National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for testing part ii

  1. Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

    2007-01-01

    the DDR to exceed its rated airflow. Energy Performance ofEnergy Performance of UFAD Systems Part II: Room Air Stratification Full Scale Testing Airflow cfm/sf m³/(sm²) DDR

  2. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern sulphur mines 2-4-5 certification tests and analysis. Part I: 1981 testing. Part II: 1982 testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beasley, R.R.

    1982-12-01

    Well leak tests and a cavern pressure were conducted in June through December 1981, and are described in Part I. The tests did not indicate conclusively that there was no leakage from the cavern, but the data indicate that cavern structural failure during oil storage is unlikely. The test results indicated that retesting and well workover were desirable prior to making a decision on the cavern use. Well leak tests were conducted in March through May 1982, and are described in Part II. The tests indicated that there was no significant leakage from wells 2 and 4 but that the leakage from wells 2A and 5 exceeded the DOE criterion. Because of the proximity of cavern 2-4-5 to the edge of the salt, this cavern should be considered for only one fill/withdrawal cycle prior to extensive reevaluation. 57 figures, 17 tables.

  3. Part II

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBeryllium Disease | DepartmentOLED StakeholderINL E-IDR (InventionOCIOPaducahPart 2,

  4. Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Smog Check II Evaluation Part II: Overview of Vehicle Emissions . . . . . . . . . . . . Prepared in Later Sections ____________________ 1 3. Older Vehicles Have Higher Emissions on Average _____________ 3 ___________________________________ 12 7. Emissions of Individual Vehicles Vary from Test to Test ________ 15 8. Total Emissions

  5. _Part II - Contract Clauses

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M0572 dated 3215 Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Page I - 1 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JAN 2012)...

  6. A generic grid interface for parallel and adaptive scientific Part II: implementation and tests in DUNE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastian, Peter

    and tests in DUNE P. Bastian1 M. Blatt1 A. Dedner2 C. Engwer1 R. Kl¨ofkorn2 R. Kornhuber4 M. Ohlberger3 O performance losses. The imple- mentation is realized as part of the software environment DUNE [10]. Numerical, 65Y05, 68U20 Key words: DUNE, hierarchical grids, software, abstract interface, generic programming

  7. A CLASS OF DISCONTINUOUS PETROV-GALERKIN METHODS. PART II: OPTIMAL TEST FUNCTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopalakrishnan, Jay

    .g. [24, 25]. Demkowicz was supported in part by the Department of Energy [National Nuclear Security, in particular, refers to the original contribution of Petrov [33]. The idea of Petrov-Galerkin method

  8. Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Load components and solar) one at a time to determine impactto calibrate the solar gain term for one and two bank solarour testing to one setpoint, two solar load conditions with

  9. Supernovae. Part II: The aftermath

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trimble, V; Trimble, V

    1983-01-01

    R. Viswanathan, 1980, As- Supernovae. Part II ExperimentalSmith, 1982, Astrophys. Supernovae. Chevalier, R. A. , andC. B. , 1974, Ed. , Supernovae and Supernova Rem- nants,

  10. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPoweredE Contract No.No. 330 J.2-1 ContractII

  11. Smog Check II Evaluation Part IV: Smog Check Costs and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Smog Check II Evaluation Part IV: Smog Check Costs and Cost Effectiveness Are the Overall Costs of Smog Check? __________________ 2 2.1. Vehicle Testing Costs____________________________________________ 3 2.2. Repair Costs ___________________________________________________ 5 2.3. Administrative Costs

  12. 8. SQL II 8-1 Part 8: SQL II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brass, Stefan

    8. SQL II 8-1 Part 8: SQL II References: · Elmasri/Navathe:Fundamentals of Database Systems, 3rd Edition, 1999. Chap. 8, "SQL -- The Relational Database Standard" (Sect. 8.2, 8.3.3, part of 8.3.4.) · Silberschatz/Korth/Sudarshan: Database System Concepts, 3rd Edition. McGraw-Hill, 1999: Chapter 4: "SQL

  13. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-01

    Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

  14. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. Includes glossary You are...

  15. PRAXIS II Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Exam The Praxis SeriesTM assessments provide educational tests and other services that states use as part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    educational tests and other services that states use as part of their teacher licensure and certification education, 10 questions regarding housing, 11 questions regarding clothing and textiles, 18 questions and lifestyles, the development and education of family members, consumer education, physical and psychological

  16. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  17. Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, Dayton A.

    2009-05-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

  18. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc H. Pinsonneault; Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis

    2000-06-20

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  19. Part II: Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M801 Section B - ii PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service...

  20. Part II: Section B - Supplies, Services, and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M938 Section B - ii PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service...

  1. Completion of NDCX-II Facility and Initial Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Joe

    2012-01-01

    HIFAN 1832 Completion of NDCX-II Facility and Initial TestsSorting Category: 2.1.1 (E) Completion of NDCX-II Facility

  2. Part II - Managerial Competencies: Organizational Representation and

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes havePUBLICof EnergyParagon Sales:a. Part

  3. AT2 DS II - Accelerator System Design (Part II) - CCC Video Conference

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Discussion Session - Accelerator System Design (Part II) Tutors: C. Darve, J. Weisend II, Ph. Lebrun, A. Dabrowski, U. Raich Video Conference with the CERN Control Center. Experts in the field of Accelerator science will be available to answer the students questions. This session will link the CCC and SA (using Codec VC).

  4. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches: PART II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Andrade, R.M.; Taylor, D. J.; Stimmel, J. J.; Zaelke, R. L.; Balkey, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of good business practices, a team of glovebox experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been assembled to proactively investigate processes and procedures that minimize unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures. A major part of this effort involves the review of glovebox glove failures that have occurred at the Plutonium Facility and at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Facility. Information dating back to 1993 has been compiled from formal records. This data has been combined with information obtained from a baseline inventory of about 9,000 glovebox gloves. The key attributes tracked include those related to location, the glovebox glove, type and location of breaches, the worker, and the consequences resulting from breaches. This glovebox glove failure analysis yielded results in the areas of the ease of collecting this type of data, the causes of most glove failures that have occurred, the effectiveness of current controls, and recommendations to improve hazard control systems. As expected, a significant number of breaches involve high-risk operations such as grinding, hammering, using sharps (especially screwdrivers), and assembling equipment. Surprisingly, tasks such as the movement of equipment and material between gloveboxes and the opening of cans are also major contributions of breaches. Almost half the gloves fail within a year of their install date. The greatest consequence for over 90% of glovebox glove failures is alpha contamination of protective clothing. Personnel self-monitoring at the gloveboxes continues to be the most effective way of detecting glovebox glove failures. Glove failures from these tasks can be reduced through changes in procedures and the design of remote-handling apparatus. The Nuclear Materials Technology Division management uses this information to improve hazard control systems to reduce the number of unplanned breaches in the glovebox further. As a result, excursions of contaminants into the operator's breathing zone and excess exposure to the radiological sources associated with unplanned breaches in the glovebox have been minimized. In conclusion, investigations of control failures, near misses, and accidents contribute to an organization's scientific and technological excellence by providing information that can be used to increase its operational safety.

  5. Mathematics & Statistics Strategic Planning Phase III Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Mathematics & Statistics Strategic Planning Phase III Part II 1 Research and The Faculty Overview. Over the past two decades, the Department of Mathematics and Statistics has systematically worked toward its overarching goal of becoming one of the top 10 departments of mathematical sciences among

  6. Wireless Tomography, Part II: A System Engineering Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Wireless Tomography, Part II: A System Engineering Approach R. C. Qiu, Z. Hu, M. C. Wicks, S. J.Wicks@rl.af.mil Abstract--This is the second paper in a series on a new initiative of wireless tomography. The goal is to combine two areas: wireless communication and radio tomography. This paper studies wireless tomography

  7. ENGINEERING TRIPOS PART IIB ELECTRICAL AND INFORMATION SCIENCES TRIPOS PART II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    ENGINEERING TRIPOS PART IIB ELECTRICAL AND INFORMATION SCIENCES TRIPOS PART II Monday 15 January) Affine (iv) Projective (b) A video surveillance system views a rectangular car-park to ensure that only of the car-park shown in Fig. 2(a). The boundaries of the car-park appear as a trapezium in the image

  8. On synchronous robotic networks - Part II: Time complexity of rendezvous and deployment algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazzoli, Emilio; Bullo, Francesco; Cortes, Jorge; Martinez, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    et al. : SYNCHRONOUS ROBOTIC NETWORKS—PART II control andFrazzoli, “On synchronous robotic networks—Part I: Models,et al. : SYNCHRONOUS ROBOTIC NETWORKS—PART II links. ) We

  9. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

  10. WASTES II model storage requirements benchmark testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shay, M.R.; Walling, R.C.; Altenhofen, M.K.

    1986-09-01

    A study was conducted to benchmark results obtained from using the Waste System Transportation and Economic Simulation - Version II (WASTES II) model against information published in the ''Spent Fuel Storage Requirements'' report (DOE/RL-84-1). The WASTES model was developed by PNL for use in evaluating the spent-fuel storage and transportation requirements and costs for the US Department of Energy (DOE). The ''Spent Fuel Storage Requirements'' report is issued annually by the DOE and provides both historical/projected spent fuel inventory data and storage requirements data based on information supplied directly from utilities. The objective of this study is to compare the total inventory and storage requirements documented in the ''Spent Fuel Storage Requirements'' report with similar data that results from use of the WASTES model. Three differences have been identified as a result of benchmark testing. Two minor differences are present in the total inventory projected and the equivalent metric tons of uranium of spent fuel requiring storage. These differences result from the way reinserted spent fuel is handled and the methods used to calculate mass equivalents. A third difference is found in the storage requirements for the case that uses intra-utility transshipment. This discrepancy is due to the Oyster Creek reactor, which is shown to not require additional storage in the Spent Fuel Storage Requirements report, even though there is no destination reactor of the same type within its utility. The discrepancy was corrected soon after the 1984 ''Spent Fuel Storage Requirements report was issued and does not appear in more recent documents (DOE/RL-85-2).

  11. Adv. Fossil Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I Due Date Adv. Fossil Solicitation Part I Due DateAdv.II

  12. AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) AGA 12, Part 2 Performance Test Plan (November 2006) Under the guidance and sponsorship of DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery...

  13. Development of a nuclear test strategy for Test Program Element II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deis, G.A.; Hsu, P.Y.; Liebenthal, J.L.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Schmunk, R.E.; Uldrich, E.D.; Wadkins, R.P.; Watts, K.D.

    1982-03-01

    As part of Phase O in Test Program Element II of the Office of Fusion Energy's First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program, a test strategy has been developed to address the blanket/shield's (B/S's) thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical data needs, which were identified in an earlier task through the use of nuclear and supporting nonnuclear testing. In Phase I, which extends through 1984, this strategy emphasizes the development of pre-design information and the nonnuclear supporting tests. After Phase I, nuclear testing will be emphasized, and B/S design-verification testing will become more important. The proposed program will investigate a solid-breeder-blanket concept via nuclear testing. This program can begin in Phase I with nonnuclear support tests, and can progress to integrated nuclear testing soon after the completion of Phase I. The program's approximate cost and schedule are presented. In addition, other possible areas of study for Phase I, and strategies for the use of nuclear and nonnuclear facilities after Phase I are outlined.

  14. Benchmark specifications for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sofu, T.; Briggs, L. L.

    2012-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is hosting an IAEA-coordinated research project on benchmark analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactor passive safety tests performed at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The benchmark project involves analysis of a protected and an unprotected loss of flow tests conducted during an extensive testing program within the framework of the U.S. Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate the inherently safety features of EBR-II as a pool-type, sodium-cooled fast reactor prototype. The project is intended to improve the participants' design and safety analysis capabilities for sodium-cooled fast reactors through validation and qualification of safety analysis codes and methods. This paper provides a description of the EBR-II tests included in the program, and outlines the benchmark specifications being prepared to support the IAEA-coordinated research project. (authors)

  15. Teaching Grid Computing in North Carolina: Part II IEEE DS Online Exclusive Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferner, Clayton

    Teaching Grid Computing in North Carolina: Part II IEEE DS Online Exclusive Content Education Teaching Grid Computing in North Carolina: Part II Barry Wilkinson · University of North Carolina Charlotte Clayton Ferner · University of North Carolina Wilmington In Part I, we described a grid computing course

  16. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Introduction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation is the Introduction to the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, held on August 13, 2014.

  17. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

  18. Process maps for plasma spray. Part II: Deposition and properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XIANGYANG,JIANG; MATEJICEK,JIRI; KULKARNI,ANAND; HERMAN,HERBERT; SAMPATH,SANJAY; GILMORE,DELWYN L.; NEISER JR.,RICHARD A

    2000-03-28

    This is the second paper of a two part series based on an integrated study carried out at the State University of New York at Stony Brook and Sandia National Laboratories. The goal of the study is the fundamental understanding of the plasma-particle interaction, droplet/substrate interaction, deposit formation dynamics and microstructure development as well as the deposit property. The outcome is science-based relationships, which can be used to link processing to performance. Molybdenum splats and coatings produced at 3 plasma conditions and three substrate temperatures were characterized. It was found that there is a strong mechanical/thermal interaction between droplet and substrate, which builds up the coatings/substrate adhesion. Hardness, thermal conductivity, and modulus increase, while oxygen content and porosity decrease with increasing particle velocity. Increasing deposition temperature resulted in dramatic improvement in coating thermal conductivity and hardness as well as increase in coating oxygen content. Indentation reveals improved fracture resistance for the coatings prepared at higher deposition temperature. Residual stress was significantly affected by deposition temperature, although not significant by particle energy within the investigated parameter range. Coatings prepared at high deposition temperature with high-energy particles suffered considerably less damage in wear tests. Possible mechanisms behind these changes are discussed within the context of relational maps which are under development.

  19. TRUPACT-II Hydrogen G-Valve Program Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mroz, Eugene J.

    1999-01-01

    This test plan describes the objectives, scope, participants, and components of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) Hydrogen G-Value Program (GH2P). The GH2P builds on the experience, results, and experimental setup of the TRUPACT-II Matrix Depletion Program (MDP) to establish effective hydrogen G-values (G-values) for additional waste matrices. This plan details the experimental design and test matrices for experiments to measure the G-value for additional waste matrices, including first- and second-stage sludges at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and molten salt extraction residues with varying amounts of residual moisture (i.e., unbound water). Data collected from the GH2P will be used to support an application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for G-values and corresponding wattage limits for the TRUPACT-II payloads containing these waste matrices. The testing will also evaluate the ability to determine G-values on a waste stream basis.

  20. WIPP SEIS-II - Comment Response Supplement, Volume II (Part 1...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II Public Comments September 1997 Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office Carlsbad, New Mexico This Document Printed on Recycled Paper COMMENT RESPONSE SUPPLEMENT TABLE OF...

  1. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation from Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments.

  2. Theoretical and Experimental Simulation of Accident Scenarios of the JET Cryogenic Components Part II: The JET LHCD Cryopump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theoretical and Experimental Simulation of Accident Scenarios of the JET Cryogenic Components Part II: The JET LHCD Cryopump

  3. Industrial applications' simulation technologies in virtual environments Part II: Virtual Manufacturing and Virtual Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aristomenis, Antoniadis

    categories, according to the subject and the technology that is required: · Virtual Manufacturing1 Industrial applications' simulation technologies in virtual environments Part II: Virtual Manufacturing and Virtual Assembly Bilalis Nikolaos Associate Professor Department of Production and Engineering

  4. Theory of sorption hysteresis in nanoporous solids: Part II Molecular condensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazant, Martin Z.

    Motivated by the puzzle of sorption hysteresis in Portland cement concrete or cement paste, we develop in Part II of this study a general theory of vapor sorption and desorption from nanoporous solids, which attributes ...

  5. Resonance in Optimal Perturbation Evolution. Part II: Effects of a Nonzero Mean PV Gradient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Vries, Hylke

    Resonance in Optimal Perturbation Evolution. Part II: Effects of a Nonzero Mean PV Gradient H. DE (PV) perturbations and the surface edge wave plays a key role in the surface dynamics (e.g. De Vries

  6. Part II: Landscape Design Guidelines & Precinct Plans Cornell Master Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    Urban Strategies Inc. · Polshek Partnership Architects · Stantec · New England Engineering #12;#12;Part 160 17 East Hill Village 168 18 Cornell Park 176 19 Arboretum 186 20 Orchards 188 21 McGowan 194 22

  7. DOE/EH 0434 Part II: Procedures Manual (Revised 2012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i pStateDOEAnalysis,Department of Energy topicalDraftII: Procedures

  8. Low-voltage switchgear and controlgear assemblies: part 1: type-tested and partially type-tested assemblies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Electrotechnical Commission. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    Low-voltage switchgear and controlgear assemblies: part 1: type-tested and partially type-tested assemblies

  9. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Magazine articles which focus on the subject of solar energy are presented. The booklet prepared is the second of a four part series of the Solar Energy Reader. Excerpts from the magazines include the history of solar energy, mythology and tales, and selected poetry on the sun. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  10. Test of In-core Flux Detectors in KNK II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoppe, P

    1979-01-01

    The development of in-core detectors for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) is still in an early stage, and little operation experience is available. Therefore self-powered neutron and gamma detectors and neutron sensitive ionization chambers -especially developed for LMFBRs- have been tested in the Fast Sodium Cooled Test Reactor KNK II. Seven flux detectors have been installed in the core of KNK II by means of a special test rig. Five of them failed already within the first week during operation in the reactor. Due to measurements of electrical resistances and capacities, sodium penetrating into the detectors or cables probably seems to be the cause. As tests prior to the installation in the core proved the tightness of all detectors, it is suspected that small cracks have developed in the detector casings or in the outer cable sheaths during their exposure to the hot coolant. Two ionization chambers did not show these faults. However, one of them failed because the saturation current plateau disap...

  11. Economically Efficient Operation of CO2 Capturing Process Part II: Control Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    be considered as the CO2 recovery in the absorber and the CO2 mole fraction at the bottom of the stripper Efficient Operation of CO2 Capturing Process Part II: Control Layer Mehdi Panahi, Sigurd Skogestad regions of a post-combustion CO2 capturing process using the top-down steady-state economic part

  12. Part II: Section B - Supplies, Services, and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P - .EnergyHYDROGENParagona. Part

  13. Adv. Fossil Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:I Due Date Adv. Fossil Solicitation Part I Due

  14. Asymptotic Geometry of Discrete Interlaced Patterns: Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Duse; Anthony Metcalfe

    2015-07-02

    We study the boundary of the liquid region $\\mathcal{L}$ in large random lozenge tiling models defined by uniform random interlacing particle systems with general initial configuration, which lies on the line $(x,1)$, $x\\in\\mathbb{R}\\equiv \\partial \\mathbb{H}$. We assume that the initial particle configuration converges weakly to a limiting density $\\phi(x)$, $0\\le \\phi\\leq 1$. The liquid region is given by a homeomorphism $W_{\\mathcal{L}}: \\mathcal{L}\\to \\mathbb{H}$, the upper half plane, and we consider the extension of $W_{\\mathcal{L}}^{-1}$ to $\\overline{\\mathbb{H}}$. Part of $\\partial \\mathcal{L}$ is given by a curve, the edge $\\mathcal{E}$, parametrized by intervals in $\\partial \\mathbb{H}$, and this corresponds to points where $\\phi$ is identical to $0$ or $1$. If $0continuously to $\\overline{\\mathbb{H}}$. Singular points give rise to parts of $\\partial \\mathcal{L}$ not given by $\\mathcal{E}$ and which can border a frozen region, or be "inside" the liquid region. This shows that in general the boundary of $\\partial \\mathcal{L}$ can be very complicated. We expect that on the singular parts of $\\partial \\mathcal{L}$ we do not get a universal point process like the Airy or the extended Sine kernel point processes.

  15. Slag Behavior in Gasifiers. Part II: Constitutive Modeling of Slag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massoudi, Mehrdad; Wang, Ping

    2013-02-07

    The viscosity of slag and the thermal conductivity of ash deposits are among two of the most important constitutive parameters that need to be studied. The accurate formulation or representations of the (transport) properties of coal present a special challenge of modeling efforts in computational fluid dynamics applications. Studies have indicated that slag viscosity must be within a certain range of temperatures for tapping and the membrane wall to be accessible, for example, between 1,300 °C and 1,500 °C, the viscosity is approximately 25 Pa·s. As the operating temperature decreases, the slag cools and solid crystals begin to form. Since slag behaves as a non-linear fluid, we discuss the constitutive modeling of slag and the important parameters that must be studied. We propose a new constitutive model, where the stress tensor not only has a yield stress part, but it also has a viscous part with a shear rate dependency of the viscosity, along with temperature and concentration dependency, while allowing for the possibility of the normal stress effects. In Part I, we reviewed, identify and discuss the key coal ash properties and the operating conditions impacting slag behavior.

  16. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; ? Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 25 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation parameters and off-gas chemistry. In order to generate off-gas data in support of the flammability model development for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet, vapor space steady state testing in the range of ~300-750°C was conducted under the following conditions, (i) 100% (nominal and excess antifoam levels) and 125% stoichiometry feed and (ii) with and without argon bubbling. Adjustments to feed rate, heater outputs and purge air flow were necessary in order to achieve vapor space temperatures in this range. Surge testing was also completed under nominal conditions for four days with argon bubbling and one day without argon bubbling.

  17. Fission matrix capability for MCNP, Part II - Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carney, S. E.; Brown, F. B.; Kiedrowski, B. C.; Martin, W. R.

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the initial experience and results from implementing a fission matrix capability into the MCNP Monte Carlo code. The fission matrix is obtained at essentially no cost during the normal simulation for criticality calculations. It can be used to provide estimates of the fundamental mode power distribution, the reactor dominance ratio, the eigenvalue spectrum, and higher mode spatial eigenfunctions. It can also be used to accelerate the convergence of the power method iterations. Past difficulties and limitations of the fission matrix approach are overcome with a new sparse representation of the matrix, permitting much larger and more accurate fission matrix representations. Numerous examples are presented. A companion paper (Part I - Theory) describes the theoretical basis for the fission matrix method. (authors)

  18. Medicine at the crossroads. Part II. Summary of completed project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    Medicine at the crossroads (a.k.a. The Future of Medicine) is an 8-part series of one-hour documentaries which examines the scientific and social forces that have shaped the practice of medicine around the world. The series was developed and produced over a five-year period and in eleven countries. Among the major issues examined in the series are the education of medical practitioners and the communication of medical issues. The series also considers the dilemmas of modern medicine, including the treatment of the elderly and the dying, the myth of the quick fix in the face of chronic and incurable diseases such as HIV, and the far-reaching implications of genetic treatments. Finally, the series examines the global progress made in medical research and application, as well as the questions remaining to be answered. These include not only scientific treatment, but accessibility and other critical topics affecting the overall success of medical advances. Medicine at the crossroads is a co-production of Thirteen/WNET and BBC-TV in association with Television Espafiola SA (RTVE) and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Stefan Moore of Thirteen/WNET and Martin Freeth of BBC-TV are series producers. George Page is executive in charge of medicine at the crossroads. A list of scholarly advisors and a program synopses is attached.

  19. Stochastic dynamics of Arctic sea ice Part II: Multiplicative noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Woosok

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the numerical solutions of a stochastic Arctic sea ice model with multiplicative noise over a wide range of external heat-fluxes, $\\Delta F_0$, which correspond to greenhouse gas forcing. When the noise is multiplicative, the noise-magnitude depends on the state-variable, and this will influence the statistical moments in a manner that differs from the additive case, which we analyzed in Part I of this study. The state variable describing the deterministic backbone of our model is the energy, $E(t)$, contained in the ice or the ocean and for a thorough comparison and contrast we choose the simplest form of multiplicative noise $\\sigma E(t) \\xi(t)$, where $\\sigma$ is the noise amplitude and $\\xi(t)$ is the noise process. The case of constant additive noise (CA) we write as $\\sigma\\overline{E_S}\\xi(t)$, in which $\\overline{E_S}$ is the seasonally averaged value of the periodic deterministic steady-state solution $E_S(t)$, or the deterministic seasonal cycle. We then treat the case of seasonally-varyi...

  20. Sensitivity of Climate to Diapycnal Diffusivity: Part I. Equilibrium State; Part II. Global Warming Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalan, Fabio.

    Part I: The diapycnal diffusivity in the ocean is one of the least known parameters in current climate models. Measurements of this diffusivity are sparse and insufficient for compiling a global map. Inferences from inverse ...

  1. Transient PVT measurements and model predictions for vessel heat transfer. Part II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felver, Todd G.; Paradiso, Nicholas Joseph; Winters, William S., Jr.; Evans, Gregory Herbert; Rice, Steven F.

    2010-07-01

    Part I of this report focused on the acquisition and presentation of transient PVT data sets that can be used to validate gas transfer models. Here in Part II we focus primarily on describing models and validating these models using the data sets. Our models are intended to describe the high speed transport of compressible gases in arbitrary arrangements of vessels, tubing, valving and flow branches. Our models fall into three categories: (1) network flow models in which flow paths are modeled as one-dimensional flow and vessels are modeled as single control volumes, (2) CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) models in which flow in and between vessels is modeled in three dimensions and (3) coupled network/CFD models in which vessels are modeled using CFD and flows between vessels are modeled using a network flow code. In our work we utilized NETFLOW as our network flow code and FUEGO for our CFD code. Since network flow models lack three-dimensional resolution, correlations for heat transfer and tube frictional pressure drop are required to resolve important physics not being captured by the model. Here we describe how vessel heat transfer correlations were improved using the data and present direct model-data comparisons for all tests documented in Part I. Our results show that our network flow models have been substantially improved. The CFD modeling presented here describes the complex nature of vessel heat transfer and for the first time demonstrates that flow and heat transfer in vessels can be modeled directly without the need for correlations.

  2. Upgrade of the SLAC SLED II Pulse Compression System Based on Recent High Power Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vlieks, A.E.; Fowkes, W.R.; Loewen, R.J.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

    2011-09-06

    In the Next Linear Collider (NLC) it is expected that the high power rf components be able to handle peak power levels in excess of 400 MW. We present recent results of high power tests designed to investigate the RF breakdown limits of the X-band pulse compression system used at SLAC. (SLED-II). Results of these tests show that both the TE{sub 01}-TE{sub 10} mode converter and the 4-port hybrid have a maximum useful power limit of 220-250 MW. Based on these tests, modifications of these components have been undertaken to improve their peak field handling capability. Results of these modifications will be presented. As part of an international effort to develop a new 0.5-1.5 TeV electron-positron linear collider for the 21st century, SLAC has been working towards a design, referred to as 'The Next Linear Collider' (NLC), which will operate at 11.424 GHz and utilize 50-75 MW klystrons as rf power sources. One of the major challenges in this design, or any other design, is how to generate and efficiently transport extremely high rf power from a source to an accelerator structure. SLAC has been investigating various methods of 'pulse compressing' a relatively wide rf pulse ({ge} 1 {mu}s) from a klystron into a narrower, but more intense, pulse. Currently a SLED-II pulse compression scheme is being used at SLAC in the NLC Test Accelerator (NLCTA) and in the Accelerator Structures Test Area (ASTA) to provide high rf power for accelerator and component testing. In ASTA, a 1.05 {mu}s pulse from a 50 MW klystron was successfully pulse compressed to 205 MW with a pulse width of 150 ns. Since operation in NLC will require generating and transporting rf power in excess of 400 MW it was decided to test the breakdown limits of the SLED-II rf components in ASTA with rf power up to the maximum available of 400 MW. This required the combining of power from two 50 MW klystrons and feeding the summed power into the SLED-II pulse compressor. Results from this experiment demonstrated that two of the key components of SLED-II; the Magic Tee and the 'Flower Petal' mode converter (converts between TE{sub 10} rectangular and TE{sub 01} circular modes), were not robust enough at higher power levels. Because of this, a major effort is underway to upgrade the existing devices to operate stably at the higher power levels, and also to investigate new components, which have inherently low field enhancement in their design and therefore more robust.

  3. Molecular dynamics study of non-equilibrium energy transport from a cylindrical track: Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Molecular dynamics study of non-equilibrium energy transport from a cylindrical track: Part II that it is the description of the radial transport and the absence of energy transport to the surface, rather than¯ects the nature of the energizing process rather than the energy transport. In this paper we describe the details

  4. Billiards Digest July, 2011 "Aim, Align, Sight -Part II: Visual Alignment" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alciatore, David G.

    Billiards Digest July, 2011 "Aim, Align, Sight - Part II: Visual Alignment" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES alignment is off. Diagram 1 Changes in visual perception with head position #12;Billiards Digest July, 2011 to the right. Diagram 3 Results of head alignment errors #12;Billiards Digest July, 2011 Human vision

  5. Nonserial Dynamic Programming with Applications in Smart Home Appliances Scheduling Part II: Nonserial Dynamic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    Nonserial Dynamic Programming with Applications in Smart Home Appliances Scheduling ­ Part II) is presented. The problem in this paper generalizes the smart home appliances scheduling problem introduced the following smart home appliances scheduling problem described in the companion paper [3], as the later

  6. MAINE GAP ANALYSIS VERTEBRATE DATA -PART II: DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT RELATIONS, AND STATUS OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boone, Randall B.

    MAINE GAP ANALYSIS VERTEBRATE DATA - PART II: DISTRIBUTION, HABITAT RELATIONS, AND STATUS OF BREEDING BIRDS IN MAINE Randall B. Boonea Department of Wildlife Ecology and Maine Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit University of Maine, Orono, ME 04469-5755 and William B. Krohn USGS Biological

  7. Shape and Topology Optimization for Periodic Problems Part II: Optimization algorithm and numerical examples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisbon, University of

    Regeneration · Shape Optimization · Topology Optimization · Auxetic Materials 1 Introduction The main of the effective material are optimized by minimizing a cost functional (6) under a volume constraintShape and Topology Optimization for Periodic Problems Part II: Optimization algorithm and numerical

  8. Billiards Digest May, 2012 "VEPP Part II: Progressive Practice, and Draw Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alciatore, David G.

    Billiards Digest May, 2012 "VEPP ­ Part II: Progressive Practice, and Draw Drills" ILLUSTRATED the first disc: "VEPP I ­ Fundamentals and Basic Position Control." This month, I'll present a drill approach called "progressive practice," and show some useful draw shot challenge drills, also from Disc I

  9. Re-generable Field Emission Cathodes Part II: Quenched Emitter Performance Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Lyon B.

    Re-generable Field Emission Cathodes Part II: Quenched Emitter Performance Analyses Jason M. Makela emission cathodes have been considered for use as neutralizers on electric propulsion systems. In order to be compatible with EP, the field emission electron sources must be capable of long-life operation and must

  10. Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part II: The Enduring Research Themes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisheries Utilization Research-50 Years in Retrospect, Part II: The Enduring Research Themes JOHN A. DASSOW Introduction The enduring themes of fisheries util ization research are neither surprising, the quality, nutrition, and safe ty of fishery products comprise the triad of past and future utilization

  11. Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants 2001 Marc Prensky Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knaust, Helmut

    Marc Prensky Digital Natives Digital Immigrants ©2001 Marc Prensky _____________________________________________________________________________ Digital Natives, Digital Immigrants, Part II: Do They Really Think Differently? By Marc Prensky From On the Horizon (NCB University Press, Vo 6, December 2001)l. 9 No. © 2001 Marc Prensky Different kinds

  12. An efficient model for three-dimensional surface wave simulations. Part II: Generation and absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clamond, Didier

    An efficient model for three-dimensional surface wave simulations. Part II: Generation wave generation procedures and efficient numerical beaches are crucial components of a fully non for efficient fully non-linear wave generation in three dimensions. Analytical integration of the (linear

  13. Single-cycle mixed-fluid LNG process Part II: Optimal operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Single-cycle mixed-fluid LNG process Part II: Optimal operation Jørgen Bauck Jensen and Sigurd of work that goes into the design of LNG processes, there is surprisingly little attention simple LNG process, namely the PRICO process. Keywords: PRICO, LNG, operation 1 Introduction The process

  14. High-frequency asymptotics for Maxwell's equations in anisotropic media Part II: Nonlinear propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    High-frequency asymptotics for Maxwell's equations in anisotropic media Part II: Nonlinear of pulses in noncentrosymmetric crystals. The method is based upon high-frequency expansions techniques pulses by using a technique based on high-frequency expansions of the fields.7 The derived equations find

  15. Highfrequency asymptotics for Maxwell's equations in anisotropic media Part II: Nonlinear propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    High­frequency asymptotics for Maxwell's equations in anisotropic media Part II: Nonlinear of pulses in noncentrosymmetric crystals. The method is based upon high­frequency expansions techniques pulses by using a technique based on high­frequency expansions of the fields. 7 The derived equations

  16. Supersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing, Part II: Conceptual Design of a High Speed Civil Transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Gecheng

    ° so that the side of the airplane during supersonic flight becomes the front of the airplane airplanes and is not a serious problem for transonic flight due to the low supersonic Mach numberSupersonic Bi-Directional Flying Wing, Part II: Conceptual Design of a High Speed Civil Transport

  17. European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part II: pharmacological treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paschou, Peristera

    European clinical guidelines for Tourette syndrome and other tic disorders. Part II of TS and other tic disorders between 1970 and November 2010. We present a summary of the current experience and opinion, since rigorous experimental studies are scarce. Keywords Tics Á Tourette Á

  18. Best Entry Points for Structured Document Retrieval Part II: Types, Usage and Effectiveness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lalmas, Mounia

    Best Entry Points for Structured Document Retrieval ­ Part II: Types, Usage and Effectiveness Jane documents. This paper examines the concept of best entry points, which are document components from which of best entry points in structured document retrieval, and their usage and effectiveness in real

  19. Multiple Oscillatory Modes of the Argentine Basin. Part II: The Spectral Origin of Basin Modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijer, Wilbert

    Multiple Oscillatory Modes of the Argentine Basin. Part II: The Spectral Origin of Basin Modes et Approches Numériques, Paris, France SARAH T. GILLE Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla In this paper the spectrum of barotropic basin modes of the Argentine Basin is shown to be connected

  20. Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dombey, Norman

    2011-01-01

    Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

  1. Abdus Salam: A Reappraisal. Part II Salam's Part in the Pakistani Nuclear Weapon Programme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norman Dombey

    2011-12-10

    Salam's biographies claim that he was opposed to Pakistan's nuclear weapon programme. This is somewhat strange given that he was the senior Science Advisor to the Pakistan government for at least some of the period between 1972 when the programme was initiated and 1998 when a successful nuclear weapon test was carried out. I look at the evidence for his participation in the programme.

  2. Electrodynamics II Exam 1. Part A (176 pts.) Closed Book Radiation and Scattering Name KSU 2006/02/21

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wysin, Gary

    Electrodynamics II Exam 1. Part A (176 pts.) Closed Book Radiation and Scattering Name KSU 2006/02/21 Instructions: Use SI units. No derivations here, just state your responses clearly, and define your variables formula: = N1 = 2k4 3N |n - 1|2 . 3 #12;Electrodynamics II Exam 1. Part B (154 pts.) Open Book Radiation

  3. Space-qualified, abuttable packaging for LBNL p-channel CCDs, Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Space-qualified, abuttable packaging for LBNL p-channel CCDs, Part II R.W. Besuner1 , C. Baltay2 techniques and hardware that have produced space-qualified 4-side abuttable, high-precision detector packages for 10.5 m pixel, 3.5k x 3.5k p-channel LBNL CCDs. These packages are built around a silicon carbide

  4. Subseabed disposal program annual report, January-December 1980. Volume II. Appendices (principal investigator progress reports). Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinga, K.R. (ed.) ed.

    1981-07-01

    Volume II of the sixth annual report describing the progress and evaluating the status of the Subseabed Disposal Program contains the appendices referred to in Volume I, Summary and Status. Because of the length of Volume II, it has been split into two parts for publication purposes. Part 1 contains Appendices A-Q; Part 2 contains Appendices R-MM. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each appendix for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

  5. Statistical Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40 CFR Part 1065 Engine Dynamometer Test Cell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Effects of "new" engine testing procedures (40 CFR Part 1065) with respect to repeatability of transient engine dynamometer tests were examined as well as the effects of calibration and measurement methods

  6. PULSE COMBUSTOR DESIGN QUALIFICATION TEST AND CLEAN COAL FEEDSTOCK TEST - VOLUME I AND VOLUME II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-02-08

    For this Cooperative Agreement, the pulse heater module is the technology envelope for an indirectly heated steam reformer. The field of use of the steam reformer pursuant to this Cooperative Agreement with DOE is for the processing of sub-bituminous coals and lignite. The main focus is the mild gasification of such coals for the generation of both fuel gas and char--for the steel industry is the main focus. An alternate market application for the substitution of metallurgical coke is also presented. This project was devoted to qualification of a 253-tube pulse heater module. This module was designed, fabricated, installed, instrumented and tested in a fluidized bed test facility. Several test campaigns were conducted. This larger heater is a 3.5 times scale-up of the previous pulse heaters that had 72 tubes each. The smaller heater has been part of previous pilot field testing of the steam reformer at New Bern, North Carolina. The project also included collection and reduction of mild gasification process data from operation of the process development unit (PDU). The operation of the PDU was aimed at conditions required to produce char (and gas) for the Northshore Steel Operations. Northshore Steel supplied the coal for the process unit tests.

  7. Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar BoundaryLayer Flow --Part II: Use of Sensors and Spectral Controller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erlebacher, Gordon

    Active Control of Instabilities in Laminar Boundary­Layer Flow -- Part II: Use of Sensors growth and stabilize the instabilities within the laminar boundary layer. This scenario is shown in Fig

  8. An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleson, Keith W.; Bonan, Gordon B.; Feddema, Johannes J.; Vertenstein, M.

    2008-01-01

    -Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 An Urban Parameterization for a Global Climate Model. Part II: Sensitivity to Input Parameters and the Simulated Urban Heat Island in Offline Simulations K. W. OLESON AND G. B. BONAN Climate and Global Dynamics... Model. Here the robustness of the model is tested through sensitivity studies and the model’s ability to simulate urban heat islands in different environments is evaluated. Findings show that heat storage and sensible heat flux are most sensitive...

  9. Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0007749 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal Register / Vol. 76,EXAMPLERevision 1* PART II

  10. A New Chicane Experiment In PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pivi, M T F; Celata, C M; Cooper, F; Furman, M A; Kharakh, D; King, F K; Kirby, R E; Kuekan, B; Lipari, J J; Munro, M; Ng, J S T; Olszewski, J; Raubenheimer, T O; Seeman, J; Smith, B; Spencer, C M; Wang, L; Wittmer, W

    2008-01-01

    A New Chicane Experiment In PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders

  11. Time Synchronization Attack in Smart Grid-Part II: Cross Layer Detection Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhenghao; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D; Li, Husheng

    2012-01-01

    A novel time synchronization attack (TSA) on wide area monitoring systems in smart grid has been identified in the first part of this paper. A cross layer detection mechanism is proposed to combat TSA in part II of this paper. In the physical layer, we propose a GPS carrier signal noise ratio (C/No) based spoofing detection technique. In addition, a patch-monopole hybrid antenna is applied to receive GPS signal. By computing the standard deviation of the C/No difference from two GPS receivers, a priori probability of spoofing detection is fed to the upper layer, where power system state is estimated and controlled. A trustworthiness based evaluation method is applied to identify the PMU being under TSA. Both the physical layer and upper layer algorithms are integrated to detect the TSA, thus forming a cross layer mechanism. Experiment is carried out to verify the effectiveness of the proposed TSA detection algorithm.

  12. Theory and Implementation of Nuclear Safety System Codes - Part II: System Code Closure Relations, Validation, and Limitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn A Roth; Fatih Aydogan

    2014-09-01

    This is Part II of two articles describing the details of thermal-hydraulic sys- tem codes. In this second part of the article series, the system code closure relationships (used to model thermal and mechanical non-equilibrium and the coupling of the phases) for the governing equations are discussed and evaluated. These include several thermal and hydraulic models, such as heat transfer coefficients for various flow regimes, two phase pressure correlations, two phase friction correlations, drag coefficients and interfacial models be- tween the fields. These models are often developed from experimental data. The experiment conditions should be understood to evaluate the efficacy of the closure models. Code verification and validation, including Separate Effects Tests (SETs) and Integral effects tests (IETs) is also assessed. It can be shown from the assessments that the test cases cover a significant section of the system code capabilities, but some of the more advanced reactor designs will push the limits of validation for the codes. Lastly, the limitations of the codes are discussed by considering next generation power plants, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), analyz- ing not only existing nuclear power plants, but also next generation nuclear power plants. The nuclear industry is developing new, innovative reactor designs, such as Small Modular Reactors (SMRs), High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) and others. Sub-types of these reactor designs utilize pebbles, prismatic graphite moderators, helical steam generators, in- novative fuel types, and many other design features that may not be fully analyzed by current system codes. This second part completes the series on the comparison and evaluation of the selected reactor system codes by discussing the closure relations, val- idation and limitations. These two articles indicate areas where the models can be improved to adequately address issues with new reactor design and development.

  13. Ex Parte Communication on Central Air-Conditioner Test Procedure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    with a representative from the Department of Energy (DOE) to discuss proposed amended test procedures for central air conditioners and how they would impact ICM manufacturers....

  14. The Surface Expression of Semidiurnal Internal Tides near a Strong Source at Hawaii. Part II: Interactions with Mesoscale Currents*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) ABSTRACT Observations of semidiurnal surface currents in the Kauai Channel, Hawaii, are interpreted of semidiurnal currents in the Kauai Channel (Chavanne et al. 2010, hereafter Part I) during the Hawaii OceanThe Surface Expression of Semidiurnal Internal Tides near a Strong Source at Hawaii. Part II

  15. Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part II: Effect of Batch and Bubbles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part II: Effect of Batch and thermal structure in glass melting furnaces with a throat. The effects of the following parameters This is a second part of a study concerned with the three-dimensional natural circulation in glass melting furnaces

  16. Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2002-03-01

    The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

  17. Kaman 40-kW wind system. Phase II. Fabrication and tests. Volume II. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howes, H; Perley, R

    1981-01-01

    A program is underway to design, fabricate and test a horizontal axis Wind Turbine Generator (WTG) capable of producing 40 kW electrical output power in a 20 mph wind. Results are presented of the program effort covering fabrication and testing of the Wing Turbine Generator designed earlier. A minimum of difficulties were experienced during fabrication and, after successful completion of Contractor tests through 20 mph winds, the WTG was shipped to Rocky Flats, assembled and operated there. The 40 kW WTG is presently undergoing extended tests at Rockwell's Rocky Flats test facility.

  18. Constructions of Optical Queues With a Limited Number of Recirculations--Part II: Optimal Constructions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Xuan-Chao

    2010-01-01

    One of the main problems in all-optical packet-switched networks is the lack of optical buffers, and one feasible technology for the constructions of optical buffers is to use optical crossbar Switches and fiber Delay Lines (SDL). In this two-part paper, we consider SDL constructions of optical queues with a limited number of recirculations through the optical switches and the fiber delay lines. Such a problem arises from practical feasibility considerations. In Part I, we have proposed a class of greedy constructions for certain types of optical queues, including linear compressors, linear decompressors, and 2-to-1 FIFO multiplexers, and have shown that every optimal construction among our previous constructions of these types of optical queues under the constraint of a limited number of recirculations must be a greedy construction. In Part II, the present paper, we further show that there are at most two optimal constructions and give a simple algorithm to obtain the optimal construction(s). The main idea i...

  19. Heat Pump Water Heater Durabliltiy Testing - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, VAND.

    2004-05-29

    Ten heat pump water heaters (HPWH) were placed in an environmentally controlled test facility and run through a durability test program of approximately 7300 duty cycles (actual cycles accumulated ranged from 6640 to 8324 for the ten units). Five of the units were upgraded integral types (HPWH mounted on storage tank, no pump) from the same manufacturer as those tested in our first durability program in 2001 (Baxter and Linkous, 2002). The other five were ''add-on'' type units (HPWH with circulation pump plumbed to a separate storage tank) from another manufacturer. This durability test was designed to represent approximately 7-10 years of normal operation to meet the hot water needs of a residence. The integral units operated without incident apart from two control board failures. Both of these were caused by inadvertent exposure to very hot and humid (>135 F dry bulb and >120 F dew point) conditions that occurred due to a test loop failure. It is not likely that any residential water heater would be installed where such conditions were expected so these failures are not considered a long-term reliability concern. Two of the integral HPWHs featured a condensate management system (CMS) option that effectively eliminated any need for an evaporator condensate drain, but imposed significant efficiency penalties when operating in high humidity ambient conditions. The add-on units experienced no operational failures (breakdowns with loss of hot water production) during the course of the testing. However, their control systems exhibited some performance degradation under the high temperature, high humidity test conditions--HPWHs would shut off with tank water temperatures 15-20 F lower than when operating under moderate ambient conditions. One unit developed a refrigerant leak during the test program and lost about 50% of its charge resulting in reduced efficiency. Efficiency measurements on all the integral units and four of the add-on units showed significantly higher efficiencies than conventional electric water heaters (EWH). DOE Simulated Use Tests conducted prior to starting the durability testing resulted in energy factors (EF) of about 2.3 for the integral design and 1.4 for the add-on design compared to the minimum value of 0.86 prescribed for EWHs. Based on the experience from this and the previous durability testing, there is no evidence that strongly suggests that any of the HPWHs suffered significant performance degradation after undergoing over 7000 water heat cycles.

  20. Testing LHT at the LHC Run-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Qing-Hong; Liu, Yandong

    2016-01-01

    We study the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity (LHT) in the process of $pp \\to W_H^+W_H^- \\to W^+W^- A_H A_H$ at the 14 TeV LHC. With the $W$-jet tagging technique, we demonstrate that the bulk of the model parameter space can be probed at the level of more than $5\\sigma$ in the signature of two fat $W$-jets plus large missing energy. Furthermore, we propose a novel strategy of measuring the principle parameter $f$ that is crucial to testify the LHT model and to fix mass spectrum, including dark matter particle. Our proposal can be easily incorporated into current experimental program of diboson searches at the LHC Run-II.

  1. Development of a pilot-scale kinetic extruder feeder system and test program. Phase II. Verification testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-01-12

    This report describes the work done under Phase II, the verification testing of the Kinetic Extruder. The main objective of the test program was to determine failure modes and wear rates. Only minor auxiliary equipment malfunctions were encountered. Wear rates indicate useful life expectancy of from 1 to 5 years for wear-exposed components. Recommendations are made for adapting the equipment for pilot plant and commercial applications. 3 references, 20 figures, 12 tables.

  2. MTH 1740: PRACTICE TEST 2 University Calculus II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, David

    1740: PRACTICE TEST 2 4. Write down an integral that will calculate the area of one of the petals is the function y = f(x) = 2 cosh kx + 3 sinh kx a solution of the differential equation y - 25y = 0? 2. (a ways. (c) Sketch the polar equation r = 1 + 2 cos 2. 3. Find the solution to the following differential

  3. Feasibility of Ground Testing a Moon and Mars Surface Power Reactor in EBR-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheryl Morton; Carl Baily; Tom Hill; Jim Werner

    2006-02-01

    Ground testing of a surface fission power system would be necessary to verify the design and validate reactor performance to support safe and sustained human exploration of the Moon and Mars. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has several facilities that could be adapted to support a ground test. This paper focuses on the feasibility of ground testing at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) facility and using other INL existing infrastructure to support such a test. This brief study concludes that the INL EBR-II facility and supporting infrastructure are a viable option for ground testing the surface power system. It provides features and attributes that offer advantages to locating and performing ground testing at this site, and it could support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration schedules for human exploration of the Moon. This study used the initial concept examined by the U.S. Department of Energy Inter-laboratory Design and Analysis Support Team for surface power, a lowtemperature, liquid-metal, three-loop Brayton power system. With some facility modification, the EBR-II can safely house a test chamber and perform long-term testing of the space reactor power system. The INL infrastructure is available to receive and provide bonded storage for special nuclear materials. Facilities adjacent to EBR-II can provide the clean room environment needed to assemble and store the test article assembly, disassemble the power system at the conclusion of testing, and perform posttest examination. Capability for waste disposal is also available at the INL.

  4. Modeling the probability of excitation and the defective part level as testing progresses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dworak, Jennifer Lynn

    2000-01-01

    The primary purpose of digital circuit manufacture testing is to detect defective parts so that they will not be sold to customers. Predicting the defective part level, which results after a set of test patterns has been applied, is not a simple...

  5. Faith in the algorithm, part 1: beyond the turing test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, Marko A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pepe, Alberto [UCLA

    2009-01-01

    Since the Turing test was first proposed by Alan Turing in 1950, the goal of artificial intelligence has been predicated on the ability for computers to imitate human intelligence. However, the majority of uses for the computer can be said to fall outside the domain of human abilities and it is exactly outside of this domain where computers have demonstrated their greatest contribution. Another definition for artificial intelligence is one that is not predicated on human mimicry, but instead, on human amplification, where the algorithms that are best at accomplishing this are deemed the most intelligent. This article surveys various systems that augment human and social intelligence.

  6. Expedient methods of respiratory protection. II. Leakage tests. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cooper, D.W.; Hinds, W.C.; Price, J.M.; Weker, R.; Yee, H.S.

    1983-07-01

    The following readily-available materials were tested on a manikin connected to a breathing simulator to determine the fraction of an approximately 2-..mu..m-diameter aerosol that would leak around the seal of the materials to the manikin's face: cotton/polyester shirt material, cotton handkerchief material, toweling (a wash cloth), a surgical mask (Johnson and Johnson Co., model HRI 8137), and a NIOSH-approved disposable face mask (3M, model number 8710). The leakage tests were performed to supplement the measurements of penetration through the materials, conducted as the first phase of this investigation. The leakage tests were performed with the materials held on to the face by three methods, leakage fractions being determined from comparisons with the penetration of the same aerosol for the materials fully taped to the face. At a breathing rate of 37 liters per minute, mean leakages ranged from 0.0 percent to 63 percent. Mean penetrations exclusive of leakage ranged from 0.6 percent to 39 percent. Use of nylon hosiery material (panty hose) to hold the handkerchief material or the disposable face mask to the face was found to be very effective in preventing leakage. Such a combination could be expected to reduce leakage around the handkerchief to about ten percent or less in practice, and around the mask to less than one percent, offering substantial protection from accidentally generated aerosols. The reduction in leakage around the mask provided by the hosiery material suggests the adaptation and use of such an approach in regular industrial hygiene practice. The third and final phase of this investigation is underway, in which the penetration of the materials by particles with diameters between 0.05 and 0.5 ..mu..m is being measured and the effectiveness of the methods for dose reduction in the presence of radioactive aerosols is being modeled.

  7. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II, New Construction- August 13, 2014- Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation, Moisture Monitoring Results in an R-40 Wall, was presented at the Building America webinar, High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II, on August 13, 2014.

  8. N. Garca-Pedrajas et al. (Eds.): IEA/AIE 2010, Part II, LNAI 6097, pp. 407417, 2010. Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosse, Tibor

    N. García-Pedrajas et al. (Eds.): IEA/AIE 2010, Part II, LNAI 6097, pp. 407­417, 2010. © Springer

  9. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies, Part II: Low-E Storm Windows and Window Attachments

  10. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: High Performance HVAC Systems, Part II: Low-Load HVAC Systems for Single and Multifamily Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Transcript for the Nov. 16 webinar, High Performance HVAC Systems, Part II: Low-Load HVAC Systems for Single and Multifamily Applications.

  11. David Alciatore, PhD ("Dr. Dave") ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES "End-of-game frozen-rail shots part II"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alciatore, David G.

    " Note: Supporting narrated video (NV) demonstrations, high-speed video (HSV) clips, and technical proofs the example in the video). Faster speed helps the 8-ball compress into the rail cushion more, allowing the CBDavid Alciatore, PhD ("Dr. Dave") ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES "End-of-game frozen-rail shots ­ part II

  12. Gravity Waves in a Horizontal Shear Flow. Part II: Interaction between Gravity Waves and Potential Vorticity Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Brian F.

    Gravity Waves in a Horizontal Shear Flow. Part II: Interaction between Gravity Waves and Potential perturbations and propagating internal gravity waves in a horizon- tally sheared zonal flow is investigated. In the strong stratification limit, an initial vorticity perturbation weakly excites two propagating gravity

  13. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 00, NO. 00, 2010 1 Ion Channel Biosensors--Part II: Dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamurthy, Vikram

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON NANOTECHNOLOGY, VOL. 00, NO. 00, 2010 1 Ion Channel Biosensors--Part II are described by a second-order linear6 system. The chemical kinetics of the biosensor response to analyte7 of the biosensor in transient and steady-state14 regimes. Finally, we outline the use of statistical signal

  14. Towards a Packet-based Control Theory -Part II: Rate Issues Ling Shi and Richard M. Murray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, Richard M.

    Towards a Packet-based Control Theory - Part II: Rate Issues Ling Shi and Richard M. Murray networked control structure. For details of classical information theory, readers are referred to [14], [4], [6] and for details of classical control theory, readers are referred to [10], [17], [3]. Networked

  15. Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 Unraveling the conundrum of river response to rising sea level from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    Part II of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 1 Unraveling the conundrum of river to Sedimentology, May, 2006 2 deltas is adapted to describe the response of the Fly-Strickland River system, Papua of manuscript submitted to Sedimentology, May, 2006 3 Pleistocene-Holocene eustatic sea level rise of some 120 m

  16. Radiative Impacts on the Growth of Drops within Simulated Marine Stratocumulus. Part II: Solar Zenith Angle Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Jerry Y.

    Radiative Impacts on the Growth of Drops within Simulated Marine Stratocumulus. Part II: Solar 19 November 2004) ABSTRACT The effects of solar heating at a variety of solar zenith angles ( o trajectories and is used to drive an offline microphysical model that includes the influence of radiation

  17. Projective Transformations for Interior Point Methods, Part II: Analysis of An Algorithm for Finding the Weighted Center of a Polyhedral System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freund, Robert M.

    In Part II of this study, the basic theory of Part I is applied to the problem of finding the w-center of a polyhedral system X . We present a projective transformation algorithm, analagous but more general than Karmarkar's ...

  18. WIPP SEIS-II - Comment Response Supplement, Volume I (Part 1...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    throughout the public comment period by mail, electronic mail, facsimile, and the Internet; copies of those comments are contained in Volume II of this supplement. To...

  19. Nitrogen-Doped 9-Cell Cavity Performance in a Test Cryomodule for LCLS-II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonnella, Dan; Furuta, Fumio; Ge, Mingqi; Hall, Daniel; Ho, Vivian; Hoffstaetter, Georg; Liepe, Matthias; O'Connell, Tim; Posen, Sam; Quigley, Peter; Sears, James; Veshcherevich, Vadim; Grassellino, Anna; Romanenko, Alexander; Sergatskov, Dmitri

    2014-01-01

    The superconducting RF linac for LCLS-II calls for 1.3 GHz 9-cell cavities with an average intrinsic quality factor Q0 of 2.7x10^10 at 2 K and 16 MV/m accelerating gradient. Two niobium 9-cell cavities, prepared with nitrogen-doping at Fermilab, were assembled into the Cornell Horizontal Test Cryomodule (HTC) to test cavity performance in a cryomodule that is very similar to a full LCLS-II cryomodule. The cavities met LCLS-II specifications with an average quench field of 17 MV/m and an average Q0 of 3x10^10. The sensitivity of the cavities' residual resistance to ambient magnetic field was determined to be 0.5 nOhm/mG during fast cool down. In two cool downs, a heater attached to one of the cavity beam tubes was used to induce large horizontal temperature gradients. Here we report on the results of these first tests of nitrogen-doped cavities in cryomodule, which provide critical information for the LCLS-II project.

  20. Phase II Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregg Ruskuaff

    2010-01-01

    This document, the Phase II Frenchman Flat transport report, presents the results of radionuclide transport simulations that incorporate groundwater radionuclide transport model statistical and structural uncertainty, and lead to forecasts of the contaminant boundary (CB) for a set of representative models from an ensemble of possible models. This work, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) strategy (FFACO, 1996; amended 2010), forms an essential part of the technical basis for subsequent negotiation of the compliance boundary of the Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU) by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) and National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Underground nuclear testing via deep vertical shafts was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) from 1951 until 1992. The Frenchman Flat area, the subject of this report, was used for seven years, with 10 underground nuclear tests being conducted. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), NNSA/NSO initiated the UGTA Project to assess and evaluate the effects of underground nuclear tests on groundwater at the NTS and vicinity through the FFACO (1996, amended 2010). The processes that will be used to complete UGTA corrective actions are described in the “Corrective Action Strategy” in the FFACO Appendix VI, Revision No. 2 (February 20, 2008).

  1. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  2. Feasibility of MHD submarine propulsion. Phase II, MHD propulsion: Testing in a two Tesla test facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doss, E.D.; Sikes, W.C.

    1992-09-01

    This report describes the work performed during Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the collaborative research program established between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company (NNS). Phase I of the program focused on the development of computer models for Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) propulsion. Phase 2 focused on the experimental validation of the thruster performance models and the identification, through testing, of any phenomena which may impact the attractiveness of this propulsion system for shipboard applications. The report discusses in detail the work performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, a two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented. The test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to computer model predictions. In general, the results of the tests and their comparison with the predictions indicate that thephenomena affecting the performance of MHD seawater thrusters are well understood and can be accurately predicted with the developed thruster computer models.

  3. Advanced control strategies for HVAC&R systems—An overview: Part II: Soft and fusion control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Subbaram Naidu; Craig G. Rieger

    2011-04-01

    A chronological overview of the advanced control strategies for HVAC&R is presented. The overview focuses on hard-computing or control techniques, such as proportional-integral-derivative, optimal, nonlinear, adaptive, and robust; soft-computing or control techniques, such as neural networks, fuzzy logic, genetic algorithms; and the fusion or hybrid of hard and soft control techniques. Part I focused on hardcontrol strategies; Part II focuses on soft and fusion control and some future directions in HVA&R research. This overview is not intended to be an exhaustive survey on this topic, and any omissions of other works is purely unintentional.

  4. DOE ZERH Webinar: Going Green and Building Strong: Building FORTIFIED Homes Part II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Part 1 of this series introduced the basic concepts of building and wind interactions and how the FORTIFIED building programs can reduce property damage and loss.  In Part 2, IBHS will discuss the...

  5. Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume II - Potentiometric Data Document Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    Volume II of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the potentiometric data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

  6. Fatigue Testing of Metallurgically-Bonded EBR-II Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.C. Totemeier; D.M. Wachs; D.L. Porter

    2008-05-01

    Fatigue crack growth and impact tests were performed on 2¼Cr-1Mo steel specimens machined from ex-service Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) superheater duplex tubes. The tubes had been metallurgically bonded with a 100 µm thick Ni layer; the specimens incorporated this bond layer. Impact tests were performed at temperatures from –50 to 400°C; cracks propagating from the V-notch were arrested by delamination at the bond layer for all tests with one exception at –50°C. Fatigue crack growth tests were performed at room temperature in air and at 400°C in air and humid Ar; cracks were grown at varied levels of constant ?K. In all conditions the presence of the Ni bond layer was found to result in a net retardation of growth as the crack passed through the layer. The mechanism of retardation was identified as a disruption of crack planarity and uniformity after passing through the porous bond layer. Full crack arrest was only observed in a single test performed at near-threshold ?K level (12 MPa?m) at 400°C. In this case the crack tip was blunted by oxidation of the base steel at the steel-nickel interface.

  7. Fatigue Testing of Metallurgically-Bonded EBR-II Superheater Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry C. Totemeier

    2006-12-01

    Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on 2¼Cr-1Mo steel specimens machined from ex-service Experimental Breeder Reactor – II (EBR-II) superheater duplex tubes. The tubes had been metallurgically bonded with a 100 µm thick Ni interlayer; the specimens incorporated this bond layer. Tests were performed at room temperature in air and at 400°C in air and humid Ar; cracks were grown at varied levels of constant ?K. Crack growth tests at a range of ?K were also performed on specimens machined from the shell of the superheater. In all conditions the presence of the Ni interlayer was found to result in a net retardation of growth as the crack passed through the interlayer. The mechanism of retardation was identified as a disruption of crack planarity and uniformity after passing through the porous interlayer. Full crack arrest was only observed in a single test performed at near-threshold ?K level (12 MPa?m) at 400°C. In this case the crack tip was blunted by oxidation of the base steel at the steel-interlayer interface.

  8. TEST & EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE HEDGEHOG-II PACKAGING SYSTEMS DOT-7A TYPE A CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY, D.L.

    2003-12-29

    This report documents the US. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A compliance test and evaluation results for the Hedgehog-II packaging systems. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations provide primary and secondary containment. The approved packaging configurations described within this report are designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be in solid or liquid form. Liquids transported in the approved 1 L glass bottle assembly shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 1.6. Liquids transported in all other approved configurations shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 2.0. The solid contents, including packaging, are limited in weight to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations described in this report may be transported by air, and have been evaluated as meeting the applicable International Air Transport Association/International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA/ICAO) Dangerous Goods Regulations in addition to the DOT requirements.

  9. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 3 -Case Study on an IT Equipment-testing Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 3 - Case Study on an IT Equipment-testing Center (No. 20 .............................................................................................. 12 4.3 DATA CENTER SPACE AIR TEMPERATURE AND RELATIVE HUMIDITY Summary The data center in this study had a total floor area of 3,024 square feet (ft2 ) with one

  10. Long-term evaluation of solid oxide fuel cell candidate materials in a 3-cell generic short stack fixture, Part II: sealing glass stability, microstructure and interfacial reactions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2014-03-15

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials and processing methods under realistic conditions. Part I of the work addressed the stack fixture, seal system and cell performance of a 3-cell short stack tested at 800oC for 6000h. Commercial NiO-YSZ anode-supported thin YSZ electrolyte cells with LSM cathodes were used for assessment and were tested in constant current mode with dilute (~50% H2) fuel versus air. Part II of the work examined the sealing glass stability, microstructure development, interfacial reactions, and volatility issues. Part III of the work investigated the stability of Ce-(Mn,Co) spinel coating, AISI441 metallic interconnect, alumina coating, and cell degradation. After 6000h of testing, the refractory sealing glass YSO77 (Ba-Sr-Y-B-Si) showed desirable chemical compatibility with YSZ electrolyte in that no discernable interfacial reaction was identified, consistent with thermodynamic calculations. In addition, no glass penetration into the thin electrolyte was observed. At the aluminized AISI441 interface, the protective alumina coating appeared to be corroded by the sealing glass. Air side interactions appeared to be more severe than fuel side interactions. Metal species such as Cr, Mn, and Fe were detected in the glass, but were limited to the vicinity of the interface. No alkaline earth chromates were found at the air side. Volatility was also studied in a similar glass and weight loss in a wet reducing environment was determined. Using the steady-state volatility data, the life time (40,000h) weight loss of refractory sealing glass YSO77 was estimated to be less than 0.1 wt%.

  11. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION Part II AH-1G ROTOR IN LOW SPEED DESCENT FLIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;5.1 Details of the Flight Test A flight test of the AH-1G helicopter was performed at NASA Ames Research and Acoustics Test (TAAT) was conducted on an AH-1G Cobra. It used highly instrumented rotor blades collected from a few pressure ports on the blade. Several calculations for this helicopter have been

  12. Anatomical noise in contrast-enhanced digital mammography. Part II. Dual-energy imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Melissa L.; Yaffe, Martin J.; Mainprize, James G.; Carton, Ann-Katherine; Saab-Puong, Sylvie; Iordache, R?zvan; Muller, Serge; Jong, Roberta A.; Dromain, Clarisse

    2013-08-15

    Purpose: Dual-energy (DE) contrast-enhanced digital mammography (CEDM) uses an iodinated contrast agent in combination with digital mammography (DM) to evaluate lesions on the basis of tumor angiogenesis. In DE imaging, low-energy (LE) and high-energy (HE) images are acquired after contrast administration and their logarithms are subtracted to cancel the appearance of normal breast tissue. Often there is incomplete signal cancellation in the subtracted images, creating a background “clutter” that can impair lesion detection. This is the second component of a two-part report on anatomical noise in CEDM. In Part I the authors characterized the anatomical noise for single-energy (SE) temporal subtraction CEDM by a power law, with model parameters ? and ?. In this work the authors quantify the anatomical noise in DE CEDM clinical images and compare this with the noise in SE CEDM. The influence on the anatomical noise of the presence of iodine in the breast, the timing of imaging postcontrast administration, and the x-ray energy used for acquisition are each evaluated.Methods: The power law parameters, ? and ?, were measured from unprocessed LE and HE images and from DE subtracted images to quantify the anatomical noise. A total of 98 DE CEDM cases acquired in a previous clinical pilot study were assessed. Conventional DM images from 75 of the women were evaluated for comparison with DE CEDM. The influence of the imaging technique on anatomical noise was determined from an analysis of differences between the power law parameters as measured in DM, LE, HE, and DE subtracted images for each subject.Results: In DE CEDM, weighted image subtraction lowers ? to about 1.1 from 3.2 and 3.1 in LE and HE unprocessed images, respectively. The presence of iodine has a small but significant effect in LE images, reducing ? by about 0.07 compared to DM, with ? unchanged. Increasing the x-ray energy, from that typical in DM to a HE beam, significantly decreases ? by about 2 × 10{sup ?5} mm{sup 2}, and lowers ? by about 0.14 compared to LE images. A comparison of SE and DE CEDM at 4 min postcontrast shows equivalent power law parameters in unprocessed images, and lower ? and ? by about 3 × 10{sup ?5} mm{sup 2} and 0.50, respectively, in DE versus SE subtracted images.Conclusions: Image subtraction in both SE and DE CEDM reduces ? by over a factor of 2, while maintaining ? below that in DM. Given the equivalent ? between SE and DE unprocessed CEDM images, and the smaller anatomical noise in the DE subtracted images, the DE approach may have an advantage over SE CEDM. It will be necessary to test this potential advantage in future lesion detectability experiments, which account for realistic lesion signals. The authors' results suggest that LE images could be used in place of DM images in CEDM exam interpretation.

  13. II*

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See full Hydrocarbon Gas2 II Now

  14. LEFT QUOTIENTS OF C*-ALGEBRAS, II: ATOMIC PARTS OF LEFT QUOTIENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Ngai-Ching

    A is the direct sum of type I factors and (1 - z)A has no type I factor direct summand of A. In particular, z}. Date: May 27, 1998; a version submitted to J. Operator Theory. 1991 Mathematics Subject Classification atomic parts. Partially supported by National Science Council of Republic of China, NSC 86-2115-M110

  15. Single-cycle mixed-fluid LNG process Part II: Optimal operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    consider Case 8 from part I, where a liquid turbine is included both in the expansion of natural gas of natural gas and it has been optimized in several publications (Lee et al., 2002; Del Nogal et al., 2005: rotational speed 4 Cooler: flow of sea water (SW) in cooler 5 Load: Feed flow of natural gas (can also

  16. Preprint Computer Methods in Applied Mechanics and Engineering THE TWOLEVEL FETI METHOD PART II: EXTENSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandel, Jan

    the finite element discretization of static and dynamic plate bending problems. In this paper, we extend in Part I of this work [6] and in [7] to fourth­order plate bending problems. The main idea introduced) was mathematically proved in [8] for second­order elasticity problems, and in [7] for fourth­order plate bending

  17. Tropical Cyclogenesis Associated with Rossby Wave Energy Dispersion of a Preexisting Typhoon. Part II: Numerical Simulations*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Bin

    Tropical Cyclogenesis Associated with Rossby Wave Energy Dispersion of a Preexisting Typhoon. Part (1987) and Fiorino and Els- berry (1989) showed that a cyclonic vortex experiences Rossby wave energy) ABSTRACT The cyclogenesis events associated with the tropical cyclone (TC) energy dispersion are simulated

  18. HIERARCHICAL METHODOLOGY FOR MODELING HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEMS PART II: DETAILED MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardy, B; Donald L. Anton, D

    2008-12-22

    There is significant interest in hydrogen storage systems that employ a media which either adsorbs, absorbs or reacts with hydrogen in a nearly reversible manner. In any media based storage system the rate of hydrogen uptake and the system capacity is governed by a number of complex, coupled physical processes. To design and evaluate such storage systems, a comprehensive methodology was developed, consisting of a hierarchical sequence of models that range from scoping calculations to numerical models that couple reaction kinetics with heat and mass transfer for both the hydrogen charging and discharging phases. The scoping models were presented in Part I [1] of this two part series of papers. This paper describes a detailed numerical model that integrates the phenomena occurring when hydrogen is charged and discharged. A specific application of the methodology is made to a system using NaAlH{sub 4} as the storage media.

  19. Search for Low Mass Exotic mesonic structures. Part II: attempts to understand the experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Tatischeff; E. Tomasi-Gustafsson

    2007-10-09

    Our previous paper, part I of the same study, shows the different experimental spectra used to conclude on the genuine existence of narrow, weakly excited mesonic structures, having masses below and a little above the pion (M=139.56 MeV) mass. This work \\cite{previous} was instigated by the observation, in the $\\Sigma^{+}$ disintegration: $\\Sigma^{+}\\to$pP$^{0}$, P$^{0}\\to\\mu^{-}\\mu^{+}$ \\cite{park}, of a narrow range of dimuon masses. The authors conclude on the existence of a neutral intermediate state P$_{0}$, with a mass M=214.3 MeV $\\pm$ 0.5 MeV. We present here some attempts to understand the possible nature of the structures observed in part I.

  20. Experimental Assessment of Toughness in Ceramic Matrix Composites using the J-integral with Digital Image Correlation Part II: Application to Ceramic Matrix Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Awtar, Shorya

    Experimental Assessment of Toughness in Ceramic Matrix Composites using the J-integral with Digital Image Correlation Part II: Application to Ceramic Matrix Composites J. Tracy, A. Waas, S. Daly AbstractCf/SiCc ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). In Part I, line and area integral adaptations of the J-integral were

  1. Free-piston Stirling engine experimental program: Part 1. Baseline test summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berggren, R.; Moynihan, T.

    1983-06-01

    Free-Piston Stirling Engine experimental data are presented from a series of tests that establish the operating characteristics of the engine and determine performance repeatability. The operating envelope of the engine was to determine maximum parameter range and repeatability. Tests were then carried out in which individual operating parameters were varied while others were maintained constant. These data establish the baseline operation of the engine as a preliminary to a series of tests in which several suspected sources of energy loss are investigated by changing the engine geometry to isolate and magnify each suspected loss mechanism. Performance with the geometry change is compared against baseline operation to quantify the magnitude of the loss mechanism under investigation. The results of the loss mechanism investigation are presented in Part 2 of this report.

  2. Full Scale Cyclic Testing of Foundation Support Systems for Highway Bridges. Part II: Abutment Backwalls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    4th Int. Conf. on Soil Mechanics and Foundation Eng. , Vol.influence of strains in soil mechanics,” Geotechnique, 20(K. (1943). Theoretical Soil Mechanics, Wiley, New York.

  3. Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

    2007-01-01

    Diffuser Design Ratio (DDR) – This refers to the ratio ofdiffusers to maintain the same DDR). In some chart legendsnumber of diffusers, airflow, DDR and extraction rate. The

  4. Full Scale Cyclic Testing of Foundation Support Systems for Highway Bridges. Part II: Abutment Backwalls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    from the Caltrans Seismic Design Criteria and US Navy design1043–1053. Seismic Design Criteria, Caltrans. (2004) Seismicversion 1.3. Seismic Design Criteria, Caltrans. (2006)

  5. Energy performance of air distribution systems part II: room air stratification full scale testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Tom; Lukaschek, Wolfgang; Dickeroff, Darryl; Bauman, Fred

    2007-01-01

    and M. Shi, 2002. “Thermal Stratification Performance ofthermal plume is different than for internal loads, the stratificationstratification performance of UFAD systems under cooling operation is based on the interaction between warm thermal

  6. CHARACTERIZATION OF TANK 16H ANNULUS SAMPLES PART II: LEACHING RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, M.; Reboul, S.

    2012-06-19

    The closure of Tank 16H will require removal of material from the annulus of the tank. Samples from Tank 16H annulus were characterized and tested to provide information to evaluate various alternatives for removing the annulus waste. The analysis found all four annulus samples to be composed mainly of Si, Na, and Al and lesser amounts of other elements. The XRD data indicate quartz (SiO{sub 2}) and sodium aluminum nitrate silicate hydrate (Na{sub 8}(Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24})(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}.4H{sub 2}O) as the predominant crystalline mineral phases in the samples. The XRD data also indicate the presence of crystalline sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}), sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}), gibbsite (Al(OH){sub 3}), hydrated sodium bicarbonate (Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O), and muscovite (KAl{sub 2}(AlSi{sub 3}O{sub 10})(OH){sub 2}). Based on the weight of solids remaining at the end of the test, the water leaching test results indicate 20-35% of the solids dissolved after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of water at 45 C. The chemical analysis of the leachates and the XRD results of the remaining solids indicate sodium salts of nitrate, nitrite, sulfate, and possibly carbonate/bicarbonate make up the majority of the dissolved material. The majority of these salts were dissolved in the first water contact and simply diluted with each subsequent water contact. The water leaching removed large amounts of the uranium in two of the samples and approximately 1/3 of the {sup 99}Tc from all four samples. Most of the other radionuclides analyzed showed low solubility in the water leaching test. The oxalic acid leaching test result indicate approximately 34-47% of the solids in the four annulus samples will dissolve after three contacts with an approximately 3:1 volume of acid to solids at 45 C. The same sodium salts found in the water leaching test comprise the majority of dissolved material in the oxalic acid leaching test. However, the oxalic acid was somewhat more effective in dissolving radionuclides than the water leach. In contrast to the water leaching results, most constituents continued to dissolve during subsequent cycles of oxalic acid leaching. The somewhat higher dissolution found in the oxalic acid leaching test versus the water leaching test might be offset by the tendency of the oxalic acid solutions to take on a gel-like consistency. The filtered solids left behind after three oxalic acid contacts were sticky and formed large clumps after drying. These two observations could indicate potential processing difficulties with solutions and solids from oxalic acid leaching. The gel formation might be avoided by using larger volumes of the acid. Further testing would be recommended before using oxalic acid to dissolve the Tank 16H annulus waste to ensure no processing difficulties are encountered in the full scale process.

  7. Future use of BI-GAS facility. Final report, Part II. [Other possible uses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    The 120 tpd BI-GAS pilot plant, intended to produce SNG at high pressure, was completed in 1976. For the next three and a half years, the operator, Stearns-Roger Inc., was engaged in operating the plant while overcoming a series of mechanical problems that have prevented the plant from running at design capacity and pressure. Since July 1980, these problems have apparently been corrected and considerable progress was made. In late 1979, the Yates Congressional Committee directed DOE to investigate the possibility of establishing an entrained-bed gasifier test facility at the site. In January 1981, the DOE established a study group composed of DOE and UOP/SDC personnel to determine how best to use the BI-GAS facility. The group considered four possibilities: Continue operation of the facility in accordance with the technical program plan developed by DOE and Stearns-Roger; modify the plant into an entrained-bed facility for testing components and processes; mothball the facility, or dismantle the facility. The group took the view that modifying the plant into a test facility would increase substantially the amount of engineering data available to the designers of commercial gasification plants. Since it appears that syngas plants will be of commercial interest sooner than SNG plants will, it was decided that the facility should test syngas production components and processes at high pressure. Consequently, it was recommended that: Operation of the plant be continued, both to collect data and to prove the BI-GAS process, as long as the schedule of the technical program plan is met; Begin at once to prepare a detailed design for modifying the BI-GAS plant to a high-pressure, entrained flow syngas test facility; and Implement the modification plan as soon as the BI-GAS process is proven or it becomes apparent that progress is unsatisfactory.

  8. Electric Vehicle Communications Standards Testing and Validation - Phase II: SAE J2931/1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pratt, Richard M.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2013-01-15

    Vehicle to grid communication standards enable interoperability among vehicles, charging stations and utility providers and provide the capability to implement charge management. Several standards initiatives by the Society of Automobile Engineers (SAE), International Standards Organization and International Electrotechnical Commission (ISO/IEC), and ZigBee/HomePlug Alliance are developing requirements for communication messages and protocols. Recent work by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in collaboration with SAE and automobile manufacturers has identified vehicle to grid communication performance requirements and developed a test plan as part of SAE J2931/1 committee work. This laboratory test plan was approved by the SAE J2931/1 committee and included test configurations, test methods, and performance requirements to verify reliability, robustness, repeatability, maximum communication distance, and authentication features of power line carrier (PLC) communication modules at the internet protocol layer level. The goal of the testing effort was to select a communication technology that would enable automobile manufacturers to begin the development and implementation process. The EPRI/Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) testing teams divided the testing so that results for each test could be presented by two teams, performing the tests independently. The PNNL team performed narrowband PLC testing including the Texas Instruments (TI) Concerto, Ariane Controls AC-CPM1, and the MAXIM Tahoe 2 evaluation boards. The scope of testing was limited to measuring the vendor systems communication performance between Electric Vehicle Support Equipment (EVSE) and plug-in electric vehicles (PEV). The testing scope did not address PEV’s CAN bus to PLC or PLC to EVSE (Wi-Fi, cellular, PLC Mains, etc.) communication integration. In particular, no evaluation was performed to delineate the effort needed to translate the IPv6/SEP2.0 messages to PEV’s CAN bus. The J2931/1 laboratory test results were presented to the SAE membership on March 20-22, 2012. The SAE committee decided to select HomePlug GreenPHY (HPGP) as the communication technology to use between the PEV and EVSE. No technology completely met all performance requirements. Both the MAXIM Tahoe 2 and TI Concerto met the 100Kbps throughput requirement, are estimated to meet the latency measurement performance, and met the control pilot impairment requirements. But HPGP demonstrated the potential to provide a data throughput rate of 10x of the requirement and either met or showed the potential to meet the other requirements with further development.

  9. Cold flow model for the H-Coal reactor. Part II. Data correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasalos, I.A.; Rundell, D.N.; Bild, E.M.; Tatterson, D.F.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments at ambient temperatures with extrudates of desulfurization catalyst fluidized with mixtures of nitrogen and coal char/kerosene slurries are used to simulate the fluid dynamics of the H-Coal reactor at actual operating conditions. Data from these studies presented in Part I are used to establish the validity of a model giving the volume fraction occupied by the gas, the slurry, and the catalyst phase. The importance of bubble terminal velocity and solids holdup in the gas wake volume in explaining bed contraction is discussed.

  10. Introduction to M(atrix) theory and noncommutative geometry, Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Konechny; A. Schwarz

    2001-07-29

    This review paper is a continuation of hep-th/0012145 and it deals primarily with noncommutative ${\\mathbb R}^{d}$ spaces. We start with a discussion of various algebras of smooth functions on noncommutative ${\\mathbb R}^{d}$ that have different asymptotic behavior at infinity. We pay particular attention to the differences arising when working with nonunital algebras and the unitized ones obtained by adjoining the unit element. After introducing main objects of noncommutative geometry over those algebras such as inner products, modules, connections, etc., we continue with a study of soliton and instanton solutions in field theories defined on these spaces. The discussion of solitons includes the basic facts regarding the exact soliton solutions in the Yang-Mills-Higgs systems as well as an elementary discussion of approximate solitons in scalar theories in the $\\theta \\to \\infty$ limit. We concentrate on the module structure and topological numbers characterizing the solitons. The section on instantons contains a thorough description of noncommutative ADHM construction, a discussion of gauge triviality conditions at infinity and the structure of a module underlying the ADHM instanton solution. Although some familiarity with general ideas of noncommutative geometry reviewed in the first part is expected from the reader, this part is largely independent from the first one.

  11. Life-cycle analysis results for geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems: Part II.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J.L.; Clark, C.E.; Yuan, L.; Han, J.; Wang, M.

    2012-02-08

    A study has been conducted on the material demand and life-cycle energy and emissions performance of power-generating technologies in addition to those reported in Part I of this series. The additional technologies included concentrated solar power, integrated gasification combined cycle, and a fossil/renewable (termed hybrid) geothermal technology, more specifically, co-produced gas and electric power plants from geo-pressured gas and electric (GPGE) sites. For the latter, two cases were considered: gas and electricity export and electricity-only export. Also modeled were cement, steel and diesel fuel requirements for drilling geothermal wells as a function of well depth. The impact of the construction activities in the building of plants was also estimated. The results of this study are consistent with previously reported trends found in Part I of this series. Among all the technologies considered, fossil combustion-based power plants have the lowest material demand for their construction and composition. On the other hand, conventional fossil-based power technologies have the highest greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, followed by the hybrid and then two of the renewable power systems, namely hydrothermal flash power and biomass-based combustion power. GHG emissions from U.S. geothermal flash plants were also discussed, estimates provided, and data needs identified. Of the GPGE scenarios modeled, the all-electric scenario had the highest GHG emissions. Similar trends were found for other combustion emissions.

  12. Nanodiamond in tellurite glass Part II: practical nanodiamond-doped fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Yinlan; Johnson, Brett C; Ohshima, Takeshi; Greentree, Andrew D; Gibson, Brant C; Monro, Tanya M; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike

    2014-01-01

    Tellurite glass fibers with embedded nanodiamond are attractive materials for quantum photonics applications. Reducing the loss of these fibers in the 600-800 nm wavelength range of nanodiamond fluorescence is essential to exploit the unique properties of nanodiamond in the new hybrid material. The first part of this study reported the origin of loss in nanodiamond-doped glass and impact of glass fabrication conditions. Here, we report the fabrication of nanodiamond-doped tellurite fibers with significantly reduced loss in the visible through further understanding of the impact of glass fabrication conditions on the interaction of the glass melt with the embedded nanodiamond. We fabricated tellurite fibers containing nanodiamond in concentrations up to 0.7 ppm-weight, while reducing the loss by more than an order of magnitude down to 10 dB/m at 600-800 nm.

  13. Detecting spatial patterns with the cumulant function. Part II: An application to El Nino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernacchia, Alberto; Vrac, Mathieu; Yiou, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    The spatial coherence of a measured variable (e.g. temperature or pressure) is often studied to determine the regions where this variable varies the most or to find teleconnections, i.e. correlations between specific regions. While usual methods to find spatial patterns, such as Principal Components Analysis (PCA), are constrained by linear symmetries, the dependence of variables such as temperature or pressure at different locations is generally nonlinear. In particular, large deviations from the sample mean are expected to be strongly affected by such nonlinearities. Here we apply a newly developed nonlinear technique (Maxima of Cumulant Function, MCF) for the detection of typical spatial patterns that largely deviate from the mean. In order to test the technique and to introduce the methodology, we focus on the El Nino/Southern Oscillation and its spatial patterns. We find nonsymmetric temperature patterns corresponding to El Nino and La Nina, and we compare the results of MCF with other techniques, such a...

  14. Rate of reduction of ore-carbon composites: Part II. Modeling of reduction in extended composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fortini, O.M.; Fruehan, R.J. [US Steel Research & Technological Center, Monroeville, PA (United States)

    2005-12-01

    A new process for ironmaking was proposed using a rotary hearth furnace and an iron bath smelter to produce iron employing wood charcoal as an energy source and reductant. This paper examines reactions in composite pellet samples with sizes close to sizes used in industrial practice (10 to 16 min in diameter). A model was constructed using the combined kinetic mechanism developed in Part I of this series of articles along with equations for the computation of pellet temperature and shrinkage during the reaction. The analysis of reaction rates measured for pellets with wood charcoal showed that heat transfer plays a significant role in their overall rate of reaction at elevated temperatures. The slower rates measured in pellets containing coal char show that the intrinsic kinetics of carbon oxidation is more significant than heat transfer. Model calculations suggest that the rates are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity of pellets containing wood charcoal and are less sensitive to the external conditions of heat transfer. It was seen that the changes in pellet surface area and diameter due to shrinkage introduce little change on reaction rates. The model developed provides an adequate description of pellets of wood charcoal up to circa 90% of reduction. Experimentally determined rates of reduction of iron oxide by wood charcoal were approximately 5 to 10 times faster than rates measured in pellets with coal char.

  15. Rich methane laminar flames doped with light unsaturated hydrocarbons. Part II: 1,3butadiene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gueniche, Hadj-Ali; Fournet, René; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

    2007-01-01

    In line with the study presented in the part I of this paper, the structure of a laminar rich premixed methane flame doped with 1,3-butadiene has been investigated. The flame contains 20.7% (molar) of methane, 31.4% of oxygen and 3.3% of 1,3-butadiene, corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 1.8, and a ratio C4H6 / CH4 of 16 %. The flame has been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa using argon as dilutant, with a gas velocity at the burner of 36 cm/s at 333 K. The temperature ranged from 600 K close to the burner up to 2150 K. Quantified species included usual methane C0-C2 combustion products and 1,3-butadiene, but also propyne, allene, propene, propane, 1,2-butadiene, butynes, vinylacetylene, diacetylene, 1,3-pentadiene, 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene (isoprene), 1-pentene, 3-methyl-1-butene, benzene and toluene. In order to model these new results, some improvements have been made to a mechanism previously developed in our laboratory for the reactions of C3-C4 unsaturated hydrocarbons. The main reacti...

  16. An Ansatz Regarding Relativistic Space Travel Part II-Propulsion Realities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murad, Paul A

    2008-01-21

    Travel to the stars can involve a perilous journey in an unfriendly space-time continuum that can include singularities, nonlinear events, gravity as a function of both position and vehicle velocity, and extra dimensional effects discussed in Part I. Such a device may possibly use field propulsion technology. Although several field propulsion schemes exist, a proposed candidate is based upon using an electromagnetic drive that uses a rotating magnetic field superimposed on the spacecraft's stationary or static electric field. This is comparable to a Searl generator and the field interaction would generate an electromagnetic vortex to create nonlinear gravitational effects possibly due to an inverse Gertsenshtein relationship to push against the intrinsic gravitational field of a planet. Moreover, changing alignment of the magnetic field axis with the electric field will induce a margin of lateral controllability. Issues such as assessing this combined effect of using both electric and magnetic fields are discussed. Finally, the need for experimental data is stressed to validate these otherwise very speculative theoretical notions.

  17. Kenaf Bast Fibers—Part II: Inorganic Nanoparticle Impregnation for Polymer Composites

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shi, Jinshu; Shi, Sheldon Q.; Barnes, H. Michael; Horstemeyer, Mark F.; Wang, Ge

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate an inorganic nanoparticle impregnation (INI) technique to improve the compatibility between kenaf bast fibers and polyolefin matrices. The Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) was used to examine the surface morphology of the INI-treated fibers showing that the CaCO 3 nanoparticle crystals grew onto the fiber surface. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) was used to verify the CaCO 3 nanoparticle deposits on the fiber surface. The tension tests of the individual fiber were conducted, and the results showed that the tensile strength of the fibers increased significantly (more than 20%) after the INI treatments.more »Polymer composites were fabricated using the INI-treated fiber as reinforcement and polypropylene (PP) as the matrix. The results showed that the INI treatments improved the compatibility between kenaf fibers and PP matrix. The tensile modulus and tensile strength of the composites reinforced with INI-treated fibers increased by 25.9% and 10.4%, respectively, compared to those reinforced with untreated kenaf fibers. « less

  18. Analysis of an industrial cogeneration unit driven by a gas engine. Part 1: Experimental testing under full and part-load operating conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Lucia, M.; Lanfranchi, C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes and analyzes an industrial cogeneration plant driven by a gas fueled reciprocating engine installed in a textile factory. It presents the results of experimental testing conducted under full and part-load operating conditions, as well as first-law energy considerations. The experimental tests conducted on the cogeneration unit proved the validity of the plant design and also enabled evaluation of part-load performance, which is the most common operating mode in cogeneration plants in the small-size industries which typical of central Italy.

  19. Standard test method for uranium in presence of plutonium by iron(II) reduction in phosphoric acid followed by chromium(VI) titration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    Standard test method for uranium in presence of plutonium by iron(II) reduction in phosphoric acid followed by chromium(VI) titration

  20. Trading places - an innovative SO{sub 2} trading program to mitigate potential adverse impacts on class I areas: part II. Mitigation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis Militana; Cindy Huber; Christopher Colbert; Chris Arrington; Don Shepherd

    2005-08-01

    This is the second of two articles describing a plan that was developed to mitigate the effects of acid deposition and visibility impairment in four Class I areas from the proposed Longview Power Project. Part I (published in July 2005) discussed the air quality impacts of the proposed coal-fired power plant. Part II discusses the mitigation plan. 2 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  1. THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

    2010-08-31

    This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

  2. TESTING GRAVITATIONAL LENSING AS THE SOURCE OF ENHANCED STRONG Mg II ABSORPTION TOWARD GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rapoport, Sharon; Onken, Christopher A.; Schmidt, Brian P.; Tucker, Brad E. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia); Wyithe, J. Stuart B. [School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria 3010 (Australia); Levan, Andrew J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-08-01

    Sixty percent of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) reveal strong Mg II absorbing systems, which is a factor of {approx}2 times the rate seen along lines of sight to quasars. Previous studies argue that the discrepancy in the strong Mg II covering factor is most likely to be the result of either quasars being obscured due to dust or the consequence of many GRBs being strongly gravitationally lensed. We analyze observations of quasars that show strong foreground Mg II absorption. We find that GRB lines of sight pass closer to bright galaxies than would be expected for random lines of sight within the impact parameter expected for strong Mg II absorption. While this cannot be explained by obscuration in the GRB sample, it is a natural consequence of gravitational lensing. Upon examining the particular configurations of galaxies near a sample of GRBs with strong Mg II absorption, we find several intriguing lensing candidates. Our results suggest that lensing provides a viable contribution to the observed enhancement of strong Mg II absorption along lines of sight to GRBs, and we outline the future observations required to test this hypothesis conclusively.

  3. Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Dennis

    Computing and Partitioning Cloud Feedbacks Using Cloud Property Histograms. Part II: Attribution to Changes in Cloud Amount, Altitude, and Optical Depth MARK D. ZELINKA Department of Atmospheric Sciences received 12 May 2011, in final form 15 November 2011) ABSTRACT Cloud radiative kernels and histograms

  4. Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II: Radiation of Gravity Waves from a Gaussian Jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Brian F.

    Momentum and Energy Transport by Gravity Waves in Stochastically Driven Stratified Flows. Part II structures that dominate wave momentum and energy transport. When the interior of a typical midlatitude jet and energy at jet interior critical levels. Longer waves transport momentum and energy away from the jet

  5. _Part II - Contract Clauses

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... 254 132. FAR 52.223-15 ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN ENERGY-CONSUMING PRODUCTS (DEC 2007) (ADDED M473) ......

  6. PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPoweredE Contract No.No. 330 J.2-1 ContractI

  7. _Part II - Contract Clauses

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en46A NAME AND TITLE OFPart I -to

  8. Syracuse Univesity Test Report On Uptake Factor Resulting From A Dropped Storage Container - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Zhi; Zhang, Jianshun S.

    2012-01-01

    Under certain circumstances, powder from an accidently dropped container can become airborne and inhaled by people nearby such as those who are moving the containers. The inhaled fine particles can deposit on respiratory tracts and lungs, causing asthma, lung cancer, and other acute respiratory illnesses and chronic symptoms. The objective of this study was to develop a standard procedure to measure the airborne concentrations of different size particles within the vicinity of a dropped container where a significant portion of the contained powder is ejected. Tungsten oxide (WO{sub 3}) was selected in this study to represent relatively heavy powders (7.16 g/cm3 specific gravity for WO{sub 3}). A typical can with the outer dimensions of 4.25” diameter and 4.875” tall was used as the container. The powder was dropped in two different configurations: 1) contained within a can covered by a lid that has a 0.25” diameter hole, and 2) contained within a can without a lid. The packing volume of the powder was 51.4 in3 (842.7 cm{sup 3}) and the target mass was 1936 g. The tests were carried out in a full-scale stainless steel environmental chamber with an interior volume of 852 ft3 (24.1 m3). The chamber system includes an internal recirculation loop with a rectangular air diffuser and 10 variable frequency drive fans to provide a typical room air recirculation flow pattern. Two air filters were installed in the chamber air supply duct and return duct to achieve the required low background particle concentration. The initial chamber air conditions were set at 70°F (± 5°F) and 50% (± 10%) RH. A supporting frame and releasing device were designed and built to trigger consistently the dropping of the can. The particle sampling inlet was placed 5 ft above the floor and 6 inches laterally away from the can’s falling path. Concentrations of particles between 0.5 ?m and 20 ?m were recorded in units of mass and number of particles per unit volume. The data acquisition rate was once every 2 seconds during the first 2 hours. A test procedure was developed and verified. A total of thirty two drop tests were performed, eight in Phase I and twenty four in Phase II, covering variations in dropping height (8 ft or 4 ft from the floor), room air movement (0.25-0.30 m/s or 0.10-0.15 m/s near the ceiling), landing scenario (on a flat plate or a block), and lid condition (¼” lid hole or no lid). There were ten tests with flat plate and ¼” lid hole, ten tests with flat plate no lid and twelve tests with block no lid.

  9. McDonnell 40-kW Giromill Wind System. Phase II. Fabrication and test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brulle, R

    1980-06-01

    A 40 kW vertical axis windmill called a ''Giromill'' was fabricated, erected, and tested. The system design is described as well as some design changes made during fabrication. Manufacturing cost estimates are updated. Fabrication of the turbine blades, support arms, and fixed and rotating tower is described as well as the tests. Testing included control systems acceptance tests; Giromill system acceptance tests; structural, mechanical, control system and electric generation operational tests; and performance tests connected to the utility grid. (LEW)

  10. Final Report: Part 1. In-Place Filter Testing Instrument for Nuclear Material Containers. Part 2. Canister Filter Test Standards for Aerosol Capture Rates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Austin Douglas; Runnels, Joel T.; Moore, Murray E.; Reeves, Kirk Patrick

    2014-11-02

    A portable instrument has been developed to assess the functionality of filter sand o-rings on nuclear material storage canisters, without requiring removal of the canister lid. Additionally, a set of fifteen filter standards were procured for verifying aerosol leakage and pressure drop measurements in the Los Alamos Filter Test System. The US Department of Energy uses several thousand canisters for storing nuclear material in different chemical and physical forms. Specialized filters are installed into canister lids to allow gases to escape, and to maintain an internal ambient pressure while containing radioactive contaminants. Diagnosing the condition of container filters and canister integrity is important to ensure worker and public safety and for determining the handling requirements of legacy apparatus. This report describes the In-Place-Filter-Tester, the Instrument Development Plan and the Instrument Operating Method that were developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory to determine the “as found” condition of unopened storage canisters. The Instrument Operating Method provides instructions for future evaluations of as-found canisters packaged with nuclear material. Customized stainless steel canister interfaces were developed for pressure-port access and to apply a suction clamping force for the interface. These are compatible with selected Hagan-style and SAVY-4000 storage canisters that were purchased from NFT (Nuclear Filter Technology, Golden, CO). Two instruments were developed for this effort: an initial Los Alamos POC (Proof-of-Concept) unit and the final Los Alamos IPFT system. The Los Alamos POC was used to create the Instrument Development Plan: (1) to determine the air flow and pressure characteristics associated with canister filter clogging, and (2) to test simulated configurations that mimicked canister leakage paths. The canister leakage scenarios included quantifying: (A) air leakage due to foreign material (i.e. dust and hair) fouling of o-rings, (B) leakage through simulated cracks in o-rings, and (C) air leakage due to inadequately tightened canister lids. The Los Alamos POC instrument determined pertinent air flow and pressure quantities, and this knowledge was used to specify a customized Isaac® (Z axis, Salt Lake City, UT) leak test module. The final Los Alamos IPFT (incorporating the Isaac® leak test module) was used to repeat the tests in the Instrument Development Plan (with simulated filter clogging tests and canister leak pathway tests). The Los Alamos IPFT instrument is capable of determining filter clogging and leak rate conditions, without requiring removal of the container lid. The IPFT measures pressure decay rate from 1.7E-03 in WC/sec to 1.7E-01 in WC/sec. On the same unit scale, helium leak testing of canisters has a range from 5.7E-07 in WC/sec to 1.9E-03 in WC/sec. For a 5-quart storage canister, the IPFT measures equivalent leak flow rates from 0.03 to 3.0 cc/sec. The IPFT does not provide the same sensitivity as helium leak testing, but is able to gauge the assembled condition of as-found and in-situ canisters.

  11. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  12. Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

  13. Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colella, Whitney G.

    2010-06-01

    Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

  14. Deep-Sea Research II 55 (2008) 432454 Euphausiid distribution along the Western Antarctic Peninsula--Part B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanton, Tim

    2008-01-01

    and nutrient-rich circumpolar deep water onto the shelf were present, despite such intrusions being thoughtDeep-Sea Research II 55 (2008) 432­454 Euphausiid distribution along the Western Antarctic Physics and Engineering, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, MA 02543, USA Accepted 10

  15. Sandia Energy - Leading Edge Erosion Phase II Wind Tunnel Test Begins

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal Energy &Water Power ProgramLarge EddyAvailable forLaunch

  16. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-05-01

    In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

  17. Performance of Charcoal Cookstoves for Haiti Part 1: Results from the Water Boiling Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Booker, Kayje

    2012-01-01

    is brought to a boil. 3. Simmer (low power): Immediatelywater is maintained at a simmer for 45 minutes. In this60% open during the low power (simmer phase) test. The same

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--I: FUNDAMENTAL THEORY AND APPLICATIONS, VOL. 44, NO. 10, OCTOBER 1997 1027 [1] M. J. Ogorzalek, "Taming chaos--Part II: Control," IEEE Trans. Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, James J.

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS--I: FUNDAMENTAL THEORY AND APPLICATIONS, VOL. 44, NO. 10, OCTOBER 1997 1027 REFERENCES [1] M. J. Ogorzalek, "Taming chaos--Part II: Control," IEEE Trans. Circuits

  19. Wireless Roadside Inspection Phase II Tennessee Commercial Mobile Radio Services Pilot Test Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzese, Oscar; Lascurain, Mary Beth; Capps, Gary J; Siekmann, Adam

    2011-05-01

    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program is researching the feasibility and value of electronically assessing truck and bus driver and vehicle safety at least 25 times more often than is possible using only roadside physical inspections. The WRI program is evaluating the potential benefits to both the motor carrier industry and to government. These potential benefits include reduction in accidents, fatalities and injuries on our highways and keeping safe and legal drivers and vehicles moving on the highways. WRI Pilot tests were conducted to prototype, test and demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of electronically collecting safety data message sets from in-service commercial vehicles and performing wireless roadside inspections using three different communication methods. This report summarizes the design, conduct and results of the Tennessee CMRS WRI Pilot Test. The purpose of this Pilot test was to demonstrate the implementation of commercial mobile radio services to electronically request and collect safety data message sets from a limited number of commercial vehicles operating in Tennessee. The results of this test have been used in conjunction with the results of the complimentary pilot tests to support an overall assessment of the feasibility and benefits of WRI in enhancing motor carrier safety (reduction in accidents) due to increased compliance (change in motor carrier and driver behavior) caused by conducting frequent safety inspections electronically, at highway speeds, without delay or need to divert into a weigh station

  20. Turbulence Investigation and Reproduction for Assisting Downstream Migrating Juvenile Salmonids, Part II of II; Effects of Induced Turbulence on Behavior of Juvenile Salmon, 2001-2005 Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, Russell W.; Farley, M. Jared; Hansen, Gabriel S.

    2005-07-01

    Passage through dams is a major source of mortality of anadromous juvenile salmonids because some populations must negotiate up to eight dams in Columbia and Snake rivers. Dams cause direct mortality when fish pass through turbines, but dams may also cause indirect mortality by altering migration conditions in rivers. Forebays immediately upstream of dams have decreased the water velocity of rivers and may contribute substantially to the total migration delay of juvenile salmonids. Recently, Coutant (2001a) suggested that in addition to low water velocities, lack of natural turbulence may contribute to migration delay by causing fish to lose directional cues. Coutant (2001a) further hypothesized that restoring turbulence in dam forebays may reduce migration delay by providing directional cues that allow fish to find passage routes more quickly (Coutant 2001a). Although field experiments have yielded proof of the concept of using induced turbulence to guide fish to safe passage routes, little is known about mechanisms actually causing behavioral changes. To test hypotheses about how turbulence influences movement and behavior of migrating juvenile salmonids, we conducted two types of controlled experiments at Cowlitz Falls Dam, Washington. A common measure of migration delay is the elapsed time between arrival at, and passage through, a dam. Therefore, for the first set of experiments, we tested the effect of induced turbulence on the elapsed time needed for fish to traverse through a raceway and pass over a weir at its downstream end (time trial experiment). If turbulence helps guide fish to passage routes, then fish should pass through the raceway quicker in the presence of appropriately scaled and directed turbulent cues. Second, little is known about how the physical properties of water movement provide directional cues to migrating juvenile salmonids. To examine the feasibility of guiding fish with turbulence, we tested whether directed turbulence could guide fish into one of two channels in the raceway, and subsequently cause them to pass disproportionately over the weir where turbulent cues were aimed (guidance experiment). Last, we measured and mapped water velocity and turbulence during the experiments to understand water movement patterns and the spatial distribution of turbulence in the raceways.

  1. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part I. chemically generated precipitates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahn, C. B.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K.; Klein, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the current program was to evaluate the properties of chemical precipitates proposed by industry that have been used in sump strainer head loss testing. Specific precipitates that were evaluated included aluminum oxyhydroxide (AlOOH) and sodium aluminum silicate (SAS) prepared according to the procedures in WCAP-16530-NP, along with precipitates formed from injecting chemicals into the test loop according to the procedure used by one sump strainer test vendor for U.S. pressurized water reactors. The settling rates of the surrogate precipitates are strongly dependent on their particle size and are reasonably consistent with those expected from Stokes Law or colloid aggregation models. Head loss tests showed that AlOOH and SAS surrogates are quite effective in increasing the head loss across a perforated pump inlet strainer that has an accumulated fibrous debris bed. The characteristics of aluminum hydroxide precipitate using sodium aluminate were dependent on whether it was formed in high-purity or ordinary tap water and whether excess silicate was present or not.

  2. Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part II of II, case study results.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colella, Whitney G.

    2010-06-01

    Innovative energy system optimization models are deployed to evaluate novel fuel cell system (FCS) operating strategies, not typically pursued by commercial industry. Most FCS today are installed according to a 'business-as-usual' approach: (1) stand-alone (unconnected to district heating networks and low-voltage electricity distribution lines), (2) not load following (not producing output equivalent to the instantaneous electrical or thermal demand of surrounding buildings), (3) employing a fairly fixed heat-to-power ratio (producing heat and electricity in a relatively constant ratio to each other), and (4) producing only electricity and no recoverable heat. By contrast, models discussed here consider novel approaches as well. Novel approaches include (1) networking (connecting FCSs to electrical and/or thermal networks), (2) load following (having FCSs produce only the instantaneous electricity or heat demanded by surrounding buildings), (3) employing a variable heat-to-power ratio (such that FCS can vary the ratio of heat and electricity they produce), (4) co-generation (combining the production of electricity and recoverable heat), (5) permutations of these together, and (6) permutations of these combined with more 'business-as-usual' approaches. The detailed assumptions and methods behind these models are described in Part I of this article pair.

  3. Radionuclide Retention Mechanisms in Secondary Waste-Form Testing: Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Um, Wooyong; Valenta, Michelle M.; Chung, Chul-Woo; Yang, Jungseok; Engelhard, Mark H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Parker, Kent E.; Wang, Guohui; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Westsik, Joseph H.

    2011-09-26

    This report describes the results from laboratory tests performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) to evaluate candidate stabilization technologies that have the potential to successfully treat liquid secondary waste stream effluents produced by the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). WRPS is considering the design and construction of a Solidification Treatment Unit (STU) for the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. The ETF, a multi-waste, treatment-and-storage unit that has been permitted under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), can accept dangerous, low-level, and mixed wastewaters for treatment. The STU needs to be operational by 2018 to receive secondary liquid waste generated during operation of the WTP. The STU will provide the additional capacity needed for ETF to process the increased volume of secondary waste expected to be produced by WTP. This report on radionuclide retention mechanisms describes the testing and characterization results that improve understanding of radionuclide retention mechanisms, especially for pertechnetate, {sup 99}TcO{sub 4}{sup -} in four different waste forms: Cast Stone, DuraLith alkali aluminosilicate geopolymer, encapsulated fluidized bed steam reforming (FBSR) product, and Ceramicrete phosphate bonded ceramic. These data and results will be used to fill existing data gaps on the candidate technologies to support a decision-making process that will identify a subset of the candidate waste forms that are most promising and should undergo further performance testing.

  4. RCRA Part A Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site, Part B Permit Application Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, Nevada Test Site, and Part B Permit Application - Explosives Ordnance Disposal Unit (EODU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-06-17

    The Area 5 Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) was established to support testing, research, and remediation activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), a large-quantity generator of hazardous waste. The HWSU, located adjacent to the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), is a prefabricated, rigid steel-framed, roofed shelter used to store hazardous nonradioactive waste generated on the NTS. No offsite generated wastes are managed at the HWSU. Waste managed at the HWSU includes the following categories: Flammables/Combustibles; Acid Corrosives; Alkali Corrosives; Oxidizers/Reactives; Toxics/Poisons; and Other Regulated Materials (ORMs). A list of the regulated waste codes accepted for storage at the HWSU is provided in Section B.2. Hazardous wastes stored at the HWSU are stored in U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) compliant containers, compatible with the stored waste. Waste transfer (between containers) is not allowed at the HWSU and containers remain closed at all times. Containers are stored on secondary containment pallets and the unit is inspected monthly. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  5. Standard test method for plutonium by Iron (II)/Chromium (VI) amperometric titration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2002-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of plutonium in unirradiated nuclear-grade plutonium dioxide, uranium-plutonium mixed oxides with uranium (U)/plutonium (Pu) ratios up to 21, plutonium metal, and plutonium nitrate solutions. Optimum quantities of plutonium to measure are 7 to 15 mg. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Observational Tests and Predictive Stellar Evolution II: Non-standard Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick A. Young; David Arnett

    2004-09-27

    We examine contributions of second order physical processes to results of stellar evolution calculations amenable to direct observational testing. In the first paper in the series (Young et al. 2001) we established baseline results using only physics which are common to modern stellar evolution codes. In the current paper we establish how much of the discrepancy between observations and baseline models is due to particular elements of new physics. We then consider the impact of the observational uncertainties on the maximum predictive accuracy achievable by a stellar evolution code. The sun is an optimal case because of the precise and abundant observations and the relative simplicity of the underlying stellar physics. The Standard Model is capable of matching the structure of the sun as determined by helioseismology and gross surface observables to better than a percent. Given an initial mass and surface composition within the observational errors, and no additional constraints for which the models can be optimized, it is not possible to predict the sun's current state to better than ~7%. Convectively induced mixing in radiative regions, seen in multidimensional hydrodynamic simulations, dramatically improves the predictions for radii, luminosity, and apsidal motions of eclipsing binaries while simultaneously maintaining consistency with observed light element depletion and turnoff ages in young clusters (Young et al. 2003). Systematic errors in core size for models of massive binaries disappear with more complete mixing physics, and acceptable fits are achieved for all of the binaries without calibration of free parameters. The lack of accurate abundance determinations for binaries is now the main obstacle to improving stellar models using this type of test.

  7. Revision of the orchid bee subgenus Euglossella (Hymenoptera: Apidae), part II: The viridis and mandibularis species groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinojosa-Dí az, Ismael A.; Engel, Michael S.

    2014-08-13

    angle projected posterolaterally as a truncate lamella; intertegular distance 3.35 mm (3.21–3.50; n=4); mesoscutal length 2.57 mm (2.43–2.64; n=4); mesoscutellar length 1.19 mm (1.14–1.21; n=4); posterior margin of mesoscutel- lum appearing truncate... groups Ismael A. Hinojosa-Díaz1 & Michael S. Engel2,3 Abstract. The second and final part of a revision of the subgenus Euglossella Moure in the or- chid bee genus Euglossa Latreille (Apinae: Euglossini) is presented here, redefining the species groups...

  8. The Conversion of CESR to Operate as the Test Accelerator, CesrTA, Part 1: Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billing, M G

    2015-01-01

    Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it ideal for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper outlines the motivation, design and conversion of CESR to a test accelerator, CesrTA, enhanced to study such subjects as low emittance tuning methods, electron cloud (EC) effects, intra-beam scattering, fast ion instabilities as well as general improvements to beam instrumentation. While the initial studies of CesrTA focussed on questions related to the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping ring design, CesrTA is a very flexible storage ring, capabl...

  9. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-01-30

    This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done to support several different programs that desire access to the ground surface above expended underground nuclear tests. The programs include: the Borehole Management Program, the Environmental Restoration Program, and the National Center for Nuclear Security Gas-Migration Experiment. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Evaluation of cavity collapse and crater formation is input into the safety decisions. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who participated in weapons testing activities perform these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. The evaluations do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011 was published on March 2, 2011. This report, considered Part 2 of work undertaken in calendar year 2011, compiles evaluations requested after the March report. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 6 LLNL test locations in Yucca Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Pahute Mesa. They include: Baneberry in U8d; Clearwater in U12q; Wineskin in U12r, Buteo in U20a and Duryea in nearby U20a1; and Barnwell in U20az.

  10. Cooling process for inelastic Boltzmann equations for hard spheres, Part II: Self-similar solutions and tail behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stéphane Mischler; Clément Mouhot

    2006-07-21

    We consider the spatially homogeneous Boltzmann equation for inelastic hard spheres, in the framework of so-called constant normal restitution coefficients. We prove the existence of self-similar solutions, and we give pointwise estimates on their tail. We also give general estimates on the tail and the regularity of generic solutions. In particular we prove Haff 's law on the rate of decay of temperature, as well as the algebraic decay of singularities. The proofs are based on the regularity study of a rescaled problem, with the help of the regularity properties of the gain part of the Boltzmann collision integral, well-known in the elastic case, and which are extended here in the context of granular gases.

  11. Model-Predictive Cascade Mitigation in Electric Power Systems With Storage and Renewables-Part II: Case-Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almassalkhi, MR; Hiskens, IA

    2015-01-01

    The novel cascade-mitigation scheme developed in Part I of this paper is implemented within a receding-horizon model predictive control (MPC) scheme with a linear controller model. This present paper illustrates the MPC strategy with a case-study that is based on the IEEE RTS-96 network, though with energy storage and renewable generation added. It is shown that the MPC strategy alleviates temperature overloads on transmission lines by rescheduling generation, energy storage, and other network elements, while taking into account ramp-rate limits and network limitations. Resilient performance is achieved despite the use of a simplified linear controller model. The MPC scheme is compared against a base-case that seeks to emulate human operator behavior.

  12. Automating Embedded Analysis Capabilities and Managing Software Complexity in Multiphysics Simulation, Part II: Application to Partial Differential Equations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pawlowski, Roger P.; Phipps, Eric T.; Salinger, Andrew G.; Owen, Steven J.; Siefert, Christopher M.; Staten, Matthew L.

    2012-01-01

    A template-based generic programming approach was presented in Part I of this series of papers [Sci. Program. 20 (2012), 197–219] that separates the development effort of programming a physical model from that of computing additional quantities, such as derivatives, needed for embedded analysis algorithms. In this paper, we describe the implementation details for using the template-based generic programming approach for simulation and analysis of partial differential equations (PDEs). We detail several of the hurdles that we have encountered, and some of the software infrastructure developed to overcome them. We end with a demonstration where we present shape optimization and uncertaintymore »quantification results for a 3D PDE application.« less

  13. Post-Service Examination of PWR Baffle Bolts, Part I. Examination and Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard, Keith J.; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Gussev, Maxim N.

    2015-04-30

    In support of extended service and current operations of the US nuclear reactor plants, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), through the Department of Energy (DOE), Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, is coordinating with Ginna Nuclear Power Plant, The Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC, and ATI Consulting, the selective procurement of baffle bolts that were withdrawn from service in 2011 and currently stored on site at Ginna. The goal of this program is to perform detailed microstructural and mechanical property characterization of baffle former bolts following in-service exposures. This report outlines the selection criteria of the bolts and the techniques to be used in this study. The bolts available are the original alloy 347 steel fasteners used in holding the baffle plates to the baffle former structures within the lower portion of the pressurized water reactor vessel. Of the eleven possible bolts made available for this work, none were identified to have specific damage. The bolts, however, did show varying levels of breakaway torque required in their removal. The bolts available for this study varied in peak fluence (highest dose within the head of the bolt) between 9.9 and 27.8x1021 n/cm2 (E>1MeV). As no evidence for crack initiation was determined for the available bolts from preliminary visual examination, two bolts with the higher fluence values were selected for further post-irradiation examination. The two bolts showed different breakaway torque levels necessary in their removal. The information from these bolts will be integral to the LWRS program initiatives in evaluating end of life microstructure and properties. Furthermore, valuable data will be obtained that can be incorporated into model predictions of long-term irradiation behavior and compared to results obtained in high flux experimental reactor conditions. The two bolts selected for the ORNL study will be shipped to Westinghouse with bolts of interest to their collaborative efforts with the Electric Power Research Institute. Westinghouse will section the ORNL bolts into samples specified in this report and return them to ORNL. Samples will include bend bars for fracture toughness and crack propagation studies along with thin sections from which specimens for bend testing, subscale tensile and microstructural analysis can be obtained. Additional material from the high stress concentration region at the transition between the bolt head and shank will also be preserved to allow for further investigation of possible crack initiation sites.

  14. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 4 - Case Study on aComputer-testing Center (No. 21)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

    2007-08-01

    The data center in this study had a total floor area of 8,580 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 440 racks, and was located in a 208,240 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally, it was served by a single electrical supply with no provision for backup power. The data center operated on a 24 hour per day, year-round cycle, and users had all hour full access to the data center facility. The study found that data center computer load accounted for 23% of the overall building electrical load, while the total power consumption attributable to the data center including allocated cooling load and lighting was 30% of the total facility load. The density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the data center was 63 W/ft{sup 2}. Power consumption density for all data center allocated load (including cooling and lighting) was 84 W/ft{sup 2}, approximately 12 times the average overall power density in rest of the building (non-data center portion). For the data center, 75% of the overall electric power was the rack critical loads, 11% of the power was consumed by chillers, 9% by CRAH units, 1% by lighting system, and about 4% of the power was consumed by pumps. The ratio of HVAC to IT power demand in the data center in this study was approximately 0.32. General recommendations for improving overall data center energy efficiency include improving the lighting control, airflow optimization, and control of mechanical systems serving the data center in actual operation. This includes chilled water system, airflow management and control in data centers. Additional specific recommendations or considerations to improve energy efficiency are provided in this report.

  15. Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 3 - Case Study on an ITEquipment-testing Center (No. 20)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

    2007-07-01

    The data center in this study had a total floor area of 3,024 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 147 racks, and was located in a 96,000 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but was served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally it was served by only a single electrical supply with no provision for backup power in the event of a power outage. The Data Center operated on a 24 hour per day, year-round cycle, and users had full-hour access to the data center facility. The study found that data center computer load accounted for 15% of the overall building electrical load, while the total power consumption attributable to the data center including allocated cooling load and lighting was 22% of the total facility load. The density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the data center was 61 W/ft{sup 2}. Power consumption density for all data center allocated load (including cooling and lighting) was 88 W/ft{sup 2}, approximately eight times the average overall power density in rest of the building (non-data center portion). The building and its data center cooling system was provided with various energy optimizing systems that included the following: (1) Varying chilled water flow rate through variable speed drives on the primary pumps. (2) No energy losses due to nonexistence of UPS or standby generators. (3) Minimized under-floor obstruction that affects the delivery efficiency of supply air. (4) Elimination of dehumidification/humidification within the CRAH units. For the data center, 70% of the overall electric power was the rack critical loads, 14% of the power was consumed by chillers, 12% by CRAH units, 2% by lighting system, and about 2% of the power was consumed by chilled water pumps. General recommendations for improving overall data center energy efficiency include improving the lighting control, airflow optimization, control of mechanical systems serving the data center in actual operation.. This includes chilled water system, airflow management and control in the data center. Additional specific recommendations or considerations to improve energy efficiency are provided in this report.

  16. Efficient Algorithm for Locating and Sizing Series Compensation Devices in Large Transmission Grids: Solutions and Applications (PART II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frolov, Vladimir; Backhaus, Scott N.; Chertkov, Michael

    2014-01-14

    In a companion manuscript, we developed a novel optimization method for placement, sizing, and operation of Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) devices to relieve transmission network congestion. Specifically, we addressed FACTS that provide Series Compensation (SC) via modification of line inductance. In this manuscript, this heuristic algorithm and its solutions are explored on a number of test cases: a 30-bus test network and a realistically-sized model of the Polish grid (~2700 nodes and ~3300 lines). The results on the 30-bus network are used to study the general properties of the solutions including non-locality and sparsity. The Polish grid is used as a demonstration of the computational efficiency of the heuristics that leverages sequential linearization of power flow constraints and cutting plane methods that take advantage of the sparse nature of the SC placement solutions. Using these approaches, the algorithm is able to solve an instance of Polish grid in tens of seconds. We explore the utility of the algorithm by analyzing transmission networks congested by (a) uniform load growth, (b) multiple overloaded configurations, and (c) sequential generator retirements

  17. Influence of lubricant oil on heat transfer performance of refrigerant flow boiling inside small diameter tubes. Part II: Correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Wenjian; Ding, Guoliang; Hu, Haitao; Wang, Kaijian

    2007-10-15

    The predictive ability of the available state-of-the-art heat transfer correlations of refrigerant-oil mixture is evaluated with the present experiment data of small tubes with inside diameter of 6.34 mm and 2.50 mm. Most of these correlations can be used to predict the heat transfer coefficient of 6.34 mm tube, but none of them can predict heat transfer coefficient of 2.50 mm tube satisfactorily. A new correlation of two-phase heat transfer multiplier with local properties of refrigerant-oil mixture is developed. This correlation approaches the actual physical mechanism of flow boiling heat transfer of refrigerant-oil mixture and can reflect the actual co-existing conditions of refrigerant and lubricant oil. More than 90% of the experiment data of both test tubes have less than {+-}20% deviation from the prediction values of the new correlations. (author)

  18. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of an Experimental Reactor Cavity Cooling System with Air. Part I: Experiments; Part II: Separate Effects Tests and Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corradin, Michael; Anderson, M.; Muci, M.; Hassan, Yassin; Dominguez, A.; Tokuhiro, Akira; Hamman, K.

    2014-10-15

    This experimental study investigates the thermal hydraulic behavior and the heat removal performance for a scaled Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) with air. A quarter-scale RCCS facility was designed and built based on a full-scale General Atomics (GA) RCCS design concept for the Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR). The GA RCCS is a passive cooling system that draws in air to use as the cooling fluid to remove heat radiated from the reactor pressure vessel to the air-cooled riser tubes and discharged the heated air into the atmosphere. Scaling laws were used to preserve key aspects and to maintain similarity. The scaled air RCCS facility at UW-Madison is a quarter-scale reduced length experiment housing six riser ducts that represent a 9.5° sector slice of the full-scale GA air RCCS concept. Radiant heaters were used to simulate the heat radiation from the reactor pressure vessel. The maximum power that can be achieved with the radiant heaters is 40 kW with a peak heat flux of 25 kW per meter squared. The quarter-scale RCCS was run under different heat loading cases and operated successfully. Instabilities were observed in some experiments in which one of the two exhaust ducts experienced a flow reversal for a period of time. The data and analysis presented show that the RCCS has promising potential to be a decay heat removal system during an accident scenario.

  19. HSWA Part II Permit Modification

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Kansas City, Kansas, this 24th day of August , 2012. Final Original signed by John J. Smith for Rebecca Weber Director Air and Waste Management Division August 24, 2012 Date...

  20. PART II … CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPoweredE Contract No.No. 330 J.2-1

  1. HSWA Part II Permit Modification

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) AugustA. -71- Particulate: Columns 59 and R e s e

  2. CATALYST ACTIVITY MAINTENANCE FOR THE LIQUID PHASE SYNTHESIS GAS-TO-DIMETHYL ETHER PROCESS PART II: DEVELOPMENT OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE AS THE DEHYDRATION CATALYST FOR THE SINGLE-STEP LIQUID PHASE SYNGAS-TO-DME PROCESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiang-Dong Peng

    2002-05-01

    At the heart of the single-step liquid phase syngas-to-DME process (LPDME{trademark}) is a catalyst system that can be active as well as stable. In the Alternative Fuels I program, a dual-catalyst system containing a Cu-based commercial methanol synthesis catalyst (BASF S3-86) and a commercial dehydration material ({gamma}-alumina) was demonstrated. It provided the productivity and selectivity expected from the LPDME process. However, the catalyst system deactivated too rapidly to warrant a viable commercial process [1]. The mechanistic investigation in the early part of the DOE's Alternative Fuels II program revealed that the accelerated catalyst deactivation under LPDME conditions is due to detrimental interaction between the methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst [2,3]. The interaction was attributed to migration of Cu- and/or Zn-containing species from the synthesis catalyst to the dehydration catalyst. Identification of a dehydration catalyst that did not lead to this detrimental interaction while retaining adequate dehydration activity was elusive. Twenty-nine different dehydration materials were tested, but none showed the desired performance [2]. The search came to a turning point when aluminum phosphate was tested. This amorphous material is prepared by precipitating a solution containing Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} with NH{sub 4}OH, followed by washing, drying and calcination. The aluminum phosphate catalyst has adequate dehydration activity and good stability. It can co-exist with the Cu-based methanol synthesis catalyst without negatively affecting the latter catalyst's stability. This report documents the details of the development of this catalyst. These include initial leads, efforts in improving activity and stability, investigation and development of the best preparation parameters and procedures, mechanistic understanding and resulting preparation guidelines, and the accomplishments of this work.

  3. H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part II) H2A Delivery: Forecourt Compression & Storage Optimization (Part II) Presentation by Matthew Hooks of TIAX at the...

  4. A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

    2008-04-01

    In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191.

  5. A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G.J.; Yucel, V.; Desotell, L. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Pyles, G.; Carilli, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milli-Sievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191. (authors)

  6. RCRA Part A and Part B Permit Application for Waste Management Activities at the Nevada Test Site: Proposed Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWSU)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2010-07-19

    The proposed Mixed Waste Storage Unit (MWSU) will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Existing facilities at the RWMC will be used to store low-level mixed waste (LLMW). Storage is required to accommodate offsite-generated LLMW shipped to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal in the new Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU) currently in the design/build stage. LLMW generated at the NTS (onsite) is currently stored on the Transuranic (TRU) Pad (TP) in Area 5 under a Mutual Consent Agreement (MCA) with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, Bureau of Federal Facilities (NDEP/BFF). When the proposed MWSU is permitted, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will ask that NDEP revoke the MCA and onsite-generated LLMW will fall under the MWSU permit terms and conditions. The unit will also store polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) waste and friable and non-friable asbestos waste that meets the acceptance criteria in the Waste Analysis Plan (Exhibit 2) for disposal in the MWDU. In addition to Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements, the proposed MWSU will also be subject to Department of Energy (DOE) orders and other applicable state and federal regulations. Table 1 provides the metric conversion factors used in this application. Table 2 provides a list of existing permits. Table 3 lists operational RCRA units at the NTS and their respective regulatory status.

  7. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for automated rotating/flipping/aligning system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2013-01-01

    measurements with x-ray optics. Part 1: Review of LTP errorsprecise reflective X-ray optics,” Nucl. Inst. and Meth. Ameasurements of x-ray optics. Part 2: Specification for

  8. Fault detection and isolation in aircraft gas turbine engines. Part 2: validation on a simulation test bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    319 Fault detection and isolation in aircraft gas turbine engines. Part 2: validation of fault detection and isolation (FDI) in aircraft gas turbine engines. The FDI algorithms are built upon,onasimulationtestbed.Thetestbedisbuiltuponanintegratedmodelofageneric two-spool turbofan aircraft gas turbine engine including the engine control system. Keywords: aircraft

  9. Soiling of building envelope surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance - Part II: Development of an accelerate aging method for roofing materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Mohamad Sleiman

    2014-01-01

    thermal comfort conditions. Solar Energy 85, 3085-3102.surfaces and its effect on solar reflectance-Part I:of roofing product databases. . Solar Energy Materials and

  10. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part II: Benchmark comparisons of PUMA core parameters with MCNP5 and improvements due to a simple cell heterogeneity correction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant, C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Mollerach, R. [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Arribenos 3619, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Leszczynski, F.; Serra, O.; Marconi, J. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Fink, J. [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Arribenos 3619, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update of reactor physics calculation methods and models was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. This paper presents benchmark comparisons of core parameters of a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the PUMA reactor code with MCNP5. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, more symmetric than Atucha-II, and has some experimental data available. To validate the new models benchmark comparisons of k-effective, channel power and axial power distributions obtained with PUMA and MCNP5 have been performed. In addition, a simple cell heterogeneity correction recently introduced in PUMA is presented, which improves significantly the agreement of calculated channel powers with MCNP5. To complete the validation, the calculation of some of the critical configurations of the Atucha-I reactor measured during the experiments performed at first criticality is also presented. (authors)

  11. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 4. 1. Cloud studies. Part 1. Cloud physics. Part 2. Development of the atomic cloud. Part 3. Cloud-tracking photography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, C.E.; Gustafson, P.E.; Kellogg, W.W.; McKown, R.E.; McPherson, D.E.

    1985-09-01

    The cloud-physics project was primarily intended to fulfill a requirements for detailed information on the meteorological microstructure of atomic clouds. By means of a tracking and photographic network extending halfway around Eniwetok Atoll, the behavior of the first three clouds of Operation Greenhouse were observed and recorded. The rise of the fourth cloud was observed visually from only one site. The analysis of these observations, combined with information about the local weather conditions, gives a fairly complete picture of the development of each of the clouds. Particular emphasis was placed on the earlier phases of development, and the heights and sizes of the cloud parts have been determined as functions of time. A summary of important features of some previous atomic clouds are included for comparison.

  12. Phase II Documentation Overview of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2010-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Subproject to assess and evaluate radiologic groundwater contamination resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. These activities are overseen by the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996, as amended March 2010). For Frenchman Flat, the UGTA Subproject addresses media contaminated by the underground nuclear tests, which is limited to geologic formations within the saturated zone or 100 meters (m) or less above the water table. Transport in groundwater is judged to be the primary mechanism of migration for the subsurface contamination away from the Frenchman Flat underground nuclear tests. The intent of the UGTA Subproject is to assess the risk to the public from the groundwater contamination produced as a result of nuclear testing. The primary method used to assess this risk is the development of models of flow and contaminant transport to forecast the extent of potentially contaminated groundwater for the next 1,000 years, establish restrictions to groundwater usage, and implement a monitoring program to verify protectiveness. For the UGTA Subproject, contaminated groundwater is that which exceeds the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) the State of Nevada’s groundwater quality standard to protect human health and the environment. Contaminant forecasts are expected to be uncertain, and groundwater monitoring will be used in combination with land-use control to build confidence in model results and reduce risk to the public. Modeling forecasts of contaminant transport will provide the basis for negotiating a compliance boundary for the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit (CAU). This compliance boundary represents a regulatory-based distinction between groundwater contaminated or not contaminated by underground testing. Transport modeling simulations are used to compute radionuclide concentrations in time and space within the CAU for the 1,000-year contaminant boundary. These three-dimensional (3-D) concentration simulations are integrated into probabilistic forecasts of the likelihood of groundwater exceeding or remaining below the radiological standards of the Safe Drinking Water Act (CFR, 2009) defined as the contaminant boundary. Contaminant boundaries are not discrete predictions of the location or concentration of contaminants, but instead are spatial representations of the probability of exceeding Safe Drinking Water Act radiological standards. The forecasts provide planning tools to facilitate regulatory decisions designed to protect the health and safety of the public.

  13. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges in overhead power lines. Part I. Fast pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramrus, A.

    1986-02-01

    Objective of the study was to create conceptual designs of high voltage pulsers capable of simulating two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) caused by a high-altitude nuclear burst; the slow rise time magnetohydrodynamic (MHD-EMP) and the fast rise time high-altitude EMP (HEMP). The pulser design was directed towards facilities capable of performing EMP vulnerability testing of components used in the national electric power system.

  14. Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2006-05-01

    The Phase II Frenchman Flat groundwater flow model is a key element in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) corrective action strategy for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Frenchman Flat corrective action unit (CAU). The objective of this integrated process is to provide an estimate of the vertical and horizontal extent of contaminant migration for each CAU to predict contaminant boundaries. A contaminant boundary is the model-predicted perimeter that defines the extent of radionuclide-contaminated groundwater from underground testing above background conditions exceeding the ''Safe Drinking Water Act'' (SDWA) standards. The contaminant boundary will be composed of both a perimeter boundary and a lower hydrostratigraphic unit (HSU) boundary. The computer model will predict the location of this boundary within 1,000 years and must do so at a 95 percent level of confidence. Additional results showing contaminant concentrations and the location of the contaminant boundary at selected times will also be presented. These times may include the verification period, the end of the five-year proof-of-concept period, as well as other times that are of specific interest. This report documents the development and implementation of the groundwater flow model for the Frenchman Flat CAU. Specific objectives of the Phase II Frenchman Flat flow model are to: (1) Incorporate pertinent information and lessons learned from the Phase I Frenchman Flat CAU models. (2) Develop a three-dimensional (3-D), mathematical flow model that incorporates the important physical features of the flow system and honors CAU-specific data and information. (3) Simulate the steady-state groundwater flow system to determine the direction and magnitude of groundwater fluxes based on calibration to Frenchman Flat hydrogeologic data. (4) Quantify the uncertainty in the direction and magnitude of groundwater flow due to uncertainty in parameter values and alternative component conceptual models (e.g., geology, boundary flux, and recharge).

  15. Instruments of RT-2 Experiment onboard CORONASPHOTON and their test and evaluation II: RT-2/CZT payload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotoch, Tilak B; Debnath, D; Malkar, J P; Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Madhav, Vaibhav P; Sreekumar, S; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; 10.1007/s10686-010-9189-y

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors are high sensitivity and high resolution devices for hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopic studies. The new series of CZT detector modules (OMS40G256) manufactured by Orbotech Medical Solutions (OMS), Israel, are used in the RT-2/CZT payload onboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite. The CZT detectors, sensitive in the energy range of 20 keV to 150 keV, are used to image solar flares in hard X-rays. Since these modules are essentially manufactured for commercial applications, we have carried out a series of comprehensive tests on these modules so that they can be confidently used in space-borne systems. These tests lead us to select the best three pieces of the 'Gold' modules for the RT-2/CZT payload. This paper presents the characterization of CZT modules and the criteria followed for selecting the ones for the RT-2/CZT payload. The RT-2/CZT payload carries, along with three CZT modules, a high spatial resolution CMOS detector for high resolution imaging of transient X-ray ev...

  16. Radionuclides in the terrestrial ecosystem near a Canadian uranium mill -- Part 3: Atmospheric deposition rates (pilot test)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, P.A.

    2000-06-01

    Atmospheric deposition rates of uranium series radionuclides were directly measured at three sites near the operating Key Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan. Sites impacted by windblown tailings and mill dusts had elevated rates of uranium deposition near the mill and elevated {sup 226}Ra deposition near the tailings compared to a control site. Rainwater collectors, dust jars, and passive vinyl collectors previously used at the Ranger Mine in Australia were pilot-tested. Adhesive vinyl surfaces (1 m{sup 2}) were oriented horizontally, vertically, and facing the ground as a means of measuring gravitational settling, wind impaction, and soil resuspension, respectively. Although the adhesive glue on the vinyls proved difficult to digest, relative differences in deposition mode were found among radionuclides and among sites. Dry deposition was a more important transport mechanism for uranium, {sup 226}Ra, and {sup 210}Pb than rainfall, while more {sup 210}Po was deposited with rainfall.

  17. The Conversion of CESR to Operate as the Test Accelerator, CesrTA, Part 2: Vacuum Modifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Billing, M G

    2015-01-01

    Cornell's electron/positron storage ring (CESR) was modified over a series of accelerator shutdowns beginning in May 2008, which substantially improves its capability for research and development for particle accelerators. CESR's energy span from 1.8 to 5.6 GeV with both electrons and positrons makes it ideal for the study of a wide spectrum of accelerator physics issues and instrumentation related to present light sources and future lepton damping rings. Additionally a number of these are also relevant for the beam physics of proton accelerators. This paper, the second in a series of four, discusses the modifications of the vacuum system necessary for the conversion of CESR to the test accelerator, CesrTA, enhanced to study such subjects as low emittance tuning methods, electron cloud (EC) effects, intra-beam scattering, fast ion instabilities as well as general improvements to beam instrumentation. A separate paper describes the vacuum system modifications of the superconducting wigglers to accommodate the ...

  18. Shallow Flaws Under Biaxial Loading Conditions, Part II: Application of a Weibull Stress Analysis of the Cruciform Bend Specimen Using a Hydrostatic Stress Criterion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bass, B.R.; McAfee, W.J.; Williams, P.T.

    1999-08-01

    Cruciform beam fracture mechanics specimensl have been developed in the Heavy Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to introduce a prototypic, far- field, out-of-plane biaxird bending stress component in the test section that approximates the nonlinear biaxial stresses resulting from pressurized-thernxd-shock or pressure-temperature loading of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV). Matrices of cruciform beam tests were developed to investigate and quantify the effects of temperature, biaxial loading, and specimen size on fracture initiation toughness of two-dimensional (constant depth), shtdlow, surface flaws. Tests were conducted under biaxial load ratios ranging from uniaxial to equibiaxial. These tests demonstrated that biaxial loading can have a pronounced effect on shallow-flaw fracture toughness in the lower transition temperature region for RPV materials. Two and three- parameter Weibull models have been calibrated using a new scheme (developed at the University of Illinois) that maps toughness data from test specimens with distinctly different levels of crack-tip constraint to a small scale yielding (SSY) Weibull stress space. These models, using the new hydrostatic stress criterion in place of the more commonly used maximum principal stress in the kernel of the OW integral definition, have been shown to correlate the experimentally observed biaxiaI effect in cruciform specimens, thereby providing a scaling mechanism between uniaxial and biaxial loading states.

  19. This letter is to inform AHAM that DOE is adopting a new policy regarding DOE ENERGY STAR verification testing of models that are part of the AHAM verification program.

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This letter is to inform AHAM that DOE is adopting a new policy regarding DOE ENERGY STAR verification testing of models that are part of the AHAM verification program.

  20. Accelerated screening methods for determining chemical and thermal stability of refreigerant-lubricant mixtures. Part II: Experimental comparison and verification of methods. Final report, volume I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, R.

    1995-09-01

    The research reported herein was performed to develop an accelerated screening method for determining the chemical and thermal stabilities of refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The developed screening method was designed to be safe and to produce accelerated stability rankings that are in agreement with the rankings determined by the current test, Sealed Glass Tube Method to Test the Chemical Stability of Material for Use Within Refrigerant Systems, ANSI/ASHRAE Method 97-1989. The accelerated screening test developed was designed to be independent of refrigerant and lubricant compositions and to be used with a wide variety of construction materials. The studied refrigerants included CFC-11, CFC-12, HCFC-22, HFC-134a, and HFC-32/HFC-134a (zeotrope 30:70 by weight). The studied lubricants were selected from the chemical classes of mineral oil, alkylbenzene oil, polyglycols, and polyolesters. The work reported herein was performed in three phases. In the first phase, previously identified thermal analytical techniques were evaluated for development into an accelerated screening method for refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The identified thermal analytical techniques used in situ measurements of color, temperature, or conductivity to monitor the degradation of the heated refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The identified thermal analytical techniques also used catalysts such as ferric fluoride to accelerate the degradation of the heated refrigerant/lubricant mixtures. The thermal analytical technique employing in situ conductivity measurements was determined to be the most suitable for development into an accelerated screening method.

  1. Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuknecht, Nate; White, David; Hoste, Graeme

    2014-09-11

    The SkyTrough DSP will advance the state-of-the-art in parabolic troughs for utility applications, with a larger aperture, higher operating temperature, and lower cost. The goal of this project was to develop a parabolic trough collector that enables solar electricity generation in the 2020 marketplace for a 216MWe nameplate baseload power plant. This plant requires an LCOE of 9¢/kWhe, given a capacity factor of 75%, a fossil fuel limit of 15%, a fossil fuel cost of $6.75/MMBtu, $25.00/kWht thermal storage cost, and a domestic installation corresponding to Daggett, CA. The result of our optimization was a trough design of larger aperture and operating temperature than has been fielded in large, utility scale parabolic trough applications: 7.6m width x 150m SCA length (1,118m2 aperture), with four 90mm diameter × 4.7m receivers per mirror module and an operating temperature of 500°C. The results from physical modeling in the System Advisory Model indicate that, for a capacity factor of 75%: The LCOE will be 8.87¢/kWhe. SkyFuel examined the design of almost every parabolic trough component from a perspective of load and performance at aperture areas from 500 to 2,900m2. Aperture-dependent design was combined with fixed quotations for similar parts from the commercialized SkyTrough product, and established an installed cost of $130/m2 in 2020. This project was conducted in two phases. Phase I was a preliminary design, culminating in an optimum trough size and further improvement of an advanced polymeric reflective material. This phase was completed in October of 2011. Phase II has been the detailed engineering design and component testing, which culminated in the fabrication and testing of a single mirror module. Phase II is complete, and this document presents a summary of the comprehensive work.

  2. PRAXIS II Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Exam The Praxis SeriesTM assessments provide educational tests and other services that states use as part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dyer, Bill

    will also be assessed. Management This section of the exam will assess your knowledge of time management in reaching management decisions. Consumer Economics This section of the exam will assess your knowledge storage and preservation, food preparation, food selection, food purchase, food and meal management

  3. No moving parts safe and arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrix, J.L.

    1994-12-31

    A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and arm scheme with no moving parts. The safe and arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe and arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activated the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel.

  4. Using a dual plasma process to produce cobalt--polypyrrole catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells -- part II: analysing the chemical structure of the films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, Christian; Vyalikh, Denis; Brüser, Volker; Quade, Antje; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; 10.1149/2.043209jes

    2012-01-01

    The chemical structure of cobalt--polypyrrole -- produced by a dual plasma process -- is analysed by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (NEXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX) and extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS).It is shown that only nanoparticles of a size of 3\\,nm with the low temperature crystal structure of cobalt are present within the compound. Besides that, cobalt--nitrogen and carbon--oxygen structures are observed. Furthermore, more and more cobalt--nitrogen structures are produced when increasing the magnetron power. Linking the information on the chemical structure to the results about the catalytic activity of the films -- which are presented in part I of this contribution -- it is concluded that the cobalt--nitrogen structures are the probable catalytically active sites. The cobalt--nitrogen bond length is calculated as 2.09\\,\\AA\\ and the carbon--nitrogen bond length as 1.38\\,\\AA.

  5. No moving parts safe & arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendrix, James L. (Overland Park, KS)

    1995-01-01

    A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and m scheme with no moving parts. The safe & arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe & arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activates the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel, and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel. Simultaneous event channels may also be utilized by optically splitting a single event channel. The built-in-test may be performed anytime prior to ordnance ignition.

  6. No moving parts safe & arm apparatus and method with monitoring and built-in-test for optical firing of explosive systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendrix, J.L.

    1995-04-11

    A laser initiated ordnance controller apparatus which provides a safe and arm scheme with no moving parts. The safe & arm apparatus provides isolation of firing energy to explosive devices using a combination of polarization isolation and control through acousto-optical deviation of laser energy pulses. The apparatus provides constant monitoring of the systems status and performs 100% built-in-test at any time prior to ordnance ignition without the risk of premature ignition or detonation. The apparatus has a computer controller, a solid state laser, an acousto-optic deflector and RF drive circuitry, built-in-test optics and electronics, and system monitoring capabilities. The optical system is completed from the laser beam power source to the pyrotechnic ordnance through fiber optic cabling, optical splitters and optical connectors. During operation of the apparatus, a command is provided by the computer controller and, simultaneous with laser flashlamp fire, the safe & arm device is opened for approximately 200 microseconds which allows the laser pulse to transmit through the device. The arm signal also energizes the laser power supply and activates the acousto-optical deflector. When the correct fire format command is received, the acousto-optic deflector moves to the selected event channel, and the channel is verified to ensure the system is pointing to the correct position. Laser energy is transmitted through the fiber where an ignitor or detonator designed to be sensitive to optical pulses is fired at the end of the fiber channel. Simultaneous event channels may also be utilized by optically splitting a single event channel. The built-in-test may be performed anytime prior to ordnance ignition. 6 figures.

  7. Reduction of iron-oxide-carbon composites: part II. Rates of reduction of composite pellets in a rotary hearth furnace simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halder, S.; Fruehan, R.J. [Praxair Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States). Praxair Technological Center

    2008-12-15

    A new ironmaking concept is being proposed that involves the combination of a rotary hearth furnace (RHF) with an iron-bath smelter. The RHF makes use of iron-oxide-carbon composite pellets as the charge material and the final product is direct-reduced iron (DRI) in the solid or molten state. This part of the research includes the development of a reactor that simulated the heat transfer in an RHF. The external heat-transport and high heating rates were simulated by means of infrared (IR) emitting lamps. The reaction rates were measured by analyzing the off-gas and computing both the amount of CO and CO{sub 2} generated and the degree of reduction. The reduction times were found to be comparable to the residence times observed in industrial RHFs. Both artificial ferric oxide (PAH) and naturally occurring hematite and taconite ores were used as the sources of iron oxide. Coal char and devolatilized wood charcoal were the reductants. Wood charcoal appeared to be a faster reductant than coal char. However, in the PAH-containing pellets, the reverse was found to be true because of heat-transfer limitations. For the same type of reductant, hematite-containing pellets were observed to reduce faster than taconite-containing pellets because of the development of internal porosity due to cracking and fissure formation during the Fe2O{sub 3}-to-Fe3O{sub 4} transition. This is, however, absent during the reduction of taconite, which is primarily Fe3O{sub 4}. The PAH-wood-charcoal pellets were found to undergo a significant amount of swelling at low-temperature conditions, which impeded the external heat transport to the lower layers. If the average degree of reduction targeted in an RHF is reduced from 95 to approximately 70 pct by coupling the RHF with a bath smelter, the productivity of the RHF can be enhanced 1.5 to 2 times. The use of a two- or three-layer bed was found to be superior to that of a single layer, for higher productivities.

  8. Addendum for the Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, NevadaTest Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 0 (page changes)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2007-05-01

    This document, which makes changes to Phase II Groundwater Flow Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, S-N/99205--074, Revision 0 (May 2006) was prepared to address review comments on this final document provided by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated June 20, 2006. The document includes revised pages that address NDEP review comments and comments from other document users. Change bars are included on these pages to identify where the text was revised. In addition to the revised pages, the following clarifications are made: • Section 6.0 Conceptual Model Uncertainty Analyses. Please note that in this section figures showing the observed versus simulated well head (Figures 6-1, 6-5, 6-7, 6-16, 6-28, 6-30, 6-32, 6-34, 6-37, 6-42, 6-47, 6-52, 6-57, 6-62, 6-71, and 6-86) have a vertical break in scale on the y axis. • Section 7.0 Parameter Sensitivity Analysis. In Section 7.2, the parameter perturbation analysis defines two components of the objective function PHI. These two components include the WELL component that represents the head portion of the objective function as measured in wells and the FLUX component that represents the lateral boundary flux portion of the objective function. In the text and figures in Section 7.2, the phrases “well portion of the objective function” and “head portion of the objective function” are used interchangeably in discussions of the WELL component of the objective function.

  9. Swift Progress on NSLS-II Booster

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-17

    Get an inside look around the booster ring at the National Synchrotron Light Source II. The booster is part of the injector complex for NSLS-II, now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

  10. (MATH 1302) Calculus II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiying

    (MATH 1302) MATH 1426 Calculus I MATH 2425 Calculus II MATH 2326 Calculus III IE 3312 PHYS 1443 PHYS 1444 IE 3301 EE 2440 Circuits MATH 3319 ENGL 1301 ENGL 1302 (1310) (Intro) 1320 C/C++ 2312 Ass Sw Des Pat *4321 Testing *4322 Sw Mgmt (CHEM 1300) CHEM 1441 Math Placement Test / Advising (MATH

  11. On synchronous robotic networks - Part I: Models, tasks, and complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frazzoli, Emilio; Bullo, Francesco; Cortes, Jorge; Martinez, Sonia

    2007-01-01

    E. Frazzoli, “On synchronous robotic networks Part II: Timeto control design for mobile robotic networks. Application2007 On Synchronous Robotic Networks—Part I: Models, Tasks,

  12. Sist. Lin. II Aps Escalonamento

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabral, Marco

    Lineares ­ 2a Parte Paulo Goldfeld Marco Cabral Departamento de Matemática Aplicada Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo Goldfeld DMA / IM / UFRJ 1 conjunto-solução = { } sistema inconsistente Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo

  13. Correlation of radioactive-waste-treatment costs and the environmental impact of waste effluents in the nuclear fuel cycle: conversion of yellow cake to uranium hexafluoride. Part II. The solvent extraction-fluorination process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sears, M.B.; Etnier, E.L.; Hill, G.S.; Patton, B.D.; Witherspoon, J.P.; Yen, S.N.

    1983-03-01

    A cost/benefit study was made to determine the cost and effectiveness of radioactive waste (radwaste) treatment systems for decreasing the release of radioactive materials and chemicals from a model uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) production plant using the solvent extraction-fluorination process, and to evaluate the radiological impact (dose commitment) of the release materials on the environment. The model plant processes 10,000 metric tons of uranium per year. Base-case waste treatment is the minimum necessary to operate the process. Effluents meet the radiological requirements listed in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20 (10 CFR 20), Appendix B, Table II, but may not be acceptable chemically at all sites. Additional radwaste treatment techniques are applied to the base-case plant in a series of case studies to decrease the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the amounts of radioactive materials released and to reduce the radiological dose commitment to the population in the surrounding area. The costs for the added waste treatment operations and the corresponding dose committment are correlated with the annual cost for treatment of the radwastes. The status of the radwaste treatment methods used in the case studies is discussed. Much of the technology used in the advanced cases will require development and demonstration, or else is proprietary and unavailable for immediate use. The methodology and assumptions for the radiological doses are found in ORNL-4992.

  14. Tutorial Part II Outline: Current technologies: Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Wei

    ­ Biological and Environmental Research ­ Fusion Energy Sciences ­ Nuclear Physics ­ Advanced Scientific to a single technology? · Several benefits: ­less space, less heat, less electricity, less knowledge, less control, congestion control · Subnet manager & Routing IEEE ANTS 2012 Tutorial Data Center Networking 108

  15. Ablative Laser Propulsion: An Update, Part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Lin Jun; Thompson, M. Shane

    2004-03-30

    This paper presents an updated review of studies on Ablative Laser Propulsion conducted by the Laser Propulsion Group (LPG) at the University of Alabama in Huntsville. In particular, we describe the experimental technique developed for determination of specific impulses from plasma plume imaging with an intensified CCD camera.

  16. Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    . At NIST, applications include the modeling of antennas (including those on integrated circuits (University of New Mexico) http://www.boulder.nist.gov/itl/div891/alpert/td-em/index.html Acoustic of electromagnetic (and acoustic) wave propagation are extremely broad, ranging over device design, for antennas

  17. Part II: Project Summaries Project Summaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    . At NIST, applications include the modeling of antennas (including those on integrated circuits Leslie Greengard (New York University) Thomas Hagstrom (University of New Mexico) Acoustic of electromagnetic (and acoustic) wave propagation are extremely broad, ranging over device design, for antennas

  18. Part II ALICE Chapter 3 ALICE Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmer, Uwe

    include all rele­ vant problems of mobile robots not having possibilities of (external) global positioning

  19. LEAD SUBSTITUTION AND ELIMINATION STUDY, PART II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. MARTINEZ; M. COURNOYER

    2001-01-01

    Within the Nuclear Materials Technology Division of Los Alamos National Laboratory, lead is used as shielding for a variety of operations, including actinide chemistry, weapons production, radiochemistry, and analytical chemistry. In this study, waste minimization issues associated with replacing lead shielding with non-hazardous materials are addressed. These include institutional program available to support this effort, the hazards and accompanying controls grouped with lead shielding, operations that use lead bricks and how this effects the selection of the substitute. Life cycle management issues are also examined. As a final step, an approach to get buy-in from both technical and budget minded employees is presented.

  20. Mathematical Logic (Part II) December 22, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salibra, Antonino

    . Determine whether the following sets are open, closed, neither open nor closed: (a) A = {5, 3, 7}; (b) B, is contained within R \\ {x}. - B is neither open neither closed. B is a countable set and it is not union] is a semiopen interval; it is neither open (every interval containg 1 has points outside C) neither closed (the

  1. RESPONSIBLE CONDUCT OF RESEARCH PART II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahriar, Selim

    ;1989 : Cold Fusion Pons and Fleischmann announce Cold Fusion Electrolysis of heavy water Deuterium enters palladium cathode See temperature rise Detect fusion products like Helium in water 11/1/12 12 #12;Big

  2. Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1 PRESS KIT/December 2014 www.nasa.gov NP-2014-11-020-JSC National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12;#12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Contents Section Page ........................................................................................... 28 i #12;Orion Flight Test ii December 2014 #12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Flight Overview

  3. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Wurtz

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  4. LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

    2011-12-01

    As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

  5. Part I Student Identification Pleaseprintortype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gough, Christopher M.

    Part I Student Identification Pleaseprintortype Name of student Taxpayer identification number Address (number, street, and apt. or suite no.) City, state, and ZIP code Part II Taxpayer Identification Number Certification I certify that the number shown on this form is my correct taxpayer identification

  6. Experience with capture cavity II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeth, T.; /Fermilab /Rutgers U., Piscataway; Branlard, J.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.; Harms, E.; Hocker, A.; McGee, M.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Prieto, P.; Reid, J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    Valuable experience in operating and maintaining superconducting RF cavities in a horizontal test module has been gained with Capture Cavity II. We report on all facets of our experience to date.

  7. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore »supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O?, SO?²?, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO?, and SO? over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the dominant role of dust is CCN or IN. These results indicate the importance of the heterogeneous ice nucleation treatments and dust emissions in accurately simulating regional climate and air quality.« less

  8. Photosystem II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    James Barber

    2010-09-01

    James Barber, Ernst Chain Professor of Biochemistry at Imperial College, London, gives a BSA Distinguished Lecture titled, "The Structure and Function of Photosystem II: The Water-Splitting Enzyme of Photosynthesis."

  9. 2 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS, PACKAGING, AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY--PART B, VOL. 20, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 1997 A Novel Test Technique for MCM Substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    2 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS, PACKAGING, AND MANUFACTURING TECHNOLOGY--PART B, VOL. 20, NO. 1 packages provide a means for interconnect- ing, powering, cooling, and protecting integrated circuit (IC chips or between other discrete components, mounted on the package. Since semiconductor chips

  10. Analysis and Design of a Test Apparatus for Resolving Near-Field Effects Associated With Using a Coarse Sun Sensor as Part of a 6-DOF Solution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stancliffe, Devin Aldin

    2011-10-21

    cell (photovoltaic cell or PV cell) is only dependent on the component of the incident light which is normal to the PV cell. The energy per area (which generates a voltage and current) on the PV cell is therefore proportional to the cosine... vector in Figure 2 are part of a triad whose third member, the Y-axis, is generated by the right-hand rule (i.e. into the page). Imagine that the Y-axis also has a two PV cell system oriented such that the four cells create a pyramid of PV cells...

  11. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

    2004-10-27

    Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

  12. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 5. Neutron measurements. Part 3. High-energy spectrum (time-of-flight method)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, W.C.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the experiments performed to measure the energy spectrum of neutrons released in certain atomic-weapons tests in Operation Greenhouse. The measurements were made of two types: (1) the time-of-flight measurements designed to establish the fission neutron spectrum down to about 3 MeV energy, and (2) the so-called Tenex (Temperature-Neutron Experiment) measurements designed to obtain the velocity distribution of neutrons produced by the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions.

  13. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 5. Neutron measurements. Part 1. Diagnostic neutron experiments, Section 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krause, E.H.

    1985-09-01

    The effects of radiation on the passage of an electromagnetic wave along a cable are too complicated to predict accurately from theory alone. Also, near the bomb, the intensity during the shot is so high that the results of laboratory measurements must be extrapolated by too many orders of magnitude to be applied with much confidence to the test conditions. Therefore, a number of cables were installed near the bomb for the sole purpose of study the radiation effects, both to help correct the data obtained in the present tests and to help predict shielding requirements in future tests. The two types of effects looked for were (1) a simple attenuation of a voltage across the line due to the shunt conductance set up when Compton-recoil electrons from the gamma rays ionize the gas between the inner and outer conductors; and (2) an induced signal due to the Compton electrons being knocked out of the inner and outer conductors in unequal amounts. On the basis of the results, a discussion is given of the adequacy of the coral shielding actually used to protect the horizontal cable runs.

  14. Directed random testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacheco, Carlos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01

    Random testing can quickly generate many tests, is easy to implement, scales to large software applications, and reveals software errors. But it tends to generate many tests that are illegal or that exercise the same parts ...

  15. Operation Greenhouse: Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 9. Air drop instrumentation. Part 3. Disc camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    The disc camera was designed for use to determine the growth characteristic of the fireball and so the yield. The instrument has three separate optical systems and can record three separate streak images of the fireball on a rotating glass photographic plate. The angular velocity of the photoplate at the time of exposure is determined by marker pips recorded on the photoplate. The marker generator is gated by a phototube and is turned off by a time delay. Time to minimum can be determined directly from the streaks and by the use of the scaling laws. Bhangmeter yield can also be determined. For Operation Greenhouse, two cameras were operated in phototowers. Good records were obtained on the first two shots. On the George Shot, which was a daylight test, the photocell in the fiducial marker did not function and no records were attained. The cameras were not operated on the Item Shot. The yields derived compare favorably with those from other fireball determinations.

  16. II-Local Solution of a Spherical Homogeneous and Isotropic Universe Radially Decelerated towards the Expansion Center: Tests on Historic Data Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luciano Lorenzi

    1999-06-17

    The topic of the paper is the mathematical analysis of a radially decelerated Hubble expansion from the Bahcall & Soneira void center. Such analysis, in the hypothesis of local homogeneity and isotropy, gives a particular Hubble ratio dipole structure to the expansion equation, whose solution has been studied at different precision orders and successfully tested on a few historic data sets, by de Vaucouleurs (1965), by Sandage & Tammann (1975), and by Aaronson et al. (1982-86). The fittings of both the separate AA1 and AA2 samples show a good solution convergence as the analysis order increases, giving even coinciding solutions when applied to 308 nearby individual galaxies (308AA1) and to 10 clusters (148AA2), respectively.

  17. Part IV: Section D: Packaging and Marketing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D PACKAGING AND MARKING DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M801 Section D - Page ii PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging 1 D.2 Marking 1...

  18. Validation of updated neutronic calculation models proposed for Atucha-II PHWR. Part I: Benchmark comparisons of WIMS-D5 and DRAGON cell and control rod parameters with MCNP5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mollerach, R. [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Arribenos 3619, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Leszczynski, F. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Avenida del Libertador 8250, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina); Fink, J. [Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A., Arribenos 3619, Buenos Aires 1429 (Argentina)

    2006-07-01

    In 2005 the Argentine Government took the decision to complete the construction of the Atucha-II nuclear power plant, which has been progressing slowly during the last ten years. Atucha-II is a 745 MWe nuclear station moderated and cooled with heavy water, of German (Siemens) design located in Argentina. It has a pressure-vessel design with 451 vertical coolant channels, and the fuel assemblies (FA) are clusters of 37 natural UO{sub 2} rods with an active length of 530 cm. For the reactor physics area, a revision and update calculation methods and models (cell, supercell and reactor) was recently carried out covering cell, supercell (control rod) and core calculations. As a validation of the new models some benchmark comparisons were done with Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5. This paper presents comparisons of cell and supercell benchmark problems based on a slightly idealized model of the Atucha-I core obtained with the WIMS-D5 and DRAGON codes with MCNP5 results. The Atucha-I core was selected because it is smaller, similar from a neutronic point of view, and more symmetric than Atucha-II Cell parameters compared include cell k-infinity, relative power levels of the different rings of fuel rods, and some two-group macroscopic cross sections. Supercell comparisons include supercell k-infinity changes due to the control rods (tubes) of steel and hafnium. (authors)

  19. NSLS-II Transport Line Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliller R. P.; Wahl, W.; Anderson, A.; Benish, B.; DeBoer, W.; Ganetis, G.; Heese, R.; Hseuh, H.-C.; Hu, J.-P.; Johanson, M.P.; Kosciuk, B.N.; Padrazo, D.; Roy, K.; Shaftan, T.; Singh, O.; Tuozzolo, J.; Wang, G.

    2012-05-20

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) is a state-of-the-art 3-GeV third generation light source currently under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The NSLS-II injection system consists of a 200 MeV linac, a 3-GeV booster synchrotron and associated transfer lines. The first part of the Linac to Booster Transport (LBT) line has been installed for linac commissioning. This part includes all components necessary to commission the NSLS-II linac. The second part of this transport line is undergoing installation. Initial results of hardware commissioning will be discussed. The Booster to Storage Ring (BSR) transport line underwent a design review. The first part of the BSR transport line, consisting of all components necessary to commission the booster will be installed in 2012 for booster commissioning. We report on the final design of the BSR line along with the plan to commission the booster.

  20. LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY II ENERGY AND ELECTRIC CIRCUITS Lab II - 1 It is often useful to study physical. An electric circuit illustrates how energy can be transformed within a system, transferred to different parts it is the electric charge that transports the energy from one place in the system to another

  1. Esp. Vet. II (In)Dependncia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabral, Marco

    ­ 2a Parte Paulo Goldfeld Marco Cabral Departamento de Matemática Aplicada Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo Goldfeld DMA / IM / UFRJ 1 / 28-trivial destes vetores. Álgebra Linear II 2008/2 Prof. Marco Cabral & Prof. Paulo Goldfeld DMA / IM / UFRJ 2 / 28

  2. Initial comparison of leach behavior between fully radioactive and simulated nuclear waste glasses through long-term testing. Part 1, Solution analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Xiangdong; Bates, J.K.

    1992-04-01

    A comparison of glass reactivity between radioactive sludge based and simulated nuclear waste glasses has been made through long-term testing of both glass types for SRL 165, SRL 131, and SRL 200 frit compositions. The data demonstrate that for time periods through 280 days, differences in elemental release to solution up to 400% are observed. However, in general, differences in glass reactivity as measured by the release of boron, lithium, and sodium are less than a factor of two. The differences in reactivity are not large enough to alter the order of glass durability for the different compositions or to change the controlling glass dissolution mechanism. A radiation effect exists, mainly in the influence on the leachate pH, which in turn affects the glass reaction mechanism and rate. The differences in reactivity between fully radioactive and the simulated glasses can be reasonably explained if the controlling reaction mechanism is accounted for. Those differences are glass composition and leaching mechanism dependent. Lithium is found to have the highest elemental release in an ion-exchange dominated glass reaction process, while lithium has a lower release than boron and sodium in a matrix dissolution dominated process, where boron and sodium are usually among the most concentrated solution species.

  3. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 2, delayed gamma-ray measurements. Part 1. Gamma-ray spectrum measurements (abridged)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, H.F.; Miller, W.; Motz, J.W.; Smeltzer, J.C.; Wyckoff, H.O.

    1985-09-01

    The measurement of bomb efficiencies from the number of gamma rays requires fundamentally two separate experiments. The average number of gamma rays emitted from the fission fragments (delayed gamma rays) per fission must be determined. This experiment can be carried out in the laboratory, a second experiment, the absolute determination of the number of gamma rays from the bomb are also attempted. Because gamma rays are not directly observable but are measured only through their secondary effects, and because the probability of occurrence of the secondary effects depends upon the gamma ray energy, it is not usually possible to count directly the number of gamma rays in a heterochromatic spectrum. A spectral distribution must be first obtained from which the actual total number of gamma rays may be computed. This volume discusses the planning for the experiment and the spectral distribution of collimated gamma rays determined from the Greenhouse tests on two shots. A discussion of measurement of build-up factor which is needed to estimate the effect of collimation is also given.

  4. Testing the Disk Regulation Paradigm with Spitzer Observations. II. A Clear Signature of Star-Disk Interaction in NGC 2264 and the Orion Nebula Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Cieza; N. Baliber

    2007-07-31

    Observations of PMS star rotation periods reveal slow rotators in young clusters of various ages, indicating that angular momentum is somehow removed from these rotating masses. The mechanism by which spin-up is regulated as young stars contract has been one of the longest-standing problems in star formation. Attempts to observationally confirm the prevailing theory that magnetic interaction between the star and its circumstellar disk regulates these rotation periods have produced mixed results. In this paper, we use the unprecedented disk identification capability of the Spitzer Space Telescope to test the star-disk interaction paradigm in two young clusters, NGC 2264 and the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC). We show that once mass effects and sensitivity biases are removed, a clear increase in the disk fraction with period can be observed in both clusters across the entire period range populated by cluster members. We also show that the long-period peak (P $\\sim$8 days) of the bimodal distribution observed for high-mass stars in the ONC is dominated by a population of stars possessing a disk, while the short-period peak (P $\\sim$2 days) is dominated by a population of stars without a disk. Our results represent the strongest evidence to date that star-disk interaction regulates the angular momentum of these young stars. This study will make possible quantitative comparisons between the observed period distributions of stars with and without a disk and numerical models of the angular momentum evolution of young stars.

  5. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 8. 3. Special radar, radio, and photographic studies of weapons effects. Part 1, 2, 3, and 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-09-01

    Contents include: Part 1--radar-scope photography; Part 2--effects of atomic detonation on radio propagation; Part 3; photographic assessment of bomb damage; Part 4--film fogging studies.

  6. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by NDEP/BFF. The generator of permissible waste is responsible for preparing documentation related to waste acceptance criteria, waste characterization, and load verification. Waste and Water (WW) personnel are responsible for operating the disposal site and reviewing documentation to determine if the waste is acceptable.

  7. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  8. Fusion Power Demonstrations I and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doggett, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    In this report we present a summary of the first phase of the Fusion Power Demonstration (FPD) design study. During this first phase, we investigated two configurations, performed detailed studies of major components, and identified and examined critical issues. In addition to these design specific studies, we also assembled a mirror-systems computer code to help optimize future device designs. The two configurations that we have studied are based on the MARS magnet configuration and are labeled FPD-I and FPD-II. The FPD-I configuration employs the same magnet set used in the FY83 FPD study, whereas the FPD-II magnets are a new, much smaller set chosen to help reduce the capital cost of the system. As part of the FPD study, we also identified and explored issues critical to the construction of an Engineering Test Reactor (ETR). These issues involve subsystems or components, which because of their cost or state of technology can have a significant impact on our ability to meet FPD's mission requirements on the assumed schedule. General Dynamics and Grumman Aerospace studied two of these systems, the high-field choke coil and the halo pump/direct converter, in great detail and their findings are presented in this report.

  9. Sinks of Light Elements in Stars - Part III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corinne Charbonnel; Constantine P. Deliyannis; Marc H. Pinsonneault

    2000-06-20

    The fragile light elements lithium, beryllium, and boron are easily destroyed in stellar interiors, and are thus superb probes of physical processes occuring in the outer stellar layers. The light elements are also excellent tracers of the chemical evolution of the Galaxy, and can test big bang nucleosynthesis (BBN). These inter-related topics are reviewed with an emphasis on stellar physics. In Part I (presented by CPD), an overview is given of the physical processes which can modify the surface abundances of the light elements, with emphasis on Population I dwarfs - convection; gravitational settling, thermal diffusion, and radiative levitation; slow mixing induced by gravity waves or rotation. We will discuss the increasingly large body of data which begin to enable us to discern the relative importance of these mechanisms in Population I main sequence stars. In Part II (presented by MHP), discussion is extended to the issue of whether or not the halo Li plateau is depleted, and includes the following topics: Li dispersion in field and globular cluster stars, Li production vs. destruction in Li-rich halo stars, and constraints from 6Li. Also discussed are trends with metal abundance and Teff and implications for chemical evolution and BBN. In Part III (presented by CC), evidence is reviewed that suggests that in situ mixing occurs in evolved low mass Population I and Population II stars. Theoretical mechanisms that can create such mixing are discussed, as well as their implications in stellar yields.

  10. CENTRIFUGAL MODEL TESTS FOR ULTIMATE BEARING CAPACITY OF FOOTINGS ON STEEP SLOPES IN COHESIONLESS SOIL [abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gemperline, Mark

    1984-01-01

    Gemperline, Mark C. , Centrifugal ~odel Tests for UltimateDivision. ABSTRACTS II CENTRIFUGAL MODEL TESTS FOR ULTIMATE

  11. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPowered oscillatorCenterAccount-56-C PART I

  12. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPowered oscillatorCenterAccount-56-C PART

  13. PART III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumptionPoweredE Contract No.No. 330 J.2-1J TOC PART

  14. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams forOrhan Kizilkaya,P. Leslie Dutton0B i PART I

  15. PART I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O Streams forOrhan Kizilkaya,P. Leslie Dutton0B i PART

  16. Problems associated with the use of urea-formaldehyde foam for residential insulation. Part II. The effects of temperature and humidity on free formaldehyde, extractable formaldehyde, formaldehyde emission, and physical characteristics of the foam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schutte, W.C.; Cole, R.S.; Frank, C.W.; Long, K.R.

    1981-02-01

    Results of testing with two products of urea-formaldehyde based foams are described. Results of three products have previously been reported. Methods for detection and quantitative determination of formaldehyde, design of the experimental chambers, and the procedures are described. Samples of Product D were monitored for about 29 days and samples of Product E were monitored for 60 days in chambers and results are tabulated for formaldehyde emission. Additional tests performed on the two products are: extractable formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); free formaldehyde (high and low temperature conditions); comparison of free formaldehyde concentration; density (high and low temperature conditions); shrinkage (high and low temperature conditions). Control panels were constructed to simulate a wall in a home and observations were made and compared with results of the experimental products.

  17. Artificial Photosynthesis II -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II - Artificial Photosynthesis II - Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP) Simulations NathanLewis.png Schematic of a photoelectrochemical cell being designed to harness...

  18. Test 1 STAT 47201 Fall 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsoft account

    2015-08-25

    Test 1. STAT 47201. Fall 2014. October 7, 2014. Copyright Jeffrey Beckley 2014. August 25, 2015. 1. You are given: i. Mortality follows the illustrative life table ii.

  19. Recommended Underground Test Area Activity Reference Documents

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Rainier MesaShoshone Mountain Rev 0, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, DOENV-1031, December 2004. (838783) o Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units...

  20. Permutation Tests for Classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggio, Tomaso

    of classifi- cation accuracy, which is particularly useful in scientific applications of machine learning where high dimensionality of the data and the small number of training examples ren- der most standard in part by NSF IIS 9610249 grant and Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging collaborative

  1. EBR-II Superheater Duplex Tube Examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Dennis D. Keiser; Douglas L. Porter; Naoyuki Kisohara

    2008-12-01

    After 30 years of operation, the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Superheater 710 at Argonne National Laboratory-West (now Idaho National Laboratory) was decommissioned. As part of its post-service examination, four duplex tube sections were removed and Charpy impact testing was performed to characterize the crack arresting ability of nickel-bonded tube interfaces. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination was also performed to characterize and identify changes in bond material microstructure. From room temperature to 400 degrees C, all samples demonstrated ductility and crack-stopping ability similar to that exhibited by beginning-of-life samples. However, at low temperature (-5 degrees C), samples removed from the lower region of the superheater (near the sodium inlet) failed while those from the upper region (near the sodium outlet) did not. SEM analysis revealed that all the tube-tube interfaces showed evidence of iron diffusion into the nickel braze, which resulted in the formation of a multiphase diffusion structure. Yet, significant void formation was only observed in the bond layer of the tubes removed from the lower region. This may be due to a change in the crystal microstructure of one of the phases within the bond layer that occurs in the 350 to 450 degrees C temperature range, which results in a lower density and the formation of porosity. Apparently, only the samples from the higher temperature region were exposed to this transition temperature, and the resulting large voids that developed acted as stress concentrators that led to low-temperature embrittlement and failure of the Charpy impact specimens.

  2. Phase II Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Units 101 and 102: Central and Western Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 2 with ROTC 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marutzky, Sam

    2009-07-01

    This Phase II CAIP describes new work needed to potentially reduce uncertainty and achieve increased confidence in modeling results. This work includes data collection and data analysis to refine model assumptions, improve conceptual models of flow and transport in a complex hydrogeologic setting, and reduce parametric and structural uncertainty. The work was prioritized based on the potential to reduce model uncertainty and achieve an acceptable level of confidence in the model predictions for flow and transport, leading to model acceptance by NDEP and completion of the Phase II CAI stage of the UGTA strategy.

  3. Chap. II : Les structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poinsot, Laurent

    Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot 12 f´evrier 2009 #12;Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Les objets structur´es Pour de types "structur´es". #12;Chap. II : Les objets structur´es Laurent Poinsot Les objets structur´es

  4. An integrated approach to offshore wind energy assessment: Great Lakes 3D Wind Experiment. Part I. Calibration and testing RJ Barthelmie1, SC Pryor1, CM Smith1, P Crippa1, H Wang1, R. Krishnamurthy2, R. Calhoun2, D Valyou3, P Marzocca3, D Matthiesen4, N.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    An integrated approach to offshore wind energy assessment: Great Lakes 3D Wind Experiment. Part I Government or any agency thereof." Introduction An experiment to test wind and turbulence measurement strategies was conducted at a northern Indiana wind farm in May 2012. The experimental design focused

  5. Risk Assessment Revision for 40 CPR Part 61 Subpart W

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risk Assessment Revision for 40 CPR Part 61 Subpart W ­ Radon Emissions from Operating Mill-II............................................................................................................13 2.9 GENII-NESHAPS and Indoor Air (ORIA) promulgated National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAPs

  6. BBF RFC 106: A Standard Type IIS Syntax for Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutten, Virginia

    2015-03-17

    Here we define a standard syntax for assembling standard parts for expression in plant cells, extensible to all other eukaryotes. Variations of the Type IIS mediated cloning method known as Golden Gate Cloning, most notably ...

  7. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBerylliumDepartmentResolution ofBETTER|BrianOvercoat:July 2013 BuildingUpdate:ToolNewNew

  8. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar will continue our series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits. Presenters and specific topics for this webinar...

  9. Building America Webinar: High Performance Space Conditioning Systems, Part II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The webinar on Nov. 18, 2014, continued the series on strategies to improve the performance of HVAC systems for low load homes and home performance retrofits.

  10. XLES Part II: From Extended Large Eddy Simulation to ODTLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glawe, Christoph; Kerstein, Alan R; Klein, Rupert

    2015-01-01

    In turbulence research and flow applications, turbulence models like RaNS (Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes) models and LES (Large Eddy Simulation) are used. Both models filter the governing flow equations. Thus a scale separation approach is introduced for modeling purposes with the large scales simulated using a numerical scheme while smaller scales are assumed to be less important and might be modeled more or less easily. Unfortunately small scales are frequently of big importance, e.g. in reactive flows, wall bounded flows, or flows with significant Prandtl or Schmidt number effects. Recent alternatives to these standard models are the class of models based on the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) idea, like ODTLES. The ability of ODT to capture highly turbulent flows (recently up to $Re_\\tau = 6\\times 10^5$) allows ODTLES to realize 3D resolutions basically independent of the turbulent intensity. In two papers we provide a formal theory and application of an innovative modeling strategy for highly turbulen...

  11. SEACAS Theory Manuals: Part II. Nonlinear Continuum Mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Attaway, S.W.; Laursen, T.A.; Zadoks, R.I.

    1998-09-01

    This report summarizes the key continuum mechanics concepts required for the systematic prescription and numerical solution of finite deformation solid mechanics problems. Topics surveyed include measures of deformation appropriate for media undergoing large deformations, stress measures appropriate for such problems, balance laws and their role in nonlinear continuum mechanics, the role of frame indifference in description of large deformation response, and the extension of these theories to encompass two dimensional idealizations, structural idealizations, and rigid body behavior. There are three companion reports that describe the problem formulation, constitutive modeling, and finite element technology for nonlinear continuum mechanics systems.

  12. Realistic Industrial Scale Energy Optimization: Part II - Analytic Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinschrodt, F. J., III

    1982-01-01

    as demonstrated in Figure 2. The heat exchanger size can be set in Step 2 Level A; but to ensure that this selection will ultimately fit the overall scheme, multiple cases are developed by varying some parameter such as hurdle rate. This is known as intra... of efficiency for various thermodynamic paths and feasibility analysis -- a graphical technique used to determine the maximum possible heat exchange duty and minimum utility usage. Predictive techniques include: distillation and reaction synthesis...

  13. Measuring solar reflectance Part II: Review of practical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    a solar collector illuminated by multiple sun-trackingcollector illumi- nated almost exclusively by beam sunlight from sun-

  14. Oceanic Isopycnal Slope Spectra. Part II: Turbulence JODY M. KLYMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California JAMES N. MOUM College of Oceanic the rate of turbulence dissipation in the ocean, either by direct measurement (Osborn and Cox 1972 of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6, Canada. E-mail: jklymak@ uvic.ca 1232 J O U R N A L

  15. Measuring solar reflectance Part II: Review of practical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    amount ?S by which SSRv6 V5n solar re?ectance measured with137 exceeds SSRv5 n solar re?ectance, shown for (a) AM0, (b)d) AM2. In press at Progress in Solar Energy April 28, 2010

  16. Phenomenology of COMPASS data: multiplicities and Phenomenology - part II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anselmino, Mauro [TURIN; Boglione, Mariaelena [TURIN; Gonzalez H., J.O. [TORINO; Melis, Stefano [TURIN; Prokudin, Alexey [JLAB

    2015-01-01

    We present some of the main features of the multidimensional COMPASS multiplicities, via our analysis using the simple Gaussian model. We briefly discuss these results in connection with azimuthal asymmetries.

  17. Smog Check II Evaluation Part I: Background Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    ________________________________________13 5.4. Vehicles Included _____________________________________________________13 5.5. Number of Cars Fits into Federal and State Air Pollution Policy 28 6.1. Federal Statutory and Regulatory Framework _______________________________28 6.2. Administration of California Air Pollution Policy ____________________________28 6.3. Federal

  18. Flow over Heated Terrain. Part II: Generation of Convective Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.; Crook, N. Andrew

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that thunderstorms in the Rocky Mountain region have preferred areas in which to form. There has been some indication that these areas depend on the midtropospheric wind direction. A nonhydrostatic model with a terrain...

  19. President's Message- The Future of CalAAEM, Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabaeff, Steven C

    2006-01-01

    a more even footing with Cal/ACEP financially. These effortsmedicine and fee splitting The ACEP leadership expends thephysician income. 5. Mandatory ACEP membership… is it legal?

  20. Online Analysis of Wind and Solar Part II: Transmission Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makarov, Yuri V.; Etingov, Pavel V.; Ma, Jian; Subbarao, Krishnappa

    2012-01-31

    To facilitate wider penetration of renewable resources without compromising system reliability concerns arising from the lack of predictability of intermittent renewable resources, a tool for use by California Independent System Operator (CAISO) power grid operators was developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with CAISO with funding from California Energy Commission. The tool analyzes and displays the impacts of uncertainties in forecasts of loads and renewable generation on: (1) congestion, (2)voltage and transient stability margins, and (3)voltage reductions and reactive power margins. The impacts are analyzed in the base case and under user-specified contingencies.A prototype of the tool has been developed and implemented in software.

  1. Measuring solar reflectance Part II: Review of practical methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levinson, Ronnen; Akbari, Hashem; Berdahl, Paul

    2010-05-14

    A companion article explored how solar reflectance varies with surface orientation and solar position, and found that clear sky air mass 1 global horizontal (AM1GH) solar reflectance is a preferred quantity for estimating solar heat gain. In this study we show that AM1GH solar reflectance R{sub g,0} can be accurately measured with a pyranometer, a solar spectrophotometer, or an updated edition of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer (version 6). Of primary concern are errors that result from variations in the spectral and angular distributions of incident sunlight. Neglecting shadow, background and instrument errors, the conventional pyranometer technique can measure R{sub g,0} to within 0.01 for surface slopes up to 5:12 [23{sup o}], and to within 0.02 for surface slopes up to 12:12 [45{sup o}]. An alternative pyranometer method minimizes shadow errors and can be used to measure R{sub g,0} of a surface as small as 1 m in diameter. The accuracy with which it can measure R{sub g,0} is otherwise comparable to that of the conventional pyranometer technique. A solar spectrophotometer can be used to determine R*{sub g,0}, a solar reflectance computed by averaging solar spectral reflectance weighted with AM1GH solar spectral irradiance. Neglecting instrument errors, R*{sub g,0} matches R{sub g,0} to within 0.006. The air mass 1.5 solar reflectance measured with version 5 of the Solar Spectrum Reflectometer can differ from R*{sub g,0} by as much as 0.08, but the AM1GH output of version 6 of this instrument matches R*{sub g,0} to within about 0.01.

  2. ZERH WEBINAR: HIGH-PERFORMANCE HOME SALES TRAINING PART II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home (ZERH) Program represents a whole new level of home performance, with rigorous requirements that ensure outstanding levels of energy savings,...

  3. Fast hadron freeze-out generator, part II: noncentral collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. S. Amelin; R. Lednicky; I. P. Lokhtin; L. V. Malinina; A. M. Snigirev; Iu. A. Karpenko; Yu. M. Sinyukov; I. Arsene; L. Bravina

    2007-12-13

    The fast Monte Carlo procedure of hadron generation developed in our previous work is extended to describe noncentral collisions of nuclei. We consider different possibilities to introduce appropriate asymmetry of the freeze-out hyper-surface and flow velocity profile. For comparison with other models and experimental data we demonstrate the results based on the standard parametrizations of the hadron freeze-out hyper-surface and flow velocity profile assuming either a common chemical and thermal freeze-out or the chemically frozen evolution from chemical to thermal freeze-out. The C++ generator code is written under the ROOT framework and is available for public use at http://uhkm.jinr.ru/

  4. THE ORGANIC GEOCHEMISTRY OF ANCIENT SEDIMENTS PART II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1966-01-01

    1965) Change in Green River Oil Shale Paraffins with Depth.in the Green Hiver' Oil-Shale, as a ftmction of depth (

  5. Measuring solar reflectance Part II: Review of practical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    roo?ng assemblies. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells, 82:solar energy transmittance and re?ectance (terrestrial) of sheet materials.materials: A new approach in video-goniophotometry. Solar Energy,

  6. Seamless Energy Management Systems Part II: Development of Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurement units (PMU) 2. The difficulty in comparing application results due to the utilization of different models in operations and planning, and to tie these models to PMU data 3. Repetitiveness of simulations

  7. Phenomenology of COMPASS data: Multiplicities and phenomenology - part II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Anselmino, M.; Boglione, M.; Gonzalez H., J. O.; Melis, S.; Prokudin, A.

    2015-01-23

    In this study, we present some of the main features of the multidimensional COMPASS multiplicities, via our analysis using the simple Gaussian model. We briefly discuss these results in connection with azimuthal asymmetries.

  8. LONG TERM FILE MIGRATION - PART II: FILE REPLACEMENT ALGORITHMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jay Smith, Alan

    2011-01-01

    ~~"-' ,m . I 'f'-~I I ,/:? :RIlNG SET r -t j IS) iO" 1C. ~ETNR(LSIZEt>ClIISS)/ '.I~RllNG LJ.J 8DGO Ot\\ YS ~~:\\ j3 1 :in ~ill particular a batch lng OD aEriv~l phenomenon r by

  9. Young People's Day in Court: Part II 29 April 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    -ocean and Arctic drilling, long-wall coal mining, hydro-fracking ­ all practices that will become more invasive

  10. QER Public Meeting: New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints Part II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy will convene a public meeting to discuss and receive comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review. The purpose of the meeting is to examine energy infrastructure constraints in New England and regional approaches to addressing them

  11. Fundamental Limits of Wideband Localization - Part II: Cooperative Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Yuan

    The availability of position information is of great importance in many commercial, governmental, and military applications. Localization is commonly accomplished through the use of radio communication between mobile devices ...

  12. A Brief History of the Chemistry Department -Part II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    geniuses during the great #12;A brief history, continued porn poge I the world, among them -Barcelona

  13. Measuring solar reflectance Part II: Review of practical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    illuminated by multiple sun-tracking mirrors. Hence, itbeam sunlight from sun-tracking mirrors [8]. This particularto that incident on a sun-tracking (beam-normal) surface

  14. Measuring solar reflectance Part II: Review of practical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    d) AM2. In press at Progress in Solar Energy April 28, 2010responsivity functions. Solar Energy, 80(3):322 – 331,roo?ng assemblies. Solar Energy Materials & Solar Cells, 82:

  15. Measuring solar reflectance Part II: Review of practical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Crisis and Energy from the Sun; Supplement to thefrom full sun In press at Progress in Solar Energy April 28,sun-tracking surface, the air mass splitting the annual beam normal solar energy

  16. INVESTIGATION OF OXYGEN REDUCTION MECHANISMS USING CATHODE MICROELECTRODES, PART II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    and alternatives are proposed for further investigation. INTRODUCTION The power of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC. Although oxygen re- duction at SOFC cathodes has been studied in the literature, a comprehensive and clear resistances and capacitances in the SOFC behavior. All implications presented in Refs. 2-7 have been based

  17. REEE Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBeryllium Disease | DepartmentOLEDEnergyPermitQ&A: TheServices|

  18. REEE Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBeryllium Disease | DepartmentOLEDEnergyPermitQ&A: TheServices|

  19. REEE Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBeryllium Disease | DepartmentOLEDEnergyPermitQ&A: TheServices|

  20. REEE Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics AndBeryllium Disease | DepartmentOLEDEnergyPermitQ&A: TheServices|

  1. Solar Energy Education. Reader, Part II. Sun story. [Includes glossary]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effect Photovoltaics -7541 *ImpactScience(Technical Report) | SciTech

  2. Building America Webinar: High Performance Enclosure Strategies: Part II,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels| Department of Energy America: Research forDepartment ofNew

  3. REEE Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on Global Technology OUTSIDEContractThe CentersMarch

  4. Adv. Fossil Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDIT REPORT:FederalEconomicAdmirals ADR Memo FY11

  5. Adv. Fossil Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDIT REPORT:FederalEconomicAdmirals ADR Memo FY11

  6. Adv. Fossil Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDIT REPORT:FederalEconomicAdmirals ADR Memo FY11

  7. Adv. Fossil Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDIT REPORT:FederalEconomicAdmirals ADR Memo FY11October 19

  8. Adv. Fossil Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDIT REPORT:FederalEconomicAdmirals ADR Memo FY11October

  9. Adv. Nuclear Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDIT REPORT:FederalEconomicAdmirals ADR MemoAdv. Nuclear

  10. Adv. Nuclear Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDIT REPORT:FederalEconomicAdmirals ADR MemoAdv.

  11. Apartment Hunting - Part II - Keeping those Energy Bills Down |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment of EnergyResearchers atDay 12:wasProjectsreguarly

  12. REEE Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnow Your Power Plants

  13. REEE Solicitation Part II Due Date | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report Appendices |ProjectKnow Your Power Plants

  14. ACRA-II

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003089IBMPC00 ACRA-II: Kernel Integration Code System for Estimation of Radiation Doses Caused by a Hypothetical Reactor Accident   

  15. Guidelines for Participation in the ETV ESTE Verification Test of Lead Paint Test Kits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidelines for Participation in the ETV ESTE Verification Test of Lead Paint Test Kits Revised 09 in the ETV ESTE verification test of lead paint test kits. Test kits must conform to the following guidelines as part of the ETV verification test of lead paint test kits. Testing is scheduled to start by November

  16. Analise Matematica II Semestre 2005/06

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisboa, Universidade Técnica de

    propostos, exerc´icios resolvidos, enunciados e resolu¸c~oes de testes e exames. AVALIAC¸ ~AO Provas, John Wiley, 1976. - "Exerc´icios de An´alise Matem´atica I e II", Dep. Matem´atica IST, IST Press 2003. Material de Estudo na internet Consulte os links na p´agina da cadeira que incluem muitos exerc´icios

  17. LABORATORY ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM Part III: ACKNOWLEDGED APPROVED BY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emmons, Scott

    LABORATORY ROTATION REGISTRATION FORM Part III: ACKNOWLEDGED APPROVED BY Part II: ROTATION LABORATORY INFORMATION Instructions to the student: This form must be submitted with a completed OSHA Form). The Associate Dean's signature will be obtained by the Graduate Office. First Laboratory Rotation Period

  18. Infocom 2001 VIP -Magda El Zarki II.1 Tutorial T5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El Zarki, Magda

    Infocom 2001 VIP - Magda El Zarki II.1 Tutorial T5 Video Over IP Magda El-Zarki (University of California at Irvine) Monday, 23 April, 2001 - Morning #12;MPEG-4 over IP - Part 2 Magda El Zarki Dept. of ICS UC, Irvine elzarki@uci.edu #12;Infocom 2001 VIP - Magda El Zarki II.3 Outline of Tutorial 1. Part

  19. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Appendices 1-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    These appendices contain the following reports: (1) investigation of coupling failure from the Gladys McCall No. 1 well; (2) failure analysis - oil well casing coupling; (3) technical remedial requirements for 5-inch production tubing string; (4) reservoir limit test data for sand zone No. 9; (5) reservoir fluid study - sand zone No. 9; (6) engineering interpretation of exploration drawdown tests; and (7) reservoir analysis. (ACR)

  20. LABORATORY II MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab II - 1 LABORATORY II MECHANICAL OSCILLATIONS Most of the laboratory problems so far have was constant. In this set of laboratory problems, the total force acting on an object, and thus its's oscillation frequency. OBJECTIVES: After successfully completing this laboratory, you should be able to

  1. Bomb tests attack the food chain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruff, T. )

    1990-03-01

    Ciguatera poisoning, the most common type of fish poisoning in the world, has become a major public health problem in some parts of the South Pacific. This area has always been the site of periodic outbreaks, especially after severe storms or natural disasters that damage core reefs. But since World War II it has become evident that military activities and major construction projects that wreak havoc on corals also lead to ciguatera outbreaks. Extraordinarily high rates of ciguatera poisoning have occurred on the small Pacific islands that have been used for nuclear tests and on the islands that host the military infrastructures and activities that accompany the tests. This is true for both the Marshall Islands near Bikini and Eniwetok, where U.S. tests took place, and in French Polynesia, in the area around Moruroa Atoll where the French government continues to test. Ciguatera poisoning has a disastrous effect on people who depend on fishing as a way of life and on fish as the major source of protein. 10 refs.

  2. Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullard, K.L.

    1994-08-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

  3. Rapid prototype and test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, D.L.; Hansche, B.D.

    1996-06-01

    In order to support advanced manufacturing, Sandia has acquired the capability to produce plastic prototypes using stereolithography. Currently, these prototypes are used mainly to verify part geometry and ``fit and form`` checks. This project investigates methods for rapidly testing these plastic prototypes, and inferring from prototype test data actual metal part performance and behavior. Performances examined include static load/stress response, and structural dynamic (modal) and vibration behavior. The integration of advanced non-contacting measurement techniques including scanning laser velocimetry, laser holography, and thermoelasticity into testing of these prototypes is described. Photoelastic properties of the epoxy prototypes to reveal full field stress/strain fields are also explored.

  4. Easter Term 2015 Examination Timetables (from 6 April 15 May Exams) Architecture Tripos Part IA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Easter Term 2015 Examination Timetables (from 6 April ­ 15 May Exams) Contents Architecture Tripos Part IA Architecture Tripos Part IB Architecture Tripos Part II Chemical Engineering Tripos Part IIA of Philosophy Examination in Technology Policy for the degree of Master of Philosophy Examination in Theology

  5. Part I: SST for NWP Part II: Decadal Strategic Plan for USGCRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Ning

    Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO Paris, France Presented at 39th Meeting of Coordination Group Plan for USGCRP Executive Office of the President (EOP) Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP of Energy Department of Health and Human Services Department of the Interior Department of State Department

  6. Statistical Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40 CFR Part 1065 Engine Dynamometer Test Cell Statistical Analysis of Transient Cycle Test Results in a 40 CFR Part 1065 Engine...

  7. Conceptual design report: Nuclear materials storage facility renovation. Part 1, Design concept. Part 2, Project management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-14

    The Nuclear Materials Storage Facility (NMSF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was a Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 line-item project completed in 1987 that has never been operated because of major design and construction deficiencies. This renovation project, which will correct those deficiencies and allow operation of the facility, is proposed as an FY 97 line item. The mission of the project is to provide centralized intermediate and long-term storage of special nuclear materials (SNM) associated with defined LANL programmatic missions and to establish a centralized SNM shipping and receiving location for Technical Area (TA)-55 at LANL. Based on current projections, existing storage space for SNM at other locations at LANL will be loaded to capacity by approximately 2002. This will adversely affect LANUs ability to meet its mission requirements in the future. The affected missions include LANL`s weapons research, development, and testing (WRD&T) program; special materials recovery; stockpile survelliance/evaluation; advanced fuels and heat sources development and production; and safe, secure storage of existing nuclear materials inventories. The problem is further exacerbated by LANL`s inability to ship any materials offsite because of the lack of receiver sites for mate rial and regulatory issues. Correction of the current deficiencies and enhancement of the facility will provide centralized storage close to a nuclear materials processing facility. The project will enable long-term, cost-effective storage in a secure environment with reduced radiation exposure to workers, and eliminate potential exposures to the public. This document provides Part I - Design Concept which describes the selected solution, and Part II - Project Management which describes the management system organization, the elements that make up the system, and the control and reporting system.

  8. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6. Blast measurements. Part 4. Pressure-time measurements in the Mach region. Sections 1 and 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, J.F.; Sokol, G.M.; Anastasion, S.N.; Vader, R.L.; Walthall, E.R.

    1985-09-01

    The objective of the laboratory and field work described in this report was to make accurate measurements of air blast in the Mach region from two explosions of Operation Greenhouse. Measurements were made at constant height along a single radius on Test Dog and along two different radii for test Easy. In addition, diaphragm-type inductance gages were installed at five different heights on approximately the same radii on test Easy. The spring-piston gage successfully did the job it was designed to do. The diaphragm-type inductance-gage measuring system had an accuracy of 2% in pressure and a resolving time of approximately 1 musec. Complete details concerning equipment design, field operation, and recommendations for future use of the systems are presented.

  9. Operation greenhouse, scientific director`s report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951, annex 9.2, Sandia Corporation Proving Ground Group. Part 3. Fuzing and firing activities, December 1951 (sanitized version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-29

    This report covers the activities of the Fuzing and Firing Team of Task Unit 3.1.4, the Weapons Assembly Organization. The Fuzing and Firing Team was directly responsible for the assembly and testing of the various fuzing and firing systems necessary to detonate the experimental weapons under test. Other responsibilities of this group included the supplying of fiducial signals from the firing sets for the transit-time experiments being conducted by other groups and a partial responsibility for the final arming of the weapons fired on the towers.

  10. DATE: __________________ NVLAP LAB CODE: _________________ Test Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DATE: __________________ NVLAP LAB CODE: _________________ Test Method Designation Short Title _____ 30/DISC00A ANSI/INCITS 423.1 (2008) Information Technology - Conformance Testing Methodology Standard for Biometric Data Interchange Format Standards - Part 1: Generalized Conformance Testing Methodology _____ 30

  11. Stuck-at-fault test set compaction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vanfickell, Jason Michael

    2013-02-22

    Proper testing of manufactured digital circuits is critical to ensuring the number of defective parts is minimized. Automated test pattern generation tools are created in order to produce test patterns that can be applied with the intention...

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Going Green and Building Strong: Building a FORTIFIED Home-- Part 2 Webinar (Text Version)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here is the text version of the webinar, Going Green and Building Strong: Building a FORTIFIED Home -- Part II, presented in June 2014.

  13. Preliminary PBFA II design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, D. L.; VanDevender, J. P.; Martin, T. H.

    1980-01-01

    The upgrade of Sandia National Laboratories particle beam fusion accelerator, PBFA I, to PBFA II presents several interesting and challenging pulsed power design problems. PBFA II requires increasing the PBFA I output parameters from 2 MV, 30 TW, 1 MJ to 4 MV, 100 TW, 3.5 MJ with the constraint of using much of the same PBFA I hardware. The increased PBFA II output will be obtained by doubling the number of modules (from 36 to 72), increasing the primary energy storage (from 4 MJ to 15 MJ), lowering the pulse forming line (PFL) output impedance, and adding a voltage doubling network.

  14. Relativistic Quaternionic Wave Equation II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Charles

    2007-01-01

    Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II J. Math. Phys.Relativistic quaternionic wave equation. II Charles Schwartzcomponent quaternionic wave equation recently introduced. A

  15. LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

    2012-06-01

    This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The technetium-loaded Sn(II)apatite was also subjected to water leach tests. The loaded sample (0.2 g of Sn(II)apatite was loaded with 0.342 mg of Tc-99) was placed in a 200-mL distilled water column and sparged with air. Samples were taken weekly over a 6-week period, and the dissolved oxygen ranged from 8.4 to 8.7 mg/L (average 8.5 mg/L); all samples recorded less than the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L Tc-99. The mechanism by which TcO{sub 2} is sequestered and hence protected from re-oxidation appears to be an exchange with phosphate in the apatite lattice, as the phosphorus that appeared in solution after reaction with technetium was essentially the same moles of technetium that were taken up by the Sn(II)apatite (Table 6). Overall, the reduction of the mobile pertechnetate (+7) to the less mobile technetium dioxide (+4) by Sn(II)apatite and subsequent sequestration of the technetium in the material indicates that Sn(II)apatite is an excellent candidate for long-term immobilization of technetium. The indications are that the Sn(II)apatite will lend itself to sequestering and inhibiting the reoxidation to the mobile pertechnetate species, thus keeping the radionuclide out of the environment.

  16. Part removal of 3D printed parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peña Doll, Mateo

    2014-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to understand the correlation between printing parameters in the FDM 3D printing process, and the force required to remove a part from the build platform of a 3D printing using a patent ...

  17. STAT 472 F14 Test 1-1.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsoft account

    2015-08-25

    Test 1. STAT 47201. Fall 2014. October 7, 2014. Copyright Jeffrey Beckley 2014. August 25, 2015. 1. You are given: i. Mortality follows the illustrative life table ii.

  18. Belle-II Experiment Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asner, David; Bell, Greg; Carlson, Tim; Cowley, David; Dart, Eli; Erwin, Brock; Godang, Romulus; Hara, Takanori; Johnson, Jerry; Johnson, Ron; Johnston, Bill; Dam, Kerstin Kleese-van; Kaneko, Toshiaki; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Kuhr, Thomas; McCoy, John; Miyake, Hideki; Monga, Inder; Nakamura, Motonori; Piilonen, Leo; Pordes, Ruth; Ray, Douglas; Russell, Richard; Schram, Malachi; Schroeder, Jim; Sevior, Martin; Singh, Surya; Suzuki, Soh; Sasaki, Takashi; Williams, Jim

    2013-05-28

    The Belle experiment, part of a broad-based search for new physics, is a collaboration of ~400 physicists from 55 institutions across four continents. The Belle detector is located at the KEKB accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan. The Belle detector was operated at the asymmetric electron-positron collider KEKB from 1999-2010. The detector accumulated more than 1 ab-1 of integrated luminosity, corresponding to more than 2 PB of data near 10 GeV center-of-mass energy. Recently, KEK has initiated a $400 million accelerator upgrade to be called SuperKEKB, designed to produce instantaneous and integrated luminosity two orders of magnitude greater than KEKB. The new international collaboration at SuperKEKB is called Belle II. The first data from Belle II/SuperKEKB is expected in 2015. In October 2012, senior members of the Belle-II collaboration gathered at PNNL to discuss the computing and neworking requirements of the Belle-II experiment with ESnet staff and other computing and networking experts. The day-and-a-half-long workshop characterized the instruments and facilities used in the experiment, the process of science for Belle-II, and the computing and networking equipment and configuration requirements to realize the full scientific potential of the collaboration's work.

  19. Gasoline reformulation: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This first of a two-part article looks at the effects that gas reformulation and vehicle equipment have on emissions. Phase 1 of the AQIRP (Auto-Oil Air Quality Improvement Research Program) investigated the effect of gasoline properties and composition on emissions from pre-1990 vehicles. In the first half of phase 2, studies focused on better understanding two of the larger effects observed in Phase 1; namely, the effects of fuel sulfur and distillation properties on exhaust emissions. This testing used a fleet of 1989 vehicles. Data generated from both phases played significant roles in development of the US EPA Complex Model, and the CARB Predictive Model. These models predict vehicle emissions as a function of gasoline fuel properties, and represent major portions of reformulated gasoline regulations instituted in the US and California. Fleet-Average exhaust and hot soak evaporative mass emissions and calculated ozone-forming reactivity using the most recent Carter reactivity factors are reported for the various vehicle fleet and fuel combinations. Emissions data are also reported for subsets of the fleets including only the 4-cylinder passenger cars operating on common Fuel, C2, to assess the impact of vehicle technology effects on emissions.

  20. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6. Blast measurements. Part 5. Measurement of density, temperature, and material velocity in an air shock produced by a nuclear explosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porzel, F.B.; Whitener, J.E.

    1985-09-01

    The results from laboratory tests and test firing were quite encouraging. It was concluded that: (1) the beta densitometer is a feasible device for the measurement of density as a function of time in the shock wave from a nuclear explosion. It is limited to pressure levels of 6 or 8 psi for bombs in the range of 50 kt, but is capable of higher-pressure levels on larger bombs where the interference from gamma rays is less serious; (2) dust-loading behind the shock wave is a major perturbation to the ideal hydrodynamics and can change the density by as large a factor as the shock itself; (3) the rise time at distances of 7,500 feet on Easy Shot was sharp within a resolution of approximately 0.2 msec; and (4) the field calibration used on Operation Greenhouse appeared reasonably accurate and was worthy of subsequent development.

  1. Copyright 2001, Agrawal & Bushnell VLSI Test: Lecture 28 1 MIC05: Teste de Circuitos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dos Santos, C.A.

    Copyright 2001, Agrawal & Bushnell VLSI Test: Lecture 28 1 MIC05: Teste de Circuitos Integrados Marcelo Lubaszewski PPGMicro - UFRGS 2007/II #12;Copyright 2001, Agrawal & Bushnell VLSI Test: Lecture 28 instructions s Summary #12;Copyright 2001, Agrawal & Bushnell VLSI Test: Lecture 28 3 Motivation for Standard

  2. _PART I - THE SCHEDULE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    H, Page i PART I - THE SCHEDULE TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION B: SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICESCOSTS ... 3 B-1...

  3. BNL ATF II beamlines design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedurin, M.; Jing, Y.; Stratakis, D.; Swinson, C.

    2015-05-03

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory. Accelerator Test Facility (BNL ATF) is currently undergoing a major upgrade (ATF-II). Together with a new location and much improved facilities, the ATF will see an upgrade in its major capabilities: electron beam energy and quality and CO2 laser power. The electron beam energy will be increased in stages, first to 100-150 MeV followed by a further increase to 500 MeV. Combined with the planned increase in CO2 laser power (from 1-100 TW), the ATF-II will be a powerful tool for Advanced Accelerator research. A high-brightness electron beam, produced by a photocathode gun, will be accelerated and optionally delivered to multiple beamlines. Besides the energy range (up to a possible 500 MeV in the final stage) the electron beam can be tailored to each experiment with options such as: small transverse beam size (<10 um), short bunch length (<100 fsec) and, combined short and small bunch options. This report gives a detailed overview of the ATFII capabilities and beamlines configuration.

  4. STAT 472 Fall 2014 Test 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsoft account

    2015-08-25

    Copyright Jeffrey Beckley 2014. August 25, 2015. STAT 472. Fall 2014. Test 2. November 11, 2014. 1. (6 points) You are given: i. 2. 0.450 x. A + = ii. 0.04 i = iii.

  5. Copyright Cem Kaner. Automated Testing Page 1 Improving the Maintainability of Automated Test Suites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are spread by tool vendors, by executives who don't understand testing, and even by testers and test managers paper "Test Automation Snake Oil."3 1 Parts of this paper were published in Kaner, C., "Pitfalls

  6. Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test for the Hanford Central Plateau: Soil Desiccation Pilot Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Strickland, Christopher E.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Johnson, Christian D.; Greenwood, William J.; Ward, Anderson L.; Clayton, Ray E.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Peterson, John E.; Hubbard, Susan; Chronister, Glen B.; Benecke, Mark W.

    2012-05-01

    This report describes results of a pilot test of soil desiccation conducted as part of the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test program. The report is written in CERCLA treatabilty test report format.

  7. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 1. Prompt-gamma-ray measurements. Part 2. Prompt-gamma-ray intensity as a function of time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, W.C.

    1985-09-01

    This report describes the procedure followed and the results obtained in measuring, as a function of time, the prompt gamma radiation emitted within 1,000 seconds after the explosion of the atomic weapons studies in Operation Greenhouse. The design of the experiment and a description of the equipment are given. The fast coaxial scintillation detectors for the Greenhouse test were used without collimators at a distance of several mean free paths from the source. Numerous factors complicated the interpretation of the data obtained, thus reducing the accuracy that may be ascribed to the results. The probable peak gamma-ray intensity, the time of occurrence of the peak, and the prompt-gamma decay curves as a function of time were obtained for each shot. A composite decay curve fitting all the shots was obtained, and from this, a scaling factor was deduced which related the shot energy to the gamma-ray intensity.

  8. Phase II Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, Reid; McPherson, Brian; Lee, Rober

    2011-08-01

    The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) one of seven regional partnerships sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) carried out five field pilot tests in its Phase II Carbon Sequestration Demonstration effort, to validate the most promising sequestration technologies and infrastructure concepts, including three geologic pilot tests and two terrestrial pilot programs. This field testing demonstrated the efficacy of proposed sequestration technologies to reduce or offset greenhouse gas emissions in the region. Risk mitigation, optimization of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) protocols, and effective outreach and communication were additional critical goals of these field validation tests. The program included geologic pilot tests located in Utah, New Mexico, Texas, and a region-wide terrestrial analysis. Each geologic sequestration test site was intended to include injection of a minimum of ~75,000 tons/year CO{sub 2}, with minimum injection duration of one year. These pilots represent medium- scale validation tests in sinks that host capacity for possible larger-scale sequestration operations in the future. These validation tests also demonstrated a broad variety of carbon sink targets and multiple value-added benefits, including testing of enhanced oil recovery and sequestration, enhanced coalbed methane production and a geologic sequestration test combined with a local terrestrial sequestration pilot. A regional terrestrial sequestration demonstration was also carried out, with a focus on improved terrestrial MVA methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region.

  9. About APPLE II Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, T.; Zimoch, D.

    2007-01-19

    The operation of an APPLE II based undulator beamline with all its polarization states (linear horizontal and vertical, circular and elliptical, and continous variation of the linear vector) requires an effective description allowing an automated calculation of gap and shift parameter as function of energy and operation mode. The extension of the linear polarization range from 0 to 180 deg. requires 4 shiftable magnet arrrays, permitting use of the APU (adjustable phase undulator) concept. Studies for a pure fixed gap APPLE II for the SLS revealed surprising symmetries between circular and linear polarization modes allowing for simplified operation. A semi-analytical model covering all types of APPLE II and its implementation will be presented.

  10. Appendix II: Discussion Panel on Evaluation in Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix II: Discussion Panel on Evaluation Research in Generation Moderator: Inderjeet Mani. The evaluation methods include intrinsic methods which test the generation system in itself, and extrinsic methods which test the generation system in relation to some other task. Intrinsic methods can include

  11. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  12. MyUni Tests Tests.............................................................................................................................................. 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva

    MyUni ­ Tests Tests.............................................................................................................................................. 2 Test question types.................................................................................................................... 2 Create a test

  13. An Evaluation of the Carbon Sequestration Potential of the Cambro-Ordovician Strata of the Illinois and Michigan Basins: Part 1: Evaluation of Phase 2 CO{sub 2} Injection Testing in the Deep Saline Gunter Sandstone Reservoir (Cambro-Ordovician Knox Group), Marvin Blan No. 1 Hancock County, Kentucky Part 2: Time-lapse Three-Dimensional Vertical Seismic Profile (3D-VSP) of Sequestration Target Interval with Injected Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Bowersox; John Hickman; Hannes Leetaru

    2012-12-01

    Part 1 of this report focuses on results of the western Kentucky carbon storage test, and provides a basis for evaluating injection and storage of supercritical CO{sub 2} in Cambro-Ordovician carbonate reservoirs throughout the U.S. Midcontinent. This test demonstrated that the Cambro- Ordovician Knox Group, including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite in stratigraphic succession from shallowest to deepest, had reservoir properties suitable for supercritical CO{sub 2} storage in a deep saline reservoir hosted in carbonate rocks, and that strata with properties sufficient for long-term confinement of supercritical CO{sub 2} were present in the deep subsurface. Injection testing with brine and CO{sub 2} was completed in two phases. The first phase, a joint project by the Kentucky Geological Survey and the Western Kentucky Carbon Storage Foundation, drilled the Marvin Blan No. 1 carbon storage research well and tested the entire Knox Group section in the open borehole � including the Beekmantown Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, and Copper Ridge Dolomite � at 1152�2255 m, below casing cemented at 1116 m. During Phase 1 injection testing, most of the 297 tonnes of supercritical CO{sub 2} was displaced into porous and permeable sections of the lowermost Beekmantown below 1463 m and Gunter. The wellbore was then temporarily abandoned with a retrievable bridge plug in casing at 1105 m and two downhole pressure-temperature monitoring gauges below the bridge plug pending subsequent testing. Pressure and temperature data were recorded every minute for slightly more than a year, providing a unique record of subsurface reservoir conditions in the Knox. In contrast, Phase 2 testing, this study, tested a mechanically-isolated dolomitic-sandstone interval in the Gunter. Operations in the Phase 2 testing program commenced with retrieval of the bridge plug and long-term pressure gauges, followed by mechanical isolation of the Gunter by plugging the wellbore with cement below the injection zone at 1605.7 m, then cementing a section of a 14-cm casing at 1470.4�1535.6. The resultant 70.1-m test interval at 1535.6�1605.7 m included nearly all of the Gunter sandstone facies. During the Phase 2 injection, 333 tonnes of CO{sub 2} were injected into the thick, lower sand section in the sandy member of the Gunter. Following the completion of testing, the injection zone below casing at 1116 m in the Marvin Blan No. 1 well, and wellbore below 305 m was permanently abandoned with cement plugs and the wellsite reclaimed. The range of most-likely storage capacities found in the Knox in the Marvin Blan No. 1 is 1000 tonnes per surface hectare in the Phase 2 Gunter interval to 8685 tonnes per surface hectare if the entire Knox section were available including the fractured interval near the base of the Copper Ridge. By itself the Gunter lacks sufficient reservoir volume to be considered for CO{sub 2} storage, although it may provide up to 18% of the reservoir volume available in the Knox. Regional extrapolation of CO{sub 2} storage potential based on the results of a single well test can be problematic, although indirect evidence of porosity and permeability can be demonstrated in the form of active saltwater-disposal wells injecting into the Knox. The western Kentucky region suitable for CO{sub 2} storage in the Knox is limited updip, to the east and south, by the depth at which the base of the Maquoketa shale lies above the depth required to ensure storage of CO{sub 2} in its supercritical state and the deepest a commercial well might be drilled for CO{sub 2} storage. The resulting prospective region has an area of approximately 15,600 km{sup 2}, beyond which it is unlikely that suitable Knox reservoirs may be developed. Faults in the subsurface, which serve as conduits for CO{sub 2} migration and compromise sealing strata, may mitigate the area with Knox reservoirs suitable for CO{sub 2} storage. The results of the injection tes

  14. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 6. Blast measurements. Part 2. Free-air peak-pressure measurements. Section 2. Telemetering from moored balloons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frolich, A.J.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to determine the free-air peak-pressure as a function of distance from an atomic explosion. In this report, free-air peak-pressure is defined as the pressure at the head of the blast wave in regions where it has not been reinforced by a reflected wave. Operation in the test area was more difficult than anticipated. Heavy winds made balloon handling very difficult. On the whole, the radio link performed satisfactorily on all occasions and appears to be a reliable method. For some unknown reason, blast switches closer than 1,500 feet failed to give satisfactory signals. Pressures were computed using the Rankine-Hugoniot relation, which is based on the shock wave being a definite discontinuity in pressure. Since the pressures measured on the ground showed relatively long times, there has been some speculation that a true shock wave may not exist in free air. If a true shock wave does not exist in the free-air region, pressures as computed are not correct, and the method of this experiment cannot be used.

  15. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic-weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 1. 2. Delayed gamma-ray measurements. Part 1. Gamma-ray spectrum measurements (abridged)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, H.F.; Miller; Motz, J.W.; Smeltzer, J.C.; Wyckoff, H.O.

    1985-09-01

    Measurements of bomb efficiencies from the number of gamma rays requires fundamentally two separate experiments. The average number of gamma rays emitted from the fission fragments (delayed gamma rays) per fission must be determined. This experiment can be carried out in the laboratory. A second experiment, the absolute determination of the number of gamma rays from the bomb was also attempted. Because gamma rays are not directly observable but are measurable only through their secondary effects, and because the probability of occurrence of the secondary effects depends upon the gamma ray energy, it is not usually possible to count directly the number of gamma rays in a heterochromatic spectrum. A spectral distribution must be first obtained from which the actual total number of gamma rays may be computed. This volume discusses, in detail, the planning for the experiment and the spectral distribution of collimated gamma-rays determined from the Greenhouse tests on two shots. A discussion of measurement of build-up factor which is needed to estimate the effect of collimation is also given.

  16. TEAM PROJECT: USER TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TEAM PROJECT: USER TESTING Due: Wed April 21 (section 2) Thu April 22 (section 1) Now that you have: usability inspection, Neilsen's heuristic evaluation, pluralistic walk through, or GOMS analysis (without part of your project. You might consider a joint session with another team! Format: 3-4 page report

  17. A U. S. Perspective on Fast Reactor Fuel Fabrication Technology and Experience Part I: Metal Fuels and Assembly Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas E. Burkes; Randall S. Fielding; Douglas L. Porter; Douglas C. Crawford; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2009-06-01

    This paper is Part I of a review focusing on the United States experience with metallic fast reactor fuel fabrication and assembly design for the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and the Fast Flux Test Facility, and it also refers to the impact of development in other nations. Experience with metal fuel fabrication in the United States is extensive, including over 60 years of research conducted by the government, national laboratories, industry, and academia. This experience has culminated into a foundation of research and resulted in significant improvements to the technologies employed to fabricate metallic fast reactor fuel. This part of the review documents the current state of fuel fabrication technologies for metallic fuels, some of the challenges faced by previous researchers, and how these were overcome. Knowledge gained from reviewing previous investigations will aid both researchers and policy makers in forming future decisions relating to nuclear fuel fabrication technologies.

  18. Inert Doublet Model and LEP II Limits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erik Lundstrom; Michael Gustafsson; Joakim Edsjo

    2009-02-19

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  19. Inert doublet model and LEP II limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundstroem, Erik; Gustafsson, Michael; Edsjoe, Joakim

    2009-02-01

    The inert doublet model is a minimal extension of the standard model introducing an additional SU(2) doublet with new scalar particles that could be produced at accelerators. While there exists no LEP II analysis dedicated for these inert scalars, the absence of a signal within searches for supersymmetric neutralinos can be used to constrain the inert doublet model. This translation however requires some care because of the different properties of the inert scalars and the neutralinos. We investigate what restrictions an existing DELPHI Collaboration study of neutralino pair production can put on the inert scalars and discuss the result in connection with dark matter. We find that although an important part of the inert doublet model parameter space can be excluded by the LEP II data, the lightest inert particle still constitutes a valid dark matter candidate.

  20. TRUPACT-II 157 Examination Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry H. O'Brien; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Kip E. Archibald

    2003-12-01

    This report presents the results of examination and recovery activities performed on the TRUPACT-II 157 shipping container. The container was part of a contact-handled transuranic waste shipment being transported on a truck to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico when an accident occurred. Although the transport vehicle sustained only minor damage, airborne transuranic contamination was detected in air samples extracted from inside TRUPACT-II 157 at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Consequently, the shipping container was rejected, resealed, and returned to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory where the payload was disassembled, examined, and recovered for subsequent reshipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. This report documents the results of those activities.

  1. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  2. Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Giant Protease TPP II's Structure, Mechanism Uncovered Print Tripeptidyl peptidase II (TPP II), the largest known eukaryotic enzyme that breaks down proteins (a protease), is...

  3. Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, JR.G.L.

    2006-03-08

    Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

  4. Kauai Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The Kauai Test Facility (KTF) is a Department of Energy rocket launch facility operated by Sandia National Laboratories. Originally it was constructed in support of the high altitude atmospheric nuclear test phase of operation Dominic in the early 1960's. Later, the facility went through extensive improvement and modernization to become an integral part of the Safeguard C readiness to resume nuclear testing program. Since its inception and build up, in the decade of the sixties and the subsequent upgrades of the seventies, range test activities have shifted from full scale test to emphasis on research and development of materials and components, and to making high altitude scientific measurements. Primarily, the facility is intended to be utilized in support of development programs at the DOE weapons laboratories, however, other organizations may make use of the facility on a non-interface basis. The physical components at KTF and their operation are described.

  5. 5) Management ii) Mechanical methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Robert S.

    5) Management c) Control ii) Mechanical methods = manually or mechanically damaging plants #12;5) Management c) Control ii) Mechanical methods Advantages · Generally much less public opposition #12;5) Management c) Control ii) Mechanical methods Advantages · Generally much less public opposition · Works well

  6. SWAMI II technology transfer plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, C.R.; Peterson, K.D.; Harpring, L.J.; Immel, D.M.; Jones, J.D.; Mallet, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    Thousands of drums of radioactive/hazardous/mixed waste are currently stored at DOE sites throughout US; they are stored in warehouse facilities on an interim basis, pending final disposition. Recent emphasis on anticipated decommissioning of facilities indicates that many more drums of waste will be generated, requiring additional storage. Federal and state regulations dictate that hazardous waste covered by RCRA be inspected periodically for container degradation and to verify inventories. All known DOE waste storage facilities are currently inspected manually. A system to perform robotic inspection of waste drums is under development by the SRTC Robotics Group of WSRC; it is called the Stored Waste Autonomous Mobile Inspector (SWAMI). The first version, SWAMI I, was developed by the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) as a proof of principle system for autonomous inspection of drums in a warehouse. SWAMI I was based on the Transitions Research Corporation (TRC) HelpMate mobile robot. TRC modified the Helpmate to navigate in aisles of drums. SRTC added subsystems to SWAMI I to determine its position in open areas, read bar code labels on the drums up to three levels high, capture images of the drums and perform a radiation survey of the floor in the aisles. The radiation survey was based on SRTC patented technology first implemented on the Semi-Intelligent Mobile Observing Navigator (SIMON). The radiation survey is not essential for the inspection of drums, but is an option that can increase the utility and effectiveness of SWAMI in warehouses with radioactive and/or mixed waste. All the sensors on SWAMI I were fixed on the vehicle. From the success of SWAMI I, a second version, SWAMI II, was developed; it will be evaluated at Fernald and tested with two other mobile robots. Intent is to transfer the technology developed for SWAMI I and II to industry so that it can supply additional units for purchase for drum inspection.

  7. HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

  8. Ribosomal Database Project II

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Ribosomal Database Project (RDP) provides ribosome related data and services to the scientific community, including online data analysis and aligned and annotated Bacterial small-subunit 16S rRNA sequences. As of March 2008, RDP Release 10 is available and currently (August 2009) contains 1,074,075 aligned 16S rRNA sequences. Data that can be downloaded include zipped GenBank and FASTA alignment files, a histogram (in Excel) of the number of RDP sequences spanning each base position, data in the Functional Gene Pipeline Repository, and various user submitted data. The RDP-II website also provides numerous analysis tools.[From the RDP-II home page at http://rdp.cme.msu.edu/index.jsp

  9. Realistic Industrial Scale Energy Optimization: Part I - Organizing and Executing Energy Conservation Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    an energy conservation program. The energy audit is particularly stressed. Part II will discuss the analytic techniques which are employed during the engineering phase of the program. Included are: targeting methods, process optimization, heat exchange...

  10. Parte de Algoritmos de la asignatura de Programacin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giménez, Domingo

    Parte de Algoritmos de la asignatura de Programación Master de Bioinformática Análisis de Algoritmos Web asignatura: http://dis.um.es/~domingo/algbio.html E-mail profesor: domingo@um.es Transparencias preparadas a partir de las del curso de Algoritmos y Estructuras de Datos II, del Grado de

  11. Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ......................................................................................STRUCT-3 DOE/WIPP-09-3424 STRUCT-i Structure #12;Title 40 CFR Part 191 Subparts B and C Compliance Recertification Application 2009 This page intentionally left blank. DOE/WIPP-09-3424 STRUCT-ii Structure #12 Compliance Recertification Application EPA U.S. Environmental Protection Agency WIPP Waste Isolation Pilot

  12. Billiards Digest August, 2012 "VEPP Part V: Hanger Table-Center Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alciatore, David G.

    Billiards Digest August, 2012 "VEPP ­ Part V: Hanger Table-Center Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES-dave-billiards.com/vepp. Last month, we looked at useful position-control target-practice drills from Disc II: "VEPP II ­ Position Control and English." This month, we'll look at center-of-table drills, also from the second DVD

  13. Billiards Digest September, 2012 "VEPP Part VI: Line-of-Balls Drill" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alciatore, David G.

    Billiards Digest September, 2012 "VEPP ­ Part VI: Line-of-Balls Drill" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES David-dave-billiards.com/vepp. Last month, we looked at useful center-of-table drills from Disc II: "VEPP II ­ Position Control and English." This month, we'll look at another type of position control drill, also from the second DVD

  14. Billiards Digest June, 2012 "VEPP Part III: Wagon Wheel Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alciatore, David G.

    Billiards Digest June, 2012 "VEPP ­ Part III: Wagon Wheel Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES David couple of articles, I introduced the series and covered some fundamentals and draw shot drills from the first disc. This month, we'll look at a useful "wagon wheel" drill from Disc II: "VEPP II ­ Position

  15. NASA ROSES CCS NNH13ZDA001N-CARBON MSTMIP PHASE II DATA MANAGEMENT PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NASA ROSES CCS NNH13ZDA001N-CARBON MSTMIP PHASE II DATA MANAGEMENT PLAN 4-1 MSTMIP PHASE II: DATA UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, 4 CARNEGIE INSTITUTE, AND 5 JPL NASA The following Data Management Plan was part of the NASA ROSES 2013 Proposal North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model

  16. ME EN 3200/3210 MECHATRONICS I/II FINAL COMPETITION, FALL 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mascaro, Stephen A.

    ME EN 3200/3210 MECHATRONICS I/II FINAL COMPETITION, FALL 2008 INDIANA JONES AND THE SECRET vendors, etc., or as credit towards the use of parts and materials that are stocked in the mechatronics/credits/donations. #12;ME EN 3200/3210 MECHATRONICS I/II FINAL COMPETITION, FALL 2008 INDIANA JONES AND THE SECRET

  17. Harvard University Physics 143b: Quantum Mechanics II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Principle, Schr¨odinger equation and its solution in simple one-dimensional potentials, the Hilbert space and Dirac notation, angular momentum and spin, and spectrum of the hydrogen atom. The course will cover Part II of Griffiths, and then move onto advanced topics, depending upon available time. A tentative

  18. Scoping Study for Demand Respose DFT II Project in Morgantown, WV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2008-06-06

    This scoping study describes the underlying data resources and an analysis tool for a demand response assessment specifically tailored toward the needs of the Modern Grid Initiatives Demonstration Field Test in Phase II in Morgantown, WV. To develop demand response strategies as part of more general distribution automation, automated islanding and feeder reconfiguration schemes, an assessment of the demand response resource potential is required. This report provides the data for the resource assessment for residential customers and describes a tool that allows the analyst to estimate demand response in kW for each hour of the day, by end-use, season, day type (weekday versus weekend) with specific saturation rates of residential appliances valid for the Morgantown, WV area.

  19. _PART I - THE SCHEDULE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    572 dated 3215 Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Page 2 Part I - The Schedule Sections B through H TABLE OF CONTENTS B-1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED...

  20. _PART I - THE SCHEDULE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    93015 to Mod 0588 Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. M202 Page 2 Part I - The Schedule Sections B through H TABLE OF CONTENTS B-1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED...

  1. Yearly Report___________________________________________________________ 93 Part III: Activity Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perkins, Richard A.

    .M. Rappoport, "Algorithms and Codes for the Macdonald Function: Recent Progress and Comparisons," Journal Statistical Analysis of Test Parts Manufactured in Production Environments," ASME Journal of Manufacturing'Leary, "Deconvolving LADAR Images of Bar Codes for Construction Site Object Recognition," Journal of Automation

  2. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  3. Meatiness Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the ignition phenomena of selected polymeric materials using the Hot Wire Ignition Test. This test is prescribed by Underwriters Laboratories as one of various requirements ...

  4. Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

  5. PARS II TRAINING

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes have a more than 20-yearPAE EvaluationPARS II13,

  6. Questions about Cori II

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-RichProton Delivery and RemovalQuantumdefault Sign In About

  7. COMPARATIVE STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TEST PARTS MANUFACTURED IN PRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilsinn, David E.

    center machine tool errors was developed. Uncertainty estimates of the errors in the working volume were Measuring Machine ISO International Organization for Standardization LBB Laser Ball Bar NC Numerical ............................................................................................................ 10 3.3 Measuring the Vertical Machining Center

  8. COP 3337 Test 3 NAME_________________ Part 1: Selection Sort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, Giri

    SelectionSorter(String[] anArray) { array = anArray; } public void sort() { for (int i = 0; i .length - 1; i++) { int minPos = minimumPosition(i); swap(minPos, i); } } private void swap(int i, int j of the minimumPosition method in the box below: private int minimumPosition(int from) { } 01 - (Irvine, Spring

  9. Ex Parte Communication on Central Air-Conditioner Test Procedure |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLfor InnovativeProcessing22, 2014 TheMonday March 3, 2014, a

  10. AGA-12, Part 2 Performance Test Results | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks25 AMOSystemADAEnergy them.(RevisionAGA

  11. IN-CLASS TEST II October 22, 2004 Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taalman, Laura

    that D4, the group of symmetries of the square, has eight elements: 0 = identity, 1 = counterclockwise/False. Determine whether each statement is true (T) or false (F). (a) T F Every element of a group generates a cyclic subgroup of the group. (b) T F Every subgroup is a left coset. (c) T F Every left coset

  12. Completion of NDCX-II Facility and Initial Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwan, Joe

    2012-01-01

    of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.of Science, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences, of the U.S.heavy-ion-driven Inertial Fusion Energy. * The machine will

  13. Beryllium Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Beryllium is a naturally occurring metal and is not radioactive. Because of its properties, beryllium has been part of the atomic energy and nuclear weapons industries since the 1940s.

  14. Sampling and analysis plan for phase II of the Bear Creek Valley treatability study Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Bear Creek Valley (BCV) Treatability Study is intended to provide site-specific data defining potential treatment technologies applicable to contaminated groundwater and surface water. This project directly supports Alternative 5 of the base action in the BCV Feasibility Study, and indirectly supports other alternatives through proof of concept. In that role, the ultimate goal is to install a treatment system that will remove uranium and nitrate from groundwater before it reaches Bear Creek. A secondary goal is the concurrent removal of technetium and several metals that impact ecological risk. This project is intended to produce hydraulic and treatment performance data required to design the treatment system to reach those goals. This project will also generate information that can be applied at other facilities within the Oak Ridge Reservation. This report is the sampling and analysis plan (SAP) for the field work component of Phase II of the BCV Treatability Study. Field work for this phase of the BCV Treatability Study consists of media testing. In-field continuous flow tests will be conducted over an extended time period (5 weeks) to generate data on long-term treatment effects on potential treatment media including sorbents and zero valent iron, over 28 weeks for constructed wetlands treatment, and over 24 weeks for algal mats treatment. The SAP addresses environmental sampling at the S-3 Site at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Samples will be taken from groundwater, effluent from test columns, effluent from an algal mat reactor, and effluent from a pilot-scale wetlands. This plan will be implemented as part of the BCV Phase II Treatability Study Best Management Practices Plan and in conjunction with the BCV Phase II Treatability Study Health and Safety Plan and the BCV Phase II Treatability Study Waste Management Plan.

  15. RESERVATION OF RIGHTS A number of governments and agencies participated in the development of this Flathead Subbasin Plan, Part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this Flathead Subbasin Plan, Part I (Assessment Volume), Part II (Inventory Volume), and Part III (Management that respond to impacts from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing hydropower system. Nothing in this Plan or the participation in its development is intended to, and shall

  16. RESERVATION OF RIGHTS A number of governments and agencies participated in the development of this Flathead Subbasin Plan, Part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this Flathead Subbasin Plan, Part I (Assessment Volume), Part II (Inventory Volume), and Part III (Management the subbasin over the last five years.The Inventory also evaluates how well past and current projects have that respond to impacts from the development and operation of the Columbia River hydropower system. Nothing

  17. Modeling defective part level due to static and dynamic defects based upon site observation and excitation balance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dworak, Jennifer Lynn

    2004-09-30

    a subset that detects a high percentage of the defective parts and produces a low defective part level. Historically, test pattern generation has often been seen as a deterministic endeavor. Test sets are generated to deterministically ensure that a...

  18. Ex Parte Memorandum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 InfographiclighbulbsDepartmentDeveloping11, 2012 Ex ParteJulyJune

  19. Ex Parte Memorandum

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015 InfographiclighbulbsDepartmentDeveloping11, 2012 Ex ParteJulyJuneStaff

  20. QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosner, Jonathan L.

    QUANTUM MECHANICS II Physics 342 KPTC 103 9:00 ­ 10:20 a.m. 1 Tues., Thurs. ­ Winter Quarter 2011 quantum mechanics at the graduate level. The text for Quantum Mechanics II will be J. J. Sakurai and Jim Napolitano, Modern Quantum Mechanics, Second Edition (Addison-Wesley, San Francisco, 2011). For supplemental

  1. II JORNADAS "PUBLICAR EN REVISTAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Escolano, Francisco

    II JORNADAS "PUBLICAR EN REVISTAS DE IMPACTO" 20 de Septiembre 2011 Facultad de Ciencias de la Salud #12;Taller: "Elaboración de Manuscritos y Proceso Editorial en Revistas Indexadas: el Caso del: Secretaría. Departamento de Psicología de la Salud II JORNADAS "PUBLICAR EN REVISTAS DE IMPACTO" 20 de

  2. National Synchrotron Light Source II

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Steve Dierker

    2010-01-08

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory is a proposed new state-of-the-art medium energy storage ring designed to deliver world-leading brightness and flux with top-off operation

  3. Unit II-5 Interpolation 1 Interpolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birkett, Stephen

    Unit II-5 Interpolation 1 Unit II-5 Interpolation Unit II-5 Interpolation 2 Interpolation outside the range of values of xi use extrapolation Unit II-5 Interpolation 3 Basic ideas · given: n+1 in tabular format Unit II-5 Interpolation 4 Basis functions · n basis functions 1, 2, ... , n can be used

  4. Post-Test for Physics 123 All engineering students are taking Pre and Post Tests in physics this year. At the beginning of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glashausser, Charles

    Post-Test for Physics 123 All engineering students are taking Pre and Post Tests in physics this year. At the beginning of the semester you took a Pre-Test in recitation. The Post-Test the four parts (pre- test, pre-test online survey, post-test, post-test online survey) must be taken to get

  5. STARS MDT-II targets mission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sims, B.A.; White, J.E.

    1997-08-01

    The Strategic Target System (STARS) was launched successfully on August 31, 1996 from the Kauai Test Facility (KTF) at the Pacific Missile Range Facility (PMRF). The STARS II booster delivered a payload complement of 26 vehicles atop a post boost vehicle. These targets were designed and the mission planning was achieved to provide for a dedicated mission for view by the Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) Satellite Sensor Suite. Along with the MSX Satellite, other corollary sensors were involved. Included in these were the Airborne Surveillance Test Bed (AST) aircraft, the Cobra Judy sea based radar platform, Kwajalein Missile Range (KMR), and the Kiernan Reentry Measurements Site (KREMS). The launch was a huge success from all aspects. The STARS Booster flew a perfect mission from hardware, software and mission planning respects. The payload complement achieved its desired goals. All sensors (space, air, ship, and ground) attained excellent coverage and data recording.

  6. Brainstorming Session II | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    RD PI Meeting files Brainstorming Session II Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Test Facility Discussion (Raubenheimer) .pdf file (124KB) Testbed Discussion (Murphy) .pdf...

  7. Evaluation of Fluid Conduction and Mixing within a Subassembly of the Actinide Burner Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff B. Davis

    2007-09-01

    The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid, including axial and radial heat conduction and subchannel mixing, that are not currently represented with internal code models. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor.

  8. Bibliography of reports on studies of the geology, hydrogeology and hydrology at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, from 1951--1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seaber, P.R.; Stowers, E.D.; Pearl, R.H.

    1997-04-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established in 1951 as a proving ground for nuclear weapons. The site had formerly been part of an Air Force bombing and gunnery range during World War II. Sponsor-directed studies of the geology, hydrogeology, and hydrology of the NTS began about 1956 and were broad based in nature, but were related mainly to the effects of the detonation of nuclear weapons. These effects included recommending acceptable media and areas for underground tests, the possibility of off-site contamination of groundwater, air blast and surface contamination in the event of venting, ground-shock damage that could result from underground blasts, and studies in support of drilling and emplacement. The studies were both of a pure scientific nature and of a practical applied nature. The NTS was the site of 828 underground nuclear tests and 100 above-ground tests conducted between 1951 and 1992 (U.S. Department of Energy, 1994a). After July 1962, all nuclear tests conducted in the United States were underground, most of them at the NTS. The first contained underground nuclear explosion was detonated on September 19, 1957, following extensive study of the underground effect of chemical explosives. The tests were performed by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration. As part of a nationwide complex for nuclear weapons design, testing and manufacturing, the NTS was the location for continental testing of new and stockpiled nuclear devices. Other tests, including Project {open_quotes}Plowshare{close_quotes} experiments to test the peaceful application of nuclear explosives, were conducted on several parts of the site. In addition, the Defense Nuclear Agency tested the effect of nuclear detonations on military hardware.

  9. Test Comparability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

    2010-01-01

    stream_size 3106 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Test Comparability ChangeJuly (2).pdf.txt stream_source_info Test Comparability ChangeJuly (2).pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please share...

  10. Disposition of fuel elements from the Aberdeen and Sandia pulse reactor (SPR-II) assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mckerley, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bustamante, Jacqueline M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Costa, David A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Drypolcher, Anthony F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hickey, Joseph [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    We describe the disposition of fuel from the Aberdeen (APR) and the Sandia Pulse Reactors (SPR-II) which were used to provide intense neutron bursts for radiation effects testing. The enriched Uranium - 10% Molybdenum fuel from these reactors was shipped to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size reduction prior to shipment to the Savannah River Site (SRS) for final disposition in the H Canyon facility. The Shipper/Receiver Agreements (SRA), intra-DOE interfaces, criticality safety evaluations, safety and quality requirements and key materials management issues required for the successful completion of this project will be presented. This work is in support of the DOE Consolidation and Disposition program. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has operated pulse nuclear reactor research facilities for the Department of Energy since 1961. The Sandia Pulse Reactor (SPR-II) was a bare metal Godiva-type reactor. The reactor facilities have been used for research and development of nuclear and non-nuclear weapon systems, advanced nuclear reactors, reactor safety, simulation sources and energy related programs. The SPR-II was a fast burst reactor, designed and constructed by SNL that became operational in 1967. The SPR-ll core was a solid-metal fuel enriched to 93% {sup 235}U. The uranium was alloyed with 10 weight percent molybdenum to ensure the phase stabilization of the fuel. The core consisted of six fuel plates divided into two assemblies of three plates each. Figure 1 shows a cutaway diagram of the SPR-II Reactor with its decoupling shroud. NNSA charged Sandia with removing its category 1 and 2 special nuclear material by the end of 2008. The main impetus for this activity was based on NNSA Administrator Tom D'Agostino's six focus areas to reenergize NNSA's nuclear material consolidation and disposition efforts. For example, the removal of SPR-II from SNL to DAF was part of this undertaking. This project was in support of NNSA's efforts to consolidate the locations of special nuclear material (SNM) to reduce the cost of securing many SNM facilities. The removal of SPR-II from SNL was a significant accomplishment in SNL's de-inventory efforts and played a key role in reducing the number of locations requiring the expensive security measures required for category 1 and 2 SNM facilities. A similar pulse reactor was fabricated at the Y-12 National Security Complex beginning in the late 1960's. This Aberdeen Pulse Reactor (APR) was operated at the Army Pulse Radiation Facility (APRF) located at the Aberdeen Test Center (ATC) in Maryland. When the APRF was shut down in 2003, a portion of the DOE-owned Special Nuclear Material (SNM) was shipped to an interim facility for storage. Subsequently, the DOE determined that the material from both the SPR-II and the APR would be processed in the H-Canyon at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Because of the SRS receipt requirements some of the material was sent to the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for size-reduction prior to shipment to the SRS for final disposition.

  11. Fabrication/Assembly Instructions McMaster Parts List

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dollar, Aaron M.

    ) ­ Model material: ABS ­ Support material? Yes · Not recommended to use PLA or alternative materials for RP parts · Majority of parts are designed to not require support material · Authors do not know how well be attached with any appropriately-sized set of bolts/nuts · Improved clinch knot used in prototype tests

  12. H5Part

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFESOpportunitiesNERSCGrid-based29 1.921 1.892 1.887 H HPart H5Part

  13. Foundations of Software Testing: Dependability Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamlet, Richard

    Foundations of Software Testing: Dependability Theory Dick Hamlet Portland State University Center for Software Quality Research Abstract Testing is potentially the best grounded part of software engineering's pri- mary goal should be to measure the dependability of tested software. In support of this goal

  14. MIC05: Teste de Circuitos Marcelo Lubaszewski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dos Santos, C.A.

    · Uses: ­ Analysis of difficulty of testing internal circuit parts ­ redesign or add special test ­ PREDICT ­ 1st exact probabilistic measures Origins #12;Testability Analysis Involves Circuit Topological analysis, but no test vectors and no search algorithm Static analysis Linear computational complexity

  15. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  16. STAT 472 F14 Test 2-1.pdf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Microsoft account

    2015-08-25

    Copyright Jeffrey Beckley 2014. August 25, 2015. STAT 472. Fall 2014. Test 2. November 11, 2014. 1. (6 points) You are given: i. 2. 0.450 x. A + = ii. 0.04 i = iii.

  17. Testing of the structural evaluation test unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    In the evaluation of the safety of radioactive material transportation it is important to consider the response of Type B packages to environments more severe than that prescribed by the hypothetical accident sequence in Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations (NRC 1995). The impact event in this sequence is a 9-meter drop onto an essentially unyielding target, resulting in an impact velocity of 13.4 m/s. The behavior of 9 packages when subjected to impacts more severe than this is not well known. It is the purpose of this program to evaluate the structural response of a test package to these environments. Several types of structural response are considered. Of primary importance is the behavior of the package containment boundary, including the bolted closure and 0-rings. Other areas of concern are loss of shielding capability due to lead slump and the deceleration loading of package contents, that may cause damage to them. This type of information is essential for conducting accurate risk assessments on the transportation of radioactive materials. Currently very conservative estimates of the loss of package protection are used in these assessments. This paper will summarize the results of a regulatory impact test and three extra-regulatory impact tests on a sample package.

  18. Phase II Planning for Niall Gaffney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase II Planning for the HET Niall Gaffney March 6, 1997 #12;#12;Phase II Planning for the HET 3 ................................................................................................................................. 38 Plan Templates .............................................................................................................................................. 47 Example Plans

  19. Phase II Planning for Niall Gaffney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phase II Planning for the HET Niall Gaffney March 6, 1997 #12; #12; Phase II Planning for the HET 3 ................................................................................................................................. 38 Plan Templates .............................................................................................................................................. 47 Example Plans

  20. Opportunities for Energy Conservation and Improved Comfort From Wind Washing Retrofits in Two-Story Homes - Part

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, C. R. Jr.; Cummings, J. B.

    2010-01-01

    of wind washing found in this study. Repairs and energy monitoring were completed in six of these homes to evaluate retrofit methods and cost effectiveness of retrofit solutions. These results are discussed in Part II of this paper....

  1. A numerical study of steady-state vortex configurations and vortex pinning in type-II superconductors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sangbum

    2006-04-12

    In part I, a numerical study of the mixed states in a mesoscopic type-II superconducting cylinder is described. Steady-state configurations and transient behavior of the magnetic vortices for various values of the applied ...

  2. ADVANCED SIMULATION CAPABILITY FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT- CURRENT STATUS AND PHASE II DEMONSTRATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, R.

    2013-02-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Office of Soil and Groundwater, is supporting development of the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM). ASCEM is a state-of-the-art scientific tool and approach for understanding and predicting contaminant fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. The modular and open source high-performance computing tool facilitates integrated approaches to modeling and site characterization that enable robust and standardized assessments of performance and risk for EM cleanup and closure activities. The ASCEM project continues to make significant progress in development of computer software capabilities with an emphasis on integration of capabilities in FY12. Capability development is occurring for both the Platform and Integrated Toolsets and High-Performance Computing (HPC) Multiprocess Simulator. The Platform capabilities provide the user interface and tools for end-to-end model development, starting with definition of the conceptual model, management of data for model input, model calibration and uncertainty analysis, and processing of model output, including visualization. The HPC capabilities target increased functionality of process model representations, toolsets for interaction with Platform, and verification and model confidence testing. The Platform and HPC capabilities are being tested and evaluated for EM applications in a set of demonstrations as part of Site Applications Thrust Area activities. The Phase I demonstration focusing on individual capabilities of the initial toolsets was completed in 2010. The Phase II demonstration completed in 2012 focused on showcasing integrated ASCEM capabilities. For Phase II, the Hanford Site deep vadose zone (BC Cribs) served as an application site for an end-to-end demonstration of capabilities, with emphasis on integration and linkages between the Platform and HPC components. Other demonstrations, addressing attenuation-based remedies at the Savannah River Site F Area and performance assessment for a representative waste tank, illustrate integration of linked ASCEM capabilities and initial integration efforts with tools from the Cementitious Barriers Partnership.

  3. Section 8.1 Hypotheses and Test Procedures June 1, 2015 1 8 Tests of Hypotheses Based on a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Elizabeth A.

    that peanut oil causes colon cancer. Example: State the hypotheses for testing the claim that peanut oil and in medical terminology. Describe the Type II error in regular English and in medical terminology

  4. Options Study - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Wigeland; T. Taiwo; M. Todosow; W. Halsey; J. Gehin

    2010-09-01

    The Options Study has been conducted for the purpose of evaluating the potential of alternative integrated nuclear fuel cycle options to favorably address the issues associated with a continuing or expanding use of nuclear power in the United States. The study produced information that can be used to inform decisions identifying potential directions for research and development on such fuel cycle options. An integrated nuclear fuel cycle option is defined in this study as including all aspects of the entire nuclear fuel cycle, from obtaining natural resources for fuel to the ultimate disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) or radioactive wastes. Issues such as nuclear waste management, especially the increasing inventory of used nuclear fuel, the current uncertainty about used fuel disposal, and the risk of nuclear weapons proliferation have contributed to the reluctance to expand the use of nuclear power, even though it is recognized that nuclear power is a safe and reliable method of producing electricity. In this Options Study, current, evolutionary, and revolutionary nuclear energy options were all considered, including the use of uranium and thorium, and both once-through and recycle approaches. Available information has been collected and reviewed in order to evaluate the ability of an option to clearly address the challenges associated with the current implementation and potential expansion of commercial nuclear power in the United States. This Options Study is a comprehensive consideration and review of fuel cycle and technology options, including those for disposal, and is not constrained by any limitations that may be imposed by economics, technical maturity, past policy, or speculated future conditions. This Phase II report is intended to be used in conjunction with the Phase I report, and much information in that report is not repeated here, although some information has been updated to reflect recent developments. The focus in this Options Study was to identify any nuclear fuel cycle technology or option that may result in a significant beneficial impact to the issues as compared to the current U.S. approach of once-through use of nuclear fuel in LWRs or similar reactors followed by direct disposal of UNF. This approach was taken because incremental differences may be difficult to clearly identify and justify due to the large uncertainties that can be associated with the specific causes of the issues. Phase II of this Options Study continued the review of nuclear fuel cycle options that was initiated and documented during Phase I, concentrating on reviewing and summarizing the potential of integrated nuclear fuel cycles. However, based on the reviews of previous studies and available data, it was not always possible to clearly determine sufficiently large differences between the various fuel cycle and technology options for some of the issues or evaluation measures, for example, in cases where only incremental differences with respect to the issues might be achieved regardless of the fuel cycle option or technologies being considered, or where differences were insufficient to clearly rise above the uncertainties.

  5. Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the IA is attached or the location of Part A. For example, Part A could be located in the master file for IA number xxx at contracting office xxx. Activities undertaken pursuant to...

  6. DOL: Role in EEOICPA – Part B and Part E

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOL is tasked with administering the EEOICPA, both Parts B and E. Part B covers current and former workers who have been diagnosed with cancer, chronic beryllium disease, beryllium sensitivity, or...

  7. NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dierker, S.

    2007-11-01

    Following the CD0 approval of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) during August 2005, Brookhaven National Laboratory prepared a conceptual design for a worldclass user facility for scientific research using synchrotron radiation. DOE SC review of the preliminary baseline in December 2006 led to the subsequent CD1 approval (approval of alternative selection and cost range). This report is the documentation of the preliminary design work for the NSLS-II facility. The preliminary design of the Accelerator Systems (Part 1) was developed mostly based of the Conceptual Design Report, except for the Booster design, which was changed from in-storage-ring tunnel configuration to in external- tunnel configuration. The design of beamlines (Part 2) is based on designs developed by engineering firms in accordance with the specification provided by the Project. The conventional facility design (Part 3) is the Title 1 preliminary design by the AE firm that met the NSLS-II requirements. Last and very important, Part 4 documents the ES&H design and considerations related to this preliminary design. The NSLS-II performance goals are motivated by the recognition that major advances in many important technology problems will require scientific breakthroughs in developing new materials with advanced properties. Achieving this will require the development of new tools that will enable the characterization of the atomic and electronic structure, chemical composition, and magnetic properties of materials, at nanoscale resolution. These tools must be nondestructive, to image and characterize buried structures and interfaces, and they must operate in a wide range of temperatures and harsh environments. The NSLS-II facility will provide ultra high brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. It will also provide advanced insertion devices, optics, detectors, and robotics, and a suite of scientific instruments designed to maximize the scientific output of the facility. Together these will enable the study of material properties and functions with a spatial resolution of {approx}1 nm, an energy resolution of {approx}0.1 meV, and the ultra high sensitivity required to perform spectroscopy on a single atom. In order to meet this need, NSLS-II has been designed to provide world-leading brightness and flux and exceptional beam stability. The brightness is defined as the number of photons emitted per second, per photon energy bandwidth, per solid angle, and per unit source size. Brightness is important because it determines how efficiently an intense flux of photons can be refocused to a small spot size and a small divergence. It scales as the ring current and the number of total periods of the undulator field (both of which contribute linearly to the total flux), as well as eing nversely proportional to the horizontal and vertical emittances (the product of beam size and divergence) of the electron beam. Raising the current in the storage ring to obtain even brighter beams is ultimately limited by beam-driven, collective instabilities in the accelerator. Thus, to maximize the brightness, the horizontal and vertical emittances must be made as small as possible. With the concept of using damping wigglers, low-field bending magnets, and a large number of lattice cells to achieve ultra small emittance, the performance of NSLS-II will be nearly at the ultimate limit of storage ring light sources, set by the intrinsic properties of the synchrotron radiation process. The facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than those produced at NSLS today. The facility, with various insertion devices, including three-pole-wigglers and low-field dipole radiations, has the capability of covering a broad range of radiation spectra, from hard x-ray to far infra-red. The superlative character and combination of capabilities will have broad impact on a wide range of disciplines and scientific initiatives in the coming decades, including new studies of small crystals in structural biology, a wide range of nanometer-resolution probes

  8. by popular demand: Addiction II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niv, Yael

    by popular demand: Addiction II PSY/NEU338:Animal learning and decision making: Psychological, size of other non-drug rewards, and cost (but ultimately the demand is inelastic, or at least

  9. Summary of NREL's Recent Class 8 Tractor Trailer Platooning Testing (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lammert, M.; Kelly, K.; Walkowicz, K.

    2014-08-01

    This presentation summarizes NREL's recent class 8 tractor trailer platooning testing, including analysis of SAE J1321 Type II fuel consumption testing, fuel consumption improvement, fuel economy and platooning position accuracy.

  10. Test Results for HD1, a 16 Tesla Nb3Sn Dipole Magnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lietzke, A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Design and Fabrication ofa 16 Tesla Nb 3 Sn Dipole Magnet",Test Results for HD 1, a 16 Tesla Nb 3 Sn Dipole Magnet A.F.and bore fields above 16 Tesla. II. MAGNET FEATURES AND TEST

  11. Test and Evaluation of the Piccolo Autopilot System on a One-Third Scale Yak-54

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Rylan Walter

    2008-04-30

    dynamic models for a one-third scale Yak-54 are developed. A deliberate and methodical flight test program is developed to evaluate the Piccolo II flight control system. Parameter identification flight tests are performed to evaluate the three modeling...

  12. Integral testing of relays and circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.

    1993-12-31

    Among all equipment types considered for seismic qualification, relays have been most extensively studied through testing due to a wide variation of their designs and seismic capacities. A temporary electrical discontinuity or ``chatter`` is the common concern for relays. A chatter duration of 2 milliseconds is typically used as an acceptance criterion to determine the seismic capability of a relay. Many electrical devices, on the other hand, receiving input signals from relays can safely tolerate a chatter level much greater than 2 ms. In Phase I of a test program, Brookhaven National Laboratory performed testing of many relay models using the 2-ms chatter criterion. In Phase II of the program, the factors influencing the relay chatter criterion, and impacts of relay chatter on medium and low voltage circuit breakers and lockout relays were investigated. This paper briefly describes the Phase II tests and presents the important observations.

  13. Part I: Steady States in Two-Species Particle Aggregation; Part II: Sparse Representations For Multiscale PDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackey, Alan Patrick

    2015-01-01

    and ? i (s) = ?(s)R i e 1 (as in [87]) with cos s sin s ?(s 0 ) = ? sin s cos s With no motion in time, equations (the definition of ? i , R R cos(s s) i j ? i (s) ? ? j (s

  14. Smolt Monitoring Program, Part II, Volume II, Migrational Characteristics of Columbia Basin Salmon and Steelhead Trout, 1985 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish Passage Center

    1986-02-01

    Volume I of this report describes the results of travel time monitoring and other migrational characteristics of yearling and sub-yearling chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha), sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), and steelhead trout (Salmo gairdneri). This volume presents the freeze brand data used in the analysis of travel time for Lower Granite, Rock Island, McNary, and John Day dams. Brand recoveries for Lower Monumental dam also are presented. Summary of data collection procedures and explanation of data listings are presented in conjunction with the mark recapture data.

  15. The reflecting surface of the MAGIC-II Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Bastieri; J. Arnold; C. Baixeras; O. Citterio; F. Dazzi; B. De Lotto; M. Doro; M. Ghigo; E. Giro; F. Goebel; R. Kosyra; E. Lorenz; M. Mariotti; R. Mirzoyan; R. Paoletti; G. Pareschi; D. Pascoli; A. Pepato; L. Peruzzo; A. Saggion; P. Sartori; A. Sillanpää

    2007-09-10

    The MAGIC Collaboration is building a second telescope, MAGIC II, improving the design of the current MAGIC Telescope. MAGIC II is being built at 85 m of distance from MAGIC I, and will also feature a huge reflecting surface of ~240 m$^2$ of area. One of the improvement is the design for the mirror of MAGIC II, that are lighter and larger, being square of 1 m of side and weighting around 15 kg. For the development and production of the new mirrors, two different techniques, both reliable and affordable in price, were selected: the diamond milling of aluminium surfaces and the cold slumping of thin glass panes. As tests for the second one are still ongoing, we present a description of the diamond milling technique, and its application and performance to the produced mirrors.

  16. Researchers find 3-D printed parts to provide low-cost, custom...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tests, too. Zwicker wanted to know if the parts began to emit hydrocarbon gas - as plastics sometimes do - that would contaminate the vacuum and ruin plasma experiments at...

  17. Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

  18. Part I--Mechanics J02M.1--Flapping Toy J02M.1--Flapping Toy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    /B of the electric and magnetic fields, and the impedance Z = V (z, t)/I(z, t) of the transmission line where I(z, t, (ii) m = 0, and (iii) m/M 1? #12;Part II--E & M J02E.1--Coaxial Transmission Line J02E.1--Coaxial Transmission Line Problem An infinitely long coaxial transmission line made from perfect conductors lies along

  19. Status and future plans for the Mark II detector at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perl, M.L.

    1983-04-01

    In this brief talk, I report on three subjects. First the present status of PEP, where there has been a very large increase in the luminosity in the past five months. Next, the present status of the Mark II detector, whose secondary vertex detector constitutes a very important part of the physics which our collaboration is doing at PEP. Finally, I review the design of the upgraded Mark II Detector which will be used at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC).

  20. ALT-II armor tile design for upgraded TEXTOR operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newberry, B.L. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); McGrath, R.T.; Watson, R.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kohlhaas, W.; Finken, K.H. [Kernforschungsanlage Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik; Noda, N. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)

    1994-08-01

    The upgrade of the TEXTOR tokamak at KFA Juelich was recently completed. This upgrade extended the TEXTOR pulse length from 5 seconds to 10 seconds. The auxiliary heating was increased to a total of 8.0 MW through a combination of neutral beam injection and radio frequency heating. Originally, the inertially cooled armor tiles of the full toroidal belt Advanced Limiter Test -- II (ALT-II) were designed for a 5-second operation with total heating of 6.0 MW. The upgrade of TEXTOR will increase the energy deposited per pulse onto the ALT-II by about 300%. Consequently, the graphite armor tiles for the ALT-II had to be redesigned to avoid excessively high graphite armor surface temperatures that would lead to unacceptable contamination of the plasma. This redesign took the form of two major changes in the ALT-II armor tile geometry. The first design change was an increase of the armor tile thermal mass, primarily by increasing the radial thickness of each tile from 17 mm to 20 mm. This increase in the radial tile dimension reduces the overall pumping efficiency of the ALT-II pump limiter by about 30%. The reduction in exhaust efficiency is unfortunate, but could be avoided only by active cooling of the ALT-II armor tiles. The active cooling option was too complicated and expensive to be considered at this time. The second design change involved redefining the plasma facing surface of each armor tile in order to fully utilize the entire surface area. The incident charged particle heat flux was distributed uniformly over the armor tile surfaces by carefully matching the radial, poloidal and toroidal curvature of each tile to the plasma flow in the TEXTOR boundary layer. This geometry redefinition complicates the manufacturing of the armor tiles, but results in significant thermal performance gains. In addition to these geometry upgrades, several material options were analyzed and evaluated.

  1. Automatic test pattern generation for asynchronous circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasudevan, Dilip Prasad

    2012-11-29

    The testability of integrated circuits becomes worse with transistor dimensions reaching nanometer scales. Testing, the process of ensuring that circuits are fabricated without defects, becomes inevitably part of the ...

  2. EBR-II Data Digitization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Su-Jong; Rabiti, Cristian; Sackett, John

    2014-08-01

    1. Objectives To produce a validation database out of those recorded signals it will be necessary also to identify the documents need to reconstruct the status of reactor at the time of the beginning of the recordings. This should comprehends the core loading specification (assemblies type and location and burn-up) along with this data the assemblies drawings and the core drawings will be identified. The first task of the project will be identify the location of the sensors, with respect the reactor plant layout, and the physical quantities recorded by the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) data acquisition system. This first task will allow guiding and prioritizing the selection of drawings needed to numerically reproduce those signals. 1.1 Scopes and Deliverables The deliverables of this project are the list of sensors in EBR-II system, the identification of storing location of those sensors, identification of a core isotopic composition at the moment of the start of system recording. Information of the sensors in EBR-II reactor system was summarized from the EBR-II system design descriptions listed in Section 1.2.

  3. HEMP test of FD-565. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01

    This report describes the FD-565 test object, the test facilities of the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center, the data collected, and the test results. Tests were performed on the FD-565 to determine its ability to survive the effects of a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP). This test is part of the EMP Mitigation Program whose aim is to ensure that EMP would not significantly impede the reestablishment of telecommunications following an attack against the U.S. that includes high-altitude nuclear detonations. The EMP Mitigation Program attempts to maximize the value of the HEMP response data available.

  4. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  5. Robustness Testing and Hardening of CORBA ORB Implementations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koopman, Philip

    the Ballista software testing technique to test the exception-handling robustness of C++ ORB client. The Ballista project is supported in part by DARPA (contract DABT63-96-C-0064). 3 Jiantao Pan Department

  6. Boiler - tuning basics, part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leopold, T.

    2009-03-15

    Tuning power plant controls takes nerves of steel and an intimate knowledge of plant systems gained only by experience. Tuning controls also requires equal parts art and science, which probably is why there are so few tuning experts in the power industry. In part 1 of a two-part series, the author explores a mix of the theoretical and practical aspects of tuning boiler control. 5 figs.

  7. Prototype to Test WHY prototype to test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Prototype to Test METHOD WHY prototype to test HOW to prototype to test Prototyping to test or design space. The fundamental way you test your prototypes is by letting users experience them and react to them. In creating prototypes to test with users you have the opportunity to examine your solution

  8. Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit Running a test case: 1 Get the component to a known state (set up). 2 Cause some event (the test case). 3 Check the behaviour. · Record pass/fail · Track statistics · Typically we want to do a lot of test cases so it makes sense to automate. · Test cases

  9. Microsoft Word - Part 6.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CLOSURE REQUIREMENTS 6.1. OVERVIEW This Part specifies the closure requirements for the WIPP facility. The Permittees shall close the permitted Container Storage Units and...

  10. The Assembly of the Belle II TOP Counter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boqun Wang; for the Belle II PID Group

    2015-01-13

    A new type of ring-imaging Cherenkov counter, called TOP counter, has been developed for particle identification at the Belle II experiment to run at the SuperKEKB accelerator in KEK, Japan. The detector consists of 16 identical modules arranged azimuthally around the beam line. The assembly procedure for a TOP module is described. This procedure includes acceptance testing of the quartz mirror, prism, and quartz bar radiators. The acceptance tests include a chip search and measurements of bulk transmittance and total internal reflectance. The process for aligning and gluing the optical components together is described.

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SIGNAL PROCESSING, VOL. 56, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2008 4651 The Shiftable Complex Directional Pyramid--Part I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oraintara, Soontorn

    directional filter bank (DFB). The complex DFB is constructed by a dual-tree stucture of two real DFBs, arbitrarily high directionality, and low redundancy. In Part II [7], filter design problems and Manuscript. The conditions derived in Part I are used to design the filters. Sev- eral practical design and implementation

  12. Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nickel(II) and Copper(I,II)-based Metal-Organic Frameworks Incorporating an Extended Trispyrazolate Linker Previous Next List Tabacaru, Aurel; Galli, Simona; Pettinari, Claudio;...

  13. Integrated Efficiency Test for Pyrochemical Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. X. Li; D. Vaden; R. W. Benedict; T. A. Johnson; B. R. Westphal; Guy L. Frederickson

    2007-09-01

    An integrated efficiency test was conducted with sodium bonded, spent EBR-II drive fuel elements. The major equipment involved in the test were the element chopper, Mk-IV electrorefiner, cathode processor, and casting furnace. Four electrorefining batches (containing 54.4 kg heavy metal) were processes under the fixed operating parameters that have been developed for this equipment based on over a decade’s worth of processing experience. A mass balance across this equipment was performed. Actinide dissolution and recovery efficiencies were established based on the mass balance and chemical analytical results of various samples taken from process streams during the integrated efficiency test.

  14. HELIOPHYSICS II. ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudson, Hugh

    with the term "solar flare" dominate our thinking about energy conversion from magnetic storage to other formsHELIOPHYSICS II. ENERGY CONVERSION PROCESSES edited by CAROLUS J. SCHRIJVER Lockheed Martin of a solar flare 11 2.3.1 Flare luminosity and mechanical energy 11 2.3.2 The impulsive phase (hard X

  15. Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    Assignment II Saha & Boltzmann equations January 21, 2002 This assignment is meant to give you some practical experience in using the Saha and Boltzmann equations that govern the level populations in atoms;s =kT the partition function of ionization stage r. The Saha equation: N r+1 N r = 2U r+1 U r P e #18

  16. Visual Testing of Graphical User Interfaces: an Exploratory Study Towards Systematic Definitions and Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sillito, Jonathan

    II surveys the related literature. Visual testing and visual defects are defined in Section IIIVisual Testing of Graphical User Interfaces: an Exploratory Study Towards Systematic Definitions}@ucalgary.ca Abstract--Graphical User Interface (GUI) testing literature emphasizes testing a system's functionality

  17. Second generation Research Reactor Fuel Container (RRFC-II).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abhold, M. E.; Baker, M. C.; Bourret, S. C.; Harker, W. C.; Pelowitz, D. G.; Polk, P. J.

    2001-01-01

    The second generation Research Reactor Fuel Counter (RRFC-II) has been developed to measure the remaining {sup 235}U content in foreign spent Material Test Reactor (MTR)-type fuel being returned to the Westinghouse Savannah River Site (WSRS) for interim storage and subsequent disposal. The fuel to be measured started as fresh fuel nominally with 93% enriched Uraniuin alloyed with A1 clad in Al. The fuel was irradiated to levels of up to 65% burnup. The RRFC-II, which will be located in the L-Basin spent fuel pool, is intended to assay the {sup 235}U content using a combination of passive neutron coincidence counting, active neutron coincidence counting, and active-multiplicity analysis. Measurements will be done underwater, eliminating the need for costly and hazardous handling operations of spent fuel out of water. The underwater portion of the RRFC-II consists of a watertight stainless steel housing containing neutron and gamma detectors and a scanning active neutron source. The portion of the system that resides above water consists of data-processing electronics; electromechanical drive electronics; a computer to control the operation of the counter, to collect, and to analyze data; and a touch screen interface located at the equipment rack. The RRFC-II is an improved version of the Los Alamos-designed RRFC already installed in the SRS Receipts Basin for Offsite Fuel. The RRFC-II has been fabricated and is scheduled for installation in late FY 2001 pending acceptance testing by Savannah River Site personnel.

  18. SINGLE HEATER TEST FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.B. Cho

    1999-05-01

    The Single Heater Test is the first of the in-situ thermal tests conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of its program of characterizing Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site for a proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. The Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) contained an extensive plan of in-situ thermal tests aimed at understanding specific aspects of the response of the local rock-mass around the potential repository to the heat from the radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. With the refocusing of the Site Characterization Plan by the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan'' (DOE 1994), a consolidated thermal testing program emerged by 1995 as documented in the reports ''In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (DOE 1995) and ''Updated In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (CRWMS M&O 1997a). The concept of the Single Heater Test took shape in the summer of 1995 and detailed planning and design of the test started with the beginning fiscal year 1996. The overall objective of the Single Heater Test was to gain an understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are anticipated to occur in the local rock-mass in the potential repository as a result of heat from radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. This included making a priori predictions of the test results using existing models and subsequently refining or modifying the models, on the basis of comparative and interpretive analyses of the measurements and predictions. A second, no less important, objective was to try out, in a full-scale field setting, the various instruments and equipment to be employed in the future on a much larger, more complex, thermal test of longer duration, such as the Drift Scale Test. This ''shake down'' or trial aspect of the Single Heater Test applied not just to the hardware, but also to the teamwork and cooperation between multiple organizations performing their part in the test.

  19. Mittwoch, 28.05.2014 Zeit H17, NW II H18, NW II H20, NW II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Albrecht

    Beliefs and Fracking Gebäude Audimax 09:40 (Gebäudewechsel Audimax -> NW II) 10:00 "Hydrogeologie von

  20. Decommissioning of Experimental Breeder Reactor - II Complex, Post Sodium Draining

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. A. Michelbacher; S. Paul Henslee; Collin J. Knight; Steven R. sherman

    2005-09-01

    The Experimental Breeder Reactor - II (EBR-II) was shutdown in September 1994 as mandated by the United States Department of Energy. This sodium-cooled reactor had been in service since 1964. The bulk sodium was drained from the primary and secondary systems and processed. Residual sodium remaining in the systems after draining was converted into sodium bicarbonate using humid carbon dioxide. This technique was tested at Argonne National Laboratory in Illinois under controlled conditions, then demonstrated on a larger scale by treating residual sodium within the EBR-II secondary cooling system, followed by the primary tank. This process, terminated in 2002, was used to place a layer of sodium bicarbonate over all exposed surfaces of sodium. Treatment of the remaining EBR-II sodium is governed by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality issued a RCRA Operating Permit in 2002, mandating that all hazardous materials be removed from EBR-II within a 10 year period, with the ability to extend the permit and treatment period for another 10 years. A preliminary plan has been formulated to remove the remaining sodium and NaK from the primary and secondary systems using moist carbon dioxide, steam and nitrogen, and a water flush. The moist carbon dioxide treatment was resumed in May 2004. As of August 2005, approximately 60% of the residual sodium within the EBR-II primary tank had been treated. This process will continue through the end of 2005, when it is forecast that the process will become increasingly ineffective. At that time, subsequent treatment processes will be planned and initiated. It should be noted that the processes and anticipated costs associated with these processes are preliminary. Detailed engineering has not been performed, and approval for these methods has not been obtained from the regulator or the sponsors.

  1. sessions II and High School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    /high school certification. 20 Upper Division Biology Credits 06/12 MATH 95 Introductory Algebra Math Placement Testing ACT MATH 96 Intermediate Algebra Math Placement Testing ACT 20 SAT 500 MPT 12 UNLV; MATH 127 Precalculus I Math Placement Testing ACT 25 SAT 560 MPT 26 MATH 181 Calculus I Math Placement

  2. sessions II and High School

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    certification. 20 Upper Division Biology Credits 07/11 MATH 95 Introductory Algebra Math Placement Testing ACT MATH 96 Intermediate Algebra Math Placement Testing ACT 20 SAT 500 MPT 12 UNLV Chemistry; MATH 127 Precalculus I Math Placement Testing ACT 25 SAT 560 MPT 26 MATH 181 Calculus I Math Placement

  3. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Majorana Collaboration; N. Abgrall; E. Aguayo; F. T. Avignone III; A. S. Barabash; F. E. Bertrand; V. Brudanin; M. Busch; D. Byram; A. S. Caldwell; Y-D. Chan; C. D. Christofferson; D. C. Combs; C. Cuesta; J. A. Detwiler; P. J. Doe; Yu. Efremenko; V. Egorov; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; J. Esterline; J. E. Fast; P. Finnerty; F. M. Fraenkle; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. K. Giovanetti; J. Goett; M. P. Green; J. Gruszko; V. E. Guiseppe; K. Gusev; A. L. Hallin; R. Hazama; A. Hegai; R. Henning; E. W. Hoppe; S. Howard; M. A. Howe; K. J. Keeter; M. F. Kidd; O. Kochetov; S. I. Konovalov; R. T. Kouzes; B. D. LaFerriere; J. Diaz Leon; L. E. Leviner; J. C. Loach; J. MacMullin; R. D. Martin; S. J. Meijer; S. Mertens; M. L. Miller; L. Mizouni; M. Nomachi; J. L. Orrell; C. O'Shaughnessy; N. R. Overman; R. Petersburg; D. G. Phillips II; A. W. P. Poon; K. Pushkin; D. C. Radford; J. Rager; K. Rielage; R. G. H. Robertson; E. Romero-Romero; M. C. Ronquest; B. Shanks; T. Shima; M. Shirchenko; K. J. Snavely; N. Snyder; A. Soin; A. M. Suriano; D. Tedeschi; J. Thompson; V. Timkin; W. Tornow; J. E. Trimble; R. L. Varner; S. Vasilyev; K. Vetter; K. Vorren; B. R. White; J. F. Wilkerson; C. Wiseman; W. Xu; E. Yakushev; A. R. Young; C. -H. Yu; V. Yumatov; I. Zhitnikov

    2015-02-05

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

  4. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abgrall, N; Avignone, F T; Bertrand, F E; Brudanin, V; Busch, M; Byram, D; Caldwell, A S; Chan, Y-D; Christofferson, C D; Combs, D C; Cuesta, C; Detwiler, J A; Doe, P J; Efremenko, Yu; Egorov, V; Ejiri, H; Elliott, S R; Esterline, J; Fast, J E; Finnerty, P; Fraenkle, F M; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Giovanetti, G K; Goett, J; Green, M P; Gruszko, J; Guiseppe, V E; Gusev, K; Hallin, A L; Hazama, R; Hegai, A; Henning, R; Hoppe, E W; Howard, S; Howe, M A; Keeter, K J; Kidd, M F; Kochetov, O; Kouzes, R T; LaFerriere, B D; Leon, J Diaz; Leviner, L E; Loach, J C; MacMullin, J; Martin, R D; Meijer, S J; Mertens, S; Miller, M L; Mizouni, L; Nomachi, M; Orrell, J L; O'Shaughnessy, C; Overman, N R; Petersburg, R; Phillips, D G; Poon, A W P; Pushkin, K; Radford, D C; Rager, J; Rielage, K; Robertson, R G H; Romero-Romero, E; Ronquest, M C; Shanks, B; Shima, T; Shirchenko, M; Snavely, K J; Snyder, N; Soin, A; Suriano, A M; Tedeschi, D; Thompson, J; Timkin, V; Tornow, W; Trimble, J E; Varner, R L; Vasilyev, S; Vetter, K; Vorren, K; White, B R; Wilkerson, J F; Wiseman, C; Xu, W; Yakushev, E; Young, A R; Yu, C -H; Zhitnikov, I

    2015-01-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator is an ultra-low background physics experiment searching for the neutrinoless double beta decay of $^{76}$Ge. The Majorana Parts Tracking Database is used to record the history of components used in the construction of the Demonstrator. The tracking implementation takes a novel approach based on the schema-free database technology CouchDB. Transportation, storage, and processes undergone by parts such as machining or cleaning are linked to part records. Tracking parts provides a great logistics benefit and an important quality assurance reference during construction. In addition, the location history of parts provides an estimate of their exposure to cosmic radiation. A web application for data entry and a radiation exposure calculator have been developed as tools for achieving the extreme radio-purity required for this rare decay search.

  5. Enhanced Verification Test Suite for Physics Simulation Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kamm, J R; Brock, J S; Brandon, S T; Cotrell, D L; Johnson, B; Knupp, P; Rider, W; Trucano, T; Weirs, V G

    2008-10-10

    This document discusses problems with which to augment, in quantity and in quality, the existing tri-laboratory suite of verification problems used by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The purpose of verification analysis is demonstrate whether the numerical results of the discretization algorithms in physics and engineering simulation codes provide correct solutions of the corresponding continuum equations. The key points of this document are: (1) Verification deals with mathematical correctness of the numerical algorithms in a code, while validation deals with physical correctness of a simulation in a regime of interest. This document is about verification. (2) The current seven-problem Tri-Laboratory Verification Test Suite, which has been used for approximately five years at the DOE WP laboratories, is limited. (3) Both the methodology for and technology used in verification analysis have evolved and been improved since the original test suite was proposed. (4) The proposed test problems are in three basic areas: (a) Hydrodynamics; (b) Transport processes; and (c) Dynamic strength-of-materials. (5) For several of the proposed problems we provide a 'strong sense verification benchmark', consisting of (i) a clear mathematical statement of the problem with sufficient information to run a computer simulation, (ii) an explanation of how the code result and benchmark solution are to be evaluated, and (iii) a description of the acceptance criterion for simulation code results. (6) It is proposed that the set of verification test problems with which any particular code be evaluated include some of the problems described in this document. Analysis of the proposed verification test problems constitutes part of a necessary--but not sufficient--step that builds confidence in physics and engineering simulation codes. More complicated test cases, including physics models of greater sophistication or other physics regimes (e.g., energetic material response, magneto-hydrodynamics), would represent a scientifically desirable complement to the fundamental test cases discussed in this report. The authors believe that this document can be used to enhance the verification analyses undertaken at the DOE WP Laboratories and, thus, to improve the quality, credibility, and usefulness of the simulation codes that are analyzed with these problems.

  6. PARS II Training Materials | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Training Materials PARS II Training Materials PARS II presentation hand-outs and step-by-step "how to" exercises for each course are available for download. Users who are attending...

  7. HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L L

    2005-07-13

    Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

  8. Sloan Digital Sky Survey II (SDSS-II) Supernova Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) is a series of three interlocking imaging and spectroscopic surveys, carried out over an eight-year period with a dedicated 2.5m telescope located at Apache Point Observatory in Southern New Mexico. The SDSS Supernova Survey was one of those three components of SDSS and SDSS-II, a 3-year extension of the original SDSS that operated from July 2005 to July 2008. The Supernova Survey was a time-domain survey, involving repeat imaging of the same region of sky every other night, weather permitting. The primary scientific motivation was to detect and measure light curves for several hundred supernovae through repeat scans of the SDSS Southern equatorial stripe 82 (about 2.5? wide by ~120? long). Over the course of three 3-month campaigns SDSS-II SN discovered and measured multi-band lightcurves for ~500 spectroscopically confirmed Type Ia supernovae in the redshift range z=0.05-0.4. In addition, the project harvested a few hundred light curves for SNe Ia and discovered about 80 spectroscopically confirmed core-collapse supernovae (supernova types Ib/c and II).

  9. Nilpotence and Stable Homotopy Theory II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-12-14

    Nilpotence and Stable Homotopy. Theory II. Michael J. Hopkins. ?. Jeffrey H. Smith. †. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge Massachusetts.

  10. Control of parts : parts making in the building industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kendall, Stephen Holmes

    1990-01-01

    The thesis advances a diagramming tool called PAct. Each diagram is a model of a "value adding" enterprise, representing materials processing, parts manipulation and assembly, and the agents involved. Its purpose is to ...

  11. Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich CMPE 640 11/23/05 #12;Testing Verifies that manufactured chip meets design specifications. Cannot test for every potential defect. Modeling defects as faults allows for passing and failing of chips. Ideal test would capture all defects and pass only chips

  12. Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

  13. Development of a core design optimization tool and analysis in support of the planned LEU conversion of the MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connaway, Heather M. (Heather Moira)

    2012-01-01

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR-II) is currently undergoing analysis for the planned conversion from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU), as part of a global effort to minimize the availability of ...

  14. PART I. THERMAL BREAKDOWN CHARACTERISTICS OF MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE COMPONENTS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    ENVIRONMENTS AND PART II. MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN CHINA Alexander P. Whitworth Advisor: Prof. Marco of Municipal Solid Waste Components in Varying Oxygen Environments and Municipal Solid Waste Management Management (MSW) in China In 2004, China surpassed the USA as the world's leading producer of solid waste

  15. Billiards Digest October, 2012 "VEPP Part VII: 9-Ball Pattern Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alciatore, David G.

    Billiards Digest October, 2012 "VEPP ­ Part VII: 9-Ball Pattern Drills" ILLUSTRATED PRINCIPLES-dave-billiards.com/vepp. In the last few months, we've looked at useful position control drills from Disc II. This month, we look at some 9-ball pattern drills from Disc III: "VEPP III ­ Patterns and Safety Play." You can work on cut

  16. Phase II Contaminant Transport Parameters for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeNovio, Nicole M.; Bryant, Nathan; King, Chrissi B.; Bhark, Eric; Drellack, Sigmund L.; Pickens, John F.; Farnham, Irene; Brooks, Keely M.; Reimus, Paul; Aly, Alaa

    2005-04-01

    This report documents pertinent transport data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support parameterization of the Phase II FF CAU transport model.

  17. Phase II Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2004-12-01

    This report documents pertinent hydrologic data and data analyses as part of the Phase II Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for Frenchman Flat (FF) Corrective Action Unit (CAU): CAU 98. The purpose of this data compilation and related analyses is to provide the primary reference to support the development of the Phase II FF CAU groundwater flow model.

  18. II. Residency A. The City University of New York Residency Requirements and Guidelines 5 -8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artemov, Sergei N.

    II. Residency Pages A. The City University of New York Residency Requirements and Guidelines 5 - 8 16 G. Children of Staff and Employees of the City of New York 17 H. Guidelines for Completing Part C of Tuition for Non-Residents of New York 15 State including Undocumented and Out-of Status Immigrants D

  19. Spectroscopic Properties of a Self-Assembled Zinc Porphyrin Tetramer II. Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Spectroscopic Properties of a Self-Assembled Zinc Porphyrin Tetramer II. Time-Resolved Fluorescence tetramer [Part I], with a 1 ns rotational correlation time at 10 °C. The initial fluorescence anisotropy of the monomer is found to be 0.1. In the tetramer an additional depolarization process occurs with a correlation

  20. Chemistry in Combustion Processes II Introduce and discuss some important topics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Chemistry in Combustion Processes II Introduce and discuss some important topics and methods of today's combustion chemistry research - Burning of biomass based fuels in large scale boilers - Black to ash - "Toolbox" for combustion chemistry analysis #12;Schedule CCP2-2012 #12;CCP2 2012 part B #12