Sample records for testimony presentations radio

  1. presents... CJSF Radio, SFU's Campus and Community radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presents... CJSF Radio, SFU's Campus and Community radio station is offering their Radio Kids Camp once again this year, for kids aged 8-12! CJSF 90.1fm is a radio station which promotes local around Storytelling. With radio as a way to express their voice, campers will learn innovative skills

  2. Testimony by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as possible, one or more permanent deep geological facilities for the safe disposal of spent fuel and high- level nuclear waste. Testimony by House Science, Space and Rick...

  3. EERE Testimonials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    These video testimonials capture what a variety of CEOs and business leaders have to say about the difference the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is making in the clean energy economy.

  4. Presentations & Testimony | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) Mapping the Impact ofHome Pacific Northwest SitePresentations

  5. Presentations & Testimony

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4(SC) Mapping the Impact ofHome Pacific Northwest Site

  6. Ernest Moniz Senate Testimony Power Point

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This is the slide presentation used by Secretary Ernest Moniz during his testimony before the U.S. Senate Appropriations committee on spurring innovation through federal funding given April 29, 2014.

  7. Testimony Before Senate Energy & Water Development Committee...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Reports Testimony Testimony Before Senate Energy & Water Development Committee Testimony Before Senate Energy & Water Development Committee March 21, 2012 Fiscal Year 2013...

  8. Testimony | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTank 48H TreatmentEnergy Test DriveMadelynTestimony

  9. Testimonials - Partnerships in Battery Technologies - Capstone...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Battery Technologies - Capstone Turbine Corporation Testimonials - Partnerships in Battery Technologies - Capstone Turbine Corporation Addthis Text Version The words Office of...

  10. Testimony of Amy Myers Jaffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    to the discussion of U.S. oil and natural gas export policy. The United States has several vital interests at stake free trade obligations. The United States already exports natural gas and condensate to Mexico Trade Agreement (CAFTA). Testimony The rapid growth of oil and natural gas production from

  11. Political Interference with Government Climate Change Science Testimony of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Interference with Climate Change Science A. Communication of Climate Change Threat B. Delay of ActionPolitical Interference with Government Climate Change Science Testimony of James E. Hansen;2 Political Interference with Government Climate Change Science Contents 1. Rationale of Presentation 2. My

  12. Testimony Before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Testimony Before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development Testimony Before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development...

  13. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DR. JAMES S. FAMIGLIETTI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Steven C.

    offer the following testimony. INTRODUCTION Groundwater -- the water stored beneath the land surfaceWRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DR. JAMES S. FAMIGLIETTI DIRECTOR, UC CENTER FOR HYDROLOGIC MODELING PROFESSOR groundwater resources. My name is James Famiglietti. I am a hydrologist and Professor on the faculty

  14. Testimony to the US Senate on the greenhouse effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigley, T.M.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This testimony was presented on January 28, 1987 at the hearing on ''The Greenhouse Effect, Climate Change and Ozone Depletion,'' United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, Subcommittee on Environmental Protection and Subcommittee on Hazardous Wastes and Toxic Substances. The testimony concerns the observed global warming that has occurred over the past 100 years. How this temperature record was obtained is summarized and the details of the record described, with particular reference to the most recent decades and to the differences between the records for Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The record is compared with the predicted warming over the same period due to the effects of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The projected warming over the next 70 years is compared with global temperature changes that have occurred over the past few million years. (ACR)

  15. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES APRIL 3, 2014 Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith

  16. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RUSSELL F. SMITH III DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR INTERNATIONAL FISHERIES Introduction Good morning Mr. Chairman and Members of the Committee. I am Russell Smith, Deputy Assistant

  17. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Presentations Presentations Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category Barbara Helland: NERSC-HEP Requirements Review November 27, 2012 |...

  18. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | ppt | 35 MB Present and Future Computing Requirements for Computational Prediction of Protein-DNA Binding September 12, 2012 | Author(s): Mohammed AlQuraishi |...

  19. Presenters

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tuesday October 16 Presenters 7:30 Registration 8:30 Welcome Remarks Pilar Thomas, Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs Introductions All 9:00...

  20. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Craig Tull: Present and Future Computing Requirements for Daya Bay November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Craig Tull (LBNL) | Download File: CraigTull20121127Dayabay.pdf | pdf | 11 MB...

  1. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Future Computing Requirements for Daya Bay November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Craig Tull (LBNL) | Download File: CraigTull20121127Dayabay.pdf | pdf | 11 MB Present and Future...

  2. Testimony of David L. Goodin President and CEO, MDU Resources...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and stored. However, recent testimony on behalf of the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Research Program indicates that carbon capture and storage (CCS) remains in the...

  3. Testimonials - Partnerships in Fuel Cells - GE Global Research...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fuel Cells - GE Global Research Testimonials - Partnerships in Fuel Cells - GE Global Research Addthis An error occurred. Unable to execute Javascript. Text Version The words...

  4. Testimony Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Testimony Before the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Environment Before the House Energy and...

  5. Testimonials - Partnerships in R&D - Air Products and Chemicals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Air Products and Chemicals Incorporated Testimonials - Partnerships in R&D - Air Products and Chemicals Incorporated Addthis Text Version The words "Office of Energy Efficiency &...

  6. 10-21-09_Final_Testimony_(Klara)_(NETL).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    opportunity to provide testimony on the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Clean Coal Research Program, particularly those activities related to co-feeding biomass...

  7. Written Testimony of Wes Kelley Executive Director Columbia Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Testimony of Wes Kelley Executive Director Columbia Power & Water Systems Columbia, Tennessee Before the Department of Energy, Quadrennial Energy Review Public Meeting 10:...

  8. Testimonials - Partnerships in R&D - Capstone Turbine Corporation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    R&D - Capstone Turbine Corporation Testimonials - Partnerships in R&D - Capstone Turbine Corporation Addthis Text Version The words Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

  9. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected to growPresentations Basic

  10. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected to growPresentations

  11. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected to growPresentations Harvey

  12. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected to growPresentations

  13. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected to growPresentations 20th

  14. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected to growPresentations

  15. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected to growPresentationsCameron

  16. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical InformationProcess and CombustionIndustryPresentations

  17. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical InformationProcess and CombustionIndustryPresentations

  18. Dangerous Human-Made Interference with Climate Testimony of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Dangerous Human-Made Interference with Climate Testimony of James E. Hansen 4273 Durham Road of Representatives 26 April 2007 #12;2 Dangerous Human-Made Interference with Climate Contents 1. Summary 2. Basis for Testimony A. Dangerous human-made interference with climate: a GISS modelE study (in press: Atmospheric

  19. Final Testimony Poneman September 22, 2011

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINAL Site-WideTestimony of Deputy

  20. Wind Vision Testimonials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengtheningWildfires may contribute more to globalWind Power LinksTestimonials

  1. Wind Vision Testimonials (Text Version) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the text version for the Wind Vision Testimonials video. The video opens with the "Wind Energy Foundation" logo. The first slide shows the first report published and its cover:...

  2. Captive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenfeld, Lauren

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Captive Radio (working title) – Fine Cut Transcript,TRT: 23:20 Jungle aerials RADIO VOICE, It is 5:21 in theas the day breaks on Caracol Radio’s program, The Voices of

  3. Testimony Before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Energy and Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Secretary Moniz's full written testimony prepared for the House Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Energy and Power.

  4. Testimony to the United States Senate Finance Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , which is the transportation sector, addressing primarily incentives for energy efficient and low. Performance can be measured in different ways: e.g., energy use, petroleum consumption, or GHG emissions.11 Testimony to the United States Senate Finance Committee TECHNOLOGY-NEUTRAL INCENTIVES FOR ENERGY

  5. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RICHARD A. FEELY, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF RICHARD A. FEELY, Ph.D. OFFICE OF OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC RESEARCH NATIONAL, and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has documented, global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions dioxide from the atmosphere, or about one third of the anthropogenic carbon emissions released during

  6. LOWFREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF XRAY GHOST BUBBLES A2597: A HISTORY RADIO ACTIVITY THE CORE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarazin, Craig

    LOW­FREQUENCY RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF X­RAY GHOST BUBBLES A2597: A HISTORY RADIO ACTIVITY THE CORE T showed ``ghost holes'' X­ray emission west northeast central radio galaxy PKS 2322#123. Previous radio observations detect radio emission coming from interior X­ray holes. present low­frequency observations A2597

  7. Radio Interferometric Geolocation Miklos Maroti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maróti, Miklós

    Radio Interferometric Geolocation Mikl´os Mar´oti P´eter V¨olgyesi Sebesty´en D´ora Branislav.kusy, akos.ledeczi}@vanderbilt.edu ABSTRACT We present a novel radio interference based sensor local- ization method for wireless sensor networks. The technique relies on a pair of nodes emitting radio waves

  8. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : Direct Testimony.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of our testimony is to sponsor the rate design portions of Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA) Wholesale Power Rate Development Study (WPRDS), WP-07-E-BPA-05, and associated portions of the Wholesale Power Rate Schedules and GRSPs (WP-07-E-BPA-07). Our testimony is organized in eight sections. The first section outlines the purpose of our testimony. Section 2 describes BPA's Demand Rates, including subsections on the definition of the Demand Rate, the method for computing the Demand Rates, and differences from the currently effective WP-02 Demand Rate. Section 3 describes BPA's Load Variance Rate, with subsections on the definition and purpose of the Load Variance Rate, application of the Load Variance Rate, how the Load Variance Rate is calculated, and the differences from the WP-02 Load Variance Rate. Section 4 describes the steps involved in developing BPA's energy rates and differences from the WP-02 rate case. Section 5 discusses discontinuation of the Stepped Up Multi-Year Block Rate. Section 6 describes a minor change to the Unauthorized Increase Rates and the Excess Factoring Rates. Section 7 describes the Targeted Adjustment Charge. Section 8 addresses the Operating Reserves Credit.

  9. Width of Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet CMEs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Michalek; N. Gopalswamy; H. Xie

    2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present paper we report on the difference in angular sizes between radio-loud and radio-quiet CMEs. For this purpose we compiled these two samples of events using Wind/WAVES and SOHO/LASCO observations obtained during 1996-2005. It is shown that the radio-loud CMEs are almost two times wider than the radio-quiet CMEs (considering expanding parts of CMEs). Furthermore we show that the radio-quiet CMEs have a narrow expanding bright part with a large extended diffusive structure. These results were obtained by measuring the CME widths in three different ways.

  10. The radio structure of radio-quiet quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian Leipski; Heino Falcke; Nicola Bennert; Susanne Huettemeister; ;

    2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the radio emitting structures of radio-quiet active galactic nuclei with an emphasis on radio-quiet quasars to study their connection to Seyfert galaxies. We present and analyse high-sensitivity VLA radio continuum images of 14 radio-quiet quasars and six Seyfert galaxies. Many of the low redshift radio-quiet quasars show radio structures that can be interpreted as jet-like outflows. However, the detection rate of extended radio structures on arcsecond scales among our sample decreases with increasing redshift and luminosity, most likely due to a lack of resolution. The morphologies of the detected radio emission indicate strong interactions of the jets with the surrounding medium. We also compare the radio data of seven quasars with corresponding HST images of the [OIII] emitting narrow-line region (NLR). We find that the scenario of interaction between the radio jet and the NLR gas is confirmed in two sources by structures in the NLR gas distribution as previously known for Seyfert galaxies. The extended radio structures of radio-quiet quasars at sub-arcsecond resolution are by no means different from that of Seyferts. Among the luminosities studied here, the morphological features found are similar in both types of objects while the overall size of the radio structures increases with luminosity. This supports the picture where radio-quiet quasars are the scaled-up versions of Seyfert galaxies. In addition to known luminosity relations we find a correlation of the NLR size and the radio size shared by quasars and Seyferts.

  11. Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Radio Astronomy Fundamentals I John Simonetti Spring 2012 Radio astronomy provides a very different view of the universe than optical astronomy. Radio astronomers and optical astronomers use different terminology to describe their work. Here I present some basic concepts and terms of radio

  12. Testimony by the Inspector General | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for|Idaho |EnergyTankless orTerrachanicsTestimony

  13. Testimony by the Inspector General | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative JC3 RSS SeptemberRenewable Energy, U.S. DepartmentTechnology TenTestimony by the

  14. WP-07 IP Rebuttal Testimony (wp07/initial)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsing Maps1DOE Awards ContractRebuttal Testimony (updated

  15. Radio Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beskin, V S; Gwinn, C R; Tchekhovskoy, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Almost 50 years after radio pulsars were discovered in 1967, our understanding of these objects remains incomplete. On the one hand, within a few years it became clear that neutron star rotation gives rise to the extremely stable sequence of radio pulses, that the kinetic energy of rotation provides the reservoir of energy, and that electromagnetic fields are the braking mechanism. On the other hand, no consensus regarding the mechanism of coherent radio emission or the conversion of electromagnetic energy to particle energy yet exists. In this review, we report on three aspects of pulsar structure that have seen recent progress: the self-consistent theory of the magnetosphere of an oblique magnetic rotator; the location, geometry, and optics of radio emission; and evolution of the angle between spin and magnetic axes. These allow us to take the next step in understanding the physical nature of the pulsar activity.

  16. Testimony of Kathryn McKinley, Microsoft, before the House Science Committee on 2/14/2013 Page 1 Written Testimony of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKinley, Kathryn S.

    at Microsoft Research and an Endowed Professor of Computer Science at the University of Texas at Austin. The National Science Foundation (NSF), IBM, DARPA, Microsoft, Google, CISCO, and Intel all supported myTestimony of Kathryn McKinley, Microsoft, before the House Science Committee on 2/14/2013 Page 1

  17. Presentations & Testimony | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development1U CO1)Programs »Policies and

  18. Leveraging Multiple Heterogeneous Radios for Energy-efficient Routing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kravets, Robin

    /low- rate radio) and presented a dual-radio communication protocol that manages the transitions of the high-power/n. To calculate the anticipated delay, each node mon- Power Source Dual Power Dual Radio MonitorPower Meter Figure efficiency than these lower-power radios due to their higher bit rates, the larger idle costs make them less

  19. "To appear in Bureau, S., Prabhu, B. S., & Gadh, R. 2008. Radio Frequency Identification: Beyond the Myths. A case for Health Care. Paper presented at the Academy of Management, 8-13 aot, Anaheim, Ca, USA"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    15923 1 "To appear in Bureau, S., Prabhu, B. S., & Gadh, R. 2008. Radio Frequency Identification, School of Engineering University of California, Los Angeles & R. Gadh Professor, School of Engineering

  20. EVN+MERLIN Observations of Radio-Intermediate Quasars: Evidence for Boosted Radio-Weak Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino Falcke; Alok Patnaik; William Sherwood

    1996-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present VLBI (EVN+MERLIN) observations of a sample of three low-redshift radio-intermediate PG quasars (RIQ) with flat and variable radio spectrum (III Zw 2, PG 1309+355, PG 2209+184). Their radio-to-optical flux ratio (R) is slightly lower than the average R for steep-spectrum quasars, but their radio spectral properties are those of core-dominated quasars. It was proposed previously that these sources might be relativistically boosted jets in radio-weak quasars. Our VLBI observations now indeed confirm the presence of a high brightness temperature core in all three of these objects --- two of them have lower limits on T_B well in excess of 10^10 Kelvin. Moreover, we find no ``missing-flux'' which means that basically all the flux of these quasars is concentrated in the compact radio core. As the total radio flux is already at the low end for radio-loud quasars, we can place a strong limit on the presence of any extended emission. This limit is consistent with the extended emission in radio-weak quasars, but excludes that the flat-spectrum RIQ reside in typical radio-loud quasars. The observations therefore strongly support the idea that relativistic jets are present in radio-weak quasars and hence that radio-loud and radio-weak quasars have very similar central engines.

  1. Telecommunications Radio Lease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telecommunications Radio Lease 1. Fax completed form to 979.847.1111. 2. If you do not receive. Note: There is an air time charge for the use of the radios. Radio lease rates depend on the radio type to any of the radios, chargers and accessories until signed back over to the Telecommunications office

  2. Radio Bubbles in Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. J. H. Dunn; A. C. Fabian; G. B. Taylor

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend our earlier work on cluster cores with distinct radio bubbles, adding more active bubbles, i.e. those with Ghz radio emission, to our sample, and also investigating ``ghost bubbles,'' i.e. those without GHz radio emission. We have determined k, which is the ratio of the total particle energy to that of the electrons radiating between 10 MHz and 10 GHz. Constraints on the ages of the active bubbles confirm that the ratio of the energy factor, k, to the volume filling factor, f lies within the range 1 < k/f < 1000. In the assumption that there is pressure equilibrium between the radio-emitting plasma and the surrounding thermal X-ray gas, none of the radio lobes has equipartition between the relativistic particles and the magnetic field. A Monte-Carlo simulation of the data led to the conclusion that there are not enough bubbles present in the current sample to be able to determine the shape of the population. An analysis of the ghost bubbles in our sample showed that on the whole they have higher upper limits on k/f than the active bubbles, especially when compared to those in the same cluster. A study of the Brightest 55 cluster sample shows that 17, possibly 20, clusters required some form of heating as they have a short central cooling time, t_cool < 3 Gyr, and a large central temperature drop, T_centre/T_outer< 1/2. Of these between 12 (70 per cent) and 15 (75 per cent), contain bubbles. This indicates that the duty cycle of bubbles is large in such clusters and that they can play a major role in the heating process.

  3. Potential Impacts of Mexico's Energy Reform on Texas' Transportation System 1 Testimony of Jolanda Prozzi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of oil, condensate, and natural gas.i Exploration of Mexico's shale reserves that are located south the monopoly of the oil company Petróleos Mexicanos (Pemex) and encourage foreign investment in Mexico's energyPotential Impacts of Mexico's Energy Reform on Texas' Transportation System 1 Testimony of Jolanda

  4. Testimony Regarding Fiscal Year 2013 Funding for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Testimony Regarding Fiscal Year 2013 Funding for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA the DOT, FAA, and FHWA and the atmospheric science community: Federal Aviation Administration Current) and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Submitted 19 March 2012 to the Subcommittee on Transportation

  5. Testimony Before the Health Subcommittee of the Energy and Commerce Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Alex

    Testimony Before the Health Subcommittee of the Energy and Commerce Committee United States at more than 2,600 universities, medical schools, and other research institutions in the United States. These benefits include: a nearly 70 percent reduction in the death rate for coronary disease and stroke

  6. Distributed Radio Interferometric Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yatawatta, Sarod

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing data volumes delivered by a new generation of radio interferometers require computationally efficient and robust calibration algorithms. In this paper, we propose distributed calibration as a way of improving both computational cost as well as robustness in calibration. We exploit the data parallelism across frequency that is inherent in radio astronomical observations that are recorded as multiple channels at different frequencies. Moreover, we also exploit the smoothness of the variation of calibration parameters across frequency. Data parallelism enables us to distribute the computing load across a network of compute agents. Smoothness in frequency enables us reformulate calibration as a consensus optimization problem. With this formulation, we enable flow of information between compute agents calibrating data at different frequencies, without actually passing the data, and thereby improving robustness. We present simulation results to show the feasibility as well as the advantages of distribute...

  7. Elements of Radio Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank G. Borg; Ismo Hakala; Jukka Määttälä

    2007-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a summary of the basic properties of the radio wave generation, propagation and reception, with a special attention to the gigahertz bandwidth region which is of interest for wireless sensor networks. We also present some measurement results which use the so-called RSSI indicator in order to track how the field strength varies with position and distance of the transceivers. We hope the paper may be useful to anyone who looks for a quick review of the fundamentals of electromagnetic theory with application to antennas.

  8. Testimony on electricity policy issues before the subcommittee on energy and power, House Committee on Energy and Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This testimony discusses the changing structure of the electricity industry and some of the public policy issues that are associated with these changes. Professor Joskow also discusses his perspective on a selected set of ...

  9. Modulate Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    1 Modulate Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio By: Elie Salameh Outline. · Fm in gnu radio · Audio Streams in Internet Radio · Gnu & Audio Files · Sox command · Playlist ".pls" · Recording internet radio #12;2 Project description · Using gnu radio to modulate internet radio into fm. · Using usrp

  10. Telecommunications Radio Rental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telecommunications Radio Rental 1. Fax completed form to 979.847.1111. 2. If you do not receive://telecom.tamu.edu/Accounts/Rate_Information.php). There is an air time charge for the use of the radios. Rental radios will be pro-rated per radio per daily usage of the radios, chargers and accessories until signed back over to the Telecommunications office. Amount

  11. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cown, Steven H. (Rigby, ID); Derr, Kurt Warren (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  12. Energy Efficient Radio Resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    Energy Efficient Radio Resource Management in a Coordinated Multi-Cell Distributed Antenna System Omer HALILOGLU Introduction System Model Performance Evaluation Conclusion References Energy Efficient Hacettepe University 5 September 2014 Omer HALILOGLU (Hacettepe University) Energy Efficient Radio Resource

  13. Radio-Excess IRAS Galaxies: IV. Optical Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catherine L. Buchanan; Peter J. McGregor; Geoffrey V. Bicknell; Michael A. Dopita

    2006-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the fourth in our series of papers investigating radio-excess galaxies, which have radio emission associated with an active nucleus but which do not fit into the traditional categories of either radio-loud or radio-quiet active galaxies. In this paper, we present optical spectra of our sample of FIR-luminous radio-excess galaxies. Optical emission line diagnostics are used to determine the dominant source of the ionizing radiation. We find that radio excess is an excellent indicator of the presence of an active nucleus: the radio-excess sample contains a much higher fraction of AGN than samples selected on FIR luminosity alone, or using other criteria such as warm FIR colors. Several objects have ambiguous classifications and are likely to be composite objects with mixed excitation. The type of optical spectrum appears to be associated with the radio-loudness: radio-loud objects may be more `pure' AGN than radio-intermediate objects. We find strong evidence for interaction between the radio plasma and the surrounding gas. The jet energy fluxes of the radio-excess objects, inferred from the [O III] luminosities, are lower than in powerful radio sources, consistent with our previous results. We conclude that the jets of radio-intermediate sources are intrinsically weaker than those in sources with more powerful radio emission. A significant fraction of the sample spectra show post-starburst stellar continuum, with A-star absorption lines, consistent with the large fraction of merging or disturbed host galaxies in the sample. The ages of the radio sources are significantly less than those of A stars indicating that, if the radio sources are associated with merging activity, there is a delay between the interaction and the initiation of the radio activity. (Abridged.)

  14. CENSORS: A Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources. I. Sample definition, radio data and optical identifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. N. Best; J. N. Arts; H. J. A. Rottgering; R. Rengelink; M. H. Brookes; J. Wall

    2003-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A new sample of radio sources, with the designated name CENSORS (A Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources), has been defined by combining the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) at 1.4 GHz with the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) Patch D, a 3 by 2 degree region of sky centred at 09 51 36.0, -21 00 00 (J2000). New radio observations of 199 NVSS radio sources with NVSS flux densities S(1.4GHz) > 7.8mJy are presented, and compared with the EIS I-band imaging observations which reach a depth of I~23; optical identifications are obtained for over two-thirds of the ~150 confirmed radio sources within the EIS field. The radio sources have a median linear size of 6 arcseconds, consistent with the trend for lower flux density radio sources to be less extended. Other radio source properties, such as the lobe flux density ratios, are consistent with those of brighter radio source samples. From the optical information, 30-40% of the sources are expected to lie at redshifts z >~ 1.5. One of the key goals of this survey is to accurately determine the high redshift evolution of the radio luminosity function. These radio sources are at the ideal flux density level to achieve this goal; at redshifts z~2 they have luminosities which are around the break of the luminosity function and so provide a much more accurate census of the radio source population at those redshifts than the existing studies of extreme, high radio power sources. Other survey goals include investigating the dual--population unification schemes for radio sources, studying the radio luminosity dependence of the evolution of radio source environments, and understanding the radio power dependence of the K-z relation for radio galaxies.

  15. Presentations Giving Effective Presentations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . THE CONCLUSION Restate the purpose/thesis and summarize the main points. End with strength by sharing an insight of a friend for feedback. Keep going over the presentation in your daily life ­ in the shower, car etc. Know

  16. Presentations: Giving Effective Presentations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    speaking in public in lowrisk, unevaluated situations, such as the Student Learning Commons' English the whole presentation. o Focus on learning the flow of ideas rather than exact wording. o Memorize small. The Student Learning Commons offers PowerPoint workshops for students. See the schedule at http://workshops.learning

  17. Testimony Before the House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Investigations iManage Presentation Before the House Oversight and Government Reform Subcommittee on Technology, Information Policy, Intergovernmental Relations, and...

  18. TESTIMONY OF WILLIAM S. MAHARAY DEPUTY INSPECTOR GENERAL FOR AUDIT SERVICES

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCOSystems Analysis Success Stories Systems AnalysisTESTIMONY OF WILLIAM S.

  19. Radio galaxies in the 2SLAQ Luminous Red Galaxy survey: II. The stellar populations of radio-loud and radio-quiet LRGs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helen M. Johnston; Elaine M. Sadler; Russell Cannon; Scott M. Croom; Nicholas P. Ross; Donald P. Schneider

    2007-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of the optical spectra of a volume-limited sample of 375 radio galaxies at redshift 0.4radio-quiet sources from the same survey, we also investigate the effect on the galaxy of the presence of an active nucleus. The composite spectra, binned by redshift and radio luminosity, all require two components to describe them, which we interpret as an old and a younger population. We found no evolution with redshift of the age of the younger population in radio galaxies, nor were they different from the radio-quiet comparison sample. Similarly, there is no correlation with radio power, with the exception that the most powerful radio sources (P(1.4) > 10^26 W/Hz) have younger stars and stronger emission lines than the less powerful sources. This suggests that we have located the threshold in radio power where strong emission lines "switch on", at radio powers of around 10^26 W/Hz. Except for the very powerful radio galaxies, the presence of a currently-active radio AGN does not appear to be correlated with any change in the observed stellar population of a luminous red galaxy at z~0.5.

  20. TACTICAL RADIO OPERATIONS August 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    FM 6-02.53 TACTICAL RADIO OPERATIONS August 2009 DISTRIBUTION RESTRICTION. Approved for public August 2009 TACTICAL RADIO OPERATIONS Contents Page PREFACE ...........................................................................................................viii Chapter 1 APPLICATIONS FOR TACTICAL RADIO DEPLOYMENT.............................. 1-1 Modularity

  1. Committee on Government Reform, United States House of Representatives Testimony for the September 21, 2006 Hearing on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    Committee on Government Reform, United States House of Representatives Testimony for the September Waxman, and other members of the House Committee on Government Reform, I am grateful for the opportunity on Government Reform, September 21, 2006 - 2- In July of last year the Honourable R. John Efford

  2. Stabilized radio frequency quadrupole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, Henry D. (Orinda, CA); Fugitt, Jock A. (Berkeley, CA); Howard, Donald R. (Danville, CA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  3. 3-4-10_Final_Testimony_28SWPA29_28Worthingon29.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a communications system that includes microwave, VHF radio, and state-of-the-art fiber optics. Staff members work from offices located in Gore, Oklahoma; Jonesboro, Arkansas;...

  4. Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Techniques and Technology Article Optimizing Radio Retention and Minimizing Radio Impacts the duration of transmitter attachment and minimizing the impacts of radios on the behavior and demography of the study animal. We tested 4 methods of radio attachment for a breeding population of upland sandpipers

  5. Radio-loud Narrow-Line Type 1 Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Komossa; W. Voges; D. Xu; S. Mathur; H. -M. Adorf; G. Lemson; W. Duschl; D. Grupe

    2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first systematic study of (non-radio-selected) radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies. Cross-correlation of the `Catalogue of Quasars and Active Nuclei' with several radio and optical catalogues led to the identification of 11 radio-loud NLS1 candidates including 4 previously known ones. Most of the radio-loud NLS1s are compact, steep spectrum sources accreting close to, or above, the Eddington limit. The radio-loud NLS1s of our sample are remarkable in that they occupy a previously rarely populated regime in NLS1 multi-wavelength parameter space. While their [OIII]/H_beta and FeII/H_beta intensity ratios almost cover the whole range observed in NLS1 galaxies, their radio properties extend the range of radio-loud objects to those with small widths of the broad Balmer lines. Among the radio-detected NLS1 galaxies, the radio index R distributes quite smoothly up to the critical value of R ~ 10 and covers about 4 orders of magnitude in total. Statistics show that ~7% of the NLS1 galaxies are formally radio-loud while only 2.5% exceed a radio index R > 100. Several mechanisms are considered as explanations for the radio loudness of the NLS1 galaxies and for the lower frequency of radio-louds among NLS1s than quasars. While properties of most sources (with 2-3 exceptions) generally do not favor relativistic beaming, the combination of accretion mode and spin may explain the observations. (abbreviated)

  6. Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    Satellite Radio: Its Global Impact TIFR Alumni Lecture By S.Rangarajan #12;1 A wonder called RADIO "No wonder so many physicists started as radio tinkers, and no wonder, before physicist became on Richard Feynmann We will stick to the definition of Radio as · Wireless Audio Delivery ·Listener cannot

  7. Hoffman Testimony

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist,the Community Marketof R&D and

  8. Hoffman Testimony

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of EnergySeacrist,the Community Marketof R&D

  9. Testimony by

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed Donat About Us TedJ.L

  10. Radio flares from gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kopac, D; Kobayashi, S; Virgili, F J; Harrison, R; Japelj, J; Guidorzi, C; Melandri, A; Gomboc, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present predictions of centimeter and millimeter radio emission from reverse shocks in the early afterglows of gamma-ray bursts with the goal of determining their detectability with current and future radio facilities. Using a range of GRB properties, such as peak optical brightness and time, isotropic equivalent gamma-ray energy and redshift, we simulate radio light curves in a framework generalized for any circumburst medium structure and including a parametrization of the shell thickness regime that is more realistic than the simple assumption of thick- or thin-shell approximations. Building on earlier work by Mundell et al. (2007) and Melandri et al. (2010) in which the typical frequency of the reverse shock was suggested to lie at radio, rather than optical wavelengths at early times, we show that the brightest and most distinct reverse-shock radio signatures are detectable up to 0.1 -- 1 day after the burst, emphasizing the need for rapid radio follow-up. Detection is easier for bursts with later opt...

  11. Cognitive Radio Networks as Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandari, Dorna; Yang, Seung R.; Zhao, Yue; Pottie, Gregory

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    assuming the cognitive radios know their own coordinates.Networked Sensing Cognitive Radio Networks As SensorIntroduction: Cognitive Radio (CR) Networks The Need For

  12. The First Steps of Radio Astronomy in Czestochowa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Jarosik; S. Starzynski; M. Szczesniak; R. Szczesniak; A. Ceglarek

    2007-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In the paper, technical documentation and the principle of operation is presented. "KLAUDIA" radio telescope was built in Rabka in 2007 and it is used to receive secondary radio waves, emitted by the Earth's ionosphere at frequency of 40 kHz.

  13. Soft Sensing and Optimal Power Control for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar, Syed A.

    1 Soft Sensing and Optimal Power Control for Cognitive Radio Sudhir Srinivasa and Syed Ali Jafar being present increases. We find that that power control that maximizes the SNR is binary, i transmit power constraint at the secondary radio, both the SNR and capacity optimal power control schemes

  14. Radio-Frequency Rectification on Membrane Bound Pores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sujatha Ramachandran; Robert H. Blick; Daniel W. van der Weide

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements on direct radio-frequency pumping of ion channels and pores bound in bilipid membranes. We make use of newly developed microcoaxes, which allow delivering the high frequency signal in close proximity to the membrane bound proteins and ion channels. We find rectification of the radio-frequency signal, which is used to pump ions through the channels and pores.

  15. Ultra-Low Power Time Synchronization Using Passive Radio Receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Ultra-Low Power Time Synchronization Using Passive Radio Receivers Yin Chen Qiang Wang Marcus Chang. In this pa- per, we present an inexpensive and ultra-low power ( of elapsed seconds. The universal time sig- nal receiver combines an off-the-shelf radio chip with an ultra-low

  16. Sounds energetic: the radio producer's energy minibook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Minibook will be expanded into the final Radio Producer's Energy Sourcebook. Radio producers and broadcasters are asked to contribute ideas for presenting energy knowledge to the public and to be included in the Sourcebook. Chapter One presents a case study suggesting programming and promotion ideas and sample scripts for a radio campaign that revolves around no-cost or low-cost steps listeners can take to increase their home energy efficiency and save money. A variety of other energy topics and suggestions on ways to approach them are addressed in Chapter Two. Chapter Three contains energy directories for Baltimore, Philadelphia, Pittsburg, and Washington, DC. The directories will be expanded in the Sourcebook and will consist of a selection of local public and private sector energy-related organizations and list local experts and organizations and the best Federal, state, and local government programs that can provide consumers and citizens groups with information, technical assistance, and financial support. (MCW)

  17. Radio Observations of the Hubble Deep Field South Region IV: Optical Properties of the Faint Radio Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. T. Huynh; C. A. Jackson; R. P. Norris; A. Fernandez-Soto

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Australia Telescope Hubble Deep Field-South (ATHDFS) survey of the Hubble Deep Field South reaches sensitivities of ~10 miceoJyJy at 1.4, 2.5, 5.2 and 8.7 GHz, making the ATHDFS one of the deepest surveys ever performed with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Here we present the optical identifications of the ATHDFS radio sources using data from the literature. We find that ~66% of the radio sources have optical counterparts to I = 23.5 mag. Deep HST imaging of the area identifies a further 12% of radio sources. We present new spectroscopic observations for 98 of the radio sources, and supplement these spectroscopic redshifts with photometric ones calculated from 5-band optical imaging. The host galaxy colors and radio-to-optical ratios indicate that low luminosity (or "radio quiet") AGN make up a significant proportion of the sub-mJy radio population, a result which is in accordance with a number of other deep radio studies. The radio-to-optical ratios of the bright (S_1.4GHz > 1 mJy) sources is consistent with a bimodal distribution.

  18. eRadio : empowerment through community Web radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Monroy, Carla, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The eRadio project proposes to be an effective aid to increase interaction and reduce alienation among the members of dispersed communities by using a holistic approach to participatory and interactive web radio-production, ...

  19. Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahai, Anant

    ' & $ % Some Fundamental Limitations for Cognitive Radio Anant Sahai Wireless Foundations, UCB EECS program November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Outline 1. Why cognitive radios? 2 November 1 at BWRC Cognitive Radio Workshop #12;' & $ % Apparent spectrum allocations · Traditional

  20. Deep radio observations of 3C 324 and 3C 368: evidence for jetcloud interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, Philip

    Deep radio observations of 3C 324 and 3C 368: evidence for jet­cloud interactions P. N. Best,1 C. L form 1997 August 27 A B S T R AC T High-resolution, deep radio images are presented for two distant radio galaxies, 3C 324 (z ¼ 1:206) and 3C 368 (z ¼ 1:132), which are both prime examples of the radio

  1. Seyfert galaxies: Nuclear Radio Structure and Unification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lal, Dharam V; Gabuzda, Denise

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio study of a carefully selected sample of 20 Seyfert galaxies that are matched in orientation-independent parameters, which are measures of intrinsic active galactic nuclei (AGN) power and host galaxy properties is presented to test the predictions of the unified scheme hypothesis. Our sample sources have core flux densities greater than 8 mJy at 5 GHz on arcsec-scales due to the feasibility requirements. These simultaneous pc-scale and kpc-scale radio observations reveal (i) that Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies have equal tendency to show compact radio structures on mas-scales, (ii) the distributions of pc-scale and kpc-scale radio luminosities are similar for both Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies, (iii) no evidence for relativistic beaming in Seyfert galaxies, (iv) similar distributions of source spectral indices in spite of the fact that Seyferts show nuclear radio flux density variations, and (v) the distributions of projected linear size for Seyfert 1 and Seyfert 2 galaxies are not significantly d...

  2. Extended emission around GPS radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Stanghellini; C. P. O'Dea; D. Dallacasa; P. Cassaro; S. A. Baum; R. Fanti; C. Fanti

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Extended radio emission detected around a sample of GHz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources is discussed. Evidence for extended emission which is related to the GPS source is found in 6 objects out of 33. Three objects are associated with quasars with core-jet pc-scale morphology, and three are identified with galaxies with symmetric (CSO) radio morphology. We conclude that the core-jet GPS quasars are likely to be beamed objects with a continuous supply of energy from the core to the kpc scale. It is also possible that low surface brightness extended radio emission is present in other GPS quasars but the emission is below our detection limit due to the high redshifts of the objects. On the other hand, the CSO/galaxies with extended large scale emission may be rejuvenated sources where the extended emission is the relic of previous activity. In general, the presence of large scale emission associated with GPS galaxies is uncommon, suggesting that in the context of the recurrent activity model, the time scale between subsequent bursts is in general longer than the radiative lifetime of the radio emission from the earlier activity.

  3. Cognitive Radio: Fundamentals and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morelos-Zaragoza, Robert H.

    Cognitive Radio: Fundamentals and Opportunities Robert H. Morelos-Zaragoza Department of Electrical Engineering San Jose State University October 12, 2007 #12;Cognitive Radio - RHMZ - 2007 Slide 2 of 18 Outline 1. Software-defined radio (SDR) a) Black-box approach b) Components and attributes (Mitola) 2

  4. Language Issues for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kokar, Mieczyslaw M.

    INVITED P A P E R Language Issues for Cognitive Radio Computer languages that may be useful for expressing cognitive radio concepts are identified and evaluated in this tutorial paper. By Mieczyslaw M aspects of formal languages in the context of cognitive radio. A bottom up approach is taken in which

  5. INSERT PRESENTATION TITLE HERE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergyFindingINFORMATION ONNational

  6. Radio morphology and spectral analysis of cD galaxies in rich and poor galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Giacintucci; T. Venturi; M. Murgia; D. Dallacasa; R. Athreya; S. Bardelli; P. Mazzotta; D. J. Saikia

    2007-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a radio morphological study and spectral analysis for a sample of 13 cD galaxies in rich and poor clusters of galaxies.} Our study is based on new high sensitivity Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT) observations at 1.28 GHz, 610 MHz and 235 MHz, and on archival data. From a statistical sample of cluster cD galaxies we selected those sources with little information available in the literature and promising for the detection of aged radio emission. Beyond the high sensitivity images for all 13 radio galaxies, we present also a detailed spectral analysis for 7 of them. We found a variety of morphologies and linear sizes, as typical for radio galaxies in the radio power range sampled here (low to intermediate power radio galaxies). The spectral analysis shows that 10/13 radio galaxies have steep radio spectrum, with spectral index $\\alpha \\ge 1$. In general, the radiative ages and growth velocities are consistent with previous findings that the evolution of radio galaxies at the cluster centres is affected by the dense external medium (i.e. low growth velocities and old ages. We suggest that the dominant galaxies in A 2622 and MKW 03s are dying radio sources, which at present are not fed by nuclear activity. On the other hand, the spectacular source at the centre of A 2372 might be a very interesting example of restarted radio galaxy. For this source we estimated a life cycle of the order of 10$^6$ yr.

  7. Spectral indices of Galactic radio loops between 1420, 820 and 408 MHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Borka

    2007-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the average brightness temperatures and surface brightnesses at 1420, 820 and 408 MHz of the six main Galactic radio-continuum loops are derived, as are their radio spectral indices. The temperatures and surface brightnesses of the radio loops are computed using data taken from radio continuum surveys at 1420, 820 and 408 MHz. We have demonstrated the reality of Loops V and VI and present diagrams of their spectra for the first time. We derived the radio spectral indices of Galactic radio loops from radio surveys at three frequencies (1420, 820 and 408 MHz) and confirm them to be non-thermal sources. Diameters and distances of Loops I-VI were also calculated. The results obtained are in good agreement with current theories of supernova remnant (SNR) evolution and suggest that radio loops may have a SNR origin.

  8. Radio Jets in Galaxies with Actively Accreting Black Holes: new insights from the SDSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guinevere Kauffmann; Timothy M. Heckman; Philip N. Best

    2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The majority of nearby radio-loud AGN are found in massive, old elliptical galaxies with weak emission lines. At high redshifts,however, most known radio AGN have strong emission lines. In this paper, we examine a subset of radio AGN with emission lines selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The probability for a nearby radio AGN to have emission lines is a strongly decreasing function of galaxy mass and an increasing function of radio luminosity above 10^25 W/Hz. Emission line and radio luminosities are correlated, but with large dispersion. At a given radio power, AGN with small black holes have higher [OIII] luminosities (which we interpret as higher accretion rates) than AGN with big black holes. However, if we scale both radio and emission line luminosities by the black hole mass, we find a correlation between normalized radio power and accretion rate in Eddington units that is independent of black hole mass. There is also a clear correlation between normalized radio power and the age of the stellar population in the galaxy. Present-day AGN with the highest normalized radio powers are confined to galaxies with small black holes. High-redshift, high radio-luminosity AGN could be explained if big black holes were similarly active at earlier cosmic epochs. To investigate why only a small fraction of emission line AGN become radio loud, we create matched samples of radio-loud and radio-quiet AGN and compare their host galaxy properties and environments. The main difference lies in their environments; our local density estimates are a factor 2 larger around the radio-loud AGN. We propose a scenario in which radio-loud AGN with emission lines are located in galaxies where accretion of both cold and hot gas can occur simultaneously. (Abridged)

  9. Radio-AGN Feedback: When the Little Ones were Monsters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, W L

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the evolution of the fraction of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN) as a function of their host stellar mass. We make use of two samples of radio galaxies: one in the local universe, $0.01 10^{24}$ W/Hz at z ~ 1-2 while the radio-loud fraction for higher mass galaxies ($M_* > 10^{11.25}$ M$_{\\odot}$) remains the same. We argue that this increase is driven largely by the increase in cold or radiative mode accretion with increasing cold gas supply at earlier epochs. The increasing population of low mass Radio-Loud AGN can thus explain the upturn in the Radio Luminosity Function (RLF) at high redshift which is important for understanding the impact of AGN feedback in galaxy evolution.

  10. Predicting low-frequency radio fluxes of known extrasolar planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grießmeier, J -M; Spreeuw, H

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Close-in giant extrasolar planets (''Hot Jupiters'') are believed to be strong emitters in the decametric radio range. Aims. We present the expected characteristics of the low-frequency magnetospheric radio emission of all currently known extrasolar planets, including the maximum emission frequency and the expected radio flux. We also discuss the escape of exoplanetary radio emission from the vicinity of its source, which imposes additional constraints on detectability. Methods. We compare the different predictions obtained with all four existing analytical models for all currently known exoplanets. We also take care to use realistic values for all input parameters. Results. The four different models for planetary radio emission lead to very different results. The largest fluxes are found for the magnetic energy model, followed by the CME model and the kinetic energy model (for which our results are found to be much less optimistic than those of previous studies). The unipolar interaction model does ...

  11. MOS: A critical tool for current and future radio surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Daniel J B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since radio continuum observations are not affected by dust obscuration, they are of immense potential diagnostic power as cosmological probes and for studying galaxy formation and evolution out to high redshifts. However, the power-law nature of radio frequency spectra ensures that ancillary spectroscopic information remains critical for studying the properties of the faint radio sources being detected in rapidly-increasing numbers on the pathway to the Square Kilometre Array. In this contribution, I present some of the key scientific motivations for exploiting the immense synergies between radio continuum observations and multi-object spectroscopic surveys. I review some of the ongoing efforts to obtain the spectra necessary to harness the huge numbers of star-forming galaxies and AGN that current and future radio surveys will detect. I also touch on the WEAVE-LOFAR survey, which will use the WEAVE spectrograph currently being built for the William Herschel Telescope to target hundreds of thousands of low f...

  12. Radio-frequency spectroscopy of ultracold atomic Fermi gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schirotzek, Andre

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents experiments investigating the phase diagram of ultracold atomic Fermi gases using radio-frequency spectroscopy. The tunability of many experimental parameters including the temperature, the interparticle ...

  13. Radio and Collective Identity in the 2006 Oaxacan Uprising

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Jennifer B.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    4): Buckley, Steve. 2000. “Radio’s New Horizons: DemocracyDiego. 2007. “Community Radio Stations Under Fire. ” InterWhat is Community Radio? A Resource Guide. Johannesburg:

  14. Predicting low-frequency radio fluxes of known extrasolar planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -M. Grießmeier; P. Zarka; H. Spreeuw

    2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Context. Close-in giant extrasolar planets (''Hot Jupiters'') are believed to be strong emitters in the decametric radio range. Aims. We present the expected characteristics of the low-frequency magnetospheric radio emission of all currently known extrasolar planets, including the maximum emission frequency and the expected radio flux. We also discuss the escape of exoplanetary radio emission from the vicinity of its source, which imposes additional constraints on detectability. Methods. We compare the different predictions obtained with all four existing analytical models for all currently known exoplanets. We also take care to use realistic values for all input parameters. Results. The four different models for planetary radio emission lead to very different results. The largest fluxes are found for the magnetic energy model, followed by the CME model and the kinetic energy model (for which our results are found to be much less optimistic than those of previous studies). The unipolar interaction model does not predict any observable emission for the present exoplanet census. We also give estimates for the planetary magnetic dipole moment of all currently known extrasolar planets, which will be useful for other studies. Conclusions. Our results show that observations of exoplanetary radio emission are feasible, but that the number of promising targets is not very high. The catalog of targets will be particularly useful for current and future radio observation campaigns (e.g. with the VLA, GMRT, UTR-2 and with LOFAR).

  15. Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 3 Implementation Status of the SCA Based FM Radio P. Balister Institute & State University Blacksburg, VA 24061 #12;Implementation Status of the SCA Based FM Radio Philip description of the FM Radio architecture planned for the SCA radio and provides information about the current

  16. SIMULTANEOUS X-RAY AND RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF ROTATING RADIO TRANSIENT J1819-1458

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J. J.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rea, N. [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (IEEC-CSIC) Campus UAB, Fac. de Ciències, Torre C5, parell, 2a planta, E-08193 Barcelona (Spain); Lazaridis, K.; Keane, E. F.; Kramer, M. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Lyne, A. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of simultaneous radio and X-ray observations of PSR J1819–1458. Our 94 ks XMM-Newton observation of the high magnetic field (?5 × 10{sup 13} G) pulsar reveals a blackbody spectrum (kT ? 130 eV) with a broad absorption feature, possibly composed of two lines at ?1.0 and ?1.3 keV. We performed a correlation analysis of the X-ray photons with radio pulses detected in 16.2 hr of simultaneous observations at 1-2 GHz with the Green Bank, Effelsberg, and Parkes telescopes, respectively. Both the detected X-ray photons and radio pulses appear to be randomly distributed in time. We find tentative evidence for a correlation between the detected radio pulses and X-ray photons on timescales of less than 10 pulsar spin periods, with the probability of this occurring by chance being 0.46%. This suggests that the physical process producing the radio pulses may also heat the polar-cap.

  17. GNU Radio & USRPGNU Radio & USRP File transfer through WirelessFile transfer through Wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    1 GNU Radio & USRPGNU Radio & USRP File transfer through WirelessFile transfer through WirelessSachin Hirve April 30, 2008April 30, 2008 Contents:Contents: What is Software Radio?What is Software Radio? USRPUSRP ­­ MultiMulti--functional hardwarefunctional hardware GNU RadioGNU Radio Previous Work

  18. Radio frequency (RF) heated supersonic flow laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wantuck, P.; Watanabe, H.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique supersonic flow apparatus which employs an inductively-coupled, radio frequency (RF) torch to supply high enthalpy source gas to the nozzle inlet is described. The main features of this system are the plasma tube, a cooled nozzle assembly, and a combustion/expansion chamber with a heat exchanger. A description of these components with current test data is presented. In addition, a discussion of anticipated experiments utilizing this system is included.

  19. Chautauqua notebook: appropriate technology on radio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renz, B.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiences in establishing and maintaining a regional call-in information-exchange radio show (Chautauqua) on energy conservation, appropriate technology, renewable energy sources, and self-reliance are discussed. Information is presented on: appropriate technology; the Chautauquaa concept; topics discussed; research performed; guests; interviewing tips; types of listeners; program features; where to find help; promotion and publicity; the technical and engineering aspects; the budget and funding; and station policies. (MCW)

  20. On the origin of radio emission in radio quiet quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor; Ehud Behar

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The radio emission in radio loud quasars originates in a jet carrying relativistic electrons. In radio quiet quasars (RQQs) the relative radio emission is ~10^3 times weaker, and its origin is not established yet. We show here that there is a strong correlation between the radio luminosity (L_R) and X-ray luminosity (L_X) with L_R~10^-5L_X, for the radio quiet Palomar-Green (PG) quasar sample. The sample is optically selected, with nearly complete radio and X-ray detections, and thus this correlation cannot be due to direct selection biases. The PG quasars lie on an extension of a similar correlation noted by Panessa et al., for a small sample of nearby low luminosity type 1 AGN. A remarkably similar correlation, known as the Guedel-Benz relation, where L_R/L_X~10^-5, holds for coronally active stars. The Guedel-Benz relation, together with correlated stellar X-ray and radio variability, implies that the coronae are magnetically heated. We therefore raise the possibility that AGN coronae are also magnetically heated, and that the radio emission in RQQ also originates in coronal activity. If correct, then RQQ should generally display compact flat cores at a few GHz due to synchrotron self-absorption, while at a few hundred GHz we should be able to see directly the X-ray emitting corona, and relatively rapid and large amplitude variability, correlated with the X-ray variability, is likely to be seen. We also discuss possible evidence that the radio and X-ray emission in ultra luminous X-ray sources and Galactic black holes may be of coronal origin as well.

  1. DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN ABELL 754

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S. [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India)], E-mail: ruta@rri.res.in, E-mail: dwaraka@rri.res.in

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a low-frequency study of the diffuse radio emission in the galaxy cluster A754. We present a new 150 MHz image of the galaxy cluster A754 made with the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and discuss the detection of four diffuse features. We compare the 150 MHz image with the images at 74, 330, and 1363 MHz; one new diffuse feature is detected. The flux density upper limits at 330 and 1363 MHz imply a synchrotron spectral index, {alpha}>2 (S {proportional_to} {nu}{sup -{alpha}}), for the new feature. The 'west relic' detected at 74 MHz is not detected at 150 MHz and is thus consistent with its nondetection at 1363 MHz and 330 MHz. Integrated spectra of all the diffuse features are presented. The fourth diffuse feature is located along the proposed merger axis in A754 and 0.7 Mpc away from the peak of X-ray emission; we refer to it as a relic. We have made use of the framework of the adiabatic compression model to obtain spectra. We show that the spectrum of the fourth diffuse feature is consistent with that of a cocoon of a radio galaxy lurking for about 9 x 10{sup 7} yr; no shock compression is required. The other three diffuse emission have spectra steeper than 1.5 and could be cocoons lurking for longer time. We discuss other possibilities such as shocks and turbulent reacceleration being responsible for the diffuse emission in A754.

  2. SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    business process for an organization; as a result, the security risks for RFID systems and the controls for an organization; as a result, the security risks for RFID systems and the controls available to address themMay 2007 SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID) SYSTEMS SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY

  3. Stabilized radio-frequency quadrupole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lancaster, H.D.; Fugitt, J.A.; Howard, D.R.

    1982-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A long-vane stabilized radio frequency resonator for accelerating charged particles and including means defining a radio frequency resonator cavity, a plurality of long vanes mounted in the defining means for dividing the cavity into sections, and means interconnecting opposing ones of the plurality of vanes for stabilizing the resonator.

  4. A pilot study of the radio-emitting AGN population: the emerging new class of FR0 radio-galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldi, Ranieri D; Giovannini, Gabriele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a pilot JVLA project aimed at studying the bulk of the radio-emitting AGN population, unveiled by the NVSS/FIRST and SDSS surveys.We obtained A-array observations at the JVLA at 1.4, 4.5, and 7.5 GHz for 12 sources of the SDSS/NVSS sample. The radio maps reveal compact unresolved or slightly resolved radio structures on a scale of 1-3 kpc, with only one exception of a FRI/FRII source extended over $\\sim$40 kpc. We isolate the radio core component in most of them. The sample splits into two groups. Four sources have small black hole (BH) masses (mostly $\\sim$10$^{7}$ M$_{\\odot}$) and are hosted by blue galaxies, often showing evidence of a contamination from star formation to their radio emission and associated with radio-quiet AGN. The second group consists in seven radio-loud AGN, which live in red massive ($\\sim10^{11}$ M$_{\\odot}$) early-type galaxies, with large BH masses ($\\gtrsim$10$^{8}$ M$_{\\odot}$), and spectroscopically classified as Low Excitation Galaxies, all characteris...

  5. Studying the properties of the radio emitter in LS 5039

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Bosch-Ramon

    2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    LS 5039 is an X-ray binary that presents non-thermal radio emission. The radiation at $\\sim 5$ GHz is quite steady and optically thin, consisting on a dominant core plus an extended jet-like structure. There is a spectral turnover around 1 GHz, and evidence of variability at timescales of 1 yr at 234 MHz. We investigate the radio emitter properties using the available broadband radio data, and assuming two possible scenarios to explain the turnover: free-free absorption in the stellar wind, or synchrotron self-absorption. We use the relationships between the turnover frequency, the stellar wind density, the emitter location, size and magnetic field, and the Lorentz factor of the emitting electrons, as well as a reasonable assumption on the energy budget, to infer the properties of the low-frequency radio emitter. Also, we put this information in context with the broadband radio data. The location and size of the low-frequency radio emitter can be restricted to $\\ga$ few AU from the primary star, its magnetic field to $\\sim 3\\times 10^{-3}-1$ G, and the electron Lorentz factors to $\\sim 10-100$. The observed variability of the extended structures seen with VLBA would point to electron bulk velocities $\\ga 3\\times 10^8$ cm s$^{-1}$, whereas much less variable radiation at 5 GHz would indicate velocities for the VLBA core $\\la 10^8$ cm s$^{-1}$. The emission at 234 MHz in the high state would mostly come from a region larger than the dominant broadband radio emitter. We suggest a scenario in which secondary pairs, created via gamma-ray absorption and moving in the stellar wind, are behind the steady broadband radio core, whereas the resolved jet-like radio emission would come from a collimated, faster, outflow.

  6. DEEP SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF INFRARED-FAINT RADIO SOURCES: HIGH-REDSHIFT RADIO-LOUD ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, Ray P.; Mao, Minnie [CSIRO Australia Telescope National Facility, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW, 1710 (Australia); Afonso, Jose [Observatorio Astronomico de Lisboa, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-018 Lisbon (Portugal); Cava, Antonio [Departamento de Astrofisica, Facultad de CC. Fisicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Farrah, Duncan; Oliver, Seb [Astronomy Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Huynh, Minh T.; Mauduit, Jean-Christophe; Surace, Jason [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Ivison, R. J. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Jarvis, Matt [Centre for Astrophysics, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield, Herts, AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Lacy, Mark [NRAO, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Maraston, Claudia [Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth, PO1 3FX (United Kingdom); Middelberg, Enno [Astronomisches Institut, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Universitaetsstr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany); Seymour, Nick, E-mail: Ray.Norris@csiro.au [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, UCL, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRSs) are a rare class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelengths but very faint at infrared and optical wavelengths. Here we present sensitive near-infrared observations of a sample of these sources taken as part of the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey. Nearly all the IFRSs are undetected at a level of {approx}1 {mu}Jy in these new deep observations, and even the detections are consistent with confusion with unrelated galaxies. A stacked image implies that the median flux density is S{sub 3.6{mu}m} {approx} 0.2 {mu}Jy or less, giving extreme values of the radio-infrared flux density ratio. Comparison of these objects with known classes of object suggests that the majority are probably high-redshift radio-loud galaxies, possibly suffering from significant dust extinction.

  7. Radio bursts from superconducting strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that radio bursts from cusps on superconducting strings are linearly polarized, thus, providing a signature that can be used to distinguish them from astrophysical sources. We write the event rate of string-generated radio transients in terms of observational variables, namely, the event duration and flux. Assuming a canonical set of observational parameters, we find that the burst event rate can be quite reasonable, e.g., order ten a year for Grand Unified strings with 100 TeV currents, and a lack of observed radio bursts can potentially place strong constraints on particle physics models.

  8. Radio Broadcasts from Superconducting Strings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Fu Cai; Eray Sabancilar; Daniele A. Steer; Tanmay Vachaspati

    2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting cosmic strings can give transient electromagnetic signatures that we argue are most evident at radio frequencies. We investigate the three different kinds of radio bursts from cusps, kinks, and kink-kink collisions on superconducting strings. We find that the event rate is dominated by kink bursts in a range of parameters that are of observational interest, and can be quite high (several a day at 1 Jy flux) for a canonical set of parameters. In the absence of events, the search for radio transients can place stringent constraints on superconducting cosmic strings.

  9. Spectrum Sensing and Reconstruction for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Spectrum Sensing and Reconstruction for Cognitive Radio Amanpreet S Saini, Zhen Hu, Robert Qiu with spectrum sensing and spectrum reconstruction under the umbrella of cognitive radio which is the smart radio to explore and exploit the free spectrum. Spectrum analyzer is used to emulate cognitive radio to do spectrum

  10. Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 4 A Comparison of Some Existing Radios with Implications 1 2 Methodology 1 3 Findings 2 4 Concluding Remarks 3 A Summary of Radio Specifications 5 B.S. consists of a dis- parate collection of radio technologies operating over a wide range of frequencies

  11. Royal Institute of Technology Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maguire Jr., Gerald Q.

    Royal Institute of Technology Cognitive Radio Model-Based Competence for Software Radios Joseph Communication Systems Laboratory Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm, Sweden Cognitive Radio Model-Based Competence for Software Radios Joseph Mitola III August 1999 A thesis submitted to the Royal Institute

  12. Cognitive Radio Technology [from THE GUEST EDITORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Benedetto, Maria-Gabriella

    Cognitive Radio Technology [from THE GUEST EDITORS] Maria Gabriella di Benedetto, Yingbo Hua, Thomas Kaiser, and Xiaodong Wang C ognitive radio is an exciting and new way of thinking and researching of cognitive radio. Perhaps the most pressing of them is improved utilization of the electromagnetic radio

  13. Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 17 The Rise of All-Band All- Mode Radio S.W. Ellingson and S Institute & State University #12;The Rise of All-Band All-Mode Radio Steve Ellingson and S.M. Shajedul Hasan is based on network infrastructure. In this approach, disparate radio networks are integrated through

  14. Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Chameleonic Radio Technical Memo No. 1 Prototyping a Software Defined Radio Receiver Based on USRP Defined Radio (SDR) is an emerging technology which supports multi- standard, multi-mode and future proof radio designs. There are several SDR software architectures have been developed during the last few

  15. Radio: Borderless and selective On the use codes in radio broadcast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Radio: Borderless and selective On the use codes in radio broadcast Jacob Thøgersen The universal radio In the beginning of the 21st century, the Internet may be heralded as the great bringer of free invention, the radio. In Denmark, the earliest experiments with radio broadcasting started as private

  16. Deep ATLAS radio observations of the CDFS-SWIRE field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray P. Norris; Jose Afonso; Phil N. Appleton; Brian J. Boyle; Paolo Ciliegi; Scott M. Croom; Minh T. Huynh; Carole A. Jackson; Anton M. Koekemoer; Carol J. Lonsdale; Enno Middelberg; Bahram Mobasher; Seb J. Oliver; Mari Polletta; Brian D. Siana; Ian Smail; Maxim A. Voronkov

    2006-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first results from the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS), which consist of deep radio observations of a 3.7 square degree field surrounding the Chandra Deep Field South, largely coincident with the infrared Spitzer Wide-Area Extragalactic (SWIRE) Survey. We also list cross-identifications to infrared and optical photometry data from SWIRE, and ground-based optical spectroscopy. A total of 784 radio components are identified, corresponding to 726 distinct radio sources, nearly all of which are identified with SWIRE sources. Of the radio sources with measured redshifts, most lie in the redshift range 0.5-2, and include both star-forming galaxies and active galactic nuclei (AGN). We identify a rare population of infrared-faint radio sources which are bright at radio wavelengths but are not seen in the available optical, infrared, or X-ray data. Such rare classes of sources can only be discovered in wide, deep surveys such as this.

  17. Radio faint AGN: a tale of two populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padovani, P; Kellermann, K I; Miller, N; Mainieri, V; Tozzi, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDFS) Very Large Array sample, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 32.5 microJy at the field centre and redshift ~ 4, and covers ~ 0.3 deg^2. Number counts are presented for the whole sample while the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions are derived for active galactic nuclei (AGN). The faint radio sky contains two totally distinct AGN populations, characterised by very different evolutions, luminosity functions, and Eddington ratios: radio-quiet (RQ)/radiative-mode, and radio-loud/jet-mode AGN. The radio power of RQ AGN evolves ~ (1+z)^2.5, similarly to star-forming galaxies, while the number density of radio-loud ones has a peak at ~ 0.5 and then declines at higher redshifts. The number density of radio-selected RQ AGN is consistent with that of X-ray selected AGN, which shows that we are sampling the same population. The unbiased fraction of radiative-mode RL AGN, derived from our own and previously published data, is a strong funct...

  18. A search for molecular gas in restarting radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmi Saripalli; Karl-Heinz Mack

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Several radio galaxies are known that show radio morphological signatures that are best interpreted as restarting of nuclear activity after a period of quiescence. The conditions surrounding the phenomenon of nuclear recurrence are not understood. In this paper we have attempted to address this question by examining the nuclear fuelling characteristics in a sample of restarting radio galaxies. We have examined the detection rate for molecular gas in a representative sample of nine restarting radio galaxies, for seven of which we present new upper limits to the molecular gas mass derived from CO line observations we made with the IRAM 30-m telescope. We derive a low CO detection rate for the relatively young restarted radio galaxies suggesting that the cessation of the nuclear activity and its subsequent restarting may be a result of instabilities in the fuelling process rather than a case of depletion of fuel followed by a recent fuel acquisition. It appears that abundant molecular gas content at the level of few 10^8 to 10^9 solar masses does not necessarily accompany the nuclear restarting phenomenon. For comparison we also discuss the molecular gas properties of five normal giant radio galaxies, three of which we observed using SEST. Despite obvious signs of interactions and nuclear dust disks none of them has been found to host significant quantities of molecular gas.

  19. Microwave and Radio Frequency Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the Microwave and Radio Frequency Workshop (held in Long Beach, CA, on July 25, 2012), academic and industry experts discussed the existing and emerging electrotechnologies – such as microwave ...

  20. YOUNG RADIO PULSARS IN GALACTIC GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyles, J.; Lorimer, D. R. [Department of Physics, 210 Hodges Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Turk, P. J.; Mnatsakanov, R. [Department of Statistics, 423 Hodges Hall, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Lynch, R. S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Ransom, S. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Freire, P. C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel D-53121, Bonn (Germany); Belczynski, K. [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, AL Ujazdowskie 4,00-478, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently three isolated radio pulsars and one binary radio pulsar with no evidence of any previous recycling are known in 97 surveyed Galactic globular clusters (GCs). As pointed out by Lyne et al., the presence of these pulsars cannot be explained by core-collapse supernovae, as commonly assumed for their counterparts in the Galactic disk. We apply a Bayesian analysis to the results from surveys for radio pulsars in GCs and find the number of potentially observable non-recycled radio pulsars present in all clusters to be <3600. Accounting for beaming and retention considerations, the implied birthrate for any formation scenario for all 97 clusters is <0.25 pulsars century{sup -1} assuming a Maxwellian distribution of velocities with a dispersion of 10 km s{sup -1}. The implied birthrates for higher velocity dispersions are substantially higher than inferred for such pulsars in the Galactic disk. This suggests that the velocity dispersion of young pulsars in GCs is significantly lower than those of disk pulsars. These numbers may be substantial overestimates due to the fact that the currently known sample of young pulsars is observed only in metal-rich clusters. We propose that young pulsars may only be formed in GCs with metallicities with log[Fe/H] > - 0.6. In this case, the potentially observable population of such young pulsars is 447{sup +1420}{sub -399} (the error bars give a 95% confidence interval) and their birthrate is 0.012{sup +0.037}{sub -0.010} pulsars century{sup -1}. The most likely creation scenario to explain these pulsars is the electron capture supernova of an OMgNe white dwarf.

  1. SPITZER OBSERVATIONS OF HOTSPOTS IN RADIO LOBES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, Michael W.; Murphy, David W.; Livingston, John H.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Jones, Dayton L.; Meier, David L.; Lawrence, Charles R. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out a systematic search with Spitzer Warm Mission and archival data for infrared emission from the hotspots in radio lobes that have been described by Hardcastle et al. These hotspots have been detected with both radio and X-ray observations, but an observation at an intermediate frequency in the infrared can be critical to distinguish between competing models for particle acceleration and radiation processes in these objects. Between the archival and warm mission data, we report detections of 18 hotspots; the archival data generally include detections at all four IRAC bands, the Warm Mission data only at 3.6 {mu}m. Using a theoretical formalism adopted from Godfrey et al., we fit both archival and warm mission spectral energy distributions (SEDs)-including radio, X-ray, and optical data from Hardcastle as well as the Spitzer data-with a synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the X-rays are produced by Compton scattering of the radio frequency photons by the energetic electrons which radiate them. With one exception, an SSC model requires that the magnetic field be less or much less than the equipartition value which minimizes total energy and has comparable amounts of energy in the magnetic field and in the energetic particles. This conclusion agrees with those of comparable recent studies of hotspots, and with the analysis presented by Hardcastle et al. We also show that the infrared data rule out the simplest synchrotron-only models for the SEDs. We briefly discuss the implications of these results and of alternate interpretations of the data.

  2. Large Scale Impact of the Cosmological Population of Expanding Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paramita Barai

    2008-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We seek to compute the fraction of the volume of the Universe filled by expanding cocoons of the cosmological population of radio galaxies over the Hubble time as well as the magnetic field infused by them, in order to assess their importance in the cosmic evolution of the Universe. Using N-body $\\Lambda$CDM simulations, radio galaxies distributed according to the observed radio luminosity function are allowed to evolve in a cosmological volume as using well defined prescriptions for their expansion. We find that the radio galaxies permeate $10 - 30%$ of the total volume with $\\sim 10^{-8}$ G magnetic field by the present epoch.

  3. Large Scale Impact of the Cosmological Population of Expanding Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barai, Paramita

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We seek to compute the fraction of the volume of the Universe filled by expanding cocoons of the cosmological population of radio galaxies over the Hubble time as well as the magnetic field infused by them, in order to assess their importance in the cosmic evolution of the Universe. Using N-body $\\Lambda$CDM simulations, radio galaxies distributed according to the observed radio luminosity function are allowed to evolve in a cosmological volume as using well defined prescriptions for their expansion. We find that the radio galaxies permeate $10 - 30%$ of the total volume with $\\sim 10^{-8}$ G magnetic field by the present epoch.

  4. First `Winged' and `X'-shaped Radio Source Candidates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, C.C.

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A small number of double-lobed radio galaxies (17 from our own census of the literature) show an additional pair of low surface brightness ''wings'', thus forming an overall ''X''-shaped appearance. The origin of the wings in these radio sources is unclear. They may be the result of back-flowing plasma from the currently active radio lobes into an asymmetric medium surrounding the active nucleus, which would make these ideal systems in which to study thermal/non-thermal plasma interactions in extragalactic radio sources. Another possibility is that the wings are the aging radio lobes left over after a (rapid) realignment of the central supermassive black-hole/accretion disk system due perhaps to a merger. Generally, these models are not well tested; with the small number of known examples, previous works focused on detailed case studies of selected sources with little attempt at a systematic study of a large sample. Using the VLA-FIRST survey database, we are compiling a large sample of winged and X-shaped radio sources for such studies. As a first step toward this goal, an initial sample of 100 new candidate objects of this type are presented in this paper. The search process is described, optical identifications from available literature data, and basic radio data are presented. From the limited resolution FIRST images ({approx} 5''), we can already confidently classify a sufficient number of these objects as having the characteristic wing lengths >80% of the active lobes to more than double the number of known X-shaped radio sources. We have also included as candidates, radio sources with shorter wings (<80% wing to lobe length ratios), or simply ''winged'' sources, as it is probable that projection effects are important. Finally, among the candidates are four quasars (z=0.37 to 0.84), and several have morphologies suggestive of Fanaroff-Riley type-I (low-power) radio galaxies. While followup observations are necessary to confirm these identifications, this stresses the importance of source orientation and imaging limitations in finding these enigmatic objects.

  5. Tradeoff between spoofing and jamming a cognitive radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Q; Cosman, P C; Milstein, L B

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tradeoff for cognitive radio networks,” IEEE Transactions onemulation attacks in cognitive radio networks,” IEEE Journaldeception for cognitive radio networks,” IEEE Globecom 2009,

  6. RADIO OBSERVATRIO DO ITAPETINGA, ATIBAIA, SP ZONA DE SILNCIO ELTRICO.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIO OBSERVATÓRIO DO ITAPETINGA, ATIBAIA, SP ZONA DE SILÊNCIO ELÉTRICO. PROTEÇÃO DO RÁDIO uma Radio Conferência Mundial (World Adminstrative Radio Conference, WARC) patrocinada pela União

  7. A Method for Broadband Full-Duplex MIMO Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Yingbo; Liang, Ping; Ma, Yiming; Cirik, Ali C; Gao, Qian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    canceller for collocated radios,” IEEE Trans. Microwaveusing off-the shelf radios: Feasibility and first results,”Broadband Full-Duplex MIMO Radio Yingbo Hua, Fellow, IEEE,

  8. TRIESTE: A Trusted Radio Infrastructure for Enforcing SpecTrum Etiquettes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Wenyuan

    1 TRIESTE: A Trusted Radio Infrastructure for Enforcing SpecTrum Etiquettes Wenyuan Xu Pandurang presents a framework, known as TRIESTE (Trusted Radio Infrastructure for Enforcing SpecTrum Etiquettes to their privileges. In TRIESTE, two levels of etiquette enforcement mechanisms are employed. The first is an on

  9. Study of Calibration of Solar Radio Spectrometers and the quiet-Sun Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chengming; Tan, Baolin; Fu, Qijun; Liu, Yuying; Xu, Guirong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the influence of weather conditions on the calibration errors by using Gaussian fitness, least chi-square linear fitness and wavelet transform to analyze the calibration coefficients from observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers (at frequency bands of 1.0-2.0 GHz, 2.6-3.8 GHz, and 5.2-7.6 GHz) during 1997-2007. We found that calibration coefficients are influenced by the local air temperature. Considering the temperature correction, the calibration error will reduce by about $10\\%-20\\%$ at 2800 MHz. Based on the above investigation and the calibration corrections, we further study the radio emission of the quiet-Sun by using an appropriate hybrid model of the quiet-Sun atmosphere. The results indicate that the numerical flux of the hybrid model is much closer to the observation flux than that of other ones.

  10. Compact radio sources and jet-driven AGN feedback in the early Universe: Constraints from integral-field spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. P. H. Nesvadba; M. D. Lehnert; C. De Breuck; A. Gilbert; W. van Breugel

    2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the impact of radio jets during the formation epoch of their massive host galaxies, we present an analysis of two massive, log(M_stel/ M_sun)~10.6 and 11.3, compact radio galaxies at z=3.5, TNJ0205+2242 and TNJ0121+1320. Their small radio sizes (Rradio properties and gas dynamics with those in well extended radio galaxies at high redshift, which show strong evidence for powerful, jet-driven outflows of significant gas masses (M 10^9-10 M_sun). Our analysis combines rest-frame optical integral-field spectroscopy with existing radio imaging, CO emission line spectra, and rest-frame UV spectroscopy. [OIII]5007 line emission is compact in both galaxies and lies within the region defined by the radio lobes. For TNJ0205+2242, the Ly-alpha profile narrows significantly outside the jet radius, indicating the presence of a quiescent halo. TNJ0121+1320 has two components separated by ~10 kpc and a velocity offset of ~300 km s^-1. If motions are gravitational, this implies a dynamical mass of 2x10^11 M_sun for the more massive, radio-loud component. The dynamical mass, molecular gas mass measured from the CO line emission, and radio luminosity of these two compact radio galaxies imply that compact radio sources may well develop large-scale, energetic outflows as observed in extended radio galaxies, with the potential of removing significant fractions of the ISM from the host galaxy. The absence of luminous emission line gas extending beyond the radio emission in these sources agrees with the observed timescales and outflow rates in extended radio galaxies, and adds further evidence that the energetic, large-scale outflows observed in extended radio sources (Nesvadba et al. 2006) are indeed the result of influence of the radio jet.

  11. Cluster Mergers and Diffuse Radio Emission in Abell 2256 and Abell 754

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. E. Clarke; T. A. Ensslin

    2001-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present deep VLA observations of the galaxy clusters Abell 2256 and Abell 754, both of which appear to be in the violent stage of major cluster merger events. The complex nature of Abell 2256 is revealed through radio images which, in addition to the head-tail galaxies, show two extended, irregular, and sharp-edged regions of diffuse radio emission at the cluster periphery (so called radio relics), and a large-scale diffuse radio halo located in the central regions of the cluster. Polarimetry of the A2256 cluster relics reveals large-scale ordered magnetic fields which appear to trace the bright filaments in the relics. The polarization fraction across the relics ranges from 20% - 40% with the majority of the relics polarized above the 30% level. At the sensitivity of our current observations we place an upper limit of 20% on the polarization of the radio halo. Low frequency VLA observations of Abell 754 reveal extended, diffuse radio (halo) emission in the cluster core region as well as steep spectrum emission in the cluster periphery. The location, morphology, and spectral index of the peripheral emission are consistent with the properties of radio relics. The X-ray evidence of the ongoing mergers in both clusters, together with the polarization properties of A2256's radio relics supports recent suggestions of a merger-induced origin of the relic emission. Deciphering the complex radio properties of these clusters may thus provide the key to understanding the dynamical history of the systems.

  12. Some Comments related to AGN Radio Loudness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor

    2003-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The bimodality of the AGN radio loudness distribution, and the relation of radio loudness and black hole mass were recently disputed. A closer look at the existing data suggests possible resolutions of these disputes, as further described below.

  13. Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 131, Radio tomography of the ionosphere: Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Raphaël

    Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 1­31, Radio tomography of the ionosphere: Analysis AND CRESPON: 4D IONOSPHERE TOMOGRAPHY After analysing the forward and inverse problems of radio tomography, the development of Faraday rotation measurements on-board satellites opens the way to magnetospheric radio

  14. Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 15, Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation for Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    Radio Science, Volume ???, Number , Pages 1­5, Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation for Detection of Extended Sources with an Interferometer Geoffrey C. Bower Radio Astronomy Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Radio frequency interference (RFI) is a significant problem for current

  15. Final Project Report Modulate of Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    Final Project Report Modulate of Internet Radio Into FM Using GNU Radio Department of Electrical-Introduction: Internet radio (also known as Webcasting) is becoming more and more popular. Especially that it covers for people traveling all the time or living away from there home country, internet radio helps them keep

  16. Air Shower Measurements with the LOPES Radio Antenna Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Haungs; for the LOPES collaboration

    2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    LOPES is set up at the location of the KASCADE-Grande extensive air shower experiment in Karlsruhe, Germany and aims to measure and investigate radio pulses from Extensive Air Showers. Since radio waves suffer very little attenuation, radio measurements allow the detection of very distant or highly inclined showers. These waves can be recorded day and night, and provide a bolometric measure of the leptonic shower component. LOPES is designed as a digital radio interferometer using high bandwidths and fast data processing and profits from the reconstructed air shower observables of KASCADE-Grande. The LOPES antennas are absolutely amplitude calibrated allowing to reconstruct the electric field strength which can be compared with predictions from detailed Monte Carlo simulations. We report about the analysis of correlations present in the radio signals measured by the LOPES 30 antenna array. Additionally, LOPES operates antennas of a different type (LOPES-STAR) which are optimized for an application at the Pierre Auger Observatory. Status, recent results of the data analysis and further perspectives of LOPES and the possible large scale application of this new detection technique are discussed.

  17. Giant radio galaxies - II. Tracers of large-scale structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malarecki, J M; Saripalli, L; Staveley-Smith, L; Subrahmanyan, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have carried out optical spectroscopy with the Anglo-Australian Telescope for 24,726 objects surrounding a sample of 19 Giant Radio Galaxies (GRGs) selected to have redshifts in the range 0.05 to 0.15 and projected linear sizes from 0.8 to 3.2 Mpc. Such radio galaxies are ideal candidates to study the Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium (WHIM) because their radio lobes extend beyond the ISM and halos of their host galaxies, and into the tenuous IGM. We were able to measure redshifts for 9,076 galaxies. Radio imaging of each GRG, including high-sensitivity, wideband radio observations from the Australia Telescope Compact Array for 12 GRGs and host optical spectra (presented in a previous paper, Malarecki et al. 2013), is used in conjunction with the surrounding galaxy redshifts to trace large-scale structure. We find that the mean galaxy number overdensity in volumes of ~700 Mpc$^3$ near the GRG host galaxies is ~70 indicating an overdense but non-virialized environment. A Fourier component analysis is used to qu...

  18. Soft Sensing and Optimal Power Control for Cognitive Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar, Syed A.

    Soft Sensing and Optimal Power Control for Cognitive Radio Sudhir Srinivasa and Syed Ali Jafar being present increases. We find that power control that maximizes the SNR is binary, i implementation at the secondary transmitter. With binary detection and binary power control, minimizing

  19. RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Melrose, Don

    I t RADIO EMISSION FROM INSTABILITIES IN SPACE PLASMAS: MARGINAL STABILITY, 4TOCHASTIC GROWTH emission, hich is an indirect emission process first discussed by Ginaburg and Zhe/eznyakoe, 9581, and electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME), which is a direct emission ess first discussed in the presently

  20. Optical and Radio monitoring of S5 1803+74

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Nesci; E. Massaro; M. Maesano; F. Montagni; S. Sclavi; T. Venturi; D. Dallacasa; F. D'Alessio

    2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical (BVRI) and radio (8.4 GHz) light curves of S5 1803+784 on a time span of nearly 6 years are presented and discussed. The optical light curve showed an overall variation greater than 3 mag, and the largest changes occured in three strong flares. No periodicity was found in the light curve on time scales up to a year. The variability in the radio band is very different, and shows moderate oscillations around an average constant flux density rather than relevant flares, with a maximum amplitude of $\\sim$30%, without a simultaneous correspondence between optical and radio luminosity. The optical spectral energy distribution was always well fitted by a power law. The spectral index shows small variations and there is indication of a positive correlation with the source luminosity. Possible explanations of the source behaviour are discussed in the framework of current models.

  1. Cognitive Radio and Smart Grid Dr. Robert C. Qiu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Cognitive Radio and Smart Grid Dr. Robert C. Qiu Professor Wireless Networking Systems Laboratory RadioCognitive Radio 2 2/23/2010 #12;Outline Cognitive Radio Cognitive Radio @ Tennessee Tech University Spectrum Sensing and Wideband Spectrum Sensing Cognitive Radio Networks and Testbeds Cognitive

  2. Telecommunications Emergency Alert System (EAS) Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Telecommunications Emergency Alert System (EAS) Radio 1. Send completed form to Mail Stop of submitting this form, call 979.845.1020. In the event the radio is lost or broken, the department will be charged for a replacement. If the radio malfunctions, please contact Telecommunications. Texas A

  3. FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waddington, Ian

    FAINT RADIO SOURCES AND STAR FORMATION HISTORY Deborah B. Haarsma 1 , R. Bruce Partridge 1 , Ian 85287­1504 USA Abstract. Faint extragalactic radio sources provide important information about the global history of star formation. Sensitive radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field and other fields

  4. > RADIO TUDIANTE CISM 89,3 FM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charette, André

    3 0 > RADIO ÉTUDIANTE ­ CISM 89,3 FM Pavillon J.-A.-DeSève 2332, boul. Édouard-Montpetit Local C@pol.umontreal.ca Revue du Département de science politique de l'UdeM. Radio > ATELIERS DE FORMATION EN RADIO (ACTIVITÉS

  5. Analysis of modulation scheme using GNU Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    1 Analysis of modulation scheme using GNU Radio By: Zeyu long Outline Introduce Project Goal QPSK CPFSK Resolute Project conclusion Project challenges Reference #12;2 Introduce (1) GNU radio: One of the most popular applications of Software Defined Radios Use C++ to write blocks Use python to connect

  6. Radio Network Planning with Combinatorial Optimisation Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Radio Network Planning with Combinatorial Optimisation Algorithms P. Calégari, F. Guidec, P. Kuonen@c2r.tdf.fr Group: Software tools Abstract: Future UMTS radio planning engineers will face difficult, a software for the optimisation of the radio network is under development. Two mathematical models

  7. Storm in a "Teacup": a radio-quiet quasar with ~10kpc radio-emitting bubbles and extreme gas kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, C M; Alexander, D M; Bauer, F E; Edge, A C; Hogan, M T; Mullaney, J R; Swinbank, A M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present multi-frequency (1-8 GHz) VLA data, combined with VIMOS IFU data and HST imaging, of a z=0.085 radio-quiet type 2 quasar (with L(1.4GHz)~5e23 W/Hz and L(AGN)~2e45 erg/s). Due to the morphology of its emission-line region, the target (J1430+1339) has been referred to as the Teacup AGN in the literature. We identify "bubbles" of radio emission that are extended ~10-12 kpc to both the east and west of the nucleus. The edge of the brighter eastern bubble is co-spatial with an arc of luminous ionized gas. We also show that the Teacup AGN hosts a compact radio structure, located ~0.8 kpc from the core position, at the base of the eastern bubble. This radio structure is co-spatial with an ionized outflow with an observed velocity of v=-760 km/s. This is likely to correspond to a jet, or possibly a quasar wind, interacting with the interstellar medium at this position. The large-scale radio bubbles appear to be inflated by the central AGN, which indicates that the AGN can also interact with the gas on >~10...

  8. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN) [London, TN; Dress, William B. (Camas, WA) [Camas, WA

    2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method, includes receiving a hybrid spread spectrum signal including: fast frequency hopping demodulating and direct sequence demodulating a direct sequence spread spectrum signal, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time and each bit is represented by chip transmissions at multiple frequencies.

  9. A Semi-automatic Search for Giant Radio Galaxy Candidates and their Radio-Optical Follow-up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago-Bautista, I del C; Andernach, H; Coziol, R; Torres-Papaqui, J P; Andrade, E F Jimenez; Plauchu-Frayn, I; Momjian, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of a search for giant radio galaxies (GRGs) with a projected largest linear size in excess of 1 Mpc. We designed a computational algorithm to identify contiguous emission regions, large and elongated enough to serve as GRG candidates, and applied it to the entire 1.4-GHz NRAO VLA Sky survey (NVSS). In a subsequent visual inspection of 1000 such regions we discovered 15 new GRGs, as well as many other candidate GRGs, some of them previously reported, for which no redshift was known. Our follow-up spectroscopy of 25 of the brighter hosts using two 2.1-m telescopes in Mexico, and four fainter hosts with the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), yielded another 24 GRGs. We also obtained higher-resolution radio images with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array for GRG candidates with inconclusive radio structures in NVSS.

  10. MULTI-FREQUENCY STUDIES OF RADIO RELICS IN THE GALAXY CLUSTERS A4038, A1664, AND A786

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kale, Ruta; Dwarakanath, K. S., E-mail: ruta@iucaa.ernet.in [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560 080 (India)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a multi-frequency study of radio relics associated with the galaxy clusters A4038, A1664, and A786. Radio images, integrated spectra, spectral index maps, and fits to the integrated spectra in the framework of the adiabatic compression model are presented. Images of the relic in A4038 at 150, 240, and 606 MHz with the Giant Meterwave Radio Telescope have revealed extended ultra-steep spectrum ({alpha} {approx} -1.8 to -2.7) emission of extent 210 Multiplication-Sign 80 kpc{sup 2}. The model of passively evolving radio lobes compressed by a shock fits the integrated spectrum best. The relic with a circular morphology at the outskirts of the cluster A1664 has an integrated spectral index of {approx} - 1.10 {+-} 0.06 and is best fit by the model of radio lobes lurking for {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} yr. The relic near A786 has a curved spectrum and is best fit by a model of radio lobes lurking for {approx}3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} yr. At 4.7 GHz, a compact radio source, possibly the progenitor of the A786 relic, is detected near the center of the radio relic. The A786 radio relic is thus likely a lurking radio galaxy rather than a site of cosmological shock as has been considered in earlier studies.

  11. A Study of 3CR Radio Galaxies from z = 0.15 to 0.65. I. Evidence for an Evolutionary Relationship Between Quasars and Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Harvanek; E. Ellingson; John T. Stocke

    2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep optical images have been gathered for a nearly complete sample of radio galaxies from the Revised 3rd Cambridge (3CR) Catalog in the redshift range 0.15 0.4 supports the hypothesis that some radio-loud quasars may dim with time and evolve into radio galaxies with an e-folding time of ~0.9 Gyr. A compatible scenario is presented for this evolution in which the quasar dims due to the absence of low velocity interactions between the quasar host and companion galaxies which trigger quasar activity and/or a diminishing fuel supply caused by the more effective gas ``sweeping'' of a growing intracluster medium.

  12. GEOL 5303 Project Presentations Presenter name: ______________________________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    pertinent materials. 10 7 4 0 Conclusion: What did you learn? Presenter summarizes total project (triumphsGEOL 5303 Project Presentations Presenter name: ______________________________________________ Project title: ___________________________________________________________ Project content Superb

  13. Software-defined Radio Based Wireless Tomography: Experimental Demonstration and Verification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonior, Jason D [ORNL; Hu, Zhen [Tennessee Technological University; Guo, Terry N. [Tennessee Technological University; Qiu, Robert C. [Tennessee Technological University; Browning, James P. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Wicks, Michael C. [University of Dayton Research Institute

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This letter presents an experimental demonstration of software-defined-radio-based wireless tomography using computer-hosted radio devices called Universal Software Radio Peripheral (USRP). This experimental brief follows our vision and previous theoretical study of wireless tomography that combines wireless communication and RF tomography to provide a novel approach to remote sensing. Automatic data acquisition is performed inside an RF anechoic chamber. Semidefinite relaxation is used for phase retrieval, and the Born iterative method is utilized for imaging the target. Experimental results are presented, validating our vision of wireless tomography.

  14. Impedance matching and DC-DC converter designs for tunable radio frequency based mobile telecommunication systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong, Yan Chiew

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tunability and adaptability for radio frequency (RF) front-ends are highly desirable because they not only enhance functionality and performance but also reduce the circuit size and cost. This thesis presents a number ...

  15. Using a co-located GNSS radio occultation payload for microwave radiometer calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davé, Pratik K. (Pratik Kamlesh)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents a new method of calibrating an orbital cross-track scanning microwave radiometer using a co-located radio occultation (RO) instrument with Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). The radiometer and ...

  16. Robust range-based localization and motion planning under uncertainty using ultra-wideband radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prentice, Samuel J. (Samuel James)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented in this thesis addresses two problems: accurately localizing a mobile robot using ultra-wideband (UWB) radio signals in GPS-denied environments; and planning robot trajectories that incorporate belief ...

  17. The Nature of Radio-Intermediate Quasars: What is Radio-Loud and what is Radio-Quiet?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino Falcke; William Sherwood; Alok Patnaik

    1996-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed quasi-simultaneous radio flux density measurements at 2.7 and 10 GHz for all PG quasars with radio flux densities between 4-200 mJy. We find that a large fraction of these sources are variable, flat-spectrum quasars. This brings the total fraction of flat-spectrum quasars with a ratio between radio and optical flux of R>10 - a value previously used to define a radio-loud quasar - to 40% in the PG quasar sample. We also find that the median R-parameter of these flat-spectrum quasars is lower than those of steep-spectrum radio-loud quasars. This contradicts the predictions of the unified scheme and the idea that all flat-spectrum, core-dominated quasars are relativistically boosted lobe-dominated quasars. We show that this discrepancy is due to a population of flat-spectrum radio-intermediate quasars with 25radio-loud quasars nor as normal radio-weak quasars. We point out that a natural explanation for the flat-spectrum radio-intermediate quasars is relativistic boosting in radio-weak quasars. If the flat-spectrum radio-intermediate quasars are considered the boosted counterparts to usual radio-weak quasars, their fraction among radio-weak quasars is roughly 10%, similar to the fraction of boosted radio-loud quasars. This would point towards average Lorentz factors of gamma_jet=2-4 for radio-loud and radio-weak quasars. The presence of the flat-spectrum radio-intermediate quasars changes the definition of 'radio-loud' and can bias some conclusions drawn from optically selected quasar samples, where R ~ 1-10 is used as the dividing line for both, flat- and steep-spectrum quasars. Instead one should use separate R-parameters for the dividing line in steep- (R~25) and flat-spectrum (R~250) quasars.

  18. Fourier Modeling of the Radio Torus Surrounding Supernova 1987A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. -Y. Ng; B. M. Gaensler; L. Staveley-Smith; R. N. Manchester; M. J. Kesteven; L. Ball; A. K. Tzioumis

    2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We present detailed Fourier modeling of the radio remnant of Supernova 1987A, using high-resolution 9 GHz and 18 GHz data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array over the period 1992 to 2008. We develop a parameterized three-dimensional torus model for the expanding radio shell, in which the emission is confined to an inclined equatorial belt; our model also incorporates both a correction for light travel-time effects and an overall east-west gradient in the radio emissivity. By deriving an analytic expression for the two-dimensional Fourier transform of the projected three-dimensional brightness distribution, we can fit our spatial model directly to the interferometric visibility data. This provides robust estimates to the radio morphology at each epoch. The best-fit results suggest a constant remnant expansion at 4000 +/- 400 km/s over the 16-year period covered by the observations. The model fits also indicate substantial mid-latitude emission, extending to 40 degree on either side of the equatorial plane. This likely corresponds to the extra-planar structure seen in H$\\alpha$ and Ly$\\alpha$ emission from the supernova reverse shock, and broadly supports hydrodynamic models in which the complex circumstellar environment was produced by a progression of interacting winds from the progenitor. Our model quantifies the clear asymmetry seen in the radio images: we find that the eastern half of the radio remnant is consistently ~40 brighter than the western half at all epochs, which may result from an asymmetry in the ejecta distribution between these two hemispheres.

  19. Lateral Expansion of the Bridges of Cygnus A and other Powerful Radio Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greg F. Wellman; Ruth A. Daly

    1995-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the width of the radio bridge at several locations along the bridge for each of four powerful extended radio sources are presented. Adopting a few simple assumptions, these measurements may be used to predict the radio surface brightness as a function of position across the radio bridge. The predicted and observed surface brightnesses across the bridges are compared and found to agree fairly well. The results are consistent with a simple picture in which the radio power and size of the radio lobe at the forward edge of the radio bridge are roughly time-independent for a given source, and the expansion of the bridge in the lateral direction is adiabatic. There is no indication that reacceleration or energy transport is important in the bridges of these sources. The rate of lateral expansion of the bridge just behind the radio lobe and hotspot in terms of the rate of forward propagation is compared with that predicted, and found to be in good agreement with the predicted value.

  20. ATLBS EXTENDED SOURCE SAMPLE: THE EVOLUTION IN RADIO SOURCE MORPHOLOGY WITH FLUX DENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saripalli, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Thorat, K.; Ekers, R. D. [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Hunstead, R. W.; Johnston, H. M.; Sadler, E. M., E-mail: lsaripal@rri.res.in [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the Australia Telescope Low Brightness Survey (ATLBS) we present a sample of extended radio sources and derive morphological properties of faint radio sources. One hundred nineteen radio galaxies form the ATLBS Extended Source Sample (ATLBS-ESS) consisting of all sources exceeding 30'' in extent and integrated flux densities exceeding 1 mJy. We give structural details along with information on galaxy identifications and source classifications. The ATLBS-ESS, unlike samples with higher flux-density limits, has almost equal fractions of FR-I and FR-II radio galaxies, with a large fraction of the FR-I population exhibiting 3C31-type structures. Significant asymmetry in lobe extents appears to be a common occurrence in the ATLBS-ESS FR-I sources compared with FR-II sources. We present a sample of 22 FR-Is at z > 0.5 with good structural information. The detection of several giant radio sources, with size exceeding 0.7 Mpc, at z > 1 suggests that giant radio sources are not less common at high redshifts. The ESS also includes a sample of 28 restarted radio galaxies. The relative abundance of dying and restarting sources is indicative of a model where radio sources undergo episodic activity in which an active phase is followed by a brief dying phase that terminates with restarting of the central activity; in any massive elliptical a few such activity cycles wherein adjacent events blend may constitute the lifetime of a radio source and such bursts of blended activity cycles may be repeated over the age of the host. The ATLBS-ESS includes a 2 Mpc giant radio galaxy with the lowest surface brightness lobes known to date.

  1. The interaction between radio lobes and hot gas in the nearby radio galaxies 3C285 and 3C442A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Hardcastle; R. P. Kraft; D. M. Worrall; J. H. Croston; D. A. Evans; M. Birkinshaw; S. S. Murray

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Chandra observations of two nearby radio galaxies in group environments, 3C285 and 3C442A. The host galaxies of both sources are involved in mergers with nearby massive galaxies, and the hot gas in the systems is extended along lines joining the interacting galaxies. Both sources show strong evidence for interactions between the radio lobes and the asymmetrical hot gas. We argue that the structure in the hot gas is independent of the existence of the radio lobes in these systems, and argue that hot gas shaped by an ongoing massive galaxy merger may play an important role in the dynamics of radio lobes in other objects. For 3C442A, our observations show that gas is being driven out of both members of the host interacting galaxy pair, and the implied constraints on galaxy velocities are consistent with mildly supersonic motions with respect to the group-scale hot gas. The previously known filamentary radio structure in the center of 3C442A may be a result of the interaction between hot gas expelled from these galaxies and pre-existing radio-emitting plasma. In 3C285, where there is no ongoing galaxy merger, the powerful radio source is probably having a significant effect on the energetics of the host group.

  2. A MULTI-EPOCH STUDY OF THE RADIO CONTINUUM EMISSION OF ORION SOURCE. I. CONSTRAINTS ON THE DISK EVOLUTION OF A MASSIVE YSO AND THE DYNAMICAL HISTORY OF ORION BN/KL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddi, C.

    We present new ?7 mm continuum observations of Orion BN/KL with the Very Large Array. We resolve the emission from the young stellar objects radio Source I and BN at several epochs. Radio Source I is highly elongated ...

  3. RADIO CONTROL ADC0 (RSSI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 D D C C B B A A RADIO CONTROL PCLK PDATA PALE RADIO DATA SPI_SCK SPI_MOSI SPI_MISO[0..7] PALE RF_DETECT US_OUT_EN SPI_MISO I2C_CLK I2C_DATA US_DETECT AC+ US_OUT SCK RSTN UART_RXD0/SS PB1/SCK PB2/MOSI PB3/MISO PB4/OC0 PB5/OC1A PB6/OC1B PB7/OC1C PC0/A8 PC1/A9 PC2/A10 PC3/A11 PC4/A12

  4. Radio Observations of Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Reich

    2002-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Supernovae release an enormous amount of energy into the interstellar medium. Their remnants can observationally be traced up to several ten-thousand years. So far more than 230 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs) have been identified in the radio range. Detailed studies of the different types of SNRs give insight into the interaction of the blast wave with the interstellar medium. Shock accelerated particles are observed, but also neutron stars left from the supernova explosion make their contribution. X-ray observations in conjunction with radio data constrain models of supernova evolution. A brief review of the origin and evolution of SNRs is given, which are compared with supernova statistics and observational limitations. In addition the morphology and characteristics of the different types of SNRs are described, including some recent results and illustrated by SNRs images mostly obtained with the Effelsberg 100-m telescope.

  5. Old stellar populations in distant radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Dunlop

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the current status of our attempts to determine the age of the oldest known stellar populations at high redshift, in the red mJy radio galaxies 53W091 ($z = 1.55$) and 53W069 ($z = 1.43$). During the past year the original conclusion of Dunlop et al. (1996) - that 53W091 is $>3$ Gyr old - has been questioned from two, basically orthogonal directions. First, reports that the near-infrared light from 53W091 is highly polarized have cast some doubt on whether its red colour is genuinely due to an old population of stars. Second, assuming that all the light is indeed due to stars, it has been claimed that 53W091 is in fact only 1-2 Gyr old. Here I present a preliminary analysis of new infrared polarimetric observations of 53W091 which show that the first of these criticisms can be rejected with very high confidence. I then explore why different modellers have derived different ages for 53W091, and present new model fits to the spectrum of 53W069 which demonstrate that different spectral synthesis codes are certainly in good agreement that this galaxy is 3-4 Gyr old. Finally I present a preliminary analysis of the morphologies and scale-lengths of 53W091 and 53W069 as derived from new I-band WFPC2 HST images, and compare the results with those for 3CR galaxies at comparable redshifts. I conclude that the scalelengths and luminosities of radio galaxies at $z \\simeq 1.5$ appear to scale together as would be predicted from the Kormendy relation for low-redshift elliptical galaxies.

  6. The Host Galaxies of Radio-Loud and Radio-Quiet Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James S. Dunlop

    2001-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    I review our knowledge of the properties of the host galaxies of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars, both in comparison to each other and in the context of the general galaxy population. It is now clear that the hosts of radio-loud and radio-quiet quasars with M_V 10^9 solar masses appears to be a necessary (although perhaps not sufficient) condition for the production of radio jets of sufficient power to produce an FRII radio source within a massive galaxy halo.

  7. Sources of the Radio Background Considered

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Stawarz, L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

  8. Radio-telemetry equipment and applications for carnivores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    7 Radio-telemetry equipment and applications for carnivores Mark R. Fuller and Todd K. Fuller Radio goals for this chapter are to provide basic information about radio-telemetry equipment and procedures's (2001) comprehensive book, A manual of wildlife radio tagging for persons who are unfamiliar with radio

  9. Radio frequency overview of the high explosive radio telemetry project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracht, R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Dimsdle, J.; Rich, D.; Smith, F. [AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    High explosive radio telemetry (HERT) is a project that is being developed jointly by Los Alamos National Laboratory and AlliedSignal Federal Manufacturing and Technologies. The ultimate goal is to develop a small, modular telemetry system capable of high-speed detection of explosive events, with an accuracy on the order of 10 nanoseconds. The reliable telemetry of this data, from a high-speed missile trajectory, is a very challenging opportunity. All captured data must be transmitted in less than 20 microseconds of time duration. This requires a high bits/Hertz microwave telemetry modulation code to insure transmission of the data with the limited time interval available.

  10. A radio Search for high redshift HI absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram N. Chengalur; A. G. de Bruyn; R. Braun; C. L. Carilli

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ground based optical observations have yielded considerable information on the statistics of damped-lyman alpha systems. In particular these systems are known to be the dominant repository of the observed neutral gas at high redshift. However, particularly at high redshift, there is the possibility that optical observations could be biased due to the exclusion of damped-lyman alpha systems that contain moderate to significant amounts of dust. Independent observational constraints on the neutral hydrogen content at high redshifts and the amount of dust in high redshift systems can be obtained from a radio search against the bright lobes of distant radio galaxies (which is less affected by the presence of dust in foreground damped-lyman alpha systems). We describe here a pilot radio survey along the line of sight to a small sample of high redshift radio galaxies, and also present some preliminary results. The survey uses a novel observing mode at the WSRT which enables one to make sensitive searches of a large redshift interval in a modest amount of telescope time.

  11. The Isotropic Radio Background and Annihilating Dark Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooper, Dan [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Belikov, Alexander V. [Institut d'Astrophysique (France); Jeltema, Tesla E. [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Linden, Tim [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Profumo, Stefano [Univ. of California, Santa Cruz, CA (United States); Slatyer, Tracy R. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations by ARCADE-2 and other telescopes sensitive to low frequency radiation have revealed the presence of an isotropic radio background with a hard spectral index. The intensity of this observed background is found to exceed the flux predicted from astrophysical sources by a factor of approximately 5-6. In this article, we consider the possibility that annihilating dark matter particles provide the primary contribution to the observed isotropic radio background through the emission of synchrotron radiation from electron and positron annihilation products. For reasonable estimates of the magnetic fields present in clusters and galaxies, we find that dark matter could potentially account for the observed radio excess, but only if it annihilates mostly to electrons and/or muons, and only if it possesses a mass in the range of approximately 5-50 GeV. For such models, the annihilation cross section required to normalize the synchrotron signal to the observed excess is sigma v ~ (0.4-30) x 10^-26 cm^3/s, similar to the value predicted for a simple thermal relic (sigma v ~ 3 x 10^-26 cm^3/s). We find that in any scenario in which dark matter annihilations are responsible for the observed excess radio emission, a significant fraction of the isotropic gamma ray background observed by Fermi must result from dark matter as well.

  12. Radio galaxies and the star formation history of the universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gopal-Krishna; Paul J. Wiita; M. Angela Osterman

    2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-wavelength observations made in the last decade suggest that the universe underwent an intense phase of star formation in the past (z > 1). This intensive activity is commonly attributed to a higher galaxy merger rate when the universe was a fraction of its present age. We examine the role of the powerful radio sources whose comoving density is known to be a few orders of magnitude higher at z ~ 2, the `quasar era'. Taking into account recent models for the temporal evolution of the size and luminosity of a powerful double radio source, as well as Lambda-CDM simulations of the cosmic web of baryonic material at different redshifts, we argue that during the quasar era a high fraction of the volume of the web was occupied by the lobes of double radio sources. Widespread compression of protostellar clouds, triggered by the high pressure of the synchrotron plasma of the radio lobes, can thus be expected to have played a significant role in the global star formation history of the universe. These lobes can also yield a rather high level of magnetization of the intergalactic medium at these early cosmic epochs.

  13. Compact Radio Sources and Jet-driven AGN Feedback in the Early Universe: Constraints from Integral-Field Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesvadba, N H; Lehnert, M D; De Breuck, C; Gilbert, A; van Breugel, W

    2007-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the impact of radio jets during the formation epoch of their massive host galaxies, we present an analysis of two massive, log M{sub stellar}/M{sub {circle_dot}} {approx} 10.6 and 11.3, compact radio galaxies at z = 3.5, TNJ0205+2242 and TNJ0121+1320. Their small radio sizes (R {le} 10 kpc) are most likely a sign of youth. In particular, we compare their radio properties and gas dynamics with those in well extended radio galaxies at high redshift, which show strong evidence for powerful, jet-driven outflows of significant gas masses (M {approx} 10{sup 9-10} M{sub {circle_dot}}). Our analysis combines rest-frame optical integral-field spectroscopy obtained with SINFONI on the VLT with existing radio imaging, CO(4-3) emission line spectra, and rest-frame UV longslit spectroscopy. [OIII]{lambda}5007 line emission is compact in both galaxies and lies within the region defined by the radio lobes. For TNJ0205+2242, the Ly{alpha} profile narrows significantly outside the jet radius, indicating the presence of a quiescent halo. TNJ0121+1320 has two components at a projected relative distance of {approx}10 kpc and a velocity offset of {approx}300 km s{sup -1}, measured from the [OIII]{lambda}5007 velocity map. This suggests that the fainter component is orbiting around the more massive, radio-loud galaxy. If motions are gravitational, this implies a dynamical mass of 2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} for the radio-loud component. The dynamical mass, molecular gas mass measured from the CO line emission, and radio luminosity of these two compact radio galaxies imply that compact radio sources may well develop large-scale, energetic outflows as observed in extended radio galaxies, with the potential of removing significant fractions of the ISM from the host galaxy. The absence of luminous emission line gas extending beyond the radio emission in these sources agrees with the observed timescales and outflow rates in extended radio galaxies, and adds further evidence that the energetic, large-scale outflows observed in extended radio sources (Nesvadba et al. 2006) are indeed the result of influence of the radio jet.

  14. Hybrid spread spectrum radio system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Stephen F. (London, TN); Dress, William B. (Camas, WA)

    2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods are described for hybrid spread spectrum radio systems. A method includes modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control an amplification circuit that provides a gain to the signal. Another method includes: modulating a signal by utilizing a subset of bits from a pseudo-random code generator to control a fast hopping frequency synthesizer; and fast frequency hopping the signal with the fast hopping frequency synthesizer, wherein multiple frequency hops occur within a single data-bit time.

  15. Magnetic Field Geometry of the Broad Line Radio Galaxy 3C111

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kharb; D. Gabuzda; W. Alef; E. Preuss; P. Shastri

    2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Very Long Baseline Polarimetric observations of the Broad Line Radio galaxy 3C111 performed in July and September of 1996 at 8 and 43 GHz reveal rapidly evolving parsec-scale radio structure after a large millimetre outburst. The B-field geometry is not simple. We present a first analysis of possible Faraday and optical depth effects based on a comparison of the polarization images for the two frequencies.

  16. Cognitive Radio Network {swjang, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahk, Saewoong

    2010 Cognitive Radio Network , , {swjang, sbahk}@netlab.snu.ac.kr Analysis of Average Opportunities in Cognitive Radio Networks Seowoo Jang, Saewoong Bahk INMC, EECS, Seoul National University Cognitive Radio Network . Primary user

  17. RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE IN THE FEL SECTION OF A TBA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuenning, R.W.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Amplitude Control of the Radio Frequency Wave in the Two-Madison, WI, August 21-27, 1986 RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE IN THEAC03-76SF00098 LBL- 223Pl RADIO FREQUENCY PHASE IN THE FEL

  18. PTF 12gzk—A rapidly declining, high-velocity type Ic radio supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horesh, Assaf; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Corsi, Alessandra [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st Street, NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Frail, Dale A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 0, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Cenko, S. Bradley [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Ben-Ami, Sagi; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Yaron, Ofer; Arcavi, Iair; Ofek, Eran O. [Department of Particle Physics and Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Carnegie Institution for Science, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Road, Washington, DC 20008 (United States)

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Only a few cases of Type Ic supernovae (SNe) with high-velocity ejecta (?0.2 c) have been discovered and studied. Here, we present our analysis of radio and X-ray observations of the Type Ic SN PTF 12gzk. The radio emission declined less than 10 days after explosion, suggesting SN ejecta expanding at high velocity (?0.3 c). The radio data also indicate that the density of the circumstellar material (CSM) around the supernova is lower by a factor of ?10 than the CSM around normal Type Ic SNe. PTF 12gzk may therefore be an intermediate event between a 'normal' SN Ic and a gamma-ray-burst-SN-like event. Our observations of this rapidly declining radio SN at a distance of 58 Mpc demonstrates the potential to detect many additional radio SNe, given the new capabilities of the Very Large Array (improved sensitivity and dynamic scheduling), which are currently missed, leading to a biased view of radio SNe Ic. Early optical discovery followed by rapid radio observations would provide a full description of the ejecta velocity distribution and CSM densities around stripped massive star explosions as well as strong clues about the nature of their progenitor stars.

  19. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE R. Lacasse #12;NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia 140-ft CASSEGRAIN BAa

  20. Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced Manufacturing Microwave (MW) and Radio Frequency (RF) as Enabling Technologies for Advanced...

  1. Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density Using Radio Waves to Control Fusion Plasma Density Simulations Run at NERSC Support Fusion Experiments at MIT, General Atomics...

  2. Advanced Radio Frequency-Based Sensors for Monitoring Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radio Frequency-Based Sensors for Monitoring Diesel Particulate Filter Loading and Regeneration Advanced Radio Frequency-Based Sensors for Monitoring Diesel Particulate Filter...

  3. Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor Reduces Fuel...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor Reduces Fuel Consumption, Wins R&D 100 Award Radio Frequency Diesel Particulate Filter Sensor Reduces Fuel Consumption, Wins R&D...

  4. The morphology of the emission line region of Compact Steep Spectrum radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. J. Axon; A. Capetti; R. Fanti; R. Morganti; A. Robinson; R. Spencer

    2000-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of HST narrow band imaging of eleven Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources. Five of them (3C 48, 3C 147, 3C303.1, 3C 277.1 and 4C 12.50) were part of a dedicated ``pointed'' program of deep line imaging ([OIII]). For six additional sources (3C 49, 3C 93.1, 3C 138, 3C 268.3, 3C305.1 and 3C343.1) ``snapshot'' images ([OIII] or [OII]) were taken from the HST archive. In all but one of the targets (3C 49) line emission has been detected and only in one case (3C 138) is unresolved. In four out five of the sources with deep observations, the line emission extends well beyond the size of the radio source but along the radio axis. Structures of similar surface brightness would have not been seen in the snapshot images. These emission line structures extend to scales of 10 to 30 kpc and cover a projected angle, when seen from the nucleus, of 30 to 110 degrees, indicating that the nuclear illumination is anisotropic. Photon counting arguments also support this interpretation. In six objects the radio emission extends over more than 1 arcsec. In these cases the line emission has an elongated structure, linking the nucleus to the radio-lobes, possibly tracing the path of the invisible radio jets. Nevertheless the emission line morphologies do not show the bow shocks at the extremities of the radio lobes expected if they are sources whose expansion is frustrated by a dense external medium. Our data favour the alternative model in which CSSs are the young phase of the large size radio sources. When ``pointed'' pure continuum images are available, there appears to be no alignment between radio and continuum emission which contradicts previous suggestions based on broad-band HST imaging.

  5. Meeting Notes and Presentations

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of voting board members was documented. All members were present or had a representative present on the call. Previous 5 Focus Areas: Dave Tuttel presented the proposed...

  6. The Energetics and Lifetimes of Local Radio Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Ross J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model describing the evolution of Fanaroff-Riley type I and II radio AGN, and the transition between these classes. We quantify galaxy environments using a semi-analytic galaxy formation model, and apply our model to a volume-limited low redshift ($0.03 \\leqslant z \\leqslant 0.1$) sample of observed AGN to determine the distribution of jet powers and active lifetimes at the present epoch. Radio sources in massive galaxies are found to remain active for longer, spend less time in the quiescent phase, and inject more energy into their hosts than their less massive counterparts. The jet power is independent of the host stellar mass within uncertainties, consistent with maintenance-mode AGN feedback paradigm. The environments of these AGN are in or close to long-term heating-cooling balance. We also examine the properties of high- and low-excitation radio galaxy sub-populations. The HERGs are younger than LERGs by an order of magnitude, whilst their jet powers are greater by a factor of four. The Edd...

  7. Cosmological Radio Emission induced by WIMP Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Fornengo; R. Lineros; M. Regis; M. Taoso

    2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed analysis of the radio synchrotron emission induced by WIMP dark matter annihilations and decays in extragalactic halos. We compute intensity, angular correlation, and source counts and discuss the impact on the expected signals of dark matter clustering, as well as of other astrophysical uncertainties as magnetic fields and spatial diffusion. Bounds on dark matter microscopic properties are then derived, and, depending on the specific set of assumptions, they are competitive with constraints from other indirect dark matter searches. At GHz frequencies, dark matter sources can become a significant fraction of the total number of sources with brightness below the microJansky level. We show that, at this level of fluxes (which are within the reach of the next-generation radio surveys), properties of the faint edge of differential source counts, as well as angular correlation data, can become an important probe for WIMPs.

  8. Brightest Cluster Galaxies in the Extended GMRT radio halo cluster sample. Radio properties and cluster dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kale, Ruta; Cassano, Rossella; Giacintucci, Simona; Bardelli, sandro; Dallacasa, Daniele; Zucca, Elena

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brightest Cluster Galaxies (BCGs) show exceptional properties over the whole electromagnetic spectrum. Their special location at the centres of galaxy clusters raises the question of the role of the environment on their radio properties. To decouple the effect of the galaxy mass and of the environment in their statistical radio properties, we investigate the possible dependence of the occurrence of radio loudness and of the fractional radio luminosity function on the dynamical state of the hosting cluster. We studied the radio properties of the BCGs in the Extended GMRT Radio Halo Survey (EGRHS). We obtained a statistical sample of 59 BCGs, which was divided into two classes, depending on the dynamical state of the host cluster, i.e. merging (M) and relaxed (R). Among the 59 BCGs, 28 are radio-loud, and 31 are radio--quiet. The radio-loud sources are located favourably located in relaxed clusters (71\\%), while the reverse is true for the radio-quiet BCGs, mostly located in merging systems (81\\%). The fraction...

  9. Allocating Reserve Requirements (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; King, J.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of present and possible future ways to allocate and assign benefits for reserve requirements.

  10. Testimony by J. William Currie, Ph.D Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs Washington D.C.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, J.W.

    1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of the testimony by J. William Currie, Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, Washington, DC on February 18, 1992. He states ``It is a pleasure to have the opportunity to talk with this distinguished committee about energy conservation technologies and policies, especially as they relate to federal energy use and the commercialization of energy-efficiency technologies. Clearly, using energy more efficiently offers the potential for tremendous cost savings and environmental benefits in the United States and throughout the rest of the world. The challenge, especially with regard to the federal sector, is to lay the foundation for ensuring that the citizens of our nation realize the maximum savings and environmental benefit over the long run. This is the primary focus of my comments today.``

  11. Testimony by J. William Currie, Ph. D Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs Washington D. C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currie, J.W.

    1992-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This report consists of the testimony by J. William Currie, Manager, Energy Systems Modernization Office, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories before The Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs, Washington, DC on February 18, 1992. He states It is a pleasure to have the opportunity to talk with this distinguished committee about energy conservation technologies and policies, especially as they relate to federal energy use and the commercialization of energy-efficiency technologies. Clearly, using energy more efficiently offers the potential for tremendous cost savings and environmental benefits in the United States and throughout the rest of the world. The challenge, especially with regard to the federal sector, is to lay the foundation for ensuring that the citizens of our nation realize the maximum savings and environmental benefit over the long run. This is the primary focus of my comments today.''

  12. Multi-mode radio frequency device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Ronald W. (Morgan Hill, CA); Carrender, Curtis Lee (Morgan Hill, CA); Anderson, Gordon A. (Benton City, WA); Steele, Kerry D. (Kennewick, WA)

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A transponder device having multiple modes of operation, such as an active mode and a passive mode, wherein the modes of operation are selected in response to the strength of a received radio frequency signal. A communication system is also provided having a transceiver configured to transmit a radio frequency signal and to receive a responsive signal, and a transponder configured to operate in a plurality of modes and to activate modes of operation in response to the radio frequency signal. Ideally, each mode of operation is activated and deactivated independent of the other modes, although two or more modes may be concurrently operational.

  13. High power radio frequency attenuation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, Quentin A. (Bloomingdale, IL); Miller, Harold W. (Winfield, IL)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  14. GivingPresentations 77Giving Presentations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    presentation, e.g. I want the audience to understand the causes of global warming or I want the audience to be persuaded that they can do something about global warming or a combination of both. 7.1.2 Analyse your

  15. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING OBSERVATIONS OF THE SUN AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES WITH THE MURCHISON WIDEFIELD ARRAY PROTOTYPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberoi, Divya; Matthews, Lynn D.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Benkevitch, Leonid [MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA (United States); Cairns, Iver H.; Lobzin, Vasili [School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney (Australia); Emrich, David; Wayth, Randall B.; Arcus, Wayne [Curtin Institute for Radio Astronomy, Curtin University, Perth (Australia); Morgan, Edward H.; Williams, Christopher [MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Cambridge, MA (United States); Prabu, T.; Vedantham, Harish [Raman Research Institute, Bangalore (India); Williams, Andrew [Perth Observatory, The University of Western Australia, Perth (Australia); White, Stephen M. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland, NM (United States); Allen, G. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW (Australia); Barnes, David [Center for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Bernardi, Gianni [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (United States); Bowman, Judd D. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States); Briggs, Frank H. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

    2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9- 201.6 MHz. Though our observing period is characterized as a period of 'low' to 'medium' activity, one broadband emission feature and numerous short-lived, narrowband, non-thermal emission features are evident. Our data represent a significant advance in low radio frequency solar imaging, enabling us to follow the spatial, spectral, and temporal evolution of events simultaneously and in unprecedented detail. The rich variety of features seen here reaffirms the coronal diagnostic capability of low radio frequency emission and provides an early glimpse of the nature of radio observations that will become available as the next generation of low-frequency radio interferometers come online over the next few years.

  16. Pat Hoffman Testimony

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHA Administrative Judgea. Part B 1 Part B -EnergyOctober 6,

  17. SG Testimony for March

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy atLLC - FE DKT. 10-160-LNG - ORDER 2913| Department of Energy PATRICIA

  18. FE Speeches and Testimony

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexasManager FAQS Reference Guide -SeptemberNovember 9, 2012

  19. House Testimony | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault SignInstitute / Texas A&MAboutHouse

  20. First Spectroscopic Imaging Observations of the Sun at Low Radio Frequencies with the Murchison Widefield Array Prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oberoi, Divya

    We present the first spectroscopic images of solar radio transients from the prototype for the Murchison Widefield Array, observed on 2010 March 27. Our observations span the instantaneous frequency band 170.9–201.6 MHz. ...

  1. Gravitational Redshift Experiment with the Space Radio Telescope RadioAstron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Litvinov; N. Bartel; K. Belousov; M. Bietenholz; A. Biriukov; A. Fionov; A. Gusev; V. Kauts; A. Kovalenko; V. Kulagin; N. Poraiko; V. Rudenko

    2015-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique test of general relativity is possible with the space radio telescope RadioAstron. The ultra-stable on-board hydrogen maser frequency standard and the highly eccentric orbit make RadioAstron an ideal instrument for probing the gravitational redshift effect. Large gravitational potential variation, occurring on the time scale of $\\sim$24 hr, causes large variation of the on-board H-maser clock rate, which can be detected via comparison with frequency standards installed at various ground radio astronomical observatories. The experiment requires specific on-board hardware operating modes and support from ground radio telescopes capable of tracking the spacecraft continuously and equipped with 8.4 or 15 GHz receivers. Our preliminary estimates show that $\\sim$30 hr of the space radio telescope's observational time are required to reach $\\sim 2\\times10^{-5}$ accuracy in the test, which would constitute a factor of 10 improvement over the currently achieved best result.

  2. Gravitational Redshift Experiment with the Space Radio Telescope RadioAstron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litvinov, D; Belousov, K; Bietenholz, M; Biriukov, A; Fionov, A; Gusev, A; Kauts, V; Kovalenko, A; Kulagin, V; Poraiko, N; Rudenko, V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique test of general relativity is possible with the space radio telescope RadioAstron. The ultra-stable on-board hydrogen maser frequency standard and the highly eccentric orbit make RadioAstron an ideal instrument for probing the gravitational redshift effect. Large gravitational potential variation, occurring on the time scale of $\\sim$24 hr, causes large variation of the on-board H-maser clock rate, which can be detected via comparison with frequency standards installed at various ground radio astronomical observatories. The experiment requires specific on-board hardware operating modes and support from ground radio telescopes capable of tracking the spacecraft continuously and equipped with 8.4 or 15 GHz receivers. Our preliminary estimates show that $\\sim$30 hr of the space radio telescope's observational time are required to reach $\\sim 2\\times10^{-5}$ accuracy in the test, which would constitute a factor of 10 improvement over the currently achieved best result.

  3. Energy Efficient Transmissions In MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Energy Efficient Transmissions In MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks Liqun Fu The Institute of Network@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract-In this paper, we consider energy efficient transmis sions for MIMO cognitive radio networks. Index Terms-Cognitive radio networks, MIMO, Energy efficiency. I. INTRODUCTION Cognitive radio, which

  4. RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES The secret are going to say. Many people with radios have a tendency to talk and/or repeat too much. Say what you need until it is second nature. Practicing proper day-to-day radio procedures will make emergency radio

  5. The nature of the optical---radio correlations for powerful radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. N. Tadhunter; R. Morganti; A. Robinson; R. Dickson; M. Villar-Martin; R. A. E. Fosbury

    1998-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the optical--radio correlations for powerful radio galaxies is investigated using spectroscopic observations of a complete sample of southern 2Jy radio sources. In line with previous work, we find that significant correlations exist between the luminosities of the [OIII]5007, [OII]3727 and Hbeta emission lines and the radio luminosity. However, our observations are not easily reconciled with the idea that these correlations are caused by the increase in the power of the photoionizing quasar as the jet power increases, with average ISM properties not changing appreciably with redshift or radio power: not only do we find that the scatter in the L_[OIII] vs. L_radio correlation is significantly larger than in L_[OII]} vs. L_radio and L_Hbeta vs. L_radio correlations, but the ionization state deduced from the emission lines does not increase with radio power as predicted by the simple, constant ISM, photionization model. We conclude that: (a) there exists a considerable range in the quasar ionizing luminosity at a given redshift; and (b) that the mean density of the emission line clouds is larger in the high redshift/high power radio sources. The latter density enhancement may either be a consequence of the increased importance of jet-cloud interactions or, alternatively, due to a higher pressure in the confining hot ISM, in the high redshift objects. Deep spectra show that many of the sources in our sample are broad line radio galaxies (BLRG). The fact that the BLRG are observed out the redshift limit of the survey, overlapping in redshift with the quasars, argues against the idea that BLRG are simply the low radio power counterparts of high power, high redshift quasars.

  6. CEES Publications and Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Presentations CEES-Authored and Co-Authored Cover Stories Peer-Reviewed Publications Conference Proceedings, Abstracts, Presentations, and Poster Sessions Patents Frontiers in...

  7. IACT Publications and Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications and Presentations Peer-Reviewed Publications Conference Proceedings, Abstracts, Presentations, and Poster Sessions IACT-funded Master and Doctoral Theses September...

  8. The cooling flow cluster Abell 2626 and the associated radio emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myriam Gitti

    2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present VLA data at 330 MHz and 1.5 GHz of the radio emission observed in the cooling flow cluster A2626. By producing images at different resolutions we found that the radio source consists of different components: an unresolved core plus a jet-like feature, two elongated parallel features, and an extended diffuse emission (radio mini-halo). Low resolution images allow us to derive morphological and spectral information of the diffuse emission: the radio mini-halo is extended on a scale comparable to that of the cooling flow region and is characterized by amorphous morphology, lack of polarized flux and very steep spectrum which steepens with distance from the center. We then applied to this new mini-halo source a model for particle re-acceleration in cooling flows (Gitti, Brunetti & Setti 2002). In particular, we found that its main radio properties (brightness profile, integrated radio spectrum and radial spectral steepening) can be accounted for by the synchrotron radiation from relic relativistic electrons in the cluster, which are efficiently re-accelerated by MHD turbulence amplified by the compression of the cluster magnetic field in the cooling flow region.

  9. Is the radio emission in the Bullet cluster due to Dark Matter annihilation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchegiani, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the complex structure of the Bullet cluster radio halo to determine the Dark Matter (DM) contribution to the emission observed in the different subhalos corresponding to the DM and baryonic dominated regions. We use different non-thermal models to study the different regions, and we compare our results with the available observations in the radio, X-ray and gamma-ray bands, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect data. We find that the radio emission coming from the main DM subhalo can be produced by secondary electrons produced by DM annihilations. In this scenario there are however some open issues, like the difficulty to explain the observed flux at 8.8 GHz, the high value of the required annihilation cross section, and the lack of observed emission coming from the minor DM subhalo. We also find that part of the radio emission originated by DM annihilation could be associated with a slightly extended radio source present near the main DM subhalo. Regarding the baryonic subhalos, the radio measureme...

  10. A Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources (CENSORS) III: Spectroscopic observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. H. Brookes; P. N. Best; J. A. Peacock; H. J. A. Rottgering; J. S. Dunlop

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Combined EIS-NVSS Survey Of Radio Sources (CENSORS) is a 1.4GHz radio survey selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and complete to a flux-density of 7.2mJy. It targets the ESO Imaging Survey (EIS) Patch D, which is a 3 by 2 square degree field centred on 09 51 36.0, -21 00 00 (J2000). This paper presents the results of spectroscopic observations of 143 of the 150 CENSORS sources. The primary motivation for these observations is to achieve sufficient spectroscopic completeness so that the sample may be used to investigate the evolution of radio sources. The observations result in secure spectroscopic redshifts for 63% of the sample and likely redshifts (based on a single emission line, for example) for a further 8%. Following the identification of the quasars and star-forming galaxies in the CENSORS sample, estimated redshifts are calculated for the remainder of the sample via the K-z relation for radio galaxies. Comparison of the redshift distribution of the CENSORS radio sources to distributions predicted by the various radio luminosity function evolution models of Dunlop & Peacock 1990, results in no good match. This demonstrates that this sample can be used to expand upon previous work in that field.

  11. Security approaches for Radio Frequency Identification systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Joseph Timothy, 1976-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I explore the challenges related to the security of the Electronic Product Code (EPC) class of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags and associated data. RFID systems can be used to improve supply chain ...

  12. Commercial Mobile Radio Service (WRI CMRS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Commercial Mobile Radio Service (WRI ­ CMRS) Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor #12 caused by higher frequency of roadside safety inspections using wireless technologies. · Benefits

  13. Radio Wavelength Observatories within the Exploration Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lazio; R. J. Macdowall; J. Burns; L. Demaio; D. L. Jones; K. W. Weiler

    2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe (the Epoch of Reionization), the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Moreover, achieving the performance needed to address these scientific questions demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet" locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. We describe a series of lunar-based radio wavelength interferometers of increasing capability. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS) is an array designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers) and addressing particle acceleration and the lunar ionosphere. Future arrays would be larger, more capable, and deployed as experience is gained in working on the lunar surface.

  14. A Global 86GHz VLBI Survey of Compact Radio Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sang-Sung Lee; Andrei P. Lobanov; Thomas P. Krichbaum; Arno Witzel; J. Anton Zensus; Michael Bremer; Albert Greve; Michael Grewing

    2008-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from a large 86GHz global VLBI survey of compact radio sources. The main goal of the survey is to increase by factors of 3--5 the total number of objects accessible for future 3-mm VLBI imaging. The survey observations reach the baseline sensitivity of 0.1Jy and image sensitivity of better than 10 mJy/beam. The total of 127 compact radio sources have been observed. The observations have yielded images for 109 sources, extending the database of the sources imaged at 86GHz with VLBI observation by a factor of 5, and only 6 sources have not been detected. The remaining 12 objects have been detected but could not be imaged due to insufficient closure phase information. Radio galaxies are less compact than quasars and BL Lacs on sub-milliarcsecond scale. Flux densities and sizes of core and jet components of all imaged sources have been estimated using Gaussian model fitting. From these measurements, brightness temperatures have been calculated, taking into account resolution limits of the data. The cores of 70% of the imaged sources are resolved. The core brightness temperatures of the sources peak at $\\sim 10^{11}$ K and only 1% have brightness temperatures higher than $10^{12}$ K. Cores of Intraday Variable (IDV) sources are smaller in angular size than non-IDV sources, and so yield higher brightness temperatures.

  15. UC Irvine 800MHz Trunked Radio System Revised 08/16/96 UCI RADIO USE AND PROCEDURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    and/or sound effects over the radio. This activity violates UC and Federal Communications Commission communications are in progress on other talk groups and your unnecessary transmission may delay another radio radio identifier or radio call ]__ , reporting an emergency. " The Communications Center dispatcher

  16. Electron cooling in a young radio supernova: SN 2012aw

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Naveen; Ray, Alak [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Chakraborti, Sayan [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stockdale, Christopher [Marquette University, Milwaukee, WI 53233 (United States); Chandra, Poonam [National Center for Radio Astronomy-TIFR, Pune 411007 (India); Smith, Randall [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Roy, Rupak; Bose, Subhash [Aryabhhata Research Institute of Observational Sciences, Nainital 263129 (India); Dwarkadas, Vikram [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Sutaria, Firoza [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560034 (India); Pooley, David, E-mail: nyadav@tifr.res.in, E-mail: akr@tifr.res.in [Department of Physics, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX 77341 (United States)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the radio observations and modeling of an optically bright Type II-P supernova (SN), SN 2012aw which exploded in the nearby galaxy Messier 95 (M95) at a distance of 10 Mpc. The spectral index values calculated using C, X, and K bands are smaller than the expected values for the optically thin regime. During this time, the optical bolometric light curve stays in the plateau phase. We interpret the low spectral-index values to be a result of electron cooling. On the basis of comparison between the Compton cooling timescale and the synchrotron cooling timescale, we find that the inverse Compton cooling process dominates over the synchrotron cooling process. We therefore model the radio emission as synchrotron emission from a relativistic electron population with a high energy cutoff. The cutoff is determined by comparing the electron cooling timescale, t {sub cool}, and the acceleration timescale, t-tilde {sub acc}. We constrain the mass-loss rate in the wind ( M-dot ?1.9×10{sup ?6} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1}) and the equipartition factor between relativistic electrons and the magnetic field ( ?-tilde =?{sub e}/?{sub B}?1.12×10{sup 2}) through our modeling of radio emission. Although the time of explosion is fairly well constrained by optical observations within about two days, we explore the effect of varying the time of explosion to best fit the radio light curves. The best fit is obtained for the explosion date as 2012 March 15.3 UT.

  17. Simultaneous effects of photo- and radio- darkening in ytterbium-doped aluminosilicate fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchez, Jean-Bernard, E-mail: jbduchez@unice.fr; Mady, Franck, E-mail: jbduchez@unice.fr; Mebrouk, Yasmine, E-mail: jbduchez@unice.fr; Benabdesselam, Mourad, E-mail: jbduchez@unice.fr [University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, CNRS UMR 7336, Parc Valrose, 06108 NICE cedex 2 (France)

    2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present original characterizations of photo-radio-darkening in ytterbium-doped silica optical fibers submitted to the simultaneous action of the pump and of an ionizing radiation. We present the interplay between both radiations, showing e.g. that the pump is able to darken or bleach the fiber depending on the ionizing dose. The photo-resistance of the fiber is shown to play a crucial role on its radio-resistance, and that photo-resistant fibers should be also radio-resistant in low dose rate conditions. All the results are thoroughly explained by a physical model presented in a separate article by Mady et al. (this conference proceeding)

  18. Radio signals of particle dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Regis

    2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In most of particle dark matter (DM) models, the DM candidate injects sizable fluxes of high-energy electrons and positrons through its annihilations or decays. Emitted in regions with magnetic field, they in turn give raise to a synchrotron radiation, which typically covers radio and infrared bands. We discuss the possibility of detecting signatures of Galactic and extra-galactic DM in the total intensity and small-scale anisotropies of the radio background.

  19. Low Luminosity Radio Loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Giovannini; M. Giroletti

    2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    I review observational properties of low power radio loud AGN. High resolution VLBI observations allow the estimate of the jet velocity and orientation with respect to the line of sight and the determination of the Doppler factor. These data reveal rich structures, including two-sided jets and secondary components. New results on 1144+35, a giant radio source with superluminal motion are shown in detail.

  20. STEP Partner Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Partner Presentation, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  1. STEP Conference Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Conference Presentation, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  2. Short range radio locator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio location system comprises a wireless transmitter that outputs two megahertz period bursts of two gigahertz radar carrier signals. A receiver system determines the position of the transmitter by the relative arrival of the radar bursts at several component receivers set up to have a favorable geometry and each one having a known location. One receiver provides a synchronizing gating pulse to itself and all the other receivers to sample the ether for the radar pulse. The rate of the synchronizing gating pulse is slightly offset from the rate of the radar bursts themselves, so that each sample collects one finely-detailed piece of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver each pulse period. Thousands of sequential pulse periods provide corresponding thousand of pieces of information about the time-of-flight of the radar pulse to each receiver, in expanded, not real time. Therefore the signal processing can be done with relatively low-frequency, inexpensive components. A conventional microcomputer is then used to find the position of the transmitter by geometric triangulation based on the relative time-of-flight information.

  3. The connection between the radio jet and the gamma-ray emission in the radio galaxy 3C 120

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casadio, Carolina; Grandi, Paola; Jorstad, Svetlana G; Marscher, Alan P; Lister, Matthew L; Kovalev, Yuri Y; Savolainen, Tuomas; Pushkarev, Alexander B

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the analysis of the radio jet evolution of the radio galaxy 3C 120 during a period of prolonged gamma-ray activity detected by the Fermi satellite between December 2012 and October 2014. We find a clear connection between the gamma-ray and radio emission, such that every period of gamma-ray activity is accompanied by the flaring of the mm-VLBI core and subsequent ejection of a new superluminal component. However, not all ejections of components are associated with gamma-ray events detectable by Fermi. Clear gamma-ray detections are obtained only when components are moving in a direction closer to our line of sight.This suggests that the observed gamma-ray emission depends not only on the interaction of moving components with the mm-VLBI core, but also on their orientation with respect to the observer. Timing of the gamma-ray detections and ejection of superluminal components locate the gamma-ray production to within almost 0.13 pc from the mm-VLBI core, which was previously estimated to lie about 0...

  4. RADIO EMISSION FROM SN 1994I IN NGC 5194 (M 51): THE BEST-STUDIED TYPE Ib/c RADIO SUPERNOVA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiler, Kurt W.

    We present the results of detailed monitoring of the radio emission from the Type Ic supernova SN 1994I from three days after optical discovery on 1994 March 31 until eight years later at age 2927 days on 2002 April 5. The ...

  5. Radio broadcasting and the politics of mass culture in transwar Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Ji Hee

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Press, Cox, Jim. The Great Radio Audience ParticipationSusan. Listening In: Radio and the American Imagination. NewCalling: Japanese Overseas Radio Broadcasting 1937- 1945.

  6. Radio-frequency identification could help reduce the spread of plant pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luvisi, Andrea; Panattoni, Alessandra; Triolo, Enrico

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ReVIEW Article Radio-frequency identification could helpcertified nursery stock. Radio- frequency identification (Panattoni and Enrico Triolo Radio-frequency identification (

  7. Renewable Energy 101 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, A.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation given at the 2012 Department of Homeland Security Renewable Energy Roundtable as an introduction to renewable technologies and applications.

  8. Senior Debt Fastball Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary III: Project Finance and Investment Senior Debt Fastball Presentation Phillip Thomas, Senior Vice President of Commercial Lending, Heartland Bank

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. This presentation was presented in a Wind Powering America webinar on August 15, 2012 and is now available through the Wind Powering America website.

  10. Radio Pumping of Ionospheric Plasma with Orbital Angular Momentum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leyser, T. B. [Swedish Institute of Space Physics, Box 537, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Norin, L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Box 515, Uppsala SE-751 20 (Sweden); McCarrick, M. [BAE SYSTEMS Advanced Technologies, 1250 24th St, NW, Suite 850, Washington, D.C. (United States); Pedersen, T. R. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts 01731 (United States); Gustavsson, B. [Department of Physics and Technology, University of Tromsoe, N-9037 Tromsoe (Norway)

    2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental results are presented of pumping ionospheric plasma with a radio wave carrying orbital angular momentum (OAM), using the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility in Alaska. Optical emissions from the pumped plasma turbulence exhibit the characteristic ring-shaped morphology when the pump beam carries OAM. Features of stimulated electromagnetic emissions (SEE) that are attributed to cascading Langmuir turbulence are well developed for a regular beam but are significantly weaker for a ring-shaped OAM beam in which case upper hybrid turbulence dominates the SEE.

  11. Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

  12. Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Cognitive Radio will revolutionize American transportation. Through smart technology, it will anticipate user needs; detect available bandwidths and frequencies then seamlessly connect vehicles, infrastructures, and consumer devices; and it will support the Department of Transportation IntelliDrive Program, helping researchers, auto manufacturers, and Federal and State officials advance the connectivity of US transportation systems for improved safety, mobility, and environmental conditions. Using cognitive radio, a commercial vehicle will know its driver, onboard freight and destination route. Drivers will save time and resources communicating with automatic toll booths and know ahead of time whether to stop at a weigh station or keep rolling. At accident scenes, cognitive radio sensors on freight and transportation modes can alert emergency personnel and measure on-site, real-time conditions such as a chemical leak. The sensors will connect freight to industry, relaying shipment conditions and new delivery schedules. For industry or military purposes, cognitive radio will enable real-time freight tracking around the globe and its sensory technology can help prevent cargo theft or tampering by alerting shipper and receiver if freight is tampered with while en route. For the average consumer, a vehicle will tailor the transportation experience to the passenger such as delivering age-appropriate movies via satellite. Cognitive radio will enhance transportation safety by continually sensing what is important to the user adapting to its environment and incoming information, and proposing solutions that improve mobility and quality of life.

  13. Renewable Hydrogen (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remick, R. J.

    2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Presentation about the United State's dependence on oil, how energy solutions are challenging, and why hydrogen should be considered as a long-term alternative for transportation fuel.

  14. Presentations for Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Learn energy-saving strategies from leading manufacturing companies and energy experts. The presentations are organized below by topic area. In addition, industrial energy managers, utilities, and...

  15. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ground Water Issues Presentation for DOE Tritium Focus Group May 5-6, 2015 Steven M. Garry, CHP US Nuclear Regulatory Commission NRRDRAARCB Tritium Leaks * Approximately 70% of...

  16. Detection of the thermal radio continuum emission from the G9.62+0.19-F Hot Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Testi; P. Hofner; S. Kurtz; M. Rupen

    2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new high resolution and high sensitivity multi-frequency VLA radio continuum observations of the G9.62+0.19-F hot molecular core. We detect for the first time faint centimetric radio continuum emission at the position of the core. The centimetric continuum spectrum of the source is consistent with thermal emission from ionised gas. This is the first direct evidence that a newly born massive star is powering the G9.62+0.19-F hot core.

  17. COMPLEX DIFFUSE RADIO EMISSION IN THE MERGING PLANCK ESZ CLUSTER A3411

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Weeren, R. J.; Fogarty, K.; Jones, C.; Forman, W. R.; Kraft, R. P.; Murray, S. S. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Clarke, T. E. [Naval Research Laboratory Remote Sensing Division, Code 7213 4555 Overlook Ave SW, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Brueggen, M. [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany); Lal, D. V. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, TIFR, Pune University Campus, Post Bag 3, Pune 411 007 (India); Roettgering, H. J. A., E-mail: rvanweeren@cfa.harvard.edu [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) radio and Chandra X-ray observations of the merging galaxy cluster A3411. For the cluster, we find an overall temperature of 6.4{sup +0.6}{sub -1.0} keV and an X-ray luminosity of 2.8 {+-} 0.1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 44} erg s{sup -1} between 0.5 and 2.0 keV. The Chandra observation reveals the cluster to be undergoing a merger event. The VLA observations show the presence of large-scale diffuse emission in the central region of the cluster, which we classify as a 0.9 Mpc size radio halo. In addition, a complex region of diffuse, polarized emission is found in the southeastern outskirts of the cluster along the projected merger axis of the system. We classify this region of diffuse emission as a radio relic. The total extent of this radio relic is 1.9 Mpc. For the combined emission in the cluster region, we find a radio spectral index of -1.0 {+-} 0.1 between 74 MHz and 1.4 GHz. The morphology of the radio relic is peculiar, as the relic is broken up into five fragments. This suggests that the shock responsible for the relic has been broken up due to interaction with a large-scale galaxy filament connected to the cluster or other substructures in the intracluster medium. Alternatively, the complex morphology reflects the presence of electrons in fossil radio bubbles that are re-accelerated by a shock.

  18. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a Power Systems Engineering Research Center webinar on September 4, 2012.

  19. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in an Union of Concerned Scientists webinar on June 12, 2012.

  20. Interactive Multimedia Presentation Capabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boll, Susanne

    Interactive Multimedia Presentation Capabilities for an Object-Oriented DBMS Susanne Boll, Michael and Mathematics (ERCIM) Workshop Reports, 9th ERCIM Database Research Group Workshop on Multimedia Database Sys, FRANCE, 1996. #12;Interactive Multimedia Presentation Capabilities for an Object-Oriented DBMS Susanne

  1. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It is being presented at the Utility Variable-Generation Integration Group Fall Technical Workshop on October 24, 2012.

  2. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented in a webinar given by the California Energy Commission.

  3. HEATING THE HOT ATMOSPHERES OF GALAXY GROUPS AND CLUSTERS WITH CAVITIES: THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN JET POWER AND LOW-FREQUENCY RADIO EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Sullivan, E.; Raychaudhury, S.; Ponman, T. J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Giacintucci, S.; David, L. P.; Gitti, M.; Vrtilek, J. M., E-mail: ejos@star.sr.bham.ac.uk [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present scaling relations between jet power and radio power measured using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT), Chandra, and XMM-Newton, for a sample of nine galaxy groups combined with the BIrzan et al. sample of clusters. Cavity power is used as a proxy for mechanical jet power. Radio power is measured at 235 MHz and 1.4 GHz, and the integrated 10 MHz-10 GHz radio luminosity is estimated from the GMRT 610-235 MHz spectral index. The use of consistently analyzed, high-resolution low-frequency radio data from a single observatory makes the radio powers for the groups more reliable than those used by previous studies, and the combined sample covers 6-7 decades in radio power and 5 decades in cavity power. We find a relation of the form P{sub jet}{proportional_to} L{approx}0.7{sub radio} for integrated radio luminosity, with a total scatter of {sigma}{sub Lrad} = 0.63 and an intrinsic scatter of {sigma}{sub i,Lrad} = 0.59. A similar relation is found for 235 MHz power, but a slightly flatter relation with greater scatter is found for 1.4 GHz power, suggesting that low-frequency or broadband radio measurements are superior jet power indicators. We find our low-frequency relations to be in good agreement with previous observational results. Comparison with jet models shows reasonable agreement, which may be improved if radio sources have a significant low-energy electron population. We consider possible factors that could bias our results or render them more uncertain, and find that correcting for such factors in those groups we are able to study in detail leads to a flattening of the P{sub jet}:L{sub radio} relation.

  4. The origin of the UV excess in powerful radio galaxies: spectroscopy and polarimetry of a complete sample of intermediate redshift radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Tadhunter; R. Dickson; R. Morganti; T. G. Robinson; K. Wills; M. Villar-Martin; M. Hughes

    2002-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present spectroscopic and polarimetric observations of a complete, optically unbiased sample of 2Jy radio galaxies at intermediate redshifts (0.15 10% level. Careful measurement and modelling of our spectra have allowed us to quantify the contributions of other components to the UV excess. We show that nebular continuum (present in all objects at the 3 -- 40% level), direct AGN light (significant in 40% of objects), and young stellar populations (significant in 15 -- 50% of objects) all make important contributions to the UV continuum in the population of powerful radio galaxies. These results serve to emphasise the multi-component nature of the UV continuum in radio galaxies. The results also point to an interesting link betweeen the optical/UV and far-IR properties of our sample objects, in the sense that the objects with the clearest evidence for optical/UV starburst activity are also the most luminous at far-IR wavelengths. This supports the idea that the cooler dust components in radio galaxies are heated by starbursts rather than by AGN.

  5. Radio-tracking reveals that lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros) forage in woodland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Radio-tracking reveals that lesser horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus hipposideros) forage in woodland±8 g) precluded the use of radio-telemetry because commercially available radio-transmitters exceeded 10% of its body mass. In this study, radio- transmitters weighing

  6. GPS radio occultation with CHAMP Jens Wickert, Georg Beyerle, Torsten Schmidt, Christian Marquardt, Rolf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GPS radio occultation with CHAMP Jens Wickert, Georg Beyerle, Torsten Schmidt, Christian Marquardt Positioning System) radio occultation experiment onboard the German CHAMP (CHAllenging Minisatellite Payload sensing of Earth's atmosphere, GPS radio occulta- tion 1 Introduction The CHAMP GPS radio occultation

  7. Coherent Transition Radiation in Askaryan radio detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Vries, Krijn D; van Eijndhoven, Nick; Meures, Thomas; O'Murchadha, Aongus; Scholten, Olaf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the coherent transition radiation emitted by a macroscopic bunch of particles with a net charge traversing the boundary of two different media. The obtained expression is compared to the emission from a relativistically moving steady charge, as well the emission from a time-varying charge or current. As a first application, we discuss the transition radiation from high-energy cosmic-ray induced air showers hitting Earth's surface before the cascade has died out in the atmosphere. The induced emission gives rise to a radio signal which should be detectable in the currently operating Askaryan radio detectors built to search for the GZK neutrino flux.

  8. Multiple Objective Fitness Functions for Cognitive Radio Adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Newman, Timothy Ray

    2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores genetic algorithm and rule-based optimization techniques used by cognitive radios to make operating parameter decisions. Cognitive radios take advantage of intelligent control methods by using sensed ...

  9. askaryan radio array: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Askaryan Radio Array (ARA) is an ultra-high energy (>1017 eV) cosmic neutrino detector in phased construction near the South Pole. ARA searches for radio Cherenkov emission...

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office May 23, 2013 2 Presentation name Today, ORNL is DOE's largest science and energy laboratory 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy 1.65B budget...

  11. GIS TRANSFORMATIONS Conference Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobler, Waldo

    GIS TRANSFORMATIONS Conference Presentation Waldo Tobler Geography Department University, line, area, or field phenomena, then the sixteen common classes of transformation are: point -> point (scalar, vector, tensor) data, to obtain eighty distinct possible classes of transformation. The common

  12. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  13. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  14. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NATIONAL CHAIRS MEETING Deer Creek State Park, Mt. Sterling, Ohio November 5-7, 2013 U.S. Department of Energy Practices Related to Public Input Presented by Greg Simonton Federal...

  15. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  16. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050.

  17. Solar Data Hub (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orwig, K.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As power grid integration of renewables becomes ever more important and detailed, the need for a centralized place for solar-related resource data is needed. This presentation describes such a place and website.

  18. 2005 ACERC conference presentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presentations are available on the internet for free download. Subjects included NOx and particulate emissions, gasification, and current ACERC and ICES research. The poster papers are also available.

  19. An assessment of presentism 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, Brannon David

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a debate in the philosophy of time over the status of non-present entities. Do these things exist, and if so, what sorts of things are they? Recently, the debate has split into two groups, presentists and ...

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Quality (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohi, J.

    2007-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Jim Ohi of NREL's presentation on Hydrogen Fuel Quality at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation on May 15-18, 2007 in Arlington, Virginia.

  1. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M. M.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented to the 2012 Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners, during their June, 2012, meeting. The Western Conference of Public Service Commissioners is a regional association within the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC).

  2. Blade Testing Trends (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desmond, M.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an invited guest speaker, Michael Desmond presented on NREL's NWTC structural testing methods and capabilities at the 2014 Sandia Blade Workshop held on August 26-28, 2014 in Albuquerque, NM. Although dynamometer and field testing capabilities were mentioned, the presentation focused primarily on wind turbine blade testing, including descriptions and capabilities for accredited certification testing, historical methodology and technology deployment, and current research and development activities.

  3. Measurement of the gravitational redshift effect with RadioAstron satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birukov, A V; Litvinov, D A; Porayko, N K; Rudenko, V N

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    RadioAstron satellite admits in principle a testing the gravitational redshift effect with an accuracy of better than $10^{-5}$. It would surpass the result of Gravity Probe A mission at least an order of magnitude. However, RadioAstron's communications and frequency transfer systems are not adapted for a direct application of the non relativistic Doppler and troposphere compensation scheme used in the Gravity Probe A experiment. This leads to degradation of the redshift test accuracy approximately to the level 0.01. We discuss the way to overcome this difficulty and present preliminary results based on data obtained during special observing sessions scheduled for testing the new techniques.

  4. Measurement of the gravitational redshift effect with RadioAstron satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Birukov; V. L. Kauts; D. A. Litvinov; N. K. Porayko; V. N. Rudenko

    2015-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    RadioAstron satellite admits in principle a testing the gravitational redshift effect with an accuracy of better than $10^{-5}$. It would surpass the result of Gravity Probe A mission at least an order of magnitude. However, RadioAstron's communications and frequency transfer systems are not adapted for a direct application of the non relativistic Doppler and troposphere compensation scheme used in the Gravity Probe A experiment. This leads to degradation of the redshift test accuracy approximately to the level 0.01. We discuss the way to overcome this difficulty and present preliminary results based on data obtained during special observing sessions scheduled for testing the new techniques.

  5. High-Resolution Radio Imaging of Gravitational Lensing Candidates in the 1 Jansky BL Lac Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Rector; J. T. Stocke

    2003-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    While BL Lacertae objects are widely believed to be highly beamed, low-luminosity radio galaxies, many radio-selected BL Lacs have extended radio power levels and optical emission lines that are too luminous to be low-luminosity radio galaxies. Also, Stocke & Rector discovered an excess of MgII absorption systems along BL Lac sightlines compared to quasars, suggesting that gravitational lensing may be another means of creating the BL Lac phenomenon in some cases. We present a search for gravitationally-lensed BL Lacs with deep, high-resolution, two-frequency VLA radio maps of seven lensing candidates from the 1 Jansky BL Lac sample. We find that none of these objects are resolved into an Einstein ring like B 0218+357, nor do any show multiple images of the core. All of the lensing candidates that were resolved show a flat-spectrum core and very unusual, steep-spectrum extended morphology that is incompatible with a multiply lensed system. Thus, while these observations do not rule out microlensing, no macrolensing is observed.

  6. Molecular Gas in the Powerful Radio Nucleus of the Ultraluminous Infrared Galaxy PKS 1345+12

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Evans; D. -C. Kim; J. M. Mazzarella; N. Z. Scoville; D. B. Sanders

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Millimeter CO(1-0) interferometry and high resolution, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) 1.1, 1.6, and 2.2 micron imaging of the radio compact galaxy PKS 1345+12 are presented. With an infrared luminosity of 2x10^{12} L_sun, PKS 1345+12 is a prime candidate for studying the link between the ultraluminous infrared galaxy phenomenon and radio galaxies. These new observations probe the molecular gas distribution and obscured nuclear regions of PKS 1345+12 and provide morphological support for the idea that the radio activity in powerful radio galaxies is triggered by the merger of gas rich galaxies. Two nuclei separated by 2" (4.0 kpc) are observed in the near-infrared; the extended southeastern nucleus has colors consistent with reddened starlight, and the compact northwestern nucleus has extremely red colors indicative of an optical quasar with a warm dust component. Further, the molecular gas, 3mm continuum, and radio emission are coincident with the redder nucleus, confirming that the northwestern nucleus is the site of the AGN and that the molecular gas is the likely fuel source.

  7. BLIND MULTIUSER DETECTION AND INTERFERENCE CANCELLATION IN DSCDMA MOBILE RADIO SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yih-Fang

    BLIND MULTIUSER DETECTION AND INTERFERENCE CANCELLATION IN DS­CDMA MOBILE RADIO SYSTEMS Samir USA ABSTRACT This paper deals with blind adaptive multiuser detection and interference cancellation presents a two­stage blind adaptive receiver architecture which car­ ries out multiuser detection using

  8. The Einstein Database of IPC Xray Observations of Optically and Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkes, Belinda

    The Einstein Database of IPC X­ray Observations of Optically and Radio Selected Quasars. 1 Belinda February 22, 1995 Abstract We present the first volume of the Einstein quasar database. The database galaxies observed with the Imaging Proportional Counter (IPC) aboard the Einstein observatory. All were

  9. Radio, Infrared and X-ray observations of GRS 1915+105

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. P. Fender; G. G. Pooley; C. R. Robinson; B. A. Harmon; S. N. Zhang; C. Canosa

    1996-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present multiwavelength observations of the superluminal jet source GRS 1915+105 in 1996 April-May, over which period a variety of phenomena, including radio QPO, strong infrared emission lines and rapid X-ray flickering and outbursts were observed.

  10. Focused excimer laser initiated, radio frequency sustained high pressure air plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharer, John E.

    . One variant of the ICP reactor is the solenoidal type, having a helical coil wound around the side diameter helical radio frequency (RF) coil are presented. Quantum resonant multi-photon ionization (REMPI measurement of the gas pressure the electron temperature is obtained. Experiments show that the laser-formed

  11. Policy-Based Cognitive Radios David Wilkins, Grit Denker, Mark-Oliver Stehr,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Policy-Based Cognitive Radios David Wilkins, Grit Denker, Mark-Oliver Stehr, Daniel Elenius, Rukman: firstname.lastname@sri.com April 2, 2007 Abstract We present a new language for expressing policies that unanticipated policy types can be encoded. We also describe a Policy Reasoner that reasons about CoRaL policies

  12. The Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope S. Ananthakrishnan and A. Pramesh Rao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    and to gain other advantages like low wind, land availability and accessibility to antennas, nearness to heavy of 30{1500 MHz, which will be a state-of-the-art instrument in radio astronomy. In this presentation equipments and availalbility of suitable man power, etc. Although the original proposal envisaged

  13. Observation of Ultrahigh-Energy Cosmic Rays with the ANITA Balloon-Borne Radio Interferometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, S.; Belov, K.; Vieregg, A. G.; Saltzberg, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Nam, J. [Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gorham, P. W.; Allison, P.; Kowalski, J.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Miki, C.; Miocinovic, P.; Romero-Wolf, A.; Rosen, M.; Ruckman, L.; Varner, G. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Manoa, Hawaii 96822 (United States); Grashorn, E.; Beatty, J. J.; Mercurio, B. C.; Palladino, K. [Department of Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of 16 cosmic ray events with a mean energy of 1.5x10{sup 19} eV via radio pulses originating from the interaction of the cosmic ray air shower with the Antarctic geomagnetic field, a process known as geosynchrotron emission. We present measurements in the 300-900 MHz range, which are the first self-triggered, first ultrawide band, first far-field, and the highest energy sample of cosmic ray events collected with the radio technique. Their properties are inconsistent with current ground-based geosynchrotron models. The emission is 100% polarized in the plane perpendicular to the projected geomagnetic field. Fourteen events are seen to have a phase inversion due to reflection of the radio beam off the ice surface, and two additional events are seen directly from above the horizon. Based on a likelihood analysis, we estimate angular pointing precision of order 2 deg. for the event arrival directions.

  14. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titov, O. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Jauncey, D. L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Mount Stromlo Observatory, Cotter Road, Weston, ACT 2611 (Australia); Johnston, H. M.; Hunstead, R. W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Christensen, L., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [Technische Universitaet Munich, Excellence Cluster Universe, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of spectroscopic observations of the optical counterparts of 47 southern radio sources from the candidate International Celestial Reference Catalogue as part of a very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame, especially in the south. We made the observations with the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope. We obtained redshifts for 30 quasars and one radio galaxy, with a further seven objects being probable BL Lac objects with featureless spectra. Of the remainder, four were clear misidentifications with Galactic stars and five had low signal-to-noise spectra and could not be classified. These results, in combination with new VLBI data of the radio sources with redshifts more than 2, add significantly to the existing data needed to refine the distribution of source proper motions over the celestial sphere.

  15. Diffusive Shock Acceleration of Electrons and Radio Emission from Large Diameter Shell-Type Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Asvarov

    2000-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In present study I examine the capability of diffusive shock acceleration mechanism to explain existing data on radio emission from evolved large diameter shell-type adiabatic supernova remnants (SNRs). Time-dependent ''onion-shell'' model for the radio emission of SNRs is developed, which is based on the assumptions: a) acceleration takes place from thermal energies and test-particle approximation is valid; b) the problem of injection is avoided by introducing, like Bell (1978), two injection parameters; c) to take into consideration very late stages of SNR evolution the analytic approximation of Cox and Andersen (1982) for the shell structure is used; c)no radiative cooling. Constructed Surface Brightness - Diameter $(\\Sigma -D)$ tracks are compared with the empirical $\\Sigma -D$ diagram. The main conclusion of the study is that the DSA mechanism is capable of explaining all the statistics of radio SNRs including very large diameter remnants and giant galactic loops.

  16. Complex Faraday depth structure of Active Galactic Nuclei as revealed by broadband radio polarimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Sullivan, S P; Robishaw, T; Schnitzeler, D H F M; McClure-Griffiths, N M; Feain, I J; Taylor, A R; Gaensler, B M; Landecker, T L; Harvey-Smith, L; Carretti, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed study of the Faraday depth structure of four bright (> 1 Jy), strongly polarized, unresolved, radio-loud quasars. The Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) was used to observe these sources with 2 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth from 1.1 to 3.1 GHz. This allowed us to spectrally resolve the polarization structure of spatially unresolved radio sources, and by fitting various Faraday rotation models to the data, we conclusively demonstrate that two of the sources cannot be described by a simple rotation measure (RM) component modified by depolarization from a foreground Faraday screen. Our results have important implications for using background extragalactic radio sources as probes of the galactic and intergalactic magneto-ionic media as we show how RM estimations from narrow-bandwidth observations can give erroneous results in the presence of multiple interfering Faraday components. We postulate that the additional RM components arise from polarized structure in the compact inner regio...

  17. Pricing for Uplink Power Control in Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xinbing

    1 Pricing for Uplink Power Control in Cognitive Radio Networks Hui Yu, Lin Gao, Zheng Li, Xinbing of the proposed pricing scheme. Keywords: Cognitive radio, power control, non-cooperative game, profit management problems such as power control quite complicated. Wireless radio devices with "cognitive" ability

  18. Energy Efficient Transmissions in MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Jianwei

    Energy Efficient Transmissions in MIMO Cognitive Radio Networks Liqun Fu The Institute of Network@ie.cuhk.edu.hk Abstract--In this paper, we consider energy efficient transmis- sions for MIMO cognitive radio networks on the traffic load of the secondary system. Index Terms--Cognitive radio networks, MIMO, Energy- efficiency. I

  19. Radio Imaging by Cooperative Wireless Network: Localization Algorithms and Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savazzi, Stefano

    Radio Imaging by Cooperative Wireless Network: Localization Algorithms and Experiments Stefano-mail: (savazzi, nicoli)@elet.polimi.it Abstract-- Radio imaging allows to locate and track passive targets (i. INTRODUCTION Radio Imaging is an emerging technology for locating and tracking moving objects or people

  20. INVITED PAPER, IEEE PIMRC'97 HELSINKI, FINLAND. 0 Impulse Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    INVITED PAPER, IEEE PIMRC'97 ­ HELSINKI, FINLAND. 0 Impulse Radio Robert A. Scholtz and Moe Z. Win, Los Angeles, CA 90089-2565 USA Abstract Impulse radio, a form of ultra-wide band signaling, has. This paper describes the characteristics of impulse radio, gives analytical estimates of its multiple access

  1. Radio Number for Trees Daphne Der-Fen Liu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Daphne Der-Fen

    Radio Number for Trees Daphne Der-Fen Liu Department of Mathematics California State University be a connected graph with diameter diam(G). The radio number for G, denoted by rn(G), is the smallest integer k bound for the radio number of trees, and characterize the trees achiev- ing this bound. Moreover, we

  2. Radio Emission from Ultracool Dwarfs and the Relevant Radiation Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radio Emission from Ultracool Dwarfs and the Relevant Radiation Mechanisms A thesis submitted have learnt a lot of knowledge which includes not only the radio instruments for observations, but also the science such as particle simulations for understanding the detected radio signal. Also, from this research

  3. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors Coskun Kocabas*, Hoon properties of individ- ual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demon- stration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios

  4. Radio Interferometry & The Measurement Equation -1 School of Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tittley, Eric

    Radio Interferometry & The Measurement Equation - 1 School of Physics and Astronomy An Introduction to Radio Interferometry and The Measurement Equation Formalism Pedagogical Seminar Louise M. Ker March 2010 Abstract The next generation of radio telescopes, such as LOFAR, e-Merlin, ASKAP, MeerKat and even- tually

  5. Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LETTERS Radio-frequency scanning tunnelling microscopy U. Kemiktarak1 , T. Ndukum3 , K. C. Schwab3 measurementsinmesoscopicelectronicsandmechanics. Broadband noise measurements across the tunnel junction using this radio-frequency STM available from nanoscale optical and electrical displacement detection tech- niques, and the radio

  6. Pop Up Radio Archive: A Solution for Independent Producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Pop Up Radio Archive: A Solution for Independent Producers Anne Wootton, Bailey Smith, and Christen Penny UC Berkeley School of Information May 4, 2012 #12;Pop Up Radio Archive 2 Abstract Independent" and "dream of a system where [retrieval is easier]" (Silva). Pop Up Radio Archive is a free, open

  7. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mai, T.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at the 2012 RE AMP Annual Meeting. RE-AMP is an active network of 144 nonprofits and foundations across eight Midwestern states working on climate change and energy policy with the goal of reducing global warming pollution economy-wide 80% by 2050.

  8. Renewable Electricity Futures (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMeo, E.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation library summarizes findings of NREL's Renewable Electricity Futures study, published in June 2012. RE Futures investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. It was presented at Wind Powering America States Summit. The Summit, which follows the American Wind Energy Association's (AWEA's) annual WINDPOWER Conference and Exhibition, provides state Wind Working Groups, state energy officials, U.S. Energy Department and national laboratory representatives, and professional and institutional partners an opportunity to review successes, opportunities, and challenges for wind energy and plan future collaboration.

  9. Presentations SHE-2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical InformationProcess andPresentations &Presentations

  10. FLARE-ASSOCIATED TYPE III RADIO BURSTS AND DYNAMICS OF THE EUV JET FROM SDO/AIA AND RHESSI OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Naihwa; Ip, Wing-Huen [Graduate Institute of Astronomy, National Central University, Jhongli 32001, Taiwan (China); Innes, Davina, E-mail: d949001@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: wingip@astro.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: innes@mps.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed description of the interrelation between the Type III radio bursts and energetic phenomena associated with the flare activities in active region AR11158 at 07:58 UT on 2011 February 15. The timing of the Type III radio burst measured by the radio wave experiment on Wind/WAVE and an array of ground-based radio telescopes coincided with an extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) jet and hard X-ray (HXR) emission observed by SDO/AIA and RHESSI, respectively. There is clear evidence that the EUV jet shares the same source region as the HXR emission. The temperature of the jet, as determined by multiwavelength measurements by Atmospheric Imaging Assembly, suggests that Type III emission is associated with hot, 7 MK, plasma at the jet's footpoint.

  11. When less is more: Are radio galaxies below the Fanaroff-Riley break more polarized on parsec scales ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Kharb; P. Shastri; D. C. Gabuzda

    2005-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present images showing the first detections of polarization on parsec scales in the nuclei of four Fanaroff-Riley type I (low-luminosity) radio galaxies. Observations with Very Long Baseline Interferometry at \\lambda 3.6cm reveal the presence of ordered magnetic fields within ~1650 Schwarzchild radii of the putative central supermassive black hole. The relatively high fractional polarization in the pc-scale jets of these galaxies is consistent with the standard scheme unifying low-luminosity radio galaxies with BL Lac objects. This result also suggests that these radio galaxies lack the obscuring tori that apparently depolarize the nuclear emission in the more powerful FRII radio galaxies, and that their supermassive blackholes are poorly fed and/or inefficient radiators.

  12. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    of operating 135 cryogenic receivers on the VIA. First, a review of recent progress in cryogenically-cooled have been developed for use in a new radio astronomy system [1]. This new system is called the Very other frequencies utilize HEMT amplifiers cooled to 13 K in separate dewars at the Cassegrain focus

  13. Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-2294E Barrier Immune Radio Communications for Demand Response F. Rubinstein, G. Ghatikar, J Ann Piette of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's (LBNL) Demand Response Research Center (DRRC and Environment's (CIEE) Demand Response Emerging Technologies Development (DRETD) Program, under Work for Others

  14. Angular clustering in the SUMSS radio survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Blake; Tom Mauch; Elaine M. Sadler

    2003-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the angular correlation function of radio galaxies selected by the 843 MHz Sydney University Molonglo Sky Survey (SUMSS). We find that the characteristic imprint of large-scale structure is clearly detectable, and that the survey is very uniform. Through comparison with similar analyses for other wide-area radio surveys - the 1400 MHz NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) and the 325 MHz Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) - we are able to derive consistent angular clustering parameters, including a steep slope for the clustering function, $w(\\theta) \\propto \\theta^{-1.1}$. We revise upwards previous estimates of the NVSS clustering amplitude, and find no evidence for dependence of clustering properties on radio frequency. It is important to incorporate the full covariance matrix when fitting parameters to the measured correlation function. Once the redshift distribution for mJy radio galaxies has been determined, these projected clustering measurements will permit a robust description of large-scale structure at $z \\sim 0.8$, the median redshift of the sources.

  15. RADIO EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARE PARTICLE ACCELERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RADIO EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARE PARTICLE ACCELERATION A. O. Benz Abstract The solar corona is a very be considered as a particle accelerator. The free mobility of charged particles in a dilute plasma to accelerate particles in resonance. From a plasma physics point of view, acceleration is not surprising

  16. Broad band energy distribution of ROSAT detected quasars II: Radio-quiet objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Yuan; W. Brinkmann; J. Siebert; W. Voges

    1998-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A database of radio-quiet quasars detected with ROSAT is presented containing 846 quasars seen in the All-Sky Survey and/or in pointed PSPC observations. About 70% of the objects have been detected in X-rays for the first time. We present the soft X-ray fluxes and spectra, if available. Using an optically selected subsample compiled from this database, we study the broad band properties of radio-quiet quasars with high statistical significance. We confirm that radio-quiet quasars have in general steeper soft X-ray spectra than radio-loud. The spectral differences persist to high redshifts. A spectral flattening with increasing redshift is confirmed up to redshift around 2, beyond which the spectral slopes seem to be independent of redshift. The spectral slopes of the ROSAT radio-quiet quasars at z>2.5 are consistent with those found for nearby quasars in the medium energy band (2-10keV), implying that the X-ray spectral evolution is not important. We show that there is, in a statistical sense, little or no excess absorption for most of the radio-quiet objects at z>2. The existence of a correlation between the X-ray luminosity and the luminosity at 2500A is confirmed. Individual objects show a large scatter from this correlation. The X-ray loudness alpha_ox appears to be independent of z, but the analyses indicate a slight increase of alpha_ox with optical luminosity. However, this behavior is likely not caused by physical properties inherent to the quasars but is the result of the intrinsic dispersion. Finally, we find a small fraction of objects which appear to be relatively `X-ray quiet' compared to the bulk of the other quasars.

  17. Doing Business Presented at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doing Business with B&W Y-12 Presented at Oak Ridge National Laboratory By Gloria D. Mencer charities and education #12;B&W Y-12 Company Policy B&W Y-12's continued support of the small business community is an important business strength and each employee is encouraged to actively seek ways

  18. Effective Presentations Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shull, David H.

    1 Pericles Effective Presentations · Content · Organization · Delivery · Visual aids and graphics Be brave Graphics · KISS · Powerpoint: ­ Font · Bigger than you'd expect · San serif ­ Lines · Thicker than · Organization · Energy · Clarity · Poise Key: Practice Web Resources · http

  19. An assessment of presentism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDaniel, Brannon David

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    that no past or future things exist now. Socrates does not now exist, though he did in the past; my future daughter does not now exist, though she may in the future. Ontologically, the present is distinct, serving to demarcate all that currently has existence...

  20. Presented by Performance Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presented by Performance Engineering Research Institute (PERI) Philip C. Roth Future Technologies of Energy Roth_PERI_SC10 Performance engineering: enabling petascale science Maximizing performance accelerator modeling S3D turbulent combustion modeling Photo courtesy of Argonne National Laboratory Cray XT5

  1. Distant FR I radio galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field: implications for the cosmological evolution of radio-loud AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Best, Philip

    Distant FR I radio galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field: implications for the cosmological evolution of radio-loud AGN I. A. G. SnellenP and P. N. Best Institute for Astronomy, Royal Observatory, Blackford S T R AC T Deep and high-resolution radio observations of the Hubble Deep Field and flanking fields have

  2. Research Roadmap Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloman, Aaron

    Research Roadmap Presentation: euCognition Meeting, Munich 12 Jan 2007 http://www.eucognition.org/six_monthly_meeting_2.htm What's a Research Roadmap For? Why do we need one? How can we produce one? Aaron Sloman ( http.cs.bham.ac.uk/research/projects/cosy/papers/#pr0701 See also the euCognition Research Roadmap project: http://www.eucognition.org/wiki/index.php?title=Research_Roadmap

  3. Bisfuel links - Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess Stories Site Map PrintablePresentations

  4. ILLUMINATING THE DARKEST GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH RADIO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zauderer, B. A.; Berger, E.; Margutti, R.; Fong, W.; Laskar, T.; Chornock, R.; Soderberg, A. M. [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Levan, A. J. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Olivares E, F.; Greiner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Perley, D. A.; Horesh, A.; Carpenter, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91225 (United States); Updike, A. C. [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Roger Williams University, Bristol, RI 02809 (United States); Tanvir, N. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Menten, K. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Nakar, E. [Department of Astrophysics, Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Chandra, P. [National Centre for Radio Astrophysics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Pune University Campus, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Castro-Tirado, A. J. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), P.O. Box 03004, E-18080 Granada (Spain); Bremer, M. [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d'Heres (France); and others

    2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present X-ray, optical, near-infrared (IR), and radio observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) 110709B and 111215A, as well as optical and near-IR observations of their host galaxies. The combination of X-ray detections and deep optical/near-IR limits establish both bursts as ''dark''. Sub-arcsecond positions enabled by radio detections lead to robust host galaxy associations, with optical detections that indicate z {approx}< 4 (110709B) and z Almost-Equal-To 1.8-2.9 (111215A). We therefore conclude that both bursts are dark due to substantial rest-frame extinction. Using the radio and X-ray data for each burst we find that GRB 110709B requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>5.3 mag and GRB 111215A requires A{sub V}{sup host}{approx}>8.5 mag (assuming z = 2). These are among the largest extinction values inferred for dark bursts to date. The two bursts also exhibit large neutral hydrogen column densities of N{sub H,{sub int}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} (z = 2) as inferred from their X-ray spectra, in agreement with the trend for dark GRBs. Moreover, the inferred values are in agreement with the Galactic A{sub V} -N{sub H} relation, unlike the bulk of the GRB population. Finally, we find that for both bursts the afterglow emission is best explained by a collimated outflow with a total beaming-corrected energy of E{sub {gamma}} + E{sub K} Almost-Equal-To (7-9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 51} erg (z = 2) expanding into a wind medium with a high density, M Almost-Equal-To (6-20) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1} (n Almost-Equal-To 100-350 cm{sup -3} at Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 17} cm). While the energy release is typical of long GRBs, the inferred density may be indicative of larger mass-loss rates for GRB progenitors in dusty (and hence metal rich) environments. This study establishes the critical role of radio observations in demonstrating the origin and properties of dark GRBs. Observations with the JVLA and ALMA will provide a sample with sub-arcsecond positions and robust host associations that will help to shed light on obscured star formation and the role of metallicity in GRB progenitors.

  5. Radio Spectrum and Distance of the SNR HB9

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. A. Leahy; W. W. Tian

    2006-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    New images are presented of the supernova remnant (SNR) HB9 based on 408 MHz and 1420 MHz continuum emission and HI-line emission data of the Canadian Galactic Plane Survey (CGPS) by the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO). Two methods of spectral index analysis for HB9 are presented and compared: one removes compact sources at both frequencies but is limited to the resolution of the 408 MHz image; the other removes compact sources only in the 1420 MHz image so is effective at higher spatial resolution. The second allows more detailed spectral index variation studies than the first. The two T-T plot methods and new integrated flux densities give spectral index (S_{\

  6. State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Press Releases Presentations Congressional Testimony Radio Spots Enter Search Term(s): Search eia.gov A-Z Index A-Z Index A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U...

  7. Radio Linear and Circular Polarization from M81*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Brunthaler; Geoffrey C. Bower; Heino Falcke

    2006-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from archival Very Large Array (VLA) data and new VLA observations to investigate the long term behavior of the circular polarization of M81*, the nuclear radio source in the nearby galaxy M81. We also used the Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) array to observe M81* at 86 and 230 GHz. M81* is unpolarized in the linear sense at a frequency as high as 86 GHz and shows variable circular polarization at a frequency as high as 15 GHz. The spectrum of the fractional circular polarization is inverted in most of our observations. The sign of circular polarization is constant over frequency and time. The absence of linear polarization sets a lower limit to the accretion rate of $10^{-7} M_\\odot y^{-1}$. The polarization properties are strikingly similar to the properties of Sgr A*, the central radio source in the Milky Way. This supports the hypothesis that M81* is a scaled up version of Sgr A*. On the other hand, the broad band total intensity spectrum declines towards milimeter wavelengths which differs from previous observations of M81* and also from Sgr A*.

  8. Hermetic aluminum radio frequency interconnection and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kilgo, Riley D. (Albuquerque, NM); Kovacic, Larry (Albuquerque, NM); Brow, Richard K. (Rolla, MO)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a light-weight, hermetic coaxial radio-frequency (RF) interconnection having an electrically conductive outer housing made of aluminum or an aluminum alloy, a central electrical conductor made of ferrous or non-ferrous material, and a cylinder of dielectric material comprising a low-melting-temperature, high-thermal-expansion aluminophosphate glass composition for hermetically sealing between the aluminum-alloy outer housing and the ferrous or non-ferrous center conductor. The entire RF interconnection assembly is made permanently hermetic by thermally fusing the center conductor, glass, and housing concurrently by bringing the glass to the melt point by way of exposure to an atmospheric temperature sufficient to melt the glass, less than 540.degree. C., but that does not melt the center conductor or the outer aluminum or aluminum alloy housing. The composition of the glass used is controlled to provide a suitable low dielectric constant so that an appropriate electrical characteristic impedance, for example 50 ohms, can be achieved for an electrical interconnection that performs well at high radio frequencies and also provides an interconnection maintaining a relatively small physical size.

  9. Global VLBI Observations of Compact Radio Sources in M82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. R. McDonald; T. W. B. Muxlow; A. Pedlar; M. A. Garrett; K. A. Wills; S. T. Garrington; P. J. Diamond; P. N. Wilkinson

    2000-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of the starburst galaxy, M82, have been made with a 20-station global VLBI array at $\\lambda$18cm. Maps are presented of the brightest young supernova remnants (SNR) in M82 and the wide-field mapping techniques used in making images over a field of view of $\\sim$1 arcminute with 3 milliarcsecond resolution are discussed. A limit has been placed on the power law deceleration of the young SNR, 43.31+592 with an index greater than 0.73 $\\pm$ 0.11 from observations with the European VLBI Network. Using the global array we have resolved compact knots of radio emission in the source which, with future global observations, will enable better constraints to be placed on the expansion parameters of this SNR. The latest global observations have also provided high resolution images of the most compact radio source in M82, 41.95+575. We determine an upper limit to the radial expansion rate along the major axis of 2000 km s$^{-1}$. However, the new images also show structure resembling that of collimated ejection which brings into question the previous explanation of the source as being due to the confinement of a supernova by a high density circumstellar medium. It is apparent that we are now able to image the brightest supernova remnants in M82 with a linear scale which allows direct comparison with galactic SNR such as Cassiopeia A.

  10. Optimization of radio astronomical observations using Allan variance measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schieder; C. Kramer

    2001-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Stability tests based on the Allan variance method have become a standard procedure for the evaluation of the quality of radio-astronomical instrumentation. They are very simple and simulate the situation when detecting weak signals buried in large noise fluctuations. For the special conditions during observations an outline of the basic properties of the Allan variance is given, and some guidelines how to interpret the results of the measurements are presented. Based on a rather simple mathematical treatment clear rules for observations in ``Position-Switch'', ``Beam-'' or ``Frequency-Switch'', ``On-The-Fly-'' and ``Raster-Mapping'' mode are derived. Also, a simple ``rule of the thumb'' for an estimate of the optimum timing for the observations is found. The analysis leads to a conclusive strategy how to plan radio-astronomical observations. Particularly for air- and space-borne observatories it is very important to determine, how the extremely precious observing time can be used with maximum efficiency. The analysis should help to increase the scientific yield in such cases significantly.

  11. Energy Week presentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Topics covered include: energy security; clean energy and low carbon; energy for growth and poverty reduction in Africa; financing of energy efficiency; SMEs for decentralised energy service provision; potential for biofuels in developing countries; clean energy and sustainable development; clean energy finance and private equity funds; power generation and low carbon technologies; beyond traditional finance; rehabilitation and emission control in thermal power plants; and carbon finance. The presentations are mainly in ppt (Power Point) or pdf (Acrobat) format. Some videos of the conference are also available on the website.

  12. Underground coal gasification. Presentations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 8 presentations are: underground coal gasification (UCG) and the possibilities for carbon management (J. Friedmann); comparing the economics of UCG with surface gasification technologies (E. Redman); Eskom develops UCG technology project (C. Gross); development and future of UCG in the Asian region (L. Walker); economically developing vast deep Powder River Basin coals with UCG (S. Morzenti); effectively managing UCG environmental issues (E. Burton); demonstrating modelling complexity of environmental risk management; and UCG research at the University of Queensland, Australia (A.Y. Klimenko).

  13. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO Overview OCHCO OCHCOControlGuideCleanupEnvironmentalPresentation to the

  14. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO Overview OCHCO OCHCOControlGuideCleanupEnvironmentalPresentation toNational

  15. Presentations - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical InformationProcess andPresentations &

  16. Meeting and Presentation Materials

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof6,Projects38, 1) Agenda 2) Presentations: a.MEETING

  17. Meeting and Presentation Materials

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof6,Projects38, 1) Agenda 2) Presentations:

  18. Meeting and Presentation Materials

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12Approvedof6,Projects38, 1) Agenda 2) Presentations:EM QUALITY

  19. FES Review 2013 Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Environmental Assessments (EA) /EmailMolecularGE,Ozone Layer F.tPresentations

  20. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Maslennikov, K. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Pulkovskoye Shosse, 65/1, 196140, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Boldycheva, A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  1. Detecting Radio Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers and Neutrinos with a Digital Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heino Falcke; Peter Gorham

    2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibilities of measuring ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos with radio techniques. We review a few of the properties of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers and show how these properties can be explained by coherent ``geosynchrotron'' emission from electron-positron pairs in the shower as they move through the geomagnetic field. This should allow one to use the radio emission as a useful diagnostic tool for cosmic ray research. A new generation of digital telescopes will make it possible to study this radio emission in greater detail. For example, the planned Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), operating at 10-200 MHz, will be an instrument uniquely suited to study extensive air showers and even detect neutrino-induced showers on the moon. We discuss sensitivities, count rates and possible detection algorithms for LOFAR and a currently funded prototype station LOPES. This should also be applicable to other future digital radio telescopes such as the Square-Kilometer-Array (SKA). LOFAR will be capable of detecting air-shower radio emission from >2*10^14 eV to ~10^20 eV. The technique could be easily extended to include air shower arrays consisting of particle detectors (KASCADE, Auger), thus providing crucial additional information for obtaining energy and chemical composition of cosmic rays. It also has the potential to extend the cosmic ray search well beyond an energy of 10^21 eV if isotropic radio signatures can be found. Other issues that LOFAR can address are to determine the neutral component of the cosmic ray spectrum, possibly look for neutron bursts, and do actual cosmic ray astronomy.

  2. Radio and X-rays From SN 2013df Enlighten Progenitors of Type IIb Supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamble, Atish; Soderberg, Alicia M; Chakraborti, Sayan; Fransson, Claes; Chevalier, Roger; Powell, Diana; Milisavljevic, Dan; Parrent, Jerod; Bietenholz, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present radio and X-ray observations of the nearby Type IIb Supernova 2013df in NGC4414 from 10 to 250 days after the explosion. The radio emission showed a peculiar soft-to-hard spectral evolution. We present a model in which inverse Compton cooling of synchrotron emitting electrons can account for the observed spectral and light curve evolution. A significant mass loss rate, $\\dot{M} \\approx 8 \\times 10^{-5}\\,\\rm M_{\\odot}/yr$ for a wind velocity of 10 km/s, is estimated from the detailed modeling of radio and X-ray emission, which are primarily due to synchrotron and bremsstrahlung, respectively. We show that SN 2013df is similar to SN 1993J in various ways. The shock wave speed of SN 2013df was found to be average among the radio supernovae; $v_{sh}/c \\sim 0.07$. We did not find any significant deviation from smooth decline in the light curve of SN 2013df. One of the main results of our self-consistent multiband modeling is the significant deviation from energy equipartition between magnetic fields and...

  3. Preparing a public database of radio sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Andernach; S. A. Trushkin; A. G. Gubanov; O. V. Verkhodanov; V. B. Titov; A. Micol

    1996-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have collected the largest existing set of radio source lists in machine-readable form: 320 tables with 1.75 million records. Only a minor fraction of these is accessible via public databases. We describe our plans to make this huge amount of heterogeneous data accessible in a homogeneous way via the World Wide Web, with reliable cross-identifications, and searchable by various observables.

  4. Detecting Radio Emission from Cosmic Ray Air Showers and Neutrinos with a Digital Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, H; Falcke, Heino; Gorham, Peter

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibilities of measuring ultra-high energy cosmic rays and neutrinos with radio techniques. We review a few of the properties of radio emission from cosmic ray air showers and show how these properties can be explained by coherent ``geosynchrotron'' emission from electron-positron pairs in the shower as they move through the geomagnetic field. This should allow one to use the radio emission as a useful diagnostic tool for cosmic ray research. A new generation of digital telescopes will make it possible to study this radio emission in greater detail. For example, the planned Low-Frequency Array (LOFAR), operating at 10-200 MHz, will be an instrument uniquely suited to study extensive air showers and even detect neutrino-induced showers on the moon. We discuss sensitivities, count rates and possible detection algorithms for LOFAR and a currently funded prototype station LOPES. This should also be applicable to other future digital radio telescopes such as the Square-Kilometer-Array (SKA). LOFAR...

  5. On the Radio and Optical Luminosity Evolution of Quasars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron.; Stawarz, L.; /JAXA, Sagamihara /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.

    2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We calculate simultaneously the radio and optical luminosity evolutions of quasars, and the distribution in radio loudness R defined as the ratio of radio and optical luminosities, using a flux limited data set containing 636 quasars with radio and optical fluxes from White et al. We first note that when dealing with multivariate data it is imperative to first determine the true correlations among the variables, not those introduced by the observational selection effects, before obtaining the individual distributions of the variables. We use the methods developed by Efron and Petrosian which are designed to obtain unbiased correlations, distributions, and evolution with redshift from a data set truncated due to observational biases. It is found that as expected the population of quasars exhibits strong positive correlation between the radio and optical luminosities and that this correlation deviates from a simple linear relation in a way indicating that more luminous quasars are more radio loud. We also find that there is a strong luminosity evolution with redshift in both wavebands, with significantly higher radio than optical evolution. We conclude that the luminosity evolution obtained by arbitrarily separating the sources into radio loud (R > 10) and radio quiet (R < 10) populations introduces significant biases that skew the result considerably. We also construct the local radio and optical luminosity functions and the density evolution. Finally, we consider the distribution of the radio loudness parameter R obtained from careful treatment of the selection effects and luminosity evolutions with that obtained from the raw data without such considerations. We find a significant difference between the two distributions and no clear sign of bi-modality in the true distribution. Our results indicate therefore, somewhat surprisingly, that there is no critical switch in the efficiency of the production of disk outflows/jets between very radio quiet and very radio loud quasars, but rather a smooth transition. Also, this efficiency seems higher for the high-redshift and more luminous sources in the considered sample.

  6. Introduction State of the Art My Contribution Technical Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    Maode, Marceau Coupechoux and Philippe Godlewski Radio Engineering of Relay-Based OFDMA Networks 1 #12

  7. A compression scheme for radio data in high performance computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masui, Kiyoshi; Connor, Liam; Deng, Meiling; Fandino, Mateus; Höfer, Carolin; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D; Hinshaw, Gary; Parra, Juan Mena; Newburgh, Laura B; Shaw, J Richard; Vanderlinde, Keith

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a procedure for efficiently compressing astronomical radio data for high performance applications. Integrated, post-correlation data are first passed through a nearly lossless rounding step which compares the precision of the data to a generalized and calibration-independent form of the radiometer equation. This allows the precision of the data to be reduced in a way that has an insignificant impact on the data. The newly developed Bitshuffle lossless compression algorithm is subsequently applied. When the algorithm is used in conjunction with the HDF5 library and data format, data produced by the CHIME Pathfinder telescope is compressed to 28% of its original size and decompression throughputs in excess of 1 GB/s are obtained on a single core.

  8. On Black Hole Masses and Radio Loudness in AGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ari Laor

    2000-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution of radio to optical fluxes in AGN is bimodal. The physical origin for this bimodality is not understood. In this Letter I describe observational evidence, based on the Boroson & Green PG quasar sample, that the radio loudness bimodality is strongly related to the black hole mass (M_BH). Nearly all PG quasars with M_BH>10^9M_sun are radio loud, while quasars with M_BH<3x10^8M_sun are practically all radio quiet. This result is consistent with the dependence of quasar host galaxy morphology on radio loudness. There is no simple physical explanation for this result, but it may provide a clue on how jets are formed near massive black holes. The radio loudness--black hole mass relationship suggests that the properties of various types of AGN may be largely set by three basic parameters, M_BH, L/L_Eddington, and inclination angle.

  9. GNU Radio Group Final Research Report Thomas Bell Kevin Gajewski Anthony Hsu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Chansu

    GNU Radio Group Final Research Report Thomas Bell Kevin Gajewski Anthony Hsu Advisors: Yu-Dong Yao, the once only theoretical concept of Software-Defined Radio is now a practical reality. Using an open source software-defined radio package called GNU Radio and a basic radio hardware component called

  10. EVERY BCG WITH A STRONG RADIO AGN HAS AN X-RAY COOL CORE: IS THE COOL CORE-NONCOOL CORE DICHOTOMY TOO SIMPLE?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, M., E-mail: msun@virginia.ed [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States)

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The radio active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback in X-ray cool cores has been proposed as a crucial ingredient in the evolution of baryonic structures. However, it has long been known that strong radio AGNs also exist in 'noncool core' clusters, which brings up the question whether an X-ray cool core is always required for the radio feedback. In this work, we present a systematic analysis of brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) and strong radio AGNs in 152 groups and clusters from the Chandra archive. All 69 BCGs with radio AGN more luminous than 2 x 10{sup 23} W Hz{sup -1} at 1.4 GHz are found to have X-ray cool cores. BCG cool cores can be divided into two classes: the large cool core (LCC) class and the corona class. Small coronae, easily overlooked at z > 0.1, can trigger strong heating episodes in groups and clusters, long before LCCs are formed. Strong radio outbursts triggered by coronae may destroy embryonic LCCs and thus provide another mechanism to prevent the formation of LCCs. However, it is unclear whether coronae are decoupled from the radio feedback cycles as they have to be largely immune to strong radio outbursts. Our sample study also shows the absence of groups with a luminous cool core while hosting a strong radio AGN, which is not observed in clusters. This points to a greater impact of radio heating on low-mass systems than clusters. Few L {sub 1.4GHz} > 10{sup 24} W Hz{sup -1} radio AGNs (approx16%) host an L {sub 0.5-10keV} > 10{sup 42} erg s{sup -1} X-ray AGN, while above these thresholds, all X-ray AGNs in BCGs are also radio AGNs. As examples of the corona class, we also present detailed analyses of a BCG corona associated with a strong radio AGN (ESO 137-006 in A3627) and one of the faintest coronae known (NGC 4709 in the Centaurus cluster). Our results suggest that the traditional cool core/noncool core dichotomy is too simple. A better alternative is the cool core distribution function, with the enclosed X-ray luminosity or gas mass.

  11. CHANDRA VIEW OF THE ULTRA-STEEP SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCE IN A2443: MERGER SHOCK-INDUCED COMPRESSION OF FOSSIL RADIO PLASMA?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, T. E. [Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Randall, S. W. [Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sarazin, C. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Blanton, E. L. [Astronomy Department and Institute for Astrophysical Research, Boston University, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Giacintucci, S., E-mail: tracy.clarke.ca@nrl.navy.mil [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new Chandra X-ray observation of the intracluster medium in the galaxy cluster A2443, hosting an ultra-steep spectrum radio source. The data reveal that the intracluster medium is highly disturbed. The thermal gas in the core is elongated along a northwest to southeast axis and there is a cool tail to the north. We also detect two X-ray surface brightness edges near the cluster core. The edges appear to be consistent with an inner cold front to the northeast of the core and an outer shock front to the southeast of the core. The southeastern edge is coincident with the location of the radio relic as expected for shock (re)acceleration or adiabatic compression of fossil relativistic electrons.

  12. Radio constraints on heavily obscured star formation within dark gamma-ray burst host galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perley, D. A. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, MC 249-17, 1200 East California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Perley, R. A., E-mail: dperley@astro.caltech.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly dust-obscured starbursting galaxies (submillimeter galaxies and their ilk) represent the most extreme sites of star formation in the distant universe and contribute significantly to overall cosmic star formation beyond z > 1.5. Some stars formed in these environments may also explode as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and contribute to the population of 'dark' bursts. Here we present Very Large Array wideband radio-continuum observations of 15 heavily dust-obscured Swift GRBs to search for radio synchrotron emission associated with intense star formation in their host galaxies. Most of these targets (11) are not detected. Of the remaining four objects, one detection is marginal, and for two others we cannot yet rule out the contribution of a long-lived radio afterglow. The final detection is secure, but indicates a star formation rate (SFR) roughly consistent with the dust-corrected UV-inferred value. Most galaxies hosting obscured GRBs are therefore not forming stars at extreme rates, and the amount of optical extinction seen along a GRB afterglow sightline does not clearly correlate with the likelihood that the host has a sufficiently high SFR to be radio-detectable. While some submillimeter galaxies do readily produce GRBs, these GRBs are often not heavily obscured—suggesting that the outer (modestly obscured) parts of these galaxies overproduce GRBs and the inner (heavily obscured) parts underproduce GRBs relative to their respective contributions to star formation, hinting at strong chemical or initial mass function gradients within these systems.

  13. Submillimetre observations of WISE/radio-selected AGN and their environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Suzy F; Lonsdale, Carol; Condon, James; Farrah, Duncan; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Assef, Roberto J; Bridge, Carrie; Kimball, Amy; Lacy, Mark; Eisenhardt, Peter; Wu, Jingwen; Jarrett, Tom

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present JCMT SCUBA-2 850microns submillimetre (submm) observations of 30 mid-infrared (mid-IR) luminous AGN, detected jointly by the WISE all-sky IR survey and the NVSS/FIRST radio survey. These rare sources are selected by their extremely red mid-infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and compact radio counterparts. Further investigations show that they are highly obscured, have abundant warm AGN-heated dust and are thought to be experiencing intense AGN feedback. These galaxies appear to be consistent with an AGN-dominated galaxy, and could be a transient phase of merging galaxies. When comparing the number of submm galaxies (SMGs) detected serendipitously in the surrounding 1.5-arcmin to those in blank-field submm surveys, there is a very significant overdensity, of order 5, but no sign of radial clustering centred at our primary objects. The WISE/radio-selected AGN thus reside in 10-Mpc-scale overdense environments, that could be forming in pre-viralised clusters of galaxies. WISE/radio-selected...

  14. Radio to gamma-ray variability study of blazar S5 0716+714

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rani, B; Fuhrmann, L; Boettcher, M; Lott, B; Aller, H D; Aller, M F; Angelakis, E; Bach, U; Bastieri, D; Falcone, A D; Fukazawa, Y; Gabanyi, K E; Gupta, A C; Gurwell, M; Itoh, R; Kawabata, K S; Krips, M; Lähteenmäki, A A; Liu, X; Marchili, N; Max-Moerbeck, W; Nestoras, I; Nieppola, E; Quintana-Lacaci, G; Readhead, A C S; Richards, J L; Sasada, M; Sievers, A; Sokolovsky, K; Stroh, M; Tammi, J; Tornikoski, M; Uemura, M; Ungerechts, H; Urano, T; Zensus, J A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a series of radio, optical, X-ray and gamma-ray observations of the BL Lac object S50716+714 carried out between April 2007 and January 2011. The multi-frequency observations were obtained using several ground and space based facilities. The intense optical monitoring of the source reveals faster repetitive variations superimposed on a long-term variability trend at a time scale of ~350 days. Episodes of fast variability recur on time scales of ~ 60-70 days. The intense and simultaneous activity at optical and gamma-ray frequencies favors the SSC mechanism for the production of the high-energy emission. Two major low-peaking radio flares were observed during this high optical/gamma-ray activity period. The radio flares are characterized by a rising and a decaying stage and are in agreement with the formation of a shock and its evolution. We found that the evolution of the radio flares requires a geometrical variation in addition to intrinsic variations of the source. Different estima...

  15. Identifications of FIRST radio sources in the NOAO Deep-Wide Field Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. EL Bouchefry; C. M. Cress

    2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present the results of an optical and near infrared identification of 514 radio sources from the FIRST survey (Faint Images of the Radio Sky Survey at Twenty centimeters) with a flux-density limit of 1 mJy in the NOAO Deep-Wide Field Survey (NDWFS) Bootes field. Using optical (Bw, R, I) and K band data with approximate limits of Bw ~ 25.5mag, R ~ 25.8 mag, I ~25.5 mag and K~19.4 mag, optical counterparts have been identified for 378 of 514 FIRST radio sources. This corresponds to an identification rate of 34% in four bands (BwRIK), 60% in optical bands (BwRI) and 74% in I band. Photometric redshifts for these sources have been computed using the hyperz code. The inclusion of quasar template spectra in hyperz is investigated. We note that the photometric data are, in many cases, best matched to templates with very short star-formation timescales and the inferred ages of identified galaxies depend strongly on the assumptions about the star-formation timescale. The redshifts obtained are fairly consistent with those expected from the K-z relation for brighter radio sources but there is more scatter in the K-z diagram at z<1.

  16. ON THE CONNECTION OF THE APPARENT PROPER MOTION AND THE VLBI STRUCTURE OF COMPACT RADIO SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moor, A.; Frey, S. [FOeMI Satellite Geodetic Observatory, P.O. Box 585, H-1592 Budapest (Hungary); Lambert, S. B. [Observatoire de Paris, Departement Systemes de Reference Temps Espace (SYRTE), CNRS/UMR8630, 75014 Paris (France); Titov, O. A. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra 2601 (Australia); Bakos, J., E-mail: moor@konkoly.hu, E-mail: frey@sgo.fomi.hu, E-mail: sebastien.lambert@obspm.fr, E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au, E-mail: jbakos@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Many of the compact extragalactic radio sources that are used as fiducial points to define the celestial reference frame are known to have proper motions detectable with long-term geodetic/astrometric very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) measurements. These changes can be as high as several hundred microarcseconds per year for certain objects. When imaged with VLBI at milliarcsecond (mas) angular resolution, these sources (radio-loud active galactic nuclei) typically show structures dominated by a compact, often unresolved 'core' and a one-sided 'jet'. The positional instability of compact radio sources is believed to be connected with changes in their brightness distribution structure. For the first time, we test this assumption in a statistical sense on a large sample rather than on only individual objects. We investigate a sample of 62 radio sources for which reliable long-term time series of astrometric positions as well as detailed 8 GHz VLBI brightness distribution models are available. We compare the characteristic direction of their extended jet structure and the direction of their apparent proper motion. We present our data and analysis method, and conclude that there is indeed a correlation between the two characteristic directions. However, there are cases where the {approx}1-10 mas scale VLBI jet directions are significantly misaligned with respect to the apparent proper motion direction.

  17. A Chandra study of particle acceleration in the multiple hotspots of nearby radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Hardcastle; J. H. Croston; R. P. Kraft

    2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Chandra observations of a small sample of nearby classical double radio galaxies which have more than one radio hotspot in at least one of their lobes. The X-ray emission from the hotspots of these comparatively low-power objects is expected to be synchrotron in origin, and therefore to provide information about the locations of high-energy particle acceleration. In some models of the relationship between the jet and hotspot the hotspots that are not the current jet termination point should be detached from the energy supply from the active nucleus and therefore not capable of accelerating particles to high energies. We find that in fact some secondary hotspots are X-ray sources, and thus probably locations for high-energy particle acceleration after the initial jet termination shock. In detail, though, we show that the spatial structures seen in X-ray are not consistent with naive expectations from a simple shock model: the current locations of the acceleration of the highest-energy observable particles in powerful radio galaxies need not be coincident with the peaks of radio or even optical emission.

  18. Time monitoring of radio jets and magnetospheres in the nearby young stellar cluster R Coronae Australis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Takami, Michihiro; Yan, Chi-Hung; Karr, Jennifer; Chou, Mei-Yin; Ho, Paul T.-P. [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, Taipei, 106, Taiwan (China); Galván-Madrid, Roberto; Costigan, Gráinne; Manara, Carlo Felice [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Forbrich, Jan [Department of Astrophysics, University of Vienna, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180, Vienna (Austria); Rodríguez, Luis F. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, A.P. 3-72, Xangari, Morelia, 58089 (Mexico); Zhang, Qizhou, E-mail: hyliu@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2014-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 8-10 GHz (? = 3.0-3.7 cm) monitoring observations toward the young stellar object (YSO) cluster R Coronae Australis (R CrA), taken from 2012 March 15 to 2012 September 12. These observations were planned to measure the radio flux variabilities in timescales from 0.5 hr to several days, to tens of days, and up to ?200 days. We found that among the YSOs detectable in individual epochs, in general, the most reddened objects in the Spitzer observations show the highest mean 3.5 cm Stokes I emission, and the lowest fractional variabilities on <200 day timescales. The brightest radio flux emitters in our observations are the two reddest sources IRS7W and IRS7E. In addition, by comparing our observations with observations taken from 1996 to 1998 and 2005, we found that the radio fluxes of these two sources have increased by a factor of ?1.5. The mean 3.5 cm fluxes of the three Class I/II sources, IRSI, IRS2, and IRS6, appear to be correlated with their accretion rates derived by a previous near-infrared line survey. The weakly accreting Class I/II YSOs, or those in later evolutionary stages, present radio flux variability on <0.5 hr timescales. Some YSOs were detected only during occasional flaring events. The source R CrA went below our detection limit during a few fading events.

  19. Absolute kinematics of radio source components in the complete S5 polar cap sample I. First and second epoch maps at 8.4 GHz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Ros; J. M. Marcaide; J. C. Guirado; M. A. Perez-Torres

    2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the thirteen extragalactic radio sources of the S5 polar cap sample at 8.4 GHz with the Very Long Baseline Array, on 1997.93 and 1999.41. We present the maps from those two epochs and briefly discuss the morphological changes experimented by some of the radio sources in the 1.4 yr elapsed. These results correspond to the first two epochs at 8.4 GHz of a program directed to study the absolute kinematics of the radio source components of the members of the sample by means of phase delay astrometry at 8.4, 15 and 43 GHz.

  20. An accretion disk and radio spectra of pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. V. Prigara

    2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of the unified model of compact radio sources, the dependence of a turnover frequency in the smoothed radio spectrum of a pulsar upon the ratio of the dispersion measure to the period of a pulsar is obtained. This relation is produced by the radial density wave in the accretion disk surrounding a pulsar. The unified model of compact radio sources gives also the smoothed spectral indices of radio emission from pulsars as $\\alpha=2$ for the gaseous disk with the temperature profile T=const and $\\alpha=3$ for the gaseous disk with the pressure profile P=const ($F_{\

  1. TWO POPULATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURST RADIO AFTERGLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancock, P. J.; Gaensler, B. M.; Murphy, T., E-mail: Paul.Hancock@Sydney.edu.au [Also at Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for All-sky Astrophysics (CAASTRO), The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia. (Australia)

    2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection rate of gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows is ?30% at radio wavelengths, much lower than in the X-ray (?95%) or optical (?70%) bands. The cause of this low radio detection rate has previously been attributed to limited observing sensitivity. We use visibility stacking to test this idea, and conclude that the low detection rate is instead due to two intrinsically different populations of GRBs: radio-bright and radio-faint. We calculate that no more than 70% of GRB afterglows are truly radio-bright, leaving a significant population of GRBs that lack a radio afterglow. These radio-bright GRBs have higher gamma-ray fluence, isotropic energies, X-ray fluxes, and optical fluxes than the radio-faint GRBs, thus confirming the existence of two physically distinct populations. We suggest that the gamma-ray efficiency of the prompt emission is responsible for the difference between the two populations. We also discuss the implications for future radio and optical surveys.

  2. Underground radio technology saves miners and emergency response...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and tunnel radios use magnetic induction, advanced digital communications techniques and ultra-low frequency transmission to wirelessly provide reliable 2-way voice, text, or data...

  3. COLLOQUIUM: Type II Solar Radio Bursts: From Fundamental Plasma...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: Type II Solar Radio Bursts: From Fundamental Plasma Physics to Space Weather Research Professor Iver Cairns University of Sydney - School of Physics For...

  4. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | pdf | 5.9 MB Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Dynamics and Lignocellulosic Biomass September 11, 2012 | Download File: PetridisNERSC12.pdf | pdf | 2.8 MB NERSC Role...

  5. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Dynamics and Lignocellulosic Biomass September 11, 2012 | Download File: PetridisNERSC12.pdf | pdf | 2.8 MB Subsurface Flow and Reactive...

  6. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | pdf | 2.4 MB Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Dynamics and Lignocellulosic Biomass September 11, 2012 | Download File: PetridisNERSC12.pdf | pdf | 2.8 MB BERNERSC...

  7. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | pdf | 7.5 MB Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Protein Dynamics and Lignocellulosic Biomass September 11, 2012 | Download File: PetridisNERSC12.pdf | pdf | 2.8 MB Climate...

  8. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andrew Connolly : The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Andrew Connolly (University of Washington) | Download File: LSST-Connolly.pdf | pdf |...

  9. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | 2 MB Cosmic Microwave Background Data Analysis Steven Gottlieb: GPU & MIC for Lattice Field Theory November 27, 2012 | Author(s): Steven Gottlieb | Download File:...

  10. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerator Simulation Using Laser and Particle Beam Drivers Author(s): Cameron Geddes (LBNL) | Download File: Geddes-LPA.pdf | pdf | 7.5 MB Plasma Accelerator Simulation Using...

  11. presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, ,Development of NovelHigh( ( ( (ASpend by Stateupdate

  12. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected to

  13. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected toAndrew Connolly : The

  14. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected toAndrew Connolly :

  15. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected toAndrew Connolly : User

  16. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected toAndrew Connolly :

  17. Presented

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah ProjectPRE-AWARDenergy use is projected toAndrew Connollyl* t , f ,

  18. PRESENT:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14 Jan-15LiquidBGOperablePERCENT

  19. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)IntegratedSpeedingTechnical InformationProcess and CombustionIndustry

  20. 44 Short stories told on the local radio (Kap York Radio)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Stephen Pax

    last updated on Monday, 4 April 2011 Accession Form for Individual Recordings: Collection / Collector Name Stephen Leonard Tape No. / Track / Item No. 44 Length of track 2 hours 45 minutes Title of track Short stories told on the local radio (Kap...

  1. A Survey of Kiloparsec-Scale Radio Outflows in Radio-Quiet Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. F. Gallimore; D. J. Axon; C. P. O'Dea; S. A. Baum; A. Pedlar

    2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Seyfert galaxies commonly host compact jets spanning 10-100 pc scales, but larger structures (KSRs) are resolved out in long baseline, aperture synthesis surveys. We report a new, short baseline Very Large Array (VLA) survey of a complete sample of Seyfert and LINER galaxies. Out of all of the surveyed radio-quiet sources, we find that 44% (19 / 43) show extended radio structures at least 1 kpc in total extent that do not match the morphology of the disk or its associated star-forming regions. The KSR Seyferts stand out by deviating significantly from the far-infrared - radio correlation for star-forming galaxies, and they are more likely to have a relatively luminous, compact radio source in the nucleus; these results argue that KSRs are powered by the AGN rather than starburst. KSRs probably originate from jet plasma that has been decelerated by interaction with the nuclear ISM. We demonstrate the jet loses virtually all of its power to the ISM within the inner kiloparsec to form the slow KSRs.

  2. RADIO CONTROL CRICKET V2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    5 5 4 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 D D C C B B A A PCLK PDATA PALE RADIO DATA SPI_SCK SPI_MOSI SPI_MISO CHP_SCK PCLK PDATA PALE ADC0 SPI_MISO CHP_OUT RF_DETECT AVCC AVCC VCC VCC AVCC VCC AVCC VCC VCC VCC J9 HDR 2 X AVCC AVCC AVCC AVCC RF_IN RF_OUT L1 L2 CHP_OUT R_BIAS XOSC1 XOSC2 DIO DCLK PCLK PDATA PALE RSSI C18 R13

  3. High efficiency, oxidation resistant radio frequency susceptor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Klett, James W.

    2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    An article and method of producing an article for converting energy from one form to another having a pitch-derived graphitic foam carbon foam substrate and a single layer coating applied to all exposed surfaces wherein the coating is either silicon carbide or carbides formed from a Group IVA metal. The article is used as fully coated carbon foam susceptors that more effectively absorb radio frequency (RF) band energy and more effectively convert the RF energy into thermal band energy or sensible heat. The essentially non-permeable coatings also serve as corrosion or oxidation resistant barriers.

  4. UHECRs from the Radio Lobes of AGNs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Fraschetti; F. Melia

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a stochastic mechanism of particle acceleration from first principles in an environment having properties like those of Radio Lobes in AGNs. We show that energies $\\sim 10^{20}$ eV are reached in $\\sim 10^6$ years for protons. Our results reopen the question regarding the nature of the high-energy cutoff in the observed spectrum: whether it is due solely to propagation effects, or whether it is also affected by the maximum energy permitted by the acceleration process itself.

  5. Revealing Cosmic Magnetism with Radio Polarimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan M. Gaensler

    2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    While gravitation sustains the on-going evolution of the cosmos, it is magnetism that breaks gravity's symmetry and that provides the pathway to the non-thermal Universe. By enabling processes such as anisotropic pressure support, particle acceleration, and jet collimation, magnetism has for billions of years regulated the feedback vital for returning matter to the interstellar and intergalactic medium. After reviewing recent results that demonstrate the unique view of magnetic fields provided by radio astronomy, I explain how the Square Kilometre Array will provide data that will reveal what cosmic magnets look like, how they formed, and what role they have played in the evolving Universe.

  6. CXAllenRadioTower2.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z C o . C l a r8.0 -CURRICULUM VITAEAllen Radio Tower

  7. Radio Towers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap Jump to:b <RGS Development BVRadiantRadio

  8. Drill Rig Safety Topics of the Presentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;Inspect Cooling System & Fan #12;The Most Injury Related Activity Handling Drill Pipe Tools Casing #12;Automated Loading Arms w/ Radio Remote Controls #12;Automatic Pipe Handling System w/ Tilt Out Top Head #12

  9. Background radio-frequency radiation and its impact on radio astronomy Michelle C. Storey, Bruce MacA Thomas and John M. Sarkissian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkissian, John M.

    1 Background radio-frequency radiation and its impact on radio astronomy Michelle C. Storey, Bruce 1710 Email:mstorey@atnf.csiro.au Abstract: The use of radio-frequency telecommunications equipment is dramatically increasing, and one consequence is that background levels of radio-frequency radiation

  10. Cognitive Radio: A path in the Evolution of Public Wireless Networks The concept of cognitive radio has arisen as a generalization of the principle of multiple

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jafar, Syed A.

    Cognitive Radio: A path in the Evolution of Public Wireless Networks The concept of cognitive radio has arisen as a generalization of the principle of multiple access in radio channels initially layer including fixed modulation and error control coding algorithms. The cognitive radio is supposed

  11. Radio-Frequency Beam Conditioner for Fast-Wave Free-Electron Generators of Coherent Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sessler, Andrew M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Physical Review Letters Radio-Frequency Beam ConditionerDE-AC03-76SF00098 LBL-31006 RADIO-FREQUENCY BEAM CONDITIONERIbaraki, 305, Japan. RADIO-FREQUENCY BEAM CONDITIONER FOR

  12. Demo Abstract: A Unified Architecture for Flexible Radio Power Management in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Chenyang

    Demo Abstract: A Unified Architecture for Flexible Radio Power Management in Wireless Sensor Terms Experimentation, Design Keywords Wireless Sensor Networks, Radio Power Management, Architecture, Framework 1 Overview Radio power management is of paramount concern in wireless sensor networks. While

  13. US researchers make tiny radio from 11:05AM Tuesday January 29, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    the radios. They consist of two radio frequency amplifiers, a radio frequency mixer and an audio amplifier ©2008, APN Holdings NZ Limited Served by: Laurel Instance: static | 04 Feb 2008 05:36:27 | 1,877 Page 2

  14. TURBULENCE AND RADIO MINI-HALOS IN THE SLOSHING CORES OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZuHone, J. A.; Markevitch, M. [Astrophysics Science Division, Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics, Code 662, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Astrophysics Science Division, Laboratory for High Energy Astrophysics, Code 662, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brunetti, G. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy)] [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, Via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Giacintucci, S. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of relaxed, cool-core galaxy clusters exhibit diffuse, steep-spectrum radio sources in their central regions, known as radio mini-halos. It has been proposed that the relativistic electrons responsible for the emission have been reaccelerated by turbulence generated by the sloshing of the cool core gas. We present a high-resolution MHD simulation of gas sloshing in a galaxy cluster coupled with subgrid simulations of relativistic electron acceleration to test this hypothesis. Our simulation shows that the sloshing motions generate turbulence on the order of {delta}v {approx} 50-200 km s{sup -1} on spatial scales of {approx}50-100 kpc and below in the cool core region within the envelope of the sloshing cold fronts, whereas outside the cold fronts, there is negligible turbulence. This turbulence is potentially strong enough to reaccelerate relativistic electron seeds (with initial {gamma} {approx} 100-500) to {gamma} {approx} 10{sup 4} via damping of magnetosonic waves and non-resonant compression. The seed electrons could remain in the cluster from, e.g., past active galactic nucleus activity. In combination with the magnetic field amplification in the core, these electrons then produce diffuse radio synchrotron emission that is coincident with the region bounded by the sloshing cold fronts, as indeed observed in X-rays and the radio. The result holds for different initial spatial distributions of pre-existing relativistic electrons. The power and the steep spectral index ({alpha} Almost-Equal-To 1-2) of the resulting radio emission are consistent with observations of mini-halos, though the theoretical uncertainties of the acceleration mechanisms are high. We also produce simulated maps of inverse-Compton hard X-ray emission from the same population of relativistic electrons.

  15. Abell 2111: An Optical and Radio Study of the Richest Butcher-Oemler Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal A. Miller; William Oegerle; John Hill

    2006-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an in-depth analysis of the Butcher-Oemler cluster A2111, including new optical spectroscopy plus a deep Very Large Array (VLA) radio continuum observation. These are combined with optical imaging from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) to assess the activity and properties of member galaxies. Prior X-ray studies have suggested A2111 is a head-on cluster merger, a dynamical state which might be connected to the high level of activity inferred from its blue fraction. We are able to directly assess this claim, using our spectroscopic data to identify 95 cluster members among 196 total galaxy spectra. These galaxy velocities do not themselves provide significant evidence for the merger interpretation, however they are consistent with it provided the system is viewed near the time of core passage and at a viewing angle >~30 degrees different from the merger axis. The SDSS data allow us to confirm the high blue fraction for A2111, f_b = 0.15 +/- 0.03 based on photometry alone and f_b = 0.23 +/- 0.03 using spectroscopic data to remove background galaxies. We are able to detect 175 optical sources from the SDSS in our VLA radio data, of which 35 have redshift information. We use the SDSS photometry to determine photometric redshifts for the remaining 140 radio-optical sources. In total we identify up to 26 cluster radio galaxies, 14 of which have spectroscopic redshifts. The optical spectroscopy and radio data reveal a substantial population of dusty starbursts within the cluster. The high blue fraction and prevalence of star formation is consistent with the hypothesis that dynamically-active clusters are associated with more active member galaxies than relaxed clusters.

  16. Starbursts and the triggering of the activity in nearby powerful radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Tadhunter; T. G. Robinson; R. M. Gonzalez Delgado; K. Wills; R. Morganti

    2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present high quality long-slit spectra for three nearby powerful radio galaxies 3C293, 3C305, PKS1345+12. These were taken with the aim of characterising the young stellar populations (YSP), and thereby investigating the evolution of the host galaxies, as well as the events that triggered the activity. Isochrone spectral synthesis modelling of the wide wavelength coverage spectra of nuclear and off-nuclear continuum-emitting regions have been used to estimate the ages, masses and luminosities of the YSP component, taking full account of reddening effects and potential contamination by activity-related components. We find that the YSP make a substantial contribution to the continuum flux in the off-nuclear regions on a radial scale of 1 - 20kpc in all three objects. Moreover, in two objects we find evidence for reddened post-starburst stellar populations in the near-nuclear regions of the host galaxies. The YSP are relatively old (0.1- 2Gyr), massive and make up a large proportion (~1 - 50%) of the total stellar mass in the regions of galaxies sampled by the observations. Overall, these results are consistent with the idea that AGN activity in some radio galaxies is triggered by major gas-rich mergers. Therefore, these radio galaxies form part of the subset of early-type galaxies that is evolving most rapidly in the local universe. Intriguingly, the results also suggest that the radio jets are triggered relatively late in the merger sequence, and that there is an evolutionary link between radio galaxies and luminous/ultra-luminous infrared galaxies.

  17. Characteristics of radio-frequency atmospheric pressure dielectric-barrier discharge with dielectric electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hussain, S., E-mail: shussain@uos.edu.pk, E-mail: shussainuos@yahoo.com; Qazi, H. I. A.; Badar, M. A. [Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, 40100 Sargodha (Pakistan)] [Department of Physics, University of Sargodha, 40100 Sargodha (Pakistan)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental investigation to characterize the properties and highlight the benefits of atmospheric pressure radio-frequency dielectric-barrier discharge (rf DBD) with dielectric electrodes fabricated by anodizing aluminium substrate is presented. The current-voltage characteristics and millisecond images are used to distinguish the ? and ? modes. This atmospheric rf DBD is observed to retain the discharge volume without constriction in ? mode. Optical emission spectroscopy demonstrates that the large discharge current leads to more abundant reactive species in this plasma source.

  18. New Measurements of the Radio Photosphere of Mira based on Data from the JVLA and ALMA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, L D; Menten, K M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new measurements of the millimeter wavelength continuum emission from the long period variable Mira ($o$ Ceti) at frequencies of 46 GHz, 96 GHz, and 229 GHz ($\\lambda$~7 mm, 3 mm, and 1 mm) based on observations obtained with the Jansky Very Large Array (JVLA) and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA). The measured millimeter flux densities are consistent with a radio photosphere model derived from previous observations, where flux density, $S_{\

  19. X-RAY OBSERVATIONS OF HIGH-B RADIO PULSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olausen, S. A.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, Rutherford Physics Building, McGill University, 3600 University Street, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Zhu, W. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Vogel, J. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Lyne, A. G.; Espinoza, C. M.; Stappers, B. W. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Manchester, R. N. [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [Australia Telescope National Facility, CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, White Hall, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

    2013-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of high-magnetic-field pulsars is important for examining the relationships between radio pulsars, magnetars, and X-ray-isolated neutron stars (XINSs). Here, we report on X-ray observations of three such high-magnetic-field radio pulsars. We first present the results of a deep XMM-Newton observation of PSR J1734-3333, taken to follow up on its initial detection in 2009. The pulsar's spectrum is well fit by a blackbody with a temperature of 300 {+-} 60 eV, with bolometric luminosity L{sub bb}=2.0{sub -0.7}{sup +2.2} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 32} erg s{sup -1}{approx}0.0036 E-dot for a distance of 6.1 kpc. We detect no X-ray pulsations from the source, setting a 1{sigma} upper limit on the pulsed fraction of 60% in the 0.5-3 keV band. We compare PSR J1734-3333 to other rotation-powered pulsars of similar age and find that it is significantly hotter, supporting the hypothesis that the magnetic field affects the observed thermal properties of pulsars. We also report on XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of PSRs B1845-19 and J1001-5939. We do not detect either pulsar, setting 3{sigma} upper limits on their blackbody temperatures of 48 and 56 eV, respectively. Despite the similarities in rotational properties, these sources are significantly cooler than all but one of the XINSs, which we attribute to the two groups having been born with different magnetic fields and hence evolving differently.

  20. Physical Properties of Very Powerful FRII Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher P. O'Dea; Ruth A. Daly; Preeti Kharb; Kenneth A. Freeman; Stefi A. Baum

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate ages and physical properties of powerful radio galaxies. An analysis of new multi-wavelength VLA observations of eleven very powerful classical double (FRIIb) radio galaxies with redshifts between 0.4 and 1.3 is presented. We estimate ages and velocities for each side of each source. The eleven new sources are combined with previously studied samples and the characteristics of the full sample of 31 sources are studied; the full sample includes sources with redshifts between 0.056 and 1.79, and core-hot spot sizes of about 30 to 400 kpc. The velocities are independent of core-hotspot separation, suggesting the rate of growth of a given source is roughly constant over the source lifetime. We combine the rate of growth, width, and pressure of a source to study the beam power, lifetime, energy, and ambient gas density using standard methods previously applied to smaller samples. Typical beam powers are in the range from 1E44 to 1E46 erg/s; we show that this quantity is insensitive to assumptions regarding minimum energy conditions. The beam powers are independent of core-hotspot separation suggesting that the beam power of a given source is roughly constant over the source lifetime. Typical total source lifetimes are found to be about a few E6 to E7 years, and typical total outflow energies (E/c^2) are found to be about 5(E5 - E6) solar masses. Ambient gas densities are found to decrease with increasing core-hotspot distance, but have no redshift dependence. Overall, the results obtained with the sample of 31 sources studied here are consistent with those obtained earlier with smaller samples.

  1. Quark Nova Model for Fast Radio Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachary Shand; Amir Ouyed; Nico Koning; Rachid Ouyed

    2015-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    FRBs are puzzling, millisecond, energetic radio transients with no discernible source; observations show no counterparts in other frequency bands. The birth of a quark star from a parent neutron star experiencing a quark nova - previously thought undetectable when born in isolation - provides a natural explanation for the emission characteristics of FRBs. The generation of unstable r-process elements in the quark nova ejecta provides millisecond exponential injection of electrons into the surrounding strong magnetic field at the parent neutron star's light cylinder via $\\beta$-decay. This radio synchrotron emission has a total duration of hundreds of milliseconds and matches the observed spectrum while reducing the inferred dispersion measure by approximately 200 cm$^{-3}$ pc. The model allows indirect measurement of neutron star magnetic fields and periods in addition to providing astronomical measurements of $\\beta$-decay chains of unstable neutron rich nuclei. Using this model, we can calculate expected FRB average energies ($\\sim$ 10$^{41}$ ergs), spectra shapes and provide a theoretical framework for determining distances.

  2. On the Nature of Pulsar Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyutikov, M; Machabeli, G Z; Lyutikov, Maxim; Blandford, Roger D.; Machabeli, George

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of pulsar radio emission generation, in which the observed waves are produced directly by maser-type plasma instabilities operating at the anomalous cyclotron-Cherenkov resonance $\\omega- k_{\\parallel} v_{\\parallel} + \\omega_B/ v_{\\parallel} - k_{\\perp} u_d =0$, is capable of explaining the main observational characteristics of pulsar radio emission. The instabilities are due to the interaction of the fast particles from the primary beam and the tail of the distribution with the normal modes of a strongly magnetized one-dimensional electron-positron plasma. The waves emitted at these resonances are vacuum-like, electromagnetic waves that may leave the magnetosphere directly. In this model, the cyclotron-Cherenkov instability is responsible for core emission pattern and the Cherenkov-drift instability produces conal emission. The conditions for the development of the cyclotron-Cherenkov instability are satisfied for both typical and millisecond pulsars provided that the streaming energy of the bulk pl...

  3. Intranight optical variability of radio-quiet BL Lacertae objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yuan; Zhang, Shuang Nan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: The intranight variation (or microvariation) is a common phenomenon of radio-loud BL Lac objects. However, it is not clear whether the recently found radio-quiet BL Lac objects have the same properties. The occurrence rate of intranight variation is helpful in distinguishing the mechanism of the continuum of radio-quiet BL Lac objects. Methods: We conducted a photometric monitoring of 8 radio-quiet BL Lac objects by Xinglong 2.16m and Lijiang 2.4m telescopes. The differential light curves are calculated between each target and two comparison stars. To qualify the variation, the significance of variation is examined by scaled $F$-test. Results: No significant variation is found in the 11 sessions of light curves of 8 radio-quiet BL Lac objects (one galactic source is excluded). The lack of microvariation in radio-quiet BL Lac objects is consistent with the detection rate of microvariation in normal radio-quiet AGNs, but much lower than that of radio-loud AGNs. This result indicates that the continua of t...

  4. Real-time MISO UWB Radio Testbed and Waveform Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Robert Caiming

    Real-time MISO UWB Radio Testbed and Waveform Design Yu Song, Zhen Hu, Nan Guo, and Robert C. Qiu-input single-output (MISO) ultra-wideband (UWB) radio testbed, which involves Xinlix Virtex-5 Field in indoor environment. The transmitted MISO signals are optimized in the passband with a bandwidth up to 500

  5. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT and Ionospheric Center, Arecibo, Puerto Rico by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The general design concept was taken from previous receivers assembled at NRAO. S. Weinreb and N

  6. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT No. 159 INTERFERENCE POTENTIAL FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA CRAIG ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA Craig R. Moore and James L. Dolan Introduction

  7. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Rep preformed by the Standard Receiver Section of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The following breakdown was used to divide the costs into various categories: (1) Emckajs.c1 . 1

  8. Simultaneous Operation of Multiple Collocated Radios and the Scanning Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbeau, Michel

    Simultaneous Operation of Multiple Collocated Radios and the Scanning Problem Michel Barbeau. The radio interface scans channels to uncover beacons periodically sent by transmitters. The goal of the scanning activity is to uncover the beacons within the shortest possible time. We call this the scanning

  9. Negotiating Multichannel Sensing and Access In Cognitive Radio Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, M. Saif

    Negotiating Multichannel Sensing and Access In Cognitive Radio Wireless Networks Hua Liu§, Bhaskar the coordination among secondary users on channel sensing strategy in cognitive wireless networks. In this problem and potentially access in a cognitive radio network? If users may have a potentially different valuation of each

  10. EnergyEfficient Initialization Protocols for Adhoc Radio Networks ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakano, Koji

    Energy­Efficient Initialization Protocols for Ad­hoc Radio Networks ? J. L. Bordim 1 , J. Cui 1 , T contribution of this work is to propose energy­ efficient randomized initialization protocols for ad­hoc radio this protocol to de­ sign an energy­efficient initialization protocol that terminates, with high probability

  11. CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;CITY OF PRINCE GEORGE: RADIO FREQUENCY TREATMENT OF PARTIALLY DIGESTED/DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS/DEWATERED BIOSOLIDS FINAL REPORT SUMMARY The City of Prince George recently proposed to investigate the possibility of applying radio frequency (RF) technology to partially digested/dewatered biosolids from domestic wastewater

  12. Orthogonal Exponential Spline Pulses with Application to Impulse Radio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Federal Communications Commission and will potentially enable an impulse radio communica- tions system@mx.ibaraki.ac.jp Abstract: With application to the impulse radio communications in mind, a locally supported and zero properties are required (i) for the sake of real-time communications, (ii) for the pulse to be feasible

  13. argon radio-frequency glow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute of Standards and Technology RFID is a form of automatic 6 Radio frequency ion source CERN Preprints Summary: The study on Radio Frequency Ion Source is mainly...

  14. Radio detection of cosmic ray air showers with LOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huege, T; Asch, T; Badea, A F; Bähren, L; Bekk, K; Bercuci, A; Bertaina, M; Biermann, P L; Blumer, J; Bozdog, H; Brancus, I M; Buitink, S; Bruggemann, M; Buchholz, P; Butcher, H; Chiavassa, A; Cossavella, F; Daumiller, K; Di Pierro, F; Doll, P; Engel, R; Falcke, H; Gemmeke, H; Ghia, P L; Glasstetter, R; Grupen, C; Hakenjos, A; Haungs, A; Heck, D; Hörandel, J R; Horneffer, A; Isar, P G; Kampert, K H; Kolotaev, Yu; Krömer, O; Kuijpers, J; Lafebre, S; Mathes, H J; Mayer, H J; Meurer, C; Milke, J; Mitrica, B; Morello, C; Navarra, G; Nehls, S; Nigl, A; Obenland, R; Oehlschläger, J; Ostapchenko, S; Over, S; Petcu, M; Petrovic, J; Pierog, T; Plewnia, S; Rebel, H; Risse, A; Roth, M; Schieler, H; Sima, O; Singh, K; Stumpert, M; Toma, G; Trinchero, G C; Ulrich, H; Van Buren, J; Walkowiak, W; Weindl, A; Wochele, J; Zabierowski, J; Zensus, J A; Zimmermann, D; Huege, Tim; al, et

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years, radio detection of cosmic ray air showers has experienced a true renaissance, becoming manifest in a number of new experiments and simulation efforts. In particular, the LOPES project has successfully implemented modern interferometric methods to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES has confirmed that the emission is coherent and of geomagnetic origin, as expected by the geosynchrotron mechanism, and has demonstrated that a large scale application of the radio technique has great potential to complement current measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We describe the current status, most recent results and open questions regarding radio detection of cosmic rays and give an overview of ongoing research and development for an application of the radio technique in the framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  15. Radio detection of cosmic ray air showers with LOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tim Huege; the LOPES Collaboration

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last few years, radio detection of cosmic ray air showers has experienced a true renaissance, becoming manifest in a number of new experiments and simulation efforts. In particular, the LOPES project has successfully implemented modern interferometric methods to measure the radio emission from extensive air showers. LOPES has confirmed that the emission is coherent and of geomagnetic origin, as expected by the geosynchrotron mechanism, and has demonstrated that a large scale application of the radio technique has great potential to complement current measurements of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We describe the current status, most recent results and open questions regarding radio detection of cosmic rays and give an overview of ongoing research and development for an application of the radio technique in the framework of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  16. Forthcoming Close Angular Approaches of Planets to Radio Sources and Possibilities to Use Them as GR Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. M. Malkin; V. N. L'vov; S. D. Tsekmeister

    2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    During close angular approaches of solar system planets to astrometric radio sources, the apparent positions of these sources shift due to relativistic effects and, thus, these events may be used for testing the theory of general relativity; this fact was successfully demonstrated in the experiments on the measurements of radio source position shifts during the approaches of Jupiter carried out in 1988 and 2002. An analysis, performed within the frames of the present work, showed that when a source is observed near a planet's disk edge, i.e., practically in the case of occultation, the current experimental accuracy makes it possible to measure the relativistic effects for all planets. However, radio occultations are fairly rare events. At the same time, only Jupiter and Saturn provide noticeable relativistic effects approaching the radio sources at angular distances of about a few planet radii. Our analysis resulted in the creation of a catalog of forthcoming occultations and approaches of planets to astrometric radio sources for the time period of 2008-2050, which can be used for planning experiments on testing gravity theories and other purposes. For all events included in the catalog, the main relativistic effects are calculated both for ground-based and space (Earth-Moon) interferometer baselines.

  17. XMM-Newton observations of M31: X-ray properties of radio sources and SNR candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergey Trudolyubov; William Priedhorsky

    2004-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the ongoing XMM-Newton survey of M31. 17 X-ray sources detected in the survey have bright radio counterparts, and 15 X-ray sources coincide with SNR candidates from optical and radio surveys. 15 out of 17 sources with radio counterparts, not SNR candidates, have spectral properties similar to that observed for background radio galaxies/quasars or Crab-like supernova remnants located in M31. The remaining two sources, XMMU J004046.8+405525 and XMMU J004249.1+412407, have soft X-ray spectra, and are associated with spatially resolved H-alpha emission regions, which makes them two new SNR candidates in M31. The observed absorbed X-ray luminosities of SNR candidates in our sample range from 1e35 to 5e36 ergs/s, assuming the distance of 760 kpc. Most of the SNR candidates detected in our survey have soft X-ray spectra. The spectra of the brightest sources show presence of emission lines and can be fit by thermal plasma models with kT~0.1-0.4 keV. The results of spectral fitting of SNR candidates suggest that most of them should be located in a relatively low density regions. We show that X-ray color-color diagrams can be useful tool for distinguishing between intrinsically hard background radio sources and Crab-like SNR and thermal SNR in M31 with soft spectra.

  18. Implementing TCP Flow-Level Fairness Using 802.11e in a Multi-Radio Mesh Testbed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Ken

    , CSMA/CA, TCP, test-bed I. Introduction The problems faced by TCP in 802.11 multi-hop mesh wireless with multi-radio relay stations built us- ing commodity hardware. The proposed approach creates present whenever TCP flows are aggregated at a relay hop in a mesh network. This leads to queueing

  19. THE COORDINATED RADIO AND INFRARED SURVEY FOR HIGH-MASS STAR FORMATION. II. SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purcell, C. R.; Hoare, M. G.; Lumsden, S. L.; Urquhart, J. S. [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, E.C. Stoner Building, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Cotton, W. D. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Chandler, C. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Array Operations Center, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville Road, Socorro, NM 87801-0387 (United States); Churchwell, E. B. [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [The University of Wisconsin, Department of Astronomy, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Diamond, P.; Fuller, G.; Garrington, S. T. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)] [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Manchester, Oxford Rd, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dougherty, S. M. [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada)] [National Research Council of Canada, Herzberg Institute for Astrophysics, Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory, P.O. Box 248, Penticton, British Columbia V2A 6J9 (Canada); Fender, R. P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)] [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Gledhill, T. M. [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)] [Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom); Goldsmith, P. F. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Hindson, L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia)] [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Jackson, J. M. [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Kurtz, S. E. [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico)] [Centro de Radioastronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico - Morelia, Apartado Postal 3-72, C.P. 58090 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Marti, J., E-mail: C.R.Purcell@leeds.ac.uk [Departamento de Fisica, EPSJ, Universidad de Jaen, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, Edif. A3, E-23071 Jaen (Spain); and others

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CORNISH project is the highest resolution radio continuum survey of the Galactic plane to date. It is the 5 GHz radio continuum part of a series of multi-wavelength surveys that focus on the northern GLIMPSE region (10 Degree-Sign < l < 65 Degree-Sign ), observed by the Spitzer satellite in the mid-infrared. Observations with the Very Large Array in B and BnA configurations have yielded a 1.''5 resolution Stokes I map with a root mean square noise level better than 0.4 mJy beam{sup -1}. Here we describe the data-processing methods and data characteristics, and present a new, uniform catalog of compact radio emission. This includes an implementation of automatic deconvolution that provides much more reliable imaging than standard CLEANing. A rigorous investigation of the noise characteristics and reliability of source detection has been carried out. We show that the survey is optimized to detect emission on size scales up to 14'' and for unresolved sources the catalog is more than 90% complete at a flux density of 3.9 mJy. We have detected 3062 sources above a 7{sigma} detection limit and present their ensemble properties. The catalog is highly reliable away from regions containing poorly sampled extended emission, which comprise less than 2% of the survey area. Imaging problems have been mitigated by down-weighting the shortest spacings and potential artifacts flagged via a rigorous manual inspection with reference to the Spitzer infrared data. We present images of the most common source types found: H II regions, planetary nebulae, and radio galaxies. The CORNISH data and catalog are available online at http://cornish.leeds.ac.uk.

  20. Reconstruction of the energy and depth of maximum of cosmic-ray air-showers from LOPES radio measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. D. Apel; J. C. Arteaga-Velazquez; L. Bähren; K. Bekk; M. Bertaina; P. L. Biermann; J. Blümer; H. Bozdog; I. M. Brancus; E. Cantoni; A. Chiavassa; K. Daumiller; V. de Souza; F. Di Pierro; P. Doll; R. Engel; H. Falcke; B. Fuchs; D. Fuhrmann; H. Gemmeke; C. Grupen; A. Haungs; D. Heck; J. R. Hörandel; A. Horneffer; D. Huber; T. Huege; P. G. Isar; K. -H. Kampert; D. Kang; O. Krömer; J. Kuijpers; K. Link; P. ?uczak; M. Ludwig; H. J. Mathes; M. Melissas; C. Morello; J. Oehlschläger; N. Palmieri; T. Pierog; J. Rautenberg; H. Rebel; M. Roth; C. Rühle; A. Saftoiu; H. Schieler; A. Schmidt; F. G. Schröder; O. Sima; G. Toma; G. C. Trinchero; A. Weindl; J. Wochele; J. Zabierowski; J. A. Zensus

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    LOPES is a digital radio interferometer located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany, which measures radio emission from extensive air showers at MHz frequencies in coincidence with KASCADE-Grande. In this article, we explore a method (slope method) which leverages the slope of the measured radio lateral distribution to reconstruct crucial attributes of primary cosmic rays. First, we present an investigation of the method on the basis of pure simulations. Second, we directly apply the slope method to LOPES measurements. Applying the slope method to simulations, we obtain uncertainties on the reconstruction of energy and depth of shower maximum Xmax of 13% and 50 g/cm^2, respectively. Applying it to LOPES measurements, we are able to reconstruct energy and Xmax of individual events with upper limits on the precision of 20-25% for the primary energy and 95 g/cm^2 for Xmax, despite strong human-made noise at the LOPES site.

  1. On the integrated continuum radio-spectrum of supernova remnant W44 (G34.7-0.4): new insights from Planck's data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oni?, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the integrated continuum radio-spectrum of supernova remnant (SNR) W44 was analyzed up to 70 GHz, testing the different emission models that can be responsible for its particular shape. {\\it Planck's} observations made possible to analyze the high frequency part of radio-emission from SNRs. Although the quality of radio-continuum spectrum (a high scatter of data points at same frequencies) prevents us to make definite conclusions, we emphasize the possibility of spinning-dust emission detection towards this remnant. In addition, a concave-down feature, due to synchrotron losses, can not be definitely dismissed by the present knowledge of the integrated radio continuum spectrum of this SNR.

  2. Substructure in clusters containing wide-angle tailed radio galaxies. I. New redshifts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Pinkney; Jack O. Burns; Michael J. Ledlow; Percy L. Gomez; John M. Hill

    2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new redshifts and positions for 635 galaxies in nine rich clusters containing Wide-Angle Tailed (WAT) radio galaxies. Combined with existing data, we now have a sample of 18 WAT-containing clusters with more than 10 redshifts. This sample contains a substantial portion of the WAT clusters in the VLA 20 cm survey of Abell clusters, including 75% of WAT clusters in the complete survey (z0.09. It is a representative sample which should not contain biases other than selection by radio morphology. We graphically present the new data using histograms and sky maps. A semi-automated procedure is used to search for emission lines in the spectra in order to add and verify galaxy redshifts. We find that the average apparent fraction of emission line galaxies is about 9% in both the clusters and the field. We investigate the magnitude completeness of our redshift surveys with CCD data for a test case, Abell 690. This case indicates that our galaxy target lists are deeper than the detection limit of a typical MX exposure, and they are 82% complete down to R=19.0. The importance of the uniformity of the placement of fibers on targets is posited, and we evaluate this in our datasets. We find some cases of non-uniformities which may influence dynamical analyses. A second paper will use this database to look for correlations between the WAT radio morphology and the cluster's dynamical state.

  3. VLBI AND ARCHIVAL VLA AND WSRT OBSERVATIONS OF THE GRB 030329 RADIO AFTERGLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesler, Robert A.; Pihlstroem, Ylva M.; Taylor, Greg B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Granot, Johnathan, E-mail: meslerra@unm.edu [Centre for Astrophysics Research, Science and Technology Research Institute, University of Hertfordshire, College Lane, Hatfield AL10 9AB (United Kingdom)

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present VLBI and archival Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) observations of the radio afterglow from the gamma-ray burst (GRB) of 2003 March 29 (GRB 030329) taken between 672 and 2032 days after the burst. The VLA and WSRT data suggest a simple power-law decay in the flux at 5 GHz, with no clear signature of any rebrightening from the counterjet. We report an unresolved source at day 2032 of size 1.18 {+-} 0.13 mas, which we use in conjunction with the expansion rate of the burst to argue for the presence of a uniform, interstellar-medium-like circumburst medium. A limit of <0.067 mas yr{sup -1} is placed on the proper motion, supporting the standard afterglow model for gamma-ray bursts.

  4. Modeling Bright Gamma-ray and Radio Emission at Fast Cloud Shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Shiu-Hang; Raymond, John C; Nagataki, Shigehiro; Slane, Patrick O; Ellison, Donald C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) onboard the Fermi satellite have revealed bright gamma-ray emission from middle-aged supernova remnants (SNRs) inside our Galaxy. These remnants, which also possess bright non-thermal radio shells, are often found to be interacting directly with surrounding gas clouds. We explore the non-thermal emission mechanism at these dynamically evolved SNRs by constructing a hydrodynamical model. Two scenarios of particle acceleration, either a re-acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) or an efficient nonlinear diffusive shock acceleration (NLDSA) of particles injected from downstream, are considered. Using parameters inferred from observations, our models are contrasted with the observed spectra of SNR W44. For the re-acceleration case, we predict a significant enhancement of radio and GeV emission as the SNR undergoes a transition into the radiative phase. If sufficiently strong magnetic turbulence is present in the molecular cloud, the re-acceleration scenari...

  5. An improved integrally formed radio frequency quadrupole

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbott, S.R.

    1987-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved radio frequency quadrupole is provided having an elongate housing with an elongate central axis and top, bottom and two side walls symmetrically disposed about the axis, and vanes formed integrally with the walls, the vanes each having a cross-section at right angles to the central axis which tapers inwardly toward the axis to form electrode tips spaced from each other by predetermined distances. Each of the four walls, and the vanes integral therewith, is a separate structural element having a central lengthwise plane passing through the tip of the vane, the walls having flat mounting surfaces at right angles to and parallel to the control plane, respectively, which are butted together to position the walls and vane tips relative to each other. 4 figs.

  6. Axion Stars and Fast Radio Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Iwazaki

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that fast radio bursts arise from collisions between axion stars and neutron stars. The bursts are emitted in the atmosphere of the neutron stars. The observed frequencies of the bursts are given by the axion mass $m_a$ such as $m_a/2\\pi\\simeq 1.4\\,\\mbox{GHz}\\,\\big(m_a/(6\\times 10^{-6}\\mbox{eV})\\big)$. From the event rate $\\sim 10^{-3}$ per year in a galaxy, we can determine the mass $\\sim 10^{-11}M_{\\odot}$ of the axion stars. Using these values we can explain short durations ( $\\sim $ms ) and amount of radiation energies ( $\\sim 10^{43}$GeV ) of the bursts.

  7. MicrobeWorld Radio and Communications Initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbara Hyde

    2006-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    MicrobeWorld is a 90-second feature broadcast daily on more than 90 public radio stations and available from several sources as a podcast, including www.microbeworld.org. The feature has a strong focus on the use and adapatbility of microbes as alternative sources of energy, in bioremediation, their role in climate, and especially the many benefits and scientific advances that have resulting from decoding microbial genomes. These audio features are permanantly archived on an educational outreach site, microbeworld.org, where they are linked to the National Science Education Standards. They are also being used by instructors at all levels to introduce students to the multiple roles and potential of microbes, including a pilot curriculum program for middle-school students in New York.

  8. Radio Triggered Star Formation in Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. R. McNamara

    1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The giant galaxies located at the centers of cluster cooling flows are frequently sites of vigorous star formation. In some instances, star formation appears to have been triggered by the galaxy's radio source. The colors and spectral indices of the young populations are generally consistent with short duration bursts or continuous star formation for durations much less than 1 Gyr, which is less than the presumed ages of cooling flows. The star formation properties are inconsistent with fueling by a continuously accreting cooling flow, although the prevalence of star formation is consistent with repeated bursts and periodic refueling. Star formation may be fueled, in some cases, by cold material stripped from neighboring cluster galaxies.

  9. The nature of extragalactic radio-jets from high-resolution radio-interferometric observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perucho, Manel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extragalactic jets are a common feature of radio-loud active galaxies. The nature of the observed jets in relation to the bulk flow is still unclear. In particular it is not clear whether the observations of parsec-scale jets using the very long baseline interferometric technique (VLBI) reveal wave-like structures that develop and propagate along the jet, or trace the jet flow itself. In this contribution I review the evidence collected during the last years showing that the ridge-lines of helical radio-jets do not correspond to observational artifacts. This conclusion was reached by studying a number of VLBI observations of the radio jet in the quasar S5~0836+710 at different frequencies and epochs. The ridge-line of the emission in the jet coincides at all frequencies within the errors. Moreover, small differences between the ridge-lines as observed at different epochs reveal wave-like motion transversal to the jet propagation axis. I also discuss similar results, albeit with different interpretations, obta...

  10. Enclosures STC Stakeholder Meeting Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation outlines the goals of the Enclosures Standing Technical Committee, as presented at the Building America Spring 2012 Stakeholder meeting on February 29, 2012, in Austin, Texas.

  11. On the Nature of Pulsar Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Lyutikov; Roger D. Blandford; George Machabeli

    1998-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A theory of pulsar radio emission generation, in which the observed waves are produced directly by maser-type plasma instabilities operating at the anomalous cyclotron-Cherenkov resonance $\\omega- k_{\\parallel} v_{\\parallel} + \\omega_B/ \\gamma_{res}=0$ and the Cherenkov-drift resonance $\\omega- k_{\\parallel} v_{\\parallel} - k_{\\perp} u_d =0$, is capable of explaining the main observational characteristics of pulsar radio emission. The instabilities are due to the interaction of the fast particles from the primary beam and the tail of the distribution with the normal modes of a strongly magnetized one-dimensional electron-positron plasma. The waves emitted at these resonances are vacuum-like, electromagnetic waves that may leave the magnetosphere directly. In this model, the cyclotron-Cherenkov instability is responsible for core emission pattern and the Cherenkov-drift instability produces conal emission. The conditions for the development of the cyclotron-Cherenkov instability are satisfied for both typical and millisecond pulsars provided that the streaming energy of the bulk plasma is not very high $\\gamma_p \\approx 10$. In a typical pulsar the cyclotron-Cherenkov and Cherenkov-drift resonances occur in the outer parts of magnetosphere at $r_{res} \\approx 10^9 cm$. This theory can account for various aspects of pulsar phenomenology including the morphology of the pulses, their polarization properties and their spectral behavior. We propose several observational tests for the theory. The most prominent prediction are the high altitudes of the emission region and the linear polarization of conal emission in the plane orthogonal to the local osculating plane of the magnetic field.

  12. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF MONICA MEDINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES June 18, 2009 Good morning Chairwoman Bordallo for action on many levels to address the competing uses and ecological challenges facing our oceans. The time

  13. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DAVID KENNEDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ON INSULAR AFFAIRS, OCEANS, AND WILDLIFE COMMITTEE ON NATURAL RESOURCES U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES October Sound resources as well as establish ecological forecasts to manage these resources more efficiently in the ecologically and economically sustainable use of Puget Sound's vast coastal resources. NOAA recognizes regional

  14. Testimony of Professor Raymond Fonck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in large part by completing existing programs. Strategic plans for the evolving program need to assist the start of necessary transformations in the program. Progress in Plasma Sciences Motivates a New and stars. Developing fusion power in the laboratory truly means capturing the power of the #12

  15. TESTIMONY OF ROGER S. PULWARTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and services NOAA provides to improve management of sectors of our economy - including energy, agriculture in 2006 and for inviting me to provide the Committee with an update on the Program. It is an honor

  16. Testimony of Allan H. Dobrin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brinkmann, Peter

    on campus, placing "Cover Your Cough/Wash Your Hands" posters in prominent places and in every bathroom

  17. TESTIMONY OF KATHRYN D. SULLIVAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    happy to have the support of my friends and family that are here with me today. Also with me in spirit family moved to California, and the open spaces of the San Fernando Valley became my playground. Our

  18. WRITTEN TESTIMONY OF DONNA WIETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are Listed or Delisted Any individual or organization may petition NMFS or USFWS to "list" a species under. In that instance, the statutory time frames described above do not apply. The same process applies for delisting and delisting decisions b

  19. Testimony of Charles H. Romine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management systems, protect privacy, and assure that U.S. interests are represented in the international before you today to discuss our role in standards and testing for biometrics and identity management measurement science, standards, and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality

  20. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex Flow WorkshopInformation Resources »ResourcesMayMay

  1. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex Flow WorkshopInformation Resources

  2. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex Flow WorkshopInformation ResourcesOctober 21, 2009

  3. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex Flow WorkshopInformation ResourcesOctober 21,

  4. Final_Testimony(2).pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers New Training on Energy6 FederalofE: Bibliography of(PEIS) |Department

  5. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete Company Moving

  6. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete Company MovingSeptember 17,

  7. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete Company MovingSeptember

  8. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete Company MovingSeptemberApril

  9. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete Company

  10. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete CompanyDecember 8, 2011

  11. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete CompanyDecember 8, 2011May

  12. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete CompanyDecember 8, 2011May3,

  13. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete CompanyDecember 8,

  14. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete CompanyDecember 8,About Us »

  15. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsNovember 13, 2014 BuildingEnergyEnergy Concrete CompanyDecember 8,About Us

  16. Final_Poneman_Testimony.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K. Der ActingDaniel

  17. Final_Testimony(19).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K. Der

  18. Final_Testimony(20).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K. DerMatt Rogers1 1

  19. Final_Testimony(21).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K. DerMatt Rogers1

  20. Final_Testimony(22).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K. DerMatt

  1. Final_Testimony(26).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K. DerMattNATURAL

  2. Final_Testimony(6).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K. DerMattNATURAL

  3. Final_Testimony_(Chalk).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K. DerMattNATURAL

  4. Final_Testimony_(Isakowitz).pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K. DerMattNATURALSteve

  5. Final_Testimony_JSilver.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K.Committee onJonathan

  6. Final_Testimony_MKane.pdf

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440 FINALby Victor K.Committee

  7. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submitCollector/ReceiverConflict Between EconomicWorking with Us

  8. Pete_Lyons_Nomination_Testimony

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in235-1 TermoelectricaPavingPerry Luksin About UsPerspectives on

  9. Partner Testimonials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomassPPPO WebsitePalms Village Resort BParticleParticlesPartner

  10. Worker Testimonials | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of EnergyThePatricia Hoffman is theDr.Ulrike1,AprilJune

  11. Congressional Testimony | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center HomeIdleBiological ScienceCareersCommunity andWorking with Us »

  12. Microsoft Word - ML Final Testimony

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,Official File UnitedTo UnitedDocument To:MAGNA111 WilsonMichael

  13. Wind Integration Study Methods (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of common elements, differences, integration costs, and errors in integration analysis.

  14. Reliability of Electrical Interconnects (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devoto, D.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the status of NREL's research on the reliability of electrical interconnects.

  15. BEST OFFER EVER ACCELERATED TEXAS UPGRADES | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    combination of radio, newspaper, and online advertisements; mass mailings; testimonial videos; features on its website; and outreach at local events to publicize the Best Offer...

  16. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, D.J.; Kimrey, H.D. Jr.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents. 6 figures.

  17. Method and apparatus for radio frequency ceramic sintering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Daniel J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kimrey, Jr., Harold D. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio frequency energy is used to sinter ceramic materials. A coaxial waveguide resonator produces a TEM mode wave which generates a high field capacitive region in which a sample of the ceramic material is located. Frequency of the power source is kept in the range of radio frequency, and preferably between 60-80 MHz. An alternative embodiment provides a tunable radio frequency circuit which includes a series input capacitor and a parallel capacitor, with the sintered ceramic connected by an inductive lead. This arrangement permits matching of impedance over a wide range of dielectric constants, ceramic volumes, and loss tangents.

  18. High-power radio-frequency attenuation device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, Q.A.; Miller, H.W.

    1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A resistor device for attenuating radio frequency power includes a radio frequency conductor connected to a series of fins formed of high relative magnetic permeability material. The fins are dimensional to accommodate the skin depth of the current conduction therethrough, as well as an inner heat conducting portion where current does not travel. Thermal connections for air or water cooling are provided for the inner heat conducting portions of each fin. Also disclosed is a resistor device to selectively alternate unwanted radio frequency energy in a resonant cavity.

  19. A Stream-Based Configurable Computing Radio Testbed Steve Swanchara, Scott Harper, and Peter Athanas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based CCM soft radio consisting of a variety of FPGAs, memories, and a programmable radio interface, providing a pathway from antenna to wired network. CCM techniques are well suited for the computations to a production radio is not always apparent. A CCM-based soft radio can exploit the data flow nature

  20. 4.1.2.8 Radio bursts of the nonthermal sun Arnold O. Benz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    4.1.2.8 Radio bursts of the non­thermal sun Arnold O. Benz The time scale of the radio flux. The dis­ tinctions and classifications by radio astronomers should not be considered as se­ mantic described in the previous chap­ ter. 1 Solar radio bursts Enhancements shorter than about one hour form

  1. THE UV/RADIO CORRELATION OF QUASARS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR UNIFIED SCHEMES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falcke, Heino

    THE UV/RADIO CORRELATION OF QUASARS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR UNIFIED SCHEMES. HEINO FALCKE of the UV/radio correlations [4] of quasars and the difference between FR I and FR II radio galaxies [3]. 2. The UV/radio correlation for quasars If there is a closely coupled jet/disk system in AGN we would expect

  2. Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Terwilliger, K M

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Suppression of radio frequency knock out in stacked beams by phase shifting the betatron oscillations

  3. 34 GPS World July 2001 www.gpsworld.com radio occultation, the tangency point of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and scans the atmospher- ic layers at Earth's limb from the ionosphere to the surface. When the radio ray Plasma Irregularities Klemens Hocke and Toshitaka Tsuda Kyoto University, Radio Science Center for Space been a professor of Radio Atmospheric Sciences at the Radio Science Center for Space and Atmosphere

  4. A multi-wavelength investigation of the radio-loud supernova PTF11qcj and its circumstellar environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corsi, A. [Department of Physics, The George Washington University, 725 21st St, NW, Washington, DC 20052 (United States); Ofek, E. O.; Gal-Yam, A.; Xu, D. [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Frail, D. A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Kulkarni, S. R.; Horesh, A.; Carpenter, J.; Arcavi, I.; Cao, Y.; Mooley, K.; Sesar, B. [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Fox, D. B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Kasliwal, M. M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sullivan, M.; Maguire, K.; Pan, Y.-C. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. B. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 685, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Sternberg, A. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Astrophysik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Bersier, D., E-mail: corsi@gwu.edu [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the discovery, classification, and extensive panchromatic (from radio to X-ray) follow-up observations of PTF11qcj, a supernova (SN) discovered by the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF). Our observations with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array show that this event is radio-loud: PTF11qcj reached a radio peak luminosity comparable to that of the famous gamma-ray-burst-associated SN 1998bw (L {sub 5} {sub GHz} ? 10{sup 29} erg s{sup –1} Hz{sup –1}). PTF11qcj is also detected in X-rays with the Chandra Observatory, and in the infrared band with Spitzer. Our multi-wavelength analysis probes the SN interaction with circumstellar material. The radio observations suggest a progenitor mass-loss rate of ?10{sup –4} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} × (v{sub w} /1000 km s{sup –1}), and a velocity of ?0.3-0.5 c for the fastest moving ejecta (at ?10 days after explosion). However, these estimates are derived assuming the simplest model of SN ejecta interacting with a smooth circumstellar wind, and do not account for possible inhomogeneities in the medium and asphericity of the explosion. The radio data show deviations from such a simple model, as well as a late-time re-brightening. The X-ray flux from PTF11qcj is compatible with the high-frequency extrapolation of the radio synchrotron emission (within the large uncertainties). A light echo from pre-existing dust is in agreement with our infrared data. Our pre-explosion data from the PTF suggest that a precursor eruption of absolute magnitude M{sub r} ? –13 mag may have occurred ?2.5 yr prior to the SN explosion. Overall, PTF11qcj fits the expectations from the explosion of a Wolf-Rayet star. Precursor eruptions may be a feature characterizing the final pre-explosion evolution of such stars.

  5. Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Presents Annual Merit Review Awards |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department ofOral TestimonyEnergy Hydrogen and Fuel

  6. On the origin of the jet-like radio/X-ray morphology of G290.1-0.8

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Federico; Albacete-Colombo, Juan F; Romero, Gustavo E; Bocchino, Fabrizio; López-Santiago, Javier

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin and evolution of supernova remnants of the mixed-morphology class is not well understood. Several remnants present distorted radio or X-ray shells with jet-like structures. G290.1-0.8 (MSH 11-61A) belongs to this class. We aim to investigate the nature of this supernova remnant in order to unveil the origin of its particular morphology. We based our work on the study of the X-ray emitting plasma properties and the conditions imposed by the cold interstellar medium where the remnant expanded. We use archival radio, HI line data and X-ray observations from XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories, to study G290.1-0.8 and its surrounding medium. Spatially resolved spectral analysis and mean photon energy maps are used to obtain physical and geometrical parameters of the source. Radio continuum and HI line maps give crucial information to understand the radio/X-ray morphology. The X-ray images show that the remnant presents two opposite symmetric bright spots on a symmetry axis running towards the NW-SE di...

  7. Renewable Resources for Hydrogen (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A. A.

    2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of renewable resources for hydrogen. It was presented at the National Hydrogen Association Hydrogen Conference & Expo in Long Beach, CA, May 3-6, 2010.

  8. Is J 133658.3-295105 a Radio Source at z >= 1.0 or at the Distance of M 83?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horacio Dottori; Ruben J. Diaz; Damian Mast

    2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Gemini optical imaging and spectroscopy of the radio source J 133658.3-295105. This source has been suggested to be the core of an FR II radio source with two detected lobes. J 133658.3-295105 and its lobes are aligned with the optical nucleus of M 83 and with three other radio sources at the M 83 bulge outer region. These radio sources are neither supernova remnants nor H II regions. This curious configuration prompted us to try to determine the distance to J 133658.3-295105. We detected H_alpha emission redshifted by ~ 130 km s^-1 with respect to an M 83 H II region 2.5" east-southeast of the radio source. We do not detect other redshifted emission lines of an optical counterpart down to m_i = 22.2 +/- 0.8. Two different scenarios are proposed: the radio source is at z >= 2.5, a much larger distance than the previously proposed lower limit z >= 1.0, or the object was ejected by a gravitational recoil event from the M 83 nucleus. This nucleus is undergoing a strong dynamical evolution, judging from previous three-dimensional spectroscopy.

  9. Throughput Analysis of Wireless Ad-Hoc Cognitive Radio Networks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaei, Armin

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation we consider the throughput performance of cognitive radio networks and derive the optimal sensing and access schemes for secondary users that maximizes their sum-throughput while guaranteeing certain ...

  10. Radio-loud high-redshift protogalaxy canidates in Bootes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croft, S; van Breugel, W; Brown, M J; de Vries, W; Dey, A; Eisenhardt, P; Jannuzi, B; Rottgering, H; Stanford, S A; Stern, D; Willner, S P

    2007-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We used the Near Infrared Camera (NIRC) on Keck I to obtain K{sub s}-band images of four candidate high-redshift radio galaxies selected using optical and radio data in the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey in Bootes. Our targets have 1.4 GHz radio flux densities greater than 1 mJy, but are undetected in the optical. Spectral energy distribution fitting suggests that three of these objects are at z > 3, with radio luminosities near the FR-I/FR-II break. The other has photometric redshift z{sub phot} = 1.2, but may in fact be at higher redshift. Two of the four objects exhibit diffuse morphologies in K{sub s}-band, suggesting that they are still in the process of forming.

  11. Radio frequency identification (RFID) applications in semiconductor manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassett, David Ian, 1971-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) has an enormous potential impact within the semiconductor supply chain, especially within semiconductor manufacturing. The end benefit of RFID will be in the mass serialization, and ...

  12. Enhancing the energy efficiency of radio base stations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holtkamp, Hauke Andreas

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is concerned with the energy efficiency of cellular networks. It studies the dominant power consumer in future cellular networks, the Long Term Evolution (LTE) radio Base Station (BS), and proposes mechanisms ...

  13. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Elec-xonics Division Internal Report 140 MV The battery voltage as a function of temperature was also measured. The voltage was extremely

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report with the calculator. It is constructed from CMOS logic for lowest power consumption and has a NiCad battery back

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report an opposition battery, a DC Null Voltmeter and a recorder. With this set-up a variation in temperature of .02 °C

  16. Numerical modelling of a radio-frequency micro ion thruster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsay, Michael Meng-Tsuan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple performance model is developed for an inductively-coupled radio-frequency micro ion thruster. Methods of particle and energy balance are utilized for modeling the chamber plasma discharge. A transformer model is ...

  17. Circuits and passive components for radio-frequency power conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Yehui, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on developing technology for high efficiency power converters operating at very high frequencies. The work in the thesis involves two aspects of such converters: rf (radio-frequency) power circuit design ...

  18. Performance Analysis of Dispersed Spectrum Cognitive Radio Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad, Muneer

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    probability of dispersed spectrum cognitive radio systems is derived for two cases: where each channel realization experiences independent and dependent Nakagami-m fading, respectively. In addition, the derivation is extended to include the effects...

  19. Throughput Analysis of Wireless Ad-Hoc Cognitive Radio Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banaei, Armin

    2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this dissertation we consider the throughput performance of cognitive radio networks and derive the optimal sensing and access schemes for secondary users that maximizes their sum-throughput while guaranteeing certain quality of service...

  20. NIST Presents Green Button: Intro

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Wollman, David

    2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Part 1/3 of NIST's presentation about the Green Button program. Slides available at http://energy.gov/developer.