suspension damping optimisation and field assessments. Part I of the study develops a three-dimensional urban bus model by integrating non-linear models of suspension components and tyres that were derived from laboratory-measured data. The vehicle model is validated through field tests, and employed for sensitivity analyses of different operating parameters, including forward speed, tyre inflation pressure, vehicle load and road roughness. The results demonstrate significant roles of these parameters on the dynamic responses relating to driver ride and road-friendliness, which are coupled in a complex manner. The results suggest that measures related to sustainability of urban infrastructure and vehicle structure, together with the health and safety of the drivers, are directly coupled in light of the road roughness. The validated full-vehicle model is further employed for suspension damping design optimisation and its field assessments, which are presented in Part II of the study.

Subhash Rakheja; Dongpu Cao; Zhanqi Wang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policy WIAT Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II #12;2 | Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II working with Forestry Commission Scotland on Woods In and Around Towns #12;Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II Woods In and Around Towns: Phase II | 3 What is this about? The Woods In and Around Towns (WIAT) Programme provides

434

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L L

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Microsoft Word - PART 970.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PART 970 PART 970 - DOE MANAGEMENT AND OPERATING CONTRACTS Subpart 970.01 - Management and Operating Contract Regulatory System Sec. 970.0100 Scope of part. 970.0103 Publication and codification. Subpart 970.03 - Improper Business Practices and Personal Conflicts of Interest 970.0309 Whistleblower protection of contractor employees. 970.0309-1 Applicability. 970.0370 Management controls and improvements. 970.0370-1 Policy. 970.0370-2 Contract clause. 970.0371 Conduct of employees of DOE management and operating contractors. 970.0371-1 Scope of section. 970.0371-2 Applicability. 970.0371-3 Definition. 970.0371-4 Gratuities. 970.0371-5 Use of privileged information. 970.0371-6 Incompatibility between regular duties and private interests. 970.0371-7 Outside employment of contractor employees.

436

Kinetic model for electrorefining, part I: Model development and validation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Electrorefining is the key process of the pryprocessing for treatment of spent nuclear fuels. In the present study, a kinetic model for electrorefining is developed. The model has the capability to predict the kinetic features of materials dissolution/deposition at anodes/cathodes of the electrorefiner and the evolution of the partial currents of the species involved, the potentials of the electrodes, and species concentrations in the molten salt. The model takes into account the changes of the surface areas and the volumes of the electrodes related to materials dissolution and deposition. The model is validated by compared with available experimental data. This article, focusing on the model development and validation, is Part I of the systemic study on development of the pyroprocessing model. Part II of this study will focus on the applications of the model.

Jinsuo Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

I. INTRODUCTION The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. INTRODUCTION The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one­of­a­kind, tritium­fueled fusion of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling. Figure 1 ­ TFTR II. Project Overview The Decommissioning and Decontamination of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics

438

Beam Position Monitor Test Stand Christopher D. Chan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electron beams will demand better accuracy in measuring the position of the beam. Current BPM designs with improved accuracy may not be enough and entirely new designs of BPMs may be needed. This BPM test stand will help with current BPM testing and future BPM design efforts. II. CURRENT BEAM POSTION MONITORING

Hoffstaetter, Georg

439

Accelerated Testing Validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the University of California. Accelerated Testing Validationmaterials requires relevant Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs),

Mukundan, Rangachary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Evaluation of carbapenemase screening and confirmation tests in Enterobacteriaceae and development of a practical diagnostic algorithm  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...carbapenemase screening and confirmation tests in Enterobacteriaceae and development of...using phenotypic screening and confirmation tests. In total, 334 clinical Enterobacteriaceae...aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) or EDTA combined-disc tests (CDTs), and the Carba NP-II test were...

Florian P. Maurer; Claudio Castelberg; Chantal Quiblier; Guido V. Bloemberg; Michael Hombach

2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Adsorption kinetics, isotherms and mechanisms of Cd(II), Pb(II), Co(II) and Ni(II) by a modified magnetic polyacrylamide microcomposite adsorbent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A novel magnetic hydroxamic acid modified polyacrylamide/Fe3O4 adsorbent (M-PAM-HA) was prepared with acrylamide by microemulsion polymerization and then nucleophilic substitution of hydroxamic acid. The morphology, structure of the magnetic adsorbents before (M-PAM) and after modification (M-PAM-HA) were characterized and their adsorption properties for the removal of metal ions by varying test conditions were also investigated. The modified M-PAM exhibited lower swelling property and less magnetic leaching than M-PAM. Their adsorption kinetics followed the pseudo-second order model. The maximum adsorption capacities of metal ions ranged from 0.11 to 0.29 mmol g?1 for M-PAM and 0.88–1.93 mmol g?1 for M-PAM-HA, respectively. Sips model fitting well to experimental data revealed the surface heterogeneity of the prepared adsorbents. In multi-metal systems, M-PAM-HA showed the relative selectivity toward Pb(II), although Pb(II) was adsorbed the least in their corresponding one-metal systems. The adsorption mechanism was proposed based on the results of FTIR and density functional theory (DFT) calculation.

Feiping Zhao; Walter Z. Tang; Dongbo Zhao; Yong Meng; Dulin Yin; Mika Sillanpää

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Testing Basis of Design  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

phases of the project. In next phase (Phase II) the JIP completed the project's first offshore drilling expedition in 2005 (Leg I) consisting of drilling, logging, and coring...

443

Pilot test specific test plan for the removal of arsenic Socorro, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative drinking water treatment technologies designed to meet the new arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 {micro}g/L (effective January 2006). As currently envisioned, pilots tests may include multiple phases. Phase I tests will involve side-by-side comparisons of several commercial technologies primarily using design parameters suggested by the Vendors. Subsequent tests (Phase II) may involve repeating some of the original tests, testing the same commercial technologies under different conditions and testing experimental technologies or additional commercial technologies. This Pilot Test Specific Test Plan (PTSTP) was written for Phase I of the Socorro Springs Pilot. The objectives of Phase I include evaluation of the treatment performance of five adsorptive media under ambient pH conditions (approximately 8.0) and assessment of the effect of contact time on the performance of one of the media. Addenda to the PTSTP may be written to cover Phase II studies and supporting laboratory studies. The Phase I demonstration began in the winter of 2004 and will last approximately 9 months. The information from the test will help the City of Socorro choose the best arsenic treatment technology for the Socorro Springs well. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Research Foundation, SNL, and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development).

Collins, Sue S.; Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Marbury, Justin Luke

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Mobile Window Thermal Test  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility winter.jpg (469135 bytes) The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems is one strategy for reducing the energy use of buildings. But the net energy flowing through a window is a combination of temperature- driven thermal flows and transmission of incident solar energy, both of which vary with time. U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), the window properties that control these flows, depend partly on ambient conditions. Window energy flows can affect how much energy a building uses, depending on when the window flows are available to help meet other energy demands within the building, and when they are adverse, adding to building energy use. This leads to a second strategy for reducing building energy use: using the beneficial solar gain available through a window, either for winter heating or for daylighting, while minimizing adverse flows.

445

Planning, Execution, and Analysis of the Meridian UAS Flight Test Program Including System and Parameter Identification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is delayed until the wind speeds are within the appropriate limits. Storm Systems The UAV only operates in Visual Flight Rules conditions. Flights are delayed until such conditions are present. 3.2 Phase II: Line-of-Sight Autonomous Flight Test....1.5 Emergency Procedures ........................................................................... 22 3.2 Phase II: Line-of-Sight Autonomous Flight Test .............................................. 24 3.2.1 Flight Test Objectives...

Tom, Jonathan

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

446

Progressive transitions using body part motion graphs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we describe a preliminary method for progressive transitions in human locomotions. To achieve this, motion graphs have been used to synthesize body part transitions and every part has been synchronized with the other parts using time scaling. ...

Adso Fernández-Baena; David Miralles

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Animal testing of beauty products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Animal testing of beauty products Animal testing of beauty products Name: Wayers Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I consider animal testing to be cruel and unnecessary in most cases. I do not disapprove entirely with the testing of drugs and beneficial technology on animals; but I completely have a problem with testing unimportant items, such as make up, hair spray, and other beauty products on innocent lives. Are there any other methods of testing companies can use that wouldn't involve the harming of animals? Wayers Replies: Experience, theoretical models and testing on cell cultures can offer guidelines for a good guess as to what will happen when you throw some new chemical into a human body, but there are examples of where even very careful guesses have proved in practice to be terribly wrong (Thalidomide and DES come to mind). Given the very high level of safety that people demand from substances that go in or on their bodies, the only testing method that is considered reliable enough at present for new chemicals is to try the stuff out on some living creature that can tell you if it hurts or is sick. And even then you must be sure the creature is as similar as possible, at least in the part of the body you are worried about, to human beings. (This is itself a real challenge, and progress in treating disease is often hampered by the lack of a suitable animal model.) Thus ultimately comes the difficult ethical choice you are concerned with: namely, who or what gets to be the guinea pig? In terms of beauty products, there are enough people who feel as you do that there are a number of product lines which are guaranteed to be made without animal testing (they use ingredients that have been tested earlier on animals and are now recognized as safe). You can find them in natural foods and ecologically-conscious stores.

448

Musselshell II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Musselshell II Musselshell II Facility Musselshell II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Goldwind Developer Volkswind USA Energy Purchaser NorthWestern Energy Location Ryegate MT Coordinates 46.26733°, -109.499175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.26733,"lon":-109.499175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Glacier II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Facility Glacier II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NaturEner Developer NaturEner Energy Purchaser San Diego Gas & Electric Location Near Ethridge MT Coordinates 48.555639°, -112.120992° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.555639,"lon":-112.120992,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

Majestic II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

II II Facility Majestic II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner NextEra Energy Resources Developer NextEra Energy Resources Energy Purchaser SWEPCO Location Amarillo TX Coordinates 35.3672156°, -101.5474892° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.3672156,"lon":-101.5474892,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

451

Harvest II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Harvest II Harvest II Facility Harvest II Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Exelon Wind Developer Exelon Wind Energy Purchaser Consumers Energy Location Pigeon MI Coordinates 43.83861292°, -83.2171011° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.83861292,"lon":-83.2171011,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

Luz II | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Luz II Luz II Jump to: navigation, search Name Luz II Place Jerusalem, Israel Zip 91450 Sector Solar Product Jerusalem-based utility-scale solar power plant developer. Coordinates 31.7736°, 35.224998° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.7736,"lon":35.224998,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

453

The EBR-II materials-surveillance program. 5: Results of SURV-5.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In March of 1965, a set of surveillance (SURV) samples was placed in the EBR-II reactor to determine the effect of irradiation, thermal aging, and sodium corrosion on reactor materials. Eight subassemblies were placed into row 12 positions of EBR-II to determine the effect of irradiation at 370 C. Two subassemblies were placed into the primary sodium basket to determine the effect of thermal aging at 370 C. One half of all samples were exposed to primary system sodium while one half were sealed in capsules with a helium atmosphere. Fifteen different structural materials were tested in the SURV program. In this work, the properties of these materials irradiated at 370 C to a total fluence of 3.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} were determined. These materials are the fifth set of irradiated subassemblies to be examined as part of the SURV program (SURV-5). The properties analyzed were weight, density, microstructure, hardness, tensile and yield strength, and fracture resistance. Of all the alloys examined in SURV-5, only Berylco-25 showed any significant weight loss. Stainless steel (both 304 and 347) had the largest density decrease, although the density decrease from irradiation for all alloys was less than 0.4 percent. The microstructure of both Berylco-25 and the aluminum-bronze alloy was altered significantly. Iron- and nickel-base alloys showed little change in microstructure. Austenitic steels (304 and 347) harden with irradiation. The hardness of Inconel X750 did not change significantly with irradiation. The ultimate tensile strength of Inconel X750, 304 stainless steel, 420 stainless steel and welded 304 changed little due to a fluence increase from 2.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} (the maximum fluence of the SURV-4 samples) to 3.2 {times} 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2}.

Ruther, W.E.; Staffon, J.D.; Carlson, B.G.; Allen, T.R.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Risks in software development with imperfect testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study analytically assesses the risk of releasing defective software that cannot be exhaustively tested and of needlessly testing defect-free software. Specifically, it quantifies the probability of committing a Type II error (ß) in software development when one may release software that still is faulty while the test methods themselves may not be perfect. The study uses truncated Poisson and geometric distributed path lengths and Bernoulli-type inspection errors to link ß to software design features, the development philosophies employed and certain aspects that include code quality, cyclomatic complexity and the average length of basis paths. For risk reduction, this study finds quantitative justification for raising test coverage, perfecting the test methods, the adoption of recent innovations and programming methods such as component-based design, SOA and XP as ways to raise the likelihood that the product developed will be fault-free. Results are relatively robust with respect to the probability distributions assumed.

Tapan P. Bagchi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Constrained Test Problems for Multi-Objective Evolutionary Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrating procedures for handling constraints. Constraint handling is a crucial part of real-world problem. Although there exists a few constraint handling procedures in the literature, they all have been tried and with two other constrained handling procedures bring out the superiority of NSGA-II in solving di

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

456

Constrained Test Problems for Multi-Objective Evolutionary Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

procedures for handling constraints. Constraint handling is a crucial part of real-world problem solving there exists a few constraint handling procedures in the literature, they all have been tried on simple constrained handling procedures bring out the superiority of NSGA-II in solving diÃ?cult constrained

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

457

DE-NA0000622 Section I, Page i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

04/01/2011 04/01/2011 TABLE OF CONTENTS I-1 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JUL 2004) (AS MODIFIED BY DEAR 952.202-1) .................................1 I-2 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ....................................................................................................1 I-3 FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984).............................................2 I-4 FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) .................................................................................................................................................................2 I-5 FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) ...............................................................3 I-6 FAR 52.203-8 CANCELLATION, RESCISSION, AND RECOVERY OF FUNDS FOR ILLEGAL OR

458

DE-NA0000622 Section I, Page i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

12/16/10 12/16/10 TABLE OF CONTENTS I-1 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JUL 2004) (AS MODIFIED BY DEAR 952.202-1) .................................1 I-2 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ....................................................................................................1 I-3 FAR 52.203-5 COVENANT AGAINST CONTINGENT FEES (APR 1984).............................................2 I-4 FAR 52.203-6 RESTRICTIONS ON SUBCONTRACTOR SALES TO THE GOVERNMENT (SEP 2006) .................................................................................................................................................................2 I-5 FAR 52.203-7 ANTI-KICKBACK PROCEDURES (OCT 2010) ...............................................................3 I-6 FAR 52.203-8 CANCELLATION, RESCISSION, AND RECOVERY OF FUNDS FOR ILLEGAL OR

459

WIPP SEIS-II - Volume I, Chapters 1-6 (Part 1 of 7)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

I I Chapters 1-6 September 1997 Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper DOE/EIS-0026-S-2 This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831; prices available from (423) 576-1301. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Road, Springfield, VA 22161. Copies of this document are available (while supplies last) upon written request to: U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, NM 88221 or by calling 1 (800) 336-9477 COVER SHEET Lead Agency: U.S. Department of Energy

460

Benchmark studies of induced radioactivity produced in LHC materials, part II: remanent dose rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......production of radioactive isotopes as well as their decay...carbon composites, boron nitride, aluminium...step (calculation of isotopes), the FLUKA implementation...benchmark(6,7). Isotope information was written...uncertainty for the determination of the effective centre......

M. Brugger; H. Khater; S. Mayer; A. Prinz; S. Roesler; L. Ulrici; H. Vincke

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

The Santa Cruz Eddy. Part II: Mechanisms of Formation CRISTINA L. ARCHER AND MARK Z. JACOBSON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

greater vorticity, wind speed, horizontal and vertical extents, and lifetime than the second eddy thermal gradients at ground level. In all cases, vertical vorticity was still created by the tilting," with horizontal resolution of 5 km, 150 120 grid points, 29 vertical levels, and 15-s time step), which covers

462

On the use of fuzzy inference techniques in assessment models: part II: industrial applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the applicability of the monotone output property and the output resolution property in fuzzy assessment models to two industrial Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) problems. First, t...

Kai Meng Tay; Chee Peng Lim

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Rapid Coal Analysis. Part II: Slurry Atomization DCP Emission Analysis of NBS Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A McCrone Micronising Mill is used to wet grind NBS bituminous coal to a median particle diameter of 5.7 ?m within 10 min. The finely divided coal slurry is immediately nebulized...

McCurdy, D L; Wichman, M D; Fry, R C

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

ORIGINAL PAPER Sustainability metrics for eco-technologies assessment, Part II.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a sustainability analysis of CO2 reuse to produce dimethyl carbonate (DMC) via eth- ylene oxide (ROUTE A) and via-to-gate in assessing pro- cess sustainability during LCA. Keywords Sustainability metrics Á CO2 sequestration Á LCA for dimethyl carbonate (DMC) production. The study aimed to assess sustainability and pointed towards routes

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

465

Observed Southern Ocean Cloud Properties and Shortwave Reflection. Part II: Phase Changes and Low Cloud Feedback  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate models produce an increase in cloud optical depth in midlatitudes associated with climate warming, but the magnitude of this increase and its impact on reflected solar radiation vary from model to model. Transition from ice to liquid in ...

Daniel T. McCoy; Dennis L. Hartmann; Daniel P. Grosvenor

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

The Collegiate Wind Competition is Next Week: Meet the Teams Part II  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

Next week, 10 student teams representing colleges and universities across the country will compete in the Energy Department’s first-ever Collegiate Wind Competition, which is designed to prepare talented young people for careers in the wind energy industry and enable academic institutions to showcase the ingenuity of their students. Meet five of these talented, creative teams.

467

Robust Distributed Routing in Dynamical Networks - Part II: Strong Resilience, Equilibrium Selection and Cascaded Failures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Strong resilience properties of dynamical networks are analyzed for distributed routing policies. The latter are characterized by the property that the way the outflow at a non-destination node gets split among its outgoing ...

Como, Giacomo

468

Minutes of the 28th Annual Plutonium Sample Exchange Meeting. Part II: metal sample exchange  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Contents of this publication include the following list of participating laboratories; agenda; attendees; minutes of October 25 and 26 meeting; and handout materials supplied by speakers. The handout materials cover the following: statistics and reporting; plutonium - chemical assay 100% minus impurities; americium neptunium, uranium, carbon and iron data; emission spectroscopy data; plutonium metal sample exchange; the calorimetry sample exchange; chlorine determination in plutonium metal using phyrohydrolysis; spectrophotometric determination of 238-plutonium in oxide; plutonium measurement capabilities at the Savannah River Plant; and robotics in radiochemical laboratory.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

On the quasi-steady aerodynamics of normal hovering flight part II: model implementation and evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...assumes that mechanical energy can be stored and released...French University in Egypt for his guiding views...and ZJ Wang. 2007 Energy-minimizing kinematics...McArthur. 2010 Span efficiencies of wings at low Reynolds...disk model and span efficiency of flapping flight in...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Mobile media search: has media search finally found its perfect platform? part II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recently, many exciting media search applications have been introduced to take advantage of smart phones' audiovisual capture capabilities and their being always on and connected. These applications address a real pain point for most mobile users and ... Keywords: image retrieval, interfaces, mobile media search, social networks, video retrieval, visualization

Berna Erol; Jiebo Luo; Shih-Fu Chang; Minoru Etoh; Hsiao-Wuen Hon; Qian Lin; Vidya Setlur

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B - Revised Description of: Biogas Energy for Hawaiian Smallprojected. Also, the low pressure biogas requires additional5000 - 5500 cubic feet of biogas (60% methane) daily may be

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

E-Print Network 3.0 - aids part ii Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Source: Forest Research Agency of the UK Forestry Commission Collection: Renewable Energy 8 CERDI, Etudes et Documents, E 2007.07 Document de travail de la srie Summary: with...

473

Annotated Bibliography of Programmed Temperature Gas Chromatography 1952–1964. Part II. 1962–1963  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......1963). "Allene Chemistry. I. Free Rad- ical...1963). "Oxidn. of Coal in Alk. Media with...Homocyon 410; TC after combustion to CO,. 244 H. D...Developments in the GC of Hard Coal Tar Products." 3 m...2015 (1963). "A Combustion-Gas Chromatographic......

W. E. Harris; H. W. Habgood

1966-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

PROJECTS FROM FEDERAL REGION IX DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM PART II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

systems, wind machines, biomass conversion systems, energymethane gas from the biomass conversion of water hyacinths

Case, C.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Use of Weather and Occupancy Forecasts for Optimal Building Climate Control Part II  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that predictive control presents a promising option to enhance the energy efficiency and comfort of buildings office building. The proposed project presents a follow-up to the forerunner project "Use of Weather-site event targeted at professionals from the building, energy and educational sectors. Project risks relate

Fischlin, Andreas

476

Tropical Cyclogenesis Associated with Rossby Wave Energy Dispersion of a Preexisting Typhoon. Part II: Numerical Simulations*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for background wind and moisture fields is crucial for maintaining a continuous vorticity growth through in a 3D model. A new TC with realistic dynamic and thermodynamic structures forms in the wake development. This oscillatory growth is also seen in the observed rainfall and cloud-top temperature fields

Wang, Bin

477

Nuclear desalination in the Arab world â?? Part II: advanced inherent and passive safe nuclear reactors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rapid increases in population levels have led to greater demands for fresh water and electricity in the Arab World. Different types of energies are needed to contribute to bridging the gap between increased demand and production. Increased levels of safeguards in nuclear power plants have became reliable due to their large operational experience, which now exceeds 11,000 years of operation. Thus, the nuclear power industry should be attracting greater attention. World electricity production from nuclear power has risen from 1.7% in 1970 to 17%-20% today. This ratio had increased in June 2002 to reach more than 30%, 33% and 42% in Europe, Japan, and South Korea respectively. In the Arab World, both the public acceptance and economic viability of nuclear power as a major source of energy are greatly dependent on the achievement of a high level of safety and environmental protection. An assessment of the recent generation of advanced reactor safety criteria requirements has been carried out. The promising reactor designs adapted for the Arab world and other similar developing countries are those that profit from the enhanced and passive safety features of the new generation of reactors, with a stronger focus on the effective use of intrinsic characteristics, simplified plant design, and easy construction, operation and maintenance. In addition, selected advanced reactors with a full spectrum from small to large capacities, and from evolutionary to radical types, which have inherent and passive safety features, are discussed. The relevant economic assessment of these reactors adapted for water/electricity cogeneration have been carried out and compared with non-nuclear desalination methods. This assessment indicates that, water/electricity cogeneration by the nuclear method with advanced inherent and passive safe nuclear power plants, is viable and competitive.

Aly Karameldin; Samer S. Mekhemar

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Advanced pressurized water reactor for improved resource utilization, part II - composite advanced PWR concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report evaluates the enhanced resource utilization in an advanced pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept using a composite of selected improvements identified in a companion study. The selected improvements were in the areas of reduced loss of neutrons to control poisons, reduced loss of neutrons in leakage from the core, and improved blanket/reflector concepts. These improvements were incorporated into a single composite advanced PWR. A preliminary assessment of resource requirements and costs and impact on safety are presented.

Turner, S.E.; Gurley, M.K.; Kirby, K.D.; Mitchell, W III

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Acoustic performance of an installed real?time three?dimensional audio system—Part II.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exterior effects room (EER) located at the NASA Langley Research Center was recently upgraded to allow for simulation of aircraft flyovers in a three?dimensional (3?D) audio and visual environment. The 3?D audio server employs an implementation of the vector base amplitude panning (VBAP) method to position virtual sources at arbitrary azimuth and elevation angles in the EER. Recent work focused on the development of loudspeaker equalization first using high order FIR filters [POMA 9 015004 (2010)] and later using low order IIR filters [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 128 2482 (2010)]. The latter in conjunction with full?path time delay compensation and relative gain compensation were implemented in real?time and shown to reproduce the desired sound field to within about ±5 dB over an extended frequency range for stationary and moving sources. In the present work the performance is further characterized both objectively and subjectively. Addressed are calibration of the system for absolute sound pressure level reproduction and measurement of the spatial uniformity of the generatedsound field. Further localization of sound sources will be subjectively measured to assess the efficacy of the VBAP implementation in the EER.

Kenneth J. Faller II; Stephen A. Rizzi; Aric R. Aumann

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Special Publication No. 3, Ticks and Tickborne Diseases, II. Hosts, Part 1. A-F  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., (1959E), 1-63) (Banvayo, Ivory Coast) Haemaphysalis parmata (Morel, P. C., (1963A), 33- 40) (Ivory Coast) Hyalomma truncatum (Morel, P. C. & Mouchet, J., (1965A), 477-496) (Cameroun) Rhipicephalus guilhoni (Morel, P. C. & Mouchet, J. , (1965A), 477..., ?., (1967A), 281-405) (Ta'l, Ivory Coast) "AGOUTI" Mamm. Rodentia Amblyomma cayennense (Floch, ?. , (1956b), 1-235) (Inini) Amblyomma oblongoguttatum (Floch, H. & Abonnenc, ?. , (1940A), 1 -46) (r?gion de l'Approuague, French Guiana) AGOUTI Mamm...

Doss, Mildred A.; Farr, Marion M.; Roach, Katharine F.; Anastos, George

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "testing part ii" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.