Sample records for testing activity requirements

  1. Integrating Customized Test Requirements with Traditional Requirements in Web Application Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampath, Sreedevi

    Integrating Customized Test Requirements with Traditional Requirements in Web Application Testing Existing test suite reduction techniques employed for test- ing web applications have either used-based requirements in relation to test suite reduction for web applications. We investigate the use of usage

  2. Integrating Customized Test Requirements with Traditional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sampath, Sreedevi

    between QA and Development by Michal Blumenstyk 4. Causes of Failures in Web Applications by Solia Pertet.9) Deployment Users Test Cases Web Application Implementation (v.1.0) User Sessions Replay Tool Test Cases-WEB, July 2006 Sreedevi Sampath . University of Delaware 5/29 Program Coverage-based Test Requirement

  3. Gas Test Loop Functional and Technical Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst; Soli T. Khericha; James L. Jones

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the technical and functional requirements for a gas test loop (GTL) to be constructed for the purpose of providing a high intensity fast-flux irradiation environment for developers of advanced concept nuclear reactors. This capability is needed to meet fuels and materials testing requirements of the designers of Generation IV (GEN IV) reactors and other programs within the purview of the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). Space nuclear power development programs may also benefit by the services the GTL will offer. The overall GTL technical objective is to provide developers with the means for investigating and qualifying fuels and materials needed for advanced reactor concepts. The testing environment includes a fast-flux neutron spectrum of sufficient intensity to perform accelerated irradiation testing. Appropriate irradiation temperature, gaseous environment, test volume, diagnostics, and access and handling features are also needed. This document serves to identify those requirements as well as generic requirements applicable to any system of this kind.

  4. On the Strategy and Requirements for Neutronics Testing in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youssef, M.Z. [University of California-Los Angeles (United States); Sawan, M.E. [University of Wisconsin-Madison (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutronics testing is among the several types of fusion technology testing scheduled to be performed in ITER. The three ports assigned for testing will test several blanket concepts proposed by the various parties with test blanket modules (TBM) that utilize different breeders and coolants. Nevertheless, neutronics issues to be resolved in ITER-TBM are generic in nature and are important to each TBM type. Dedicated neutronics tests specifically address the accuracy involved in predicting key neutronics parameters such as tritium production rate, TPR, volumetric heating rate, induced activation and decay heat, and radiation damage to the reactor components. In this paper, we address some strategies for performing the neutronics tests. Tritium self-sufficiency cannot be confirmed by testing in ITER, however, the testing can provide valuable information regarding the main parameters needed to assess the feasibility of achieving tritium self-sufficiency. The paper also addresses the operational requirement (i.e. flux and fluence) as well as the geometrical requirement of the test module (i.e. minimum size) in order to have meaningful and useful tests. Measured neutronics data require high spatial resolution. This necessitates that the measured quantity be as flat as possible in the innermost locations inside the test module. This requirement has been confirmed in the present work based on results from two-dimensional calculations. The US and Japan solid breeder test blanket modules are placed inside half a port in ITER. The R-{theta} model used accounts for the presence of the ITER shielding blanket and the surrounding frame of the port.

  5. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? PHEV Evaluations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1.pdf More Documents & Publications Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities AVTA PHEV Demonstrations and Testing Argonne...

  6. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  7. Summary of Construction Equipment Tests and Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Construction Equipment Tests and Activities Bruce Glagola - Sept 2013 Construction Equipment Tests A series of tests were conducted by the APS Construction Vibration...

  8. Automated Requirements Testing with Abstract Oracles Bernhard K. Aichernig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , a mapping between abstract and concrete test data is required. The presented framework focuses on the usage of formal requirements specifications as test ora­ cles for concrete implementations. The approach is based, then the model may serve as a test oracle and specification as well. In Fig­ A A op abstract C C op concrete r r

  9. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Non-PHEV Evaluations and Data Collection AVTA HEV, NEV, BEV and HICEV Demonstrations and Testing Benchmarking of Advanced HEVs and...

  10. 12 System Testing of Product Lines: From Requirements to Test Cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    12 System Testing of Product Lines: From Requirements to Test Cases C. Nebut, Y. Le Traon, and J is based on the automation of the generation of application system tests, for any chosen product, from the system requirements of a product line. These PL requirements are modeled using enhanced UML use cases

  11. Boron-10 ABUNCL Active Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from testing of the active mode of the General Electric Reuter-Stokes Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) at Los Alamos National Laboratory using sources and fuel pins.

  12. HEV Fleet Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activities - 2010...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Maintenance Sheet for 2010 Ford Fusion VIN 3FADP0L32AR194699 Date Mileage Description Cost 1012009 5915 Changed oil and filter 28.77...

  13. Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svoboda, J.M.; Valentich, D.J.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG&G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided.

  14. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, G.B.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year 1990 applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities. Four MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for energy testing and program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities.

  15. Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique...

  16. Study of fueling requirements for the Engineering Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, S.K.; Perkins, L.J.

    1987-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An assessment of the fueling requirement for the TIBER Engineering Test Reactor is studied. The neutral shielding pellet ablation model with the inclusion of the effects of the alpha particles is used for our study. The high electron temperature in a reactor-grade plasma makes pellet penetration very difficult. The launch length has to be very large (several tens of meters) in order to avoid pellet breakage due to the low inertial strength of DT ''ice.'' The minimum repetition rate corresponding to the largest allowable pellet, is found to be about 1 Hz. A brief survey is done on the various operational and conceptual pellet injection schemes for plasma fueling. The underlying conclusion is that an alternative fueling scheme of coaxial compact-toroid plasma gun is very likely needed for effective central fueling of reactor-grade plasmas. 16 refs.

  17. U.S. Department of Energy -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity: Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort; Donald Karner; John G. Smart

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) tests plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in closed track, dynamometer and onroad testing environments. The onroad testing includes the use of dedicated drivers on repeated urban and highway driving cycles that range from 10 to 200 miles, with recharging between each loop. Fleet demonstrations with onboard data collectors are also ongoing with PHEVs operating in several dozen states and Canadian Provinces, during which trips- and miles-per-charge, charging demand and energy profiles, and miles-per-gallon and miles-per-kilowatt-hour fuel use results are all documented, allowing an understanding of fuel use when vehicles are operated in charge depleting, charge sustaining, and mixed charge modes. The intent of the PHEV testing includes documenting the petroleum reduction potential of the PHEV concept, the infrastructure requirements, and operator recharging influences and profiles. As of May 2008, the AVTA has conducted track and dynamometer testing on six PHEV conversion models and fleet testing on 70 PHEVs representing nine PHEV conversion models. A total of 150 PHEVs will be in fleet testing by the end of 2008, all with onboard data loggers. The onroad testing to date has demonstrated 100+ miles per gallon results in mostly urban applications for approximately the first 40 miles of PHEV operations. The primary goal of the AVTA is to provide advanced technology vehicle performance benchmark data for technology modelers, research and development programs, and technology goal setters. The AVTA testing results also assist fleet managers in making informed vehicle purchase, deployment and operating decisions. The AVTA is part of DOE’s Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities are conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Engineering Corporation, with Argonne National Laboratory providing dynamometer testing support. The proposed paper and presentation will discuss PHEV testing activities and results. INL/CON-08-14333

  18. Issues and test requirements in radiation shielding of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, M.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation shield issues for fusion reactors have been investigated and the experiments and facilities required to resolve the issues have been identified and characterized as part of the FINESSE program. This paper summarizes the recommended approach to fusion shield research and development, provides a summary of the necessary experiments and facilities, and presents the results of technical analyses involved.

  19. Issues and test requirements in radiation shielding of fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, M.; Abdou, M.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation shield issues for fusion reactors have been investigated and the experiments and facilities required to resolve the issues have been identified and characterized as part of the FINESSE program. This paper summarizes the recommended approach to fusion shield R and D, provides a summary of the necessary experiments and facilities, and presents the results of technical analyses involved.

  20. Beam Test of the Superstructure Instrumentation Requirements for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the HOM-coupler signals ¯ Measurement of the BPM signals ¯ Measurement of beam orbit and energy #12 procedure "HOM Search". #12;Measurement of the BPM signals 8 Beam Test of the Superstructure Measurement of the BPM signals Beside (?!) the re-entrant cavity BPM (C. Magne), a stripline BPM (DESY

  1. Proc. of the ACM Int'l. Symp on Softw. Testing and Analysis, Seattle, WA, August 1994, pages 169184. Selecting Tests and Identifying Test Coverage Requirements for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothermel, Gregg

    of structural coverage crite­ ria. Our technique partitions an existing test suite into two subsets: testsProc. of the ACM Int'l. Symp on Softw. Testing and Analysis, Seattle, WA, August 1994, pages 169­184. Selecting Tests and Identifying Test Coverage Requirements for Modified Software* Gregg Rothermel and Mary

  2. Engineering Scaling Requirements for Solid Breeder Blanket Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying, A.; Sharafat, S.; Youssef, M.; An, J.; Hunt, R.; Rainsberry, P.; Abdou, M. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An engineering scaling process is applied to the solid breeder ITER TBM designs in accordance with the testing objectives of validating the design tools and the database, and evaluating blanket performance under prototypical operating conditions. The goal of scaling is to ensure that changes in structural response and performance caused by changes in size and operating conditions do not reduce the usefulness of the tests. Initially, constitutive equations are applied to lay out the basic operating and design parameters that dominate blanket phenomena. The suitability of these similarity criteria for the TBM design is then confirmed by comparing finite element predictions of prototype and scale model responses. The TBM design also takes into account the need to check the codes and data for future design use. Specifically, predictability of tritium production and nuclear heating rates in a complex geometry, tritium release and permeation characteristics under fusion environments belong to this category. We conclude that this engineering scaling design process has maximized the value of ITER testing.

  3. Seismic requirements for design of nuclear power plants and nuclear test facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This standard establishes engineering requirements for the design of nuclear power plants and nuclear test facilities to accommodate vibratory effects of earthquakes.

  4. Test blanket modules in ITER: An overview on proposed designs and required DEMO-relevant materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Test blanket modules in ITER: An overview on proposed designs and required DEMO-relevant materials, Russian Federation Abstract Within the framework of the ITER Test Blanket Working Group, the ITER Parties have made several proposals for test blanket modules to be tested in ITER from the first day of H

  5. ANSI/NIST-ITL 1-2011 Requirements and Conformance Test Assertions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANSI/NIST-ITL 1-2011 Requirements and Conformance Test Assertions Christofer J. McGinnis Dylan Yaga Fernando L. Podio NISTIR 7806 #12;NISTIR 7806 ANSI/NIST-ITL 1-2011 Requirements and Conformance Test, by The Department of Homeland Security/US-VISIT Program. Abstract The current version of the ANSI/NIST-ITL standard

  6. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation requires mitochondrial Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is required for fission activity41 . The recruitment of Dnm1 to yeast mitochondrial fis- sion... . Mitochondrial trans- port is required to distribute mitochondria throughout...

  8. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? PHEV Evaluations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    kWh MPG per FWHET Test Cumulative MPG Cumulative AC kWh 15 FY07 EnergyCS Prius - Fuel Costs EnergyCS PHEV Prius UDDS & HWFET Fuel Cost per Mile 0.000 0.005 0.010 0.015...

  9. Active Waste Materials Corrosion and Decontamination Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MJ Danielson; MR Elmore; SG Pitman

    2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Stainless steel alloys, 304L and 316L, were corrosion tested in representative radioactive samples of three actual Hanford tank waste solutions (Tanks AW-101, C-104, AN-107). Both the 304L and 316L exhibited good corrosion performance when immersed in boiling waste solutions. The maximum general corrosion rate was 0.015 mm/y (0.60 mils per year). Generally, the 304L had a slightly higher rate than the 316L. No localized attack was observed after 122 days of testing in the liquid phase, liquid/vapor phase, or vapor phase. Radioactive plate-out decontamination tests indicated that a 24-hour exposure to 1 {und M} HNO{sub 3} could remove about 99% of the radioactive components in the metal film when exposed to the C-104 and AN-107 solutions. The decontamination results are less certain for the AW-101 solution, since the initial contamination readings exceeded the capacity of the meter used for this test.

  10. Design requirements document for project W-465, immobilized low activity waste interim storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burbank, D.A.

    1997-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this design requirements document is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized low-activity waste interim storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity.

  11. Preliminary requirements for a Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Test Reactor (FHTR)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massie, M.; Forsberg, C.; Forget, B. [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hu, L. W. [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Test Reactor (FHTR) design is being developed at MIT to provide the first demonstration and test of a salt-cooled reactor using high-temperature fuel. The first step is to define the requirements. The top level requirements are (1) provide the confidence that a larger demonstration reactor is warranted and (2) develop the necessary data for a larger-scale reactor. Because requirements will drive the design of the FHTR, a significant effort is being undertaken to define requirements and understand the tradeoffs that will be required for a practical design. The preliminary requirements include specifications for design parameters and necessary tests of major reactor systems. Testing requirements include demonstration of components, systems, and procedures for refueling, instrumentation, salt temperature control to avoid coolant freezing, salt chemistry and volume control, tritium monitoring and control, and in-service inspection. Safety tests include thermal hydraulics, neutronics - including intrinsic core shutdown mechanisms such as Doppler feedback - and decay heat removal systems. Materials and coolant testing includes fuels (including mechanical wear and fatigue) and system corrosion behavior. Preliminary analysis indicates a thermal power output below 30 MW, an initial core using pebble-bed or prismatic-block fuel, peak outlet temperatures of at least 700 deg. C, and use of FLi{sup 7}Be ({sup 7}LiF-BeF{sub 2}) coolant. The option to change-out the reactor core, fuel type, and major components is being investigated. While the FHTR will be used for materials testing, its primary mission is as a reactor system performance test to enable the design and licensing of a FHR demonstration power reactor. (authors)

  12. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? Non-PHEV Evaluations...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Non-PHEV Evaluations and Data Collection Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Non-PHEV Evaluations and Data Collection Presentation from the U.S. DOE Office of Vehicle...

  13. CDK6 kinase activity is required for thymocyte development.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their cyclin activators, and Cip and INK4 inhibitors. J Molprotein and titrating Cip/Kip CDK inhibitors. 2 It alsokinase inhibitors, including CIP/KIP family and INK4 family

  14. Activity Based Costing - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC. g4301-1chp24.pdf -- PDF Document, 11 KB Writer: John Makepeace Subjects: Administration Management...

  15. Retinoic Acid Activates Two Pathways Required for Meiosis in Mice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubova, Jana

    In all sexually reproducing organisms, cells of the germ line must transition from mitosis to meiosis. In mice, retinoic acid (RA), the extrinsic signal for meiotic initiation, activates transcription of Stra8, which is ...

  16. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryskamp, J.M. [ed.; Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the EG&G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options.

  17. Safety requirements, facility user needs, and reactor concepts for a new Broad Application Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryskamp, J.M. (ed.); Liebenthal, J.L.; Denison, A.B.; Fletcher, C.D.

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the EG G Laboratory Directed Research and Development Program (LDRD) Broad Application Test Reactor (BATR) Project that was conducted in fiscal year 1991. The scope of this project was divided into three phases: a project process definition phase, a requirements development phase, and a preconceptual reactor design and evaluation phase. Multidisciplinary teams of experts conducted each phase. This report presents the need for a new test reactor, the project process definition, a set of current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements, a set of facility user needs for a broad range of projected testing missions, and descriptions of reactor concepts capable of meeting these requirements. This information can be applied to strategic planning to provide the Department of Energy with management options.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - active process requiring Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    invoking a service that a process activity requires, receiving the result after... -oriented architecture, services and business processes are typically integrated by invoking...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation requires modulation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas A&M University Collection: Engineering ; Renewable Energy 3 Teaching Quality Assurance TQA Manual -Introduction and Contents Summary: to the activities required of the...

  20. Lead Coolant Test Facility Technical and Functional Requirements, Conceptual Design, Cost and Construction Schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soli T. Khericha

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents preliminary technical and functional requirements (T&FR), thermal hydraulic design and cost estimate for a lead coolant test facility. The purpose of this small scale facility is to simulate lead coolant fast reactor (LFR) coolant flow in an open lattice geometry core using seven electrical rods and liquid lead or lead-bismuth eutectic. Based on review of current world lead or lead-bismuth test facilities and research need listed in the Generation IV Roadmap, five broad areas of requirements of basis are identified: Develop and Demonstrate Prototype Lead/Lead-Bismuth Liquid Metal Flow Loop Develop and Demonstrate Feasibility of Submerged Heat Exchanger Develop and Demonstrate Open-lattice Flow in Electrically Heated Core Develop and Demonstrate Chemistry Control Demonstrate Safe Operation and Provision for Future Testing. These five broad areas are divided into twenty-one (21) specific requirements ranging from coolant temperature to design lifetime. An overview of project engineering requirements, design requirements, QA and environmental requirements are also presented. The purpose of this T&FRs is to focus the lead fast reactor community domestically on the requirements for the next unique state of the art test facility. The facility thermal hydraulic design is based on the maximum simulated core power using seven electrical heater rods of 420 kW; average linear heat generation rate of 300 W/cm. The core inlet temperature for liquid lead or Pb/Bi eutectic is 420oC. The design includes approximately seventy-five data measurements such as pressure, temperature, and flow rates. The preliminary estimated cost of construction of the facility is $3.7M. It is also estimated that the facility will require two years to be constructed and ready for operation.

  1. Reaching corporate sustainability goals requires new thinking, testing options, and a diverse skill set.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Josh

    1 Reaching corporate sustainability goals requires new thinking, testing options, and a diverse Students from multiple disciplines design an innovative approach to solving a sustainability problem from a triple bottom line perspective. Technical skills are combined with a more comprehensive sustainability

  2. Design requirements document for project W-520, immobilized low-activity waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ashworth, S.C.

    1998-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This design requirements document (DRD) identifies the functions that must be performed to accept, handle, and dispose of the immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) private treatment contractors and close the facility. It identifies the requirements that are associated with those functions and that must be met. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the Tank Waste Remediation System Immobilized Low-Activity Waste disposal facility project (W-520) and provides traceability from the program-level requirements to the project design activity.

  3. Test Requirements and Conceptual Design for a Potassium Test Loop to Support an Advanced Potassium Rankine Cycle Power Conversion Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, JR.G.L.

    2006-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters for continuing the design and specification of an experimental potassium test loop are identified in this report. Design and construction of a potassium test loop is part of the Phase II effort of the project ''Technology Development Program for an Advanced Potassium Rankine Power Conversion System''. This program is supported by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Design features for the potassium test loop and its instrumentation system, specific test articles, and engineered barriers for ensuring worker safety and protection of the environment are described along with safety and environmental protection requirements to be used during the design process. Information presented in the first portion of this report formed the basis to initiate the design phase of the program; however, the report is a living document that can be changed as necessary during the design process, reflecting modifications as additional design details are developed. Some portions of the report have parameters identified as ''to be determined'' (TBD), reflecting the early stage of the overall process. In cases where specific design values are presently unknown, the report attempts to document the quantities that remain to be defined in order to complete the design of the potassium test loop and supporting equipment.

  4. Technical requirements for the actinide source-term waste test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Molecke, M.A.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the technical requirements for a test program designed to measure time-dependent concentrations of actinide elements from contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste immersed in brines similar to those found in the underground workings of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This test program wig determine the influences of TRU waste constituents on the concentrations of dissolved and suspended actinides relevant to the performance of the WIPP. These influences (which include pH, Eh, complexing agents, sorbent phases, and colloidal particles) can affect solubilities and colloidal mobilization of actinides. The test concept involves fully inundating several TRU waste types with simulated WIPP brines in sealed containers and monitoring the concentrations of actinide species in the leachate as a function of time. The results from this program will be used to test numeric models of actinide concentrations derived from laboratory studies. The model is required for WIPP performance assessment with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency`s 40 CFR Part 191B.

  5. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity

  6. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity

  7. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing

  8. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1a Watchdog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1a Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0049 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  9. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Watchdog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0019 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  10. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing

  11. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1b Watchdog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1b Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0018 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  12. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1a Watchdog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1a Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0017 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  13. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1b Watchdog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1b Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0050 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  14. Design requirements document for Project W-465, immobilized low-activity waste interim storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burbank, D.A.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The scope of this Design Requirements Document (DRD) is to identify the functions and associated requirements that must be performed to accept, transport, handle, and store immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) produced by the privatized Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) treatment contractors. The functional and performance requirements in this document provide the basis for the conceptual design of the TWRS ILAW Interim Storage facility project and provides traceability from the program level requirements to the project design activity. Technical and programmatic risk associated with the TWRS planning basis are discussed in the Tank Waste Remediation System Decisions and Risk Assessment (Johnson 1994). The design requirements provided in this document will be augmented by additional detailed design data documented by the project.

  15. Uranium Adsorption on Granular Activated Carbon – Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The uranium adsorption performance of two activated carbon samples (Tusaar Lot B-64, Tusaar ER2-189A) was tested using unadjusted source water from well 299-W19-36. These batch tests support ongoing performance optimization efforts to use the best material for uranium treatment in the Hanford Site 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. A linear response of uranium loading as a function of the solution-to-solid ratio was observed for both materials. Kd values ranged from ~380,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the B-64 material and ~200,000 to >1,900,000 ml/g for the ER2-189A material. Uranium loading values ranged from 10.4 to 41.6 ?g/g for the two Tusaar materials.

  16. Boron-10 ABUNCL Prototype Models And Initial Active Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Siciliano, Edward R.

    2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security (NA-241) is supporting the project Coincidence Counting With Boron-Based Alternative Neutron Detection Technology at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the development of a 3He proportional counter alternative neutron coincidence counter. The goal of this project is to design, build and demonstrate a system based upon 10B-lined proportional tubes in a configuration typical for 3He-based coincidence counter applications. This report provides results from MCNPX model simulations and initial testing of the active mode variation of the Alternative Boron-Based Uranium Neutron Coincidence Collar (ABUNCL) design built by General Electric Reuter-Stokes. Initial experimental testing of the as-delivered passive ABUNCL was previously reported.

  17. New requirements for digital radiographic testing of welds according to ISO standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U.; Jechow, M. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, D-12200 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Users of EN 14784-2 (general principles for computed radiography with phosphor imaging plates) reported about difficulties to achieve testing class B in weld testing with imaging plates. One of the reasons is the insufficient consideration of the inherent detector unsharpness (u{sub i}) in the minimum requirements. Digital detectors have a higher inherent unsharpness compared to film, which can even exceed the geometrical unsharpness (u{sub g}) of the typical contact technique. In EN 444 and ISO 5579 (general principles for film radiography) u{sub i} is neglected for the calculation of the minimum source-to-object distance (SOD), because it is small compared to the geometric unsharpness (u{sub g}). Considering u{sub i} for digital detectors results in a new equation for SOD (see ISO/FDIS 17636-2). Therefore, the increase in total image unsharpness requires the compensation by a larger SOD to reduce u{sub g}. This contribution discusses the need for change of the SOD for different setups (detectors, focal spots, etc.) and explains the difference in image quality, achieved on basis of the extended equation of ISO/FDIS 17636-2. Furthermore, the detection of image quality indicators depends on the achieved Contrast-to-Noise ratio (CNR) and total image unsharpness. Both of them are essential parameters, which influence the contrast sensitivity. Additionally, new compensation principles (e.g. compensation of missing spatial resolution by enhanced contrast sensitivity) allow to widen the application range of digital detectors for radiographic weld testing.

  18. Tc-99 Adsorption on Selected Activated Carbons - Batch Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattigod, Shas V.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Smith, Ronald M.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently developing a 200-West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system as the remedial action selected under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Record of Decision for Operable Unit (OU) 200-ZP-1. This report documents the results of treatability tests Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers conducted to quantify the ability of selected activated carbon products (or carbons) to adsorb technetium-99 (Tc-99) from 200-West Area groundwater. The Tc-99 adsorption performance of seven activated carbons (J177601 Calgon Fitrasorb 400, J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, J177612 Norit GAC830, J177613 Norit GAC830, and J177617 Nucon LW1230) were evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36. Four of the best performing carbons (J177606 Siemens AC1230AWC, J177609 Carbon Resources CR-1240-AW, J177611 General Carbon GC20X50, and J177613 Norit GAC830) were selected for batch isotherm testing. The batch isotherm tests on four of the selected carbons indicated that under lower nitrate concentration conditions (382 mg/L), Kd values ranged from 6,000 to 20,000 mL/g. In comparison. Under higher nitrate (750 mg/L) conditions, there was a measureable decrease in Tc-99 adsorption with Kd values ranging from 3,000 to 7,000 mL/g. The adsorption data fit both the Langmuir and the Freundlich equations. Supplemental tests were conducted using the two carbons that demonstrated the highest adsorption capacity to resolve the issue of the best fit isotherm. These tests indicated that Langmuir isotherms provided the best fit for Tc-99 adsorption under low nitrate concentration conditions. At the design basis concentration of Tc 0.865 µg/L(14,700 pCi/L), the predicted Kd values from using Langmuir isotherm constants were 5,980 mL/g and 6,870 mL/g for for the two carbons. These Kd values did not meet the target Kd value of 9,000 mL/g. Tests conducted to ascertain the effects of changing pH showed that at pH values of 6.5 and 7.5, no significant differences existed in Tc-adsorption performance for three of the carbons, but the fourth carbon performed better at pH 7.5. When the pH was increased to 8.5, a slight decline in performance was observed for all carbons. Tests conducted to ascertain the temperature effect on Tc-99 adsorption indicated that at 21 ºC, 27 ºC, and 32 ºC there were no significant differences in Tc-99 adsorption for three of the carbons. The fourth carbon showed a noticeable decline in Tc-99 adsorption performance with increasing temperature. The presence of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the source water did not significantly affect Tc-99 adsorption on either of two carbons tested. Technetium-99 adsorption differed by less than 15% with or without VOCs present in the test water, indicating that Tc-99 adsorption would not be significantly affected if VOCs were removed from the water prior to contact with carbon.

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - activation test locations Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Information Sciences 45 Power-Aware Test Planning in the Early System-on-Chip Design Exploration Process Summary: test application leads to higher activity during the testing...

  20. Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cotrell, J.; Musial, W.; Hughes, S.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind power industry in North America has an immediate need for larger blade test facilities to ensure the survival of the industry. Blade testing is necessary to meet certification and investor requirements and is critical to achieving the reliability and blade life needed for the wind turbine industry to succeed. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program is exploring options for collaborating with government, private, or academic entities in a partnership to build larger blade test facilities in North America capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m in length. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) prepared this report for DOE to describe the immediate need to pursue larger blade test facilities in North America, categorize the numerous prospective partners for a North American collaboration, and document the requirements for a North American test facility.

  1. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) Data and Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office (VTO) supports work to develop test procedures and carry out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies through the Advanced Vehicle Testing...

  2. LOW ACTIVITY WASTE FEED SOLIDS CARACTERIZATION AND FILTERABILITY TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, D.; Crawford, C.; Duignan, M.; Williams, M.; Burket, P.

    2014-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for the WTP Pretreatment facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) feed and Low Activity Waste (LAW) feed. Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and sealed in canisters. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium in the WTP Pretreatment facility, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Options are being explored to immobilize the LAW portion of the tank waste, i.e., the LAW feed from the WTP Pretreatment facility. Removal of {sup 99}Tc from the LAW Feed, followed by off-site disposal of the {sup 99}Tc, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing {sup 99}Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. The conceptual flow sheet of the {sup 99}Tc removal process includes a filter to remove insoluble solids prior to processing the stream in an ion exchange column, but the characteristics and behavior of the liquid and solid phases has not previously been investigated. This report contains results of testing of a simulant that represents the projected composition of the feed to the Supplemental LAW process. This feed composition is not identical to the aqueous tank waste fed to the Waste Treatment Plant because it has been processed through WTP Pretreatment facility and therefore contains internal changes and recycle streams that will be generated within the WTP process. Although a Supplemental LAW feed simulant has previously been prepared, this feed composition differs from that simulant because those tests examined only the fully soluble aqueous solution at room temperature, not the composition formed after evaporation, including the insoluble solids that precipitate after it cools. The conceptual flow sheet for Supplemental LAW immobilization has an option for removal of {sup 99}Tc from the feed stream, if needed. Elutable ion exchange has been selected for that process. If implemented, the stream would need filtration to remove the insoluble solids prior to processing in an ion exchange column. The characteristics, chemical speciation, physical properties, and filterability of the solids are important to judge the feasibility of the concept, and to estimate the size and cost of a facility. The insoluble solids formed during these tests were primarily natrophosphate, natroxalate, and a sodium aluminosilicate compound. At the elevated temperature and 8 M [Na+], appreciable insoluble solids (1.39 wt%) were present. Cooling to room temperature and dilution of the slurry from 8 M to 5 M [Na+] resulted in a slurry containing 0.8 wt% insoluble solids. The solids (natrophosphate, natroxalate, sodium aluminum silicate, and a hydrated sodium phosphate) were relatively stable and settled quickly. Filtration rates were in the range of those observed with iron-based simulated Hanford tank sludge simulants, e.g., 6 M [Na+] Hanford tank 241-AN-102, even though their chemical speciation is considerably different. Chemical cleaning of the crossflow filter was readily accomplished with acid. As this simulant formulation was based on an average composition of a wide range of feeds using an integrated computer model, this exact composition may never be observed. But the test conditions were selected to enable comparison to the model to enable improving its chemical prediction capability.

  3. Energy-efficiency testing activities of the Mobile Energy Laboratory - Semiannual Report: April 1, 1990, Through September 30, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1990. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. MELs are equipped for the on-site evaluation of energy use efficiency. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. This report describes the testing, test results, and suggested courses of action.

  4. Enforcement Guidance Supplement 99-02: DOE Enforcement Activities of Internal Dosimetry Program Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Section 1.3 of the Operational Procedure entitled Enforcement of DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements under Price-Anderson Amendments Act of 1988, published in June 1998, provides the opportunity for the Office of Enforcement and Investigation (EH Enforcement) to issue clarifying guidance in a timely manner with respect to the processes used in its enforcement activities. The focus of this enforcement guidance clarifies internal dosimetry program requirements identified by the Department of Energy’s nuclear safety requirements in 10 CFR 835 (Occupational Radiation Protection Programs) and 10 CFR 830.120 (Quality Assurance Requirements). To develop the enforcement guidance, EH Enforcement convened a DOE working group which included representatives from the Field Office elements and the Office of Worker Protection Programs and Hazards Management, which is the office responsible for the content and technical clarifications of 10 CFR 835. The guide discusses the following areas: (1) prospective determination of employees that are “likely to receive” 100 millirem (mrem) or greater per 10 CFR 835.402, (Individual Monitoring); (2) application of enforcement policy in taking credit for respiratory protection in prospective determinations; (3) use of contractor’s policies regarding personnel internal exposure to radioactive material; (4) As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) programs; (5) clarification of enforcement with regard to internal dosimetry programs; and Final Comments.

  5. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) ? Non-PHEV Evaluations...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    simulation and analysis technical team every other month * Testing results and life-cycle costs are used by vehicle modelers * Partnering with private sector testers provides...

  6. Load requirements for maintaining structural integrity of Hanford single-shell tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JULYK, L.J.

    1999-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides structural load requirements and their basis for maintaining the structural integrity of the Hanford Single-Shell Tanks during waste feed delivery and retrieval activities. The requirements are based on a review of previous requirements and their basis documents as well as load histories with particular emphasis on the proposed lead transfer feed tanks for the privatized vitrification plant.

  7. Tank Waste Remediation System tank waste pretreatment and vitrification process development testing requirements assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howden, G.F.

    1994-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-faceted study was initiated in November 1993 to provide assurance that needed testing capabilities, facilities, and support infrastructure (sampling systems, casks, transportation systems, permits, etc.) would be available when needed for process and equipment development to support pretreatment and vitrification facility design and construction schedules. This first major report provides a snapshot of the known testing needs for pretreatment, low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification, and documents the results of a series of preliminary studies and workshops to define the issues needing resolution by cold or hot testing. Identified in this report are more than 140 Hanford Site tank waste pretreatment and LLW/HLW vitrification technology issues that can only be resolved by testing. The report also broadly characterizes the level of testing needed to resolve each issue. A second report will provide a strategy(ies) for ensuring timely test capability. Later reports will assess the capabilities of existing facilities to support needed testing and will recommend siting of the tests together with needed facility and infrastructure upgrades or additions.

  8. Webinar: Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Testing Oxygen Reduction Reaction Activity with the Rotating Disc Electrode Technique, originally presented on March 12, 2013.

  9. Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine Presentation given at DEER 2006, August 20-24,...

  10. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Benchmark Testing of the Chevrolet Volt Onboard Charger

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Carlson

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a report for public consumption, for the AVTA website, detailing the testing and analysis of the benchmark testing conducted on the Chevrolet Volt on-board charger.

  11. Engine Tests of an Active PM Filter Regeneration System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    HERE (tm) 10 Diesel Particulate Filter Flow Direction 10 Liter, Non-catalyzed, Silicon Carbide CLEAN AIR STARTS HERE (tm) 11 XFC(tm) Engine Testing: No DPF installed Device out...

  12. Functional and operational requirements document : building 1012, Battery and Energy Storage Device Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, William H.

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview of information, prior studies, and analyses relevant to the development of functional and operational requirements for electrochemical testing of batteries and energy storage devices carried out by Sandia Organization 2546, Advanced Power Sources R&D. Electrochemical operations for this group are scheduled to transition from Sandia Building 894 to a new Building located in Sandia TA-II referred to as Building 1012. This report also provides background on select design considerations and identifies the Safety Goals, Stakeholder Objectives, and Design Objectives required by the Sandia Design Team to develop the Performance Criteria necessary to the design of Building 1012. This document recognizes the Architecture-Engineering (A-E) Team as the primary design entity. Where safety considerations are identified, suggestions are provided to provide context for the corresponding operational requirement(s).

  13. TESTING GUIDELINES FOR TECHNETIUM-99 ABSORPTION ON ACTIVATED CARBON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BYRNES ME

    2010-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) is currently evaluating the potential use of activated carbon adsorption for removing technetium-99 from groundwater as a treatment method for the Hanford Site's 200 West Area groundwater pump-and-treat system. The current pump-and-treat system design will include an ion-exchange (IX) system for selective removal of technetium-99 from selected wells prior to subsequent treatment of the water in the central treatment system. The IX resin selected for technetium-99 removal is Purolite A530E. The resin service life is estimated to be approximately 66.85 days at the design technetium-99 loading rate, and the spent resin must be replaced because it cannot be regenerated. The resulting operating costs associated with resin replacement every 66.85 days are estimated at $0.98 million/year. Activated carbon pre-treatment is being evaluated as a potential cost-saving measure to offset the high operating costs associated with frequent IX resin replacement. This document is preceded by the Literature Survey of Technetium-99 Groundwater Pre-Treatment Option Using Granular Activated Carbon (SGW-43928), which identified and evaluated prior research related to technetium-99 adsorption on activated carbon. The survey also evaluated potential operating considerations for this treatment approach for the 200 West Area. The preliminary conclusions of the literature survey are as follows: (1) Activated carbon can be used to selectively remove technetium-99 from contaminated groundwater. (2) Technetium-99 adsorption onto activated carbon is expected to vary significantly based on carbon types and operating conditions. For the treatment approach to be viable at the Hanford Site, activated carbon must be capable of achieving a designated minimum technetium-99 uptake. (3) Certain radionuclides known to be present in 200 West Area groundwater are also likely to adsorb onto activated carbon. (4) Organic solvent contaminants of concern (COCs) will load heavily onto activated carbon and should be removed from groundwater upstream of the activated carbon pre-treatment system. Unless removed upstream, the adsorbed loadings of these organic constituents could exceed the land disposal criteria for carbon.

  14. Higher Order Mutation Testing Submitted in fulfilment of the requirements for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Mark

    and Analysis: MSR for App Stores" (short paper), in Proceedings of the 9th Work- ing Conference on Mining- posium and the 13th European conference on Foundations of software engineer- ing (ESEC/FSE '11), Szeged faults Using Higher Order Mutation Testing", in Proceedings of the 8th International Working Confer- ence

  15. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Laboratory Evaporation Testing Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, Duane J.; Nash, Charles A.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream, LAW Off-Gas Condensate, from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of canistered glass waste forms. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to be within acceptable concentration ranges in the LAW glass. Diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the impact of potential future disposition of this stream in the Hanford tank farms, and investigates auxiliary evaporation to enable another disposition path. Unless an auxiliary evaporator is used, returning the stream to the tank farms would require evaporation in the 242-A evaporator. This stream is expected to be unusual because it will be very high in corrosive species that are volatile in the melter (chloride, fluoride, sulfur), will have high ammonia, and will contain carryover particulates of glass-former chemicals. These species have potential to cause corrosion of tanks and equipment, precipitation of solids, release of ammonia gas vapors, and scale in the tank farm evaporator. Routing this stream to the tank farms does not permanently divert it from recycling into the WTP, only temporarily stores it prior to reprocessing. Testing is normally performed to demonstrate acceptable conditions and limits for these compounds in wastes sent to the tank farms. The primary parameter of this phase of the test program was measuring the formation of solids during evaporation in order to assess the compatibility of the stream with the evaporator and transfer and storage equipment. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW facility melter offgas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet, and, thus, the composition will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. This report discusses results of evaporation testing of the simulant. Two conditions were tested, one with the simulant at near neutral pH, and a second at alkaline pH. The neutral pH test is comparable to the conditions in the Hanford Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) evaporator, although that evaporator operates at near atmospheric pressure and tests were done under vacuum. For the alkaline test, the target pH was based on the tank farm corrosion control program requirements, and the test protocol and equipment was comparable to that used for routine evaluation of feed compatibility studies for the 242-A evaporator. One of the

  17. Summary Report on FY12 Small-Scale Test Activities High Temperature Electrolysis Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James O'Brien

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a description of the apparatus and the single cell testing results performed at Idaho National Laboratory during January–August 2012. It is an addendum to the Small-Scale Test Report issued in January 2012. The primary program objectives during this time period were associated with design, assembly, and operation of two large experiments: a pressurized test, and a 4 kW test. Consequently, the activities described in this report represent a much smaller effort.

  18. Design and Test of an Event Detector for the ReflectoActive Seals System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

  19. Design and Test of an Event Detector and Locator for the ReflectoActive Seals System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinson, Brad J [ORNL

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to research, design, develop and test a novel instrument for detecting fiber optic loop continuity and spatially locating fiber optic breaches. The work is for an active seal system called ReflectoActive{trademark} Seals whose purpose is to provide real time container tamper indication. A Field Programmable Gate Array was used to implement a loop continuity detector and a spatial breach locator based on a high acquisition speed single photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. Communication and other control features were added in order to create a usable instrument that met defined requirements. A host graphical user interface was developed to illustrate system use and performance. The resulting device meets performance specifications by exhibiting a dynamic range of 27dB and a spatial resolution of 1.5 ft. The communication scheme used expands installation options and allows the device to communicate to a central host via existing Local Area Networks and/or the Internet.

  20. Steam Reforming, 6-in. Bench-Scale Design and Testing Project -- Technical and Functional Requirements Description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Losinski, Sylvester John; Marshall, Douglas William

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility studies and technology development work are currently being performed on several processes to treat radioactive liquids and solids currently stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), located within the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies and development work will be used to select a treatment process for treatment of the radioactive liquids and solids to meet treatment milestones of the Settlement Agreement between the Department of Energy and the State of Idaho. One process under consideration for treating the radioactive liquids and solids, specifically Sodium-Bearing Waste (SBW) and tank heel solids, is fluid bed steam reforming (FBSR). To support both feasibility and development studies a bench-scale FBSR is being designed and constructed. This report presents the technical and functional requirements, experimental objectives, process flow sheets, and equipment specifications for the bench-scale FBSR.

  1. CURRENT TESTING ACTIVITIES AT THE ACRELAB RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEMS TEST FACILITY , E S Spooner2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , AUSTRALIA 2 University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW, AUSTRALIA 3 Australian CRC for Renewable Energy in a minimum of time. ACRELab was originally conceived as a laboratory for testing remote area power supply and RAPS system components such as inverters. With the growing interest in Grid-connected inverters

  2. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for data frac'' stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  3. Hybrid Electric and Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Karner

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) conducts hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) testing in order to provide benchmark data for technology modeling and research and development programs, and to be an independent source of test data for fleet managers and other early adaptors of advanced-technology vehicles. To date, the AVTA has completed baseline performance testing on 12 HEV models and accumulated 2.7 million fleet testing miles on 35 HEVs. The HEV baseline performance testing includes dynamometer and closed-track testing to document HEV performance in a controlled environment. During fleet testing, two of each HEV model accumulate 160,000 test miles within 36 months, during which maintenance and repair events and fuel use were recorded. Three models of PHEVs, from vehicle converters Energy CS and Hymotion and the original equipment manufacturer Renault, are currently in testing. The PHEV baseline performance testing includes 5 days of dynamometer testing with a minimum of 26 test drive cycles, including the Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule, the Highway Fuel Economy Driving Schedule, and the US06 test cycle, in charge-depleting and charge-sustaining modes. The PHEV accelerated testing is conducted with dedicated drivers for 4,240 miles, over a series of 132 driving loops that range from 10 to 200 miles over various combinations of defined 10-mile urban and 10-mile highway loops, with 984 hours of vehicle charging. The AVTA is part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These AVTA testing activities were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory and Electric Transportation Applications, with dynamometer testing conducted at Argonne National Laboratory. This paper discusses the testing methods and results.

  4. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error-Detecting Command Format

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    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error-Detecting Command Format. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error

  5. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Code in PROM

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    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0045 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  6. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload Data Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload

  7. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5c Code in PROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5c Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0047 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  8. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory Monitor Commanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory Monitor Commanding. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory

  9. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory Monitors in Housekeeping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory Monitors. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory

  10. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5c Code in PROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5c Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0015 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  11. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory Download Commands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory Download Commands. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory

  12. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable/Enable Watchdog

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    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command

  13. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes for Command Opcode and Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes for Command Opcode. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes

  14. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory Download Commands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory Download Commands. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory

  15. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC Background Checking on Memory Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC Background Checking on Memory. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC

  16. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory Copy Commands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory Copy Commands Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory

  17. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC Checking on Upload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5

  18. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.1Housekeeping Response Within One Second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.1Housekeeping Response Within One. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5

  19. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Performs Requisite Initializations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Performs Requisite. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Performs

  20. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload Data Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload

  1. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory Monitors in Housekeeping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory Monitors. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory

  2. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error-Detecting Command Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error-Detecting Command Format. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error

  3. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability to Log Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability to Log Diagnostics. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability

  4. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Command to Disable/Enable Watchdog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Command to Disable. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Command

  5. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5d Code in PROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5d Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0016 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  6. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5d Code in PROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5d Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0048 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  7. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5b Code in PROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5b Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0046 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  8. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory Copy Commands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory Copy Commands Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory

  9. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory Monitor Commanding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory Monitor Commanding. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory

  10. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.2 Distinguish between Power-Up and Watchdog Resets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.2 Distinguish between Power. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5

  11. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.1 Housekeeping Response Within One Second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.1 Housekeeping Response Within One. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5

  12. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC Checking on Upload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5

  13. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC Background Checking on Memory Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC Background Checking on Memory. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC

  14. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory Initialization on Power-Up Only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory Initialization on Power. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory

  15. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable/Enable Watchdog

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command

  16. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.5a HST Error Format

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.5a HST Error Format Date: February for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-03-0054 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW

  17. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5b Code in PROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5b Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0014 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

  18. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.2 Distinguish Between Power-up and Watchdog Resets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.2 Distinguish Between Power. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5

  19. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability to Log Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability to Log Diagnostics. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability

  20. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory Initialization on Power-Up Only

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory Initialization on Power. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory

  1. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes for Command Opcode and Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes for Command Opcode. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes

  2. Appearedin Proc. ACM Software Testing Analysis and Veri cation Symp. TAV3-SIGSOFT89, pp. 179-186, Dec. 1989. 1 Estimating the Number of Test Cases Required to Satisfy the All-du-paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieman, James M.

    discriminating structural testing crite- ria are based on data ow analysis. Rapps and Weyuker de ne a familyAppearedin Proc. ACM Software Testing Analysis and Veri cation Symp. TAV3-SIGSOFT89, pp. 179-186, Dec. 1989. 1 Estimating the Number of Test Cases Required to Satisfy the All-du-paths Testing

  3. Supplemental Immobilization of Hanford Low-Activity Waste: Cast Stone Screening Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Lindberg, Michael J.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Mercier, Theresa M.; Russell, Renee L.; Cozzi, Alex; Daniel, William E.; Eibling, Russell E.; Hansen, E. K.; Reigel, Marissa M.; Swanberg, David J.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 56 million gallons of radioactive and hazardous waste are stored in 177 underground storage tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the wastes and immobilize them in a glass waste form. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into a small volume of high-level waste (HLW) containing most of the radioactivity and a larger volume of low-activity waste (LAW) containing most of the nonradioactive chemicals. The HLW will be converted to glass in the HLW vitrification facility for ultimate disposal at an offsite federal repository. At least a portion (~35%) of the LAW will be converted to glass in the LAW vitrification facility and will be disposed of onsite at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The pretreatment and HLW vitrification facilities will have the capacity to treat and immobilize the wastes destined for each facility. However, a second LAW immobilization facility will be needed for the expected volume of LAW requiring immobilization. A cementitious waste form known as Cast Stone is being considered to provide the required additional LAW immobilization capacity. The Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. The Cast Stone waste form and immobilization process must be tested to demonstrate that the final Cast Stone waste form can comply with the waste acceptance criteria for the disposal facility and that the immobilization processes can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. Further, the waste form must be tested to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support risk assessment and performance assessment (PA) analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the waste disposal in the IDF. The PA is needed to satisfy both Washington State IDF Permit and DOE Order requirements. Cast Stone has been selected for solidification of radioactive wastes including WTP aqueous secondary wastes treated at the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) at Hanford. A similar waste form called Saltstone is used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to solidify its LAW tank wastes.

  4. Recent National Solar Thermal Test Facility activities, in partnership with industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghanbari, C.; Cameron, C.P.; Ralph, M.E.; Pacheco, J.E.; Rawlinson, K.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Evans, L.R. [Ewing Technical Design, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA conducts testing of solar thermal components and systems, funded primarily by the US Department of Energy. Activities are conducted in support of Central Receiver Technology, Distributed Receiver Technology and Design Assistance projects. All activities are performed in support of various cost-shared government/industry joint ventures and, on a design assistance basis, in support of a number of other industry partners.

  5. Implementation and Testing of Fault-Tolerant Photodiode-based Active Pixel Sensor (APS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapman, Glenn H.

    Implementation and Testing of Fault-Tolerant Photodiode-based Active Pixel Sensor (APS) Sunjaya the photodiode and readout transistors into two parallel operating devices, while keeping a common row select-tolerant photodiode APS was designed and fabricated using a CMOS 0.18µm process. Testing included both fully

  6. A review of two recent occurrences at the Advanced Test Reactor involving subcontractor activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahlke, H.J.; Jensen, N.C.; Vail, J.A.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of a brief, unofficial investigation into two incidents at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility, reported on October 25 and 31, 1997. The first event was an unanticipated breach of confinement. The second involved reactor operation with an inoperable seismic scram subsystem, violating the reactor`s Technical Specifications. These two incidents have been found to be unrelated. A third event that occurred on December 16, 1996, is also discussed because of its similarities to the first event listed above. Both of these incidents were unanticipated breaches of confinement, and both involved the work of construction subcontractor personnel. The cause for the subcontractor related occurrences is a work control process that fails to effectively interface with LMITCO management. ATR Construction Project managers work sufficient close with construction subcontractor personnel to understand planned day-to-day activities. They also have sufficient training and understanding of reactor operations to ensure adherence to applicable administrative requirements. However, they may not be sufficiently involved in the work authorization and control process to bridge an apparent communications gap between subcontractor employees and Facility Operations/functional support personnel for work inside the reactor facility. The cause for the inoperable seismic scram switch (resulting from a disconnected lead) is still under investigation. It does not appear to be subcontractor related.

  7. TESTING DIAGNOSTICS OF NUCLEAR ACTIVITY AND STAR FORMATION IN GALAXIES AT z > 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Faber, S. M. [University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Konidaris, Nicholas P. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MC 105-24, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kocevski, Dale D.; Yan, Renbin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Juneau, Stephanie [Irfu/Service d'Astrophysique, CEA-Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Weiner, Benjamin J. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); McLean, Ian S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Perez-Gonzalez, Pablo G.; Villar, Victor [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present some of the first science data with the new Keck/MOSFIRE instrument to test the effectiveness of different AGN/SF diagnostics at z {approx} 1.5. MOSFIRE spectra were obtained in three H-band multi-slit masks in the GOODS-S field, resulting in 2 hr exposures of 36 emission-line galaxies. We compare X-ray data with the traditional emission-line ratio diagnostics and the alternative mass-excitation and color-excitation diagrams, combining new MOSFIRE infrared data with previous HST/WFC3 infrared spectra (from the 3D-HST survey) and multiwavelength photometry. We demonstrate that a high [O III]/H{beta} ratio is insufficient as an active galactic nucleus (AGN) indicator at z > 1. For the four X-ray-detected galaxies, the classic diagnostics ([O III]/H{beta} versus [N II]/H{alpha} and [S II]/H{alpha}) remain consistent with X-ray AGN/SF classification. The X-ray data also suggest that 'composite' galaxies (with intermediate AGN/SF classification) host bona fide AGNs. Nearly {approx}2/3 of the z {approx} 1.5 emission-line galaxies have nuclear activity detected by either X-rays or the classic diagnostics. Compared to the X-ray and line ratio classifications, the mass-excitation method remains effective at z > 1, but we show that the color-excitation method requires a new calibration to successfully identify AGNs at these redshifts.

  8. Title: Analytic Evolutions in the Digital Ocean Until recently, the collection of data regarding the activity of learners typically required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Analytic Evolutions in the Digital Ocean Abstract: Until recently, the collection of data regarding the activity of learners typically required interruption of the learning process in the form to as the digital desert (DiCerbo & Behrens, 2012, 2014). As the use of digital devices increases during the natural

  9. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity, Hydrogen/CNG Blended Fuels Performance Testing in a Ford F-150

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James E. Francfort

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal regulation requires energy companies and government entities to utilize alternative fuels in their vehicle fleets. To meet this need, several automobile manufacturers are producing compressed natural gas (CNG)-fueled vehicles. In addition, several converters are modifying gasoline-fueled vehicles to operate on both gasoline and CNG (Bifuel). Because of the availability of CNG vehicles, many energy company and government fleets have adopted CNG as their principle alternative fuel for transportation. Meanwhile, recent research has shown that blending hydrogen with CNG (HCNG) can reduce emissions from CNG vehicles. However, blending hydrogen with CNG (and performing no other vehicle modifications) reduces engine power output, due to the lower volumetric energy density of hydrogen in relation to CNG. Arizona Public Service (APS) and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (DOE AVTA) identified the need to determine the magnitude of these effects and their impact on the viability of using HCNG in existing CNG vehicles. To quantify the effects of using various blended fuels, a work plan was designed to test the acceleration, range, and exhaust emissions of a Ford F-150 pickup truck operating on 100% CNG and blends of 15 and 30% HCNG. This report presents the results of this testing conducted during May and June 2003 by Electric Transportation Applications (Task 4.10, DOE AVTA Cooperative Agreement DEFC36- 00ID-13859).

  10. Transgenic Evaluation of Activated Mutant Alleles of SOS2 Reveals a Critical Requirement for Its Kinase Activity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumaker, Karen

    , Sevilla 41080, Spain In Arabidopsis thaliana, the calcium binding protein Salt Overly Sensitive3 (SOS3 of SOS2 can be constructed in vitro by changing Thr168 to Asp in the activation loop of the kinase is known to elicit a rapid increase in the free calcium concentration in the cytoplasm (Knight et al., 1997

  11. Experimental neutronics tests for a neutron activation system for the European ITER TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klix, A.; Fischer, U. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Gehre, D. [Technical University of Dresden, IKTP, Zellescher Weg 19, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Kleizer, G. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany and Budapest University of Technology and Economics, M?egyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Raj, P. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany and Université Paris-Sud, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, F-91405 Paris (France); Rovni, I. [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, M?egyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary); Ruecker, Tom [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), INR, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Germany and University of Applied Sciences Zittau-Goerlitz, Theodor-Körner-Allee 16, D-02754 Zittau (Germany)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We are investigating methods for neutron flux measurement in the ITER TBM. In particular we have tested sets of activation materials leading to induced gamma activities with short half-lives of the order of tens of seconds up to minutes and standard activation materials. Packages of activation foils have been irradiated with the intense neutron generator of Technical University of Dresden in a pure DT neutron field as well as in a neutronics mock-up of the European ITER HCLL TBM. An important aim was to check whether the gamma activity induced in the activation foils in these packages could be measured simultaneously. It was indeed possible to identify gamma lines of interest in gamma-ray measurements immediately after extraction from the irradiation.

  12. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate: One Per Second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate: One Per Second. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate

  13. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1c Initialize to Boot State After Reset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1c Initialize to Boot State After. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1c Initialize to Boot State After Reset Size Code Indent No

  14. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1a Initialize to Boot State After Reset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1a Initialize to Boot State After. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1a Initialize to Boot State After Reset Size Code Indent No

  15. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump Anywhere in Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump Anywhere in Code. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump

  16. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump Anywhere in Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump Anywhere in Code. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump

  17. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1d Initialize to Boot State After Reset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1d Initialize to Boot State After. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1d Initialize to Boot State After Reset Size Code Indent No

  18. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate: One Per Second

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate: One Per Second. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate

  19. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counters for All Commands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counters for All Commands Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counters for All

  20. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1b Initialize to Boot State After Reset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1b Initialize to Boot State After. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1b Initialize to Boot State After Reset Size Code Indent No

  1. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Reboot DCE FSW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Reboot DCE FSW Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Reboot DCE

  2. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Re-boot DCE FSW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Re-boot DCE FSW Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Re-boot DCE FSW Size Code Indent No. Document No. Rev

  3. COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counter for All Commands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counter for All Commands Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counter for All

  4. Engineering Scaling Requirements for Solid Breeder Blanket Testing A. Ying, S. Sharafat, M. Youssef, J. An, R. Hunt, P. Rainsberry, M. Abdou

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Engineering Scaling Requirements for Solid Breeder Blanket Testing A. Ying, S. Sharafat, M. Youssef@fusion.ucla.edu An engineering scaling process is applied to the solid breeder ITER TBM designs in accordance with the testing objectives of validating the design tools and the database, and evaluating blanket performance under

  5. Testing Geometrical Discrimination within an Enzyme Active Site: Constrained Hydrogen Bonding in the Ketosteroid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herschlag, Dan

    Testing Geometrical Discrimination within an Enzyme Active Site: Constrained Hydrogen Bonding, Stanford UniVersity, Stanford, California 94305, and Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry-chain reorientation and prevent hydrogen bond shortening by 0.1 Ã? or less. Further, this constraint has substantial

  6. Testing for fault activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using independent GPS results from the BARGEN network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blewitt, Geoffrey

    Testing for fault activity at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using independent GPS results from the BARGEN June 2006; published 19 July 2006. [1] Data from BARGEN GPS stations around Yucca Mountain (YM) have at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, using independent GPS results from the BARGEN network, Geophys. Res. Lett., 33

  7. Requirements Definition Stage

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter addresses development of a Software Configuration Management Plan to track and control work products, analysis of the system owner/users' business processes and needs, translation of those processes and needs into formal requirements, and planning the testing activities to validate the performance of the software product.

  8. Nuclear Rocket Test Facility Decommissioning Including Controlled Explosive Demolition of a Neutron-Activated Shield Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Kruzic

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, the Test Cell A Facility was used in the 1960s for the testing of nuclear rocket engines, as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Program. The facility was decontaminated and decommissioned (D&D) in 2005 using the Streamlined Approach For Environmental Restoration (SAFER) process, under the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). Utilities and process piping were verified void of contents, hazardous materials were removed, concrete with removable contamination decontaminated, large sections mechanically demolished, and the remaining five-foot, five-inch thick radiologically-activated reinforced concrete shield wall demolished using open-air controlled explosive demolition (CED). CED of the shield wall was closely monitored and resulted in no radiological exposure or atmospheric release.

  9. Purpose and goals The purpose of FEAT is to carry out the functional evaluation and testing required for upgrades to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    LAT. 2 Integration refers to testing related to Campus Solutions integration and the control interface documentation · To keep eLAT and Change Control Coordinator informed of the functional testing results areas of the system or to `integration'2 . Responsibilities The FEAT Coordinator is responsible

  10. Requirements for Defining Utility Drive Cycles: An Exploratory Analysis of Grid Frequency Regulation Data for Establishing Battery Performance Testing Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hafen, Ryan P.; Vishwanathan, Vilanyur V.; Subbarao, Krishnappa; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW

    2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Battery testing procedures are important for understanding battery performance, including degradation over the life of the battery. Standards are important to provide clear rules and uniformity to an industry. The work described in this report addresses the need for standard battery testing procedures that reflect real-world applications of energy storage systems to provide regulation services to grid operators. This work was motivated by the need to develop Vehicle-to-Grid (V2G) testing procedures, or V2G drive cycles. Likewise, the stationary energy storage community is equally interested in standardized testing protocols that reflect real-world grid applications for providing regulation services. As the first of several steps toward standardizing battery testing cycles, this work focused on a statistical analysis of frequency regulation signals from the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnect with the goal to identify patterns in the regulation signal that would be representative of the entire signal as a typical regulation data set. Results from an extensive time-series analysis are discussed, and the results are explained from both the statistical and the battery-testing perspectives. The results then are interpreted in the context of defining a small set of V2G drive cycles for standardization, offering some recommendations for the next steps toward standardizing testing protocols.

  11. Charpy impact test results for low activation ferritic alloys irradiated to 30 dpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miniature specimens of six low activation ferritic alloys have been impact field tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 30 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens and specimens irradiated to 10 dpa indicates that degradation in the impact behavior appears to have saturated by {approx}10 dpa in at least four of these alloys. The 7.5Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X appears most promising for further consideration as a candidate structural material in fusion reactor applications, although the 9Cr-1V alloy may also warrant further investigation.

  12. Field Testing of Activated Carbon Injection Options for Mercury Control at TXU's Big Brown Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Pavlish; Jeffrey Thompson; Christopher Martin; Mark Musich; Lucinda Hamre

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of the project was to evaluate the long-term feasibility of using activated carbon injection (ACI) options to effectively reduce mercury emissions from Texas electric generation plants in which a blend of lignite and subbituminous coal is fired. Field testing of ACI options was performed on one-quarter of Unit 2 at TXU's Big Brown Steam Electric Station. Unit 2 has a design output of 600 MW and burns a blend of 70% Texas Gulf Coast lignite and 30% subbituminous Powder River Basin coal. Big Brown employs a COHPAC configuration, i.e., high air-to-cloth baghouses following cold-side electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), for particulate control. When sorbent injection is added between the ESP and the baghouse, the combined technology is referred to as TOXECON{trademark} and is patented by the Electric Power Research Institute in the United States. Key benefits of the TOXECON configuration include better mass transfer characteristics of a fabric filter compared to an ESP for mercury capture and contamination of only a small percentage of the fly ash with AC. The field testing consisted of a baseline sampling period, a parametric screening of three sorbent injection options, and a month long test with a single mercury control technology. During the baseline sampling, native mercury removal was observed to be less than 10%. Parametric testing was conducted for three sorbent injection options: injection of standard AC alone; injection of an EERC sorbent enhancement additive, SEA4, with ACI; and injection of an EERC enhanced AC. Injection rates were determined for all of the options to achieve the minimum target of 55% mercury removal as well as for higher removals approaching 90%. Some of the higher injection rates were not sustainable because of increased differential pressure across the test baghouse module. After completion of the parametric testing, a month long test was conducted using the enhanced AC at a nominal rate of 1.5 lb/Macf. During the time that enhanced AC was injected, the average mercury removal for the month long test was approximately 74% across the test baghouse module. ACI was interrupted frequently during the month long test because the test baghouse module was bypassed frequently to relieve differential pressure. The high air-to-cloth ratio of operations at this unit results in significant differential pressure, and thus there was little operating margin before encountering differential pressure limits, especially at high loads. This limited the use of sorbent injection as the added material contributes to the overall differential pressure. This finding limits sustainable injection of AC without appropriate modifications to the plant or its operations. Handling and storage issues were observed for the TOXECON ash-AC mixture. Malfunctioning equipment led to baghouse dust hopper plugging, and storage of the stagnant material at flue gas temperatures resulted in self-heating and ignition of the AC in the ash. In the hoppers that worked properly, no such problems were reported. Economics of mercury control at Big Brown were estimated for as-tested scenarios and scenarios incorporating changes to allow sustainable operation. This project was funded under the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory project entitled 'Large-Scale Mercury Control Technology Field Testing Program--Phase II'.

  13. Amino acid nutrition of the red drum (Sciaenops ocellatus): development of an improved test diet and determination of the total sulfur amino acid requirement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Hae Young

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    (1985) also found a significant correlation (r=0. 96) between dietary amino acid requirements and whole-body amino acid composition of channel catfish. However, a lower correlation (r-0. 68) was observed between dietary requirements and amino acid... fed amino acid test diets for six weeks1 Diet Weight gain Feed efficiency Survival designation ('/o of initial weight) (g gain/ g feed) (%%d) PM C G/AA CG RDM R D M/A A 210 c 227 c 68 1116 507 b 0. 40c 0. 41 c 0. 17d 0. 81 a 0. 67...

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Design and Analysis Activity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by the Department of Energy's Energy Storage area at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about the battery testing, design, and analysis activity.

  15. Accelerated Testing Validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Rangachary

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the University of California. Accelerated Testing Validationmaterials requires relevant Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs),

  16. Accumulation of operational history through emulation test to meet proven technology requirement for newly developed I and C technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeong Cheol, Shin; Sung Kon, Kang [Nuclear Environment Technology Institute (NETEC), Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power(KHNP) P.O. Box Youseong-gu Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han Seong, Son [ENESYS Co., Ltd. 3F, Pianetta Bldg., 337-2, Jangdae-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As new advanced digital I and C technology with potential benefits of higher functionality and better cost effectiveness is available in the market, NPP (Nuclear Power Plant) operators are inclined to use the new technology for the construction of new plant and the upgrade of existing plants. However, this new technology poses risks to the NPP operators at the same time. These risks are mainly due to the poor reliability of newly developed technology. KHNP's past experiences with the new equipment shows many cases of reliability problems. And their consequences include unintended plant trips, lowered acceptance of the new digital technology by the plant I and C maintenance crew, and increased licensing burden in answering for questions from the nuclear regulatory body. Considering the fact that the risk of these failures in the nuclear plant operation is far greater than those in other industry, nuclear power plant operators want proven technology for I and C systems. This paper presents an approach for the emulation of operational history through which a newly developed technology becomes a proven technology. One of the essential elements of this approach is the feedback scheme of running the new equipment in emulated environment, gathering equipment failure, and correcting the design(and test bed). The emulation of environment includes normal and abnormal events of the new equipment such as reconfiguration of control system due to power failure, plant operation including full spectrum of credible scenarios in an NPP. Emulation of I and C equipment execution mode includes normal operation, initialization and termination, abnormal operation, hardware maintenance and maintenance of algorithm/software. Plant specific simulator is used to create complete profile of plant operational conditions that I and C equipment is to experience in the real plant. Virtual operating crew technology is developed to run the simulator scenarios without involvement of actual operators at the emulated environment. Verification and validation are performed for detecting problems of the new technology. Verification of the equipment is done in two ways, one is to evaluate the features of the equipment according to the criteria derived from good practices of well proven I and C products and the second is to evaluate the features of the equipment by I and C experts. Validations are done in two ways, one is to validate the functions and performance of the equipment and the other is to validate the robustness of the equipment by accumulation operational experience. (authors)

  17. Wind Tunnel and Flight Testing of Active Flow Control on a UAV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babbar, Yogesh

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Active flow control has been extensively explored in wind tunnel studies but successful in-flight implementation of an active flow control technology still remains a challenge. This thesis presents implementation of active flow control technology...

  18. Iodine Adsorption on Ion-Exchange Resins and Activated Carbons– Batch Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, Kent E.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine sorption onto seven resins and six carbon materials was evaluated using water from well 299-W19-36 on the Hanford Site. These materials were tested using a range of solution-to-solid ratios. The test results are as follows: • The efficacy of the resin and granular activated carbon materials was less than predicted based on manufacturers’ performance data. It is hypothesized that this is due to the differences in speciation previously determined for Hanford groundwater. • The sorption of iodine is affected by the iodine species in the source water. Iodine loading on resins using source water ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 189.9 to 227.0 mL/g. The sorption values when the iodine is converted to iodide ranged from 2.75 to 5.90 µg/g with the corresponding Kd values from 536.3 to 2979.6 mL/g. It is recommended that methods to convert iodine to iodide be investigated in fiscal year (FY) 2015. • The chemicals used to convert iodine to iodate adversely affected the sorption of iodine onto the carbon materials. Using as-received source water, loading and Kd values ranged from 1.47 to 1.70 µg/g and 189.8 to 226.3 mL/g respectively. After treatment, loading and Kd values could not be calculated because there was little change between the initial and final iodine concentration. It is recommended the cause of the decrease in iodine sorption be investigated in FY15. • In direct support of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has evaluated samples from within the 200W pump and treat bioreactors. As part of this analysis, pictures taken within the bioreactor reveal a precipitate that, based on physical properties and known aqueous chemistry, is hypothesized to be iron pyrite or chalcopyrite, which could affect iodine adsorption. It is recommended these materials be tested at different solution-to-solid ratios in FY15 to determine their effect on iodine sorption.

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - activities field test Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at North Temperate Lakes-LTER Activities serve approximately 350... elementary, middle, and high school students annually Professional development activities reach 60...

  20. Evolutionarily conserved IMPACT impairs various stress responses that require GCN1 for activating the eIF2 kinase GCN2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cambiaghi, Tavane D.; Pereira, Catia M. [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Brazil)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Brazil); Shanmugam, Renuka; Bolech, Michael [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand)] [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand); Wek, Ronald C. [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine (United States)] [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Indiana University School of Medicine (United States); Sattlegger, Evelyn [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand)] [Institute of Natural and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University (New Zealand); Castilho, Beatriz A., E-mail: bacastilho@unifesp.br [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology, Escola Paulista de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo (Brazil)

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •GCN1 is required for mammalian and yeast GCN2 function in a variety of conditions. •Mammalian IMPACT competes with GCN2 for GCN1 binding. •IMPACT and its yeast counterpart YIH1 downregulate GCN1-dependent GCN2 activation. -- Abstract: In response to a range of environmental stresses, phosphorylation of the alpha subunit of the translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2?) represses general protein synthesis coincident with increased translation of specific mRNAs, such as those encoding the transcription activators GCN4 and ATF4. The eIF2? kinase GCN2 is activated by amino acid starvation by a mechanism involving GCN2 binding to an activator protein GCN1, along with association with uncharged tRNA that accumulates during nutrient deprivation. We previously showed that mammalian IMPACT and its yeast ortholog YIH1 bind to GCN1, thereby preventing GCN1 association with GCN2 and stimulation of this eIF2? kinase during amino acid depletion. GCN2 activity is also enhanced by other stresses, including proteasome inhibition, UV irradiation and lack of glucose. Here, we provide evidence that IMPACT affects directly and specifically the activation of GCN2 under these stress conditions in mammalian cells. We show that activation of mammalian GCN2 requires its interaction with GCN1 and that IMPACT promotes the dissolution of the GCN2–GCN1 complex. To a similar extent as the overexpression of YIH1, overexpression of IMPACT in yeast cells inhibited growth under all stress conditions that require GCN2 and GCN1 for cell survival, including exposure to acetic acid, high levels of NaCl, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or benomyl. This study extends our understanding of the roles played by GCN1 in GCN2 activation induced by a variety of stress arrangements and suggests that IMPACT and YIH1 use similar mechanisms for regulating this eIF2? kinase.

  1. Idaho National Laboratory Lead or Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) Test Facility - R&D Requirements, Design Criteria, Design Concept, and Concept Guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Loewen; Paul Demkowicz

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility will advance the state of nuclear technology relative to heavy-metal coolants (primarily Pb and Pb-Bi), thereby allowing the U.S. to maintain the pre-eminent position in overseas markets and a future domestic market. The end results will be a better qualitative understanding and quantitative measure of the thermal physics and chemistry conditions in the molten metal systems for varied flow conditions (single and multiphase), flow regime transitions, heat input methods, pumping requirements for varied conditions and geometries, and corrosion performance. Furthering INL knowledge in these areas is crucial to sustaining a competitive global position. This fundamental heavy-metal research supports the National Energy Policy Development Group’s stated need for energy systems to support electrical generation.1 The project will also assist the Department of Energy in achieving goals outlined in the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Long Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan,2 the Generation IV Roadmap for Lead Fast Reactor development, and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative research and development. This multi-unit Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility with its flexible and reconfigurable apparatus will maintain and extend the U.S. nuclear knowledge base, while educating young scientists and engineers. The uniqueness of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility is its integrated Pool Unit and Storage Unit. This combination will support large-scale investigation of structural and fuel cladding material compatibility issues with heavy-metal coolants, oxygen chemistry control, and thermal hydraulic physics properties. Its ability to reconfigure flow conditions and piping configurations to more accurately approximate prototypical reactor designs will provide a key resource for Lead Fast Reactor research and development. The other principal elements of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility (in addition to the Pool Unit and Storage Unit) are the Bench Scale Unit and Supporting Systems, principal of which are the O2 Sensor/Calibration System, Feed System, Transfer System, Off- Gas System, Purge and Evacuation System, Oxygen Sensor and Control System, Data Acquisition and Control System, and the Safety Systems. Parallel and/or independent corrosion studies and convective heat transfer experiments for cylindrical and annular geometries will support investigation of heat transfer phenomena into the secondary side. In addition, molten metal pumping concepts and power requirements will be measured for future design use.

  2. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - activated carbon testing Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest carbon projects... straightforward way to sequester carbon and is the simplest carbon sequestration activity to account for in forest... reductions achieved by...

  4. NISTIR 7933 Requirements and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NISTIR 7933 Requirements and Conformance Test Assertions for ANSI/NIST-ITL 1-2011 Record Type 18 #12;ii NISTIR 7933 Requirements and Conformance Test Assertions for ANSI/NIST-ITL 1-2011 Record Type/CTS designed to test implementations of ANSI/NIST-ITL 1- 2011 (AN-2011) "Data Format for the Interchange

  5. Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities are outlined to introduce students to information on solar energy while performing ordinary classroom work. In this teaching manual solar energy is integrated with the humanities. The activities include such things as stories, newspapers, writing assignments, and art and musical presentations all filled with energy related terms. An energy glossary is provided. (BCS)

  6. A Regression Test Selection Technique for Graphical User Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chesser, Carl

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Regression testing is a quality control measure to ensure that the newly modified part of the software still complies with its specified requirements and that the unmodified part has not been affected by the maintenance activity. Regression testing...

  7. Reaction Pathways and Site Requirements for the Activation and Chemical Conversion of Methane on Ru-Based Catalysts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    -reactant activation steps. These conclusions suggest that water-gas shift reactions are also equilibrated at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720 ReceiVed: June 24, 2003; In Final Form: September 29, 2003 Kinetic mechanistic picture and a unifying kinetic treatment for CH4/CO2 and CH4/H2O reforming reactions and CH4

  8. Corrective Action Plan for CAU No. 95: Area 15 EPA Farm Laboratory Building, Decontamination and Demolition Closure Activities - Nevada Test Site. Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, A.L.; Nacht, S.J.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides the selected corrective action alternative and proposes the closure implementation methodology for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Farm Laboratory Building 15-06 located in Area 15 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada. The facility is part of the Environmental Restoration Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy/Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) under the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Subproject which serves to manage and dispose of surplus facilities at the NTS in a manner that will protect personnel, the public, and the environment. It is identified as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 95 in Appendix III of the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO). In July 1997, the DOE/NV verbally requested approval from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for the closure schedule to be accelerated. Currently, field activities are anticipated to be completed by September 30, 1997. In order to meet this new schedule NDEP has agreed to review this document as expeditiously as possible. Comments will be addressed in the Closure Report after field activities have been completed, unless significant issues require resolution during closure activities.

  9. Activity testing of fine-particle size, iron catalysts for coal liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stohl, F.V.; Diegert, K.V.; Gugliotta, T.P.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of fine-particle size (< 40 nm) unsupported catalysts in direct coal liquefaction may result in improved economics due to possible enhanced yields of desired products, the potential for decreasing reaction severity, and the possibility of using less catalyst. Sandia has developed a standard testing procedure for evaluating and comparing the fine-particle catalysts. The test procedure uses phenanthrene as the reaction solvent, the DECS-17 Blind Canyon Coal, and a statistical experimental design to enable evaluation of the catalysts over ranges of temperature (350 to 400{degrees}C), time (20 to 60 minutes), and catalyst loading (0 to 1 wt % on a dmmf coal basis). Product analyses include tetrahydrofuran (THF) conversion, heptane conversion, solvent recovery, and gas analyses. Phenanthrene as the solvent in the testing procedure yielded significant differences between thermal and catalytic reactions, whereas using a good hydrogen donor such as 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP) showed no catalytic effects.

  10. Specific test and evaluation plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AX-B Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

  11. Development and results of experimental testing of electromembrane process for liquid active waste purification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martinov, B.V.; Smirnov, V.V.; Tugolukov, B.B.; Belyakov, Y.A. [A.A. Bochvar All Russian Scientific Research, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Inorganic Materials

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the results of studies on electromembrane purification. The concentration of salts in active wastes arising from decontamination is more than 3--5 g/l. For these investigations a solution was chosen that had arisen from the decontamination of metallic items by a two-bath method using permanganate-alkali in the first stage and nitrogen oxalic acid in the second stage. The total salt content of mixed acid and alkaline solutions was 3.0 g/l, with a pH of 8.5 and total beta-activity of 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} Ci/l.

  12. Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

  13. Use of Metallopeptide Based Mimics Demonstrates That the Metalloprotein Nitrile Hydratase Requires Two Oxidized Cysteinates for Catalytic Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearer, J.; Callan, P; Amie, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrile hydratases (NHases) are non-heme Fe{sup III} or non-corrin Co{sup III} containing metalloenzymes that possess an N{sub 2}S{sub 3} ligand environment with nitrogen donors derived from amidates and sulfur donors derived from cysteinates. A closely related enzyme is thiocyanate hydrolase (SCNase), which possesses a nearly identical active-site coordination environment as CoNHase. These enzymes are redox inactive and perform hydrolytic reactions; SCNase hydrolyzes thiocyanate anions while NHase converts nitriles into amides. Herein an active CoNHase metallopeptide mimic, [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] (NHase-m1 = AcNH-CCDLP-CGVYD-PA-COOH), that contains Co{sup III} in a similar N{sub 2}S{sub 3} coordination environment as CoNHase is reported. [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] was characterized by electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS), gel-permeation chromatography (GPC), Co K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (Co-S: 2.21 {angstrom}; Co-N: 1.93 {angstrom}), vibrational, and optical spectroscopies. We find that [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] will perform the catalytic conversion of acrylonitrile into acrylamide with up to 58 turnovers observed after 18 h at 25 C (pH 8.0). FTIR data used in concert with calculated vibrational data (mPWPW91/aug-cc-TZVPP) demonstrates that the active form of [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] has a ligated SO{sub 2} (? = 1091 cm{sup -1}) moiety and a ligated protonated SO(H) (? = 928 cm{sup -1}) moiety; when only one oxygenated cysteinate ligand (i.e., a mono-SO{sub 2} coordination motif) or the bis-SO{sub 2} coordination motif are found within [Co{sup III}NHase-m1] no catalytic activity is observed. Calculations of the thermodynamics of ligand exchange (B3LYP/aug-cc-TZVPP) suggest that the reason for this is that the SO{sub 2}/SO(H) equatorial ligand motif promotes both water dissociation from the Co{sup III}-center and nitrile coordination to the Co{sup III}-center. In contrast, the under- or overoxidized motifs will either strongly favor a five coordinate Co{sup III}-center or strongly favor water binding to the Co{sup III}-center over nitrile binding.

  14. Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar energy information is made available to students through classroom instruction by way of the Solar Energy Education teaching manuals. In this manual solar energy, as well as other energy sources like wind power, is introduced by performing school activities in the area of social studies. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  15. Fuel development activities of the US RERTR Program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snelgrove, J.L.; Domagala, R.F.; Wiencek, T.C.; Copeland, G.L.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the development and irradiation testing of high-density fuels for use with low-enriched uranium in research and test reactors is reported. Swelling and blister-threshold temperature data obtained from the examination of miniature fuel plates containing UAl/sub x/, U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/, or U/sub 3/Si dispersed in an aluminum matrix are presented. Combined with the results of metallurgical examinations, these data show that these four fuel types will perform adequately to full burnup of the /sup 235/U contained in the low-enriched fuel. The exothermic reaction of the uranium-silicide fuels with aluminum has been found to occur at about the same temperature as the melting of the aluminum matrix and cladding and to be essentially quenched by the melting endotherm. A new series of miniature fuel plate irradiations is also discussed.

  16. Testing an Active Diesel Particulate Filter on a 2-Cycle Marine Engine |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of Energy StrainClientDesignOffice -TemplateDavid L.Testing2009

  17. Further Charpy impact test results of low activation ferritic alloys, irradiated at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miniature CVN specimens of four ferritic alloys, GA3X, F82H, GA4X and HT9, have been impact tested following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to 67 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of the previously tested lower dose irradiation condition indicates that the GA3X and F82H alloys, two primary candidate low activation alloys, exhibit virtually identical behavior following irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa and at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa. Very little shift is observed in either DBTT or USE relative to the unirradiated condition. The shifts in DBTT and USE observed in both GA4X and HT9 were smaller after irradiation at 430{degrees}C to {approximately}67 dpa than after irradiation at 370{degrees}C to {approximately}15 dpa.

  18. Overview and Progress of the Battery Testing, Analysis, and Design Activity

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthewith RationalActivity| Department of

  19. Charpy impact test results of four low activation ferritic alloys irradiated at 370{degrees}C to 15 DPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schubert, L.E.; Hamilton, M.L.; Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Miniature CVN specimens of four low activation ferritic alloys have been impact tested following irradiation at 370{degrees}C to 15 dpa. Comparison of the results with those of control specimens indicates that degradation in the impact behavior occurs in each of these four alloys. The 9Cr-2W alloy referred to as GA3X and the similar alloy F82H with 7.8Cr-2W appear most promising for further consideration as candidate structural materials in fusion energy system applications. These two alloys exhibit a small DBTT shift to higher temperatures but show increased absorbed energy on the upper shelf.

  20. Interim Letter Report - Verification Survey Results for Activities Performed in March 2009 for the Vitrification Test Facility Warehouse at the West Valley Demonstration Project, Ashford, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.D. Estes

    2009-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the verification activities was to provide independent radiological surveys and data for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure that the building satisfies the requirements for release without radiological controls.

  1. Recommended surrogate PCB waste feed and fuel compositions to meet requirements given in Spec. K/D 5552 for test burns in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems Inc. incinerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, R.W.

    1984-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Waste feed heats of combustion, principle organic hazardous constituents (POHCs), ash contents, and organic chlorine concentrations are specified in Table 3 of Spec. No. K/D-5552 for test burns 1 through 7 in the Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. incinerator. The first four tests are intended to demonstrate that the incinerator will meet RCRA emission standards, HCl removal efficiencies, and requirements for destruction of POHCs. A mix containing 1,2-dichloro-, 1,2,4-trichloro-, and 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzenes with a small amount of hexachlorobenzene is recommended as a PCB surrogate for test burns 5 and 6 to simulate the destructibility of PCBs in plant wastes. The mix would be diluted with appropriate amounts of dimethyl malonate and kerosene to obtain a homogeneous solution having the required heat of combustion and chlorine content for the liquid waste feeds. For test burn 7 the polychlorinated benzene mix would contain a small amount of hexachlorobenzene with larger amounts of 1,2,4,5-tetrachloro- and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzenes. The composition of the polychlorinated mixes is such that they should be comparable to Aroclor 1254 in overall destructibility by incineration, and achievement of a DRE for hexachlorobenzene greater than 99.99% in the test burns should provide assurance that the incinerator will be able to destroy PCBs in Aroclor 1260, which is the most refractory PCB mix present in plant wastes. If hexachlorobenzene is not available for these tests, hexachlorocyclopentadiene is recommended as a substitute for hexachlorobenzene in tests 5-7, which involve a PCB surrogate, and hexachloroethane is recommended as the alternative solid waste feed for test 4. Solutions containing kerosene and methanol are recommended as liquid fuels for tests 1 and 4 to achieve the required heats of combustion, while a dimethyl malonate-methanol solution is recommended to achieve the 7000 Btu/lb heat of combustion for test burn 2.

  2. Standard Test Method for Oxygen Content Using a 14-MeV Neutron Activation and Direct-Counting Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of oxygen concentration in almost any matrix by using a 14-MeV neutron activation and direct-counting technique. Essentially, the same system may be used to determine oxygen concentrations ranging from over 50 % to about 10 g/g, or less, depending on the sample size and available 14-MeV neutron fluence rates. Note 1 - The range of analysis may be extended by using higher neutron fluence rates, larger samples, and higher counting efficiency detectors. 1.2 This test method may be used on either solid or liquid samples, provided that they can be made to conform in size, shape, and macroscopic density during irradiation and counting to a standard sample of known oxygen content. Several variants of this method have been described in the technical literature. A monograph is available which provides a comprehensive description of the principles of activation analysis using a neutron generator (1). 1.3 The values stated in either SI or inch-pound units are to be regarded...

  3. Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report. Volume 2, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for ``data frac`` stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

  4. Activities to support the liquefied gaseous fuels spill test facility program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheesley, D.; King, S.B.; Routh, T.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately a hundred years ago the petrochemical industry was in its infancy, while the chemical industry was already well established. Today, both of these industries, which are almost indistinguishable, are a substantial part of the makeup of the U.S. economy and the lifestyle we enjoy. It is difficult to identify a single segment of our daily lives that isn`t affected by these industries and the products or services they make available for our use. Their survival and continued function in a competitive world market are necessary to maintain our current standard of living. The occurrence of accidents in these industries has two obvious effects: (1) the loss of product during the accident and future productivity because of loss of a portion of a facility or transport medium, and (2) the potential loss of life or injury to individuals, whether workers, emergency responders, or members of the general public. A great deal of work has been conducted at the Liquefied Gaseous Fuels Spill test Facility (LGFSTF) on hazardous spills. WRI has conducted accident investigations as well as provided information on the research results via the internet and bibliographies.

  5. Active dc filter for HVDC system--A test installation in the Konti-Skan DC link at Lindome converter station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wenyan; Asplund, G. (ABB Power Systems, Ludvika (Sweden). HVDC Division); Aberg, A. (ABB Corporate Research, Lund (Sweden). Dept. of Man-Machine Communication); Jonsson, U. (Svenska Kraftnaet, Vaellingby (Sweden)); Loeoef, O. (Vattenfall AB, Trollhaettan (Sweden). Region Vaestsverige)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of introducing active dc filters is to meet the more and more stringent requirement from power utilities on limiting telephone interference caused by harmonic currents from HVdc transmission lines, without unnecessarily increasing the cost of HVdc stations. An active dc filter installed in the Konti-Skan HVdc link is described. The active dc filter is connected at the bottom of an existing passive dc filter at the Lindome station. The active dc filter includes optic harmonic current measuring unit, control system, protection and supervision system, PWM power amplifier, high-frequency transformer, surge arrester, and coupling apparatuses. The active dc filter has small physical size and occupies small ground area. The performance of the active dc filter for eliminating the disturbing harmonics is excellent. To achieve comparable results by passive filters would require something like ten times more high voltage equipment.

  6. Activation of p115-RhoGEF Requires Direct Association of G[alpha subscript 13] and the Dbl Homology Domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Zhe; Guo, Liang; Hadas, Jana; Gutowski, Stephen; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C. (IIT); (UTSMC); (Montana)

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    RGS-containing RhoGEFs (RGS-RhoGEFs) represent a direct link between the G{sub 12} class of heterotrimeric G proteins and the monomeric GTPases. In addition to the canonical Dbl homology (DH) and pleckstrin homology domains that carry out the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) activity toward RhoA, these RhoGEFs also possess RGS homology (RH) domains that interact with activated {alpha} subunits of G{sub 12} and G{sub 13}. Although the GEF activity of p115-RhoGEF (p115), an RGS-RhoGEF, can be stimulated by G{alpha}{sub 13}, the exact mechanism of the stimulation has remained unclear. Using combined studies with small angle x-ray scattering, biochemistry, and mutagenesis, we identify an additional binding site for activated G{alpha}{sub 13} in the DH domain of p115. Small angle x-ray scattering reveals that the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} docks onto the DH domain, opposite to the surface of DH that binds RhoA. Mutation of a single tryptophan residue in the {alpha}3b helix of DH reduces binding to activated G{alpha}{sub 13} and ablates the stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Complementary mutations at the predicted DH-binding site in the {alpha}B-{alpha}C loop of the helical domain of G{alpha}{sub 13} also affect stimulation of p115 by G{alpha}{sub 13}. Although the GAP activity of p115 is not required for stimulation by G{alpha}{sub 13}, two hydrophobic motifs in RH outside of the consensus RGS box are critical for this process. Therefore, the binding of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the RH domain facilitates direct association of G{alpha}{sub 13} to the DH domain to regulate its exchange activity. This study provides new insight into the mechanism of regulation of the RGS-RhoGEF and broadens our understanding of G protein signaling.

  7. Long-term corrosion testing pan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing needs. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to meet all future testing needs, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2007-7027 to address DOE comments and add a series of tests to address NWTRB recommendations.

  8. Long-term corrosion testing plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Frederick Douglas; Brown, Neil R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the testing and facility requirements to support the Yucca Mountain Project long-term corrosion testing program. The purpose of this document is to describe a corrosion testing program that will (a) reduce model uncertainty and variability, (b) reduce the reliance upon overly conservative assumptions, and (c) improve model defensibility. Test matrices were developed for 17 topical areas (tasks): each matrix corresponds to a specific test activity that is a subset of the total work performed in a task. A future document will identify which of these activities are considered to be performance confirmation activities. Detailed matrices are provided for FY08, FY09 and FY10 and rough order estimates are provided for FY11-17. Criteria for the selection of appropriate test facilities were developed through a meeting of Lead Lab and DOE personnel on October 16-17, 2007. These criteria were applied to the testing activities and recommendations were made for the facility types appropriate to carry out each activity. The facility requirements for each activity were assessed and activities were identified that can not be performed with currently available facilities. Based on this assessment, a total of approximately 10,000 square feet of facility space is recommended to accommodate all future testing, given that all testing is consolidated to a single location. This report is a revision to SAND2008-4922 to address DOE comments.

  9. Intrusion detection sensor testing tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, D.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrusion detection sensors must be frequently tested to verify that they are operational, and they must be periodically tested to verify that they are functioning at required performance levels. Concerns involving this testing can include: The significant amount of manpower required, inconsistent results due to variability in methods and personnel, exposure of personnel to hazardous environments, and difficulty in obtaining access to the areas containing some of the intrusion sensors. To address these concerns, the Department of Energy directed Sandia National Labs. to develop intrusion detection sensor testing tools. Over the past two years Sandia has developed several sensor testing tool prototypes. This paper describes the evolution of an exterior intrusion detection sensor tester and automatic data logger, and also describes various interior intrusion detection sensor test fixtures that can be remotely activated to simulate an intruder.

  10. Field Test and Performance Verification: Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Hybrid System Installed in a School - Final Report: Phase 4A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, J

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results of a field verification pilot site investigation that involved the installation of a hybrid integrated active desiccant/vapor-compression rooftop heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) unit at an elementary school in the Atlanta Georgia area. For years, the school had experienced serious humidity and indoor air quality (IAQ) problems that had resulted in occupant complaints and microbial (mold) remediation. The outdoor air louvers of the original HVAC units had been closed in an attempt to improve humidity control within the space. The existing vapor compression variable air volume system was replaced by the integrated active desiccant rooftop (IADR) system that was described in detail in an Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report published in 2004 (Fischer and Sand 2004). The IADR system and all space conditions have been monitored remotely for more than a year. The hybrid system was able to maintain both the space temperature and humidity as desired while delivering the outdoor air ventilation rate required by American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Standard 62. The performance level of the IADR unit and the overall system energy efficiency was measured and found to be very high. A comprehensive IAQ investigation was completed by the Georgia Tech Research Institute before and after the system retrofit. Before-and-after data resulting from this investigation confirmed a significant improvement in IAQ, humidity control, and occupant comfort. These observations were reported by building occupants and are echoed in a letter to ORNL from the school district energy manager. The IADR system was easily retrofitted in place of the original rooftop system using a custom curb adapter. All work was completed in-house by the school's maintenance staff over one weekend. A subsequent cost analysis completed for the school district by the design engineer of record concluded that the IADR system being investigated was actually less expensive to install than other less-efficient options, most of which were unable to deliver the required ventilation while maintaining the desired space humidity levels.

  11. LABORATORY OPTIMIZATION TESTS OF TECHNETIUM DECONTAMINATION OF HANFORD WASTE TREATMENT PLANT LOW ACTIVITY WASTE OFF-GAS CONDENSATE SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, K.; Nash, C.; McCabe, D.

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task examines the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in greatest abundance in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are low but are also expected to be in measurable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. These are present due to their partial volatility and some entrainment in the off-gas system. This report discusses results of optimized {sup 99}Tc decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc. Testing focused on minimizing the quantity of sorbents/reactants added, and minimizing mixing time to reach the decontamination targets in this simulant formulation. Stannous chloride and ferrous sulfate were tested as reducing agents to determine the minimum needed to convert soluble pertechnetate to the insoluble technetium dioxide. The reducing agents were tried with and without sorbents.

  12. Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

  13. Pilot-scale treatability testing -- Recycle, reuse, and disposal of materials from decontamination and decommissioning activities: Soda blasting demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the nature and magnitude of decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) obligations at its sites. With disposal costs rising and available storage facilities decreasing, DOE is exploring and implementing new waste minimizing D and D techniques. Technology demonstrations are being conducted by LMES at a DOE gaseous diffusion processing plant, the K-25 Site, in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The gaseous diffusion process employed at Oak Ridge separated uranium-235 from uranium ore for use in atomic weapons and commercial reactors. These activities contaminated concrete and other surfaces within the plant with uranium, technetium, and other constituents. The objective of current K-25 D and D research is to make available cost-effective and energy-efficient techniques to advance remediation and waste management methods at the K-25 Site and other DOE sites. To support this objective, O`Brien and Gere tested a decontamination system on K-25 Site concrete and steel surfaces contaminated with radioactive and hazardous waste. A scouring system has been developed that removes fixed hazardous and radioactive surface contamination and minimizes residual waste. This system utilizes an abrasive sodium bicarbonate medium that is projected at contaminated surfaces. It mechanically removes surface contamination while leaving the surface intact. Blasting residuals are captured and dissolved in water and treated using physical/chemical processes. Pilot-scale testing of this soda blasting system and bench and pilot-scale treatment of the generated residuals were conducted from December 1993 to September 1994.

  14. Promulgating Nuclear Safety Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Applies to all Nuclear Safety Requirements Adopted by the Department to Govern the Conduct of its Nuclear Activities. Cancels DOE P 410.1. Canceled by DOE N 251.85.

  15. Development And Initial Testing Of Off-Gas Recycle Liquid From The WTP Low Activity Waste Vitrification Process - 14333

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.; Nash, Charles A.; Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Adamson, Duane J.; Crawford, Charles L.; Morse, Megan M.

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) process flow was designed to pre-treat feed from the Hanford tank farms, separate it into a High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW) fraction and vitrify each fraction in separate facilities. Vitrification of the waste generates an aqueous condensate stream from the off-gas processes. This stream originates from two off-gas treatment unit operations, the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrospray Precipitator (WESP). Currently, the baseline plan for disposition of the stream from the LAW melter is to recycle it to the Pretreatment facility where it gets evaporated and processed into the LAW melter again. If the Pretreatment facility is not available, the baseline disposition pathway is not viable. Additionally, some components in the stream are volatile at melter temperatures, thereby accumulating to high concentrations in the scrubbed stream. It would be highly beneficial to divert this stream to an alternate disposition path to alleviate the close-coupled operation of the LAW vitrification and Pretreatment facilities, and to improve long-term throughput and efficiency of the WTP system. In order to determine an alternate disposition path for the LAW SBS/WESP Recycle stream, a range of options are being studied. A simulant of the LAW Off-Gas Condensate was developed, based on the projected composition of this stream, and comparison with pilot-scale testing. The primary radionuclide that vaporizes and accumulates in the stream is Tc-99, but small amounts of several other radionuclides are also projected to be present in this stream. The processes being investigated for managing this stream includes evaporation and radionuclide removal via precipitation and adsorption. During evaporation, it is of interest to investigate the formation of insoluble solids to avoid scaling and plugging of equipment. Key parameters for radionuclide removal include identifying effective precipitation or ion adsorption chemicals, solid-liquid separation methods, and achievable decontamination factors. Results of the radionuclide removal testing indicate that the radionuclides, including Tc-99, can be removed with inorganic sorbents and precipitating agents. Evaporation test results indicate that the simulant can be evaporated to fairly high concentration prior to formation of appreciable solids, but corrosion has not yet been examined.

  16. A Proposed Framework For Planning Deactivation And Decommissioning Engineering And Design Activities To Meet The Requirements Of DOE Order 413.3A, Program And Project Management For The Acquisition Of Capital Assets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santos, J.K.; Gladden, J.B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC (United States); Szilagyi, A.P. [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Washington, DC (United States); Negin, C.; Urland, C. [Project Enhancement Corporation, Germantown, MD (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper applies the DOE O 413.3A Design/Engineering requirements to Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) projects. A list of 41 activities for which Design/Engineering is generally required and which are relevant and common to many D and D projects was generated. For several activities in this list, examples of the level of development and/or types of deliverables that might be expected at the completion of the conceptual, preliminary and final project design phases described in the Order are provided. This paper also discusses tailoring the application of the Order to a facility based on the complexity of the facility's engineered systems and the hazards existing in the facility. DOE D and D projects are expected to meet the requirements of DOE O 413.3A. For D and D engineering and design activities only, this paper provides guidance for applying these requirements to the Order. A list of 41 typical D and D engineering and design activities has been provided. The Order divides projects into conceptual, preliminary and final design phases. Development of each of the 41 activities can also be organized in conceptual, preliminary and final levels. In general, at the conceptual level project engineers should be determining the what (i.e., the scope) for each activity. At the preliminary level they should be resolving how the activity will be accomplished. At the final level, all the engineering and design details for the activity should be completed so that the activity is ready to implement in the field. It may not be appropriate that development of each individual activity correspond to the current phase of the project. For example, at CD-2 (end of the preliminary design phase) not all activities need be developed to the same level of detail. Only those that are truly significant to the project baseline must be developed to the level of detail necessary to create a reliable project baseline. (authors)

  17. Test procedure for boxed waste assay system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachter, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This document, prepared by Los Alamos National Laboratory`s NMT-4 group, details the test methodology and requirements for Acceptance/Qualification testing of a Boxed Waste Assay System (BWAS) designed and constructed by Pajarito Scientific Corporation. Testing of the BWAS at the Plutonium Facility (TA55) at Los Alamos National Laboratory will be performed to ascertain system adherence to procurement specification requirements. The test program shall include demonstration of conveyor handling capabilities, gamma ray energy analysis, and imaging passive/active neutron accuracy and sensitivity. Integral to these functions is the system`s embedded operating and data reduction software.

  18. Environmental Assessment: Geothermal Energy Geopressure Subprogram. Gulf Coast Well Drilling and Testing Activity (Frio, Wilcox, and Tuscaloosa Formations, Texas and Louisiana)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program to evaluate the feasibility of developing the geothermal-geopressured energy resources of the Louisiana-Texas Gulf Coast. As part of this effort, DOE is contracting for the drilling of design wells to define the nature and extent of the geopressure resource. At each of several sites, one deep well (4000-6400 m) will be drilled and flow tested. One or more shallow wells will also be drilled to dispose of geopressured brines. Each site will require about 2 ha (5 acres) of land. Construction and initial flow testing will take approximately one year. If initial flow testing is successful, a continuous one-year duration flow test will take place at a rate of up to 6400 m{sup 3} (40,000 bbl) per day. Extensive tests will be conducted on the physical and chemical composition of the fluids, on their temperature and flow rate, on fluid disposal techniques, and on the reliability and performance of equipment. Each project will require a maximum of three years to complete drilling, testing, and site restoration.

  19. STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

  20. The Resonating Arm Exerciser: design and pilot testing of a mechanically passive rehabilitation device that mimics robotic active assistance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zondervan, Daniel K; Palafox, Lorena; Hernandez, Jorge; Reinkensmeyer, David J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M: Electromechanical and robot-assisted arm training forthat provides robot-like assistance for active arm trainingRobots allow a variety of forms of active Page 2 of 12 assistance to be provided for arm

  1. Laboratory Scoping Tests Of Decontamination Of Hanford Waste Treatment Plant Low Activity Waste Off-Gas Condensate Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor-Pashow, Kathryn M.; Nash, Charles A.; Crawford, Charles L.; McCabe, Daniel J.; Wilmarth, William R.

    2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Low Activity Waste (LAW) vitrification facility will generate an aqueous condensate recycle stream (LAW Off-Gas Condensate) from the off-gas system. The baseline plan for disposition of this stream is to send it to the WTP Pretreatment Facility, where it will be blended with LAW, concentrated by evaporation and recycled to the LAW vitrification facility again. Alternate disposition of this stream would eliminate recycling of problematic components, and would enable de-coupled operation of the LAW melter and the Pretreatment Facilities. Eliminating this stream from recycling within WTP would also decrease the LAW vitrification mission duration and quantity of glass waste. This LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream contains components that are volatile at melter temperatures and are problematic for the glass waste form. Because this stream recycles within WTP, these components accumulate in the Condensate stream, exacerbating their impact on the number of LAW glass containers that must be produced. Approximately 32% of the sodium in Supplemental LAW comes from glass formers used to make the extra glass to dilute the halides to acceptable concentrations in the LAW glass, and diverting the stream reduces the halides in the recycled Condensate and is a key outcome of this work. Additionally, under possible scenarios where the LAW vitrification facility commences operation prior to the WTP Pretreatment facility, identifying a disposition path becomes vitally important. This task seeks to examine the potential treatment of this stream to remove radionuclides and subsequently disposition the decontaminated stream elsewhere, such as the Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF), for example. The treatment process envisioned is very similar to that used for the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) that has been operating for years at the Savannah River Site (SRS), and focuses on using mature radionuclide removal technologies that are also compatible with longterm tank storage and immobilization methods. For this new application, testing is needed to demonstrate acceptable treatment sorbents and precipitating agents and measure decontamination factors for additional radionuclides in this unique waste stream. The origin of this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream will be the liquids from the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS) and the Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP) from the LAW melter off-gas system. The stream is expected to be a dilute salt solution with near neutral pH, and will likely contain some insoluble solids from melter carryover. The soluble components are expected to be mostly sodium and ammonium salts of nitrate, chloride, and fluoride. This stream has not been generated yet and will not be available until the WTP begins operation, but a simulant has been produced based on models, calculations, and comparison with pilot-scale tests. One of the radionuclides that is volatile and expected to be in high concentration in this LAW Off-Gas Condensate stream is Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc). Technetium will not be removed from the aqueous waste in the Hanford WTP, and will primarily end up immobilized in the LAW glass by repeated recycle of the off-gas condensate into the LAW melter. Other radionuclides that are also expected to be in appreciable concentration in the LAW Off-Gas Condensate are {sup 129}I, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 241}Am. This report discusses results of preliminary radionuclide decontamination testing of the simulant. Testing examined use of Monosodium Titanate (MST) to remove {sup 90}Sr and actinides, inorganic reducing agents for {sup 99}Tc, and zeolites for {sup 137}Cs. Test results indicate that excellent removal of {sup 99}Tc was achieved using Sn(II)Cl{sub 2} as a reductant, coupled with sorption onto hydroxyapatite, even in the presence of air and at room temperature. This process was very effective at neutral pH, with a Decontamination Factor (DF) >577 in two hours. It was less effective at alkaline pH. Conversely, removal of the cesium was more effective at alka

  2. Colorado stride (COSTRIDE): testing genetic and physiological moderators of response to an intervention to increase physical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Angela D; Magnan, Renee E; Hooper, Ann E; Ciccolo, Joseph T; Marcus, Bess; Hutchison, Kent E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    details University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309,data and rationale for Colorado STRIDE. J Behav Med 2013,as: Bryan et al. : Colorado stride (COSTRIDE): testing

  3. Competition Requirements

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy has delegated this authority for the appointment of the agency and contracting activity Advocates to the SPEs. The duties and responsibilities of agency and...

  4. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  5. Mechanism and Site Requirements for Activation and Chemical Conversion of Methane on Supported Pt Clusters and Turnover Rate Comparisons among Noble Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iglesia, Enrique

    decomposition, and water-gas shift reactions. Reforming rates are exclusively limited by C-H bond activation, indicating that CO2 activation is quasi-equilibrated and kinetically irrelevant. Binomial water, 2003; In Final Form: January 21, 2004 Isotopic tracer and kinetic studies are used to probe

  6. Quality Assurance Program Application for the Component Test Capability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephanin L. Austad

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents the application of quality requirements to Component Test Capability (CTC) Project activities for each CTC alternative. Four alternatives are considered for quality program application: do nothing, vendor testing, existing testing facility modification, and Component Test Facility. It also describes the advantages and disadvantages of using the existing Next Generation Nuclear Plant Quality Program Plan with CTC modifications versus a stand-alone CTC Quality Program Plan.

  7. Proposed design requirements for high-integrity containers used to store, transport, and dispose of high-specific-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, M.G.; Allen, G.C.; Pope, R.B.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops proposed design requirements for high integrity containers used to store, transport and/or dispose of high-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II. The wastes considered are the dewatered resins produced by the EPICOR II waste treatment system used to clean-up the auxiliary building water. The radioactivity level of some of these EPICOR II liners is 1300 curies per container. These wastes may be disposed of in an intermediate depth burial (10 to 20 meter depth) facility. The proposed container design requirements are directed to ensure isolation of the waste and protection of the public health and safety.

  8. Estradiol-Induced Object Memory Consolidation in Middle-Aged Female Mice Requires Dorsal Hippocampal Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase and Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Michael C.

    We previously demonstrated that dorsal hippocampal extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation is necessary for 17?[beta]-estradiol (E2[E subscript 2]) to enhance novel object recognition in young ovariectomized ...

  9. En beskrivning av manuellt test.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artursson Wissa, Ulrika

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ?? Test is an area in system development. Test can be performed manually or automated. Test activities can be supported by Word documents and Excel… (more)

  10. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  11. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Hyeok-Ran [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki Won [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Konkuk University, 1 Hwayang-dong, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Dong, Zigang [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States)] [Hormel Institute, University of Minnesota, 801 16th Avenue NE, Austin, MN 55912 (United States); Lee, Kyung Bok [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sang-Muk, E-mail: sangmuk_oh@konyang.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, Konyang University, 685 Gasuwon-dong, Seo-gu, Daejeon 302-718 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-{kappa}B activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-{kappa}B-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  12. HARD X-RAY LAGS IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: TESTING THE DISTANT REVERBERATION HYPOTHESIS WITH NGC 6814

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A. [Cahill Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)] [Cahill Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Cackett, E. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI 48201 (United States); Uttley, P. [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands)] [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, Postbus 94249, NL-1090 GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge, CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Miller, J. M.; Reis, R. C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an X-ray spectral and temporal analysis of the variable active galaxy NGC 6814, observed with Suzaku during 2011 November. Remarkably, the X-ray spectrum shows no evidence for the soft excess commonly observed amongst other active galaxies, despite its relatively low level of obscuration, and is dominated across the whole Suzaku bandpass by the intrinsic powerlaw-like continuum. Despite this, we clearly detect the presence of a low-frequency hard lag of ?1600 s between the 0.5-2.0 and 2.0-5.0 keV energy bands at greater than 6? significance, similar to those reported in the literature for a variety of other active galactic nuclei (AGNs). At these energies, any additional emission from, e.g., a very weak, undetected soft excess, or from distant reflection must contribute less than 3% of the observed countrates (at 90% confidence). Given the lack of any significant continuum emission component other than the powerlaw, we can rule out models that invoke distant reprocessing for the observed lag behavior, which must instead be associated with this continuum emission. These results are fully consistent with a propagating fluctuation origin for the low-frequency hard lags, and with the interpretation of the high-frequency soft lags—a common feature seen in the highest quality AGN data with strong soft excesses—as reverberation from the inner accretion disk.

  13. Activity testing of alveolar macrophages and changes in surfactant phospholipids after irradiation in bronchoalveolar lavage: Experimental and clinical data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinberg, F.; Rehn, B.; Kraus, R.; Quabeck, K.; Bruch, J.; Beelen, D.W.; Schaefer, U.W.; Streffer, C. (Univ. Clinics, Essen (Germany))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents results of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) after irradiation to the lungs in mice as well as clinical data. The number of BAL cells, mainly macrophages, lymphocytes, and granulocytes, changed in a time-dependent manner. The phagocytic activity of the macrophages measured as the phagocytosis of microbeads and measured as the esterase activity also showed a strong time-dependent increase during the acute phase up to 21 days after irradiation. The contents of surfactant phospholipids (SF) and sphingomyelin (SPH; as a parameter for cell death) were quantified by HPLC. Both were significantly changed between day 2 and 21 after irradiation. Three BALs of a patient with idiopathic interstitial pneumonitis, who had received an allogenic bone marrow graft after total body irradiation with 10 Gy, showed similar effects in the cellular and surfactant parameters. These data indicate that there are positive interactions between the number of different BAL cells, macrophage activity, and SF and SPH content in the preclinical model of the mouse as well as in the clinical situation after lung irradiation. 30 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Baseline LAW Glass Formulation Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A. [USDOE Office of River Protection, Richland, WA (United States); Mooers, Cavin [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Bazemore, Gina [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Pegg, Ian L. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Hight, Kenneth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Lai, Shan Tao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Buechele, Andrew [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Rielley, Elizabeth [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Gan, Hao [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Muller, Isabelle S. [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab; Cecil, Richard [The Catholic University of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The major objective of the baseline glass formulation work was to develop and select glass formulations that are compliant with contractual and processing requirements for each of the LAW waste streams. Other objectives of the work included preparation and characterization of glasses with respect to the properties of interest, optimization of sulfate loading in the glasses, evaluation of ability to achieve waste loading limits, testing to demonstrate compatibility of glass melts with melter materials of construction, development of glass formulations to support ILAW qualification activities, and identification of glass formulation issues with respect to contract specifications and processing requirements.

  15. Phase Startup Initiative Phases 3 and 4 Test Plan and Test Specification ( OCRWM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PAJUNEN, A.L.; LANGEVIN, M.J.

    2000-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project facilities is continuing per the Level III Baseline Schedule, and installation of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) and Integrated Water Treatment System (IWTS) in K West Basin is now complete. In order to accelerate the project, a phased start up strategy to initiate testing of the FRS and IWTS early in the overall project schedule was proposed (Williams 1999). Wilkinson (1999) expands the definition of the original proposal into four functional testing phases of the Phased Startup Initiative (PSI). Phases 1 and 2 are based on performing functional tests using dummy fuel. This test plan provides overall guidance for Phase 3 and 4 tests, which are performed using actual irradiated N fuel assemblies. The overall objective of the Phase 3 and 4 testing is to verify how the FRS and IWTS respond while processing actual fuel. Conducting these tests early in the project schedule will allow identification and resolution of equipment and process problems before they become activities on the start-up critical path. The specific objectives of this test plan are to: Define the Phase 3 and 4 test scope for the FRS and IWTS; Provide detailed test requirements that can be used to write the specific test procedures; Define data required and measurements to be taken. Where existing methods to obtain these do not exist, enough detail will be provided to define required additional equipment; and Define specific test objectives and acceptance criteria.

  16. Summary of Construction Activities and Results from Six Initial Accelerated Pavement Tests Conducted on Asphalt Concrete Pavement Section for Modified-Binder Overlay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bejarano, Manuel O.; Morton, Bruce S.; Scheffy, Clark

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Testing on the Asphalt Concrete FWD testing was conducted onin asphalt concrete modulus after HVS testing for Sectionsconcrete pavements under accelerated pavement testing. This

  17. Practical Experiences from the USE of a Method for Active Functional Tests and Optimization of Coil Energy Recovery Loop Systems in AHUs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eriksson, J.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PRACTICAL EXPERIENCES FROM THE USE OF A METHOD FOR ACTIVE FUNCTIONAL TESTS AND OPTIMIZATION OF COIL ENERGY RECOVERY LOOP SYSTEMS IN AHUS. J?rgen Eriksson* * ?F-Installation AB, Box 1551 SE 401 51 G?teborg, Sweden. Summary A method...-commissioning, ventilation, energy, efficiency, EES INTRODUCTION The reason to study coil energy recovery loop systems is that they are very common in Sweden and mainly used in cases with high air flow rates such as in hospitals and pharmaceutical industries. The heat...

  18. Defect Prevention and Detection in Software for Automated Test Equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Bean

    2006-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Software for automated test equipment can be tedious and monotonous making it just as error-prone as other software. Active defect prevention and detection are also important for test applications. Incomplete or unclear requirements, a cryptic syntax used for some test applications—especially script-based test sets, variability in syntax or structure, and changing requirements are among the problems encountered in one tester. Such problems are common to all software but can be particularly problematic in test equipment software intended to test another product. Each of these issues increases the probability of error injection during test application development. This report describes a test application development tool designed to address these issues and others for a particular piece of test equipment. By addressing these problems in the development environment, the tool has powerful built-in defect prevention and detection capabilities. Regular expressions are widely used in the development tool as a means of formally defining test equipment requirements for the test application and verifying conformance to those requirements. A novel means of using regular expressions to perform range checking was developed. A reduction in rework and increased productivity are the results. These capabilities are described along with lessons learned and their applicability to other test equipment software. The test application development tool, or “application builder”, is known as the PT3800 AM Creation, Revision and Archiving Tool (PACRAT).

  19. Test of electron beam technology on Savannah River Laboratory low-activity aqueous waste for destruction of benzene, benzene derivatives, and bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougal, R.A. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High energy radiation was studied as a means for destroying hazardous organic chemical wastes. Tests were conducted at bench scale with a {sup 60}Co source, and at full scale (387 l/min) with a 1.5 MV electron beam source. Bench scale tests for both benzene and phenol included 32 permutations of water quality factors. For some water qualities, as much as 99.99% of benzene or 90% of phenol were removed by 775 krads of {sup 60}Co irradiation. Full scale testing for destruction of benzene in a simulated waste-water mix showed loss of 97% of benzene following an 800 krad dose and 88% following a 500 krad dose. At these loss rates, approximately 5 Mrad of electron beam irradiation is required to reduce concentrations from 100 g/l to drinking water quality (5 {mu}g/l). Since many waste streams are also inhabited by bacterial populations which may affect filtering operations, the effect of irradiation on those populations was also studied. {sup 60}Co and electron beam irradiation were both lethal to the bacteria studied at irradiation levels far lower than were necessary to remove organic contaminants.

  20. NEVADA TEST SITE WASTE ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, NEVADA SITE OFFICE

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) waste acceptance criteria (WAC). The WAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive and mixed waste for disposal. Mixed waste generated within the State of Nevada by NNSA/NSO activities is accepted for disposal. It includes requirements for the generator waste certification program, characterization, traceability, waste form, packaging, and transfer. The criteria apply to radioactive waste received at the Nevada Test Site Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site for storage or disposal.

  1. In-service Inspection Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density and Size Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.; Norris, Wallace

    2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressurized thermal shock (PTS) events are system transients in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) in which there is a rapid operating temperature cool-down that results in cold vessel temperatures with or without repressurization of the vessel. The rapid cooling of the inside surface of the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) causes thermal stresses that can combine with stresses caused by high pressure. The aggregate effect of these stresses is an increase in the potential for fracture if a pre-existing flaw is present in a material susceptible to brittle failure. The ferritic, low alloy steel of the reactor vessel beltline adjacent to the core, where neutron radiation gradually embrittles the material over the lifetime of the plant, can be susceptible to brittle fracture. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), “Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events,” adopted on July 23, 1985, establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed a rule, §50.61a, published on January 4, 2010, entitled “Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events” (75 FR 13). Use of the new rule by licensees is optional. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants. These analyses are intended to determine if the actual flaw density and size distribution in the licensee’s reactor vessel beltline welds are bounded by the flaw density and size distribution values used in the PTS technical basis. Under a contract with the NRC, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been working on a program to assess the ability of current inservice inspection (ISI)-ultrasonic testing (UT) techniques, as qualified through ASME Code, Appendix VIII, Supplements 4 and 6, to detect small fabrication or inservice-induced flaws located in RPV welds and adjacent base materials. As part of this effort, the investigators have pursued an evaluation, based on the available information, of the capability of UT to provide flaw density/distribution inputs for making RPV weld assessments in accordance with §50.61a. This paper presents the results of an evaluation of data from the 1993 Browns Ferry Nuclear Plant, Unit 3, Spirit of Appendix VIII reactor vessel examination, a comparison of the flaw density/distribution from this data with the distribution in §50.61a, possible reasons for differences, and plans and recommendations for further work in this area.

  2. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  3. RERTR program activities related to the development and application of new LEU fuels. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor; low-enriched uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travelli, A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The statue of the U.S. Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program is reviewed. After a brief outline of RERTR Program objectives and goals, program accomplishments are discussed with emphasis on the development, demonstration and application of new LEU fuels. Most program activities have proceeded as planned, and a combination of two silicide fuels (U/sub 3/Si/sub 2/-Al and U/sub 3/Si-Al) holds excellent promise for achieving the long-term program goals. Current plans and schedules project the uranium density of qualified RERTR fuels for plate-type reactors to grow by approximately 1 g U/cm/sup 3/ each year, from the current 1.7 g U/cm/sup 3/ to the 7.0 g U/cm/sup 3/ which will be reached in late 1988. The technical needs of research and test reactors for HEU exports are also forecasted to undergo a gradual but dramatic decline in the coming years.

  4. Test profiles for stationary energy storage applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, P.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cole, J.F. [International Lead Zinc Research Organization, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Taylor, P.A. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaluation of battery and other energy storage technologies for stationary uses is progressing rapidly toward application-specific testing that uses computer-based data acquisition and control equipment, active electronic loads and power supplies, and customized software, to enable sophisticated test regimes that simulate actual use conditions. These simulated-use tests provide more accurate performance and life evaluations than simple constant resistance or current testing regimes. Some of the tests use stepped constant-power charge and discharge regimes to simulate conditions created by electric utility applications such as frequency regulation and spinning reserve. Other test profiles under development simulate conditions for the energy storage component of Remote Area Power Supplies (RAPS) that include renewable and/or fossil-fueled generators. Various RAPS applications have unique sets of service conditions that require specialized test profiles. However, almost all RAPS tests and many tests that represent other stationary applications need to simulate significant time periods during which storage devices operate at low-to-medium states-of-charge without full recharge. Consideration of these and similar issues in simulated-use test regimes is necessary to effectively predict the responses of the various types of batteries in specific stationary applications. This paper describes existing and evolving stationary applications for energy storage technologies and test regimes that are designed to simulate them. The paper also discusses efforts to develop international testing standards.

  5. Supervisory Training Requirements | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Requirements The Office of Learning and Workforce Development has developed an inventory of training and developmental activities that will meet the supervisory training...

  6. Graduation Requirements and Procedures Graduation Requirements and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /Degree Audit (DARS) or contact the department offering the major. Graduation Average Requirement The minimum

  7. Faculty Pride Pages (login required) RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eustice, Ryan

    is located in the North Campus Recreation Building. FACILITIES & RESOURCES Mail Environmental Environmental-2125 Mailboxes for Environmental graduate students are located in EWRE Graduate Student Lounge, room 173 EWRE of Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2340 G. G. Brown Building 2350 Hayward Ann Arbor, MI 48109

  8. LEGACY MANAGEMENT REQUIRES INFORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL, C.W.; HILDEBRAND, R.D.

    2006-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ''Legacy Management Requires Information'' describes the goal(s) of the US Department of Energy's Office of Legacy Management (LM) relative to maintaining critical records and the way those goals are being addressed at Hanford. The paper discusses the current practices for document control, as well as the use of modern databases for both storing and accessing the data to support cleanup decisions. In addition to the information goals of LM, the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, known as the ''Tri-Party Agreement'' (TPA) is one of the main drivers in documentation and data management. The TPA, which specifies discrete milestones for cleaning up the Hanford Site, is a legally binding agreement among the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). The TPA requires that DOE provide the lead regulatory agency with the results of analytical laboratory and non-laboratory tests/readings to help guide them in making decisions. The Agreement also calls for each signatory to preserve--for at least ten years after the Agreement has ended--all of the records in its or its contractors, possession related to sampling, analysis, investigations, and monitoring conducted. The tools used at Hanford to meet TPA requirements are also the tools that can satisfy the needs of LM.

  9. Managing System of Systems Requirements with a Requirements Screening Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald R. Barden

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figuring out an effective and efficient way to manage not only your Requirement’s Baseline, but also the development of all your individual requirements during a Program’s/Project’s Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages can be both daunting and difficult. This is especially so when you are dealing with a complex and large System of Systems (SoS) Program with potentially thousands and thousands of Top Level Requirements as well as an equal number of lower level System, Subsystem and Configuration Item requirements that need to be managed. This task is made even more overwhelming when you have to add in integration with multiple requirements’ development teams (e.g., Integrated Product Development Teams (IPTs)) and/or numerous System/Subsystem Design Teams. One solution for tackling this difficult activity on a recent large System of Systems Program was to develop and make use of a Requirements Screening Group (RSG). This group is essentially a Team made up of co-chairs from the various Stakeholders with an interest in the Program of record that are enabled and accountable for Requirements Development on the Program/Project. The RSG co-chairs, often with the help of individual support team, work together as a Program Board to monitor, make decisions on, and provide guidance on all Requirements Development activities during the Conceptual and Development Life Cycle Stages of a Program/Project. In addition, the RSG can establish and maintain the Requirements Baseline, monitor and enforce requirements traceability across the entire Program, and work with other elements of the Program/Project to ensure integration and coordination.

  10. DOE Underground-Coal-Conversion-Program field-test activities for 1979 and 1980. [Pricetown 1, Hoe Creek 3, Hanna IV, and SDB 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartke, T.C.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the US Department of Energy's Underground-Coal-Conversion program, four field tests were completed in 1979 and preparations were begun in 1980 for two additional field tests to be operated in 1981. The Laramie Energy Technology Center (LETC) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) completed Hanna IV, an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) completed Pricetown 1, an air gasification test in West Virginia bituminous coal. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) completed Hoe Creek 3, a steam-oxygen gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal. Gulf Research and Development Co. completed Steeply Dipping Beds (SDB) Test 1, primarily an air gasification test in Wyoming subbituminous coal and the first SDB test in the US. In 1980, Gulf R and D Co. began preparation of SDB Test 2, scheduled for operation in the fall of 1981. The DOE project teams at LETC, METC, LLNL, and SNL, in association with the Washington Irrigation and Development Co. (WIDCo), Washington Water Power (WWP), and the State of Washington, are preparing a field test site in the Centralia-Chehalis coal district of Washington. A series of large coal block tests will be completed prior to the field test, scheduled for operation in 1982 or 1983. This field test will utilize a directionally drilled link and steam-oxygen gasification system. This paper summarizes the results of the four recently completed field tests and the plans for additional tests.

  11. CISC 327 -Fall 2014 ! Course Project Assignment #1 -Front End Requirements!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordy, James R.

    represent those requirements as a set of requirements tests. The basic idea is to analyze the requirements, and create a test case for each piece. We will study this more in class.! !Create and organize a complete set of requirements tests for the Front End of Quinterac, to test for every required behaviour (of the Front End only

  12. Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (327 Building)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kammenzind, D.E.

    1997-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) is the total list of the Environment, Safety and Health (ES and H) requirements to be implemented by a site, facility, or activity. These requirements are appropriate to the life cycle phase to achieve an adequate level of protection for worker and public health and safety, and the environment during design, construction, operation, decontamination and decommissioning, and environmental restoration. S/RlDs are living documents, to be revised appropriately based on change in the site`s or facility`s mission or configuration, a change in the facility`s life cycle phase, or a change to the applicable standards/requirements. S/RIDs encompass health and safety, environmental, and safety related safeguards and security (S and S) standards/requirements related to the functional areas listed in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Environment, Safety and Health Configuration Guide. The Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) Contract S/RID contains standards/requirements, applicable to FDH and FDH subcontractors, necessary for safe operation of Project Hanford Management Contract (PHMC) facilities, that are not the direct responsibility of the facility manager (e.g., a site-wide fire department). Facility S/RIDs contain standards/requirements applicable to a specific facility that are the direct responsibility of the facility manager. S/RlDs are prepared by those responsible for managing the operation of facilities or the conduct of activities that present a potential threat to the health and safety of workers, public, or the environment, including: Hazard Category 1 and 2 nuclear facilities and activities, as defined in DOE 5480.23. Selected Hazard Category 3 nuclear, and Low Hazard non-nuclear facilities and activities, as agreed upon by RL. The Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PTL) S/RID contains standards/ requirements that are necessary for safe operation of the PTL facility, and other building/areas that are the direct responsibility of the specific facility manager. The specific DOE Orders, regulations, industry codes/standards, guidance documents and good industry practices that serve as the basis for each element/subelement are identified and aligned with each subelement.

  13. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program.

  14. CSCI 3060U/ENGR 3980U -Winter 2013 Course Project Assignment #1 -Front End Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradbury, Jeremy S.

    and in true XP fashion represent those requirements as a set of requirements tests. Create and organize a complete set of requirements tests for the Front End of the Ticket Selling Service, to test for every required behaviour. Do not write any programs yet. Each test should be a complete test session input stream

  15. Coaxial test fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Praeg, W.F.

    1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention pertains to arrangements for performing electrical tests on contact material samples, and in particular for testing contact material test samples in an evacuated environment under high current loads. Frequently, it is desirable in developing high-current separable contact material, to have at least a preliminary analysis of selected candidate conductor materials. Testing of material samples will hopefully identify materials unsuitable for high current electrical contact without requiring incorporation of the materials into a completed and oftentimes complex structure.

  16. SPECTR System Operational Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.H. Landman Jr.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report overviews installation of the Small Pressure Cycling Test Rig (SPECTR) and documents the system operational testing performed to demonstrate that it meets the requirements for operations. The system operational testing involved operation of the furnace system to the design conditions and demonstration of the test article gas supply system using a simulated test article. The furnace and test article systems were demonstrated to meet the design requirements for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Therefore, the system is deemed acceptable and is ready for actual test article testing.

  17. Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EPA'S Clean Air Act Requirements: Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Emissions Rulemaking Reid J. Rosnick requirements for operating uranium mill tailings (Subpart W) Status update on Subpart W activities Outreach/Communications #12;3 EPA Regulatory Requirements for Operating Uranium Mill Tailings (Clean Air Act) · 40 CFR 61

  18. OM Code Requirements For MOVs -- OMN-1 and Appendix III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin G. DeWall

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose or scope of the ASME OM Code is to establish the requirements for pre-service and in-service testing of nuclear power plant components to assess their operational readiness. For MOVs this includes those that perform a specific function in shutting down a reactor to the safe shutdown condition, maintaining the safe shutdown condition, and mitigating the consequences of an accident. This paper will present a brief history of industry and regulatory activities related to MOVs and the development of Code requirements to address weaknesses in earlier versions of the OM Code. The paper will discuss the MOV requirements contained in the 2009 version of ASME OM Code, specifically Mandatory Appendix III and OMN-1, Revision 1.

  19. DOE Testing Reveals Samsung Refrigerator Does Not Meet Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Testing Reveals Samsung Refrigerator Does Not Meet Energy Star Requirements DOE Testing Reveals Samsung Refrigerator Does Not Meet Energy Star Requirements March 16, 2010 - 4:28pm...

  20. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  1. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  2. Evaluation on the Feasibility of Using Ultrasonic Testing of Reactor Pressure Vessel Welds for Assessing Flaw Density/Distribution per 10 CFR 50.61a, Alternate Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection Against Pressurized Thermal Shock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical letter report provides the status of an assessment undertaken by PNNL at the request of the NRC to verify the capability of periodic ASME-required volumetric examinations of reactor vessels to characterize the density and distribution of flaws of interest for applying §50.61a on a plant-by-plant basis. The PTS rule, described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Section 50.61 (§50.61), "Fracture Toughness Requirements for Protection against Pressurized Thermal Shock Events," establishes screening criteria to ensure that the potential for a reactor vessel to fail due to a PTS event is deemed to be acceptably low. Recently, the NRC completed a research program that concluded that the risk of through-wall cracking due to a PTS event is much lower than previously estimated. The NRC subsequently developed and promulgated an alternate PTS rule, §50.61a, that can be implemented by PWR licensees. The §50.61a rule differs from §50.61 in that it requires licensees who choose to follow this alternate method to analyze the results from periodic volumetric examinations required by the ASME Code, Section XI, Rules for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Nuclear Power Plants.

  3. NREL Battery Thermal and Life Test Facility (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, M.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes NREL's Battery Thermal Test Facility and identifies test requirements and equipment and planned upgrades to the facility.

  4. The requirements discovery process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahill, A.T. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States). Systems and Industrial Engineering; Dean, F.F. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost and schedule overruns are often caused by poor requirements that are produced by people who do not understand the requirement process. This paper provides a high-level overview of the requirements discovery process.

  5. Test-Architecture Optimization and Test Scheduling for SOCs with Core-Level Expansion of Compressed Test Patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    is resulting in high test times and excessive tester memory requirements. To reduce both test time and test International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors predicted that test data volume and test time will grow 30x and wrappers for core access can be combined with test scheduling at SOC level to reduce test time. The recent

  6. Test Series 2. 3 detailed test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Test Series 2.3 is chronologically the second of the five sub-series of tests which comprise Test Series 2, the second major Test Series as part of the combustion research phase to be carried out at the Grimethorpe Experimental Pressurised Fluidised Bed Combustion Facility. Test Series 2.3 will consist of 700 data gathering hours which is expected to require some 1035 coal burning hours. The tests will be performed using US supplied coal and dolomite. This will be the first major series of tests on the Facility with other than the UK datum coal and dolomite. The document summarises the background to the facility and the experimental program. Described are modifications which have been made to the facility following Test Series 2.1 and a series of Screening Tests. Detailed test objectives are specified as are the test conditions for the experiments which comprise the test series. The test results will provide information on the effects of the bed temperature, excess air level, Ca/S ratio, number of coal feed lines, and combustion efficiency and sulphur retention. A significant aspect of the test series will be part load tests which will investigate the performance of the facility under conditions of turn down which simulate load following concepts specified for two combined cycle concepts, i.e., their CFCC combined cycle and a turbo charged combined cycle. The material test plan is also presented. The principal feature of the materials programme is the planned exposure of a set of static turbine blade specimens in a cascade test loop to the high temperature, high pressure flue gas. A schedule for the programme is presented as are contingency plans.

  7. Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order establishes the requirements and responsibilities for the DOE Federal Substance Abuse Testing Program which covers drug and alcohol testing. Cancels DOE O 3792.3 Chg 1.

  8. Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for transfer line SN-633 (241-AX-B to 241-AY-02A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hays, W.H.

    1998-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-633 transfer line by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP). This STEP encompasses all testing activities required to demonstrate compliance to the project design criteria as it relates to the addition of transfer line SN-633. The Project Design Specifications (PDS) identify the specific testing activities required for the Project. Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities), Factory Acceptance Tests (FATs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Acceptance Tests (CATs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). It should be noted that POTPs are not required for testing of the transfer line addition. The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

  9. Federal Biomass Activities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Biomass Activities Federal Biomass Activities Statutory and executive order requirements for Bioproducts and Biofuels federalbiomassactivities.pdf More Documents &...

  10. U.S. Department of Energy FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Federal Fleet Use of Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mindy Kirpatrick; J. E. Francfort

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Per Executive Order 13031, “Federal Alternative Fueled Vehicle Leadership,” the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity provided $998,300 in incremental funding to support the deployment of 220 electric vehicles in 36 Federal fleets. The 145 electric Ford Ranger pickups and 75 electric Chrysler EPIC (Electric Powered Interurban Commuter) minivans were operated in 14 states and the District of Columbia. The 220 vehicles were driven an estimated average of 700,000 miles annually. The annual estimated use of the 220 electric vehicles contributed to 39,000 fewer gallons of petroleum being used by Federal fleets and the reduction in emissions of 1,450 pounds of smog-forming pollution. Numerous attempts were made to obtain information from all 36 fleets. Information responses were received from 25 fleets (69% response rate), as some Federal fleet personnel that were originally involved with the Incremental Funding Project were transferred, retired, or simply could not be found. In addition, many of the Department of Defense fleets indicated that they were supporting operations in Iraq and unable to provide information for the foreseeable future. It should be noted that the opinions of the 25 fleets is based on operating 179 of the 220 electric vehicles (81% response rate). The data from the 25 fleets is summarized in this report. Twenty-two of the 25 fleets reported numerous problems with the vehicles, including mechanical, traction battery, and charging problems. Some of these problems, however, may have resulted from attempting to operate the vehicles beyond their capabilities. The majority of fleets reported that most of the vehicles were driven by numerous drivers each week, with most vehicles used for numerous trips per day. The vehicles were driven on average from 4 to 50 miles per day on a single charge. However, the majority of the fleets reported needing gasoline vehicles for missions beyond the capabilities of the electric vehicles, usually because of range limitations. Twelve fleets reported experiencing at least one charge depletion while driving, whereas nine fleets reported not having this problem. Twenty-four of the 25 fleets responded that the electric vehicles were easy to use and 22 fleets indicated that the payload was adequate. Thirteen fleets reported charging problems; eleven fleets reported no charging problems. Nine fleets reported the vehicles broke down while driving; 14 fleets reported no onroad breakdowns. Some of the breakdowns while driving, however, appear to include normal flat tires and idiot lights coming on. In spite of operation and charging problems, 59% of the fleets responded that they were satisfied, very satisfied, or extremely satisfied with the performance of the electric vehicles. As of September 2003, 74 of the electric vehicles were still being used and 107 had been returned to the manufacturers because the leases had concluded.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program -- Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity -- Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicle Charging Infrastructure Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevin Morrow; Donald Darner; James Francfort

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) are under evaluation by various stake holders to better understand their capability and potential benefits. PHEVs could allow users to significantly improve fuel economy over a standard HEV and in some cases, depending on daily driving requirements and vehicle design, have the ability to eliminate fuel consumption entirely for daily vehicle trips. The cost associated with providing charge infrastructure for PHEVs, along with the additional costs for the on-board power electronics and added battery requirements associated with PHEV technology will be a key factor in the success of PHEVs. This report analyzes the infrastructure requirements for PHEVs in single family residential, multi-family residential and commercial situations. Costs associated with this infrastructure are tabulated, providing an estimate of the infrastructure costs associated with PHEV deployment.

  12. Material Testing of Coated Alloys in a Syngas Combustion Environment Year 6 - Activity 1.13 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, Michael

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modifications were made to the inlet of the existing Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) thermal oxidizer to accommodate side-by-side coupon holders for exposure testing. Two 5-day tests with over 200 hours of total exposure time were completed. The first week of testing was conducted in enriched air-blown mode, with coupon temperatures ranging from 128° to 272°F. Carbonyl sampling was conducted, but it was discovered after the fact that the methodology used was producing very low recoveries of iron and nickel carbonyl. Therefore, the data generated during this week of testing were not considered accurate. The second week of testing was conducted in oxygen-blown mode, with coupon temperatures ranging from 220° to 265°F. Two improved methods were used to measure carbonyl concentration during this week of testing. These methods produced results closer to equilibrium calculations. Since both weeks of testing mostly produced a product gas with approximately 15%–18% carbon monoxide, it was felt that actual carbonyl concentrations for Week 1 should be very similar to those measured during Week 2. The revised carbonyl sampling methodology used during the second week of testing greatly improved the recovery of iron and nickel carbonyl in the sample. Even though the sampling results obtained from the first week were inaccurate, the results from the second week can be used as an estimate for the periods during which the gasifier was operating under similar conditions and producing similar product gas compositions. Specifically, Test Periods 2 and 3 from the first week were similar to the conditions run during the second week. For a product gas containing roughly 15%–18% CO and a coupon temperature of approximately 220°–270°F, the nickel carbonyl concentration should be about 0.05–0.1 ppm and the iron carbonyl concentration should be about 0.1–0.4 ppm. After each week of testing the coupons were recovered from the coupon holder, weighed, and shipped back to Siemens for analysis.

  13. Automated particulate sampler field test model operations guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowyer, S.M.; Miley, H.S.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Automated Particulate Sampler Field Test Model Operations Guide is a collection of documents which provides a complete picture of the Automated Particulate Sampler (APS) and the Field Test in which it was evaluated. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Automated Particulate Sampler was developed for the purpose of radionuclide particulate monitoring for use under the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Its design was directed by anticipated requirements of small size, low power consumption, low noise level, fully automatic operation, and most predominantly the sensitivity requirements of the Conference on Disarmament Working Paper 224 (CDWP224). This guide is intended to serve as both a reference document for the APS and to provide detailed instructions on how to operate the sampler. This document provides a complete description of the APS Field Test Model and all the activity related to its evaluation and progression.

  14. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The light-duty vehicle transportation sector in the United States depends heavily on imported petroleum as a transportation fuel. The Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is testing advanced technology vehicles to help reduce this dependency, which would contribute to the economic stability and homeland security of the United States. These advanced technology test vehicles include internal combustion engine vehicles operating on 100% hydrogen (H2) and H2CNG (compressed natural gas) blended fuels, hybrid electric vehicles, neighborhood electric vehicles, urban electric vehicles, and electric ground support vehicles. The AVTA tests and evaluates these vehicles with closed track and dynamometer testing methods (baseline performance testing) and accelerated reliability testing methods (accumulating lifecycle vehicle miles and operational knowledge within 1 to 1.5 years), and in normal fleet environments. The Arizona Public Service Alternative Fuel Pilot Plant and H2-fueled vehicles are demonstrating the feasibility of using H2 as a transportation fuel. Hybrid, neighborhood, and urban electric test vehicles are demonstrating successful applications of electric drive vehicles in various fleet missions. The AVTA is also developing electric ground support equipment (GSE) test procedures, and GSE testing will start during the fall of 2003. All of these activities are intended to support U.S. energy independence. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory manages these activities for the AVTA.

  15. Technical requirements specification for tank waste retrieval

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamberd, D.L.

    1996-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the technical requirements specification for the retrieval of waste from the underground storage tanks at the Hanford Site. All activities covered by this scope are conducted in support of the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) mission.

  16. Cylinder Test Specification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Catanach; Larry Hill; Herbert Harry; Ernest Aragon; Don Murk

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the cylinder testis two-fold: (1) to characterize the metal-pushing ability of an explosive relative to that of other explosives as evaluated by the E{sub 19} cylinder energy and the G{sub 19} Gurney energy and (2) to help establish the explosive product equation-of-state (historically, the Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) equation). This specification details the material requirements and procedures necessary to assemble and fire a typical Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) cylinder test. Strict adherence to the cylinder. material properties, machining tolerances, material heat-treatment and etching processes, and high explosive machining tolerances is essential for test-to-test consistency and to maximize radial wall expansions. Assembly and setup of the cylinder test require precise attention to detail, especially when placing intricate pin wires on the cylinder wall. The cylinder test is typically fired outdoors and at ambient temperature.

  17. Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

  18. BER Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Management and analysis of geospatial data involvingmanipulation, analysis, and display of geospatial data,Analysis and interpretation require mapping geospatial

  19. Regulators, Requirements, Statutes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Statutes Regulators, Requirements, Statutes The Laboratory must comply with environmental laws and regulations that apply to Laboratory operations. Contact Environmental...

  20. FES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    FES Science Network Requirements Report of the Fusion Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted March 13 and 14, 2008 #12;FES Science Network Requirements Workshop Fusion Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Gaithersburg, MD ­ March 13 and 14, 2008 ESnet

  1. Improvements to Technical Specifications surveillance requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobel, R.; Tjader, T.R.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In August 1983 an NRC task group was formed to investigate problems with surveillance testing required by Technical Specifications, and to recommend approaches to effect improvements. NUREG-1024 ( Technical Specifications-Enhancing Safety Impact'') resulted, and it contained recommendations to review the basis for test frequencies; to ensure that the tests promote safety and do not degrade equipment; and to review surveillance tests so that they do not unnecessarily burden personnel. The Technical Specifications Improvement Program (TSIP) was established in December 1984 to provide the framework for rewriting and improving the Technical Specifications. As an element of the TSIP, all Technical Specifications surveillance requirements were comprehensively examined as recommended in NUREG-1024. The results of that effort are presented in this report. The study found that while some testing at power is essential to verify equipment and system operability, safety can be improved, equipment degradation decreased, and unnecessary personnel burden relaxed by reducing the amount of testing at power.

  2. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, John M. (Modesto, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector testing device which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: 1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, 2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and 3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements.

  3. Pendulum detector testing device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gonsalves, J.M.

    1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A detector testing device is described which provides consistent, cost-effective, repeatable results. The testing device is primarily constructed of PVC plastic and other non-metallic materials. Sensitivity of a walk-through detector system can be checked by: (1) providing a standard test object simulating the mass, size and material content of a weapon or other contraband, (2) suspending the test object in successive positions, such as head, waist and ankle levels, simulating where the contraband might be concealed on a person walking through the detector system; and (3) swinging the suspended object through each of the positions, while operating the detector system and observing its response. The test object is retained in a holder in which the orientation of the test device or target can be readily changed, to properly complete the testing requirements. 5 figs.

  4. Nutrient Requirements of the Cow and Calf.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, L. A. Jr.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    protein and minimum megacalories of digestible energy per pound of feed. The section on travel, fetal deaelopment and gain shows the quality of forage 'needed to furnish the energy and protetin for these activities. The section on milk production...NUTRIENT REQUIREMENTS of the Cow and Calf TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE, J. E. Hutchison, Director College Station, Texas I contents I-. Energy Requirements, 3 Protein Requirements, 8 Daily Nutrient...

  5. Transportation System Requirements Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Transportation System Requirements Document (Trans-SRD) describes the functions to be performed by and the technical requirements for the Transportation System to transport spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) from Purchaser and Producer sites to a Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System (CRWMS) site, and between CRWMS sites. The purpose of this document is to define the system-level requirements for Transportation consistent with the CRWMS Requirement Document (CRD). These requirements include design and operations requirements to the extent they impact on the development of the physical segments of Transportation. The document also presents an overall description of Transportation, its functions, its segments, and the requirements allocated to the segments and the system-level interfaces with Transportation. The interface identification and description are published in the CRWMS Interface Specification.

  6. ASCR Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high performance networks is a consistent, widely deployed, well-maintained toolset that is optimized for wide area, high-speed data transfer (e.g. GridFTP) that allows scientists to easily utilize the services and capabilities that the network provides. Network test and measurement is an important part of ensuring that these tools and network services are functioning correctly. One example of a tool in this area is the recently developed perfSONAR, which has already shown its usefulness in fault diagnosis during the recent deployment of high-performance data movers at NERSC and ORNL. On the other hand, it is clear that there is significant work to be done in the area of authentication and access control - there are currently compatibility problems and differing requirements between the authentication systems in use at different facilities, and the policies and mechanisms in use at different facilities are sometimes in conflict. Finally, long-term software maintenance was of concern for many attendees. Scientists rely heavily on a large deployed base of software that does not have secure programmatic funding. Software packages for which this is true include data transfer tools such as GridFTP as well as identity management and other software infrastructure that forms a critical part of the Open Science Grid and the Earth System Grid.

  7. Double tracks test site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of site characterization activities performed at the Double Tracks Test Site, located on Range 71 North, of the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) in southern Nevada. Site characterization activities included reviewing historical data from the Double Tracks experiment, previous site investigation efforts, and recent site characterization data. The most recent site characterization activities were conducted in support of an interim corrective action to remediate the Double Tracks Test Site to an acceptable risk to human health and the environment. Site characterization was performed using a phased approach. First, previously collected data and historical records sere compiled and reviewed. Generalized scopes of work were then prepared to fill known data gaps. Field activities were conducted and the collected data were then reviewed to determine whether data gaps were filled and whether other areas needed to be investigated. Additional field efforts were then conducted, as required, to adequately characterize the site. Characterization of the Double Tracks Test Site was conducted in accordance with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER).

  8. Nevada Test Site Environmental Summary Report 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  9. Nevada Test Site Summary 2006 (Volume 2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security-related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2006 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and its satellite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  10. Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cathy Wills

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) directs the management and operation of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is the nation's historical testing site for nuclear weapons from 1951 through 1992 and is currently the nation's unique site for ongoing national-security related missions and high-risk operations. NNSA/NSO strives to provide to the public an understanding of the current activities on the NTS, including environmental monitoring and compliance activities aimed at protecting the public and the environment from radiation hazards and from nonradiological impacts. This document is a summary of the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report (NTSER) for calendar year 2007 (see attached compact disc on inside back cover). The NTSER is a comprehensive report of environmental activities performed at the NTS and offsite facilities over the previous calendar year. It is prepared annually to meet the requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the information needs of NNSA/NSO stakeholders. To provide an abbreviated and more readable version of the NTSER, this summary report is produced. This summary does not include detailed data tables, monitoring methods or design, a description of the NTS environment, or a discussion of all environmental program activities performed throughout the year. The reader may obtain a hard copy of the full NTSER as directed on the inside front cover of this summary report.

  11. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts 2010 DOE Hydrogen Program Fuel Cell Project Kick-active-area fuel cells, to be made available for DOE testing Reduce catalyst cost while achieving the required · Subcontractors: ­ Technical University of Berlin ­ Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells ­ Massachusetts Institute

  12. Requirements Reflection: Requirements as Runtime Entities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    . ICSE '10, May 2-8 2010, Cape Town, South Africa Copyright 2010 ACM 978-1-60558-719-6/10/05 ...$10 energy costs. Further, it has the domain assumption energy is cheapest at night. To satisfy the avoid activity is detected. Night operation satisfies the minimize energy costs goal. Thus all the goals

  13. Nutritional requirements of sesame

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eller, Joe C

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L)&RARYi ~st t~6~ 0F TEXACO NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis By JOE C. ELLER Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in. partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of M... AS TER 0 F SCIENC E January 1958 Major Subject: Agronomy NUTRITIONAL REQUIREMENTS OF SESAME A Thesis JOE C. ELLER Approved. as to style and content by. ' Chairman of Committee Head qg Department January 1958 ACKNOWLEDGEMENT The author wishes...

  14. Required Annual Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Required Annual Notices The Women's Health and Cancer Rights Act of 1998 (WHCRA) The medical programs sponsored by LANS will not restrict benefits if you or your dependent...

  15. Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Unreviewed Safety Question Requirements FUNCTIONAL AREA GOAL: A fully compliant Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) program is implemented and maintained across the site....

  16. Transuranic Waste Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The guide provides criteria for determining if a waste is to be managed in accordance with DOE M 435.1-1, Chapter III, Transuranic Waste Requirements.

  17. E-Print Network 3.0 - activity restrictions influence Sample...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : 1. SUMMARY OF LEGAL REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS 2. PROHIBITED AND RESTRICTED POLITICAL ACTIVITIES... REQUIREMENTS AND RESTRICTIONS a. Campaign Activities -- Contributions...

  18. AVTA: 2010 Volkswagon Golf Diesel Start-Stop Testing Results...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Volkswagon Golf Diesel Start-Stop Testing Results AVTA: 2010 Volkswagon Golf Diesel Start-Stop Testing Results The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

  19. Integrated Management Requirements mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia`s approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

  20. Integrated Management Requirements mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, J.T.; Andrews, N.S.

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains five appendices documenting how Sandia implemented the DOE Conduct of Operations (5480.19) and DOE Quality Assurance (5700.6C) orders. It provides a mapping of the Sandia integrated requirements to the specific requirements of each Order and a mapping to Sandia's approved program for implementing the Conduct of Operations Order.

  1. High School if required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Lawrence R.

    Chemistry II CHEM AP 4-5 Lab required @ UNLV; contact Chemistry PHYS 182 & 182L Engineering Physics III PHYS General Chemistry I CHEM AP 3 Lab required @ UNLV; contact Chemistry CHEM 241 Organic Chemistry I & CHEM 347 Lab Techniques of Organic Chem I CHEM 242 Organic Chemistry II & CHEM 348 Lab Techniques

  2. General Responsibilities and Requirements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The material presented in this guide provides suggestions and acceptable ways of implementing DOE M 435.1-1 and should not be viewed as additional or mandatory requirements. The objective of the guide is to ensure that responsible individuals understand what is necessary and acceptable for implementing the requirements of DOE M 435.1-1.

  3. Heuristic Search with Reachability Tests for Automated Generation of Test Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leow, Wee Kheng

    Heuristic Search with Reachability Tests for Automated Generation of Test Programs Wee Kheng Leow specification-based soft- ware testing has focused on the automated generation of test cases. Before a software system can be tested, it must be set up according to the input requirements of the test cases. This setup

  4. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  5. Thermal test options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

  6. Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

  7. Transportation Infrastructure Requirement Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal agencies and certain state governments are required to acquire alternative fuel vehicles as part of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, though they are also entitled to choose a petroleum...

  8. BES Science Network Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dart, Eli

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Directors of the Office of Science, Office of AdvancedOffice of Basic Energy Sciences. This is LBNL report LBNL-BES Science Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy

  9. Timeline for Net Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    x By July 31 of each Forecast Year, BPA publishes all Load Following customers' Net Requirements data for the two years of the upcoming Rate Period. 17.6.1 7312010 Yes...

  10. Selected Guidance & Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page contains the most requested NEPA guidance and requirement documents and those most often recommended by the Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance. Documents are listed by agency, in...

  11. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  12. Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

  13. Conditions Required by Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed I.

    No No Sto H 2 NoIs it required by law "Violence on children"?164.512 (c) (1) H CE may disclose to government to LEO HCE may not disclose to LEO H No Yes No Required by law: "reporting certain type of injuries"? H disclose to LEO H 164.512 (f) (1) (ii) (C)(2) It provides that the request is specific and limited in scope

  14. An Assessment of Fault Current Limiter Testing Requirements | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3--Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation |Challenge1Amir Roth

  15. Velocity requirements for causality violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovanni Modanese

    2015-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We re-examine the "Regge-Tolman paradox" with reference to some recent experimental results. It is straightforward to find a formula for the velocity v of the moving system required to produce causality violation. This formula typically yields a velocity very close to the speed of light (for instance, v/c > 0.97 for X-shaped microwaves), which raises some doubts about the real physical observability of the violations. We then compute the velocity requirement introducing a delay between the reception of the primary signal and the emission of the secondary. It turns out that in principle for any delay it is possible to find moving observers able to produce active causal violation. This is mathematically due to the singularity of the Lorentz transformations for beta to 1. For a realistic delay due to the propagation of a luminal precursor, we find that causality violations in the reported experiments are still more unlikely (v/c > 0.989), and even in the hypothesis that the superluminal propagation velocity goes to infinity, the velocity requirement is bounded by v/c > 0.62. We also prove that if two macroscopic bodies exchange energy and momentum through superluminal signals, then the swap of signal source and target is incompatible with the Lorentz transformations; therefore it is not possible to distinguish between source and target, even with reference to a definite reference frame.

  16. TESTING THE UNIFICATION MODEL FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN THE INFRARED: ARE THE OBSCURING TORI OF TYPE 1 AND 2 SEYFERTS DIFFERENT?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos Almeida, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom); Levenson, N. A.; Radomski, J. T. [Gemini Observatory, Casilla 603, La Serena (Chile); Alonso-Herrero, A. [Centro de Astrobiologia, INTA-CSIC, E-28850 Madrid (Spain); Asensio Ramos, A.; Rodriguez Espinosa, J. M.; Perez Garcia, A. M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), C/VIa Lactea, s/n, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Packham, C. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611-2055 (United States); Mason, R. [Gemini Observatory, Northern Operations Center, 670 North Aohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); DIaz-Santos, T., E-mail: C.Ramos@sheffield.ac.es [Department of Physics, University of Crete, GR-71003 Heraklion (Greece)

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new mid-infrared imaging data for three Type-1 Seyfert galaxies obtained with T-ReCS on the Gemini-South Telescope at subarcsecond resolution. Our aim is to enlarge the sample studied in a previous work to compare the properties of Type-1 and Type-2 Seyfert tori using clumpy torus models and a Bayesian approach to fit the infrared (IR) nuclear spectral energy distributions. Thus, the sample considered here comprises 7 Type-1, 11 Type-2, and 3 intermediate-type Seyferts. The unresolved IR emission of the Seyfert 1 galaxies can be reproduced by a combination of dust heated by the central engine and direct active galactic nucleus (AGN) emission, while for the Seyfert 2 nuclei only dust emission is considered. These dusty tori have physical sizes smaller than 6 pc radius, as derived from our fits. Unification schemes of AGN account for a variety of observational differences in terms of viewing geometry. However, we find evidence that strong unification may not hold and that the immediate dusty surroundings of Type-1 and Type-2 Seyfert nuclei are intrinsically different. The Type-2 tori studied here are broader, have more clumps, and these clumps have lower optical depths than those of Type-1 tori. The larger the covering factor of the torus, the smaller the probability of having a direct view of the AGN, and vice versa. In our sample, Seyfert 2 tori have larger covering factors (C{sub T} = 0.95 {+-} 0.02) and smaller escape probabilities (P{sub esc} = 0.05% {+-} {sup 0.08}{sub 0.03}%) than those of Seyfert 1 (C{sub T} = 0.5 {+-} 0.1; P{sub esc} = 18% {+-} 3%). All the previous differences are significant according to the Kullback-Leibler divergence. Thus, on the basis of the results presented here, the classification of a Seyfert galaxy as a Type-1 or Type-2 depends more on the intrinsic properties of the torus rather than on its mere inclination toward us, in contradiction with the simplest unification model.

  17. Prematurely terminated slug tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karasaki, K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A solution of the well response to a prematurely terminated slug test (PTST) is presented. The advantages of a PTST over conventional slug tests are discussed. A systematized procedure of a PTST is proposed, where a slug test is terminated in the midpoint of the flow point, and the subsequent shut-in data is recorded and analyzed. This method requires a downhole shut-in device and a pressure transducer, which is no more than the conventional deep-well slug testing. As opposed to slug tests, which are ineffective when a skin is present, more accurate estimate of formation permeability can be made using a PTST. Premature termination also shortens the test duration considerably. Because in most cases no more information is gained by completing a slug test to the end, the author recommends that conventional slug tests be replaced by the premature termination technique. This study is part of an investigation of the feasibility of geologic isolation of nuclear wastes being carried out by the US Department of Energy and the National Cooperative for the Storage of Radioactive Waste of Switzerland.

  18. Airbus Toulouse Flight test data centre. Diagnosis and treatment of noisy vibration flight test data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    Airbus Toulouse ­ Flight test data centre. Diagnosis and treatment of noisy vibration flight test data. The trainee will work within flight test vibration analysis team.The main missions and activities on flight test vibration data; - Implement and test in LMS Test.Lab (vibration data processing software

  19. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    - cont'd * University of California Davis, with 13 Hymotion Prius being used by 70 public drives * Oregon State Government fleets, 3 Hymotion PHEVs * National Rural Electric...

  20. Fleet Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activities - 2010 Honda...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Changed oil and filter 28.25 8192009 10,414 Changed oil and filter and checked all fluids, belts, battery, etc. 42.77 9182009 17,488 Changed oil and filter and replaced air...

  1. HEV Fleet Testing Advanced Vehicle Testing Activities - 2010...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DU5A0006063 Date Mileage Description Cost 8192009 5,090 Changed oil and filter and rotated tires 39.28 9162009 14,484 Changed oil and filter and replaced flat tire 152.58 10...

  2. Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment of EnergyAdministrative2| DepartmentEnergy 2Waste|0 DOE2

  3. Minor in Philosophy Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    2012-05-23 Minor in Philosophy Requirements: 1. 18 hours of work in philosophy with grades of C- or better. 2. A 2.0 grade point average for all work attempted in philosophy. 3. 9 hours of upper division work in philosophy, with grades of C- or better. 4. Completion of at least one course, with a grade

  4. Requirements for Xenon International

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, James C.; Ely, James H.

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This document defines the requirements for the new Xenon International radioxenon system. The output of this project will be a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) developed prototype and a manufacturer-developed production prototype. The two prototypes are intended to be as close to matching as possible; this will be facilitated by overlapping development cycles and open communication between PNNL and the manufacturer.

  5. THE REQUIREMENTS OF A FUSION DEMONSTRATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najmabadi, Farrokh

    and will analyze the strategies, facilities, and prior testing requirements needed to demonstrate electric power Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any

  6. CALiPER Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The CALiPER (Commercially Available LED Product Evaluation and Reporting) program was launched by DOE in 2006 to support testing of a representative array of solid-state lighting products for general illumination, using industry-approved test procedures carried out by qualified test labs. The program has evolved right along with the SSL market and serves multiple needs. CALiPER testing and analysis identify trends, indicate SSL's suitability for particular applications, and detect secondary issues that require further scrutiny – such as glare, flicker, physical format, and reliability concerns. The program not only guides DOE planning and helps discourage low-quality products and inflated claims, but also serves as a useful tool for manufacturers seeking to improve their products, and for municipalities, utilities, and energy-efficiency programs seeking to make informed program decisions.

  7. Hanford analytical services quality assurance requirements documents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyatt, J.E.

    1997-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Document (HASQARD) is issued by the Analytical Services, Program of the Waste Management Division, US Department of Energy (US DOE), Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL). The HASQARD establishes quality requirements in response to DOE Order 5700.6C (DOE 1991b). The HASQARD is designed to meet the needs of DOE-RL for maintaining a consistent level of quality for sampling and field and laboratory analytical services provided by contractor and commercial field and laboratory analytical operations. The HASQARD serves as the quality basis for all sampling and field/laboratory analytical services provided to DOE-RL through the Analytical Services Program of the Waste Management Division in support of Hanford Site environmental cleanup efforts. This includes work performed by contractor and commercial laboratories and covers radiological and nonradiological analyses. The HASQARD applies to field sampling, field analysis, and research and development activities that support work conducted under the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Tri-Party Agreement and regulatory permit applications and applicable permit requirements described in subsections of this volume. The HASQARD applies to work done to support process chemistry analysis (e.g., ongoing site waste treatment and characterization operations) and research and development projects related to Hanford Site environmental cleanup activities. This ensures a uniform quality umbrella to analytical site activities predicated on the concepts contained in the HASQARD. Using HASQARD will ensure data of known quality and technical defensibility of the methods used to obtain that data. The HASQARD is made up of four volumes: Volume 1, Administrative Requirements; Volume 2, Sampling Technical Requirements; Volume 3, Field Analytical Technical Requirements; and Volume 4, Laboratory Technical Requirements. Volume 1 describes the administrative requirements applicable to each of the other three volumes and is intended to be used in conjunction with the technical volumes.

  8. BER Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

  9. Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System licensed hardware second certification test series and package shock mount system test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, P.C.; Moody, D.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a summary of two separate drop test activities that were performed in support of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System (RTGTS). The first portion of this paper presents the second series of drop testing required to demonstrate that the RTG package design meets the requirements of {ital Title} 10, {ital Code} {ital of} {ital Federal} {ital Regulations}, {open_quote}{open_quote}Part 71{close_quote}{close_quote} (10 CFR 71). Results of the first test series, performed in July 1994, demonstrated that some design changes were necessary. The package design was modified to improve test performance and the design changes were incorporated into the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP). The second full-size certification test article (CTA-2) incorporated the modified design and was tested at the U.S. Department of Energy{close_quote}s (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. With the successful completion of the test series, and pending DOE Office of Facility Safety Analysis approval of the SARP, a certificate of compliance will be issued for the RTG package allowing its use. The second portion of this paper presents the design and testing of the RTG Package Mount System. The RTG package mount was designed to protect the RTG from excessive vibration during transport, provide shock protection during on/off loading, and provide a mechanism for moving the RTG package with a forklift. Military Standard (MIL-STD) 810E, {ital Transit} {ital Drop} {ital Procedure} (DOE 1989), was used to verify that the shock limiting system limited accelerations in excess of 15 G{close_quote}s at frequencies below 150 Hz. Results of the package mount drop tests indicate that an impact force of 15 G{close_quote}s was not exceeded in any test from a free drop height of 457 mm (18 in.). {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Siphon breaker design requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neill, D.T.; Stephens, A.G.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was intended to provide experimental data on siphon flow effects. The system was to be modeled with the RELAP code and the predicted and measured performances compared. The experimental system consists of a 500-gallon upper tank, a 4-inch downcomer pipe, a lower catch tank, a return pump and associated piping. The downcomer pipe is made of 4-inch clear acrylic pipe so the flow patterns could be observed and video taped during the test runs.

  11. A test device for premixed gas turbine combustion oscillations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, G.A.; Gemmen, R.S.; Yip, M.J.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses design and operation of a single-nozzle test combustor for studying lean, premixed combustion oscillations from gas turbine fuel nozzles. It was used to study oscillations from a prototype fuel nozzle that produced oscillations during testing in a commercial engine. Similar, but not identical, oscillations were recorded in the test device. Basic requirements of the device design were that the flame geometry be maintained and acoustic losses be minimized; this was achieved by using a Helmholtz resonator as the combustor geometry. Surprisingly, the combustor oscillated strongly at several frequencies, without modification of the resonator. Brief survey of operating conditions suggests that it may be helpful to characterize oscillating behavior in terms of reference velocity and inlet air temperature with the rig backpressure playing a smaller role. The preliminary results do not guarantee that the single-nozzle test device will reproduce arbitrary oscillations that occur on a complete engine test. Nozzle/nozzle interactions may complicate the response, and oscillations controlled by acoustic velocities transverse to the nozzle axis may not be reproduced in a test device that relies on a bulk Helmholtz mode. Nevertheless, some oscillations can be reproduced, and the single-nozzle test device allows both active and passive control strategies to be tested relatively inexpensively.

  12. Advanced Duct Sealing Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected weekly. The baking test specimens were visually inspected weekly, and the durability was judged by the observed deterioration in terms of brittleness, cracking, flaking and blistering (the terminology used in the UL 181B-FX test procedure).

  13. DOE nuclear material packaging manual: storage container requirements for plutonium oxide materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veirs, D Kirk [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Loss of containment of nuclear material stored in containers such as food-pack cans, paint cans, or taped slip lid cans has generated concern about packaging requirements for interim storage of nuclear materials in working facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In response, DOE has recently issued DOE M 441.1 'Nuclear Material Packaging Manual' with encouragement from the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board. A unique feature compared to transportation containers is the allowance of filters to vent flammable gases during storage. Defining commonly used concepts such as maximum allowable working pressure and He leak rate criteria become problematic when considering vented containers. Los Alamos has developed a set of container requirements that are in compliance with 441.1 based upon the activity of heat-source plutonium (90% Pu-238) oxide, which bounds the requirements for weapons-grade plutonium oxide. The pre and post drop-test He leak rates depend upon container size as well as the material contents. For containers that are routinely handled, ease of handling and weight are a major consideration. Relatively thin-walled containers with flat bottoms are desired yet they cannot be He leak tested at a differential pressure of one atmosphere due to the potential for plastic deformation of the flat bottom during testing. The He leak rates and He leak testing configuration for containers designed for plutonium bearing materials will be presented. The approach to meeting the other manual requirements such as corrosion and thermal degradation resistance will be addressed. The information presented can be used by other sites to evaluate if their conditions are bounded by LANL requirements when considering procurement of 441.1 compliant containers.

  14. Test Comparability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

  15. Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation Requirements for Sensory Impairments Vision and Hearing Students, faculty, staff documentation requirements: 1. Requirements of the PRACTITIONER: A) Ophthalmologists and optometrists of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated and signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

  16. BES Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian; Dart, Eli; Biocca, A.; Carlson, R.; Chen, J.; Cotter, S.; Dattoria, V.; Davenport, J.; Gaenko, A.; Kent, P.; Lamm, M.; Miller, S.; Mundy, C.; Ndousse, T.; Pederson, M.; Perazzo, A.; Popescu, R.; Rouson, D.; Sekine, Y.; Sumpter, B.; Wang, C.-Z.; Whitelam, S.; Zurawski, J.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  17. Required Annual Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergy Request For Report7Required

  18. Required Annual Notices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergy Request For Report7RequiredAnnual

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    initative. Together, these projects make up the largest ever deployment of all-electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and charging infrastructure in the...

  20. Summary of Construction Equipment Tests and Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security AdministrationcontrollerNanocrystalline Gallium OxideSumin Kim Sumin Kim Sumin KimSummary

  1. Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lei, Jeff Yu

    1 Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing Introduction Test Selection Test Minimization Test Prioritization Summary Software Testing and Maintenance 2 What is it? Regression testing refers to the portion of the test cycle in which a program is tested to ensure that changes do not affect

  2. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  3. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES Plan Requirements Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: GPH RQ = Requirement Program: 01848 LN = Line Plan: 3200MPH RG 5298 ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES REQUIREMENTS, 643, 653, 675, 677 or 695 LN 0030 - Environmental Health Sciences: EHS 501, 506, 507 or 508 LN 0040

  4. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING BSE PLAN REQUIREMENTS Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyy, Wei

    BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING BSE PLAN REQUIREMENTS Campus: UMICH RG = Requirement Group Career: UENG RQ = Requirement Program: LN = Line Plan: 0880BSE Sub-Plan: RG 6856 BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING MAJOR REQUIREMENTS Effective FA05/1560 (09/06/2005) RQ 4996 Program Subjects Effective FA05/1560 (09/06/2005) LN 0010 BIOMEDE

  5. Operational test report for LERF Basin 242AL-44 integrity test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galioto, T.M.

    1994-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This operational test report documents the results of LERF operational testing per operational test procedure (OTP) TFPE-WP-0231, ``LERF Basin Integrity Testing.`` The primary purpose of the OTP was to resolve test exceptions generated as a result of TFPE-WP-0184. The TOP was prepared and performed in accordance with WHC-SD-534-OTP-002, ``Operational Test Plan for the 242-A Evaporator Upgrades and the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility.`` WHC-S-086, ``Specification for Operational Testing of the Liquid Effluent Retention Facility, Basin Integrity Testing,`` identified the test requirements and acceptance criteria. The completed, signed-off test procedure is contained in Appendix A. The test log is contained in Appendix B. Section 2.1 describes all the test exceptions written during performance of the Operational Test Procedure. The test revisions generated during the testing are discussed in Section 2.2. The dispositioned test exception forms are contained in Appendix C.

  6. Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. (Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.); Commander, J.C. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

  7. Plan for decommissioning the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spampinato, P.T.; Walton, G.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Commander, J.C. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Project is in the planning phase of developing a decommissioning project. A Preliminary Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Plan has been developed which provides a framework for the baseline approach, and the cost and schedule estimates. TFTR will become activated and contaminated with tritium after completion of the deuterium-tritium (D-T) experiments. Hence some of the D&D operations will require remote handling. It is expected that all of the waste generated will be low level radioactive waste (LLW). The objective of the D&D Project is to make TFTR Test Cell available for use by a new fusion experiment. This paper discusses the D&D objectives, the facility to be decommissioned, estimates of activation, the technical (baseline) approach, and the assumptions used to develop cost and schedule estimates.

  8. Unit 14: Testing and Inspection To introduce software testing and to develop its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkelstein, Anthony

    1 Unit 14: Testing and Inspection Objectives Ð To introduce software testing and to develop its and code as a means of reducing errors in software development. What is Testing? ¥ software testing is the process of seeking errors ¥ this process is active - if we find no errors after performing a test we

  9. Developmental test report, assessment of XT-70E percussion drill rig operation in tank farms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, L.F., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The following report documents the testing of the XT-70E percussion drill rig for use in the 241-SX Tank Farm. The test is necessary to support evaluation of the safety and authorization level of the proposed activity of installing up to three new drywells in the 241- SX Tank Farm. The proposed activity plans to install drywells by percussion drilling 7 inch O.D./6 inch I.D. pipe in close proximity of underground storage tanks and associated equipment. The load transmitted from the drill rig`s percussion hammer through the ground to the tank structure and equipment is not known and therefore testing is required to ensure the activity is safe and authorized.

  10. Equipment Operational Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenwalt, B; Henderer, B; Hibbard, W; Mercer, M

    2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The Iraq Department of Border Enforcement is rich in personnel, but poor in equipment. An effective border control system must include detection, discrimination, decision, tracking and interdiction, capture, identification, and disposition. An equipment solution that addresses only a part of this will not succeed, likewise equipment by itself is not the answer without considering the personnel and how they would employ the equipment. The solution should take advantage of the existing in-place system and address all of the critical functions. The solutions are envisioned as being implemented in a phased manner, where Solution 1 is followed by Solution 2 and eventually by Solution 3. This allows adequate time for training and gaining operational experience for successively more complex equipment. Detailed descriptions of the components follow the solution descriptions. Solution 1 - This solution is based on changes to CONOPs, and does not have a technology component. It consists of observers at the forts and annexes, forward patrols along the swamp edge, in depth patrols approximately 10 kilometers inland from the swamp, and checkpoints on major roads. Solution 2 - This solution adds a ground sensor array to the Solution 1 system. Solution 3 - This solution is based around installing a radar/video camera system on each fort. It employs the CONOPS from Solution 1, but uses minimal ground sensors deployed only in areas with poor radar/video camera coverage (such as canals and streams shielded by vegetation), or by roads covered by radar but outside the range of the radar associated cameras. This document provides broad operational requirements for major equipment components along with sufficient operational details to allow the technical community to identify potential hardware candidates. Continuing analysis will develop quantities required and more detailed tactics, techniques, and procedures.

  11. Software and House Requirements Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Daniel M.

    a requirements engineer who puts her knowledge of software construction together with her creativity to come upSoftware and House Requirements Engineering: Lessons Learned in Combatting Requirements Creep creativity to try to come up with a plan for a house that will meet the customer's requirements. The customer

  12. Match Pumps to System Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency matching pumps to system requirements

  13. SOA1: Geomaterial Behaviour and Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayne, Paul W.

    Behaviour & Testing 17th ICSMGE, Alexandria, Egypt #12;10/21/2009 2 SOA1: Geomaterial Behaviour & Testing, Alexandria, Egypt #12;10/21/2009 3 SOA1: Geomaterial Behaviour & Testing Sarah M. Springman · Active (2009) SOA-1 Geomaterial Behaviour & Testing 17th ICSMGE, Alexandria, Egypt #12;10/21/2009 4 SOA1

  14. Can Clone Detection Support Test Comprehension?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Can Clone Detection Support Test Comprehension? Benedikt Hauptmann, Maximilian Junker, Sebastian¨unchen, Germany Rudolf Vaas Munich Re Group M¨unchen, Germany Abstract--Tests are central artifacts of software systems. Therefore, understanding tests is essential for activities such as maintenance, test automation

  15. Duct Tape Durability Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

  16. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

  17. Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And...

  18. Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

  19. Failure Rates from Certification Testing to UL and IEC Standards...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Publications Literature Review of the Effects of UV Exposure on PV Modules Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience US TG 4 Activities of...

  20. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in near-zero hazardous air or water pollution. This technology would also be conducive to the efficient coproduction of methane and hydrogen while also generating a relatively pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) or sequestration. Specific results of bench-scale testing in the 4- to 38-lb/hr range in the EERC pilot system demonstrated high methane yields approaching 15 mol%, with high hydrogen yields approaching 50%. This was compared to an existing catalytic gasification model developed by GPE for its process. Long-term operation was demonstrated on both Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and on petcoke feedstocks utilizing oxygen injection without creating significant bed agglomeration. Carbon conversion was greater than 80% while operating at temperatures less than 1400°F, even with the shorter-than-desired reactor height. Initial designs for the GPE gasification concept called for a height that could not be accommodated by the EERC pilot facility. More gas-phase residence time should allow the syngas to be converted even more to methane. Another goal of producing significant quantities of highly concentrated catalyzed char for catalyst recovery and material handling studies was also successful. A Pd–Cu membrane was also successfully tested and demonstrated to produce 2.54 lb/day of hydrogen permeate, exceeding the desired hydrogen permeate production rate of 2.0 lb/day while being tested on actual coal-derived syngas that had been cleaned with advanced warm-gas cleanup systems. The membranes did not appear to suffer any performance degradation after exposure to the cleaned, warm syngas over a nominal 100-hour test.

  1. A mathematical model for countercurrent moving-bed activated carbon adsorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Douglas Harold

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the column. There was insufficient data taken to verify this model. The testing procedure was limited by the approximate uniformity of the influent concentrations in the pilot plant and the effect of the activated carbon concentration and initial solute...A MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR COUNTERCURRENT MOVING-BED ACTIVATED CARBON ADSORPTION A Thesis by DOUGLAS HAROLD ANDERSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER...

  2. Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

  3. Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Morin, Et Al., 1993) Exploration Activity...

  4. Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

  5. Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fairbank Engineering Ltd, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful...

  6. Field Testing of the Advanced Worker Protection System

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    tasks which simulate actual decontamination activities. + to shake down the new IUOE test facilities. The activities began with a demonstration of filling the backpack with...

  7. Light Duty Utility Arm system pre-operational (cold test) test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K.L.

    1995-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Light Duty Utility (LDUA) Cold Test Facility, located in the Hanford 400 Area, will be used to support cold testing (pre- operational tests) of LDUA subsystems. Pre-operational testing is composed of subsystem development testing and rework activities, and integrated system qualification testing. Qualification testing will be conducted once development work is complete and documentation is under configuration control. Operational (hot) testing of the LDUA system will follow the testing covered in this plan and will be covered in a separate test plan

  8. Microgrid Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirazi, M.; Kroposki, B.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the publication of IEEE 1574.4 Guide for Design, Operation, and Integration of Distributed Resource Island Systems with Electric Power Systems, there is an increasing amount of attention on not only the design and operations of microgrids, but also on the proper operation and testing of these systems. This standard provides alternative approaches and good practices for the design, operation, and integration of microgrids. This includes the ability to separate from and reconnect to part of the utility grid while providing power to the islanded power system. This presentation addresses the industry need to develop standardized testing and evaluation procedures for microgrids in order to assure quality operation in the grid connected and islanded modes of operation.

  9. GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

  10. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  11. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  12. A Capital Market Test of Representativeness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safdar, Mohammad

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A CAPITAL MARKET TEST OF REPRESENTATIVENESS A Dissertation by MOHAMMAD URFAN SAFDAR Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR... OF PHILOSOPHY May 2012 Major Subject: Accounting A Capital Market Test of Representativeness Copyright 2012 Mohammad Urfan Safdar A CAPITAL MARKET TEST OF REPRESENTATIVENESS A Dissertation...

  13. Sandia National Laboratories: reduce platform size requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-active perovskite oxideplatform size requirements Study

  14. Defect classes - an overdue paradigm for CMOS IC testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawkins, C.F. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Soden, J.M.; Righter, A.W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ferguson, F.J. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IC test industry has struggled for more than 30 years to establish a test approach that would guarantee a low defect level to the customer. We propose a comprehensive strategy for testing CMOS ICs that uses defect classes based on measured defect electrical properties. Defect classes differ from traditional fault models. Our defect class approach requires that the test strategy match the defect electrical properties, while fault models require that IC defects match the fault definition. We use data from Sandia Labs failure analysis and test facilities and from public literature. We describe test pattern requirements for each defect class and propose a test paradigm.

  15. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Arboricultural Operations Safety Requirements LBNL Arboricultural Operation Safety Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Arboricultural Operations Safety Requirements 1 of 3 LBNL reviewed with LBNL Facilities Electric Shop (6023)? * IF THE ANSWER TO 3E WAS NO, STOP THIS WORK ACTIVITY AND CONTACT FACILITIES ELECTRIC SHOP a. Name of LBNL individual consulted? #12;LBNL Arboricultural Operations

  16. Webinar: Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Hydrogen Storage Materials Requirements, originally presented on June 25, 2013.

  17. NDHA REQUIREMENTS FOR FCNS 320 Quantity Food Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostic, Milivoje M.

    of practical food service work experience. CERTIFICATION & TB TEST GUIDELINES Food Sanitation CertificateNDHA REQUIREMENTS FOR FCNS 320 ­ Quantity Food Production OVERVIEW State Of Illinois Food) Skin Test Verification of 100 Hours Completed Work Experience in Food Production Verification

  18. Simulating Lunar Habitats and Activities to Derive System Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kortenkamp, David

    crops), water recovery, air revitalization, food processing, solid waste recycling and energy production Johnson Space Center/Metrica Inc., Houston, Texas, 77058, USA Scott Bell NASA Johnson Space Center/SKT Inc., Houston, Texas, 77058, USA Luis Rodriguez NASA Johnson Space Center/USRA, Houston, Texas, 77058, USA

  19. activation requires lipid: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microalgae have presented themselves as a strong candidate to replace diminishing oil reserves as a source of lipids for biofuels. Here we describe successful modifications...

  20. Development of a propulsion system and component test facility for advanced radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert C. O'Brien; Nathan D. Jerred; Steven D. Howe

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification and validation of design and modeling activities for radioisotope powered Mars Hopper platforms undertaken at the Center for Space Nuclear Research is essential for proof of concept. Previous research at the center has driven the selection of advanced material combinations; some of which require specialized handling capabilities. The development of a closed and contained test facility to forward this research is discussed within this paper.

  1. Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlsbad Field Office

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

  2. Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irene Farnham

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

  3. Test plan : reducing soft costs of rooftop solar installations attributed to structural considerations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  4. Prototype to Test WHY prototype to test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    Prototype to Test METHOD WHY prototype to test HOW to prototype to test Prototyping to test or design space. The fundamental way you test your prototypes is by letting users experience them and react to them. In creating prototypes to test with users you have the opportunity to examine your solution

  5. Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Dennis

    Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit Running a test case: 1 Get the component to a known state (set up). 2 Cause some event (the test case). 3 Check the behaviour. · Record pass/fail · Track statistics · Typically we want to do a lot of test cases so it makes sense to automate. · Test cases

  6. Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Software Quality Assurance Subcommittee : Guidelines for Requirements Management Requirements...

  7. Nissan Hypermini Urban Electric Vehicle Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Francfort; Robert Brayer

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), which is part of DOE’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program, in partnership with the California cities of Vacaville and Palm Springs, collected mileage and maintenance and repairs data for a fleet of eleven Nissan Hypermini urban electric vehicles (UEVs). The eleven Hyperminis were deployed for various periods between January 2001 and June 2005. During the combined total of 439 months of use, the eleven Hyperminis were driven a total of 41,220 miles by staff from both cities. This equates to an average use of about 22 miles per week per vehicle. There were some early problems with the vehicles, including a charging problem and a need to upgrade the electrical system. In addition, six vehicles required drive system repairs. However, the repairs were all made under warranty. The Hyperminis were generally well-liked and provided drivers with the ability to travel any of the local roads. Full charging of the Hypermini’s lithiumion battery pack required up to 4 hours, with about 8–10 miles of range available for each hour of battery charging. With its right-side steering wheel, some accommodation of the drivers’ customary driving methods was required to adapt for different blind spots and vehicle manipulation. For that reason, the drivers received orientation and training before using the vehicle. The Hypermini is instrumented in kilometers rather than in miles, which required an adjustment for the drivers to calculate speed and range. As the drivers gained familiarity with the vehicles, there was increased acceptance and a preference for using it over traditional city vehicles. In all cases, the Hyperminis attracted a great amount of attention and interest from the general public.

  8. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  9. INTRODUCTION Requirements to monitor the effects of potentially environ-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cranston, Peter S.

    the boundaries of which major deposits of uranium are subject to current and proposed mining activities. PerhapsINTRODUCTION Requirements to monitor the effects of potentially environ- mentally damaging mining well-regulated mining activity has left a legacy of discharged acidic and metallic wastes to several

  10. AVTA: Quantum Escape PHEV Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a Quantum Escape PHEV 2010, an experimental model not currently for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  11. AVTA: Honda Civic HEV 2013 Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2013 Honda Civic hybrid electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing.

  12. AVTA: Honda CRZ HEV 2011 Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Honda CRZ hybrid electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  13. AVTA: Mercedes Benz HEV 2010 Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2010 Mercedes Benz hybrid-electric vehicle. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  14. AVTA: 2011 Chevrolet Volt Testing Results

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The following reports describe results of testing done on a Chevrolet Volt 2011. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  15. Simulation analysis of a printed circuit board functional test process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkley, Paul Andrew

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine the source of the bottleneck, a study analyzing the operating capacity of the functional testing area was performed. Specifically, the capacity analysis divided the total time required to test printed circuit boards by the total testing time... with an on-line terminal connected to a mainframe. The mainframe generates the diagnostic tests performed on the boards which pass through the area. Complicating the test procedure is the fact that each test station is capable of testing only specific...

  16. Soil Remediation Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

  17. 1997 annual site environmental report, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Todd; Duncan, Dianne (ed.); Forston, William; Sanchez, Rebecca (ed.)

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operates the Tonopah Test Range for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Weapons Ordnance Program. Thes annual report (calendar year 1997) summarizes the compliance status to environmental regulations applicable at the site including those statutes that govern air and water quality, waste management, cleanup of contaminated areas, control of toxic substances, and adherence to requirements as related to the National Environmental Policy Act. In compliance with DOE orders, SNL also conducts environmental surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants. SNL's responsibility for environmental surveillance extends only to those activities performed by SNL or under its direction. Annual radiological and nonradiological routine releases and unplanned releases (occurrences) are also summarized. This report has been prepared as required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program.

  18. ANSI Essential Requirements: Due process requirements for American

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANSI Essential Requirements: Due process requirements for American National Standards Edition: January 2010 Copyright by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI), 25 West 43rd Street, 4th Floor, New York, New York 10036. This material may be copied without permission from ANSI only

  19. Calendar Year 2004 annual site environmental report : Tonopah Test Range, Nevada & Kauai Test Facility, Hawaii.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montoya, Amber L.; Wagner, Katrina; Goering, Teresa Lynn; Koss, Susan I.; Salinas, Stephanie A.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada and Kauai Test Facility (KTF) in Hawaii are government-owned, contractor-operated facilities operated by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), through the Sandia Site Office (SSO), in Albuquerque, NM, manages TTR and KTF's operations. Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE/NNSA's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to Sandia Corporation in administering most of the environmental programs at TTR. Sandia Corporation operates KTF as a rocket preparation launching and tracking facility. This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR and KTF through Calendar Year (CY) 2004. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at these sites include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, terrestrial surveillance, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to its operations. The DOE/NNSA, Nevada Site Office (NSO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER TTR sites. Currently, there are no ER Sites at KTF. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program (DOE 2005) and DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting (DOE 2004b).

  20. Requirements Identification, Analysis and Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis, and Management adds detail and rigor to the Mission Analysis output by: Refining the initial customer input into formal Customer Requirements Identifying any...

  1. RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING TORQUE REQUIREMENTS COMPLIANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, R.; Leduc, D.

    2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Shipping containers used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in commerce employ a variety of closure mechanisms. Often, these closure mechanisms require a specific amount of torque be applied to a bolt, nut or other threaded fastener. It is important that the required preload is achieved so that the package testing and analysis is not invalidated for the purpose of protecting the public. Torque compliance is a means of ensuring closure preload, is a major factor in accomplishing the package functions of confinement/containment, sub-criticality, and shielding. This paper will address the importance of applying proper torque to package closures, discuss torque value nomenclature, and present one methodology to ensure torque compliance is achieved.

  2. Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

  3. Large scale test simulations using the Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klenke, S.E.; Heffelfinger, S.R.; Bell, H.J.; Shierling, C.L.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Environment for Test Optimization (VETO) is a set of simulation tools under development at Sandia to enable test engineers to do computer simulations of tests. The tool set utilizes analysis codes and test information to optimize design parameters and to provide an accurate model of the test environment which aides in the maximization of test performance, training, and safety. Previous VETO effort has included the development of two structural dynamics simulation modules that provide design and optimization tools for modal and vibration testing. These modules have allowed test engineers to model and simulate complex laboratory testing, to evaluate dynamic response behavior, and to investigate system testability. Further development of the VETO tool set will address the accurate modeling of large scale field test environments at Sandia. These field test environments provide weapon system certification capabilities and have different simulation requirements than those of laboratory testing.

  4. MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow-cycle fatigue testing · High temperature testing to 2500°F · ASTM/ Boeing/ SACMA standard testing · Ability to design and fabricate non-standard test fixtures and perform non-standard tests

  5. Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Test Preparation Options Free Test Prep Websites ACT: http: http://www.collegeboard.com/student/testing/sat/prep_one/test.html http://www.number2.com://testprep.princetonreview.com/CourseSearch/Search.aspx?itemCode=17&productType=F&rid=1&zip=803 02 Test Prep Classes Front Range Community College: Classes

  6. Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chintan

    Test and Test Equipment Joshua Lottich CMPE 640 11/23/05 #12;Testing Verifies that manufactured chip meets design specifications. Cannot test for every potential defect. Modeling defects as faults allows for passing and failing of chips. Ideal test would capture all defects and pass only chips

  7. Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1 PRESS KIT/December 2014 www.nasa.gov NP-2014-11-020-JSC National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12;#12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Contents Section Page ........................................................................................... 28 i #12;Orion Flight Test ii December 2014 #12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Flight Overview

  8. Molecular Mechanisms and Inhibition of Transcription Activation by Bacterial AraC Family Activator Proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koppolu, Veerendra

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    for both DNA binding and transcription activation. We propose that transcription activation by Rns involves contacts between RS2 and AS2 region residues and these contacts may impart the structure or dynamics required by Rns to activate transcription...

  9. Reduced-Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal program objective and principal part of the proposed action is to improve the proliferation resistance of nuclear fuels used in research and test reactors by providing the technical means (through technical development, design, and testing) for reducing the uranium enrichment requirements of these fuels to substantially less than the 90 to 93% enrichment currently used. Operator acceptance of the reduced-enrichment-uranium (REU) fuel alternative will require minimizing of reactor performance reduction, fuel cycle cost increases, the number of new safety and licensing issues raised, and reactor and facility modifications. The other part of the proposed action is to assure the capability for commercial production and supply of REU fuel for use both in the US and abroad. The RERTR Program scope is limited to generic design studies, technical support to reactor operating organizations in preparing for conversions to REU fuels, fuel development, fuel demonstrations, and technical support for commercialization of REU fuels. This environmental assessment addresses the environmental consequences of RERTR Program activities and of specific conversions of typical reactors (the Ford Nuclear Reactor and one or two other to-be-designated demonstrations) to REU-fuel cycles, including domestic and international shipments of enriched uranium pertinent to the conduct of RERTR Program activities.

  10. Humidity requirements in WSCF Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.A.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to develop and document a position on Relative Humidity (RH) requirements in the WSCF Laboratories. A current survey of equipment vendors for Organic, Inorganic and Radiochemical laboratories indicate that 25% - 80% relative humidity may meet the environmental requirements for safe operation and protection of all the laboratory equipment.

  11. Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry/Biotechnology Graduate Program. A detailed account of the academic requirements and procedures is provided for graduate students in chemistry; to promote consistency in procedures and standards; and to provide a basis for communication between

  12. Degree Requirements COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulp, Mark

    or better is required in ECON 2000 (Engineering Economics), Philosophy 2244 (Engineering Ethics), and ENGLDegree Requirements COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING B.S. in Electrical Engineering Effective Date: 08) 6 Total 30 MUST SELECT ONE Computer Engineering Concentration Course Name/ # Credit Hours Course

  13. Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298,NIST31 ORVEnergy Request ForForms of1, 2

  14. Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis R&D | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE R&D Activities Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis R&D Hydrogen Storage Testing and Analysis R&D DOE's hydrogen storage R&D activities include testing, analysis, and...

  15. Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The purpose of the Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to provide space where high pressure hydrogen components can be safely tested. High pressure hydrogen storage is an integral part of energy storage technology for use in fuel cell and in other distributed energy scenarios designed to effectively utilize the variability inherent with renewable energy sources. The high pressure storage laboratory is co-located with energy storage activities such as ultra-capacitors, super conducting magnetic flywheel and mechanical energy storage systems laboratories for an integrated approach to system development and demonstration. Hazards associated with hydrogen storage at pressures up to 10,000 psi include oxygen displacement, combustion, explosion, and pressurization of room air due to fast release and physical hazards associated with burst failure modes. A critical understanding of component failure modes is essential in developing reliable, robust designs that will minimize failure risk beyond the end of service life. Development of test protocol for accelerated life testing to accurately scale to real world operating conditions is essential for developing regulations, codes and standards required for safe operation. NREL works closely with industry partners in providing support of advanced hydrogen technologies. Innovative approaches to product design will accelerate commercialization into new markets. NREL works with all phases of the product design life cycle from early prototype development to final certification testing. High pressure tests are performed on hydrogen components, primarily for the validation of developing new codes and standards for high pressure hydrogen applications. The following types of tests can be performed: Performance, Component and system level efficiency, Strength of materials and hydrogen compatibility, Safety demonstration, Model validation, and Life cycle reliability.

  16. Secondary Waste Cast Stone Waste Form Qualification Testing Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is being constructed to treat the 56 million gallons of radioactive waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site. The WTP includes a pretreatment facility to separate the wastes into high-level waste (HLW) and low-activity waste (LAW) fractions for vitrification and disposal. The LAW will be converted to glass for final disposal at the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). Cast Stone – a cementitious waste form, has been selected for solidification of this secondary waste stream after treatment in the ETF. The secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form must be acceptable for disposal in the IDF. This secondary waste Cast Stone waste form qualification testing plan outlines the testing of the waste form and immobilization process to demonstrate that the Cast Stone waste form can comply with the disposal requirements. Specifications for the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form have not been established. For this testing plan, Cast Stone specifications are derived from specifications for the immobilized LAW glass in the WTP contract, the waste acceptance criteria for the IDF, and the waste acceptance criteria in the IDF Permit issued by the State of Washington. This testing plan outlines the testing needed to demonstrate that the waste form can comply with these waste form specifications and acceptance criteria. The testing program must also demonstrate that the immobilization process can be controlled to consistently provide an acceptable waste form product. This testing plan also outlines the testing needed to provide the technical basis for understanding the long-term performance of the waste form in the disposal environment. These waste form performance data are needed to support performance assessment analyses of the long-term environmental impact of the secondary-waste Cast Stone waste form in the IDF

  17. Part B - Requirements & Funding Information PART B - Requirements...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to support the determinations and findings (D&F) required by FAR 17.502-2 to the contracting officer. Provide this information as an attachment or coordinate with the...

  18. Testing of ethylene propylene seals for the GA-4/GA-9 casks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary O-ring seal of the GA-4 and GA-9 casks was tested for leakage with a full-scale mockup of the cask lid and flange. Tests were performed at temperatures of ambient, {minus}41{degrees}, 121{degrees}, and 193{degrees}C. Shim plates between the lid and flange simulated gaps caused by thermal distortion. The testing used a helium mass spectrometer leak detector (MSLD). Results showed that the primary seal was leaktight for all test conditions. Helium permeation through the seal began in 13--23 minutes for the ambient tests and in 1--2 minutes for the tests at elevated temperatures. After each test several hours of the pumping were typically required to reduce the MSLD background reading to an acceptable level for the next test, indicating that the seal had become saturated with helium. To verify that the test results showed permeation and not real leakage, several response checks were conducted in which a calibrated leak source was inserted in the detector line near the seal. When the leak source was activated the detector responded within seconds.

  19. HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LOCKREM, L L

    2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

  20. acoustic impedance tests: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DETAILS Engineering Websites Summary: no electrical connection, and requires a lift bucket for access, a new approach was needed to enable AE testing Figure 2: Weatherproof...

  1. In Plane Conductivity Testing, BekkTech LLC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    skill and equipment required than making and testing a good MEA * Eliminates other fuel cell performance factors * Allows for an isolation of moving charge, not creation or...

  2. Design of SystemonaChip Test Access Architectures using Integer Linear Programming 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    integration. An ef­ ficient test access architecture should reduce test cost and time­to­market by minimizing. In order to reduce test cost and shorten short time­to­ market, the testing time for an SOC should) For a given test access architecture, how much test data bandwidth is required to meet specified testing time

  3. Vaccine refrigerator testing. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ventre, G.G. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Kilfoyle, D.; Marion, B. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the Central American Health Clinic Project initiated in 1986, Sandia National Laboratories and the Florida Solar Energy Center recognized the need for a test and evaluation program for vaccine refrigeration systems. At the Florida Solar Energy Center, side-by-side testing of three photovoltaic powered vaccine refrigerators began in 1987. The testing was expanded in 1988 to include a kerosene absorption refrigerator. This report presents observations, conclusions, and recommendations derived from testing the four vaccine refrigeration systems. Information is presented pertaining to the refrigerators, photovoltaic arrays, battery subsystems, charge controllers, and user requirements. This report should be of interest to designers, manufacturers, installers, and users of photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigeration systems and components.

  4. Low temperature irradiation tests on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Sample cool down by He gas loop 10K ­ 20K Fast neutron flux Measured by Ni activation in 2010 1.4xK #12;reactor Cryogenics #12;Al-Cu-Mg He gas temperature near sample 12K Resistance changesLow temperature irradiation tests on stabilizer materials using reactor neutrons at KUR Makoto

  5. Quality Assurance Protocol for AFCI Advanced Structural Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this letter is to inform you of recent progress on the development of advanced structural materials in support of advanced fast reactors and AFCI. As you know, the alloy development effort has been initiated in recent months with the procurement of adequate quantities of the NF616 and HT-UPS alloys. As the test alloys become available in the coming days, mechanical testing, evaluation of optimizing treatments, and screening of environmental effects will be possible at a larger scale. It is therefore important to establish proper quality assurance protocols for this testing effort in a timely manner to ensure high technical quality throughout testing. A properly implemented quality assurance effort will also enable preliminary data taken in this effort to be qualified as NQA-1 during any subsequent licensing discussions for an advanced design or actual prototype. The objective of this report is to describe the quality assurance protocols that will be used for this effort. An essential first step in evaluating quality protocols is assessing the end use of the data. Currently, the advanced structural materials effort is part of a long-range, basic research and development effort and not, as yet, involved in licensing discussions for a specific reactor design. After consultation with Mark Vance (an ORNL QA expert) and based on the recently-issued AFCI QA requirements, the application of NQA-1 quality requirements will follow the guidance provided in Part IV, Subpart 4.2 of the NQA-1 standard (Guidance on Graded Application of QA for Nuclear-Related Research and Development). This guidance mandates the application of sound scientific methodology and a robust peer review process in all phases, allowing for the data to be qualified for use even if the programmatic mission changes to include licensing discussions of a specific design or prototype. ORNL has previously implemented a QA program dedicated to GNEP activities and based on an appropriately graded application of NQA-1 requirements at the site. The current program is being revised to incorporate changes imposed through the recently revised AFCI Technical Integration Office QA requirements. Testing conducted under the AFCI QA program for the advanced structural materials effort shall incorporate the following quality assurance expectations: (1) personnel are adequately trained to perform assigned work; (2) activities are controlled to ensure consistency of results; (3) records necessary to substantiate how the work was performed are maintained (dedicated laboratory notebooks will be used); (4) the pedigree and traceability of the various tested materials are maintained throughout the described processes using consistent sample numbering and adequate record keeping; (5) equipment with the potential to affect the quality of the planned work is calibrated and maintained in accordance with applicable operating requirements. In addition, all reporting or related dissemination by ORNL personnel of the results of the work described in this subcontract shall be conducted in accordance with the requirements described or referenced in the ORNL Standards Based Management System subject area entitled Scientific and Technical Information. Reporting or publications at other institutions will be conducted in accordance with the requirements of that institution. Successful implementation of these protocols will provide a sound basis for future decisions and research. In addition, these steps will also help ensure that results can also be applied to licensing discussions at a future date.

  6. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 104, Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 104 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. CAU 104 consists of the following 15 Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 7 of the Nevada National Security Site: · CAS 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C · CAS 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1 · CAS 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site · CAS 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a · CAS 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S) · CAS 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S) · CAS 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S) · CAS 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie · CAS 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus) · CAS 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster) · CAS 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth · CAS 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4 · CAS 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b · CAS 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax Closure activities began in October 2012 and were completed in April 2013. Activities were conducted according to the Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for CAU 104. The corrective actions included No Further Action and Clean Closure. Closure activities generated sanitary waste, mixed waste, and recyclable material. Some wastes exceeded land disposal limits and required treatment prior to disposal. Other wastes met land disposal restrictions and were disposed in appropriate onsite landfills. The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO) requests the following: · A Notice of Completion from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to NNSA/NFO for closure of CAU 104 · The transfer of CAU 104 from Appendix III to Appendix IV, Closed Corrective Action Units, of the FFACO

  7. Fusion technology status and requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the status of fusion technology and discusses the requirements to be met in order to build a demonstration fusion plant. Strategies and programmatic considerations in pursuing engineering feasibility are also outlined.

  8. Meeting Federal Energy Security Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at at the Fall 2012 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—discusses the opportunity to increase the scope of federal-utility partnerships for meeting energy security requirements.

  9. Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NNSA /NSO Waste Management Project

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document establishes the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Nevada Test Site Waste Acceptance Criteria (NTSWAC). The NTSWAC provides the requirements, terms, and conditions under which the Nevada Test Site will accept low-level radioactive (LLW) and LLW Mixed Waste (MW) for disposal.

  10. Calibration curves for some standard Gap Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, A.L.; Sommer, S.C.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The relative shock sensitivities of explosive compositions are commonly assessed using a family of experiments that can be described by the generic term ''Gap Test.'' Gap tests include a donor charge, a test sample, and a spacer, or gap, between two explosives charges. The donor charge, gap material, and test dimensions are held constant within each different version of the gap test. The thickness of the gap is then varied to find the value at which 50% of the test samples will detonate. The gap tests measure the ease with a high-order detonation can be established in the test explosive, or the ''detonability,'' of the explosive. Test results are best reported in terms of the gap thickness at the 50% point. It is also useful to define the shock pressure transmitted into the test sample at the detonation threshold. This requires calibrating the gap test in terms of shock pressure in the gap as a function of the gap thickness. It also requires a knowledge of the shock Hugoniot of the sample explosive. We used the 2DE reactive hydrodynamic code with Forest Fire burn rates for the donor explosives to calculate calibration curves for several gap tests. The model calculations give pressure and particle velocity on the centerline of the experimental set-up and provide information about the curvature and pulse width of the shock wave. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  11. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear and Advanced Propulsion Branch, ER-11, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States); Morton, T. J. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

    2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG testing will utilize a higher fidelity point kinetics model to control core power transients, and reactivity feedback will be based on localized feedback coefficients and several independent temperature measurements taken within the core block. This paper presents preliminary test results and discusses the methodology that will be implemented in follow-on DDG testing and the additional instrumentation required to implement high fidelity dynamic testing.

  12. Design, fabrication and testing of a bearing test rig and preliminary studies on oil mist lubrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamim, Abdus

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN, FABRICATION AND TESTING OF A BEARING TEST RIG AND PRELIMINARY STUDIES ON OIL MIST LUBRICATION A Thesis by ABDUS SHAMIM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESIGN, FABRICATION AND TESTING OF A BEARING TEST RIG AND PRELIMINARY STUDIES ON OIL MIST LUBRICATION A Thesis by ABDUS SHAMIM Approved as to style and content by: C...

  13. Hydrates detection by cone penetration testing: cone penetration tests through ice layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeanjean, Philippe Henri

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDRATES DETECTION BY CONE PENETRATION TESTING: PART I: CONE PENETRATION TESTS THROUGH ICE LAYERS A Thesis by PHILIPPE HENRI JEANJEAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ABcM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering HYDRATES DETECTION BY CONE PENETRATION TESTING: PART I: CONE PENETRATION TESTS THROUGH ICE LAYERS A Thesis by PHILIPPE HENRI JEANJEAN Approved as to style...

  14. Functions and requirements for 105-KE Basin sludge retrieval and packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feigenbutz, L.V.

    1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Sludge, and the clouding due to sludge, interferes with basin operation and maintenance activities. This document defines the overall functions and requirements for sludge retrieval and packaging activities to be performed in the 105-KE Basin.

  15. Past Test One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MA 366: Introduction to Di?'erential Equations. Fall 2001, Test One. Instructor: Yip o This test booklet has FIVE QUESTIONS, totaling 50 points for the whole test.

  16. Test Advising Framework.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yurong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Test cases are represented in various formats depending on the process, the technique or the tool used to generate the tests. While different test case… (more)

  17. Directed Test Suite Augmentation.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhihong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Test suite augmentation techniques are used in regression testing to identify code elements affected by changes and to generate test cases to cover those elements.… (more)

  18. Solar-collector test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoney, W. E. [comp.] [comp.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities to evaluate the commercial readiness and potential of an all plastic solar hot water collector are summarized. The results of tests at the Florida Solar Energy Center are reported. The collector is described and data are given including the efficiency curve, incident angle modifier, raw test data, and the results of static tests. A meeting is also described which was called to obtain an outside evaluation of the collector and recommendations as to future activities. It was agreed that the design demonstrated that a thin-film plastic absorber could be built to produce performance at least equal to the mid-range of conventional copper or aluminum absorbers and that production costs could probably be at least half that of currently available collectors. (LEW)

  19. Non-Adaptive Complex Group Testing with Multiple Positive Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Francis Y.L.

    Non-Adaptive Complex Group Testing with Multiple Positive Sets Francis Y.L. Chin, Henry C.M. Leung Given n items with at most d of them having a particular property (referred as positive items), a test-adaptive group testing problem is to design how to group the items to minimize the number of tests required

  20. Automated Black-Box Testing with Abstract VDM Oracles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as test oracles for concrete software. The automation of the resulting testing frame-work is based of a target system. For that reason, a mapping between abstract and concrete test data is requiredAutomated Black-Box Testing with Abstract VDM Oracles Bernhard K. Aichernig Technical University

  1. Advanced Vehicle Testing - Beginning-of-Test Battery Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2.5 V Thermal Mgmt.: Passive, Vacuum-Sealed Unit Pack Weight: 294 kg BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 6,696 mi Date of...

  2. Romanian experience on packaging testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieru, G. [IAEA Technical Expert, Head, Reliability and Testing Lab., Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With more than twenty years ago, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), through its Reliability and Testing Laboratory, was licensed by the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body- CNCAN and to carry out qualification tests [1] for packages intended to be used for the transport and storage of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities [2] are packaged in accordance with national [3] and the IAEA's Regulations [1,6] for a safe transport to the disposal center. Subjecting these packages to the normal and simulating test conditions accomplish the evaluation and certification in order to prove the package technical performances. The paper describes the qualification tests for type A and B packages used for transport and storage of radioactive materials, during a period of 20 years of experience. Testing is used to substantiate assumption in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. The Romanian test facilities [1,3,6] are used to simulate the required qualification tests and have been developed at INR Pitesti, the main supplier of type A packages used for transport and storage of low radioactive wastes in Romania. The testing programme will continue to be a strong option to support future package development, to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on radioactive material packages or component sections, such as packages used for transport of radioactive sources to be used for industrial or medical purposes [2,8]. The paper describes and contain illustrations showing some of the various tests packages which have been performed during certain periods and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design there are also presented and commented. (authors)

  3. IFE chamber technology testing program in NIF and chamber development test plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Issues concerning chamber technology testing program in NIF involving: criteria for evaluation/prioritization of experiments, engineering scaling requirements for test article design and material selection and R and D plan prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program in NIF, the testing in NIF should provide the experimental data relevant to DEMO design choice or to DEMO design predictive capability by utilizing engineering scaling test article designs. Test plans were developed for 2 promising chamber design concepts. Early testing in non-fusion/non-ignition prior to testing in ignition facility serves a critical role in chamber R and D test plans in order to reduce the risks and costs of the more complex experiments in NIF.

  4. Introduction Statistical Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Huan

    Introduction Statistical Tests Experiment Summary Statistical Significance Testing Machine Learning Lab, ASU Surendra Singhi April 29, 2005 Surendra Singhi Statistical Significance Testing #12;Introduction Statistical Tests Experiment Summary Outline 1 Introduction Preliminary Stuff Sources of Variation

  5. Testing dynamically reconfigurable FPGAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiwale, Sameer Jagadish

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, testing methods are proposed to test the ics. logic resources and the interconnect structure of dynamically reconfigurable FPGAS. Testing methods are also proposed for testing the dedicated CPU interface in these FPGAS. A BIST...

  6. Pilot-scale treatability test plan for the 200-UP-1 groundwater Operable Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wittreich, C.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the treatability test plan for pilot-scale pump and treat testing at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. This treatability test plan has been prepared in response to an agreement between the US Department of Energy, the US Environmental Protection Agency, and the Washington State Department of Ecology, as documented in Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Ecology et al. 1989a) Change Control Form M-13-93-03 (Ecology et al. 1994). The agreement also requires that, following completion of the activities described in this test plan, a 200-UP-1 Operable Unit interim remedial measure (IRM) proposed plan be developed for use in preparing an interim action record of decision (ROD). The IRM Proposed Plan will be supported by the results of the testing described in this treatability test plan, as well as by other 200-UP-1 Operable Unit activities (e.g., limited field investigation, development of a qualitative risk assessment). Once issued, the interim action ROD will specify the interim action for groundwater contamination at the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. The approach discussed in this treatability test plan is to conduct a pilot-scale pump and treat test for the contaminant plume associated with the 200-UP-1 Operable Unit. Primary contaminants of concern are uranium and technetium-99; the secondary contaminant of concern is nitrate. The pilot-scale treatability testing presented in this test plan has as its primary purpose to assess the performance of aboveground treatment systems with respect to the ability to remove the primary contaminants in groundwater withdrawn from the contaminant plume.

  7. Bull Test ID 1140 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1140 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1141 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1142 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1143 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1144 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1145 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1146 2013 Florida

  8. Bull Test ID 1098 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1098 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1099 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1100 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1101 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1102 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1103 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1104 2013 Florida

  9. Bull Test ID 1181 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1181 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1182 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1183 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1184 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1185 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1186 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1187 2013 Florida

  10. Bull Test ID 1160 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1160 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1161 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1162 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1163 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1164 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1165 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1166 2013 Florida

  11. Bull Test ID 1118 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    Bull Test ID 1118 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1119 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1120 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1121 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1122 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1123 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1124 2013 Florida

  12. Bull Test ID 1077 2013 Florida Bull Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    14th Annual Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1077 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1078 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1079 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1080 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1081 2013 Florida Bull Test #12;Bull Test ID 1082 2013 Florida Bull Test #12

  13. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    documented safety analysis and technical safety requirements for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection's review and approval. Independent Oversight Activity...

  14. Status and specifications of a Project X front-end accelerator test facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimel, J.; Webber, R.; Madrak, R.; Wildman, D.; Pasquinelli, R.; Evans-Peoples, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the construction and operational status of an accelerator test facility for Project X. The purpose of this facility is for Project X component development activities that benefit from beam tests and any development activities that require 325 MHz or 650 MHz RF power. It presently includes an H- beam line, a 325 MHz superconducting cavity test facility, a 325 MHz (pulsed) RF power source, and a 650 MHz (CW) RF power source. The paper also discusses some specific Project X components that will be tested in the facility. Fermilab's future involves new facilities to advance the intensity frontier. In the early 2000's, the vision was a pulsed, superconducting, 8 GeV linac capable of injecting directly into the Fermilab Main Injector. Prototyping the front-end of such a machine started in 2005 under a program named the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS). While the HINS test facility was being constructed, the concept of a new, more versatile accelerator for the intensity frontier, now called Project X, was forming. This accelerator comprises a 3 GeV CW superconducting linac with an associated experimental program, followed by a pulsed 8 GeV superconducting linac to feed the Main Injector synchrotron. The CW Project X design is now the model for Fermilab's future intensity frontier program. Although CW operation is incompatible with the original HINS front-end design, the installation remains useful for development and testing many Project X components.

  15. LCLS Heavy Met Outgassing Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishiyama, K. I.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Heavy Met that is 95% tungsten, 3% nickel and 2% iron and sintered to 100% density and is Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) compatible is proposed for use as the X-ray slit in the Front End Enclosure and the Fixed Mask for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). The Heavy Met was tested in the LLNL Vacuum Sciences and Engineering Lab (VSEL) to determine its outgassing rate and its overall compatibility with the vacuum requirements for LCLS.

  16. Testing of Large-Scale ICV Glasses with Hanford LAW Simulant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrma, Pavel R.; Kim, Dong-Sang; Vienna, John D.; Matyas, Josef; Smith, Donald E.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Yeager, John D.

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preliminary glass compositions for immobilizing Hanford low-activity waste (LAW) by the in-container vitrification (ICV) process were initially fabricated at crucible- and engineering-scale, including simulants and actual (radioactive) LAW. Glasses were characterized for vapor hydration test (VHT) and product consistency test (PCT) responses and crystallinity (both quenched and slow-cooled samples). Selected glasses were tested for toxicity characteristic leach procedure (TCLP) responses, viscosity, and electrical conductivity. This testing showed that glasses with LAW loading of 20 mass% can be made readily and meet all product constraints by a far margin. Glasses with over 22 mass% Na2O can be made to meet all other product quality and process constraints. Large-scale testing was performed at the AMEC, Geomelt Division facility in Richland. Three tests were conducted using simulated LAW with increasing loadings of 12, 17, and 20 mass% Na2O. Glass samples were taken from the test products in a manner to represent the full expected range of product performance. These samples were characterized for composition, density, crystalline and non-crystalline phase assemblage, and durability using the VHT, PCT, and TCLP tests. The results, presented in this report, show that the AMEC ICV product with meets all waste form requirements with a large margin. These results provide strong evidence that the Hanford LAW can be successfully vitrified by the ICV technology and can meet all the constraints related to product quality. The economic feasibility of the ICV technology can be further enhanced by subsequent optimization.

  17. Commercial Space Activities at Goddard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    , environmental verification, and engineering `Best Practices' requirements #12;Commercial Utilization's commercial practices and processes · Brief summary of procurement activities under the three Rapid Catalogs Quantity ­ Leverage commercial practices and processes when possible ­ NASA mission assurance

  18. SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON MATERIALS...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    require 8 radiological work permit. Activities would be perfunned in compliance with as low as reasonably achievable principles, applicable state and federal regulations, DOE...

  19. Unit Testing Discussion C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Unit Testing Discussion C #12;Unit Test public Method is smallest unit of code Input/output transformation Test if the method does what it claims Not exactly black box testing #12;Test if (actual result Expected Computed Input #12;Functionality Computation ­ Easy to test Time based Asynchronous interaction

  20. Concolic Testing Koushik Sen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Koushik

    Concolic testing automates test input generation by com­ bining the concrete and symbolic (concolic) execution of the code under test. Traditional test input generation tech­ niques use either (1) concrete test inputs from these constraints. In contrast, concolic testing tightly couples both concrete

  1. Concolic Testing Koushik Sen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Koushik

    Concolic testing automates test input generation by com- bining the concrete and symbolic (concolic) execution of the code under test. Traditional test input generation tech- niques use either (1) concrete test inputs from these constraints. In contrast, concolic testing tightly couples both concrete

  2. Development, tests, and data acquisition of the integrated system of internal sensors for RFX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serianni, G.; Bolzonella, T.; Cavazzana, R.; Marchiori, G.; Pomaro, N.; Lotto, L.; Monari, M.; Taliercio, C. [Consorzio RFX, Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The RFX reversed field pinch (RFP) has undergone major modifications of the load assembly and is now equipped with a large number of active external coils for magnetohydrodynamics mode control. The study of the effects on the plasma of both the new passive structure and the active coils is then of great importance, as well as the investigation of turbulence due to its influence on plasma transport. An integrated system of magnetic, electrostatic and calorimetric sensors has been realized, fulfilling very challenging requirements in terms of spatial and temporal resolution, which are characteristic features of RFP plasmas. A description of the whole diagnostic system is given, including the original solutions adopted to cope with the limited space available and the thermal and electrical requirements, particularly for the calorimetrical probes. The tests performed on the whole system during the installation are presented. Signal conditioning and data acquisition are described.

  3. Network Requirements Workshop - Documents and Background Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Documents and Background Materials Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science...

  4. SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Requirements Management Checklist SOFTWARE QUALITY & SYSTEMS ENGINEERING PROGRAM: Requirements Management Checklist The following checklist is intended to provide system owners,...

  5. HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents additional resources on loan standards and requirements from Elise Avers' presentation on HEAT Loan Minimum Standards and Requirements.

  6. Johnson Noise Thermometry System Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Roberts, Michael [ORNL; Ezell, N Dianne Bull [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is intended to capture the requirements for the architecture of the developmental electronics for the ORNL-lead drift-free Johnson Noise Thermometry (JNT) project conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development (R&D) program. The requirements include not only the performance of the system but also the allowable measurement environment of the probe and the allowable physical environment of the associated electronics. A more extensive project background including the project rationale is available in the initial project report [1].

  7. Organic Separation Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Separable organics have been defined as “those organic compounds of very limited solubility in the bulk waste and that can form a separate liquid phase or layer” (Smalley and Nguyen 2013), and result from three main solvent extraction processes: U Plant Uranium Recovery Process, B Plant Waste Fractionation Process, and Plutonium Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Process. The primary organic solvents associated with tank solids are TBP, D2EHPA, and NPH. There is concern that, while this organic material is bound to the sludge particles as it is stored in the tanks, waste feed delivery activities, specifically transfer pump and mixer pump operations, could cause the organics to form a separated layer in the tank farms feed tank. Therefore, Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is experimentally evaluating the potential of organic solvents separating from the tank solids (sludge) during waste feed delivery activities, specifically the waste mixing and transfer processes. Given the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) waste acceptance criteria per the Waste Feed Acceptance Criteria document (24590-WTP-RPT-MGT-11-014) that there is to be “no visible layer” of separable organics in the waste feed, this would result in the batch being unacceptable to transfer to WTP. This study is of particular importance to WRPS because of these WTP requirements.

  8. Cone Penetrometer N Factor Determination Testing Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains the results of testing activities to determine the empirical 'N Factor' for the cone penetrometer in kaolin clay simulant. The N Factor is used to releate resistance measurements taken with the cone penetrometer to shear strength.

  9. PU IMMOBILIZATION - INDUCTION MELTING ND OFFGAS TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) at the Aiken County Technology Laboratory (ACTL) has been operated by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to support the Pu Disposition Conceptual Design (CD-0) development effort. The primary purpose of this report is to summarize the offgas sampling tests conducted in the CIM to capture and analyze the particulate and vapors emitted from lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) Frit X with HfO{sub 2} as a surrogate for PuO{sub 2} and added impurities. In addition, this report describes several initial tests of the CIM for the vitrification of LaBS Frit X with HfO{sub 2}. The activities required to produce Frit X from batch chemical oxides for subsequent milling to yield glass frit of nominally 20 micron particle size are also discussed. The tests with impurities added showed that alkali salts such as NaCl and KCl were substantially emitted into the offgas system as the salt particulate, HCl, or Cl{sub 2}. Retention of Na and K in the glass were about 80 and 55%, respectively. Chloride retention was about 35%; chloride remaining in the glass was 0.29-0.37 wt%. Based on a material balance, approximately 83% of F fed was retained in the glass at about 0.09 wt % (F could not be measured directly at this concentration). Transition metals (Ni, Cu, Fe, Mo, Cr) were also volatilized to varying extents. A very small amount (<0.1 g) of nickel compounds and KCl were found in crystals deposited on the melter offgas line. Overall, about 58-72% of the impurities added were volatilized. Virtually all of the particulate species were collected on the nominal 0.3 {micro}m filter. The particulate evolution rate ranged from 2-8 g/kg glass/h. The particulate was found to be as small as 0.2 {micro}m and have an approximate median size of 0.5 {micro}m. The particulate salt was also found to stick together by forming bridges between particles. Further runs without washable salts are recommended. Measurements of particle size distribution for use in offgas system design and tests of simple impingement devices for particle collection are also recommended for tests in the near future.

  10. World nuclear capacity and fuel cycle requirements, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis report presents the current status and projections of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, fuel cycle requirements, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2030 are provided in support of the Department of Energy`s activities pertaining to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (as amended in 1987). The projections of uranium requirements also support the Energy Information Administration`s annual report, Domestic Uranium Mining and Milling Industry: Viability Assessment.

  11. Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krenzien, Susan; Marutzky, Sam

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2013. All UGTA organizations—U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)—conducted QA activities in FY 2013. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. In addition, integrated UGTA required reading and corrective action tracking was instituted.

  12. Radioactive material package seal tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} std cm{sup 3}/s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2008 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing

  14. Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zadok, Erez

    Computer Science Graduation Requirements Checklist ­ Fall 2009 Computer Science Courses Course Gr. Sem. Comments CSE 114 Computer Science I [prerequisite: CSE 110] CSE 214 Computer Science II CSE 215 Foundations of Computer Science CSE 219 Computer Science III CSE 220 Computer Organization CSE 300 Writing

  15. Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    Handbook of Academic Requirements & Procedures for the Chemistry Graduate Program PLEASE NOTE and procedures is provided. The intent is to describe the programs and explain the rationale behind them of the Department; to promote consistency in procedures and standards; and to provide a basis for communication

  16. AMS vs. NWS: Educational Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Reconstruction of past climates · Climate models · Causes of past and future climate change #12;Capstone methods · Oral, written, and multimedia communication ­ Ability to create and deliver scientific ­ Ability to effectively communicate with technical and lay audiences using scientific evidence #12;Required

  17. DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    DEGREE REQUIREMENTS BIOLOGICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY The curriculum in the technology programs must satisfy the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS for the technology programs are listed by subject matter in three major categories: (A) Basic Subjects, (B) Advanced

  18. Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Documentation Requirements for Learning Disabilities Students, faculty, staff, and campus guests wishing to request accommodations due to learning disabilities should refer to the following documentation of interest. C) Documentation must be typed, dated, signed by the evaluator and submitted to ODR

  19. Page 1 of 8 POULTRY HEALTH REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamza, Iqbal

    Page 1 of 8 POULTRY HEALTH REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO MARYLAND FAIRS AND SHOWS - 2005 N. G@mda.state.md.us 1. What are the regulations on Avian Influenza testing? · Poultry must come from flocks that participate in the U.S. National Poultry Improvement Plan Certified Avian Influenza-Free Program (Sample

  20. PFBC HGCU Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the thirteenth Technical Progress Report submitted to the Department of Energy (DOE) in connection with the cooperative agreement between the DOE and Ohio Power Company for the Tidd PFBC Hot Gas Clean Up Test Facility. This report covers the period of work completed during the Fourth Quarter of CY 1992. The following are highlights of the activities that occurred during this report period: Initial operation of the Advanced Particle Filter (APF) occurred during this quarter. The following table summarizes the operating dates and times. HGCU ash lockhopper valve plugged with ash. Primary cyclone ash pluggage. Problems with the coal water paste. Unit restarted warm 13 hours later. HGCU expansion joint No. 7 leak in internal ply of bellows. Problems encountered during these initial tests included hot spots on the APP, backup cyclone and instrumentation spools, two breakdowns of the backpulse air compressor, pluggage of the APF hopper and ash removal system, failure (breakage) of 21 filter candles, leakage of the inner ply of one (1) expansion joint bellows, and numerous other smaller problems. These operating problems are discussed in detail in a subsequent section of this report. Following shutdown and equipment inspection in December, design modifications were initiated to correct the problems noted above. The system is scheduled to resume operation in March, 1993.

  1. 10 CFR 850 Implementation of Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S

    2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    10 CFR 850 defines a contractor as any entity, including affiliated entities, such as a parent corporation, under contract with DOE, including a subcontractor at any tier, with responsibility for performing work at a DOE site in furtherance of a DOE mission. The Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) applies to beryllium-related activities that are performed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CBDPP or Beryllium Safety Program is integrated into the LLNL Worker Safety and Health Program and, thus, implementation documents and responsibilities are integrated in various documents and organizational structures. Program development and management of the CBDPP is delegated to the Environment, Safety and Health (ES&H) Directorate, Worker Safety and Health Functional Area. As per 10 CFR 850, Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS) periodically submits a CBDPP to the National Nuclear Security Administration/Livermore Site Office (NNSA/LSO). The requirements of this plan are communicated to LLNS workers through ES&H Manual Document 14.4, 'Working Safely with Beryllium.' 10 CFR 850 is implemented by the LLNL CBDPP, which integrates the safety and health standards required by the regulation, components of the LLNL Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), and incorporates other components of the LLNL ES&H Program. As described in the regulation, and to fully comply with the regulation, specific portions of existing programs and additional requirements are identified in the CBDPP. The CBDPP is implemented by documents that interface with the workers, principally through ES&H Manual Document 14.4. This document contains information on how the management practices prescribed by the LLNL ISMS are implemented, how beryllium hazards that are associated with LLNL work activities are controlled, and who is responsible for implementing the controls. Adherence to the requirements and processes described in the ES&H Manual ensures that ES&H practices across LLNL are developed in a consistent manner. Other implementing documents, such as the ES&H Manual, are integral in effectively implementing 10 CFR 850.

  2. Long-term testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferber, M.; Graves, G.A. Jr.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Land-based gas turbines are significantly different from automotive gas turbines in that they are designed to operate for 50,000 h or greater (compared to 5,000--10,000 h). The primary goal of this research is to determine the long-term survivability of ceramic materials for industrial gas turbine applications. Research activities in this program focus on the evaluation of the static tensile creep and stress rupture (SR) behavior of three commercially available structural ceramics which have been identified by the gas turbine manufacturers as leading candidates for use in industrial gas turbines. For each material investigated, a minimum of three temperatures and four stresses will be used to establish the stress and temperature sensitivities of the creep and SR behavior. Because existing data for many candidate structural ceramics are limited to testing times less than 2,000 h, this program will focus on extending these data to times on the order of 10,000 h, which represents the lower limit of operating time anticipated for ceramic blades and vanes in gas turbine engines. A secondary goal of the program will be to investigate the possibility of enhancing life prediction estimates by combining interrupted tensile SR tests and tensile dynamic fatigue tests in which tensile strength is measured as a function of stressing rate. The third goal of this program will be to investigate the effects of water vapor upon the SR behavior of the three structural ceramics chosen for the static tensile studies by measuring the flexural strength as a function of stressing rate at three temperatures.

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - activate metronidazole nitroreductases...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    African Trypanosomes Summary: nitroreductase activities 6, results from the classical test should be treated with caution in assessing nitro... been shown to have activity...

  4. AMI FW UPGRADEABILITY TEST PROCEDURE AND SECURITY ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snyder, Isabelle B [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is producing NISTIR 7823 to define test requirements for Smart Meter upgradability. The term Smart Meter refers specifically to advanced electric meters being deployed to enhance management of electricity distribution for residential and industrial consumers. The underlying functional and security requirements for Smart Meter upgradability are specified in NEMA standard SG-AMI 1-2009. The purpose of NISTIR 7823 is to describe conformance test requirements that may be used voluntarily by testers and/or test laboratories to determine whether Smart Meters and Upgrade Management Systems conform to the requirements of NEMA SG-AMI 1-2009.

  5. Model-based testing in the automotive industry challenges and solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peleska, Jan - Fachbereich 3

    Test specification System integration testing ­ model-based Test executionTest model Documentation... Requirements System integration testing ­ model-based SUT Sensors/busses Input interfaces Actors/busses Output interfaces #12;9 Overview 1. Model-based system integration testing 2. Integrating external models in the HW

  6. Test specification for decant pump and winch assembly. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staehr, T.W.

    1995-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This specification provides the requirements for testing of the vertical turbine decant pump including the floating suction with load sensing winch control, instrumentation and the associated PLC/PC control system. All assembly necessary for testing including piping, temporary wiring, etc., shall be performed by the Seller. All referenced figures are at the back of this document. The testing consists of performance testing, winch testing and calibration, instrumentation verification testing and run-in testing of the pump. Testing shall be done in the presence and under the direction of the Buyer in accordance with this procedure.

  7. CLOSEOUT REPORT FOR HYBRID SULFUR PRESSURIZED BUTTON CELL TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steeper, T.

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the Close-Out Report for design and partial fabrication of the Pressurized Button Cell Test Facility at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This facility was planned to help develop the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) that is a key component of the Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for generating hydrogen. The purpose of this report is to provide as much information as possible in case the decision is made to resume research. This report satisfies DOE Milestone M3GSR10VH030107.0. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by watersplitting. The HyS Cycle utilizes the high temperature (>800 C) thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both high thermodynamic efficiency and low hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. Sulfur dioxide from the decomposer is cycled back to electrolyzers. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. Anode and cathode are formed by spraying a catalyst, typically platinized carbon, on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). SRNL has been testing SDEs for several years including an atmospheric pressure Button Cell electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2} active area) and an elevated temperature/pressure Single Cell electrolyzer (54.8 cm{sup 2} active area). SRNL tested 37 MEAs in the Single Cell electrolyzer facility from June 2005 until June 2009, when funding was discontinued. An important result of the final months of testing was the development of a method that prevents the formation of a sulfur layer previously observed in MEAs used in the Hybrid Sulfur Cycle electrolyzer. This result is very important because the sulfur layer increased cell voltage and eventually destroyed the MEA that is the heart of the cell. Steimke and Steeper [2005, 2006, 2007, 2008] reported on testing in the Single Cell Electrolyzer test facility in several periodic reports. Steimke et. al [2010] issued a final facility close-out report summarizing all the testing in the Single Cell Electrolyzer test facility. During early tests, significant deterioration of the membrane occurred in 10 hours or less; the latest tests ran for at least 200 hours with no sign of deterioration. Ironically, the success with the Single Cell electrolyzer meant that it became dedicated to long runs and not available for quick membrane evaluations. Early in this research period, the ambient pressure Button Cell Electrolyzer test facility was constructed to quickly evaluate membrane materials. Its small size allowed testing of newly developed membranes that typically were not available in sizes large enough to test in the Single Cell electrolyzer. The most promising membranes were tested in the Single Cell Electrolyzer as soon as sufficient large membranes could be obtained. However, since the concentration of SO{sub 2} gas in sulfuric acid decreases rapidly with increasing temperature, the ambient pressure Button Cell was no longer able to achieve the operating conditions needed to evaluate the newer improved high temperature membranes. Significantly higher pressure operation was required to force SO{sub 2} into the sulfuric acid to obtain meaningful concentrations at increased temperatures. A high pressure (200 psig), high temperature (120 C) Button Cell was designed and partially fabricated just before funding was discontinued in June 2009. SRNL completed the majority of the design of the test facility, including preparation of a process and instrument drawing (P&ID) and preliminary designs for the major components. SRNL intended to complete the designs and procu

  8. Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

  9. Iodine Sorbent Performance in FY 2012 Deep Bed Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing and evolve in gaseous species into the reprocessing facility off-gas systems. Analyses have shown that I-129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Iodine capture is an important aspect of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign Off-gas Sigma Team (Jubin 2011, Pantano 2011). Deep-bed iodine sorption tests for both silver-functionalized Aerogel and silver zeolite sorbents were performed during Fiscal Year 2012. These tests showed that: • Decontamination factors were achieved that exceed reasonably conservative estimates for DFs needed for used fuel reprocessing facilities in the U.S. to meet regulatory requirements for I-129 capture. • Silver utilizations approached or exceeded 100% for high inlet gas iodine concentrations, but test durations were not long enough to approach 100% silver utilization for lower iodine concentrations. • The depth of the mass transfer zone was determined for both low iodine concentrations (under 10 ppmv) and for higher iodine concentrations (between 10-50 ppmv); the depth increases over time as iodine is sorbed. • These sorbents capture iodine by chemisorption, where the sorbed iodine reacts with the silver to form very non-volatile AgI. Any sorbed iodine that is physisorbed but not chemically reacted with silver to form AgI might not be tightly held by the sorbent. The portion of sorbed iodine that tends to desorb because it is not chemisorbed (reacted to form AgI) is small, under 1%, for the AgZ tests, and even smaller, under 0.01%, for the silver-functionalized Aerogel.

  10. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.0 , which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590 PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590 PTF TEF RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  11. Ion Exchange Testing with SRF Resin FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Renee L.; Rinehart, Donald E.; Peterson, Reid A.

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion exchange using spherical resorcinol-formaldehyde (SRF) resin has been selected by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of River Protection (DOE-ORP) for use in the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) and for potential application in at-tank deployment. Numerous studies have shown SRF resin to be effective for removing 137Cs from a wide variety of actual and simulated tank waste supernatants (Adamson et al. 2006; Blanchard et al. 2008; Burgeson et al. 2004; Duignan and Nash 2009; Fiskum et al. 2006a; Fiskum et al. 2006b; Fiskum et al. 2006c; Fiskum et al. 2007; Hassan and Adu-Wusu 2003; King et al. 2004; Nash et al. 2006). Prior work at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has focused primarily on the loading behavior for 4 to 6 M Na solutions at 25 to 45°C. Recent proposed changes to the WTP ion exchange process baseline indicate that loading may include a broader range of sodium molarities (0.1 to 8 M) and higher temperatures (50°C) to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues. This report discusses ion exchange loading kinetics testing activities performed in accordance with Test Plan TP-WTPSP-002, Rev. 3.01, which was prepared and approved in response to the Test Specification 24590-PTF-TSP-RT-09-002, Rev. 0 (Lehrman 2010) and Test Exception 24590-PTF-TEF-RT-11-00003, Rev. 0 (Meehan 2011). This testing focused on column tests evaluating the impact of elevated temperature on resin degradation over an extended period of time and batch contacts evaluating the impact on Cs loading over a broad range of sodium concentrations (0.1 to 5 M). These changes may be required to alleviate post-filtration precipitation issues and broaden the data range of SRF resin loading under the conditions expected with the new equipment and process changes.

  12. Fuels from microalgae: Technology status, potential, and research requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neenan, B.; Feinberg, D.; Hill, A.; McIntosh, R.; Terry, K.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although numerous options for the production of fuels from microalgae have been proposed, our analysis indicates that only two qualify for extensive development - gasoline and ester fuel. In developing the comparisons that support this conclusion, we have identified the major areas of microalgae production and processing that require extensive development. Technology success requires developing and testing processes that fully utilize the polar and nonpolar lipids produced by microalgae. Process designs used in these analyses were derived from fragmented, preliminary laboratory data. These results must be substantiated and integrated processes proposed, tested, and refined to be able to evaluate the commercial feasibility from microalgae. The production of algal feedstocks for processing to gasoline or ester fuel requires algae of high productivity and high lipid content that efficiently utilize saline waters. Species screening and development suggest that algae can achieve required standards taken individually, but algae that can meet the integrated requirements still elude researchers. Effective development of fuels from microalgae technology requires that R and D be directed toward meeting the integrated standards set out in the analysis. As technology analysts, it is inappropriate for us to dictate how the R and D effort should proceed to meet these standards. We end our role by noting that alternative approaches to meeting the feasibility targets have been identified, and it is now the task of program managers and scientists to choose the appropriate approach to assure the greatest likelihood of realizing a commercially viable technology. 70 refs., 39 figs., 35 tabs.

  13. Multi-Modal Modeling, Analysis and Validation of Open Source Software Requirements Processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scacchi, Walt

    model of the OSS requirements process requires multiple, comparative project case studies, so our1 Multi-Modal Modeling, Analysis and Validation of Open Source Software Requirements Processes Walt@uci.edu Abstract Understanding the context, structure, activities, and content of software development processes

  14. A Brief Essay on Software Testing Antonia Bertolino, Eda Marchetti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Sukhamay

    1 A Brief Essay on Software Testing Antonia Bertolino, Eda Marchetti Abstract-- Testing of the delivered product strictly depend. Testing is not limited to the detection of "bugs" in the software and nonfunctional properties. Testing related activities encompass the entire development process and may consume

  15. Regression Testing Minimisation, Selection and Prioritisation : A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Jeremy

    Regression Testing Minimisation, Selection and Prioritisation : A Survey Shin Yoo, Mark Harman King's College London, Centre for Research on Evolution, Search & Testing, Strand, London, WC2R 2LS, UK ABSTRACT Regression testing is a testing activity that is performed to provide confidence that changes do not harm

  16. 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid - vin 3539 Advanced Vehicle Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Pack Capacity: 5.3 Ah Cooling: ActiveCabin Air Pack Weight: 96 lb BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 5,730 mi Date of...

  17. 2013 Chevrolet Volt - VIN 3929 - Advanced Vehicle Testing - Beginning...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Voltage 3 : 3.00 V Thermal Management: Active - Liquid cooled BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 4,007 mi Date of...

  18. TMACS test procedure TP001: Alarm management. Revision 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanlan, P.K.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The TMACS Software Project Test Procedures translate the project`s acceptance criteria into test steps. Software releases are certified when the affected Test Procedures are successfully performed and the customers authorize installation of these changes. This Test Procedure addresses the Alarm Management requirements of the TMACS. The features to be tested are: real-time alarming on high and low level and discrete alarms, equipment alarms, dead-band filtering, alarm display color coding, alarm acknowledgement, and alarm logging.

  19. Dual-Axis Resonance Testing of Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind turbine blades must undergo strength and fatigue testing in order to be rated and marketed appropriately. Presently, wind turbine blades are fatigue-tested in the flapwise direction and in the edgewise direction independently. This testing involves placing the blades through 1 to 10 million or more load or fatigue cycles, which may take 3 to 12 months or more to complete for each tested direction. There is a need for blade testing techniques that are less expensive to use and require...

  20. Preservation of FFTF Data Related to Passive Safety Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the goals of the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCRD) is to preserve the knowledge that has been gained in the United States on Liquid Metal Reactors (LMR). A key area deserving special attention for preservation is the data relating to passive safety testing that was conducted in FFTF and EBR-II during the 1980’s. Accidents at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Station and Unit 2 at Three Mile Island changed the safety paradigm of the nuclear power industry. New emphasis was placed on assured safety based on intrinsic plant characteristics that protect not only the public, but the significant investment in the plant as well. Plants designated to perform in this manner are considered to be passively safe since no active sensor/alarm system or human intervention is required to bring the reactor to a safe shutdown condition. The liquid metal reactor (LMR) has several key characteristics needed for a passively safe reactor: reactor coolant with superior heat transfer capability and very high boiling point, low (atmospheric) system pressures, and reliable negative reactivity feedback. The credibility of the design for a passively safe LMR rests on two issues: the validity of analytic methods used to predict passive safety performance and the availability of relevant test data to calibrate design tools. Safety analysis methods used to analyze LMRs under the old safety paradigm were focused on calculating the source term for the Core Disruptive Accident. Passive safety design requires refined analysis methods for transient events because treatment of the detailed reactivity feedbacks is important in predicting the response of the reactor. Similarly, analytic tools should be calibrated against actual test experience in existing LMR facilities. The principal objectives of the combined FFTF natural circulation and Passive Safety Testing program were: 1) to verify natural circulation as a reliable means to safely remove decay heat, 2) to extend passive safety experience to a large-size LMR and obtain data for validating design analysis computer codes, and 3) to develop and test passive safety enhancements that might be used for future LMRs. These tests were designed to provide data sufficient to allow separation of fuel temperature effects from structural temperature effects. The data developed through this testing program were used to verify the predictive capability of passive safety analysis methods as well as provide a data base for calibrating design tools such as the SASSYS/SAS4A codes. These tests were instrumental in improving understanding of reactivity feedback mechanisms in LMRs and demonstrating passive safety margins available in an LMR. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, startup, and operation of the reactor. This information may be of potential use for international exchanges with other LMR programs around the world. This information provides the basis for creating benchmarks for validating and testing large scale computer programs. All information preserved to date is now being stored and categorized consistent with the IAEA international standardized taxonomy. The test results information exists in several different formats depending upon the final stage of the test evaluation. Over 100 documents relevant to passive safety testing have been identified and are being recovered, scanned, and catalogued. Attempts to recover plant data tapes are also in progress. Documents related to passive safety testing are now being categorized consistent with internationally agreed upon IAEA standards. Documents are being converted to electronic format compatible with a general search engine being developed by INL. The data from the FFTF passive safety tests provides experimental verification of structural reactivity effects that should be very useful to innovative designers seeking to optimize passive safety in the design of new LMRs.

  1. Central serotonin neurons are required for arousal to CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Central serotonin neurons are required for arousal to CO2 Gordon F. Buchanana,b,1 and George B neurons are stimulated by CO2, and sero- tonin activates thalamocortical networks, we hypothesized any arousal response to inhalation of 10% CO2 (with 21% O2 in balance N2) but had normal arousal

  2. NOx control subsystem test plan: LEBS Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    It is planned that NO{sub x} control subsystem testing in support of Phase II of the Low-Emissions Boiler Systems (LEBS) Project occur in ABB Power Plant Laboratories` (PPL) pilot scale Boiler Simulation Facility (BSF). This work will be performed to provide necessary design and operational information for inclusion of an optimized NO, control subsystem in the Proof-of-Concept Test Facility (POCTF) and Commercial Generating Unit (CGU) designs. The BSF is a 50 to 90x10{sup 6} BTU/hr (15 to 26 MWt) coal, oil or natural gas fired tangential furnace designed to replicate the residence time/temperature history of a utility scale tangentially fired boiler. All major aspects of a typical utility boiler are duplicated in the BSF including the lower furnace, the ash hopper, multiple burner elevations, the arch section, superheater/reheater panels, and the convective heat transfer surfaces. The furnace walls and heat transfer surfaces are cooled by a surrounding water jacket. Steam generated is vented off at atmospheric pressure so that a constant sink temperature of 100{degrees}C (212{degrees}C) is maintained. The lower furnace water walls are selectively refractory lined to maintain an appropriate furnace gas temperature history. Refractory is required because the sink temperature (100{degrees}C) is cooler than that of a typical, utility boiler, and the surface-to-volume ratio of the BSF is greater than that of a utility boiler due to scale effects. For the subject testing, the BSF will be configured as a coal fired boiler. Design and planning activities associated with the construction of the NO{sub x} control subsystem test unit will continue through June, 1995. Additionally, the schedule for specification of certain low NO{sub x} firing system components was set to allow for precursor, internal and LEBS development activities to occur and subsequently provide necessary design parameters.

  3. Deep Bed Iodine Sorbent Testing FY 2011 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products that increasingly interfere with the fission process as their concentrations increase. Some of these fission and activation products tend to evolve in gaseous species during used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Deep-bed iodine sorption testing has been done to evaluate the performance of solid sorbents for capturing iodine in off-gas streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The objectives of the FY 2011 deep bed iodine sorbent testing are: (1) Evaluate sorbents for iodine capture under various conditions of gas compositions and operating temperature (determine sorption efficiencies, capacities, and mass transfer zone depths); and (2) Generate data for dynamic iodine sorption modeling. Three tests performed this fiscal year on silver zeolite light phase (AgZ-LP) sorbent are reported here. Additional tests are still in progress and can be reported in a revision of this report or a future report. Testing was somewhat delayed and limited this year due to initial activities to address some questions of prior testing, and due to a period of maintenance for the on-line GC. Each test consisted of (a) flowing a synthetic blend of gases designed to be similar to an aqueous dissolver off-gas stream over the sorbent contained in three separate bed segments in series, (b) measuring each bed inlet and outlet gas concentrations of iodine and methyl iodide (the two surrogates of iodine gas species considered most representative of iodine species expected in dissolver off-gas), (c) operating for a long enough time to achieve breakthrough of the iodine species from at least one (preferably the first two) bed segments, and (d) post-test purging with pure N2 to drive loosely or physisorbed iodine species off of the sorbent. Post-test calculations determine the control efficiencies for each bed, iodine loadings on the sorbent, and mass transfer zone depths. Portions of the iodine-laden sorbent from the first bed of two of the tests have been shipped to SNL for waste form studies. Over the past three years, we have explored a full range of inlet iodine and methyl iodide concentrations ranging from {approx}100 ppb to {approx}100 ppm levels, and shown adequate control efficiencies within a bed depth as shallow as 2 inches for lower concentrations and 4 inches for higher concentrations, for the AgZ-type sorbents. We are now performing a limited number of tests in the NC-77 sorbent from SNL. Then we plan to continue to (a) fill in data gaps needed for isotherms and dynamic sorbent modeling, and (b) test the performance of additional sorbents under development.

  4. Final Report - LAW Envelope A and B Glass Formulations Testing in Increase Waste Loading. VSL-06R6900-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Gong, W.; Gan, H.; Pegg, I. L.; Matlack, K. S.

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of testing specified by the Test Plan VSL-06R6900-1 Rev 0. The work was performed in compliance with quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The test results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

  5. Final Report - LAW Envelope C Glass Formulation Testing to Increase Waste Loading, VSL-05R5900-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Albert A.; Pegg, I. L.; Matlack, K. S.; Joseph, I.; Muller, I. S.; Gong, W.

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of testing specified by Test Plan VSL-05R5900-1 Rev.0. The work was performed in compliance with the quality assurance requirements specified in the Test Plan. Results required by the Test Plan are reported. The test results and this report have been reviewed for correctness, technical adequacy, completeness, and accuracy.

  6. Antarctic Mapping Project ACTIVE RADAR CALIBRATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    RADARSAT Antarctic Mapping Project ACTIVE RADAR CALIBRATOR INSTALLATION DOCUMENT October, 1999 ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE OF MICHIGAN CENTER FOR EARTH SCIENCES ALASKA SAR FACILITY BYRD POLAR RESEARCH...................................................................................................................................................3 Active Radar Calibrator Testing

  7. Advanced Test Reactor Testing Experience: Past, Present and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frances M. Marshall

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world’s premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner “lobes” to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 48" long and 5.0" diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. The current experiments in the ATR are for a variety of test sponsors -- US government, foreign governments, private researchers, and commercial companies needing neutron irradiation services. There are three basic types of test configurations in the ATR. The simplest configuration is the sealed static capsule, wherein the target material is placed in a capsule, or plate form, and the capsule is in direct contact with the primary coolant. The next level of complexity of an experiment is an instrumented lead experiment, which allows for active monitoring and control of experiment conditions during the irradiation. The highest level of complexity of experiment is the pressurized water loop experiment, in which the test sample can be subjected to the exact environment of a pressurized water reactor. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and future plans.

  8. Directed random testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pacheco, Carlos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Random testing can quickly generate many tests, is easy to implement, scales to large software applications, and reveals software errors. But it tends to generate many tests that are illegal or that exercise the same parts ...

  9. Test Herrera Report Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    development are described in detail in the following section. The model was run in six test sites: Test Site 1 is along the Cowlitz River (Segment 3); Test Site 2 includes the...

  10. ZiaTest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZiaTest ZiaTest Description This test executes a new proposed standard benchmark method for MPI startup that is intended to provide a realistic assessment of both launch and...

  11. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nevada...

  12. Injectivity Test At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Farrar...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date 1999 - 1999 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A second...

  13. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration...

  14. Controller Field Tests on the NREL CART2 Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossanyi, E.; Wright, A.; Fleming, P.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the results of the field tests carried out on the CART2 turbine at NREL to validate individual pitch control and active tower damping.

  15. major-test-partners | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    major-test-partners News Gasifipedia Coal-Biomass Feed Advanced Fuels Synthesis Systems Analyses International Activity Project Information Project Portfolio Publications Coal...

  16. Regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities are undergoing decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities. The performance of these activities may generate asbestos-containing waste because asbestos was formerly used in many building materials, including floor tile, sealants, plastics, cement pipe, cement sheets, insulating boards, and insulating cements. The regulatory requirements governing the disposal of these wastes depend on: (1) the percentage of asbestos in the waste and whether the waste is friable (easily crumbled or pulverized); (2) other physical and chemical characteristics of the waste; and (3) the State in which the waste is generated. This Information Brief provides an overview of the environment regulatory requirements affecting disposal of asbestos-containing waste. It does not address regulatory requirements applicable to worker protection promulgated under the Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHAct), the Mining Safety and Health Act (MSHA), or the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

  17. 2011 Hyundai Sonata 3539 - Hybrid Electric Vehicle Battery Test Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Shirk; Tyler Gray; Jeffrey Wishart

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity Program consists of vehicle, battery, and infrastructure testing on advanced technology related to transportation. The activity includes tests on hybrid electric vehicles, including testing hybrid electric vehicle batteries when both the vehicles and batteries are new and at the conclusion of 160,000 miles of on-road fleet testing. This report documents battery testing performed for the 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid (VIN KMHEC4A47BA003539). Battery testing was performed by Intertek Testing Services NA. The Idaho National Laboratory and Intertek collaborate on the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity for the Vehicle Technologies Program of the U.S. Department of Energy.

  18. Multipurpose active/passive motion compensation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, R.A.; Clements, R.E.; Davenport, M.R.

    1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microprocessor-controlled active/passive motion compensation system has been developed for deploying a variety of geotechnical in-situ testing devices with mobile drilling rigs from low-cost service vessels. The light-weight rotary heave compensator incorporates a hydraulic motor as the compensator actuator and a servo-controlled closed loop pump to reduce the air storage and power requirements. Unique features of the system are the use of inertial sensors to measure three components of boat motion, the ability to run the system in active/passive or passive modes, and the ability to automatically lower the drillstring at a constant velocity while maintaining motion compensation. Quantitative measurements made during sea trials offshore California yielded motion compensation accuracy approaching 98 percent which is much better than the compensation achieved with passive systems. Results are presented from offshore in-situ testing with a cone penetrometer, a vane shear device, and a suspension PS logger. The system can also be used for other offshore applications.

  19. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system being evaluated. This can be the system manufacturer, a system user, or a third party organization such as a government agency. b. The term Vendor (or Vendor’s) System replaces the name of the specific SCADA/EMS being tested.

  20. Beryllium Use in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen R. Longhurst

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) began operation in 1967. It makes use of a unique serpentine fuel core design and a beryllium reflector. Reactor control is achieved with rotating beryllium cylinders to which have been fastened plates of hafnium. Over time, the beryllium develops rather high helium content because of nuclear transmutations and begins to swell. The beryllium must be replaced at nominally 10-year intervals. Determination of when the replacement is made is by visual observation using a periscope to examine the beryllium surface for cracking and swelling. Disposition of the irradiated beryllium was once accomplished in the INL’s Radioactive Waste Management Complex, but that is no longer possible. Among contributing reasons are high levels of specific radioactive contaminants including transuranics. The INL is presently considering disposition pathways for this irradiated beryllium, but presently is storing it in the canal adjacent to the reactor. Numerous issues are associated with this situation including (1) Is there a need for ultra-low uranium material? (2) Is there a need to recover tritium from irradiated beryllium either because this is a strategic material resource or in preparation for disposal? (3) Is there a need to remove activation and fission products from irradiated beryllium? (4) Will there be enough material available to meet requirements for research reactors (fission and fusion)? In this paper will be discussed the present status of considerations on these issues.