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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Existing and Past Methods of Test and Rating Standards Related to Integrated Heat Pump Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report evaluates existing and past US methods of test and rating standards related to electrically operated air, water, and ground source air conditioners and heat pumps, 65,000 Btu/hr and under in capacity, that potentiality incorporate a potable water heating function. Two AHRI (formerly ARI) standards and three DOE waivers were identified as directly related. Six other AHRI standards related to the test and rating of base units were identified as of interest, as they would form the basis of any new comprehensive test procedure. Numerous other AHRI and ASHRAE component test standards were also identified as perhaps being of help in developing a comprehensive test procedure.

Reedy, Wayne R. [Sentech, Inc.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Heat Rate Program Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant facilities with performance or heat rate improvement programs perform better than those that do not have those programs. A heat rate improvement program typically provides sufficient information for decision making with respect to timely maintenance actions and/or operational adjustments. Monitoring the performance of any power plant component includes the trending of parameters that also describe the performance of other plant components, providing insight and information on improving ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

2011 Heat Rate Improvement Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rising cost of fuel and the strong possibility of CO2 emissions regulations and limitations in the near future, utilities and power generation companies are focusing on power plant heat rate and performance. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) 17th Heat Rate Improvement Conference is the latest in a series of meetings designed to assist attendees in addressing problems with power plant performance and in identifying cost-effective solutions for achieving and sustaining heat rate improve...

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

ARM - Measurement - Radiative heating rate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate govMeasurementsRadiative heating rate ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Radiative heating rate The heating rate due to the divergence of long and shortwave radiative flux. Categories Radiometric, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTS : Model Output Location Time Series Datastreams MOLTSEDASSNDCLASS1 : Model Output Loc. Time Ser. (MOLTS): EDAS

5

Heat Rate Improvement Reference Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance optimization of fossil power plants is a high priority within the electric utilities in the new competitive environment. This manual can help utility engineers establish a heat rate improvement program.

1998-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

6

Heat pipe testing program test plan  

SciTech Connect

A test plan is given which describes the tests to be conducted on several typical solar receiver heat pipes. The hardware to be used, test fixtures and rationale of the test program are discussed. The program objective is to perform life testing under simulated receiver conditions, and to conduct performance tests with selected heat pipes to further map their performance, particularly with regard to their transient behavior. Performance requirements are defined. Test fixtures designed for the program are described in detail, and their capabilities for simulating the receiver conditions and their limitations are discussed. The heat pipe design is given. (LEW)

Bienert, W.B.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

7

EPRI's Twelfth Heat Rate Improvement Conference Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Twelfth Heat Rate Improvement Conference, sponsored by EPRI's Heat Rate and Cost Optimization Value Package, is the latest in a series of meetings designed to assist utilities in addressing problems with power plant performance and in identifying cost-effective solutions for achieving and maintaining heat rate improvement. The last conference was held in Baltimore in September 1998.

2001-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

A Test of a Lapse Rate/Wind Speed Model for Estimating Heat Island Magnitude in an Urban Airshed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the winter of 1975/76 a helicopter was used to obtain temperature profiles across the city of Calgary. This operation was supported by airborne measurements of wind speed and lapse rate at the edge of the city, upwind. Regression analysis ...

Lawrence C. Nkemdirim

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Testing and analysis of immersed heat exchangers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives were to determine the performance of four immersed, ''supply-side'' heat exchangers used in solar domestic-hot-water systems; to examine the effects of flow rate, temperature difference, and coil configuration on performance; and to develop a simple model to predict the performance of immersed heat exchangers. We tested four immersed heat exchangers: a smooth coil, a finned spiral, a single-wall bayonet, and a double-wall bayonet. We developed two analyticl models and a simple finite difference model. We experimentally verified that the performance of these heat exchangers depends on the flow rate through them; we also showed that the temperature difference between the heat exchanger's inlet and the storage tank can strongly affect a heat exchanger's performance. We also compared the effects of the heat exchanger's configuration and correlated Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for each heat exchanger tested. The smooth coil had a higher effectiveness than the others, while the double-wall bayonet had a very low effectiveness. We still do not know the long-term effectiveness of heat exchangers regarding scale accumulation, nor do we know the effects of very low flow rates on a heat exchanger's performance.

Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

2007 EPRI Heat Rate Improvement Conference Proceedings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the rising cost of fuel and the growing possibility of carbon taxes in the not-too-distant future, utilities are once again focusing on the heat rate and performance of coal-fired power plants. The fifteenth Heat Rate Improvement Conference is the latest in this series of meetings designed to assist utilities in addressing problems with power plant performance and in identifying cost-effective solutions for achieving and maintaining heat rate improvement.

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

11

Proceedings 2013 Heat Rate Improvement Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the rising cost of fuel and the strong possibility of CO2 emissions regulations and limitations in the near future, utilities and power generation companies are focusing on power plant heat rate and performance. The 18th Heat Rate Improvement Conference is the latest in a series of meetings designed to assist attendees in addressing problems with power plant performance and identifying cost-effective solutions for achieving and sustaining heat rate ...

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

12

Navy Heat Source Safety Tests  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of these tests was to validate the integrity of the Navy Heat Source after imposing conditions which might, in the extreme, be encountered singly or serially so that safety would be assured.

Anderson, C. G.; Cartmill, W. B.

1975-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

13

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, R.E.; Doman, M.J.; Wilson, E.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, R.E.; Doman, M.J.; Wilson, E.C.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers Begins. The Net-Zero house features a geothermal heat pump ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Heating Rate Profiles in Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years evidence has accumulated suggesting that the gas in galaxy clusters is heated by non-gravitational processes. Here we calculate the heating rates required to maintain a physically motived mass flow rate, in a sample of seven galaxy clusters. We employ the spectroscopic mass deposition rates as an observational input along with temperature and density data for each cluster. On energetic grounds we find that thermal conduction could provide the necessary heating for A2199, Perseus, A1795 and A478. However, the suppression factor, of the clasical Spitzer value, is a different function of radius for each cluster. Based on the observations of plasma bubbles we also calculate the duty cycles for each AGN, in the absence of thermal conduction, which can provide the required energy input. With the exception of Hydra-A it appears that each of the other AGNs in our sample require duty cycles of roughly $10^{6}-10^{7}$ yrs to provide their steady-state heating requirements. If these duty cycles are unrealistic, this may imply that many galaxy clusters must be heated by very powerful Hydra-A type events interspersed between more frequent smaller-scale outbursts. The suppression factors for the thermal conductivity required for combined heating by AGN and thermal conduction are generally acceptable. However, these suppression factors still require `fine-tuning` of the thermal conductivity as a function of radius. As a consequence of this work we present the AGN duty cycle as a cooling flow diagnostic.

Edward C. D. Pope; Georgi Pavlovski; Christian R. Kaiser; Hans Fangohr

2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

17

Property:HeatRate | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HeatRate HeatRate Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "HeatRate" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AES Mendota Biomass Facility + 17,873.6 + APS Biomass I Biomass Facility + 8,911 + Acme Landfill Biomass Facility + 12,916.67 + Adrian Energy Associates LLC Biomass Facility + 13,170.6 + Agrilectric Power Partners Ltd Biomass Facility + 17,327.1 + Al Turi Biomass Facility + 15,600.2 + Alabama Pine Pulp Biomass Facility + 15,826.23 + Albany Landfill Gas Utilization Project Biomass Facility + 11,913.9 + Altamont Gas Recovery Biomass Facility + 10,500 + American Canyon Power Plant Biomass Facility + 10,886.8 + American Ref-Fuel of Delaware Valley Biomass Facility + 18,674.9 +

18

Radiative Heating Rates for Saharan Dust  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined longwave and shortwave radiative transfer model was used to determine effects of Saharan dust on the radiative fluxes and heating/cooling rates in the atmosphere. Cases are treated for cloud-free and overcast conditions over the ocean ...

Toby N. Carlson; Stanley G. Benjamin

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

NBSBR 84-2867 Test Procedures for Rating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NBSBR 84-2867 Test Procedures for Rating Residential Heating and Cooling Absorption Equipment U HEATING AND COOLING ABSORPTION EQUIPMENT Brian Weber Reinhard Radermacher David Didion U.S. DEPARTMENT-fired absorption devices operating in either the heating or cooling modes. These procedures are designed to include

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

20

Self-consistent microwave plasma heating rates  

SciTech Connect

Under conditions within a hot overdense plasma corona where the field frequency is much less than the electron plasma frequency and the field period is much less than the hydrodynamic expansion time it is shown that electron field reversal heating can exceed the combined classical heating rates due to inverse bremsstrahlung (skin effect) and field pressure (PdV) by a factor approximately v/ sub e//2v/sub i/ (half the ratio of electron and ion thermal velocities). In particular this rate can exceed the inertial expansion cooling rate at a collisionless corona density of approximately 1 percent solid core density and could be realized experimentally at core temperatures approximately 3--5 keV and microwave field intensities approximately 1 MG. (auth)

Ensley, D.L.; White, R.H.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Design and demonstration of heat pipe cooling for NASP and evaluation of heating methods at high heating rates  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation of two heating methods for demonstration of NASP leading edge heat pipe technology was conducted. The heating methods were and rf induction heated plasma jet and direct rf induction. Tests were conducted to determine coupling from the argon plasma jet on a surface physically similar to a heat pipe. A molybdenum tipped calorimeter was fabricated and installed in an rf induction heated plasma jet for the test. The calorimetric measurements indicated a maximum power coupling of approximately 500 W/cm{sup 2} with the rf plasma jet. The effect of change in gas composition on the heating rate was investigated using helium. An alternative to the plasma heating of a heat pipe tip, an rf concentrator was evaluated for coupling to the hemispherical tip of a heat pipe. A refractory metal heat pipe was designed, fabricated, and tested for the evaluation. The heat pipe was designed for operation at 1400 to 1900 K with power input to 1000 W/cm{sup 2} over a hemispherical nose tip. Power input of 800 W/cm{sup 2} was demonstrated using the rf concentrator. 2 refs., 13 figs.

Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

DWPF Macrobatch 2 Melt Rate Tests  

SciTech Connect

The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) canister production rate must be increased to meet canister production goals. Although a number of factors exist that could potentially increase melt rate, this study focused on two: (1) changes in frit composition and (2) changes to the feed preparation process to alter the redox of the melter feed. These two factors were investigated for Macrobatch 2 (sludge batch 1B) utilizing crucible studies and a specially designed ''melt rate'' furnace. Other potential factors that could increase melt rate include: mechanical mixing via stirring or the use of bubblers, changing the power skewing to redistribute the power input to the melter, and elimination of heat loss (e.g. air in leakage). The melt rate testing in FY00 demonstrated that melt rate can be improved by adding a different frit or producing a much more reducing glass by the addition of sugar as a reductant. The frit that melted the fastest in the melt rate testing was Frit 165. A paper stud y was performed using the Product Composition Control System (PCCS) to determine the impact on predicted glass viscosity, liquidus, durability, and operating window if the frit was changed from Frit 200 to Frit 165. PCCS indicated that the window was very similar for both frits. In addition, the predicted viscosity of the frit 165 glass was 46 poise versus 84 poise for the Frit 200 glass. As a result, a change from Frit 200 to Frit 165 is expected to increase the melt rate in DWPF without decreasing waste loading.

Stone, M.E.

2001-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

23

MGCR HEAT EXCHANGER TEST PROGRAM. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Maritime Gas-cooled Reactor (MGCR) project has conipleted the study and design of a closed-cycle gasturbine propulsion plant utilizing a helium- cooled nuclear reactor as the heat source. The cycle employs a counterflow shell- and-tube regenerator to attain a high thermodynamic cycle efficiency. A heat exchanger test program was conducted to compile and correlate sufficient experimental data for the aerodynamic and thermal design of the prototype regenerator. The model heat exchanger was similar in configaration to the prototype unit. The pressure-drop and heat-transfer performance of a compact parallel-flow tube bundle is given hoth in the unsupported configuration and with airfoil-shaped tube supports distributed along the bundle. The Fanning friction factor with the airfoil-shaped supports is approximately 70% greater than for the unsupported tube configuration. The airfoil supports effect a 40% increase in Colburn's heat transfer factor, j, over the unsupported configuration. Determinations of the unsupported-tube values of friction factor and Colburn-j agreed well with the literature. A section is devoted to the application of these data to the design of exchangers. The correlated data, representing some 1200 individual runs, cover a range of Reynolds number from 10,000 to 500,000. The moderate pressure-drop increment due to the airfoil-shaped supports, in conjunction with the favorable increase in heat-transfer rate, becomes especially important in the design of compact gas-to-gas heat exchangers with very low friction pressure losses. The concluding section of the report compares the size, weight, and cost of conventional baffled-shell units and the MGCR design for the requirements of the MGCR cycle. The MGCR design was one-fifth the volume, one-fourth the weight, and one-third the cost of comparable baffled-shell units. (auth)

Paulson, H.C. II

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

High Heating Rate Thermal Desorption for Molecular Surface ...  

High Heating Rate Thermal Desorption for Molecular Surface Sampling Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity. Licensing ...

25

Heat Pump Water Heaters—Laboratory Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI conducted laboratory tests of several heat pump water heaters to assess their performance and energy efficiency. Among U.S. heat pump water heaters tested were new products from A. O. Smith, General Electric (GE), and Rheem. These units are designed to be integral, drop-in replacements for standard electric water heaters. Additionally, EPRI tested the Japanese-based Eco-cute heat pump water heater from Daikin, which is a split unit with an outdoor heat pump using CO2 as the refrigerant and an indoor...

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

Table A6. Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity, and Heat Content ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State energy information, detailed and overviews. Maps. ... Table A6. Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity, and Heat Content of Electricity, 1949-2011

27

Service Water Heat Exchanger Testing Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report will assist the Service Water Heat Exchanger (SWHX) test engineer in designing specific test methods which define and constrain the analysis, operational and measurement strategies for each specific SWHX application. The resulting test methods will provide the necessary assurance that the results of tests are sufficiently representative of the true capability of the SWHX.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Evaluation of Methodologies for Real-Time Incremental Heat Rate Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduced staffing, tighter budgets, ISOs, and increased competition have created the need for maintaining up-to-date incremental heat rate information. Combining recent advances in analytics with modern performance monitoring packages and data historians may provide the capability for closer-to-real-time incremental heat rate determination. Many power generating companies either rely on historic data or slow and labor intensive testing to establish incremental heat rate curves. Those curves are ...

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Rainfall and Radiative Heating Rates from TOGA COARE Atmospheric Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric heat and moisture budgets are used to determine rainfall and radiative heating rates over the western Pacific warm pool during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE). Results are ...

Richard H. Johnson; Paul E. Ciesielski

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Evaluation of Peak Heat Release Rates in Electrical Cabinet Fires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to reanalyze the peak heat release rates (HRRs) from fires occurring in electrical cabinets of nuclear power plants.

2012-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

31

Microbase Cloud Products and Associated Heating Rates in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microbase Cloud Products and Associated Heating Rates in the Tropical Western Pacific J. H. Mather and S. A. McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington...

32

Geothermal field tests: heat exchanger evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the heat exchanger tests conducted on a scale model of a heat exchanger that has been designed and fabricated for the Geothermal Test Facility show that this exchanger will lose 60% of its heat transfer capability and fall below design requirements after 92 hours of operation. When the test exchanger was clean and operating as close as possible to design conditions, its overall heat transfer coefficient was 426 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f. when calculating in the fouling factor of .0035 this gave a design coefficient of 171 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f which was reached after less than four days of steady state operation. Thermal shocking of the test heat exchanger once each hour while the exchanger was operating at design conditions had no effect on scale removal or heat transfer. Results of tube cleaning showed that chemical treatment with 30% hydrochloric acid followed by a high pressure water jet (6000 psig), was effective in removing scale from tubes contacted with geothermal brine. After cleaning, the tubes were examined and some pitting was observed throughout the length of one tube.

Felsinger, D.E.

1973-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Niobium 1% zirconium/potassium and titanium/potassium life-test heat pipe design and testing  

SciTech Connect

Experimental lifetime performance studies currently in progress use Niobium-1% Zirconium (Nb-1Zr) and Titanium (Ti) heat pipes with potassium (K) as the working fluid. A heat pipe life-test matrix has been developed for testing the heat pipes. Because the corrosion rates in alkali metal heat pipes are affected by temperature and working fluid evaporation flux, the variable parameters of the experimental matrix are established as steady operating temperature and input heat flux density. Total impurity inventory is a factor in corrosion rate so impurity levels are being evaluated in the heat pipe materials before and after testing. Eight Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two of the heat pipes have completed testing whereas the other six are currently in test. These are gravity-assist heat pipes operating in a reflux mode. The heat pipes are tested by sets, one set of two and two sets of three heat pipes. Three Ti/K heat pipes are also in life test. These heat pipes are tested as a set in a horizontal position in a capillary pumped annular flow mode. Each of the heat pipes is encapsulated in a quartz vacuum container with a water calorimeter over the vacuum container for power throughput measurements. Thermocouples are attached to the heat pipes for measuring temperature. Heat input to the heat pipes is via an rf coil. The heat pipes are operating at between 800 and 900 K, with heat input fluxes of 13.8 to 30 W/sq cm. Of the Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes, two of the heat pipes have been in operation for 14,000 hours, three over 10,000 hours, and three over 7,000 hours. The Ti/K heat pipes have been in operation for 1,266 hours. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

User’s Guide for Getter Rate Test System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This User’s Guide describes the operation and maintenance of the Getter Rate Test System, including the mechanical equipment, instrumentation, and datalogger/computer components. The Getter Rate Test System includes equipment and instrumentation to conduct two getter rate tests simultaneously. The mechanical equipment comprises roughing and high-vacuum pumps, heated test chambers, standard hydrogen leaks, and associated piping and valves. Instrumentation includes thermocouples, pressure (vacuum) transducers, panel displays, analog-to-digital signal converter, and associated wiring. The datalogger/computer is a stand-alone computer with installed software to allow the user to record data input from the pressure transducers to data files and to calculate the getter rate from the data in an Excel® spreadsheet.

Elmore, Monte R.

2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

35

Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pump  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrated Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) Wayne Reedy Oak Ridge National Laboratory wreedy2@comcast.net 574-583-5487 April 2, 2013 Develop Standard Method of Test (MOT) for IHP 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * IHP → ≥50% savings in energy used for space conditioning and water heating - C. K. Rice, V. D. Baxter, S. A. Hern, T. P. McDowell, J. D. Munk, and B. Shen, 2013. "Development of a Residential Ground- Source Integrated Heat Pump", 2013 ASHRAE Winter Conference Paper, Dallas, TX., January. * No generally accepted MOT or rating standard exists

36

Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pump  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Integrated Integrated Heat Pump (IHP) Wayne Reedy Oak Ridge National Laboratory wreedy2@comcast.net 574-583-5487 April 2, 2013 Develop Standard Method of Test (MOT) for IHP 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: * IHP → ≥50% savings in energy used for space conditioning and water heating - C. K. Rice, V. D. Baxter, S. A. Hern, T. P. McDowell, J. D. Munk, and B. Shen, 2013. "Development of a Residential Ground- Source Integrated Heat Pump", 2013 ASHRAE Winter Conference Paper, Dallas, TX., January. * No generally accepted MOT or rating standard exists

37

PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS: TEST METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presenting Test Results Heat Exchanger Descriptions and Testof Residential Heat Exchangers Conclusions . . . . . . . .ventilation testing heat exchangers. system, a heat

Fisk, William J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

ARM - Evaluation Product - Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project ProductsBroadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Broadband Heating Rate Profile Project (BBHRP) 2000.03.01 - 2006.02.28 Site(s) SGP General Description The objective of the ARM Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) Project is to provide a structure for the comprehensive assessment of our ability to model atmospheric radiative transfer for all conditions. Required inputs to BBHRP include surface albedo and profiles of atmospheric state (temperature, humidity), gas concentrations, aerosol properties, and cloud properties. In the past year, the Radiatively Important Parameters Best Estimate (RIPBE) VAP was developed to combine all of the input properties

39

Solar Heating Rates: The Importance of Spherical Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A crucial component of any GCM is a scheme for calculating atmospheric heating rates. Since a detailed treatment of all processes involved is time consuming, many approximations are usually made. An approximation used in virtually all GCM ...

D. J. Lary; M. Balluch

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Radiative Heating and Cooling Rates in the Middle Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the limitations to the accurate calculation of radiative heating and cooling rates in the stratosphere and mesosphere has been the lack of accurate data on the atmospheric temperature and composition. Data from the LIMS experiment on ...

John C. Gille; Lawrence V. Lyjak

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Evaluation of Methodologies to Provide Comparative Heat Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power generating companiesand even more so, their coal-fired facilitieshave struggled with the comparison of heat rate values from different periods of time. Comparing a unit's July heat rate to that recorded in January has been difficult because of several factors. First, the ambient temperatures are significantly different and manifest in operational and performance changes whose adjustments, although understood, contain uncertainty. The additional effects of variations in capacity and load following f...

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

42

Evaluation of Fuel Quality Impacts on Heat Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drive to leverage fuel switching to meet more stringent SO2 and NOX emissions requirements has led to both a reduction in power station efficiency and a poorer net plant heat rate (NPHR) in many cases. The root causes include higher fuel moisture content, lower fuel energy content, poorer combustion efficiency, increased station service, and decreased unit capability. This report demonstrates the sensitivity of the key metrics of power station efficiency and heat rate to coal quality parameters, vari...

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

43

Turbine Cycle Heat Rate Monitoring: Technology and Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research has been completed on available technology for monitoring turbine cycle heat rate and factors affecting the successful deployment of this technology in fossil generating plants. Information has been gathered from interviews with experienced industry plant staff and vendors. Trends were noted and are described in this report. The report is recommended as guidance for power generation fleets and individual plants seeking to establish a successful program for heat rate reduction.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF PULVERIZED COAL  

SciTech Connect

This final technical report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period September 24, 1996 to September 23, 1999 which covers the entire performance period of the project. During this period, modification, alignment, and calibration of the measurement system, measurement of devolatilization time-scales for single coal particles subjected to a range of heating rates and temperature data at these time-scales, and analysis of the temperature data to understand the effect of heating rates on coal thermal properties were carried out. A new thermodynamic model was developed to predict the heat transfer behavior for single coal particles using one approach based on the analogy for thermal property of polymers. Results of this model suggest that bituminous coal particles behave like polymers during rapid heating on the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} K/s. At these heating rates during the early stages of heating, the vibrational part of the heat capacity of the coal molecules appears to be still frozen but during the transition from heat-up to devolatilization, the heat capacity appears to attain a sudden jump in its value as in the case of polymers. There are a few data available in the coal literature for low heating rate experiments (10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} K/s) conducted by UTRC, our industrial partner, in this project. These data were obtained for a longer heating duration on the order of several seconds as opposed to the 10 milliseconds heating time of the single particle experiments discussed above. The polymer analogy model was modified to include longer heating time on the order of several seconds to test these data. However, the model failed to predict these low heating rate data. It should be noted that UTRC's work showed reasonably good agreement with Merrick model heat capacity predictions at these low heating rates, but at higher heating rates UTRC observed that coal thermal response was heat flux dependent. It is concluded that at combustion level heating rates (10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} K/s) coal structural changes are delayed and attendant increases in heat capacity and thermal conductivity are pushed to higher temperatures or require significant hold times to become manifest.

Ramanathan Sampath

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The broad objective of this project is to obtain improved, quantitative understanding of the transient plasticity of bituminous coals under high heating rates and other reaction and pretreatment conditions of scientific and practical interest. To these ends the research plan is to measure the softening and resolidification behavior of two US bituminous coals with a rapid-heating, fast response, high-temperature coal plastometer, previously developed in this laboratory. Specific measurements planned for the project include determinations of apparent viscosity, softening temperature, plastic period, and resolidificationtime for molten coal: (1) as a function of independent variations in coal type, heating rate, final temperature, gaseous atmosphere (inert, 0{sub 2} or H{sub 2}), and shear rate; and (2) in exploratory runs where coal is pretreated (preoxidation, pyridine extraction, metaplast cracking agents), before heating. The intra-coal inventory and molecular weight distribution of pyridine extractables will also be measured using a rapid quenching, electrical screen heater coal pyrolysis reactor. The yield of extractables is representative of the intra-coal inventory of plasticing agent (metaplast) remaining after quenching. Coal plasticity kinetics will then be mathematically modeled from metaplast generation and depletion rates, via a correlation between the viscosity of a suspension and the concentration of deformable medium (here metaplast) in that suspension. Work during this reporting period has been concerned with re-commissioning the rapid heating rate plastometer apparatus.

Darivakis, G.S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump System Performance Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extensive independent evaluation recently was completed of the Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump (MSHHP) system, a proprietary heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system developed by Meckler Systems Group. The MSHHP tests were conducted on a unique test bed designed and constructed by National Technical Systems (NTS) through a research and development grant program funded by Southern California Edison Company. This paper outlines testing methods and results, including evaluations of peak power and energy savings allowed by the innovative system. The main difference between the MSHHP and a conventional HVAC system is use of a chilled water "diversity" cooling loop interconnecting air to water coils (located at each water source heat pump unit) with a central chilled water storage tank. The MSHHP system uses significantly less energy than a conventional HVAC system, and lowers peak demand by shifting required electrical energy consumption to lower-cost, off-peak and mid-peak rates. Lower heat pump capacities are a main feature of the MSHHP. This is accomplished by pre-cooling return air from the zone space, a process that also allows the heat pump to operate at a higher Coefficient of Performance (COP), thereby contributing to further energy savings.

Meckler, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP Status of the Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP Mlawer, Eli Atmospheric & Environmental Research, Inc. Clough, Shepard Atmospheric and Environmental Research Delamere, Jennifer Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Miller, Mark Brookhaven National Laboratory Johnson, Karen Brookhaven National Laboratory Troyan, David Brookhaven National Laboratory Jensen, Michael Brookhaven National Laboratory Shippert, Timothy Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Long, Chuck Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Flynn, Connor Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Sivaraman, Chitra Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Turner, David University of Wisconsin-Madison Heck, Patrick University of Wisconsin Rutan, David Analytical Services & Materials, Inc.

48

Retrofits for Improved Heat Rate and Availability: Circulating Water Heat Recovery Retrofits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circulating water heat recovery is a means of directly increasing the thermal efficiency of a power plant. If only fuel savings are considered, the economic benefit is often only marginal. However, when increased megawatt output and heat-rate improvements are included in the economic analysis, such retrofits can be attractive, with break-even fuel costs sometimes approaching $1/million Btu.

1990-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

49

Demonstration of EPRI Heat Rate Guidelines at Southern California Edison Ormond Beach Unit 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using EPRI's heat rate improvement guidelines, Southern California Edison Company (SCE) developed a heat rate improvement program and realized significant fuel cost reduction. Other utilities can follow SCE's example to develop their own effective heat rate improvement programs.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Table A6. Approximate Heat Rates for Electricity, and Heat Content ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total Fossil Fuels 6,7: ... 7 The fossil-fuels heat rate is used as the thermal conversion factor for ... approximate the quantity of fossil fuels replaced by these ...

51

High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

Schneibel, Joachim H [ORNL; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Introduction A single-column model (SCM) is used to examine the sensitivity of basic quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameter- izations of clouds and cloud microphysics. The SCM was run at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites using forcing data derived from forecast products. The forecast

53

Rate of Change of Heat Storage of the World Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results or a Fourier analysis of climatological fields of the monthly rate of change of heat storage for the world ocean are presented. The amplitude and Phase of the first harmonic are shown, as well as the percent variance of the annual cycle ...

Sydney Levitus

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Survey of Impacts of Environmental Controls on Plant Heat Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental controls for sulfur and nitrogen oxides, particulates, mercury, and other pollutants reduce the efficiency of power plants. This report documents the impacts of state-of-the-art environmental controls on power plant heat rate and identifies ways these impacts may be reduced through operating and design changes.

2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF PULVERIZED COAL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period March 24, 1999 to September 23, 1999 which covers the last (sixth) six months of the project. During this reporting period, extraction of devolatilization time-scales and temperature data at these time-scales analyzing the high-speed films taken during the experiments was complete. Also a new thermodynamic model was developed to predict the heat transfer behavior for coal particles subjected to a range of heating rates using one approach based on the analogy of polymers. Sensitivity analyses of this model suggest that bituminous coal particles behave like polymers during rapid heating on the order of 10{sup 4}-10{sup 7} K/s. At these heating rates during the early stages within the first few milliseconds of heating time, the vibrational part of the heat capacity of the coal molecules appears to be still frozen but during the transition from heat-up to devolatization, the heat capacity appears to attain a sudden jump in its value as in the case of polymers. There are few data available in the coal literature for 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3} K/s obtained by UTRC in their previous studies. These data were obtained for a longer heating duration on the order of several seconds as opposed to the 10 milliseconds heating time in the single particle experiments discussed above. The polymer analogy model is being modified to include longer heating time on the order of several seconds to test these data. It is expected that the model might still do a good job in the case of these larger heating time but very low heating rate experiments. Completion of the numerical analysis of the experimental data and preparation of the final report are in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

56

Model of home heating and calculation of rates of return to household energy conservation investment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study attempts to find out if households' investments on energy conservation yield expected returns. It first builds a home-heating regression model, then uses the results of the model to calculate the rates of return for households' investments on the energy conservation. The home heating model includes housing characteristics, economic and demographic variables, appliance related variables, and regional dummy variables. Housing characteristic variables are modeled according to the specific physical relationship between the house and its heating requirement. Data from the Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) of 1980-1981 is used for the empirical testing of the model. The model is estimated for single-detached family houses separately for three major home-heating fuel types: electricity, natural gas and fuel oil. Four scenarios are used to calculate rates of return for each household. The results show in the Northern areas the rates of return in most of the cases are a lot higher than market interest rates. In the Western and Southern areas, with few exceptions, the rates of return are lower than market interest rates. The variation of heating degree days and energy prices can affect the rates of return up to 20 percentage points.

Hsueh, L.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Develop Standard Method of Test for Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project Develop Standard Method of Test for Integrated Heat Pumps Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into the development of standard Method of Test (MOT) for integrated heat pumps (IHPs). No active, recognized test procedure or rating standard exists for IHPs. Generating a rating standard with supporting test procedure that is approved by the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning (ASHRAE) and the Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) is necessary for these products to be viably marketed. The primary market segment for IHPs is residential buildings, both single-family and small, low-rise multifamily dwellings.

58

Energy test method development for electric heat pump water heaters  

SciTech Connect

Modifications are proposed for the current US Department of Energy test procedures for water heaters in order to make them applicable to electric heat pump water heaters. The modifications are in the areas of definitions and technical procedures. The latter include the test conditions, test procedures and measurements, and calculations. Reasons for making these modifications and laboratory test data are provided to support the modifications in the technical procedures. The main modifications include: (1) lowering the water supply temperature from 70/sup 0/F to 55/sup 0/F, (2) lowering the tank thermostat setting from 160/sup 0/F to 145/sup 0/F to maintain the same 90/sup 0/F temperature rise, (3) measuring the power input instead of using the nameplate rating as in the case for an electric water heater, and (4) measuring the recovery efficiency instead of calculating it by using the standby losses in the case for an electric water heater.

Wan, C.A.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Testing of a sodium heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a heat pipe with both thermal radiation and convection heat rejection has been experimentally examined. The thermal radiation heat rejection conditions are similar to those which would be experienced in a space environment. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical model. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Holtz, R.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

On-Line Heat Rate Monitor Assessment, Part 2: Results of the Demonstration and Application of Exergetic Systems' Calculational Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes EPRI demonstrations of Exergetic Systems' Calculational Engine, an on-line heat rate monitor, at two pulverized-coal-fired plants. It also summarizes results from independent installations and tests of the Calculational Engine.

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Low heat rejection diesel ceramic coupon tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are reported from studies in which several monolithic ceramic materials in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars were exposed for 100 h to the combustion conditions found in either a small single- or two-cylinder diesel engine. Fuels included a standard Phillips D-2 diesel or synthetic mixture of the Phillips D-2 and an aromatic blend. The ceramics included two commercial grades of partially stabilized zirconia: (1) PSZ-TS and (2) PSZ-MS and silicon nitride (GTE WESGO SNW-1000 and Norton NT-154). Significant reductions in postexposure four-point bend fracture strength occurred in the PSZ-TS material irrespective of whether it was exposed in the single- or two-cylinder engine. Only a small decrease in fracture strength occurred in the PSZ-MS material, and essentially no decrease in fracture strength occurred in the silicon nitride (GTE WESGO SNW-1000) when tested at room temperature. The Norton NT-154 silicon nitride was tested at both room temperature and at 700{degree}C over several strain rates ranging from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}S{sup {minus}1}. Room temperature tests showed that the engine exposed bars actually showed a slight increase in average strength, 830 MPa, versus 771 MPa for the unexposed material. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Brinkman, C.R.; Liu, K.C.; Graves, R.L.; West, B.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Property:Heat Recovery Rating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rating Rating Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Pages using the property "Heat Recovery Rating" Showing 22 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + 300,000 + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + 2,500,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + 46,105 + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + 3,000,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + 290,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + 11,200,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + 2,000,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Floyd Bennett + 230,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Harbec Plastics + 3,750,000 + Distributed Generation Study/Hudson Valley Community College + 32,500,000 +

63

Low heat rejection diesel ceramic coupon tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are reported from studies in which several monolithic ceramic materials in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars were exposed for 100 h to the combustion conditions found in either a small single- or two-cylinder diesel engine. Fuels included a standard Phillips D-2 diesel or synthetic mixture of the Phillips D-2 and an aromatic blend. The ceramics included two commercial grades of partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ-TS and PSZ-MS), silicon nitride (GTE WESGO SNW-1000 and Norton NT-154), and (Hexoloy SA) silicon carbide. Significant reductions in postexposure four-point bend fracture strength occurred in the PSZ-TS material irrespective of whether it was exposed in the single- or two-cylinder engine. Only a small decrease in fracture strength occurred in the PSZ-MS material, and essentially no decrease in fracture strength occurred in the silicon nitride (GTE WESGO SNW-1000) when tested at room temperature. The Norton NT-154 silicon nitride was tested at both room temperature and at 700{degree}C over several strain rates ranging from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}s{sup {minus}1}. Room temperature tests indicated that the engine exposed bars actually showed a slight increase in average strength, 830 MPa, versus 771 MPa for the unexposed material. Elevated temperature strength comparisons showed no reduction in strength due to previous engine exposure. Hexoloy SA silicon carbide showed no reduction in fracture strength when tested at 700{degree}C. 4 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Brinkman, C.R.; Liu, K.C.; Graves, R.L.; West, B.H.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Designing, testing, and analyzing coupled, flux transformer heat.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The proposed research involves designing, testing, and ics. analyzing a coupled, flux transformer heat pipe system following the patent of Oktay and Peterson (1997). Experiments… (more)

Renzi, Kimberly Irene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

forth through the heat exchangers, thereby phasing the rates at which heat is absorbed and rejected from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;forth through the heat exchangers, thereby phasing the rates at which heat is absorbed balance as shown in Fig. 3 still indi- cated a greater heat loss to the engine coolant than predicted. This was caused by excessive heat leak- age from the hot to the cold working spaces, primarily by the flow leakage

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

66

The Influence of Different Inflow Water Rate and Temperature on Heat Exchange Performance of Underground Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

in the paper, the influence of different inflow water rate and temperature on heat exchange performance of underground heat pump were discussed by experiment, two vital parameters was defined to measure the properties of ground heat exchanger: Energy ... Keywords: heat pump, underground tube, influential factors, parameters

Zheng Min; Li Bai-yi

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Test results of a Stirling engine utilizing heat exchanger modules with an integral heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The Heat Pipe Stirling Engine (HP-1000), a free-piston Stirling engine incorporating three heat exchanger modules, each having a sodium filled heat pipe, has been tested at the NASA-Lewis Research Center as part of the Civil Space Technology Initiative (CSTI). The heat exchanger modules were designed to reduce the number of potential flow leak paths in the heat exchanger assembly and incorporate a heat pipe as the link between the heat source and the engine. An existing RE-1000 free-piston Stirling engine was modified to operate using the heat exchanger modules. This paper describes heat exchanger module and engine performance during baseline testing. Condenser temperature profiles, brake power, and efficiency are presented and discussed.

Skupinski, R.C.; Tower, L.K.; Madi, F.J.; Brusk, K.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

High temperature superconducting current lead test facility with heat pipe intercepts  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature superconducting (HTS) current lead test facility using heat pipe thermal intercepts is under development at the Superconducting Technology Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The facility can be configured for tests at currents up to 1,000 A. Mechanical cryocoolers provide refrigeration to the leads. Electrical isolation is maintained by intercepting thermal energy from the leads through cryogenic heat pipes. HST lead warm end temperature is variable from 65 K to over 90 K by controlling heat pipe evaporator temperature. Cold end temperature is variable up to 30 K. Performance predictions in terms of heat pipe evaporator temperature as a function of lead current are presented for the initial facility configuration, which supports testing up to 200 A. Measurements are to include temperature and voltage gradient in the conventional and HTS lead sections, temperature and heat transfer rate in the heat pipes. as well as optimum and off-optimum performance of the conventional lead sections.

Blumenfeld, P.E.; Prenger, C.; Roth, E.W.; Stewart, J.A.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Trough Receiver Heat Loss Testing (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the design, fabrication, and qualification of an experimental capability for thermal loss testing of full-size trough receiver elements; and the testing on a variety of receivers.

Lewandowski, A.; Feik, C.; Hansen, R.; Phillips, S.; Bingham, C.; Netter, J.; Forristal, R.; Burkholder, F.; Meglan, B.; Wolfrum, E.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER 10 kW POWER LOOP. SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. SECTION 2: TEST SERIES NO. 1. SECTION 3; TEST SERIES NO. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Contact Heat Exchanger . . . . . . . . . .DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER TEST LOOP . . . . . . . . TestCALIBRATION . CONVENTIONAL HEAT EXCHANGER . . . Subcritical

Engineering, Barber-Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Vibration test plan for a space station heat pipe subassembly  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes the Sundstrand portion of task two of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contract 9-x6H-8102L-1. Sundstrand Energy Systems was awarded a contract to investigate the performance capabilities of a potassium liquid metal heat pipe as applied to the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) solar dynamic power system for the Space Station. The test objective is to expose the heat pipe subassembly to the random vibration environment which simulates the space shuttle launch condition. The results of the test will then be used to modify as required future designs of the heat pipe.

Parekh, M.B. [Sundstrand Energy Systems, Rockford, IL (United States)

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

72

Parabolic Trough Receiver Heat Loss Testing (Poster)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough receivers, or heat collection elements (HCEs), absorb sunlight focused by the mirrors and transfer that thermal energy to a fluid flowing within them. Thje absorbing tube of these receivers typically operates around 400 C (752 F). HCE manufacturers prevent thermal loss from the absorbing tube to the environment by using sputtered selective Cermet coatings on the absorber and by surrounding the absorber with a glass-enclosed evacuated annulus. This work quantifies the heat loss of the Solel UVAC2 and Schott PTR70 HCEs. At 400 C, the HCEs perform similarly, losing about 400 W/m of HCE length. To put this in perspective, the incident beam radiation on a 5 m mirror aperture is about 4500 W/m, with about 75% of that energy ({approx} 3400 W/m) reaching the absorber surface. Of the 3400 W/m on the absorber, about 3000 W/m is absorbed into the working fluid while 400 W/m is lost to the environment.

Price, H.; Netter, J.; Bingham, C.; Kutscher, C.; Burkholder, F.; Brandemuehl, M.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF PULVERIZED COAL  

SciTech Connect

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period September 24, 1998 to March 23, 1999 which covers the fifth six months of the project. Devolatilization is an important initial step in virtually all commercial fossil fuel applications such as combustion, gasification, and liquefaction. Characterization of the temperature history of pulverized coal particles under high heating rates, representative of coal combustors, is critical to the understanding of devolatilization. During this reporting period, characterization experiments were continued from the previous reporting period and completed to a total of 28 single coal particles. These particles were caught in the electrodynamic balance and their volume, external surface area, mass, and density were measured. The same single particles were then heated bidirectionally with a pulsed (10 ms pulse width) Nd:YAG laser beams of equal intensity with heating rates (10{sup 4} - 10{sup 7} K/s) representative of coal combustors. The temporal power variation in the laser pulse was monitored for use in the heat transfer analysis by an ultra-fast fiber optic uv light transmitter included in the beam path and coupled to a silicon photodiode. Transient surface temperatures of the particles were measured using a single-color pyrometer. Dynamics of volatile evolution and particle swelling were recorded using well established time-resolved high-speed cinematography. Presently, extraction of devolatilization time-scales and temperature data at these time-scales running the high-speed films taken during the experiments employing a 16mm movie projector are in progress. Heat transfer analyses for the devolatilization time-scales, and temperature measurements (and hence an understanding of the effect of heating rates on coal thermal properties) are also in progress. Shipment of the donated heated grid system components from our industrial partner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), CT to CAU was complete during the previous reporting period. Testing of the heated grid system components at CAU and sensitivity analyses of the heated grid heat transfer calculations are also in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

74

Optimization Online - A Statistical Test for Comparing Success Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 28, 2003 ... A Statistical Test for Comparing Success Rates. Eric Taillard (eric.taillard ***at*** eivd.ch). Abstract: This article presents a non-parametric ...

75

Retrofitting Combined Space and Water Heating Systems: Laboratory Tests  

SciTech Connect

Better insulated and tighter homes can often use a single heating plant for both space and domestic water heating. These systems, called dual integrated appliances (DIA) or combination systems, can operate at high efficiency and eliminate combustion safety issues associated by using a condensing, sealed combustion heating plant. Funds were received to install 400 DIAs in Minnesota low-income homes. The NorthernSTAR DIA laboratory was created to identify proper system components, designs, operating parameters, and installation procedures to assure high efficiency of field installed systems. Tests verified that heating loads up to 57,000 Btu/hr can be achieved with acceptable return water temperatures and supply air temperatures.

Schoenbauer, B.; Bohac, D.; Huelman, P.; Olson, R.; Hewitt, M.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION OF HEAT EXCHANGER TEST STAND WITH INITIAL TEST RESULTS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Continual development of internal combustion engines requires greater performance from liquid coolants and heat exchangers to maintain optimal temperature. For the purpose of experimental testing… (more)

Albrecht, Daniel David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Applications Tests of Commercial Heat Pump Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field application tests have been conducted on three 4 to 6-ton commercial heat pump water heater systems in a restaurant, a coin-operated laundry, and an office building cafeteria in Atlanta. The units provide space cooling while rejecting heat to a water heating load. The tests, conducted for Georgia Power Company, examined both quantitative and qualitative aspects of the heat pumps and the overall water heating systems. The results provide valuable insight into the actual operating characteristics of heat pump water heaters and useful guidelines for system design and operation. The capacity and efficiency of the units agreed with manufacturers' specifications. COP values ranged from 2 .6 to 3.0 for water heating only, and from 4.1 to 5.0 when space cooling benefit was included. It was concluded that heat pump water heaters can provide economical water heating and space conditioning. However, application sites must be selected within certain constraints and a minimum level of operating control and maintenance must be observed.

Oshinski, J. N..; Abrams, D. W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES A Thesis Submitted April 1995 #12;PERFORMANCE OF A SINGLE-ROW HEAT EXCHANGER AT LOW IN-TUBE FLOW RATES by Xiangwei Zhao Abstract The steady and time-dependentbehavior of a single-row heat exchanger with water and air in the in

Sen, Mihir

79

Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Convection Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility Scaling Basis Full Scale Half Scale NSTF Argonne National Laboratory's Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) - one of the world's largest facilities for ex-vessel passive decay heat removal testing-confirms the performance of reactor cavity cooling systems (RCCS) and similar passive confinement or containment decay heat removal systems in modern Small Modular Reactors. Originally built to aid in the development of General Electric's Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS), the NSTF has a long history of providing confirmatory data for the airside of the RVACS. Argonne National Laboratory's NSTF is a state-of-the-art, large-scale facility for evaluating performance

80

EFFECT OF HEATING RATE ON THE THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES OF PULVERIZED COAL  

SciTech Connect

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No. DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period March 24, 1998 to September 23, 1998 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Existing laser heating set-up at the Single Particle Laboratory, Federal Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, WV would work only in the range of 10 to 10 4 5 K/s. During this reporting period, appropriate changes were made to the laser heating system to heat particles in the range of 10 to 10 K/s. Also, calibration for all the components of the 4 7 electrodynamic balance measurement system including single-color pyrometer and heating laser was successfully completed. Following the calibration, a large number of single coal particles were caught in the electrodynamic balance and their volume, external surface area, mass, and density were measured. The same single particles were then heated bidirectionally with a pulsed (10 ms pulse width) Nd:YAG laser beams of equal intensity. The temporal power variation in the laser pulse was monitored for use in the heat transfer analysis by an ultra-fast fiber optic uv light transmitter included in the beam path and coupled to a silicon photodiode. Measurements of changes in particle size that accompanied rapid heating was made by means of the high-speed diode array imaging system discussed in our previous reports. Dynamics of volatile evolution and particle swelling were recorded using well established time-resolved high-speed cinematography. Measurements of the radiant emissive power from the heated and cooled (when the laser is turned off) particles was made using the single-color pyrometer. The above experiments are being repeated for a significant number of coal particles for a number of heating rates in between 10 - 10 K/s at FETC, Morgantown. 4 7 Shipment of the donated heated grid system components from our industrial partner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), CT to CAU was complete during this reporting period. Testing of the heated grid system components at CAU is also in progress.

RAMANATHAN SAMPATH

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

K West basin isolation barrier leak rate test  

SciTech Connect

This document establishes the procedure for performing the acceptance test on the two isolation barriers being installed in K West basin. This acceptance test procedure shall be used to: First establish a basin water loss rate prior to installation of the two isolation barriers between the main basin and the discharge chute in K-Basin West. Second, perform an acceptance test to verify an acceptable leakage rate through the barrier seals.

Whitehurst, R.; McCracken, K.; Papenfuss, J.N.

1994-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Comments on the use of boiler efficiencies to determine unit heat rate  

SciTech Connect

The expression for boiler efficiency defined in ASME PTC4.1 was developed for evaluating boiler performance, carrying out acceptance tests on boilers and computing the effects of changes in parameters such as fuel characteristics on boiler performance. While satisfactory for applications such as these, this particular definition of boiler efficiency can result in substantial errors when used for computing unit performance. Sample calculations are presented for a 600 MW coal fired unit which show errors in net unit heat rate of 1 to 3 percent due to inconsistent definitions for boiler efficiency.

Levy, E.K.; Sarunac, N. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (USA). Energy Research Center); Leyse, R. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Testing of Stirling engine solar reflux heat-pipe receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alkali metal heat-pipe receivers have been identified as a desirable interface to couple a Stirling-cycle engine with a parabolic dish solar concentrator. The reflux receiver provides power nearly isothermally to the engine heater heads while de-coupling the heater head design from the solar absorber surface design. The independent design of the receiver and engine heater head leads to high system efficiency. Heat pipe reflux receivers have been demonstrated at approximately 30 kW{sub t} power throughput by others. This size is suitable fm engine output powers up to 10 kW{sub e}. Several 25-kW{sub e}, Stirling-cycle engines exist, as well as designs for 75-kW{sub t} parabolic dish solar concentrators. The extension of heat pipe technology from 30 kW{sub t} to 75 kW{sub t} is not trivial. Heat pipe designs are pushed to their limits, and it is critical to understand the flux profiles expected from the dish, and the local performance of the wick structure. Sandia has developed instrumentation to monitor and control the operation of heat pipe reflux receivers to test their throughput limits, and analytical models to evaluate receiver designs. In the past 1.5 years, several heat pipe receivers have been tested on Sandia`s test bed concentrators (TBC`s) and 60-kW{sub t} solar furnace. A screen-wick heat pipe developed by Dynatherm was tested to 27.5 kW{sub t} throughput. A Cummins Power Generation (CPG)/Thermacore 30-kW{sub t} heat pipe was pushed to a throughput of 41 kW{sub t} to verify design models. A Sandia-design screen-wick and artery 75-kW{sub t} heat pipe and a CPG/Thermacore 75-kW{sub t} sintered-wick heat pipe were also limit tested on the TBC. This report reviews the design of these receivers, and compares test results with model predictions.

Rawlinson, S.; Cordeiro, P.; Dudley, V.; Moss, T.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Field test and assessment of thermal energy storage for residential heating  

SciTech Connect

Thermal energy storage (TES) heating units can be connected to the utility grid to accept electricity only during utility off-peak periods and yet provide round-the-clock comfort heating. Their use by an increasingly larger part of the electric-heat market could provide economic and oil-saving benefits. A field test was carried out over two full heating seasons in Vermont and Maine at 45 TES sites and 30 control sites heated by electric baseboard heaters. The TES users were billed under applicable time-of-day (TOD) rates. All sites were instrumented, and measurements of inside and outside temperatures and electrical energy consumption for heating were made and recorded every 15 min. Analysis of the data has led to the following findings and conclusions: Overall technical performance of the TES units was good under extreme weather conditions. Annualized energy use was the same for the TES and the control households. Proper sizing of the storage systems is much more important for storage heaters than for nonstorage heaters. TES users were satisfied with performance. Electric-heat bills were much lower for TES users. Occupancy effects were large and caused wide variations in energy consumption on days that had the same number of heating degree-days. The individual building heat loss determined experimentally from an analysis of the actual energy consumption per heating degreeday was 30% to 50% smaller than that determined by a walkthrough energy audit.

Hersh, H.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

AN EFFICIENT APPROXIMATION OF THE CORONAL HEATING RATE FOR USE IN GLOBAL SUN–HELIOSPHERE SIMULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The origins of the hot solar corona and the supersonically expanding solar wind are still the subject of debate. A key obstacle in the way of producing realistic simulations of the Sun–heliosphere system is the lack of a physically motivated way of specifying the coronal heating rate. Recent one-dimensional models have been found to reproduce many observed features of the solar wind by assuming the energy comes from Alfvén waves that are partially reflected, then dissipated by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. However, the nonlocal physics of wave reflection has made it difficult to apply these processes to more sophisticated (three-dimensional) models. This paper presents a set of robust approximations to the solutions of the linear Alfvén wave reflection equations. A key ingredient of the turbulent heating rate is the ratio of inward-to-outward wave power, and the approximations developed here allow this to be written explicitly in terms of local plasma properties at any given location. The coronal heating also depends on the frequency spectrum of Alfvén waves in the open-field corona, which has not yet been measured directly. A modelbased assumption is used here for the spectrum, but the results of future measurements can be incorporated easily. The resulting expression for the coronal heating rate is self-contained, computationally efficient, and applicable directly to global models of the corona and heliosphere. This paper tests and validates the approximations by comparing the results to exact solutions of the wave transport equations in several cases relevant to the fast and slow solar wind. Key words: interplanetary medium – magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) – solar wind – Sun: corona – turbulence – waves Online-only material: tar file of source code 1.

Steven R. Cranmer

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission. Axially-grooved heat pipe: accelerated life test results  

SciTech Connect

The results through SIG/Galileo contract close-out of accelerated life testing performed from June 1978 to June 1979 on axially-grooved, copper/water heat pipes are presented. The primary objective of the test was to determine the expected lifetime of axially-grooved copper/water heat pipes. The heat pipe failure rate, due to either a leak or a build-up of non-condensible gas, was determined. The secondary objective of the test was to determine the effects of time and temperature on the thermal performance parameters relevant to long-term (> 50,000 h) operation on a space power generator. The results showed that the gas generation rate appears to be constant with time after an initial sharp rise although there are indications that it drops to approximately zero beyond approx. 2000 h. During the life test, the following pipe-hours were accumulated: 159,000 at 125/sup 0/C, 54,000 at 165/sup 0/C, 48,000 at 185/sup 0/C, and 8500 at 225/sup 0/C. Heated hours per pipe ranged from 1000 to 7500 with an average of 4720. Applying calculated acceleration factors yields the equivalent of 930,000 pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C. Including the accelerated hours on vendor tested pipes raises this number to 1,430,000 pipe-hours at 125/sup 0/C. It was concluded that, for a heat pipe temperature of 125/sup 0/C and a mission time of 50,000 h, the demonstrated heat pipe reliability is between 80% (based on 159,000 actual pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C) and 98% (based on 1,430,000 accelerated pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C). Measurements indicate some degradation of heat transfer with time, but no detectable degradation of heat transport. (LCL)

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Enhanced boiling heat transfer in horizontal test bundles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-phase flow boiling from bundles of horizontal tubes with smooth and enhanced surfaces has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in pure refrigerant R-113, pure R-11, and mixtures of R-11 and R-113 of approximately 25, 50, and 75% of R-113 by mass. Tests were conducted in two staggered tube bundles consisting of fifteen rows and five columns laid out in equilateral triangular arrays with pitch-to-diameter ratios of 1.17 and 1.5. The enhanced surfaces tested included a knurled surface (Wolverine`s Turbo-B) and a porous surface (Linde`s High Flux). Pool boiling tests were conducted for each surface so that reference values of the heat transfer coefficient could be obtained. Boiling heat transfer experiments in the tube bundles were conducted at pressures of 2 and 6 bar, heat flux values from 5 to 80 kW/m{sup 2}s, and qualities from 0% to 80%, Values of the heat transfer coefficients for the enhanced surfaces were significantly larger than for the smooth tubes and were comparable to the values obtained in pool boiling. It was found that the performance of the enhanced tubes could be predicted using the pool boiling results. The degradation in the smooth tube heat transfer coefficients obtained in fluid mixtures was found to depend on the difference between the molar concentration in the liquid and vapor.

Trewin, R.R.; Jensen, M.K.; Bergles, A.E.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Building, Testing, and Post Test Analysis of Durability Heat Pipe No.6  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Program at Sandia supports work developing dish/Stirling systems to convert solar energy into electricity. Heat pipe technology is ideal for transferring the energy of concentrated sunlight from the parabolic dish concentrators to the Stirling engine heat tubes. Heat pipes can absorb the solar energy at non-uniform flux distributions and release this energy to the Stirling engine heater tubes at a very uniform flux distribution thus decoupling the design of the engine heater head from the solar absorber. The most important part of a heat pipe is the wick, which transports the sodium over the heated surface area. Bench scale heat pipes were designed and built to more economically, both in time and money, test different wicks and cleaning procedures. This report covers the building, testing, and post-test analysis of the sixth in a series of bench scale heat pipes. Durability heat pipe No.6 was built and tested to determine the effects of a high temperature bakeout, 950 C, on wick corrosion during long-term operation. Previous tests showed high levels of corrosion with low temperature bakeouts (650-700 C). Durability heat pipe No.5 had a high temperature bakeout and reflux cleaning and showed low levels of wick corrosion after long-term operation. After testing durability heat pipe No.6 for 5,003 hours at an operating temperature of 750 C, it showed low levels of wick corrosion. This test shows a high temperature bakeout alone will significantly reduce wick corrosion without the need for costly and time consuming reflux cleaning.

MOSS, TIMOTHY A.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Relationship between the shear viscosity and heating rate in metallic glasses below the glass transition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been shown that first-order irreversible structural relaxation with distributed activation energies must lead to a linear decrease of the logarithm of Newtonian shear viscosity with the logarithm of heating rate upon linear heating of glass. Such a behavior is indeed observed in the experiments on metallic glasses. Structural relaxation-induced viscous flow leads to infra-low-frequency Maxwell viscoelastic internal friction, which is predicted to increase with the heating rate.

Khonik, Vitaly A.; Kobelev, N. P. [Department of General Physics, State Pedagogical University, Lenin Street 86, 394043 Voronezh (Russian Federation); Institute for Solid State Physics, Chernogolovka, 142432 Moscow District (Russian Federation)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

ARM - PI Product - Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for ProductsCloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Cloud Properties and Radiative Heating Rates for TWP 2002.01.01 - 2012.02.08 Site(s) TWP General Description A cloud properties and radiative heating rates dataset is presented where cloud properties retrieved using lidar and radar observations are input into a radiative transfer model to compute radiative fluxes and heating rates at three ARM sites located in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) region. The cloud properties retrieval is a conditional retrieval that applies various retrieval techniques depending on the available data, that is if lidar, radar or both instruments detect cloud. This Combined Remote

91

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

TEST RESULTS FOR A STIRLING-ENGINE-DRIVEN HEAT-ACTUATED HEAT PUMP BREADBOARD SYSTEM T.M. Moynihan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

849044 TEST RESULTS FOR A STIRLING-ENGINE-DRIVEN HEAT-ACTUATED HEAT PUMP BREADBOARD SYSTEM T- of the diaphragms, and corresponding displace- resonant -refrigerant compressor through a ment of oil, is a heat-actuated heat pump '_ ~*,^ (HAHP) that was developed for residential appli- -, / Combustor cations

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

93

Dependency of Heat Transfer Rate on the Brinkman Number in Microchannels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat generation from electronics increases with the advent of high-density integrated circuit technology. To come up with the heat generation, microscale cooling has been thought as a promising technology. Prediction of heat transfer rate is crucial in design of microscale cooling device but is not clearly understood yet. This work proposes a new correlation between heat transfer rate and Brinkman number which is nondimensional number of viscosity, flow velocity and temperature. It is expected that the equation proposed by this work can be useful to design microchannel cooling device.

H. S. Park

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, October 1995--November 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document is the October/November 1995 project status report of the Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Integrated tank/heat exchanger modeling is discussed, as well as advanced residential solar hot water systems. A paper to be presented at the 1996 International Solar Energy Conference is included. The subject of this paper is rating and certification of domestic water heating systems.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Sensitivity of shortwave radiative flux density, forcing, and heating rates to the aerosol vertical profile  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the aerosol vertical distribution on the solar radiation profiles, for idealized and measured profiles of optical properties (extinction and single-scattering albedo (SSA)) during the May 2003 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerosol Intensive Observation Period (AIOP), has been investigated using the Rapid Radiative Transfer Model Shortwave (RRTM_SW) code. Calculated profiles of down-welling and up-welling solar fluxes during the AIOP have been compared with the data measured by up- and down-looking solar broadband radiometers aboard a profiling research aircraft. The measured profiles of aerosol extinction, SSA, and water vapor obtained from the same aircraft that carried the radiometers served as the inputs for the model calculations. It is noteworthy that for this study, the uplooking radiometers were mounted on a stabilized platform that kept the radiometers parallel with respect to the earth’s horizontal plane. The results indicate that the shape of the aerosol extinction profiles has very little impact on direct radiative forcings at the top of atmosphere and surface in a cloud-free sky. However, as long as the aerosol is not purely scattering, the shape of the extinction profiles is important for forcing profiles. Identical extinction profiles with different absorption profiles drastically influence the forcing and heating rate profiles. Using aircraft data from 19 AIOP profiles over the Southern Great Plains (SGP), we are able to achieve broadband down-welling solar flux closure within 0.8% (bias difference) or 1.8% (rms difference), well within the expected measurement uncertainty of 1 to 3%. The poorer agreement in up-welling flux (bias -3.7%, rms 10%) is attributed to the use of inaccurate surface albedo data. The sensitivity tests reveal the important role accurate, vertically resolved aerosol extinction data plays in tightening flux closure. This study also suggests that in the presence of a strongly absorbing substance, aircraft flux measurements from a stabilized platform have the potential to determine heating rate profiles. These measurement-based heating rate profiles provide useful data for heating rate closure studies and indirect estimates of single scattering albedo assumed in radiative transfer calculations.

Guan, Hong; Schmid, Beat; Bucholtz, Anthony; Bergstrom, Robert

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Risk Impact Assessment of Extended Integrated Leak Rate Testing Intervals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a risk impact assessment for extending integrated leak rate test (ILRT) surveillance intervals to 15 years. The assessment demonstrates that on an industry-wide basis there is small risk associated with the extension, provided that the performance bases and defense-in-depth are maintained. There is an obvious benefit in not performing costly, critical-path, time-consuming tests that provide a limited benefit from a risk perspective.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Side by Side Testing of Water Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida Florida A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida Side by Side Testing of Water Heating Systems Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin , Texas March 1st, 2012 Carlos J. Colon carlos@fsec.ucf.edu FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida Hot Water Systems (HWS) Laboratory FSEC Cocoa, Florida 3 2009 -Present (Currently in third testing rotation) FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER - A Research Institute of the University of Central Florida Underground Circulation Loop * Solar circulation Loop 140+ feet of ½" copper tubing * Encased in PVC tubing with R-2.4 insulation * ICS to 50 gallon storage tank path need to

98

On the Effects of Cumulus Dimensions on Longwave Irradiance and Heating Rate Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of a cumulus cloud field, parameterized as right circular cylinders, has been used to estimate the uncertainties in longwave radiation calculations of irradiances and heating rates caused by neglecting the dimensions of the clouds. The ...

Robert G. Ellingson

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Impact of Polar Stratospheric Clouds on the Heating Rates of the Winter Polar Stratosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have computed the perturbation to the infrared radiative heating rates of the lower stratosphere due to the occurrence of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) during the winter season in the Antarctic and Arctic regions. The calculations were ...

James B. Pollack; Christopher P. McKay

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Calculating Monthly Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates fromMonthly Cloud Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radiative transfer model from NCAR’s general circulation model CCM3 is modified to calculate monthly radiative fluxes and heating rates from monthly observations of cloud properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project ...

John W. Bergman; Harry H. Hendon

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An Efficient Method for Online Calculations of Photolysis and Heating Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a computationally highly efficient method for the online calculation of photolysis and heating rates, which is especially suited for coupled transport–chemistry models. For this purpose, the spectral range 178.6 nm ? ? ? 752.5 ...

J. Landgraf; P. J. Crutzen

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Methods to Mitigate the Effect of Increased Cycling and Load Following on Heat Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the U.S. coal-fired plants currently in service were designed for baseload operation. Today, however, actual generation conditions dictate that many of these units operate in a continuous transient mode, following generation demand. As such, they often experience large load changes throughout the day that result in a poorer plant heat rate. Reducing the throttle pressure, also known as sliding pressure, reduces throttling losses and is a potential method to reduce the heat rate penalties ...

2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

103

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters Title Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-5187E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Lutz, James D. Subsidiary Authors Energy Analysis Department Document Number LBNL-5187E Pagination 21 Date Published January Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley ISBN Number LBNL-5187E Abstract The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standards Project Committee (SPC) 118.2, Method of Testing for Rating Residential Water Heaters, is seeking to improve the test procedure used for measuring the energy efficiency of residential gas and electric water heaters. ASHRAE is seeking to develop an improved test procedure in part to support the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) desire to update and amend the water heater test procedure underlying the minimum energy efficiency standards for water heaters. DOE's test procedures are often based on or reference ASHRAE standards.DOE's most recent minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for residential water heaters were promulgated in 2010.[1] The associated test procedures are stipulated in the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR).[2] Although DOE currently is conducting a rulemaking to review and possibly amend the test procedures for residential water heaters, that rulemaking pertains to accounting for energy consumed during standby and off modes. In its notice of proposed rulemaking published in the Federal Register on August 30, 2010, DOE tentatively concluded that the test procedure for water heaters already fully accounts for and incorporates the energy consumed during standby and off modes [3].

104

VAPOR COMPRESSION HEAT PUMP SYSTEM FIELD TESTS AT THE TECH COMPLEX  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, two conventional air- to-ir heat pumps, an air-to-air heat pump with desuperheater water heater for several novel and conventional heat pump systems for space conditioning and water heating. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar assisted heat pumps (SAHP) both parallel and series

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

105

Multi-vector tests: a path to perfect error-rate testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The importance of testing approaches that exploit error tolerance to improve yield has previously been established. Error rate, defined as the percentage of vectors for which the value at a circuit's output deviates from the corresponding error-free ...

Shideh Shahidi; Sandeep Gupta

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Operation and design of selected industrial process heat field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE program of solar industrial process heat field tests has shown solar energy to be compatible with numerous industrial needs. Both the operational projects and the detailed designs of systems that are not yet operational have resulted in valuable insights into design and hardware practice. Typical of these insights are the experiences discussed for the four projects reviewed. Future solar IPH systems should benefit greatly not only from the availability of present information, but also from the wealth of operating experience from projects due to start up in 1981.

Kearney, D. W.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Field test of Six-Phase Soil Heating and evaluation of engineering design code  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted to evaluate the performance of Six-Phase Soil Heating to enhance the removal of contaminants. The purpose of the test was to determine the scale-up characteristics of the Six-Phase Soil Heating technology and to evaluate a computer process simulator developed for the technology. The test heated a 20-ft diameter cylinder of uncontaminated soil to a 10-ft depth. Six-phase ac power was applied at a rate of 30--35 kW using a power system built from surplus electrical components. The test ran unattended, using a computer-based system to record data, alert staff of any excursions in operating conditions via telephone, and provide automatic shut-off of power depending on the type of excursion. The test data included in situ soil temperatures, voltage profiles, and moisture profiles (using a neutron-probetechnique). After 50 days of heating, soil in the center of the array at the 6-ft depth reached 80[degrees]C. Soil temperatures between the two electrodes at this depth reached approximately 75[degrees]C. Data from this test were compared with those predicted by a computer process simulator. The computer process simulator is a modified version of the TOUGH2 code, a thermal porous media code that can be used to determine the movement of air and moisture in soils. The code was modified to include electrical resistive heating and configured such that an application could be run quickly on a workstation (approximately 5 min for 1 day of field operation). Temperature and soil resistance data predicted from the process simulations matched actual data fairly closely. A series of parametric studies was performed to assess the affect of simulation assumptions on predicted parameters.

Bergsman, T.M.; Roberts, J.S.; Lessor, D.L.; Heath, W.O.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Field test of Six-Phase Soil Heating and evaluation of engineering design code  

SciTech Connect

A field test was conducted to evaluate the performance of Six-Phase Soil Heating to enhance the removal of contaminants. The purpose of the test was to determine the scale-up characteristics of the Six-Phase Soil Heating technology and to evaluate a computer process simulator developed for the technology. The test heated a 20-ft diameter cylinder of uncontaminated soil to a 10-ft depth. Six-phase ac power was applied at a rate of 30--35 kW using a power system built from surplus electrical components. The test ran unattended, using a computer-based system to record data, alert staff of any excursions in operating conditions via telephone, and provide automatic shut-off of power depending on the type of excursion. The test data included in situ soil temperatures, voltage profiles, and moisture profiles (using a neutron-probetechnique). After 50 days of heating, soil in the center of the array at the 6-ft depth reached 80{degrees}C. Soil temperatures between the two electrodes at this depth reached approximately 75{degrees}C. Data from this test were compared with those predicted by a computer process simulator. The computer process simulator is a modified version of the TOUGH2 code, a thermal porous media code that can be used to determine the movement of air and moisture in soils. The code was modified to include electrical resistive heating and configured such that an application could be run quickly on a workstation (approximately 5 min for 1 day of field operation). Temperature and soil resistance data predicted from the process simulations matched actual data fairly closely. A series of parametric studies was performed to assess the affect of simulation assumptions on predicted parameters.

Bergsman, T.M.; Roberts, J.S.; Lessor, D.L.; Heath, W.O.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Test Plan for Heat Cycle Research Program, Phase I Supercritical Cycle Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 60 kW Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) provides a means of examining different concepts and components associated with the generation of electrical power from a geothermal resource using a binary power cycle. In this power cycle the heat or energy in a hot geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid. This working fluid is vaporized in the heat exchange process and the vapor is in turn expanded through a turbine which drives a generator producing electrical power. the heat or energy in the vapor leaving the turbine is transferred to a circulating cooling water in the condenser where the working fluid is condensed to a liquid which can be pumped back to the heaters, completing the cycle. This waste heat load in the condenser is in turn transferred from the cooling water to the atmosphere in a cooling tower. The HCRF allows the different components described in the cycle above to be tested as well as the basic cycle itself. This cycle may vary in that the heaters, condenser, cooling system, pumps, etc. may differ in number and type, however the basic cycle does not change significantly. During this sequence of tests, the HCRF is operated using a supercritical vapor generator and a vertical condenser where the condensation occurs inside of the tubes as opposed to the shell side more commonly used in these applications. In addition to providing the data to be used to evaluate the design of these heat exchangers, these supercritical tests provide cycle and component performance data with both single component working fluids and working fluids comprised of different mixtures of hydrocarbons. The use of these mixtures promises to improve cycle performance, in terms of watt-hours per pound of geothermal fluid, provided the countercurrent flow paths can be maintained between the fluids in both the condenser and the heaters. The supercritical heaters and the condenser to be used in this series of tests were designed to provide the desired countercurrent flow paths.

Mines, Greg L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Heat-actuated metal hydride hydrogen compressor testing  

SciTech Connect

Electric utilities use hydrogen for cooling turbine generators. The majority of the utilities purchase the gas from industrial gas markets. On-site electrolytic hydrogen production may prove advantageous both logistically and economically. In order to demonstrate this concept, Public Service Electric and Gas Co. (PSE and G) and EPRI installed an electrolyzer at the Sewaren (NJ) station. To compress the gas, PSE and G purchased a heat-activated metal hydride compressor from Ergenics, Inc. This report describes closed- and open-cycle tests conducted on this metal hydride hydrogen compressor. Test systems, plans, methodologies, and results are presented. A brief discussion evaluates these performance results, addresses some of the practical problems involved with electrolyzer-compressor interface, and compares the costs and benefits of metal hydride versus mechanical hydrogen compression for utility generator cooling.

Piraino, M.; Metz, P.D.; Nienke, J.L.; Freitelberg, A.S.; Rahaman, R.S.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Crack growth rates of irradiated austenitic stainless steel weld heat affected zone in BWR environments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Austenitic stainless steels (SSs) are used extensively as structural alloys in the internal components of reactor pressure vessels because of their superior fracture toughness. However, exposure to high levels of neutron irradiation for extended periods can exacerbate the corrosion fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of these steels by affecting the material microchemistry, material microstructure, and water chemistry. Experimental data are presented on crack growth rates of the heat affected zone (HAZ) in Types 304L and 304 SS weld specimens before and after they were irradiated to a fluence of 5.0 x 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2} (E > 1 MeV) ({approx} 0.75 dpa) at {approx}288 C. Crack growth tests were conducted under cycling loading and long hold time trapezoidal loading in simulated boiling water reactor environments on Type 304L SS HAZ of the H5 weld from the Grand Gulf reactor core shroud and on Type 304 SS HAZ of a laboratory-prepared weld. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed.

Chopra, O. K.; Alexandreanu, B.; Gruber, E. E.; Daum, R. S.; Shack, W. J.; Energy Technology

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fabrication, Filling, Sealing and Testing of Micro Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Micro heat pipes are small and passive heat transfer devices. Research is going on in its applications ranging from using them in high powered electronic… (more)

NADGAUDA, OMKAR

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in FracturedFRACTURE-MATRIX HEAT TRANSFER AREA Karsten Pruess andimprove the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the

Pruess, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

H-Disk Aluminum Prototype Heat Transfer Test Summary  

SciTech Connect

The aluminum H-disk was instrumented with heaters (156 ohm on average) and 100 ohm platinum RTD's. Each heater supplies the heat of a double sided H-wedge. Since the flow splits into two flow directions at the inlet fitting, only half of the cooling channel is fully instrumented with RTD's. The other path has a single RTD to check for flow balancing. These items were installed after Greg Derylo petformed the first pressure drop tests. At the time of the test, the desired adhesive for gluing the two halves of the channel together was not available. Therefore, 5-minute epoxy was used on the inner and outer diameters of the halves. Tape was used to set the gap between the two halves. This form of attachment does not make a strong bond between the two halves so the differential pressure between the inside and the outside of the channel was limited to a couple of psi. Therefore, the tests were not conducted in a vacuum.

Squires, B.; /Fermilab

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well a previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--1992 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space hearing systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Activation, Heating and Exposure Rates for Mo?99 Experiments with 25?Disk Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An MCNPX model of the 25-disk target assembly inside the vacuum cube inside the shielded box was prepared. This was used to calculate heating and photon and neutron fluxes throughout the model. Production rates for photonuclear reaction products were calculated using the photon fluxes and ENDF/B-VII cross sections. Measured isomer to ground state yield ratios were used where available. Where not available the new correlation between spin deficit and isomer to ground state yield ratios presented at AccApp'11 was used. The photonuclear production rates and neutron fluxes were input to CINDER2008 for transmutation calculations. A cross section update file was used to supply (n,n') reactions missing from CINDER2008 libraries. Decay photon spectra produced by CINDER2008 were then used to calculate exposure rates using the MCNPX model. Two electron beam irradiations were evaluated. The first was for a thermal test at 15 MeV with 1300 {micro}A incident on one target end and the second was for a production test at 35 MeV with 350 {micro}A incident on both target ends (700 {micro}A total current on target). For the thermal test 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 h irradiation times were simulated, each followed by decay time steps out to 42 days. For the production test 6, 12, 18, 24, 30 and 36 h irradiation times were simulated followed by the same decay periods. For all simulations beam FWHMs in x and y were both assumed to be 6 mm. Simulations were run for Mo-100 enriched and natural Mo targets for both tests. It is planned that thermal test will be run for 4 h with natural target disks and production test will be run for 24 h with enriched target disks. Results for these two simulations only are presented in this report. Other results can be made available upon request. Post irradiation exposure rates were calculated at 30 cm distances from left, right, front and back of the following configurations: (1) Shielded box with everything in it (beam pipes, cooling pipes, vacuum cube, target housing weldment and target assembly), (2) Shielded box with everything in it except the target assembly, (3) Shielded box with nothing in it, (4) Target assembly taken outside of shielded box, (5) Target disks in cradle (target assembly with thermocouple weldment and flange removed), (6) Empty cradle, and (7) Target disks alone. Decay photon spectra from the CINDER2008 calculations were used as sources for the exposure rate calculations in the same model used for the flux calculations with beam on. As components were removed to simulate the seven cases considered the material compositions were changed to air and their respective sources were turned off. The MCNPX model geometry is plotted in Figure 1. The left and right detector locations for cases 1, 2 and 3 were 30 cm from the shielded box walls and 30 cm from the beam pipe openings in the left and right sides of the model (they are not in the beam line). A zoomed in plot of the target assembly alone is in Figure 2. Exposure rates for the seven cases are plotted as a function of time after irradiation in Figures 3, 4 and 5. To aid in comparison between the cases, all of these figures have been plotted using the same scale. Figures 3 and 4 are respectively the thermal and production test results for cases 1 through 6. Figure 5 includes case 7 results for both. Differences between cases 1 and 2 for both tests are not statistically significant showing that activation of components other than the target assembly, many of which are also shielding the target assembly, dominates exposure rates outside the shielded box. Case 3 shows the contribution from activation of the shield box itself. In front where shielded box wall is thickest box activation accounts for essentially all of the exposure rate outside. Differences between cases 4 and 5 are also minimal, showing that the contribution to target assembly exposure rates from the thermocouple flange and weldment are small compared to the target disks and cradle. From the numerical results the contribution is about 1%. Results for case 6, the cradle itself, are ini

Kelsey, Charles T. IV [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

CALMOS: Innovative device for the measurement of nuclear heating in material testing reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An R and D program has been carried out since 2002 in order to improve gamma heating measurements in the 70 MWth OSIRIS Material Testing Reactor operated by CEA's Nuclear Energy Div. at the Saclay research center. Throughout this program an innovative calorimetric probe associated to a specific handling system has been designed in order to make measurements both along the fissile height and on the upper part of the core, where nuclear heating rates still remain high. Two mock-ups of the probe were manufactured and tested in 2005 and 2009 in ex-core area of OSIRIS reactor for the process validation, while a displacement system has been especially designed to move the probe axially. A final probe has been designed thanks to modeling results and to preliminary measurements obtained with mock-ups irradiated to a heating level of 2W/g, This paper gives an overview of the development, describes the calorimetric probe, and expected advantages such as the possibility to use complementary methods to get the nuclear heating measurement. Results obtained with mock-ups irradiated in ex-core area of the reactor are presented and discussed. (authors)

Carcreff, H. [Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission CEA, Saclay Center, DEN/DANS/DRSN/SIREN, Gif Sur Yvette, 91191 (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Development of Monitoring Control and Fuzzy Control Test of Finned-Tube Heat-Exchanger Test-Board  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to satisfy the testing requirement of finned-tube heat-exchanger test-board, this paper designs an exclusive auto-monitor and control subsystem, studies the fuzzy control means for the supply air temperature of the heat-exchanger, and accomplishes the fuzzy control performance test. According to the experimental results, this auto-monitor and control subsystem could not only reduce the testing time for thermodynamic performances of finned-tube heat-exchanger, but also actualize easily the stable control of the supply air temperature of the heat-exchanger.

Chen, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, B.; Gao, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating: Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is the Management Plan for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. In this project IITRI will demonstrate an in situ soil heating technology for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants present in the soil. In situ heating will be accomplished by the application of 60 Hz ac power to the soil. The soil will be heated to a temperature of about 90{degrees}C. This technology is suited for the removal of those organic compounds which have a normal boiling point in the range of 100{degrees} to 210{degrees}C, or else for those which exhibit a pure component vapor pressure of at least 10 mm Hg in the 90{degrees} to 100{degrees}C temperature range. For example, perchloroethylene, dichlorobenzene, trichlorobenzene, etc. may be removed by in situ ac heating. It is planned to demonstrate the technology by heating approximately 400 tons of soil in the K-1070 Classified Burial Ground located at DOE`s K-25 Site located in Oak Ridge, TN. It is estimated that the heating portion of the demonstration will take approximately 3 weeks at an average power input rate of 150 to 175 kW. IITRI expects to spend considerable time in the front end reviewing site characteristics, preparing detail design, developing Health and Safety Plans and other documents needed to obtain regulatory approval for the demonstration, arranging for site sampling, infrastructure development and document preparation. It is anticipated that site activities will begin in approximately 5 to 6 months. This contract was signed on September 30, 1993. IITRI started work on it in October 1993. It is planned to complete the demonstration and submit approved final reports by September 30, 1994. This project has 12 tasks and four major milestones. The major milestones and their planned completion dates are shown.

Dev, H.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

120

Tropical Precipitation Rates during SOP-1, FGGE, Estimated from Heat and Moisture Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents global estimates of precipitation rates from 30°N to 30°S, derived from the “apparent” heat source (Q1) and “apparent” moisture sink (Q2) budgets using the NASA Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres Level III-b analyses collected ...

Catherine B. Pedigo; Dayton G. Vincent

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Scale Dependence of Solar Heating Rates in Convective Cloud Systems with Implications to General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors examine 3D solar radiative heating rates within tropical convective–cirrus systems to identify the scales that contribute significantly to the spatial average over a climate model’s grid cell (i.e., its grid mean), and determine their ...

A. M. Vogelmann; V. Ramanathan; I. A. Podgorny

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Parametric Analysis of a 6500-Btu/kWh Heat Rate Dispersed Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost and performance assessments of two alternative system designs for a 2-MW molten carbonate fuel cell power plant yielded encouraging results: a 6500-Btu/kWh heat rate and a total plant investment of $1200-$1300/kW. Differences between the two designs establish a permissible range of operating conditions for the fuel cell that will help guide its development.

1985-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

123

Heat-Loss Testing of Solel's UVAC3 Parabolic Trough Receiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For heat-loss testing on two Solel UVAC3 parabolic trough receivers, a correlation developed predicts receiver heat loss as a function of the difference between avg absorber and ambient temperatures.

Burkholder, F.; Kutscher, C.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Expanded microchannel heat exchanger: design, fabrication and preliminary experimental test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first reviews non-traditional heat exchanger geometry, laser welding, practical issues with microchannel heat exchangers, and high effectiveness heat exchangers. Existing microchannel heat exchangers have low material costs, but high manufacturing costs. This paper presents a new expanded microchannel heat exchanger design and accompanying continuous manufacturing technique for potential low-cost production. Polymer heat exchangers have the potential for high effectiveness. The paper discusses one possible joining method - a new type of laser welding named "forward conduction welding," used to fabricate the prototype. The expanded heat exchanger has the potential to have counter-flow, cross-flow, or parallel-flow configurations, be used for all types of fluids, and be made of polymers, metals, or polymer-ceramic precursors. The cost and ineffectiveness reduction may be an order of magnitude or more, saving a large fraction of primary energy. The measured effectiveness of the prototype with 28 micro...

Denkenberger, David C; Pearce, Joshua M; Zhai, John; 10.1177/0957650912442781

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

General-Purpose Heat Source Safety Verification Test program: Edge-on flyer plate tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will supply power for the Galileo and Ulysses space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. The GPHS modules provide power by transmitting the heat of STYPu -decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Each module contains four STYPuO2-fueled clads and generates 250 W(t). Because the possibility of a launch vehicle explosion always exists, and because such an explosion could generate a field of high-energy fragments, the fueled clads within each GPHS module must survive fragment impact. The edge-on flyer plate tests were included in the Safety Verification Test series to provide information on the module/clad response to the impact of high-energy plate fragments. The test results indicate that the edge-on impact of a 3.2-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (2219-T87) plate traveling at 915 m/s causes the complete release of fuel from capsules contained within a bare GPHS module, and that the threshold velocity sufficient to cause the breach of a bare, simulant-fueled clad impacted by a 3.5-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (5052-T0) plate is approximately 140 m/s.

George, T.G.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Explosion overpressure test series: General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test program  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular, radioisotope heat source that will be used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to supply electric power for space missions. The first two uses will be the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. The RTG for these missions will contain 18 GPHS modules, each of which contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) was conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System vehicle (space shuttle) is a conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests that simulated the overpressure exposure the RTG and GPHS modules could experience in such an event. Results of these tests, in which we used depleted UO/sub 2/ as a fuel simulant, suggest that exposure to overpressures as high as 15.2 MPa (2200 psi), without subsequent impact, does not result in a release of fuel.

Cull, T.A.; George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of heat loss tests for the Integral Collector Storage unit are shown. Work on unique solar system components is summarized briefly. (MHR)

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, December 1994--January 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report summarizes activities, experiments, and testing performed on a variety of solar heating and cooling systems in conjunction with four technical research tasks. Areas of focus include: Unique solar system components; Rating and certification of domestic water heating systems; and, Advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Experimental testing and analytical analysis of a plastic panel heat exchanger for greenhouse heating  

SciTech Connect

The performance of a plastic panel-type heat exchanger, suitable for greenhouse heating using low-grade (25 to 60/sup 0/C water) power plant reject heat, was investigated theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical analysis showed that a plastic panel heat exchanger would have an overall heat transfer coefficient, U/sub 0/, of about 18 w/m/sup 2/-/sup 0/C compared to about 12 w/m/sup 2/-/sup 0/C for a fin-tube heat exchanger, under typical greenhouse conditions. Furthermore the plastic heat exchanger would require less fan power due to reduced air pressure losses. The experimental data revealed a similar functional relationship for U/sub 0/ and air flow when compared with the theoretical calculations, however the experimental values of U/sub 0/ were consistently larger by 20 to 30%. It was concluded that a properly designed plastic heat exchanger can compete with metal fin tube type exchangers on a performance basis, but the plastic heat exchangers are 3 to 4 times larger by volume. However, because of the lower cost of plastic, a substantial cost reduction is expected. It appears that further study, examining heat exchanger lifetime, performance and costs, is warranted.

Olszewski, M.; Thomas, J.F.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

MODEL FOR ALFVEN WAVE TURBULENCE IN SOLAR CORONAL LOOPS: HEATING RATE PROFILES AND TEMPERATURE FLUCTUATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been suggested that the solar corona may be heated by dissipation of Alfven waves that propagate up from the solar photosphere. According to this theory, counterpropagating Alfven waves are subject to nonlinear interactions that lead to turbulent decay of the waves and heating of the chromospheric and coronal plasma. To test this theory, better models for the dynamics of Alfven waves in coronal loops are required. In this paper, we consider wave heating in an active region observed with the Solar Dynamics Observatory in 2010 May. First a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic model of the region is constructed, and ten magnetic field lines that match observed coronal loops are selected. For each loop we construct a 3D magnetohydrodynamic model of the Alfven waves near the selected field line. The waves are assumed to be generated by footpoint motions inside the kilogauss magnetic flux elements at the two ends of the loop. Based on such models, we predict the spatial and temporal profiles of the heating along the selected loops. We also estimate the temperature fluctuations resulting from such heating. We find that the Alfven wave turbulence model can reproduce the observed characteristics of the hotter loops in the active region core, but the loops at the periphery of the region have large expansion factors and are predicted to be thermally unstable.

Asgari-Targhi, M.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

131

Testing of an impedance heating system for solar power tower applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A non-conventional type of heating system is being tested at Sandia National Laboratories for solar thermal power tower applications. In this system, called impedance heating, electric current flows directly through the pipe to maintain the desired temperature. The pipe becomes the resistor where the heat is generated. Impedance heating has many advantages over previously used mineral insulated (MI) heat trace. An impedance heating system should be much more reliable than heat trace cable since delicate junctions and cabling are not used and the main component, a transformer, is inherently reliable. A big advantage of impedance heating is the system can be sized to rapidly heat up the piping to provide rapid response times necessary in cyclic power plants such as solar power towers. In this paper, experimental results from testing an impedance heating system are compared to MI cable heat trace. We found impedance heating was able to heat piping rapidly and effectively. There were not significant stray currents and impedance heating did not affect instrumentation.

Pacheco, J.E.; Kolb, W.J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Solar site test module. [DOE/NASA solar heating and cooling demonstration installations  

SciTech Connect

A solar site test module using the Rockwell AIM 65 micro-computer is described. The module is designed to work at any site where an IBM site data acquisition system (SDAS) is installed and is intended primarily as a troubleshooting tool for DOE/NASA commercial solar heating and cooling system demonstration installations. It collects sensor information (temperatures, flow rates, etc.) and displays or prints it immediately in calibrated engineering units. It will read one sensor on demand, periodically read up to 10 sensors or periodically read all sensors. Performance calculations can also be included with sensor data. Unattended operation is possible to, e.g., monitor a group of sensors once per hour. Work is underway to add a data acquisition system to the test module so that it can be used at sites which have no SDAS.

Kissel, R.R.; Scott, D.R.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Advanced Heat Pump Water Heating Technology: Testing Commercial and Residential Systems in the Laboratory and Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) provide electric water heating at a much greater overall efficiency than conventional electric resistance systems. In the residential market, approximately half of all water heaters are electric resistance; these systems can be replaced by HPWHs in most applications with expected savings of 30%–60%. In commercial applications, most systems presently use natural gas or another fuel in direct combustion. Emerging HPWH systems are now able to provide water heating ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fatigue Crack Propagation Rate Testing of Single Crystal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

increased. Recrystallized surface grains were also produced on NASAIR 100 specimens; and although the FCP rate increased, observations of bench marks on ...

135

General-Purpose Heat Source Development: Safety Verification Test Program. Flyer plate test series  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide electric power for space missions. The initial RTG applications will be for the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in an RTG contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) has been conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS fueled clads to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System Vehicle (space shuttle) is one conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests to simulate the fragment environment that the RTG and GPHS modules would experience in such an event. These tests deal specifically with the flat-on collision of flyer-plate-type fragments with bare, simulant-fueled (depleted UO/sub 2/) clads. Results of these tests suggest that the fueled clad is only minimally breached by collision with 3.53-mm-thick flyer-plate-type fragments of space shuttle alloy at velocities up to 1170 m/s. However, collision of a 38.1-mm-thick plate with a bare GPHS clad, at a velocity of 270 m/s, results in a total release of fuel.

Cull, T.A.; Pavone, D.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? November 12, 2009 - 8:36am Addthis...

137

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a progress report for the period of July 1, 1990 to 31 August 1990 on activities at Colorado State University in a program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Topics covered are: solar heating with isothermal collectors; solid cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling systems; solar heating systems; solar water heaters; fields tests; and program management. 6 figs., 2 tabs. (FSD)

Not Available

1990-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modeling and Test-and-Rate Methods for Innovative Thermosiphon Solar Water Heaters: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper regarding research in modeling and test-and-rate methods for thermosiphon solar domestic water heaters.

Burch, J.; Shoukas, G.; Brandemuhl, M.; Krarti, M.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Design and Testing of Metal and Silicon Heat Spreaders with Embedded Micromachined Heat Pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a new type of heat spreader based on the integration of heat pipes directly within a thin planar structure suitable for use as a heat spreader or as the base layer in a substrate. The process uses micromachining methods to produce micron scale patterns that act as a wick in these small scale heat pipes. By using silicon or a low expansion metal as the wall material of these spreaders, they achieve a good match to the thermal coefficient of expansion of the die. The match allows the use of a thin high performance die attachment even on large size die. The embedded heat pipes result in high effective thermal conductivity for the new spreader technology.

Benson, D.A.; Robino, C.V.

1999-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

140

Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect

This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Estimating Undrained Strength of Clays from Direct Shear Testing at Fast Displacement Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Germaine, J.T. (1996), “Rate-dependent undrained shearTesting at Fast Displacement Rates Andrew D. Bro 1 , M.variable shear displacement rates on specimens composed of

Bro, Andrew D; Stewart, Jonathan P; Pradel, Daniel E

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Testing of advanced ceramic fabric heat pipe for a Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

The development and application of Stirling engines for space power production requires concomitant development of an advanced heat rejection system. We are currently involved in the design, development, and testing of advanced ceramic fabric (ACF) water heat pipes for optimal heat rejection from the Stirling cycle without the use of hazardous working fluids such as mercury. Our testing to-date has been with a 200-{mu}m thick titanium heat pipe utilizing Nextel {trademark} fabric as both the outer structural component and as a wick. This heat pipe has been successfully started up from a frozen condition against a negative 4 degree tilt (i.e., fluid return to evaporator was against gravity), with 75 W heat input, in ambient air. In a horizontal orientation, up to 100 W heat input was tolerated without experiencing dryout. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Webb, B.J.; Bates, J.M.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Testing and analysis of load-side immersed heat exchangers for solar domestic hot water systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work to determine the performance of load-side heat exchangers for use in residential solar domestic hot water systems. We measured the performance of four heat exchangers: a smooth coil and a finned coil having heat transfer areas of 2.5 m/sup 2/ (26 ft/sup 2/) and those having areas of 1.7 m/sup 2/ (19 ft/sup 2/). A numerical model using the thermal network program MITAS was constructed, and results were compared to the experimental results. Research showed a smooth coil with only 70% of the surface area of a finned coil performed better than the finned coil. Also, load-side heat exchangers can maintain and enhance stratification in storage tanks, permitting the use of control strategies that take advantage of stratified storage tanks to increase system performance. The analytical model, which agreed reasonably well with the experimental results, was used to vary heat exchanger flow rate and area and initial tank temperature for both a smooth- and a finned-coil heat exchanger. Increasing the heat exchanger flow rate and area results in higher heat transfer rates but not necessarily optimal performance. Lower initial tank temperatures resulted in reduced tank stratification. The smooth heat exchanger outperformed the finned heat exchanger with the same outside surface area. 15 refs., 37 figs., 9 tabs.

Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Assessment of Feasibility of the Beneficial Use of Waste Heat from the Advanced Test Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report investigates the feasibility of using waste heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). A proposed glycol waste heat recovery system was assessed for technical and economic feasibility. The system under consideration would use waste heat from the ATR secondary coolant system to preheat air for space heating of TRA-670. A tertiary coolant stream would be extracted from the secondary coolant system loop and pumped to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, where heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air in the heating and ventilation system. Historical data from Advanced Test Reactor operations over the past 10 years indicates that heat from the reactor coolant was available (when needed for heating) for 43.5% of the year on average. Potential energy cost savings by using the waste heat to preheat intake air is $242K/yr. Technical, safety, and logistics considerations of the glycol waste heat recovery system are outlined. Other opportunities for using waste heat and reducing water usage at ATR are considered.

Donna P. Guillen

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fabrication and Testing of Mo-Re Heat Pipes Embedded in Carbon/Carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled wing and tail leading edges are being considered for use on hypersonic vehicles to limit maximum temperatures to values below material reuse limits and to eliminate the need to actively cool the leading edges. The development of a refractory-composite/heat-pipe-cooled leading edge has evolved from the design stage to the fabrication and testing of heat pipes embedded in carbon/carbon (C/C). A three-foot-long, molybdenum-rhenium heat pipe with a lithium working fluid was fabricated and tested at an operating temperature of 2460F to verify the individual heat-pipe design. Following the fabrication of this heat pipe, three additional heat pipes were fabricated and embedded in C/C. The C/C heat-pipe test article was successfully tested using quartz lamps in a vacuum chamber in both a horizontal and vertical orientation. Start up and steady state data are presented for the C/C heat-pipe test article. Radiography and eddy current evaluations were perform...

David Glass Analytical; David E. Glass; Michael A. Merrigan; J. Tom Sena

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

General-Purpose Heat Source development: Extended series test program large fragment tests  

SciTech Connect

General-Purpose Heat Source radioisotope thermoelectric generators (GPHS-RTGs) will provide electric power for the NASA Galileo and European Space Agency Ulysses missions. Each GPHS-RTG comprises two major components: GPHS modules, which provide thermal energy, and a thermoelectric converter, which converts the thermal energy into electric power. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in a GPHS-RTG contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled capsules. LANL conducted a series of safety verification tests on the GPHS-RTG before the scheduled May 1986 launch of the Galileo spacecraft to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in potential accident environments. As a result of the Challenger 51-L accident in January 1986, NASA postponed the launch of Galileo; the launch vehicle was reconfigured and the spacecraft trajectory was modified. These actions prompted NASA to reevaluate potential mission accidents, and an extended series safety test program was initiated. The program included a series of large fragment tests that simulated the collision of solid rocket booster (SRB) fragments, generated in an SRB motor case rupture or resulting from a range safety officer SRB destruct action, with the GPHS-RTG. The tests indicated that fueled clads, inside a converter, will not breach or release fuel after a square (142 cm on a side) SRB fragment impacts flat-on at velocities up to 212 m/s, and that only the leading fueled capsules breach and release fuel after the square SRB fragment impacts the modules, inside the converter, edge-on at 95 m/s. 8 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

Cull, T.A.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Electric field noise above surfaces: a model for heating rate scaling law in ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model for the scaling laws of the electric field noise spectral density as a function of the distance, $d$, above a conducting surface. Our analytical approach models the patch potentials by introducing a correlation length, $\\zeta$, of the electric potential on the surface. The predicted scaling laws are in excellent agreement with two different classes of experiments (cold trapped ions and cantilevers), that span at least four orders of magnitude of $d$. According to this model, heating rate in miniature ion traps could be greatly reduced by proper material engineering.

Dubessy, Romain; Guidoni, Luca

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electric field noise above surfaces: a model for heating rate scaling law in ion traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a model for the scaling laws of the electric field noise spectral density as a function of the distance, $d$, above a conducting surface. Our analytical approach models the patch potentials by introducing a correlation length, $\\zeta$, of the electric potential on the surface. The predicted scaling laws are in excellent agreement with two different classes of experiments (cold trapped ions and cantilevers), that span at least four orders of magnitude of $d$. According to this model, heating rate in miniature ion traps could be greatly reduced by proper material engineering.

Romain Dubessy; Thomas Coudreau; Luca Guidoni

2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

149

Performance Test and Energy Saving Analysis of a Heat Pipe Dehumidifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat pipe technology applied to ventilation, dryness, and cooling and heating radiator in a building is introduced in this paper. A new kind of heat pipe dehumidifier is designed and tested. The energy-saving ratio with the heat pipe dehumidifier ranges from 11.81% to 30.34% compared with the normal dehumidifier, according to the performance testing. The dehumidification capacity and the surface cooler power increases, but the energy saving ratio is reduced with the increase of air relative humidity, dry bulb temperature and air quantity

Zhao, X.; Li, Q.; Yun, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

test procedures for solar water heaters characterizes systemWasted water Solar Heat pump water heater Australia/Newwater_heaters/Annex_IV_8July08 International Organization for Standardization, "Draft International Standard ISO/DIS 9459-4 Solar

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Fabrication and Testing of a Leading-Edge-Shaped Heat Pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A leading-edge-shaped heat pipe was successfully fabricated and tested. The heat pipe had a "D-shaped" cross section and was fabricated from arc cast molybdenumrhenium. An artery was included in the wick. Several issues were resolved during the fabrication of the heat-pipe container and wick with a sharp-leading-edge radius. The heat pipe was tested in a vacuum chamber using induction heating and was started up from the frozen state several times. The heat pipe did operate as a heat pipe over a portion of its length. However, design temperatures and heat fluxes were not obtained due to premature failure of the heat pipe resulting from electrical discharge between the induction heating apparatus and the heat pipe. Introduction Stagnation regions, such as wing and tail leading edges and nose caps, are critical design areas of hypersonic aerospace vehicles because of the hostile thermal environment those regions experience during flight. As a hypersonic vehicle travels through the earth...

David Glass Analytical; David E. Glass; Michael A. Merrigan; J. Tom Sena; Robert S. Reid

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

HVAC and water heating system field test experiences at the Tennessee Energy Conservation in Housing (TECH) complex  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TECH complex has been utilized since 1976 as a field test site for several novel and conventional space conditioning and water heating systems. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar space heating systems (hydronic and air), parallel and series solar assisted heat pumps, air-type solar heating with off-peak storage, passive solar heating, two conventional air-to-air heat pumps, an air-to-air heat pump with desuperheater water heater, and horizontal coil and multiple shallow vertical coil ground-coupled heat pumps. System descriptions and test results are presented as well as performance observations.

Baxter, V.D.; McGraw, B.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

This document has been prepared to assist research reactor operators possessing spent fuel containing enriched uranium of United States origin to prepare part of the documentation necessary to ship this fuel to the United States. Data are included on the nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate, and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies. Isotopic masses of U, Np, Pu and Am that are present in spent research reactor fuel are estimated for MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assembly types. The isotopic masses of each fuel assembly type are given as functions of U-235 burnup in the spent fuel, and of initial U-235 enrichment and U-235 mass in the fuel assembly. Photon dose rates of spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are estimated for fuel assemblies with up to 80% U-235 burnup and specific power densities between 0.089 and 2.857 MW/kg[sup 235]U, and for fission product decay times of up to 20 years. Thermal decay heat loads are estimated for spent fuel based upon the fuel assembly irradiation history (average assembly power vs. elapsed time) and the spent fuel cooling time.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

154

Heat leak testing of a superconducting RHIC dipole magnet at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

Brookhaven National Laboratory is currently performing heat load tests on a superconducting dipole magnet. The magnet is a prototype of the 360, 8 cm bore, arc dipole magnets that will be used in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMC). An accurate measurement of the heat load is needed to eliminate cumulative errors when determining the REUC cryogenic system load requirements. The test setup consists of a dipole positioned between two quadrupoles in a common vacuum tank and heat shield. Piping and instrumentation are arranged to facilitate measurement of the heat load on the primary 4.6 K magnet load and the secondary 55 K heat shield load. Initial results suggest that the primary heat load is well below design allowances. The secondary load was found to be higher than estimated, but remained close to the budgeted amount. Overall, the dipole performed to specifications.

DeLalio, J.T.; Brown, D.P.; Sondericker, J.H.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Latent Heating and Cooling Rates in Developing and Nondeveloping Tropical Disturbances during TCS-08: TRMM PR versus ELDORA Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unique sets of Electra Doppler Radar (ELDORA) observations in both developing and nondeveloping tropical disturbances in the western North Pacific are used to retrieve latent heating and cooling rates. During the reintensification of Sinlaku, ...

Myung-Sook Park; Russell L. Elsberry

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Results from evaporation tests to support the MWTF heat removal system design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental tests program was conducted to measure the evaporative heat removal from the surface of a tank of simulated waste. The results contained in this report constitute definition design data for the latest heat removal function of the MWTF primary ventilation system.

Crea, B.A.

1994-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

157

Solar heat pipe testing of the Stirling thermal motors 4-120 Stirling engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stirling-cycle engines have been identified as a promising technology for the conversion of concentrated solar energy into usable electrical power. A 25kW electric system takes advantage of existing Stirling-cycle engines and existing parabolic concentrator designs. In previous work, the concentrated sunlight impinged directly on the heater head tubes of the Stirling Thermal Motors (STM) 4-120 engine. A Sandia-designed felt-metal-wick heat pipe receiver was fitted to the STM 4-120 engine for on-sun testing on Sandia`s Test Bed Solar Concentrator. The heat pipe uses sodium metal as an intermediate two-phase heat transfer fluid. The receiver replaces the directly-illuminated heater head previously tested. The heat pipe receiver provides heat isothermally to the engine, and the heater head tube length is reduced, both resulting in improved engine performance. The receiver also has less thermal losses than the tube receiver. The heat pipe receiver design is based on Sandia`s second-generation felt-wick heat pipe receiver. This paper presents the interface design, and compares the heat pipe/engine test results to those of the directly-illuminated receiver/engine package.

Andraka, C.E.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Moss, T.A.; Adkins, D.R.; Moreno, J.B.; Gallup, D.R.; Cordeiro, P.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johansson, S. [Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

He II Heat Exchanger Test Unit for the LHC Inner Triplet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Inner Triplet Heat Exchanger Test Unit (IT-HXTU) is a 30-m long thermal model designed at Fermilab, built in US industry, fully automated and tested at CERN as part of the US LHC program to develop the LHC Interaction Region quadrupole system. The cooling scheme of the IT-HXTU is based on heat exchange between stagnant pressurized He II in the magnet cold mass and saturated He II (two-phase) flowing in a heat exchanger located outside of and parallel to the cold mass. The purposes of this test are, among others, to validate the proposed cooling scheme and to define an optimal control strategy to be implemented in the future LHC accelerator. This paper discusses the results for the heat exchanger test runs and emphasizes the thermal and hydraulic behavior of He II for the inner triplet cooling scheme.

Blanco-Viñuela, E; Huang, Y; Nicol, T H; Peterson, T; Van Weelderen, R

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Latent Heating and Cooling Rates in Developing and Nondeveloping Tropical Disturbances during TCS-08: Radar-Equivalent Retrievals from Mesoscale Numerical Models and ELDORA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Latent heating and cooling rates have a critical role in predicting tropical cyclone formation and intensification. In a prior study, Park and Elsberry estimated the latent heating and cooling rates from aircraft Doppler radar [Electra Doppler ...

Myung-Sook Park; Andrew B. Penny; Russell L. Elsberry; Brian J. Billings; James D. Doyle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Influence of Mean Zonal Motion and Meridional Temperature Gradients on the Solar Semidiurnal Atmospheric Tide: A Revised Spectral Study with Improved Heating Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculations of the semidiurnal atmospheric tide at solstice using improved heating rates are presented. The heating rates for solar absorption by water vapor are based on a global water vapor distribution (Jenne, 1969, 1975; Jenne et al., 1974), ...

R. L. Walterscheid; J. G. DeVore; S. V. Venkateswaran

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Test results of heat-exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These tests evaluated flow-driven brushes, recirculating sponge rubber balls, chlorination, and mechanical system/chlorination combinations for in-situ cleaning of two potential heat exchanger materials: titanium and aluminum alloy 5052. Tests were successful when fouling resistance was <3.0 x 10/sup -4/ ft/sup 2/ hr-/sup 0/F/Btu. Results indicated systems and cleaning techniques using brushes, soft sponge balls, and various concentrations of chlorine had some potential for maintaining heat transfer efficiency.

Lott, D F

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Recent High Heat Flux Tests on W-Rod-Armored Mockups  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the authors initial high heat flux tests on small mockups armored with W rods, done in the small electron beam facility (EBTS) at Sandia National Laboratories, the mockups exhibited excellent thermal performance. However, to reach high heat fluxes, they reduced the heated area to only a portion ({approximately}25%) of the sample. They have now begun tests in their larger electron beam facility, EB 1200, where the available power (1.2 MW) is more than enough to heat the entire surface area of the small mockups. The initial results indicate that, at a given power, the surface temperatures of rods in the EB 1200 tests is somewhat higher than was observed in the EBTS tests. Also, it appears that one mockup (PW-10) has higher surface temperatures than other mockups with similar height (10mm) W rods, and that the previously reported values of absorbed heat flux on this mockup were too high. In the tests in EB 1200 of a second mockup, PW-4, absorbed heat fluxes of {approximately}22MW/m{sup 2} were reached but the corresponding surface temperatures were somewhat higher than in EBTS. A further conclusion is that the simple 1-D model initially used in evaluating some of the results from the EBTS testing was not adequate, and 3-D thermal modeling will be needed to interpret the results.

NYGREN,RICHARD E.; YOUCHISON,DENNIS L.; MCDONALD,JIMMIE M.; LUTZ,THOMAS J.; MISZKIEL,MARK E.

2000-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Recent Developments on the Broadband Heating Rate Profile Value-Added Product  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Developments on the Recent Developments on the Broadband Heating Rate Profile Value-Added Product E. J. Mlawer, J. S. Delamere, and S. A. Clough Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. Cambridge, Massachusetts M. A. Miller and K. L. Johnson Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York T. R. Shippert and C. N. Long Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. G. Ellingson Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida M. H. Zhang State University of New York - Stony Brook Albany, New York R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia R. T. Cederwall and S. C. Xie Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico J. A. Ogren National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

164

Expert Meeting Report: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exploring the Disconnect Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems M. Hoeschele and E. Weitzel Alliance for Residential Building Innovation (ARBI) May 2013 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, subcontractors, or affiliated partners makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark,

165

Solar test of an integrated sodium reflux heat pipe receiver/reactor for thermochemical energy transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A chemical reactor for carbon dioxide reforming of methane was integrated into a sodium reflux heat pipe receiver and tested in the solar furnace of the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. The receiver/reactor was a heat pipe with seven tubes inside an evacuated metal box containing sodium. The catalyst, 0.5 wt% Rh on alumina, filled two of the tubes with the front surface of the box serving as the solar absorber. In operation, concentrated sunlight heated the front plate and vaporized sodium from a wire mesh wick attached to other side. Sodium vapor condensed on the reactor tubes, releasing latent heat and returning to the wick by gravity. The receiver system performed satisfactorily in many tests under varying flow conditions. The maximum power absorbed was 7.5 kW at temperatures above 800C. The feasibility of operating a heat pipe receiver/reactor under solar conditions was proven, and the advantages of reflux devices confirmed.

Diver, R.B.; Fish, J.D. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Levitan, R.; Levy, M.; Meirovitch, E.; Rosin, H. (Weizmann Inst. of Science, Rehovot (Israel)); Paripatyadar, S.A.; Richardson, J.T. (Univ. of Houston, TX (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems: Project status report for the months of October and November, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes a project to develop tools for evaluating solar heating and cooling systems. Current work on this project has been to validate the Florida Solar Energy Center`s (FSEC) models of the Solahart 302K and 302K-AS systems to prepare a rating for the Sacramento Municipal Utility District`s rebate program for solar domestic hot water heaters. A preliminary rating has been issued by FSEC and updated ratings will be released as necessary. Two of the problems that were mentioned in the August/September report are addressed and a tank heat loss test is discussed. Work continues on improving and validating the models.

Not Available

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

New Idea for Hydraulic Testing Machine with Stress and Strain Rates Controlled and its Realization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the relationship between pressure and flux of thin-walled hole, a new idea is proposed for hydraulic testing machine. Using transducer and computer technique, hydraulic system is formed by SCM(single chip micyoco), needle valve, frequency converter ... Keywords: testing machine, stress rate, strain rate, needle valves

Du Jingqing; Gao Shiqiao; Niu Shaohua

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coal plasticity at high heating rates and temperatures. First technical progress report for the fourth quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect

The broad objective of this project is to obtain improved, quantitative understanding of the transient plasticity of bituminous coals under high heating rates and other reaction and pretreatment conditions of scientific and practical interest. To these ends the research plan is to measure the softening and resolidification behavior of two US bituminous coals with a rapid-heating, fast response, high-temperature coal plastometer, previously developed in this laboratory. Specific measurements planned for the project include determinations of apparent viscosity, softening temperature, plastic period, and resolidificationtime for molten coal: (1) as a function of independent variations in coal type, heating rate, final temperature, gaseous atmosphere (inert, 0{sub 2} or H{sub 2}), and shear rate; and (2) in exploratory runs where coal is pretreated (preoxidation, pyridine extraction, metaplast cracking agents), before heating. The intra-coal inventory and molecular weight distribution of pyridine extractables will also be measured using a rapid quenching, electrical screen heater coal pyrolysis reactor. The yield of extractables is representative of the intra-coal inventory of plasticing agent (metaplast) remaining after quenching. Coal plasticity kinetics will then be mathematically modeled from metaplast generation and depletion rates, via a correlation between the viscosity of a suspension and the concentration of deformable medium (here metaplast) in that suspension. Work during this reporting period has been concerned with re-commissioning the rapid heating rate plastometer apparatus.

Darivakis, G.S.; Peters, W.A.; Howard, J.B.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A Cryogenic Test Station for Subcooling Helium Heat Exchangers for LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The superconducting magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) will be cooled at 1.9 K by distributed cooling loops where counter-flow heat exchangers will be integrated. To qualify potential suppliers for the 250-units series production, prototypes of various technologies have been selected by CERN and a test station was set up at CEA-Grenoble. This test station, is constituted of a cryostat allowing an easy access to the heat exchanger to be tested as well as very low pressure pumping facilities.

Roussel, P; Tavian, L

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov?  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? November 12, 2009 - 8:36am Addthis On Monday, you read about the resources on Fueleconomy.gov and how they can help you compare the fuel economy of vehicles. Fueleconomy.gov also offers a tool called Your MPG, where you can track your own fuel economy and compare it to that of other users and to the test ratings. Many factors affect your mileage, and you may see different numbers than those list on Fueleconomy.gov. Whether you are using Your MPG or just keeping track on your own: How does your fuel economy compare to the test ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

171

USING AN ADAPTER TO PERFORM THE CHALFANT-STYLE CONTAINMENT VESSEL PERIODIC MAINTENANCE LEAK RATE TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently the Packaging Technology and Pressurized Systems (PT&PS) organization at the Savannah River National Laboratory was asked to develop an adapter for performing the leak-rate test of a Chalfant-style containment vessel. The PT&PS organization collaborated with designers at the Department of Energy's Pantex Plant to develop the adapter currently in use for performing the leak-rate testing on the containment vessels. This paper will give the history of leak-rate testing of the Chalfant-style containment vessels, discuss the design concept for the adapter, give an overview of the design, and will present results of the testing done using the adapter.

Loftin, B.; Abramczyk, G.; Trapp, D.

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

172

Heat transfer rates for filmwise, dropwise, and superhydrophobic condensation on silicon substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Condensation, a two-phase heat transfer processes, is commonly utilized in industrial systems. Condensation heat transfer can be optimized by using surfaces in which dropwise condensation (DWC) occurs, and even further ...

Hery, Travis M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Conceptual Design of Forced Convection Molten Salt Heat Transfer Testing Loop  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a proposal to design and construct a forced convection test loop. A detailed test plan will then be conducted to obtain data on heat transfer, thermodynamic, and corrosion characteristics of the molten salts and fluid-solid interaction. In particular, this report outlines an experimental research and development test plan. The most important initial requirement for heat transfer test of molten salt systems is the establishment of reference coolant materials to use in the experiments. An earlier report produced within the same project highlighted how thermophysical properties of the materials that directly impact the heat transfer behavior are strongly correlated to the composition and impurities concentration of the melt. It is therefore essential to establish laboratory techniques that can measure the melt composition, and to develop purification methods that would allow the production of large quantities of coolant with the desired purity. A companion report describes the options available to reach such objectives. In particular, that report outlines an experimental research and development test plan that would include following steps: •Molten Salts: The candidate molten salts for investigation will be selected. •Materials of Construction: Materials of construction for the test loop, heat exchangers, and fluid-solid corrosion tests in the test loop will also be selected. •Scaling Analysis: Scaling analysis to design the test loop will be performed. •Test Plan: A comprehensive test plan to include all the tests that are being planned in the short and long term time frame will be developed. •Design the Test Loop: The forced convection test loop will be designed including extensive mechanical design, instrument selection, data acquisition system, safety requirements, and related precautionary measures. •Fabricate the Test Loop. •Perform the Tests. •Uncertainty Analysis: As a part of the data collection, uncertainty analysis will be performed to develop probability of confidence in what is measured in the test loop. Overall, the testing loop will allow development of needed heat transfer related thermophysical parameters for all the salts, validate existing correlations, validate measuring instruments under harsh environment, and have extensive corrosion testing of materials of construction.

Manohar S. Sohal; Piyush Sabharwall; Pattrick Calderoni; Alan K. Wertsching; S. Brandon Grover

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Eddy Current Testing of Service Water Heat Exchangers for Engineers Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Service water (SW) heat exchangers experience tube failures due primarily to Inside Diameter (ID) pitting and flow-induced fretting wear at tube-to-tube support plate intersections. Eddy current is a fast volumetric tube wall examination technique performed from inside a tube to test and maintain structural integrity of the installed tubing. Because the service water heat exchanger tubing examination is not mandated under the ASME Code or the Regulatory Guide requirements, eddy current examination practi...

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

175

Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

Donna Post Guillen

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

IMPLEMENTING HEAT SEALED BAG RELIEF & HYDROGEN & METANE TESTING TO REDUCE THE NEED TO REPACK HANFORD TRANSURANIC (TRU) WASTE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's site at Hanford has a significant quantity of drums containing heat-sealed bags that required repackaging under previous revisions of the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC) before being shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Since glovebox repackaging is the most rate-limiting and resource-intensive step for accelerating Hanford waste certification, a cooperative effort between Hanford's TRU Program and the WIPP site significantly reduced the number of drums requiring repackaging. More specifically, recent changes to the TRAMPAC (Revision 19C), allow relief for heat-sealed bags having more than 390 square inches of surface area. This relief is based on data provided by Hanford on typical Hanford heat-sealed bags, but can be applied to other sites generating transuranic waste that have waste packaged in heat-sealed bags. The paper provides data on the number of drums affected, the attendant cost savings, and the time saved. Hanford also has a significant quantity of high-gram drums with multiple layers of confinement including heat-scaled bags. These higher-gram drums are unlikely to meet the decay-heat limits required for analytical category certification under the TRAMPAC. The combination of high-gram drums and accelerated reprocessing/shipping make it even more difficult to meet the decay-heat limits because of necessary aging requirements associated with matrix depletion. Hydrogen/methane sampling of headspace gases can be used to certify waste that does not meet decay-heat limits of the more restrictive analytical category using the test category. The number of drums that can be qualified using the test category is maximized by assuring that the detection limit for hydrogen and methane is as low as possible. Sites desiring to ship higher-gram drums must understand the advantages of using hydrogen/methane sampling and shipping under the test category. Headspace gas sampling, as specified by the WIPP Waste Analysis Plan, provides the sample necessary for hydrogen/methane analysis. Most Hanford drums are not equipped with a filter through which a headspace gas sample can be obtained. A pneumatic system is now used to insert ''dart'' filters. The filters were developed by the vendor and approved for WIPP certification at the request of the Hanford Site. The same pneumatic system is used to install septum-type sample ports to allow the headspace to be sampled. Together, these steps allow the Hanford Site to avoid repackaging a large percentage of drums, and thus accelerate certification of waste destined for WIPP.

MCDONALD, K.M.

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

General-Purpose Heat Source: Research and development program: Cold-Process Verification Test Series  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because any space mission could experience a launch abort or return from orbit, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs and individual GPHS capsules fueled with {sup 238}UO{sub 2} ({sup 235}U-depleted) to a variety of explosive overpressure and impact events. In the early 1990s, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) resumed fabrication of {sup 238}UO{sub 2} GPHS pellets. The Cold-Process Verification (CPV) Test Series was designed to compare the response of GPHS heat sources loaded with recently fabricated hot- and cold-pressed {sup 238}UO{sub 2} pellets to the response of urania pellets used in the Galileo and Ulysses performance tests. This report documents eleven bare-capsule impacts and one impact of a fully loaded GPHS module. All of the failures observed in the bare-clad impact tests were similar to failures observed in previous safety tests. No failures occurred in the module impact test.

Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

179

Expert Meeting Report: Exploring the Disconnect Between Rated and Field Performance of Water Heating Systems  

SciTech Connect

Water heating represents a major residential energy end use, especially in highly efficient homes where space conditioning loads and energy use has been significantly reduced. Future efforts to reduce water heating energy use requires the development of an improved understanding of equipment performance, as well as recognizing system interactions related to the distribution system and the fixture use characteristics. By bringing together a group of water heating experts, we hope to advance the shared knowledge on key water heating performance issues and identify additional data needs that will further this critical research area.

Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Wellsite verification testing of an advanced geothermal primary heat exchanger (APEX)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The well-site test phase is described of a research program conducted by Aerojet Liquid Rocket Company to establish the feasibility of using a recirculating solid bed material to eliminate heat exchanger fouling in geothermal service. The concept was directed towards application as the primary heat exchanger in a geothermal power plant which utilizes a binary cycle. The APEX approach was shown to be effective for condenser operation with fouling cooling water. Similarly, APEX could be applied for geothermal direct heat utilization, for example, the vapor generator in an absorption refrigeration system. Phase I of this program culminated in a laboratory demonstration of APEX concept feasibility with brine simulants. Testing under the current project phase of the research effort was conducted at the Geothermal Component Test Facility at East Mesa, California. Technical feasibility was established by testing the effectiveness of the bed material in preventing the fouling of a heat exchanger test section. The elimination of fouling was demonstrated using both geothermal well water and facility cooling water as the fouling fluids.

Addoms, J.F.; Gracey, C.M.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Lidar Observations of Mixed Layer Dynamics: Tests of Parameterized Entrainment Models of Mixed Layer Growth Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground based lidar measurements of the atmospheric mixed layer depth, the entrainment zone depth and the wind speed and wind direction were used to test various parameterized entrainment models of mixed layer growth rate. Six case studies under ...

R. Boers; E. W. Eloranta; R. L. Coulter

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Management Plan, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

This is the second revision to the Management Plan for US DOE contract entitled, ``Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,`` Contract Number DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project Number C06787. The cost plan and schedule have been revised herein. The Management Plan was revised once before, in March 1994. In this project IITRI will demonstrate its in situ soil heating and decontamination technology which uses 60 Hz AC power to heat soil to a temperature of about 900C. This technology is aimed at the decontamination of soil by the removal of organic hazardous constituents by the action of heat and a vacuum gas collection system.

Dev, H.

1995-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

183

MEASURED AND CALCULATED HEATING AND DOSE RATES FOR THE HFIR HB4 BEAM TUBE AND COLD SOURCE  

SciTech Connect

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory was upgraded to install a cold source in horizontal beam tube number 4. Calculations were performed and measurements were made to determine heating within the cold source and dose rates within and outside a shield tunnel surrounding the beam tube. This report briefly describes the calculations and presents comparisons of the measured and calculated results. Some calculated dose rates are in fair to good agreement with the measured results while others, particularly those at the shield interfaces, differ greatly from the measured results. Calculated neutron exposure to the Teflon seals in the hydrogen transfer line is about one fourth of the measured value, underpredicting the lifetime by a factor of four. The calculated cold source heating is in good agreement with the measured heating.

Slater, Charles O [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Ferguson, Phillip D [ORNL; Bucholz, James A [ORNL; Popov, Emilian L [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Oscillating flow loss test results in Stirling engine heat exchangers. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The results are presented for a test program designed to generate a database of oscillating flow loss information that is applicable to Stirling engine heat exchangers. The tests were performed on heater/cooler tubes of various lengths and entrance/exit configurations, on stacked and sintered screen regenerators of various wire diameters and on Brunswick and Metex random fiber regenerators. The test results were performed over a range of oscillating flow parameters consistent with Stirling engine heat exchanger experience. The tests were performed on the Sunpower oscillating flow loss rig which is based on a variable stroke and variable frequency linear drive motor. In general, the results are presented by comparing the measured oscillating flow losses to the calculated flow losses. The calculated losses are based on the cycle integration of steady flow friction factors and entrance/exit loss coefficients.

Koester, G.; Howell, S.; Wood, G.; Miller, E.; Gedeon, D.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Laboratory Testing of the Heating Capacity of Air-Source Heat Pumps at Low Outdoor Temperature Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-source heat pump systems offer an alternative to the common heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) configuration of single split unitary air conditioners with gas heating. In simple terms, heat pumps are traditional air conditioning units with the added capability of running in reverse as required by the building load. Thus, where the traditional air conditioning unit has an indoor evaporator to remove heat from the space and an outdoor condenser to reject heat to the ambient environment, ...

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

186

Failure analysis of radioisotopic heat source capsules tested under multi-axial conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order to qualify small radioisotopic heat sources for a 25-yr design life, multi-axial mechanical tests were performed on the structural components of the heat source. The results of these tests indicated that failure predominantly occurred in the middle of the weld ramp-down zone. Examination of the failure zone by standard metallographic techniques failed to indicate the true cause of failure. A modified technique utilizing chemical etching, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray analysis was employed and dramatically indicated the true cause of failure, impurity concentration in the ramp-down zone. As a result of the initial investigation, weld parameters for the heat sources were altered. Example welds made with a pulse arc technique did not have this impurity buildup in the ramp-down zone.

Zielinski, R.E.; Stacy, E.; Burgan, C.E.

187

Observational Test of Stochastic Heating in Low-$\\beta$ Fast Solar Wind Streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spacecraft measurements show that protons undergo substantial perpendicular heating during their transit from the Sun to the outer heliosphere. In this paper, we use {\\em Helios~2} measurements to investigate whether stochastic heating by low-frequency turbulence is capable of explaining this perpendicular heating. We analyze {\\em Helios~2} magnetic-field measurements in low-$\\beta$ fast-solar-wind streams between heliocentric distances $r=0.29$ AU and $r=0.64$ AU to determine the rms amplitude of the fluctuating magnetic field, $\\delta B_{\\rm p}$, near the proton gyroradius scale $\\rho_{\\rm p}$. We then evaluate the stochastic heating rate $Q_{\\perp \\rm stoch}$ using the measured value of $\\delta B_{\\rm p}$ and a previously published analytical formula for $Q_{\\perp \\rm stoch}$. Using {\\em Helios} measurements we estimate the `empirical' perpendicular heating rate $Q_{\\perp \\rm emp} = (k_{\\rm B}/m_{\\rm p}) B V (d/dr) (T_{\\perp \\rm p}/B)$ that is needed to explain the $T_{\\perp \\rm p}$ profile. We find that $...

Bourouaine, Sofiane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Tube vibration in industrial-size test heat exchanger (90/sup 0/ square layout)  

SciTech Connect

Tube vibrations in heat exchangers are being systematically investigated in a series of tests performed with an industrial-size test exchanger. Results from waterflow tests of eleven different tube bundles, in six- and eight-crosspass configurations on a 90/sup 0/ square layout with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25 are reported. The test cases include full tube bundles, no-tubes-in-window bundles, finned tube bundles, and proposed field and design fixes. The testing focused on identification of the lowest critical flowrate to initiate fluidelastic instability (large amplitude tube motion) and the location within the bundle of the tubes which first experience instability. The test results are tabulated to permit comparison with results obtained from previous tests with a 30/sup 0/ triangular layout tube bundle. Instability criteria are evaluated preliminarily. Pressure drop data are also generated and reported.

Halle, H.; Wambsganss, M.W.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Multiple pollutant removal using the condensing heat exchanger. Task 2, Pilot scale IFGT testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of Task 2 (IFGT Pilot-Scale Tests at the B&W Alliance Research Center) is to evaluate the emission reduction performance of the Integrated flue Gas Treatment (IFGT) process for coal-fired applications. The IFGT system is a two-stage condensing heat exchanger that captures multiple pollutants - while recovering waste heat. The IFGT technology offers the potential of a addressing the emission of SO{sub 2} and particulate from electric utilities currently regulated under the Phase I and Phase II requirements defined in Title IV, and many of the air pollutants that will soon be regulated under Title III of the Clean Air Act. The performance data will be obtained at pilot-scale conditions similar to full-scale operating systems. The task 2 IFGT tests have been designed to investigate several aspects of IFGT process conditions at a broader range of variable than would be feasible at a larger scale facility. The performance parameters that will be investigated are as follows: SO{sub 2} removal; particulate removal; removal of mercury and other heavy metals; NO{sub x} removal; HF and HCl removal; NH{sub 3} removal; ammonia-sulfur compounds generation; and steam injection for particle removal. For all of the pollutant removal tests, removal efficiency will be based on measurements at the inlet and outlet of the IFGT facility. Heat recovery measurements will also be made during these tests to demonstrate the heat recovery provided by the IFGT technology. This report provides the Final Test Plan for the first coal tested in the Task 2 pilot-scale IFGT tests.

Jankura, B.J.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

Sresty, G.C.

1994-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

191

Heating Rate within the Upper Ocean in Relation to its Bio–optical State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar radiation absorption and local heating within the upper layers of the open ocean are strongly influenced by the abundance of phytoplankton as depicted by the chlorophyll concentration. According to whether this concentration is high or low, ...

André Morel; David Antoine

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect

A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern. This document is a Treatability Study Work Plan for the demonstration program. The document contains a description of the proposed treatability study, background of the EM heating process, description of the field equipment, and demonstration test design.

Sresty, G.C.

1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Construction and testing of ceramic fabric heat pipe with water working fluid  

SciTech Connect

A prototype ceramic fabric/titanium water heat pipe has been constructed and tested; it transported 25 to 80 W of power at 423 K. Component development and testing is continuing with the aim of providing an improved prototype, with a 38-{mu}m stainless steel linear covered by a biaxially-braided Nextel (trademark of the 3M Co., St. Paul Minnesota) sleeve that is approximately 300-{mu}m thick. This fabric has been tested to 800 K, and its emittance is about 0.5 at that temperature. Advanced versions of the water heat pipe will probably require a coating over the ceramic fabric in order to increase this emittance to the 0.8 to 0.9 range. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Webb, B.J.; Bates, J.M.; Cooper, M.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

195

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marketing > RATES Marketing > RATES RATES Current Rates Past Rates 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Rates Schedules Power CV-F13 CPP-2 Transmissions CV-T3 CV-NWT5 PACI-T3 COTP-T3 CV-TPT7 CV-UUP1 Ancillary CV-RFS4 CV-SPR4 CV-SUR4 CV-EID4 CV-GID1 Future and Other Rates SNR Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K)

196

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Planning & Projects Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates You are here: SN Home page > Power Marketing > RATES Rates and Repayment Services Rates Current Rates Power Revenue Requirement Worksheet (FY 2014) (Oct 2013 - Sep 2014) (PDF - 30K) PRR Notification Letter (Sep 27, 2013) (PDF - 959K) FY 2012 FP% True-Up Calculations(PDF - 387K) Variable Resource Scheduling Charge FY12-FY16 (October 1, 2012) PRR Forecast FY14-FY17 (May 23, 2013) (PDF - 100K) Forecasted Transmission Rates (May 2013) (PDF - 164K) Past Rates 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 Historical CVP Transmission Rates (April 2013) (PDF - 287K) Rate Schedules Power - CV-F13 - CPP-2 Transmission - CV-T3 - CV-NWT5 - PACI-T3 - COTP-T3 - CV-TPT7 - CV-UUP1 Ancillary - CV-RFS4 - CV-SPR4 - CV-SUR4 - CV-EID4 - CV-GID1 Federal Register Notices - CVP, COTP and PACI

197

GPHS (General Purpose Heat Source) uranium oxide encapsulations supporting satellite safety tests  

SciTech Connect

General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) simulant-fueled capsules were assembled, welded, nondestructively examined, and shipped to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for satellite safety tests. Simulant-fueled iridium capsules contain depleted uranium oxide pellets that serve as a stand-in for plutonium-238 oxide pellets. Information on forty seven capsules prepared during 1987 and 1988 is recorded in this memorandum along with a description of the processes used for encapsulation and evaluation. LANL expects to use all capsules for destructive safety tests, which are under way. Test results so far have demonstrated excellent integrity of the Savannah River capsule welds. 10 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Kanne, W.R.

1989-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

198

Heat-pipe gas-combustion system endurance test for Stirling engine. Final report, May 1990-September 1990  

SciTech Connect

Stirling Thermal Motors, Inc., (STM) has been developing a general purpose Heat Pipe Gas Combustion System (HPGC) suitable for use with the STM4-120 Stirling engine. The HPGC consists of a parallel plate recuperative preheater, a finned heat pipe evaporator and a film cooled gas combustor. A principal component of the HPGC is the heat pipe evaporator which collects and distributes the liquid sodium over the heat transfer surfaces. The liquid sodium evaporates and flows to the condensers where it delivers its latent heat. The report presents test results of endurance tests run on a Gas-Fired Stirling Engine (GFSE). Tests on a dynamometer test stand yielded 67 hours of engine operation at power levels over 10 kW (13.5 hp) with 26 hours at power levels above 15 kW (20 hp). Total testing of the engine, including both motoring tests and engine operation, yielded 245 hours of engine run time.

Mahrle, P.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

RATES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RATES RATES Rates Document Library SNR Rates Process Calendar (PDF - 171K) Procedures Informal Process Transmission Action Items List (PDF - 144K) Power Action Item List updated on 4-27-10 (PDF - 155K) Power Action Item List (Quick links to relevant documents) Formal Process Rates Brochure (01/11/2011) (PDF - 900K) Appendix A - Federal Register Notice (01/03/2011) (PDF - 8000K) Appendix B - Central Valley Project Power Repayment Study (PDF - 22,322K) Appendix C - Development of the CVP Cost of Service Study (PDF - 2038K) Appendix D - Western Transmission System Facilities Map (PDF - 274K) Appendix E - Estimated FY12 FP and BR Customer (PDF - 1144K) Appendix F - Forecasted Replacements and Additions FY11 - FY16 (PDF - 491K) Appendix G - Definitions (PDF - 1758K) Appendix H - Acronyms (PDF - 720K)

200

General-Purpose Heat Source Safety Verification Test series: SVT-7 through SVT-10  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of the radioisotope thermoelectric generator that will supply power for the Galileo and Ulysses (formerly ISPM) space missions. The GPHS provides power by transmitting the heat of /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ ..cap alpha..-decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because the possibility of an orbital abort always exists, the heat source was designed and constructed to minimize plutonia release in any accident environment. The Safety Verification Test (SVT) series was formulated to evaluate the effectiveness of GPHS plutonia containment after atmospheric reentry and Earth impact. The first report (covering SVT-1 through SVT-6) described the results of flat and side-on module impacts. This report describes module impacts at angles of 15/sup 0/ and 30/sup 0/.

George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

NREL Tests Integrated Heat Pump Water Heater Performance in Different Climates (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This technical highlight describes NREL tests to capture information about heat pump performance across a wide range of ambient conditions for five heat pump water heaters (HPWH). These water heaters have the potential to significantly reduce water heater energy use relative to traditional electric resistance water heaters. These tests have provided detailed performance data for these appliances, which have been used to evaluate the cost of saved energy as a function of climate. The performance of HPWHs is dependent on ambient air temperature and humidity and the logic controlling the heat pump and the backup resistance heaters. The laboratory tests were designed to measure each unit's performance across a range of air conditions and determine the specific logic controlling the two heat sources, which has a large effect on the comfort of the users and the energy efficiency of the system. Unlike other types of water heaters, HPWHs are both influenced by and have an effect on their surroundings. Since these effects are complex and different for virtually every house and climate region, creating an accurate HPWH model from the data gathered during the laboratory tests was a main goal of the project. Using the results from NREL's laboratory tests, such as the Coefficient of Performance (COP) curves for different air conditions as shown in Figure 1, an existing HPWH model is being modified to produce more accurate whole-house simulations. This will allow the interactions between the HPWH and the home's heating and cooling system to be evaluated in detail, for any climate region. Once these modeling capabilities are in place, a realistic cost-benefit analysis can be performed for a HPWH installation anywhere in the country. An accurate HPWH model will help to quantify the savings associated with installing a HPWH in the place of a standard electric water heater. In most locations, HPWHs are not yet a cost-effective alternative to natural gas water heaters. The detailed system performance maps that were developed by this testing program will be used to: (1) Target regions of the country that would benefit most from this technology; (2) Identify improvements in current systems to maximize homeowner cost savings; and (3) Explore opportunities for development of advanced hot water heating systems.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Development and test of a space-reactor-core heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe designed to meet the heat transfer requirements of a 100-kW/sub e/ space nuclear power system has been developed and tested. General design requirements for the device included an operating temperature of 1500/sup 0/K with an evaporator radial flux density of 100 w/cm/sup 2/. The total heat-pipe length of 2 m comprised an evaporator length of 0.3 m, a 1.2-m adiabatic section, and a condenser length of 0.5 m. A four-artery design employing screen arteries and distribution wicks was used with lithium serving as the working fluid. Molybdenum alloys were used for the screen materials and tube shell. Hafnium and zirconium gettering materials were used in connection with a pre-purified distilled lithium charge to ensure internal chemical compatibility. After initial performance verification, the 14.1-mm i.d. heat pipe was operated at 15 kW throughput at 1500/sup 0/K for 100 hours. No performance degradation was observed during the test.

Merrigan, M.A.; Runyan, J.E.; Martinez, H.E.; Keddy, E.S.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

RADIATION HEAT TRANSFER ENVIRONMENT IN FIRE AND FURNACE TESTS OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS PAKCAGES  

SciTech Connect

The Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC) sequential test of radioactive materials packages includes a thermal test to confirm the ability of the package to withstand a transportation fire event. The test specified by the regulations (10 CFR 71) consists of a 30 minute, all engulfing, hydrocarbon fuel fire, with an average flame temperature of at least 800 C. The requirements specify an average emissivity for the fire of at least 0.9, which implies an essentially black radiation environment. Alternate test which provide equivalent total heat input at the 800 C time averaged environmental temperature may also be employed. When alternate tests methods are employed, such as furnace or gaseous fuel fires, the equivalence of the radiation environment may require justification. The effects of furnace and open confinement fire environments are compared with the regulatory fire environment, including the effects of gases resulting from decomposition of package overpack materials. The results indicate that furnace tests can produce the required radiation heat transfer environment, i.e., equivalent to the postulated pool fire. An open enclosure, with transparent (low emissivity) fire does not produce an equivalent radiation environment.

Smith, A

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

204

Side-by-Side Testing of Water Heating Systems: Results from the 2010 - 2011 Evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) continues the testing and evaluation of seven water heating systems operating side-by-side at the HWS laboratory in Cocoa, Florida, and documents results in this report. All systems are submitted to alternating hot water draw schedules (ASHRAE 90.1 and NREL/BA). The most significant system change under the latest testing rotation comes from the evaluation of a new state-of-the-art electric heat pump water heater (HPWH) system. The HPWH water heater has demonstrated that under favorable ambient conditions it can perform very well against the best system evaluated in Phase I (2009-2010) ? the differentially controlled solar flat plate solar system.

Colon, C.; Parker, D.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Development and testing of an automated wood-burning heating system. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An improved wood continuous, automated combustion system has been developed using a tunnel burner. The tunnel burner implemented into a boiler heating system has proven to be very efficient. The prototype was tested and evaluated. A second generation tunnel system was designed and fabricated. Work performed between April 1980 and April 1981 is summarized. The most important results of the project are: the finalized tunnel burner design; high combustion efficiency; and low air pollution emissions. 3 tables. (DMC)

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Design, construction, and testing of a residential solar heating and cooling system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NSF/CSU Solar House I solar heating and cooling system became operational on 1 July 1974. During the first months of operation the emphasis was placed on adjustment, ''tuning,'' and fault correction in the solar collection and the solar/fuel/cooling subsystems. Following this initial check out period, analysis and testing of the system utilizing a full year of data were accomplished. This report discusses the results of this analysis of the full year of operation. (WDM)

Ward, D.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Testing of Crystallization Temperature of a New Working Fluid for Absorption Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

Lithium bromide/water (LiBr/water) absorption systems are potential candidates for absorption heat pump water heating applications since they have been widely commercialized for cooling applications. One drawback to LiBr/water absorption water heater systems is that they are unable to operate at typical water heating temperatures due to solution crystallization hazards. Binary or ternary mixtures, serving as working fluids, were reported (Ally, 1988; Herold et al., 1991; Iyoki and Uemura, 1981; Yasuhide Nemoto et al., 2010; Zogg et al., 2005) to help improve the absorption performance or avoid crystallization of absorption heat pump systems. A recent development (De Lucas et al., 2007) investigated the use of a ternary mixture of aqueous mixture of lithium bromide and sodium formate (CHO2Na). The new working fluid composition maintains a ratio of LiBr/CHO2Na of 2 by weight. This new working fluid is a potential competitor to aqueous LiBr solution in absorption system due to higher water vapor absorption rates and lower generation temperature needed (De Lucas et al., 2004). There exists data on equilibrium performance and other physical properties of this new working fluid. However, there is no available data on crystallization behavior. Crystallization temperature is crucial for the design of absorption heat pump water heater in order to avoid crystallization hazards during operation. We have therefore conducted a systematic study to explore the crystallization temperature of LiBr/CHO2Na water solution and compared it against aqueous LiBr solutions. These results were then used to evaluate the feasibility of using the new working fluid in water heating applications showing limited potential.

Wang, Kai [ORNL; Kisari, Padmaja [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Management Plan: Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this project IITRI will demonstrate an in situ soil heating technology for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants present in the soil. In Situ heating will be accomplished by the application of 60 Hz AC power to the soil. The soil will be heated to a temperature of about 90{degree}C. This technology is suited for the removal of those organic compounds which have a normal boiling point in the range of 100{degree} to 210{degree}C, or else for those which exhibit a pure component vapor pressure of at least 10 mm Hg in the 90{degree} to 100{degree}C temperature range. For example, perchloroethylene, dichlorobenzene, trichlorobenzene, etc. may be removed by in situ AC heating. It is planned to demonstrate the technology by heating approximately 400 tons of soil in the K-1070 Classified Burial Ground located at DOE`s K-25 Site located in Oak Ridge, TN. It is estimated that the heating portion of the demonstration will take approximately 3 weeks at an average power input rate of 150 to 175 kill. IITRI expects to spend considerable time in the front end reviewing site characteristics, preparing detail design, developing Health and Safety Plans and other documents needed to obtain regulatory approval for the demonstration, arranging for site sampling, infrastructure development and document preparation. It is anticipated that site activities will begin in approximately 5 to 6 months. This contract was signed on September 30, 1993. IITRI started work on it in October 1993. It is planned to complete the demonstration and submit approved final reports by September 30, 1994. This project has 12 tasks and four major milestones. The major milestones and their planned completion dates are presented.

Dev, H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Environmental assessment of general-purpose heat source safety verification testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) was prepared to identify and evaluate potential environmental, safety, and health impacts associated with the Proposed Action to test General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) assemblies at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) 10,000-Foot Sled Track Facility, Albuquerque, New Mexico. RTGs are used to provide a reliable source of electrical power on board some spacecraft when solar power is inadequate during long duration space missions. These units are designed to convert heat from the natural decay of radioisotope fuel into electrical power. Impact test data are required to support DOE`s mission to provide radioisotope power systems to NASA and other user agencies. The proposed tests will expand the available safety database regarding RTG performance under postulated accident conditions. Direct observations and measurements of GPHS/RTG performance upon impact with hard, unyielding surfaces are required to verify model predictions and to ensure the continual evolution of the RTG designs that perform safely under varied accident environments. The Proposed Action is to conduct impact testing of RTG sections containing GPHS modules with simulated fuel. End-On and Side-On impact test series are planned.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems  

SciTech Connect

Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the same project [1]. However, this work focuses on two materials: the LiF-BeF2 eutectic (67 and 33 mol%, respectively, also known as flibe) as primary coolant and the LiF-NaF-KF eutectic (46.5, 11.5, and 52 mol%, respectively, also known as flinak) as secondary heat transport fluid. At first common issues are identified, involving the preparation and purification of the materials as well as the development of suitable diagnostics. Than issues specific to each material and its application are considered, with focus on the compatibility with structural materials and the extension of the existing properties database.

Pattrick Calderoni

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The eight-month program for 1990 is separated into seven tasks. There are tasks for each of the three solar houses, a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, a management task, and a task funding travel to attend the Field Monitoring for a Purpose'' workshop which was held April 2--5, 1990, in Gothenburg, Sweden. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Nuclear mass inventory, photon dose rate and thermal decay heat of spent research reactor fuel assemblies  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel acceptance criteria, the mass of uranium and transuranic elements in spent research reactor fuel must be specified. These data are, however, not always known or readily determined. It is the purpose of this report to provide estimates of these data for some of the more common research reactor fuel assembly types. The specific types considered here are MTR, TRIGA and DIDO fuel assemblies. The degree of physical protection given to spent fuel assemblies is largely dependent upon the photon dose rate of the spent fuel material. These data also, are not always known or readily determined. Because of a self-protecting dose rate level of radiation (dose rate greater than 100 ren-x/h at I m in air), it is important to know the dose rate of spent fuel assemblies at all time. Estimates of the photon dose rate for spent MTR, TRIGA and DIDO-type fuel assemblies are given in this report.

Pond, R.B.; Matos, J.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Electric co-heating in the ASHRAE standard method of test for thermal distribution efficiency: Test results on two New York State homes  

SciTech Connect

Electric co-heating tests on two single-family homes with forced-air heating systems were carried out in March 1995. The goal of these tests was to evaluate procedures being considered for incorporation in a Standard Method of Test for thermal distribution system efficiency now being developed by ASHRAE. Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork, piping, or other means used to transport heat or cooling effect from the building equipment that produces this thermal energy to the spaces in which it is used. Furthering the project goal, the first objective of the tests was to evaluate electric co-heating as a means of measuring system efficiency. The second objective was to investigate procedures for obtaining the distribution efficiency, using system efficiency as a base. Distribution efficiencies of 0.63 and 0.70 were obtained for the two houses.

Andrews, J.W.; Krajewski, R.F.; Strasser, J.J.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Standard test method for measurement of roll wave optical distortion in heat-treated flat glass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method is applicable to the determination of the peak-to-valley depth and peak-to-peak distances of the out-of-plane deformation referred to as roll wave which occurs in flat, heat-treated architectural glass substrates processed in a heat processing continuous or oscillating conveyance oven. 1.2 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This test method does not address other flatness issues like edge kink, ream, pocket distortion, bow, or other distortions outside of roll wave as defined in this test method. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

OTEC-1 power system test program: performance of one-megawatt heat exchangers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heat exchanger test results for the first deployment of OTEC-1 are reported. These tests were aimed at evaluating the performance of a state-of-the-art, 1-MWe titanium shell-and-tube evaporator and condenser in an ocean environment. The evaporator consisted of both a plain and an enhanced (Union Carbide High Flux) tube bundle, whereas the condenser had plain tubes only. All tests with the evaporator were conducted in the sprayed-bundle mode. Experimental results for the condenser and plain-tube portion of the evaporator were in excellent agreement with performance predictions. This result demonstrates that the thermal performance of large plain-tube heat exchangers can be predicted with a high level of confidence. However, the performance of the enhanced-tube portion of the evaporator was much lower thn predicted. Evidence strongly suggested that this poor performance was attributable mainly to fouling of the High Flux surface by corrosion products consisting predominantly of hydrated aluminum oxides.

Lorenz, J.J.; Yung, D.; Howard, P.A.; Panchal, C.B.; Poucher, F.W.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs.

Not Available

1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

217

Titanium tritide radioisotope heat source development : palladium-coated titanium hydriding kinetics and tritium loading tests.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have found that a 180 nm palladium coating enables titanium to be loaded with hydrogen isotopes without the typical 400-500 C vacuum activation step. The hydriding kinetics of Pd coated Ti can be described by the Mintz-Bloch adherent film model, where the rate of hydrogen absorption is controlled by diffusion through an adherent metal-hydride layer. Hydriding rate constants of Pd coated and vacuum activated Ti were found to be very similar. In addition, deuterium/tritium loading experiments were done on stacks of Pd coated Ti foil in a representative-size radioisotope heat source vessel. The experiments demonstrated that such a vessel could be loaded completely, at temperatures below 300 C, in less than 10 hours, using existing department-of-energy tritium handling infrastructure.

Van Blarigan, Peter; Shugard, Andrew D.; Walters, R. Tom (Savannah River National Labs, Aiken, SC)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Design, construction, and testing of a residential solar heating and cooling system  

SciTech Connect

The NSF/CSU Solar House I solar heating and cooling system became operational on 1 July 1974. During the first months of operation the emphasis was placed on adjustment, ''tuning,'' and fault correction in the solar collection and the solar/fuel/cooling subsystems. Following this initial check out period, analysis and testing of the system utilizing a full year of data were accomplished. This report discusses the results of this analysis of the full year of operation. (WDM)

Ward, D.S.; Loef, G.O.G.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

In-Situ Thermal Conductivity Testing Using a Portable Heat Flow Meter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method has been developed for measuring heat losses from insulated systems in the field. While the measurements are not as precise as those made under laboratory conditions, they are more indicative of actual in service conditions. Extensive field tests have been carried out in petrochemical plants and power plants throughout the country. Some insulating materials have been found to lose up to 60% of their insulating value after a few years in service. Calcium silicate insulations were found to be the most durable.

Harr, K. S.; Hutto, F. B., Jr.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Development and testing of thermal-energy-storage modules for use in active solar heating and cooling systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Additional development work on thermal-energy-storage modules for use with active solar heating and cooling systems is summarized. Performance testing, problems, and recommendations are discussed. Installation, operation, and maintenance instructions are included. (MHR)

Parker, J.C.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the tokamak fusion test reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial operation of the tokamak fusion test reactor has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1--0.2 s for a line-average density range (n-bar/sub e/) of (1--2.5) x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o)approx.1.2--2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(0)approx.0.9--1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/approx.3. A comparison of Princeton large torus, poloidal divertor experiment, and tokamak fusion test reactor plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

1984-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

Development and Testing of a Flattened U-Tube Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the present high cost of energy and the fact that costs are expected to continue rising in the future, those engaged in thermal processing must adapt new philosophies to maximize production efficiency. In most instances, the cost of energy may no longer be regarded as an insignificant factor in the cost of operation. Therefore, efficient use of energy and energy recuperation systems must be carefully evaluated. This paper discusses the development and testing of a U-Tube type flue gas energy recovery system for fuel fired industrial heat treating furnaces. The flattened U-Tube configuration was selected since its relative simple fabrication makes the unit quite cost effective. Development will be described beginning with the formulation of a numerical type mathematical model of the proposed heat exchanger which was computerized and then used to perform a parameter study to optimize the unit design. Analysis of data, generated by laboratory testing of the final computer selected design as a result of the computer study will be presented. Comparison of the experimental data to the computer model will also be demonstrated.

Huebner, S. R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Design, construction and testing of a liquid-heating flat-plate solar collector  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study was to design, construct, and test a liquid-heating flat-plate solar collector. From the literature search, information was gathered concerning the basic components of the collector, the different processes and materials that can be used in the construction of these components, and their advantages and disadvantages. The literature search also revealed a method used to measure the performance of the collector in terms of efficiency and heat output. Design considerations were then listed for each of the major components as well as the collector as a single unit. Then, each component was designed, taking into consideration the final assembly of the completed unit. Detailed designs were required for the absorber plate and the box and frame assembly because of their complexity in construction and assembly. Once the components were designed, the construction details were arranged in a logical sequence, again considering the final assembly of the unit. The collector was then carefully constructed and assembled following the design details. After the solar collector was assembled completely, tests were made, data were obtained and recorded, and a collector performance curve was developed.

Tuttle, R E

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Effect of Heating Rate on the Thermodynamic Properties of Pulverized Coal  

SciTech Connect

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed under DOE Grant No.DE-FG22-96PC96224 during the period September 24, 1997 to April 23, 1998 which covers the third six months of the project. During this reporting period, several components of the electrodynamic balance measurement system, Single Particle Laboratory, Federal Energy Technology center, Morgantown, WV, were successfully calibrated. A large number of single polystyrenespheres covering a size range of 80 - 200 microns in diameter were caught in the electrodynamic balance. The size counts of their projected images obtained using the top video-based imaging system, bottom video-based imaging system, and diode-array imaging system were calibrated against the actual size of the particles to within ± 3 microns. Signals obtained by the particle position control system were also calibrated against the actual movement of a polystyrene particle in the balance to within ± 1 microns. Presently, calibration of the Single Color Pyrometer to measure coal particle temperature histories is in progress. Donation agreement for the Heated-Grid measurement system from our industrial partner, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), CT, was obtained and the arrangement for the completion of the shipment of the grid system components from UTRC to CAU is in progress. Several theoretical analyses were conducted to improve the model performance of the present work and the results were compared with data available from our previous studies. These activities resulted in several publications including three conference papers, and one student poster paper during this reporting period.

Ramanathan Sampath

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Data Assimilation of Satellite-Derived Heating Rates as Proxy Surface Wetness Data into a Regional Atmospheric Mesoscale Model. Part I: Methodology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite data assimilation method is developed which incorporates satellite-observed infrared heating rates into a mesoscale atmospheric model to retrieve model soil moisture. The method builds upon previous work with the model’s surface ...

Andrew S. Jones; Ingrid C. Guch; Thomas H. Vonder Haar

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Data Assimilation of Satellite-Derived Heating Rates as Proxy Surface Wetness Data into a Regional Atmospheric Mesoscale Model. Part II: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite data assimilation method is applied which incorporates satellite-observed heating infrared rates into a mesoscale atmospheric model to retrieve model soil moisture. In a 3D case study, the method is successful at retrieving realistic ...

Andrew S. Jones; Ingrid C. Guch; Thomas H. Vonder Haar

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

MELCOR 1.8.2 Assessment: IET direct containment heating tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MELCOR is a fully integrated, engineering-level computer code, being developed at Sandia National Laboratories for the USNRC, that models the entire spectrum of severe accident phenomena in a unified framework for both BWRs and PWRS. As part of an ongoing assessment program, the MELCOR computer code has been used to analyze several of the IET direct containment heating experiments done at 1:10 linear scale in the Surtsey test facility at Sandia and at 1:40 linear scale in the corium-water thermal interactions (CWTI) COREXIT test facility at Argonne National Laboratory. These MELCOR calculations were done as an open post-test study, with both the experimental data and CONTAIN results available to guide the selection of code input. Basecase MELCOR results are compared to test data in order to evaluate the new HPME DCH model recently added in MELCOR version 1.8.2. The effect of various user-input parameters in the HPME model, which define both the initial debris source and the subsequent debris interaction, were investigated in sensitivity studies. In addition, several other non-default input modelling changes involving other MELCOR code packages were required in our IET assessment analyses in order to reproduce the observed experiment behavior. Several calculations were done to identify whether any numeric effects exist in our DCH IET assessment analyses.

Kmetyk, L.N.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Laboratory Test Report for Fujitsu 12RLS and Mitsubishi FE12NA Mini-Split Heat Pumps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mini-split heat pumps are being proposed as a new retrofit option to replace resistance heating in the Pacific Northwest. NREL has previously developed a field test protocol for mini-split systems to ensure consistent results from field tests. This report focuses on the development of detailed system performance maps for mini-split heat pumps so that the potential benefits of mini-split systems can be accurately analyzed for different climate regions and housing types. This report presents laboratory test results for two mini-split heat pumps. Steady-state heating and cooling performance for the Fujitsu 12RLS and Mitsubishi FE12NA was tested under a wide range of outdoor and indoor temperatures at various compressor and fan speeds. Cycling performance for each unit was also tested under both modes of operation. Both systems performed quite well under low loads and the experimental test data aligned with manufacturer reported values. Adequate datasets were attained to promote performance modeling of these two systems in the future.

Winkler, J.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Preliminary operational results of the low-temperature solar industrial process heat field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Six solar industrial process heat field tests have been in operation for a year or more - three are hot water systems and three are hot air systems. All are low-temperature projects (process heat at temperatures below 212/sup 0/F). Performance results gathered by each contractor's data acquisition system are presented and project costs and problems encountered are summarized. Flat-plate, evacuated-tube, and line-focus collectors are all represented in the program, with collector array areas ranging from 2500 to 21,000 ft/sup 2/. Collector array efficiencies ranged from 12% to 36% with net system efficiencies from 8% to 33%. Low efficiencies are attributable in some cases to high thermal losses and, for the two projects using air collectors, are due in part to high parasitic power consumption. Problems have included industrial effluents on collectors, glazing and absorber surface failures, excessive thermal losses, freezing and overheating, control problems, and data acquisition system failure. With design and data acquisition costs excluded costs of the projects ranged from $25/ft/sup 2/ to $87/ft/sup 2/ and $499/(MBtu/yr) to $1537/(MBtu/yr).

Kutscher, C.F.; Davenport, R.L.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Comparison of constant-rate pumping test and slug interference test results at the Hanford Site B pond multilevel test facility  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as part of the Hanford Site Ground-Water Surveillance Project, is responsible for monitoring the movement and fate of contamination within the unconfined aquifer to ensure that public health and the environment are protected. To support the monitoring and assessment of contamination migration on the Hanford Site, a sitewide 3-dimensional groundwater flow model is being developed. Providing quantitative hydrologic property data is instrumental in development of the 3-dimensional model. Multilevel monitoring facilities have been installed to provide detailed, vertically distributed hydrologic characterization information for the Hanford Site unconfined aquifer. In previous reports, vertically distributed water-level and hydrochemical data obtained over time from these multi-level monitoring facilities have been evaluated and reported. This report describes the B pond facility in Section 2.0. It also provides analysis results for a constant-rate pumping test (Section 3.0) and slug interference test (Section 4.0) that were conducted at a multilevel test facility located near B Pond (see Figure 1. 1) in the central part of the Hanford Site. A hydraulic test summary (Section 5.0) that focuses on the comparison of hydraulic property estimates obtained using the two test methods is also presented. Reference materials are listed in Section 6.0.

Spane, F.A. Jr.; Thorne, P.D.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Tribology of improved transformation-toughened ceramics-heat engine test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A short term study has been carried out to evaluate the suitability as cam roller followers of three ceria zirconia toughened aluminas and two yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconias (YTZPs) previously enhanced in programs supported by ORNL. Norton Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (NBD-100) was also included in this study as a reference material, because it was known from work at Northwestern University that Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} to experienced little or no wear in this application, and NBD-100 is currently a successful commercial bearing material. The tribological studies were subcontracted to the Torrington Company. They found that in cam roller follower simulated tests that there was essentially no wear after 1 hour and 5 hours of testing detectable by weighing and concluded that all of these ceramics are, therefore, candidate materials. Because of the minute amounts of wear it was not possible to identify the wear mechanism or to make any correlations with the other physical properties which were evaluated such as MOR, K{sub IC} hardness, density and grain size. Phase transformation during rolling has been of interest in the tribology of zirconia contain materials. The least stable of the ceria zirconia toughened aluminas resulted in as much as 33% monoclinic phase after testing whereas the yttria stabilized (TTZ) contained very little of this transformed phase. The results of this study show that oxide materials can now be considered as candidates for cam roller followers in heat engines.

Lilley, E.; Rossi, G.A.; Pelletier, P.J. (Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Tests show ability of vacuum circuit breaker to interrupt fast transient recovery voltage rates of rise of transformer secondary faults  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vacuum circuit breaker demonstrated its ability to interrupt short circuits with faster than normal rates of rise of transient recovery voltage (TRV) at levels greater than those produced by most transformer secondary faults. Two recent exploratory test programs evaluated the interrupting ability of a 15kV vacuum circuit breaker containing interrupters of the rotating arc type with contacts made from a chromium-copper powder metal mixture. The interrupting conditions covered a wide range of currents from 10% to 130% of the 28kA rated short circuit current of the tested circuit breaker and a wide range of TRV rates of rise, including the relatively slow rate of rise, normally used in testing and found in most indoor circuit breaker applications, two faster rates of rise equaling and exceeding those found in a known power plant transformer secondary protection application, and the fastest rates of rise possible in the laboratory which exceed the requirements of most transformer secondary faults. These tests showed that the interrupting performance of the tested vacuum circuit breaker was unaffected by the TRV rate of rise to the fastest rates available in the test lab. Such a vacuum circuit breaker can therefore be used without TRV modifying capacitors to slow down the rate of rise provided by the power system. This ability is particularly important if analysis shows that the expected TRV from a transformer secondary fault has a fast rate of rise beyond the recognized ability of an older circuit breaker to acceptably interrupt.

Smith, R.K. [Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Design, development and testing of a solar-powered multi-family residential-size prototype turbocompressor heat pump  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental program was conducted to further define, improve and demonstrate the performance characteristics and operational features of an existing 18-ton solar-powered prototype heat pump. The prototype heat pump is nominally sized for multi-family residential applications and provides both space heating and cooling. It incorporates a turbocompressor specially designed to operate at peak temperatures consistent with medium concentration collectors. The major efforts in this program phase included modification and improvement of the instrumentation sensors, the laboratory simulation equipment and selected heat pump components. After implementing these modifications, performance testing was conducted for a total operating time of approximately 250 hours. Experimental test results compared favorably with performance data calculated using the UTRC computer prediction program for the same boundary conditions. A series of tests was conducted continuously over a 12-h period to simulate operation (in the cooling mode) of the prototype heat pump under conditions typical of an actual installation. The test demonstrated that the heat pump could match the cooling load profile of a multi-family residential building. During the system performance testing, sufficient data were taken to identify the performance of each of the major components (e.g. turbine, compressor, heat exchangers, R11 pump). Component performance is compared with that calculated using the UTRC computer predict program and with data supplied by their manufacturers. The performance capabilities of the prototype heat pump system have been documented and recommendations are made for further design improvements which could be included in a MOD-2 configuration. The MOD-2 configuration would incorporate features that would improve system performance, reduce capital cost and most importantly improve system reliability.

Not Available

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Design, fabrication and testing of a model heating and cooling system for a vacuum vessel  

SciTech Connect

A full-size model of a typical cooling and heating system for a vacuum vessel was manufactured and examined in order to clarify and enhance the efficiency and reliability of the designed system. The model consisted of two parts; one of which had the same structure as the other and was located facing each other to simulate the adiabatic condition of the vacuum-side of a vacuum vessel. Its components were rectangular plates, eletric heater units, cooling pipes inside of which water and air flew as cooling fluid. A lot of kinds of tests and measurements were performed to evaluate efficiency and reliability on the model. The numerical and theoretical analyses on the system were also carried out using the dimensional finite difference technique. The analytical results agreed pretty well with the experimental.

Shimizu, M.; Miyauchi, Y.; Nakamura, H.; Kajiura, S.; Koizumi, M.; Hata, M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1 to 0.2 s for a line-average density range (anti n/sub e/) of 1 to 2.5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o) approx. 1.2 to 2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(o) approx. 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. 3. A comparison of PLT, PDX, and TFTR plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Partial fuel stratification to control HCCI heat release rates : fuel composition and other factors affecting pre-ignition reactions of two-stage ignition fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion with fully premixed charge is severely limited at high-load operation due to the rapid pressure-rise rates (PRR) which can lead to engine knock and potential engine damage. Recent studies have shown that two-stage ignition fuels possess a significant potential to reduce the combustion heat release rate, thus enabling higher load without knock.

Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.; Cannella, William (Chevron USA Inc.); Yang, Yi; Dronniou, Nicolas

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Assembly and testing of a composite heat pipe thermal intercept for HTS current leads  

SciTech Connect

We are building high temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads for a demonstration HTS-high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system cooled by a cryocooler. The current leads are entirely conductively cooled. A composite nitrogen heat pipe provides efficient thermal communication, and simultaneously electrical isolation, between the lead and an intermediate temperature heat sink. Data on the thermal and electrical performance of the heat pipe thermal intercept are presented. The electrical isolation of the heat pipe was measured as a function of applied voltage with and without a thermal load across the heat pipe. The results show the electrical isolation with evaporation, condensation and internal circulation taking place in the heat pipe.

Daugherty, M.A.; Daney, D.E.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Williams, P.M.; Boenig, H.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Standard practice for measurement of the glass dissolution rate using the single-pass flow-through test method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This practice describes a single-pass flow-through (SPFT) test method that can be used to measure the dissolution rate of a homogeneous silicate glass, including nuclear waste glasses, in various test solutions at temperatures less than 100°C. Tests may be conducted under conditions in which the effects from dissolved species on the dissolution rate are minimized to measure the forward dissolution rate at specific values of temperature and pH, or to measure the dependence of the dissolution rate on the concentrations of various solute species. 1.2 Tests are conducted by pumping solutions in either a continuous or pulsed flow mode through a reaction cell that contains the test specimen. Tests must be conducted at several solution flow rates to evaluate the effect of the flow rate on the glass dissolution rate. 1.3 This practice excludes static test methods in which flow is simulated by manually removing solution from the reaction cell and replacing it with fresh solution. 1.4 Tests may be conducted wit...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Modeling, Designing, Fabricating, and Testing of Channel Panel Flat Plate Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Flat plate heat pipes are very efficient passive two-phase heat transport devices. Their high e'ciency and low mass are desirable in the aerospace and electronics… (more)

Harris, James R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Equatorial Waves in the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere Forced by Latent Heating Estimated from TRMM Rain Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Equatorial atmospheric waves in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS), excited by latent heating, are investigated by using a global spectral model. The latent heating profiles are derived from the 3-hourly Tropical Rainfall ...

Jung-Hee Ryu; M. Joan Alexander; David A. Ortland

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A 2-D Test Problem for CFD Modeling Heat Transfer in Spent Fuel Transfer Cask Neutron Shields  

SciTech Connect

In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 5-10 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper presents results for a simple 2-D problem that is an effective numerical analog for the neutron shield application. Because it is 2-D, solutions can be obtained relatively quickly allowing a comparison and assessment of sensitivity to model parameter changes. Turbulence models are considered as well as the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions. Solutions are compared for two commercial CFD codes, FLUENT and STAR-CCM+. The results can be used to provide input to the CFD Best Practices for this application. Following study results for the 2-D test problem, a comparison of simulation results is provided for a high Rayleigh number experiment with large annular gap. Because the geometry of this validation is significantly different from the neutron shield, and due to the critical nature of this application, the argument is made for new experiments at representative scales

Zigh, Ghani; Solis, Jorge; Fort, James A.

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

THERMAL DESIGN METHODOLOGY FOR LOW FLOW RATE SINGLE-PHASE AND TWO-PHASE MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Engine Cooling Systems,'' Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics, and Thermodynamics 1997, June 1997, ``A Correlation for Boiling Heat Transfer to Saturated Fluids in Convective Flow,'' Ind. Eng. Chem the engines in automotive applications. Heat is transferred essentially under subcooled flow boiling

Qu, Weilin

243

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Comment submitted by the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AHRI Comments - DOE Verification Testing in Support of Energy Star AHRI Comments - DOE Verification Testing in Support of Energy Star May 9, 2011 P a g e | 1 May 9, 2010 Ms. Ashley Armstrong U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585 RE: DOE Verification Testing in Support of Energy Star Dear Ms. Armstrong: I am writing on behalf of the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) to address the proposed DOE requirements for verification testing in support of the Energy Star program. AHRI is the trade association representing manufacturers of heating, cooling, and commercial refrigeration equipment. More than 300 members strong, AHRI is an internationally recognized advocate for the industry, and develops standards for and certifies the performance of many of the

245

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program, radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test  

SciTech Connect

The general-purpose heat source provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system. The results of this test indicated that impact by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests: RTG-1 and RTG-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.; George, T.G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following tasks; solar heating with isothermal collector operation and advanced control strategy; solar cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling system development; solar house III -- development and improvement of solar heating systems employing boiling liquid collectors; generic solar domestic water heating systems; advanced residential solar domestic hot water (DHW) systems; management and coordination of Colorado State/DOE program; and field monitoring workshop.

1991-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

Development of a Rating System for a Comparative Accelerated Test Standard (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation discusses methods of developing and structuring a useful rating system and communicating the results.

Kurtz, S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Results of a field test of heating system efficiency and thermal distribution system efficiency in a manufactured home  

SciTech Connect

A two-day test using electric coheating was performed on a manufactured home in Watertown, New York. The main objective of the test was to evaluate planned procedures for measuring thermal distribution system efficiency. (Thermal distribution systems are the ductwork or piping used to transport heat or cooling effect from the equipment that produces it to the building spaces in which it is used.) These procedures are under consideration for a standard method of test now being prepared by a special committee of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers. The ability of a coheating test to give a credible and repeatable value for the overall heating system efficiency was supported by the test data. Distribution efficiency is derived from system efficiency by correcting for energy losses from the equipment. Alternative means for achieving this were tested and assessed. The best value for system efficiency in the Watertown house was 0.53, while the best value for distribution efficiency was 0.72.

Andrews, J.W.; Krajewski, R.F.; Strasser, J.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Kinney, L.; Lewis, G. [Synertech Systems Corp., Syracuse, NY (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Improving participation rates in Minnesota's residential audit program: a test marketing program  

SciTech Connect

In response to lower than anticipated requests for in-home energy audits, the Minnesota Energy Division joined Northern States Power and the Marketing Dept. of the University of Minnesota in conducting a test marketing experiment during May and June 1982. The goal of the experiment was to determine if marketing approaches other than direct mail could increase household participation in the utility sponsored Residential Conservation Service (RCS) audit program. Two delivery methods, mail and door-to-door visit by community volunteer, were used to distribute experimental marketing materials to 2,160 sampled households in 3 St. Paul area neighborhoods. Marketing materials were the standard mailed audit offer, a waterflow restrictor and two versions of a do-it-yourself home energy audit. A marketing treatment consisted of one or more of the marketing materials delivered to a residence by either of the delivery methods, direct mail or door-to-door. The impact of each treatment on audit request rates was evaluated.

Not Available

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, June--July 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities of the Colorado State program for developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems during the months of June and July, 1993.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

18 kA vapour cooled current leads to test superconducting magnet models for the proposed Large Hadron Collider at CERN using wire matrix heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

18 kA vapour cooled current leads to test superconducting magnet models for the proposed Large Hadron Collider at CERN using wire matrix heat exchangers

Hagedorn, Dietrich; Oberli, L R

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, March--May 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of heat loss tests for the Integral Collector Storage unit are shown. Work on unique solar system components is summarized briefly.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Review of International Methods of Test to Rate the Efficiency of Water Heaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

test procedure load profiles. The equivalent parameters fortable of all the load profiles is included as Appendix 1.to the draws in the load profile, the transitional test

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Effect of Heat Treatment Variations on the Hardness and Mechanical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the greatest impact on hardness with increasing cooling rate increasing fully heat treated hardness. A specimen test program was then initiated to determine the ...

256

DIRECT CONTACT HEAT EXCHANGER 10 kW POWER LOOP. SECTION 1: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY. SECTION 2: TEST SERIES NO. 1. SECTION 3; TEST SERIES NO. 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Air Tests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LOOPCALIBRATION TESTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ENDURANCE TEST . . . . . . . . . . . .

Engineering, Barber-Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Production test IP-338-A, Supp. A, DR-Reactor heat decay test at high outlet water temperatures  

SciTech Connect

This test is identical to the original except that it authorizes the performance of a trial reduction in reactor flow during a prior reactor shutdown. This trial flow reduction will be performed in the same manner as proposed for the actual test, with one exception. This is, that based upon the results of this preliminary test some changes in the timing of the different steps may be indicated. Such changes can readily be handled by making each step dependent upon the observed reactor outlet temperature during the test performance. The other significant change in the production test is the increase in the allowable bulk outlet temperature from Ti + 40 {plus_minus} 3{degrees}C{sup *}. This change is needed to obtain a reasonable extrapolation of the results of tests No. 1 and No.2 to 90{degrees}C, and is justified from a hazards standpoint by the excellent flow control achieved during test No. 1 and by the trial test that will be run prior to the performance of the actual test No. 2. Other aspects of the test basis and justification are presented in the original production test.

Jones, S.S.

1962-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

Near-field heat transfer at the spent fuel test-climax: a comparison of measurements and calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spent Fuel Test in the Climax granitic stock at the DOE Nevada Test Site is a test of the feasibility of storage and retrieval of spent nuclear reactor fuel in a deep geologic environment. Eleven spent fuel elements, together with six thermally identical electrical resistance heaters and 20 peripheral guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below surface in a three-drift test array. This array was designed to simulate the near-field effects of thousands of canisters of nuclear waste and to evaluate the effects of heat alone, and heat plus ionizing radiation on the rock. Thermal calculations and measurements are conducted to determine thermal transport from the spent fuel and electrical resistance heaters. Calculations associated with the as-built Spent Fuel Test geometry and thermal source histories are presented and compared with thermocouple measurements made throughout the test array. Comparisons in space begin at the spent fuel canister and include the first few metres outside the test array. Comparisons in time begin at emplacement and progress through the first year of thermal loading in this multi-year test.

Patrick, W.C.; Montan, D.N.; Ballou, L.B.

1981-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

259

Development testing of the two-watt RTG heat source and Hastelloy-S/T-111 alloy compatibility studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source capsules were tested to determine their survivability under extreme environmental conditions: high external pressure, high impact, and high internal pressure. Test results showed that the capsules could withstand external pressures of 1,000 bars and impacts at velocities near 150 meters per second. However, the results of the internal pressure tests (stress-rupture) were not so favorable, possibly because of copper contamination, leading to a recommendation for additional testing. A material compatibility study examined the use of Hastelloy-S as a material to clad the tantalum strength member of the two-watt radioisotopic heat source. Test capsules were subjected to high temperatures for various lengths of time, then cross sectioned and examined with a scanning electron microscope. Results of the study indicate that Hastelloy-S would be compatible with the underlying alloy, not only at the normal operating temperatures of the heat source, but also when exposed to the much higher temperatures of a credible accident scenario.

Howell, E.I.; Teaney, P.E.

1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

260

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, November--December 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

GPHS-RTG system explosion test direct course experiment 5000. [General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect

The General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) has been designed and is being built to provide electrical power for spacecrafts to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The objective of the RTG System Explosion Test was to expose a mock-up of the GPHS-RTG with a simulated heat source to the overpressure and impulse representative of a potential upper magnitude explosion of the Space Shuttle. The test was designed so that the heat source module would experience an overpressure at which the survival of the fuel element cladding would be expected to be marginal. Thus, the mock-up was placed where the predicted incident overpressure would be 1300 psi. The mock-up was mounted in an orientation representative of the launch configuration on the spacecraft to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission. The incident overpressure measured was in the range of 1400 to 2100 psi. The mock-up and simulated heat source were destroyed and only very small fragments were recovered. This damage is believed to have resulted from a combination of the overpressure and impact by very high velocity fragments from the ANFO sphere. Post-test analysis indicated that extreme working of the iridium clad material occurred, indicative of intensive impulsive loading on the metal.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Comparison of calculated results from two analytical models with measured data from a heat-exchanger flow test  

SciTech Connect

Predicted results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model were compared with measured results from an air flow test on a half-scale model of the auxiliary heat exchanger for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Measurements of both velocity and pressure were made within the heat exchanger shell side flow field. These measurements were compared with calculated results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model. Both analytical models predicted early identical results which, except for some minor anomalies, compared favorably with the measured data.

Carosella, D.P.; Pavlics, P.N.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 6. Thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 3. 05. 5B - double-ended cold-leg break simulation  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) Test 3.05.5B was conducted by members of the ORNL PWR Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program on July 3, 1980. The objective of the program is to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWRs during accidents, including small and large break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test 3.05.5B was designed to provide transient thermal-hydraulics data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. Reduced instrument responses are presented. Also included are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.; Schwinkendorf, K.N.

1982-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Testing consistency of deconfinement heating of strange stars in superbursters and soft X-ray transients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both superbursters and soft X-ray transients probe the thermal structure of the crust on compact stars and are sensitive to the process of deep crustal heating. It was recently shown that the transfer of matter from crust to core in a strange star can heat the crust by deconfinement and ignite superbursts provided certain constraints on the strange quark matter equation of state are fulfilled. Corresponding constraints are derived for soft X-ray transients in a simple parameterized model assuming their quiescent emission is powered in the same way, and the time dependence of this heating mechanism in transient systems is discussed.

M. Stejner

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

265

Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and potential inhalation exposure during cleanup and treatment test at Area 11, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test was conducted in 1981 at Area 11, Nevada Test Site. Its purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a large truck-mounted vacuum cleaner similar to those used to clean paved streets for cleaning radiological contamination from the surface of desert soils. We found that four passes with the vehicle removed 97% of the alpha contamination and reduced resuspension by 99.3 to 99.7%. Potential exposure to cleanup workers was slight when compared to natural background exposure. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

266

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, August--September 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Computer codes have been developed to predict the velocity and temperature profiles in the natural convection boundary layer on the inside of the vertical walls of the wrap-around heat exchanger tank. A brief description of several of the methods considered is given. Heat and mass transfer results for these various methods are compared for one sample case with the results of an accurate finite difference solution obtained with Keller`s box method.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Experimental testing of a direct contact heat exchanger for geothermal brine. Final report, July 1, 1978-February 1, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of direct contact heat exchanger (DCHX) experiments were conducted at the East Mesa Geothermal Test Site during the period July 1, 1978 to February 1, 1979. The purpose of these tests was to provide additional data necessary to better understand the thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the DCHX binary cycle loop components that may be used to extract energy from geothermal brines. Isobutane and Isopentane were tested as secondary working fluids. The analytical and experimental efforts were directed at the problems of working fluid loss in the effluent brine, carryover of water vapor with the vaporized secondary fluid and the free CO/sub 2/ content of the feed brine. The tests aimed at evaluating the heat transfer performance of various type tubes installed in vertical shell-and-tube secondary fluid condensers. Data was collected while operating a low temperature isopentane cycle with brine preflashed to 210 to 212/sup 0/F; the objective being to gain insight to waste heat recovery applications such as the Arkansas Power and Light project. Possible alternatives for isobutane recovery from the spent brine were investigated. A system was designed and the economic aspects studied.

Urbanek, M.W.

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Study and testing of direct contact heat exchangers for geothermal brines. Final report, June 1975--July 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of the work reported herein was to assess the technical and economic feasibility of preheating and evaporating a secondary fluid via direct contact with hot geothermal brine. The work covered a period of 12 months and included the design, construction, and testing of a unit which heats and vaporizes 10 gpm of isobutane by direct contact with 325/sup 0/F brine. The analytical and experimental efforts explored design and economic characteristics, including anticipated problem areas such as working fluid loss in the brine, production of a stable dispersion of the working fluid in brine, fluids separation, axial mixing and carry-over of water vapor with the working fluid. Isobutane was selected as the working fluid for tests primarily because of the favorable amount of net work produced per pound of geothermal brine and the low amount and cost of working fluid lost in the heat exchange process. The Elgin Spray Tower concept was selected for the preheater and boiler. The test apparatus includes a separate boiler and a separate preheater, each 6'' diameter by 6' high. Brine enters the top of each vessel and leaves the bottom. Isobutane enters the bottom of the preheater through a distributor plate to produce 0.15 inch diameter drops. The experimental unit operated with no major problems and demonstrated its hydraulic and thermal capabilities. Volumetric heat transfer coefficients obtained ranged up to 4000 BTU/hr /sup 0/F ft/sup 3/. Boiling heat transfer coefficients of as high as 17,000 BTU/hr /sup 0/F ft/sup 3/ were obtained with a design value of 10,000 BTU/hr /sup 0/F ft/sup 3/. Amount of isobutane in a 21 percent NaCl solution leaving the preheater was less than 40 ppM. A conceptual design and cost estimate was prepared for a direct contact heat exchange system sized for a 50 MW power plant.

Suratt, W.B.; Hart, G.K.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Study and testing of direct contact heat exchangers for geothermal brines. Phase II, August 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analytical and experimental studies completed under this project have explored several aspects of geothermal binary power cycles and column type direct contact heat exchangers between geothermal brine and isobutane. A major improvement of the heat exchanger was developed by the combination of the preheater and boiler into a single continuous column. At East Mesa, this new direct contact heat exchanger was tested on geothermal brine in order to correlate the experimental heat transfer data with the theoretical model for use in designing larger plants. Experiments also involved a small radial inflow turbine to produce electricity which marked the first generation of electricity from geothermal brine using a binary cycle. In analytical studies, a comparison of the relationship between column diameter and droplet size was made for both Minard--Johnson and Sakiadis--Johnson model. The Letan--Kehat model for relating column height and temperature profile was analyzed and compared with experimental data. It appears that the experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical models. A detailed design of a 250 Kw pilot plant incorporating the direct contact heat exchanger was completed. This design with estimated costs for it and a 500 Kw pilot plant is incorporated.

Suratt, W.B.; Lee, C.O.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Heat and Buoyancy Budgets and Mixing Rates in the Upper Thermocline of the Indian and Global Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diapycnal and diathermal diffusivity values in the upper thermocline are estimated from buoyancy and heat budgets for water volumes bounded by isopycnals and isotherms, the air–sea interface, and coastline where applicable. Comprehensive analysis ...

Huai-Min Zhang; Lynne D. Talley

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fabrication and Integrity Testing of a Korean ITER TBM FW Mock-Up in Preparation for High Heat Flux Test  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test Blanket, Fuel Cycle, and Breeding / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 2) Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Jae Sung Yoon; Suk Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Seungyon Cho; Dong Won Lee

272

Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Health and safety plan (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect

This document is the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) for the demonstration of IITRI`s EM Treatment Technology. In this process, soil is heated in situ by means of electrical energy for the removal of hazardous organic contaminants. This process will be demonstrated on a small plot of contaminated soil located in the Pit Area of Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D, K-25 Site, Oak Ridge, TN. The purpose of the demonstration is to remove organic contaminants present in the soil by heating to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The soil will be heated in situ by applying 60-Hz AC power to an array of electrodes placed in boreholes drilled through the soil. In this section a brief description of the process is given along with a description of the site and a listing of the contaminants found in the area.

Dev, H.

1994-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

274

ORNL rod-bundle heat-transfer test data. Volume 3. Thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 3. 06. 6B - transient film boiling in upflow. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hyraulic Test Facility (THTF) Test 3.06.6B. This test was conducted by members of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Pressurized-Water-Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer (BDHT) Separate-Effects Program on August 29, 1980. The objective of the program was to investigate heat transfer phenomena believed to occur in PWR's during accidents, including small and large break loss-of-coolant accidents. Test 3.06.6B was conducted to obtain transient film boiling data in rod bundle geometry under reactor accident-type conditions. The primary purpose of this report is to make the reduced instrument responses for THTF Test 3.06.6B available. Included in the report are uncertainties in the instrument responses, calculated mass flows, and calculated rod powers.

Mullins, C.B.; Felde, D.K.; Sutton, A.G.; Gould, S.S.; Morris, D.G.; Robinson, J.J.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Home systems research house: Gas heat pump cooling characterization test results. Topical report, July-September 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooling performance characterization tests were performed at the GRI Home Systems Research House located in the NAHB Research Home Park in Prince George's County, Maryland. Test protocols followed guidelines set forth in GRI's Research House Utilization Plan (RHUP). A combination of minute-by-minute and hourly average data consisting of weather, comfort, and energy parameters was collected by using an automated data acquisition system. The tests were performed from July 1991 through September 1991. The gas heat pump (GHP) had an average daily gas coefficient of performance (COP) value of 1.49 at an outdoor temperature of 72.8 F and 0.84 at an outdoor temperature of 83.9 F. The average test period gas COP was 1.13. The GHP peak cooling capacity achieved was approximately 34,000 Btuh. The GHP provided good overall thermal comfort control on the first-floor and moderate thermal comfort control on the second floor. Reduced second floor performance was primarily due to thermostat location and the stack effect. Good latent heat removal existed throughout the test period. Unit modulation kept room air stratification to a minimum. Thermostat setback saved energy at high average daily outdoor temperatures and used more energy at lower average daily outdoor temperatures, compared to a constant thermostat setpoint control, due to changes in unit gas COP values from low-speed to high-speed operation.

Reigel, H.D.; Kenney, T.M.; Liller, T.C.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Preliminary report on the baseline thermal and hydraulic performance tests of a sieve tray direct contact heat exchanger  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sieve tray direct contact heat exchanger was designed, built and then tested in a binary power cycle at the Raft River geothermal test site. A series of baseline thermal and hydraulic tests were conducted with an isobutane working fluid. The evaluation of these tests is reported. The testing of the DCHX confirmed that the repeated forming and coalescence of the working fluid drops in the sieve tray column produce excellent heat transfer performance. Tray thermal efficiencies were at or above the design value of 70% and the pinch points were well under the design goal of 1/sup 0/F (too small to be measured with installed instrumentation). From a hydraulic standpoint, the column operated at the working fluid velocities from the plate holes corresponding to the predicted condition of maximum total drop surface area (or minimum drop size) when the unit was operating near the flooding limits, or throughputs. This is the recommended working fluid hole velocity for use in designing sieve tray columns. The geothermal flow limits encountered (at flooding) corresponded roughly to the thermal rise velocity of a 1/32-inch drop. This is a drop size commonly used for specifying the terminal velocity (or continuous fluid velocity) in the design of columns for mass transfer applications.

Mines, G.L.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Topical report: Natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) evaluation for generating additional reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) data.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Generation IV roadmapping activity, the Very High Temperature gas cooled Reactor (VHTR) has been selected as the principal concept for hydrogen production and other process-heat applications such as district heating and potable water production. On this basis, the DOE has selected the VHTR for additional R&D with the ultimate goal of demonstrating emission-free electricity and hydrogen production with this advanced reactor concept. One of the key passive safety features of the VHTR is the potential for decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-cooled RCCS concept is notably similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that was developed for the General Electric PRISM sodium-cooled fast reactor. As part of the DOE R&D program that supported the development of this fast reactor concept, the Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) was developed at ANL to provide proof-of-concept data for the RVACS under prototypic natural convection flow, temperature, and heat flux conditions. Due to the similarity between RVACS and the RCCS, current VHTR R&D plans call for the utilization of the NSTF to provide RCCS model development and validation data, in addition to supporting design validation and optimization activities. Both air-cooled and water-cooled RCCS designs are to be included. In support of this effort, ANL has been tasked with the development of an engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF to ensure that sufficiently detailed temperature, heat flux, velocity and turbulence profiles are obtained to adequately qualify the codes under the expected range of air-cooled RCCS flow conditions. Next year, similar work will be carried out for the alternative option of a water-cooled RCCS design. Analysis activities carried out in support of this experiment planning task have shown that: (a) in the RCCS, strong 3-D effects result in large heat flux, temperature, and heat transfer variations around the tube wall; (b) there is a large difference in the heat transfer coefficient predicted by turbulence models and heat transfer correlations, and this underscores the need of experimental work to validate the thermal performance of the RCCS; and (c) tests at the NSTF would embody all important fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena in the RCCS, in addition to covering the entire parameter ranges that characterize these phenomena. Additional supporting scaling study results are available in Reference 2. The purpose of this work is to develop a high-level engineering plan for mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF in order to meet the following two technical objectives: (1) provide CFD and system-level code development and validation data for the RCCS under prototypic (full-scale) natural convection flow conditions, and (2) support RCCS design validation and optimization. As background for this work, the report begins by providing a summary of the original NSTF design and operational capabilities. Since the facility has not been actively utilized since the early 1990's, the next step is to assess the current facility status. With this background material in place, the data needs and requirements for the facility are then defined on the basis of supporting analysis activities. With the requirements for the facility established, appropriate mechanical and instrumentation modifications to NSTF are then developed in order to meet the overall project objectives. A cost and schedule for modifying the facility to satisfy the RCCS data needs is then provided.

Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Tzanos, C.P.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R.W.; Pointer, D.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Solar dynamic heat pipe development and endurance test. Monthly technical progress report number 4, August 28--September 29, 1987  

SciTech Connect

The Space Station requires a high level of reliable electric power. The baseline approach is to utilize a hybrid system in which power is provided by photovoltaic arrays and by solar dynamic power conversion modules. The organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engine is one approach to solar dynamic conversion. The ORC provides the attributes of high efficiency at low temperature and compact simple designs utilizing conventional techniques and materials. The heat receiver is one area which must be addressed in applying the proven ORC to long life applications such as the Space Station. Heat pipes with integral thermal energy storage (TES) canisters and a toluene heater tube are the prime components of the heat receiver from the Phase B preliminary design. This contract is a task order type addressing the design, fabrication and testing of a full scale heat pipe. The contract was initiated on April 16, 1987. Sundstrand has specific responsibilities in each task. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in turn has the prime contract responsibility to NASA-LeRC.

Parekh, M.B. [Sundstrand Energy Systems, Rockford, IL (United States)

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

Volatile compound evolution from the programmed temperature pyrolysis of Big Clifty and McKittrick tar sands at a 10 degrees C/min heating rate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Big Clifty (Kentucky) and McKittrick (California) tar sands were pyrolyzed at a 10{degrees}C/min heating rate from room temperature to 900{degrees}C. The volatile compounds were detected on-line and in real time by tandem mass spectrometry using MS and MS/MS detection. This paper reports the programmed temperature pyrolysis behaviors of Big Clifty and McKittrick tar sands and compares their results. 48 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Reynolds, J.G.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for the months of April and May 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Colorado State University Solar Energy Applications Laboratory is currently testing several solar domestic hot water heating systems. The experimental systems are fully instrumented to yield data appropriate for in-depth analyses of performance. Indoor testing of the horizontal-tank thermosyphon system under investigation has been completed. Current work involves outdoor testing of the system and further analysis of the heat exchanger calculations used in the TRNSYS model of the system.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Solar test of an integrated sodium reflux heat-pipe receiver/reactor for thermochemical energy transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In October 1987, a chemical reactor integrated into a sodium reflux heat-pipe receiver was tested in the solar furnace at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. The reaction carried out was the carbon dioxide reforming of methane. This reaction is one of the leading candidates for thermochemical energy transport either within a distributed solar receiver system or over long distances. The Schaeffer Solar Furnace consists of a 96 square meter heliostat and a 7.3 meter diameter dish concentrator with a 65-degree rim angle and a 3.5 meter focal length. Measurements have shown a peak concentration ratio of over 10,000 and a total power of 15 kW at an insolation of 800 w/square meter. The receiver/reactor contains seven catalyst-filled tubes inside an evacuated metal box containing sodium. The front surface of this box serves as the solar absorber of the receiver. In operation, concentrated sunlight heats the 1/8-inch Inconel plate and vaporizes sodium from the wire-mesh wick attached to the back of it. The sodium vapor condenses on the reactor tubes, releases its latent heat, and returns by gravity to the wick. Test results and areas for future development are discussed.

Diver, R.B.; Fish, J.D.; Levitan, R.; Levy, M.; Rosin, H.; Richardson, J.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for October and November 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes progress on 3 projects: Integrated tank/heat exchanger modeling and experiments for solar thermal storage; Advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems; and Incident angle modifiers (IAMs) by the Monte Carlo method for cylindrical solar collectors. IAMs are used to correct for effects such as shading, back plane reflectance, inter-reflection, etc. Summaries are given for the first two projects; however, a full draft report is given for the third.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Comparison of the PLTEMP code flow instability predictions with measurements made with electrically heated channels for the advanced test reactor.  

SciTech Connect

When the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) was designed in the 1960s the potential for fuel element burnout by a phenomenon referred to at that time as 'autocatalytic vapor binding' was of serious concern. This type of burnout was observed to occur at power levels considerably lower than those that were known to cause critical heat flux. The conversion of the MURR from HEU fuel to LEU fuel will probably require significant design changes, such as changes in coolant channel thicknesses, that could affect the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor core. Therefore, the redesign of the MURR to accommodate an LEU core must address the same issues of fuel element burnout that were of concern in the 1960s. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was designed at about the same time as the MURR and had similar concerns with regard to fuel element burnout. These concerns were addressed in the ATR by two groups of thermal-hydraulic tests that employed electrically heated simulated fuel channels. The Croft (1964), Reference 1, tests were performed at ANL. The Waters (1966), Reference 2, tests were performed at Hanford Laboratories in Richland Washington. Since fuel element surface temperatures rise rapidly as burnout conditions are approached, channel surface temperatures were carefully monitored in these experiments. For self-protection, the experimental facilities were designed to cut off the electric power when rapidly increasing surface temperatures were detected. In both the ATR reactor and in the tests with electrically heated channels, the heated length of the fuel plate was 48 inches, which is about twice that of the MURR. Whittle and Forgan (1967) independently conducted tests with electrically heated rectangular channels that were similar to the tests by Croft and by Walters. In the Whittle and Forgan tests the heated length of the channel varied among the tests and was between 16 and 24 inches. Both Waters and Whittle and Forgan show that the cause of the fuel element burnout is due to a form of flow instability. Whittle and Forgan provide a formula that predicts when this flow instability will occur. This formula is included in the PLTEMP/ANL code.Error! Reference source not found. Olson has shown that the PLTEMP/ANL code accurately predicts the powers at which flow instability occurs in the Whittle and Forgan experiments. He also considered the electrically heated tests performed in the ANS Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop at ORNL and report by M. Siman-Tov et al. The purpose of this memorandum is to demonstrate that the PLTEMP/ANL code accurately predicts the Croft and the Waters tests. This demonstration should provide sufficient confidence that the PLTEMP/ANL code can adequately predict the onset of flow instability for the converted MURR. The MURR core uses light water as a coolant, has a 24-inch active fuel length, downward flow in the core, and an average core velocity of about 7 m/s. The inlet temperature is about 50 C and the peak outlet is about 20 C higher than the inlet for reactor operation at 10 MW. The core pressures range from about 4 to about 5 bar. The peak heat flux is about 110 W/cm{sup 2}. Section 2 describes the mechanism that causes flow instability. Section 3 describes the Whittle and Forgan formula for flow instability. Section 4 briefly describes both the Croft and the Waters experiments. Section 5 describes the PLTEMP/ANL models. Section 6 compares the PLTEMP/ANL predictions based on the Whittle and Forgan formula with the Croft measurements. Section 7 does the same for the Waters measurements. Section 8 provides the range of parameters for the Whittle and Forgan tests. Section 9 discusses the results and provides conclusions. In conclusion, although there is no single test that by itself closely matches the limiting conditions in the MURR, the preponderance of measured data and the ability of the Whittle and Forgan correlation, as implemented in PLTEMP/ANL, to predict the onset of flow instability for these tests leads one to the conclusion that the same method should be able to predict the

Feldman, E. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

284

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluation and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, August--September 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes activities of the Colorado State University program on solar heating and cooling systems for the months of August and September 1993. The topics include: rating and certification of domestic water heating systems, unique solar system components, advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems, and desiccant cooling of buildings.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Modeling and analysis of a heat transport transient test facility for space nuclear systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is to design a robust test facility for a small space nuclear power system and model its physical behavior under… (more)

[No author

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Stress Corrosion Crack Growth Rate Testing and Analytical Electron Microscopy of Alloy 600 as a Function of Pourbaix Space and Microstructure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stress corrosion crack (SCC) growth rate tests and analytical electron microscopy (AEM) studies were performed over a broad range of environments and heat treatments of Alloy 600. This effort was conducted to correlate bulk environmental conditions such as pH and electrochemical potential (EcP) with the morphology of the SCC crack. Development of a library of AEM morphologies formed by SCC in different environments is an important step in identifying the conditions that lead to SCC in components. Additionally, AEM examination of stress corrosion cracks formed in different environments and microstructures lends insight into the mechanism(s) of stress corrosion cracking. Testing was conducted on compact tension specimens in three environments: a mildly acidic oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions, a caustic environment containing 10% NaOH, and hydrogenated near-neutral buffered water. Additionally, stress corrosion cracking testing of a smooth specimen was conducted in hydrogenated steam. The following heat treatments of Alloy 600 were examined: mill annealed at 980 C (near-neutral water), mill annealed at 1010 C (steam), sensitized (acid and caustic), and mill annealed + healed to homogenize the grain boundary Cr concentration (caustic). Crack growth rate (CGR) testing showed that sensitized Alloy 600 tested in the mildly acidic, oxidizing environment containing sulfate ions produced the fastest cracking ({approx} 8.8 {micro}m/hr at 260 C), and AEM examination revealed evidence of sulfur segregation to the crack tip. The caustic environment produced slower cracking ({approx} 0.4 {micro}m/hr at 307 C) in the mill annealed + healed heat treatment but no observed cracking in the sensitized condition. In the caustic environment, fully oxidized carbides were present in the crack wake but not ahead of the crack tip. In near-neutral buffered water at 338 C, the CGR was a function of dissolved hydrogen in the water and exhibited a maximum (0.17 {micro}m/hr) near the transition between Ni and NiO stability. The cracks in near-neutral hydrogenated water exhibited Cr-rich spinels and NiO-type oxides but no significant oxidation of grain boundary carbides. No clear effect of dissolved hydrogen on the crack wake morphology was apparent. In hydrogenated steam testing of a smooth specimen (CGR estimated as {approx} 0.7 {micro}m/hr at 399 C), metallic nickel nodules were evident in both the crack wake and on the specimen surface. Oxide particles having a similar size and shape to the microstructural carbides were found in the crack wake, suggesting that these particles are carbides that were oxidized by contact with the steam. The present results show that different environments often produce unique crack tip morphologies that can be identified via AEM.

N. Lewis; S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; G.A. Young

2000-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

288

7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160C at a specified rate as the heat source. The actual and maximum possible thermal efficiencies and the rate of heat rejected from this power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7-31 7-88 A geothermal power plant uses geothermal liquid water at 160ºC at a specified rate and potential energy changes are zero. 3 Steam properties are used for geothermal water. Properties Using saturated liquid properties, the source and the sink state enthalpies of geothermal water are (Table A-4) k

Bahrami, Majid

289

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for the months of June and July 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project status report for the months of June and July 1995, is given on the Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating systems.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Performance assessment of mass flow rate measurement capability in a large scale transient two-phase flow test system  

SciTech Connect

Mass flow is an important measured variable in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program. Large uncertainties in mass flow measurements in the LOFT piping during LOFT coolant experiments requires instrument testing in a transient two-phase flow loop that simulates the geometry of the LOFT piping. To satisfy this need, a transient two-phase flow loop has been designed and built. The load cell weighing system, which provides reference mass flow measurements, has been analyzed to assess its capability to provide the measurements. The analysis consisted of first performing a thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP4 to compute mass inventory and pressure fluctuations in the system and mass flow rate at the instrument location. RELAP4 output was used as input to a structural analysis code SAPIV which is used to determine load cell response. The computed load cell response was then smoothed and differentiated to compute mass flow rate from the system. Comparison between computed mass flow rate at the instrument location and mass flow rate from the system computed from the load cell output was used to evaluate mass flow measurement capability of the load cell weighing system. Results of the analysis indicate that the load cell weighing system will provide reference mass flows more accurately than the instruments now in LOFT.

Nalezny, C.L.; Chapman, R.L.; Martinell, J.S.; Riordon, R.P.; Solbrig, C.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems: project status report for June and July 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This status report details activities during the months of June and July 1996. Work continues on the development of an improved wrap- around heat exchanger/tank model. The focus of the effort during June and July has been on evaluating various `local` methods of evaluating the natural convection boundary layer for use in a two layer model of the natural convection in the tank. The advantage of a local method is that the solution of the boundary layer equations depends on one or more parameters, but not on the upstream solutions. As a result, the solutions of the boundary layer equations can be calculated in advance and tabulated for use in the tank model.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Results of a Field Test Using R-407C in Split System Heat Pumps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper discusses the results of a field test to determine implications of an R-407C replacement of R-22. A change of refrigerants precipitates other changes in materials, component selection, and processing. In addition, thermodynamic properties are different. Consequently, the effects on durability, thermal performance, humidity control, servicing, and manufacturability were questioned. The field test addressed many of these questions. Anticipated changes in manufacturing processes were implemented on the production line. Contractors were educated on the differences in the refrigerant. Data were obtained by refrigerant, lubricant, and component tear down analysis. Experiential information was derived from feed back of contractors and home owners, as well as multiple site visits. Generally, the field test has demonstrated that by following a few basic rules, the industry can anticipate use of R-407C with satisfactory results. However, the surprising appearance of a contaminate precipitant indicates the need for more investigation into long term effects.

Boyd, A.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Quarterly technical progress report No. 2, December 20-March 19, 1982. Second quarterly report on the effect of rapid heating rate on coal nitrogen and sulfur release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laser pyrolysis technique is applied to the investigation of the effects of heating rate on release of coal-bound sulfur and nitrogen. An experimental system characterization and calibration has been completed. A detailed documentation was prepared describing the 3-color pyrometer and the data analysis technique. The coal particle feed system has been calibrated to provide accurate mass flow rate at pre-selected particle velocities. The first batch of samples submitted for chemical analysis will be used for the determination of kinetics parameters at a high heating rate (approximately equal to 10/sup 6/ K/s). The coal used presently is a Montana Rosebud. Two other coals are available; one is ILL No. 6 (through EERC) which will need to be pulverized and the second is a Pitt. hv-A (through KVB). It was confirmed that sieve and drag size distribution of coal differ significantly, and that particle shape effects may be significant in the modelling of particle dynamics.

Gat, N.

1982-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

Experiments to investigate the effect of flight path on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Limited Flight Path (LFP) test series was to investigate the effect of reactor subcompartment flight path length on direct containment heating (DCH). The test series consisted of eight experiments with nominal flight paths of 1, 2, or 8 m. A thermitically generated mixture of iron, chromium, and alumina simulated the corium melt of a severe reactor accident. After thermite ignition, superheated steam forcibly ejected the molten debris into a 1:10 linear scale the model of a dry reactor cavity. The blowdown steam entrained the molten debris and dispersed it into the Surtsey vessel. The vessel pressure, gas temperature, debris temperature, hydrogen produced by steam/metal reactions, debris velocity, mass dispersed into the Surtsey vessel, and debris particle size were measured for each experiment. The measured peak pressure for each experiment was normalized by the total amount of energy introduced into the Surtsey vessel; the normalized pressures increased with lengthened flight path. The debris temperature at the cavity exit was about 2320 K. Gas grab samples indicated that steam in the cavity reacted rapidly to form hydrogen, so the driving gas was a mixture of steam and hydrogen. These experiments indicate that debris may be trapped in reactor subcompartments and thus will not efficiently transfer heat to gas in the upper dome of a containment building. The effect of deentrainment by reactor subcompartments may significantly reduce the peak containment load in a severe reactor accident. 8 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Nichols, R.T. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST); Volume 1: Cases E100-E200  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the Building Energy Simulation Test for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST) project conducted by the Tool Evaluation and Improvement International Energy Agency (IEA) Experts Group. The group was composed of experts from the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme, Task 22, Subtask A. The current test cases, E100-E200, represent the beginning of work on mechanical equipment test cases; additional cases that would expand the current test suite have been proposed for future development.

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development, testing and certification of the sigma research, Maxi-Therm S-101 thermosyphon heat exchanger. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Maxi-Therm S-101 is a thermosyphon liquid-to-air heat exchanger for use in heating systems in residential single-family dwellings and small commercial applications. It is a pumpless heating module which, when attached to a water storage tank, comprises a self contained heating unit. Electric resistance heating elements can be installed in the storage tank to provide a backup or off-peak heating system. (MOW)

Hankins, J.D.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report for the months of December 1995 and January 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Colorado State University Solar Energy Applications Laboratory is currently testing several solar domestic hot water heating systems. The experimental systems are fully instrumented to yield data appropriate for in-depth analyses of performance. One of these systems is an unpressurized drainback system with a load-side heat exchanger. An analysis of the performance of this heat exchanger is the focus of this paper. Analytical calculations for the effectiveness and convective heat transfer coefficients from correlations are compared against the experimental data. Three models for the convective heat transfer coefficients are analyzed and yield results that underpredict the measured heat transfer from 23% to 72%. TRNSYS simulations were performed using the average effectiveness (the calculated effectiveness varies from 0.68 to 0.95); the results compare favorably with experimental results, indicating that a constant effectiveness is an adequate model for the system.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Testing the ecological stability of ectomycorrhizal symbiosis: effects of heat, ash and mycorrhizal colonization on Pinus muricata seedling performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metal pan and heating it in a soil drying oven. During thesoil heating and ash addition, using a drying oven and ash

Peay, Kabir G.; Bruns, Thomas D.; Garbelotto, Matteo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Bimonthly report, December 1996 - January 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work continued on the fortran code required for a two layer (boundary layer and core region) model of the wrap-around heat exchanger solar thermal storage tank. After a review of one- dimensional models of thermal storage tanks in the literature, a modified fixed volume model is being considered for the formulation of the one-dimensional model of the core region of the thermal storage tank. In the traditional fixed volume TRNSYS model (Type 4) model an energy balance is written for individual sub-volumes of the tank. Upwind finite difference approximations are used to represent convection terms and central difference approximations for the diffusion terms. The resulting linearized first order ordinary differential equation is then integrated in time analytically in the subroutine DIFFEQ. Iteration is required to obtain the final solution for the collection of such equations which describe the tank. A one-dimensional tank model employing Patankar`s exponential differencing is being developed in the hope of reducing the numerical mixing problems encountered with the current fixed volume models thereby making the solutions less sensitive to the grid refinement (number of nodes).

NONE

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program includes six tasks, including (1) a project measuring the performance of unique solar system components, (2) a project to develop a methodology for determining annual performance ratings of solar domestic hot water systems, (3) a project that will identify, analyze, design, build, and experimentally evaluate SDHW systems incorporating advanced concepts and components, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform TRNSYS simulations to determine potential energy savings for desiccant cooling systems, especially in humid climates, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described.

Not Available

1993-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DOE/EA-1673: Environmental Assessment for Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air-Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment (July 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 Environmental Assessment for 10 CFR 431 Energy Conservation Program for Certain Industrial Equipment: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Commercial Heating, Air- Conditioning, and Water-Heating Equipment July 2009 8-i CHAPTER 8. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS 8.1 INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................... 8-1 8.2 AIR QUALITY ANALYSIS ............................................................................................... 8-1 8.3 AIR POLLUTANT DESCRIPTIONS ................................................................................ 8-1 8.4 AIR QUALITY REGULATIONS ...................................................................................... 8-3

302

Liquid metal heat pipe behavior under transient cooling and heating  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of the transient behavior of a liquid metal heat pipe. A 0.457 m long, screen-wick, sodium heat pipe with 0.0127 m outer diameter was tested in sodium loop facility. The heat pipe reversed under a pulse heat load applied at the condenser. The time at which the heat pipe reversed was dependent of the heat pipe properties, the sodium loop flow rate and heating conditions at the condenser. The start-up and the operational shut-down by forced cooling of the condenser were also studied. During the start-up process, at least part of the heat pipe was active. The active region extended gradually down to the end of the condenser until all working fluid in the heat pipe was molten. With forced cooling at the condenser, the heat pipe approached its heat transport limit before section of the condenser became frozen. The measured heat transport limit was in agreement with the theoretical value. 5 refs.

Nguyen, H.X.; Hahn, T.O.; Hahn, O.J.; Chow, L.C.; Tagavi, K.A.; Morgan, M.J. (Kentucky, University, Lexington (United States) USAF, Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Assessment of Uncertainty in Cloud Radiative Effects and Heating Rates through Retrieval Algorithm Differences: Analysis using 3-years of ARM data at Darwin, Australia  

SciTech Connect

Ground-based radar and lidar observations obtained at the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Tropical Western Pacific site located in Darwin, Australia are used to retrieve ice cloud properties in anvil and cirrus clouds. Cloud microphysical properties derived from four different retrieval algorithms (two radar-lidar and two radar only algorithms) are compared by examining mean profiles and probability density functions of effective radius (Re), ice water content (IWC), extinction, ice number concentration, ice crystal fall speed, and vertical air velocity. Retrieval algorithm uncertainty is quantified using radiative flux closure exercises. The effect of uncertainty in retrieved quantities on the cloud radiative effect and radiative heating rates are presented. Our analysis shows that IWC compares well among algorithms, but Re shows significant discrepancies, which is attributed primarily to assumptions of particle shape. Uncertainty in Re and IWC translates into sometimes-large differences in cloud radiative effect (CRE) though the majority of cases have a CRE difference of roughly 10 W m-2 on average. These differences, which we believe are primarily driven by the uncertainty in Re, can cause up to 2 K/day difference in the radiative heating rates between algorithms.

Comstock, Jennifer M.; Protat, Alain; McFarlane, Sally A.; Delanoe, Julien; Deng, Min

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

304

Oil shale retorting: a correlation of selected infrared absorbance bands with process heating rates and oil yeild  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The measured absorbance for specific infrared bands of Colorado shale oil is correlated with process oil yield and retorting rate. The results show excellent correlations using bands associated with olefinic groups (910, 990 and 1640 cm/sup -1/); analyses were carried out using both quantitative and qualitative infrared methods. No pretreatment of the crude shale oil is required. The results are encouraging enough that, with further development, the method may have potential use as an on-line monitoring technique for various retorting processes.

Evans, R.A.; Campbell, J.H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Tribology of improved transformation-toughened ceramics-heat engine test. Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A short term study has been carried out to evaluate the suitability as cam roller followers of three ceria zirconia toughened aluminas and two yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconias (YTZPs) previously enhanced in programs supported by ORNL. Norton Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (NBD-100) was also included in this study as a reference material, because it was known from work at Northwestern University that Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} to experienced little or no wear in this application, and NBD-100 is currently a successful commercial bearing material. The tribological studies were subcontracted to the Torrington Company. They found that in cam roller follower simulated tests that there was essentially no wear after 1 hour and 5 hours of testing detectable by weighing and concluded that all of these ceramics are, therefore, candidate materials. Because of the minute amounts of wear it was not possible to identify the wear mechanism or to make any correlations with the other physical properties which were evaluated such as MOR, K{sub IC} hardness, density and grain size. Phase transformation during rolling has been of interest in the tribology of zirconia contain materials. The least stable of the ceria zirconia toughened aluminas resulted in as much as 33% monoclinic phase after testing whereas the yttria stabilized (TTZ) contained very little of this transformed phase. The results of this study show that oxide materials can now be considered as candidates for cam roller followers in heat engines.

Lilley, E.; Rossi, G.A.; Pelletier, P.J. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

High temperature heat pipes for waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

Operation of heat pipes in air at temperatures above 1200/sup 0/K has been accomplished using SiC as a shell material and a chemical vapor deposit (CVD) tungsten inner liner for protection of the ceramic from the sodium working fluid. The CVD tungsten has been used as a distribution wick for the gravity assisted heat pipe through the development of a columnar tungsten surface structure, achieved by control of the metal vapor deposition rate. Wick performance has been demonstrated in tests at approximately 2 kW throughput with a 19-mm-i.d. SiC heat pipe. Operation of ceramic heat pipes in repeated start cycle tests has demonstrated their ability to withstand temperature rise rates of greater than 1.2 K/s.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Design concept and testing of an in-bundle gamma densitometer for subchannel void fraction measurements in the THTF electrically heated rod bundle. [PWR  

SciTech Connect

A design concept is presented for an in-bundle gamma densitometer system for measurement of subchannel average fluid density and void fraction in rod or tube bundles. This report describes (1) the application of the design concept to the Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) electrically heated rod bundle; and (2) results from tests conducted in the THTF.

Felde, D. K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Artificial neural network control of a heat exchanger in a closed flow air circuit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper experimentally investigates the control of a heat exchanger in a closed flow air circuit. The temperature inside the test section of the test facility has been maintained at a set value by variation of air flow rate over the heat exchanger ... Keywords: Air circuit, Heat exchanger, Multi-layer perceptron, Neural network control, PID control

Kapil Varshney; P. K. Panigrahi

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Field Test of High Efficiency Residential Buildings with Ground-source and Air-source Heat Pump Systems  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the field performance of space conditioning and water heating equipment in four single-family residential structures with advanced thermal envelopes. Each structure features a different, advanced thermal envelope design: structural insulated panel (SIP); optimum value framing (OVF); insulation with embedded phase change materials (PCM) for thermal storage; and exterior insulation finish system (EIFS). Three of the homes feature ground-source heat pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and water heating while the fourth has a two-capacity air-source heat pump (ASHP) and a heat pump water heater (HPWH). Two of the GCHP-equipped homes feature horizontal ground heat exchange (GHX) loops that utillize the existing foundation and utility service trenches while the third features a vertical borehole with vertical u-tube GHX. All of the houses were operated under the same simulated occupancy conditions. Operational data on the house HVAC/Water heating (WH) systems are presented and factors influencing overall performance are summarized.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, October--November 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the areas of: Rating and certification of domestic water heating systems, unique solar system components, advanced residential solar domestic hot water systems, analysis of advanced desiccant solar cooling systems, and management and coordination of Colorado State/DOE program.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Heating Rates in Tropical Anvils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of infrared and solar radiation with tropical cirrus anvils is addressed. Optical properties of the anvils are inferred from satellite observations and from high-altitude aircraft measurements. An infrared multiple-scattering ...

Thomas P. Ackerman; Kuo-Nan Liou; Francisco P. J. Valero; Leonhard Pfister

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating systems. Project status report, April--May 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A project status report for April and May 1995 is given on the Colorado State University program on development of solar heating systems.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. High-siliocon fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because any space mission could experience a launch abort or return from orbit, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment-impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Natural convection heat exchangers for solar water heating systems. Technical progress report, February 1, 1996--March 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report describes the thermodynamic testing and modeling of a thermosyphon heat exchanger used in solar water heating systems. Testing of a four tube-in-shell thermosyphon heat exchanger was performed in two parts. The first portion of the test increased the collector fluid while the storage tank remained isothermal. After the collector fluid temperature was raised to 95 C, the second part of the test allowed the storage tank to gain heat. The test was performed for two collector flow rates. Measured values included collector side forced flow rate, temperature differences across the heat exchanger, vertical temperature distribution in the storage tank, vertical water temperature profile in the heat exchanger, and pressure drop on the thermosyphon side of the heat exchanger. The overall heat transfer coefficient-area product (UA) values obtained confirmed that models which assume UA depends solely on thermosyphon flow rate do not adequately characterize thermosyphon heat exchangers. This is because heat transfer in thermosyphon exchangers occurs in the mixed convection, rather than forced flow, regime. A linear regression equation was developed to better predict UA using the Prandtl, Reynolds, and Grashof numbers and dimensionless parameters based on fluid properties calculated for the average hot and cold leg temperatures. 9 figs.

Davidson, J.H.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, January--February 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

316

Results of heat tests of the TGE-435 main boiler in the PGU-190/220 combined-cycle plant of the Tyumen' TETs-2 cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Special features of operation of a boiler operating as a combined-cycle plant and having its own furnace and burner unit are descried. The flow of flue gases on the boiler is increased due to feeding of exhaust gases of the GTU into the furnace, which intensifies the convective heat exchange. In addition, it is not necessary to preheat air in the convective heating surfaces (the boiler has no air preheater). The convective heating surfaces of the boiler are used for heating the feed water, thus replacing the regeneration extractions of the steam turbine (HPP are absent in the circuit) and partially replacing the preheating of condensate (the LPP in the circuit of the unit are combined with preheaters of delivery water). Regeneration of the steam turbine is primarily used for the district cogeneration heating purposes. The furnace and burner unit of the exhaust-heat boiler (which is a new engineering solution for the given project) ensures utilization of not only the heat of the exhaust gases of the GTU but also of their excess volume, because the latter contains up to 15% oxygen that oxidizes the combustion process in the boiler. Thus, the gas temperature at the inlet to the boiler amounts to 580{sup o}C at an excess air factor a = 3.50; at the outlet these parameters are utilized to T{sub out} = 139{sup o}C and a{sub out} = 1.17. The proportions of the GTU/boiler loads that can actually be organized at the generating unit (and have been checked by testing) are presented and the proportions of loads recommended for the most efficient operation of the boiler are determined. The performance characteristics of the boiler are presented for various proportions of GTU/boiler loads. The operating conditions of the superheater and of the convective trailing heating surfaces are presented as well as the ecological parameters of the generating unit.

A.V. Kurochkin; A.L. Kovalenko; V.G. Kozlov; A.I. Krivobok [Engineering Center of the Ural Power Industry (Russian Federation)

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Flow Test Details Activities (38) Areas (33) Regions (1) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Flow tests provide information on permeability, recharge rates, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling. Thermal: Flow tests can measure temperature variations with time to estimate characteristics about the heat source. Dictionary.png Flow Test: Flow tests are typically conducted shortly after a well has been drilled to test its productivity. The well is opened and fluids are released, the

318

Commissioning of the Korean High Heat Flux Test Facility by Using Electron Beam System for Plasma Facing Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Divertor and High-Heat-Flux Components / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Dong Won Lee; Duck-Hoi Kim; Seungyon Cho

319

International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method (IEA BESTEST): In-Depth Diagnostic Cases for Ground Coupled Heat Transfer Related to Slab-on-Grade Construction  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a set of idealized in-depth diagnostic test cases for use in validating ground-coupled floor slab heat transfer models. These test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST.

Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Beausoleil-Morrison, I.; Ben-Nakhi, A.; Crowley, M.; Deru, M.; Henninger, R.; Ribberink, H.; Thornton, J.; Wijsman, A.; Witte, M.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

CPC thermal collector test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive set of test procedures has evolved at Argonne National Laboratory for establishing the performance of compound parabolic and related concentrating thermal collectors with large angular fields of view. The procedures range from separate thermal and optical tests, to overall performance tests. A calorimetric ratio technique has been developed to determine the heat output of a collector without knowledge of the heat transfer fluid's mass flow rate and heat capacity. Sepcial attention is paid to the problem of defining and measuring the incident solar flux with respect to which the collector efficiency is to be calculated.

Reed, K A

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Microwave heating for adsorbents regeneration and oil sands coke activation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Microwave heating has unique advantages compared to convection-radiation heating methods including fast heating rate and selective heating of objects. This thesis studied two applications of… (more)

Chen, Heng

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Experimental results of direct containment heating by high-pressure melt ejection into the Surtsey vessel: The DCH-3 and DCH-4 tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two experiments, DCH-3 and DCH-4, were performed at the Surtsey test facility to investigate phenomena associated with a high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) reactor accident sequence resulting in direct containment heating (DCH). These experiments were performed using the same experimental apparatus with identical initial conditions, except that the Surtsey test vessel contained air in DCH-3 and argon in DCH-4. Inerting the vessel with argon eliminated chemical reactions between metallic debris and oxygen. Thus, a comparison of the pressure response in DCH-3 and DCH-4 gave an indication of the DCH contribution due to metal/oxygen reactions. 44 refs., 110 figs., 43 tabs.

Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Brockmann, J.E.; Tarbell, W.W. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Nichols, R.T. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Sweet, D.W. (AEA Technology, Winfrith (United Kingdom))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Experimental Tests of Methods for the Measurement of Rainfall Rate Using an Airborne Dual-Wavelength Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a spaceborne meteorological radar, the use of frequencies above 10 GHz may be necessary to attain sufficient spatial resolution. As the frequency increases, however, attenuation by rain becomes significant. To extend the range of rain rates ...

R. Meneghini; K. Nakamura; C. W. Ulbrich; D. Atlas

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Working on new gas turbine cycle for heat pump drive FILE COPY TAP By Irwin Stambler, Field Editor DO NOT 16 0 REMOVE 16 Small recuperated gas turbine engine, design rated at 13 hp and 27% efficiency of the cycle- as a heat pump drive for commercial installations. Company is testing prototype gas turbine

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

326

The Effects of Test Temperature, Temper, and Alloyed Copper on the Hydrogen-Controlled Crack Growth Rate of an Al-Zn-Mg-(Cu) Alloy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen embrittlement controlled stage II crack growth rate of AA 7050 (6.09 wt.% Zn, 2.14 wt% Mg, 2.19 wt.% Cu) was investigated as a function of temper and alloyed copper level in a humid air environment at various temperatures. Three tempers representing the underaged, peak aged, and overaged conditions were tested in 90% relative humidity (RH) air at temperatures between 25 and 90 C. At all test temperatures, an increased degree of aging (from underaged to overaged) produced slower stage II crack growth rates. The stage II crack growth rate of each alloy and temper displayed Arrhenius-type temperature dependence with activation energies between 58 and 99 kJ/mol. For both the normal copper and low copper alloys, the fracture path was predominantly intergranular at all test temperatures (25-90 C) in each temper investigated. Comparison of the stage II crack growth rates for normal (2.19 wt.%) and low (0.06 wt.%) copper alloys in the peak aged and overaged tempers showed the beneficial effect of copper additions on stage II crack growth rate in humid air. In the 2.19 wt.% copper alloy, the significant decrease ({approx} 10 times at 25 C) in stage II crack growth rate upon overaging is attributed to an increase in the apparent activation energy for crack growth. IN the 0.06 wt.% copper alloy, overaging did not increase the activation energy for crack growth but did lower the pre-exponential factor, {nu}{sub 0}, resulting in a modest ({approx} 2.5 times at 25 C) decrease in crack growth rate. These results indicate that alloyed copper and thermal aging affect the kinetic factors that govern stage II crack growth rate. Overaged, copper bearing alloys are not intrinsically immune to hydrogen environment assisted cracking but are more resistant due to an increased apparent activation energy for stage II crack growth.

G.A. Young, Jr.; J.R. Scully

2000-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

327

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

Wolowodiuk, Walter (New Providence, NJ)

1976-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

328

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems: Project status report for the months of May and June 1989  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cooling performance analysis of the data collected over the past four years in the research and development of the SENC solid desiccant cooling system is nearing completion. Computer models are being developed of two system designs: (1) the present system configuration with constant collector flow rate and one mixed storage tank, and (2) the proposed system with variable collector flow to maintain constant collector outlet temperature and two storage tanks (complete thermal stratification). These models are expected to reveal the annual heating system performance difference which will be realized by changing to constant collector temperature operation in Solar House I. Also the model will provide optimization with respect to storage tank temperature settings, load side heating capacity, etc.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Heat Transfer of a Multiple Helical Coil Heat Exchanger Using a Microencapsulated Phase Change Material Slurry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study has focused on the use of coil heat exchangers (CHEs) with microencapsulated phase change material (MPCM) slurries to understand if CHEs can yield greater rates of heat transfer. An experimental study was conducted using a counterflow CHE consisting of 3 helical coils. Two separate tests were conducted, one where water was used as heat transfer fluid (HTF) on the coil and shell sides, respectively; while the second one made use of MPCM slurry and water on the coil and shell sides, respectively. The NTU-effectiveness relationship of the CHE when MPCM fluid is used approaches that of a heat exchanger with a heat capacity ratio of zero. The heat transfer results have shown that when using a MPCM slurry, an increase in heat transfer rate can be obtained when compared to heat transfer results obtained using straight heat transfer sections. It has been concluded that the increased specific heat of the slurry as well as the fluid dynamics in helical coil pipes are the main contributors to the increased heat transfer.

Gaskill, Travis

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

A Class of Single- and Dual-Frequency Algorithms for Rain-Rate Profiling from a Spaceborne Radar. Part II: Tests from Airborne Radar Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I, four single-frequency (SF) algorithms and a dual-frequency (DF) algorithm for range profiling of the rain rate from a spaceborne radar were described and tested from numerical simulations. In Part II, performances of these algorithms ...

Paul Amayenc; Jean Philippe Diguet; Mongi Marzoug; Taoufik Tani

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interest Rate Reduction Program Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

332

Start Up of a Nb-1%Zr Potassium Heat Pipe From the Frozen State  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The start up of a liquid-metal heat pipe from the frozen state was evaluated experimentally with a Nb-1%Zr heat pipe with potassium as the working fluid. The heat pipe was fabricated and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory. RF induction heating was used to heat 13 cm of the 1-m-long heat pipe. The heat pipe and test conditions are well characterized so that the test data may be used for comparison with numerical analyses. An attempt was made during steady state tests to calibrate the heat input so that the heat input would be known during the transient cases. The heat pipe was heated to 675C with a throughput of 600 W and an input heat flux of 6 W/cm 2 . Steady state tests, start up from the frozen state, and transient variations from steady state were conducted. Nomenclature English L length m . mass flow rate PS power setting r radius q heat flux q" heat flux per unit area T temperature v voltage V volume x axial location on heat pipe Greek e porosity r resist...

Since Its Founding; David E. Glass; Michael A. Merrigan; J. Tom Sena

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Design of an Online Fission Gas Monitoring System for Post-irradiation Examination Heating Tests of Coated Fuel Particles for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Fission Gas Monitoring System (FGMS) has been designed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for use of monitoring online fission gas-released during fuel heating tests. The FGMS will be used with the Fuel Accident Condition Simulator (FACS) at the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) within the INL campus. Preselected Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) TRISO (Tri-isotropic) fuel compacts will undergo testing to assess the fission product retention characteristics under high temperature accident conditions. The FACS furnace will heat the fuel to temperatures up to 2,000ºC in a helium atmosphere. Released fission products such as Kr and Xe isotopes will be transported downstream to the FGMS where they will accumulate in cryogenically cooledcollection traps and monitored with High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detectors during the heating process. Special INL developed software will be used to monitor the accumulated fission products and will report data in near real-time. These data will then be reported in a form that can be readily available to the INL reporting database. This paper describes the details of the FGMS design, the control and acqusition software, system calibration, and the expected performance of the FGMS. Preliminary online data may be available for presentation at the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) conference.

Dawn Scates

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Optimization of Deep Drilling Performance - Development and Benchmark Testing of Advanced Diamond Product Drill Bits & HP/HT Fluids to Significantly Improve Rates of Penetration  

SciTech Connect

This document details the progress to date on the OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS AND HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION contract for the year starting October 2004 through September 2005. The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit--fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all Phase 1 testing and is planning Phase 2 development.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

335

Specific Heat Measurements and Post-Test Characterization of Irradiated and Unirradiated Urania and Gadolinia Doped Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In pursuit of higher burnups at nuclear plants, fuel designers have introduced the use of 'advanced' fuel types, including doped fuels. Completing a systematic program to acquire data on the basic properties of these fuels, this project measured the specific heat and density of high burn-up UO2 and (U, Gd)O2 using irradiated materials of the same origin as those on which thermal diffusivity measurements had previously been made and thermal recovery phenomena investigated.

2000-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Materials Reliability Program: Effect of Defects in an Alloy 600/82 Weld on Stress Corrosion Cracking in Testing of Heat Affected Zo ne Specimens (MRP-254)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) data for heat affected zones (HAZs) in thick-walled components of both Alloy 600 and Alloy 690TT are needed to support the Materials Reliability Program, MRP-55 crack growth rate (CGR) disposition relationship for Alloy 600 (EPRI report 1006695). Such data are also needed to ensure that welding of Alloy 690TT does not deleteriously affect its inherent resistance to PWSCC. CGR experiments to obtain data in the HAZ of Alloy 600 plates welded with Alloy 82 and...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

337

International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST): Volume 2: Cases E300-E545.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents an additional set of mechanical system test cases that are planned for inclusion in ANSI/ASHRAE STANDARD 140. The cases test a program's modeling capabilities on the working-fluid side of the coil, but in an hourly dynamic context over an expanded range of performance conditions. These cases help to scale the significance of disagreements that are less obvious in the steady-state cases. The report is Vol. 2 of HVAC BESTEST Volume 1. Volume 1 was limited to steady-state test cases that could be solved with analytical solutions. Volume 2 includes hourly dynamic effects, and other cases that cannot be solved analytically. NREL conducted this work in collaboration with the Tool Evaluation and Improvement Experts Group under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 22.

Neymark J.; Judkoff, R.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

339

Development of an integrated building load-ground source heat pump model as a test bed to assess short- and long-term heat pump and ground loop performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ground source heat pumps (GSHP) have the ability to significantly reduce the energy required to heat and cool buildings. Historically, deployment of GSHP's in the… (more)

Gaspredes, Jonathan Louis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Design, construction, and testing of the Colorado State University Solar House I heating and cooling system. United States special format report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the project is the design, construction, testing, and evaluation of a practical system for utilizing solar energy to drive heating, cooling, and domestic hot water subsystems, supplemented as necessary with auxiliary fuel. System design was accomplished during the first five months (September 1973 to January 1974) and construction completed during the following five month period (February to June 1974). This report details the evaluation of the system's performance during the period 1 September 1974 through 31 August 1975. Efforts are now underway to modify and improve the performance of the solar system, and conduct a comparative evaluation of the original design and the modified system. (WDM)

Loef, G.O.G.; Ward, D.S.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Design, construction, and testing of the Colorado State University Solar House I heating and cooling system. United States special format report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the project is the design, construction, testing, and evaluation of a practical system for utilizing solar energy to drive heating, cooling, and domestic hot water subsystems, supplemented as necessary with auxiliary fuel. System design was accomplished during the first five months (September 1973 to January 1974) and construction completed during the following five month period (February to June 1974). This report details the evaluation of the system's performance during the period 1 September 1974 through 31 August 1975. Efforts are now underway to modify and improve the performance of the solar system, and conduct a comparative evaluation of the original design and the modified system. (WDM)

Loef, G.O.G.; Ward, D.S.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Exergy Analysis and Operational Efficiency of a Horizontal Ground Source Heat Pump System Operated in a Low-Energy Test House under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents data, analyses, measures of performance, and conclusions for a ground-source heat pump (GSHP) providing space conditioning to a 345m2 house whose envelope is made of structural insulated panels (SIP). The entire thermal load of this SIP house with RSI-3.7 (RUS-21) walls, triple pane windows with a U-factor of 1.64 W/m2 K (0.29 Btu/h ft2 oF) and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) of 0.25, a roof assembly with overall thermal resistance of about RSI-8.8 (RUS-50) and low leakage rates of 0.74 ACH at 50Pa was satisfied with a 2.16-Ton (7.56 kW) GSHP unit consuming negligible (9.83kWh) auxiliary heat during peak winter season. The highest and lowest heating COP achieved was 4.90 (October) and 3.44 (February), respectively. The highest and lowest cooling COP achieved was 6.09 (April) and 3.88 (August). These COPs are calculated on the basis of the total power input (including duct, ground loop, and control power losses ). The second Law (Exergy) analysis provides deep insight into how systemic inefficiencies are distributed among the various GSHP components. Opportunities for design and further performance improvements are identified. Through Exergy analysis we provide a true measure of how closely actual performance approaches the ideal, and it unequivocally identifies, better than energy analysis does, the sources and causes of lost work, the root cause of system inefficiencies.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Engineering design construction and testing of a salt-water absorption unit optimized for use with a solar collector heat source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of a 3 ton direct evaporatively cooled LiBr chiller and the construction of three operable field test units suitable for use with flat plate collectors is reported. Compared to conventional LiBr chillers using shell and tube heat exchangers and a separate cooling tower this approach aims to reduce first cost, installation cost and parasitic power. The unit is packaged into a size approximately 94 cm square and 2 meters tall. It produces 7.2/sup 0/C (45F) chilled water with a .72 COP when fired with 89.4/sup 0/C (193F) hot water while rejecting heat to 25.6/sup 0/C (78F) wb ambient air. Power to operate the condenser fan, solution pump and surface wetting pump is 450 watts. This unit deals with water freezing by making the sump and wetting pump freeze resistant so that seasonal draining is not required. Low heat flux through the wetted surfaces yields performance insensitivity to the accumulation of scale.

Ferguson, T.; Merrick, R.H.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

CFD analysis for the applicability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for the simulation of the VHTR RCCS. Topical report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the GEN IV reactor concepts that have been proposed for thermochemical hydrogen production and other process-heat applications like coal gasification. The USDOE has selected the VHTR for further research and development, aiming to demonstrate emissions-free electricity and hydrogen production at a future time. One of the major safety advantages of the VHTR is the potential for passive decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-side of the RCCS is very similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that has been proposed for the PRISM reactor design. The design and safety analysis of the RVACS have been based on extensive analytical and experimental work performed at ANL. The Natural Convective Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at ANL that simulates at full scale the air-side of the RVACS was built to provide experimental support for the design and analysis of the PRISM RVACS system. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the NSTF facility can be used to generate RCCS experimental data: to validate CFD and systems codes for the analysis of the RCCS; and to support the design and safety analysis of the RCCS.

Tzanos, C. P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

346

Metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796) tested in high-temperature uniaxial and multiaxial experiments  

SciTech Connect

The results obtained from a number of metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel specimens were compiled. Samples were obtained from uniaxial and multiaxial tests covering a very broad span of temperatures and times. Special emphasis was on the identification of failure modes, cracking patterns, grain distortion, and grain-boundary microstructures. Uniaxial specimens exhibited the following sequence of failure modes with increasing temperature and time: ductile plastic tearing, ductile plastic shear, wedge cracking, and microvoid cracking. Over most of the temperature range examined (482 to 871/sup 0/C), M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated on grain boundaries at long times. Sigma phase and possibly ferrite were often present in the stressed areas at temperatures as low as 482/sup 0/C (900/sup 0/F). These metallurgical features promoted a severe loss in creep ductility at long times and low temperatures. Most multiaxial tests were performed under conditions that promoted wedge cracking. Stress gradients also favored surface crack initiation rather than bulk damage. Testing times for multiaxial tests were less than 10,000 h; hence, there was insufficient time for the development of embrittling features such as microvoids, sigma, and ferrite. Long-time multiaxial tests to failure are recommended.

Swindeman, R.W.; Houck, C.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Effect of mechanical cleaning on seawater corrosion of candidate OTEC heat exchanger materials. Part 1. Tests with M. A. N. brushes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion evaluations were conducted on 3003 Alclad, 5052 aluminum, C7 0600 copper-nickel, AL-6X stainless steel, and commercially-pure titanium in natural seawater under simulated OTEC heat exchanger conditions to investigate the erosion-corrosion effects of mechanical tube cleaning. Test conditions of M.A.N. brush cleaning and M.A.N. brush cleaning + chlorination were compared with no mechanical cleaning over a seven month period. M.A.N. brushing significantly accelerated corrosion of 5052 aluminum and C7 0600 copper-nickel. Chlorination significantly accelerated erosion-corrosion of 3003 Alclad and 5052 aluminium. Chlorination somewhat decreased erosion-corrosion of C7 0600 copper-nickel. There was no detectable effect of M.A.N. brushing or chlorination on AL-6X stainless steel or titanium, although AL-6X exhibited crevice corrosion at tubing connections. 3003 Alclad and 5052 aluminum exhibited piting corrosion in all 3 test environments.

Tipton, D G

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

The origin of the hot metal-poor gas in NGC1291: Testing the hypothesis of gas dynamics as the cause of the gas heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we test the idea that the low-metallicity hot gas in the centre of NGC 1291 is heated via a dynamical process. In this scenario, the gas from the outer gas-rich ring loses energy through bar-driven shocks and falls to the centre. Heating of the gas to X-ray temperatures comes from the high velocity that it reaches ($\\approx$ 700 \\kms) as it falls to the bottom of the potential well. This would explain why the stellar metallicity in the bulge region is around solar while the hot gas metallicity is around 0.1 solar. We carried out an observational test to check this hypothesis by measuring the metallicity of HII regions in the outer ring to check whether they matched the hot gas metallicity. For this purpose we obtained medium resolution long slit spectroscopy with FORS1 on the ESO VLT at Paranal and obtained the metallicities using emission line ratio diagnostics. The obtained metallicities are compatible with the bulge stellar metallicities but very different from the hot-gas metallicity. However, when comparing the different time-scales, the gas in the ring had time enough to get enriched through stellar processes, therefore we cannot rule out the dynamical mechanism as the heating process of the gas. However, the blue colours of the outer ring and the dust structures in the bar region could suggest that the origin of the X-ray hot gas is due to the infall of material from further out.

I. Perez; K. Freeman

2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

349

Thermal and hydraulic performance tests of a sieve-tray direct-contact heat exchanger vaporizing pure and mixed-hydrocarbon Rankine-cycle working fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments investigating a sieve-tray direct-contact heat exchanger were conducted at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site in southeastern Idaho using the 60-kW Mobile Heat Cycle Research Facility operating in the thermal loop mode (without a turbine). Isobutane, propane, and several hydrocarbon mixtures were heated and boiled in the direct-contact column, which is approx. 12 in. in diameter and 19-1/2 ft. high, using the energy from a 280/sup 0/F geothermal resource. Using pure fluids, isobutane or propane, the column operated much as intended, with 17 trays used for preheating and one or two accomplishing the boiling. For the pure fluids, individual tray efficiencies were found to be 70% or higher for preheating, and close to 100% for boiling; column pinch points were projected to be well under 1/sup 0/F with some runs reaching values as low as approx. 0.02/sup 0/F. Maximum geofluid throughputs for the isobutane tests corresponded roughly to the terminal rise velocity of a 1/32 in. working fluid droplet in geofluid. Boiling was found to occur in as many as 12 trays for the mixtures having the highest concentrations of the minor component, with overall efficiencies in the boiling section estimated on the order of 25 or 30%. Preheating tray efficiencies appeared to be fairly independent of working fluid, with pinch points ranging from as low as approx. 0.03/sup 0/F for a 0.95 isobutane/0.05 hexane mixture to approx. 2.3/sup 0/F for a 0.85 isobutane/0.05 hexane mixture. Column operation was noticeably less stable for the mixtures than for the pure fluids, with maximum throughputs dropping to as low as 40 to 50% of those for the pure fluids.

Mines, G.L.; Demuth, O.J.; Wiggins, D.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

SciTech Connect

We analyzed a data set of thermally induced changes in fractured rock permeability during a four-year heating (up to 200 C) and subsequent four-year cooling of a large volume, partially saturated and highly fractured volcanic tuff at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test, in Nevada, USA. Permeability estimates were derived from about 700 pneumatic (air-injection) tests, taken periodically at 44 packed-off borehole intervals during the heating and cooling cycle from November 1997 through November 2005. We analyzed air-permeability data by numerical modeling of thermally induced stress and moisture movements and their impact on air permeability within the highly fractured rock. Our analysis shows that changes in air permeability during the initial four-year heating period, which were limited to about one order of magnitude, were caused by the combined effects of thermal-mechanically-induced stress on fracture aperture and thermal-hydrologically-induced changes in fracture moisture content. At the end of the subsequent four-year cooling period, air-permeability decreases (to as low as 0.2 of initial) and increases (to as high as 1.8 of initial) were observed. By comparison to the calculated thermo-hydro-elastic model results, we identified these remaining increases or decreases in air permeability as irreversible changes in intrinsic fracture permeability, consistent with either inelastic fracture shear dilation (where permeability increased) or inelastic fracture surface asperity shortening (where permeability decreased). In this paper, we discuss the possibility that such fracture asperity shortening and associated decrease in fracture permeability might be enhanced by dissolution of highly stressed surface asperities over years of elevated stress and temperature.

Rutqvist, J.; Freifeld, B.; Min, K.-B.; Elsworth, D.; Tsang, Y.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Testing thermocline filler materials and molten-salt heat transfer fluids for thermal energy storage systems used in parabolic trough solar power plants.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Parabolic trough power systems that utilize concentrated solar energy to generate electricity are a proven technology. Industry and laboratory research efforts are now focusing on integration of thermal energy storage as a viable means to enhance dispatchability of concentrated solar energy. One option to significantly reduce costs is to use thermocline storage systems, low-cost filler materials as the primary thermal storage medium, and molten nitrate salts as the direct heat transfer fluid. Prior thermocline evaluations and thermal cycling tests at the Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility identified quartzite rock and silica sand as potential filler materials. An expanded series of isothermal and thermal cycling experiments were planned and implemented to extend those studies in order to demonstrate the durability of these filler materials in molten nitrate salts over a range of operating temperatures for extended timeframes. Upon test completion, careful analyses of filler material samples, as well as the molten salt, were conducted to assess long-term durability and degradation mechanisms in these test conditions. Analysis results demonstrate that the quartzite rock and silica sand appear able to withstand the molten salt environment quite well. No significant deterioration that would impact the performance or operability of a thermocline thermal energy storage system was evident. Therefore, additional studies of the thermocline concept can continue armed with confidence that appropriate filler materials have been identified for the intended application.

Kelly, Michael James; Hlava, Paul Frank; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Flexible Residential Test Facility: Impact of Infiltration and Ventilation on Measured Heating Season Energy and Moisture Levels  

SciTech Connect

Two identical laboratory homes designed to model existing Florida building stock were sealed and tested to 2.5 ACH50. Then, one was made leaky with 70% leakage through the attic and 30% through windows, to a tested value of 9 ACH50. Reduced energy use was measured in the tighter home (2.5 ACH50) in the range of 15% to 16.5% relative to the leaky (9 ACH50) home. Internal moisture loads resulted in higher dew points inside the tight home than the leaky home. Window condensation and mold growth occurred inside the tight home. Even cutting internal moisture gains in half to 6.05 lbs/day, the dew point of the tight home was more than 15 degrees F higher than the outside dry bulb temperature. The homes have single pane glass representative of older Central Florida homes.

Vieira, R.; Parker, D.; Fairey, P.; Sherwin, J.; Withers, C.; Hoak, D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop  

SciTech Connect

The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

SciTech Connect

Single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests involve injection of traced fluid and subsequent tracer recovery from the same well, usually with some quiescent time between the injection and withdrawal periods. SWIW are insensitive to variations in advective processes that arise from formation heterogeneities, because upon withdrawal, fluid parcels tend to retrace the paths taken during injection. However, SWIW are sensitive to diffusive processes, such as diffusive exchange of conservative or reactive solutes between fractures and rock matrix. This paper focuses on SWIW tests in which temperature itself is used as a tracer. Numerical simulations demonstrate the sensitivity of temperature returns to fracture-matrix interaction. We consider thermal SWIW response to the two primary reservoir improvements targeted with stimulation, (1) making additional fractures accessible to injected fluids, and (2) increasing the aperture and permeability of pre-existing fractures. It is found that temperature returns in SWIW tests are insensitive to (2), while providing a strong signal of more rapid temperature recovery during the withdrawal phase for (1).

Pruess, K.; Doughty, C.

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

355

Comparison of General Purpose Heat Source testing with the ANSI N43.6-1977 (R1989) sealed source standard  

SciTech Connect

This analysis provides a comparison of the testing of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) and RTG components with the testing requirements of ANSI N43.6-1977 (R1989) ``Sealed Radioactive Sources, Categorization``. The purpose of this comparison is to demonstrate that the RTGs meet or exceed the requirements of the ANSI standard, and thus can be excluded from the radioactive inventory of the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) building in Los Alamos per Attachment 1 of DOE STD 1027-92. The approach used in this analysis is as follows: (1) describe the ANSI sealed source classification methodology; (2) develop sealed source performance requirements for the RTG and/or RTG components based on criteria from the accident analysis for CMR; (3) compare the existing RTG or RTG component test data to the CMR requirements; and (4) determine the appropriate ANSI classification for the RTG and/or RTG components based on CMR performance requirements. The CMR requirements for treating RTGs as sealed sources are derived from the radiotoxicity of the isotope ({sup 238}P7) and amount (13 kg) of radioactive material contained in the RTG. The accident analysis for the CMR BIO identifies the bounding accidents as wing-wide fire, explosion and earthquake. These accident scenarios set the requirements for RTGs or RTG components stored within the CMR.

Grigsby, C.O.

1998-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

356

Geothermal heating for Caliente, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utilization of geothermal resources in the town of Caliente, Nevada (population 600) has been the objective of two grants. The first grant was awarded to Ferg Wallis, part-owner and operator of the Agua Caliente Trailer Park, to assess the potential of hot geothermal water for heating the 53 trailers in his park. The results from test wells indicate sustainable temperatures of 140/sup 0/ to 160/sup 0/F. Three wells were drilled to supply all 53 trailers with domestic hot water heating, 11 trailers with space heating and hot water for the laundry from the geothermal resource. System payback in terms of energy cost-savings is estimated at less than two years. The second grant was awarded to Grover C. Dils Medical Center in Caliente to drill a geothermal well and pipe the hot water through a heat exchanger to preheat air for space heating. This geothermal preheater served to convert the existing forced air electric furnace to a booster system. It is estimated that the hospital will save an average of $5300 in electric bills per year, at the current rate of $.0275/KWH. This represents a payback of approximately two years. Subsequent studies on the geothermal resource base in Caliente and on the economics of district heating indicate that geothermal may represent the most effective supply of energy for Caliente. Two of these studies are included as appendices.

Wallis, F.; Schaper, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Topical report : CFD analysis for the applicability of the natural convection shutdown heat removal test facility (NSTF) for the simulation of the VHTR RCCS.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) is one of the GEN IV reactor concepts that have been proposed for thermochemical hydrogen production and other process-heat applications like coal gasification. The United States Department of Energy has selected the VHTR for further research and development, aiming to demonstrate emissions-free electricity and hydrogen production at a future time. One of the major safety advantages of the VHTR is the potential for passive decay heat removal by natural circulation of air in a Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS). The air-side of the RCCS is very similar to the Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) that has been proposed for the PRISM reactor design. The design and safety analysis of the RVACS have been based on extensive analytical and experimental work performed at ANL. The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) at ANL that simulates at full scale the air-side of the RVACS was built to provide experimental support for the design and analysis of the PRISM RVACS system. The objective of this work is to demonstrate that the NSTF facility can be used to generate RCCS experimental data: to validate CFD and systems codes for the analysis of the RCCS; and to support the design and safety analysis of the RCCS. At this time no reference design is available for the NGNP. The General Atomics (GA) gas turbine - modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) has been used in many analyses as a starting reference design. In the GT-MHR the reactor outlet temperature is 850 C, while the target outlet reactor temperature in VHTR is 1000 C. VHTR scoping studies with a reactor outlet temperature of 1000 C have been performed at GA and INEL. Although the reactor outlet temperature in the VHTR is significantly higher than in the GT-MHR, the peak temperature in the reactor vessel (which is the heat source for the RCCS) is not drastically different. In this work, analyses have been performed using reactor vessel temperatures from the GT-MHR design, and the VHTR scoping studies. To demonstrate the applicability of the NSTF facility for full scale simulation of the RCCS the following approach was used. CFD analyses were performed of the RCCS and of its simulation at NSTF to demonstrate that: all significant fluid flow and heat transfer phenomena in the RCCS can be simulated at NSTF; and RCCS simulations at NSTF can cover the whole range of variation of the parameters describing these important phenomena in the RCCS. In CFD analyses, the simulation of turbulence is one of the most significant challenges. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of turbulence in large scale systems require excessive computational resources. The use of the Low-Re number k-{var_epsilon} model, which resolves the boundary layer, is computationally expensive in studies where many simulations have to be performed. In Ref. 2 it was shown that in the RCCS, heat transfer coefficient predictions of the high-Re number k-{var_epsilon} model are closer to those of the low-Re number model than those of heat transfer correlations. In this work, the standard high-Re number k-{var_epsilon} was used to simulate turbulence, and all analyses were performed with the CFD code STARCD.

Tzanos, C. P. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

358

Interface Heat Transfer Effects for Solidification Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solidification rate of a casting is governed by the rate of heat extraction, which in turn is dominated by the rate of heat transfer across the casting-mold ...

359

Collaborative National Program for the Development and Performance Testing of Distributed Power Technologies with Emphasis on Combined Heat and Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

A current barrier to public acceptance of distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies is the lack of credible and uniform information regarding system performance. Under a cooperative agreement, the Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) and the U.S. Department of Energy have developed four performance testing protocols to provide a uniform basis for comparison of systems. The protocols are for laboratory testing, field testing, long-term monitoring and case studies. They have been reviewed by a Stakeholder Advisory Committee made up of industry, public interest, end-user, and research community representatives. The types of systems covered include small turbines, reciprocating engines (including Stirling Cycle), and microturbines. The protocols are available for public use and the resulting data is publicly available in an online national database and two linked databases with further data from New York State. The protocols are interim pending comments and other feedback from users. Final protocols will be available in 2007. The interim protocols and the national database of operating systems can be accessed at www.dgdata.org. The project has entered Phase 2 in which protocols for fuel cell applications will be developed and the national and New York databases will continue to be maintained and populated.

Soinski, Arthur; Hanson, Mark

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

360

OPTIMIZATION OF DEEP DRILLING PERFORMANCE--DEVELOPMENT AND BENCHMARK TESTING OF ADVANCED DIAMOND PRODUCT DRILL BITS & HP/HT FLUIDS TO SIGNIFICANTLY IMPROVE RATES OF PENETRATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry cost shared program aims to benchmark drilling rates of penetration in selected simulated deep formations and to significantly improve ROP through a team development of aggressive diamond product drill bit--fluid system technologies. Overall the objectives are as follows: Phase 1--Benchmark ''best in class'' diamond and other product drilling bits and fluids and develop concepts for a next level of deep drilling performance; Phase 2--Develop advanced smart bit-fluid prototypes and test at large scale; and Phase 3--Field trial smart bit-fluid concepts, modify as necessary and commercialize products. As of report date, TerraTek has concluded all major preparations for the high pressure drilling campaign. Baker Hughes encountered difficulties in providing additional pumping capacity before TerraTek's scheduled relocation to another facility, thus the program was delayed further to accommodate the full testing program.

Alan Black; Arnis Judzis

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Design guidelines for solar heating/cooling/power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, design guidelines and analytical tools for the preliminary technical/economic evaluation of solar heating/cooling/power generation systems. In particular, it provides the theoretical framework, data bases and software tools for: determining the preliminary economic feasibility of solar-powered configurations compared with grid-supplied electric power and/or competing fossil fuels; selecting the optimum system configuration with respect to solar collector area and ''solar-side'' thermal storage capacity. Implementation of the methodology described in this report can be facilitated by the use of the accompanying IBM PC-compatible computer program ''SOLERAS''. This report represents the final task of the multi-year SOLERAS Program -- jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology -- which involved the development and field-testing of a solar-powered cooling system in Phoenix, AZ. 11 refs., 37 figs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Capture of Heat Energy from Diesel Engine Exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel generators produce waste heat as well as electrical power. About one-third of the fuel energy is released from the exhaust manifolds of the diesel engines and normally is not captured for useful applications. This project studied different waste heat applications that may effectively use the heat released from exhaust of Alaskan village diesel generators, selected the most desirable application, designed and fabricated a prototype for performance measurements, and evaluated the feasibility and economic impact of the selected application. Exhaust flow rate, composition, and temperature may affect the heat recovery system design and the amount of heat that is recoverable. In comparison with the other two parameters, the effect of exhaust composition may be less important due to the large air/fuel ratio for diesel engines. This project also compared heat content and qualities (i.e., temperatures) of exhaust for three types of fuel: conventional diesel, a synthetic diesel, and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen. Another task of this project was the development of a computer-aided design tool for the economic analysis of selected exhaust heat recovery applications to any Alaskan village diesel generator set. The exhaust heat recovery application selected from this study was for heating. An exhaust heat recovery system was fabricated, and 350 hours of testing was conducted. Based on testing data, the exhaust heat recovery heating system showed insignificant effects on engine performance and maintenance requirements. From measurements, it was determined that the amount of heat recovered from the system was about 50% of the heat energy contained in the exhaust (heat contained in exhaust was evaluated based on environment temperature). The estimated payback time for 100% use of recovered heat would be less than 3 years at a fuel price of $3.50 per gallon, an interest rate of 10%, and an engine operation of 8 hours per day. Based on experimental data, the synthetic fuel contained slightly less heat energy and fewer emissions. Test results obtained from adding different levels of a small amount of hydrogen into the intake manifold of a diesel-operated engine showed no effect on exhaust heat content. In other words, both synthetic fuel and conventional diesel with a small amount of hydrogen may not have a significant enough effect on the amount of recoverable heat and its feasibility. An economic analysis computer program was developed on Visual Basic for Application in Microsoft Excel. The program was developed to be user friendly, to accept different levels of input data, and to expand for other heat recovery applications (i.e., power, desalination, etc.) by adding into the program the simulation subroutines of the desired applications. The developed program has been validated using experimental data.

Chuen-Sen Lin

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

363

Heat transfer via dropwise condensation on hydrophobic microstructured surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dropwise condensation has the potential to greatly increase heat transfer rates. Heat transfer coefficients by dropwise condensation and film condensation on microstructured silicon chips were compared. Heat transfer ...

Ruleman, Karlen E. (Karlen Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Heat pipe heat amplifier  

SciTech Connect

In a heat pipe combination consisting of a common condenser section with evaporator sections at either end, two working fluids of different vapor pressures are employed to effectively form two heat pipe sections within the same cavity to support an amplifier mode of operation.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Heat Transfer Enhancement in Thermoelectric Power Generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heat transfer plays an important role in thermoelectric (TE) power generation because the higher the heat-transfer rate from the hot to the cold side of… (more)

Hu, Shih-yung

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Radiant Heating  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat...

367

Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

Heat pipe technology quarterly literature review. Volume 1, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography containing 110 citations is presented. The citations are arranged in five sections on general information on heat pipes, heat pipe applications, heat pipe theory, heat pipe design, development, and fabrication, and heat pipe testing and operation.

Srinivasan, R.; Gonzales, R.W. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate the laboratory procedure is a valid indica-Design Options to Improve the Energy Efficiency of a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;#12;Comparisons of field performance to closed-door test T ABLE 1 ratings indicate commercially manufactured refrigerators were u~ as laboratory test beds, a testing sequence of ..as PHASE I cabinets with an optimized Option 2 Evaporator/condenser size, surface r~frige~tion circuit or cvcle were

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

370

Solar water heating technical support. Technical report for November 1997--April 1998 and final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This progress report covers the time period November 1, 1997 through April 30, 1998, and also summarizes the project as the final report. The topics of the report include certification of solar collectors for water heating systems, modeling and testing of solar collectors and gas water heater backup systems, ratings of collectors for specific climates, and solar pool heating systems.

Huggins, J.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Customer Sited Combined Heat and Power on Maui: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the experience of Maui Electric Company (MECO) in developing and operating a 150 kW combined heat and power (CHP) project at a resort on Maui. Tests conducted during the project evaluated the heat rate and performance of the packaged CHP system, which had been originally designed for natural gas fueling but was fueled by commercial propane in this application.

2005-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

Test and evaluation of a solar-powered laboratory turbocompressor system for building heating and cooling. Final technical report. [Rankine cycle  

SciTech Connect

Extensive testing of an available laboratory Rankine-cycle turbocompressor cooling system was conducted over a range of temperatures consistent with present-day flat-plate and advanced medium-concentration solar collectors and at air- and water-cooled condenser temperature levels. Over 700 hours of testing demonstrated the high performance potential of such systems over a wide range of operational conditions and has provided design guidelines and preliminary specifications for future systems. Minor modifications were made to the laboratory system. These modifications included: (1) demonstration of three tons of cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of about 160 F, (2) efficient operation (i.e., COP of approximately 0.45) at turbine inlet temperatures of 240 F at air-cooled condenser temperatures, and (3) a COP in excess of 0.5 and more than five tons of cooling at system turbine inlet temperature levels of 200 F with water-cooled condenser temperatures. Generally, the test data correlated very well with detailed analytical design and off-design performance projections over the range of operating conditions. These data correlations indicate that the achieved performance levels were limited by mismatching of the existing turbomachinery elements. Data and experience obtained in this program substantiate the judgment that incorporating well-matched turbomachinery, based on existing technology, would result in the achievement of the full potential of a turbocompressor system for both air- and water-cooled operation. Prototype turbocompressor systems can be designed and developed which demonstrate high performance, (i.e., a COP approaching 1.0 and 0.75 for water and air-cooled operation, respectively), versatile operational features, permitting use of different collectors with a range of temperature capability, and potential for significant energy savings when used as solar-powered heating and cooling systems.

Biancardi, F.R.; Meader, M.D. Melikian, G.; Landerman, A.M.; Hall, J.B.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Heat pipe development status  

SciTech Connect

Test heat pipes have been operated in the 1400 K to 1700 K range for periods in excess of 20,000 hours with the objective of understanding and controlling corrosion and failure mechanisms. The results of a post test analysis of one of these heat pipes that was operated for 25,216 hours at 1700 K are reviewed and the implications for heat pipe lifetime discussed. An in-process report of an investigation of transient heat pipe behavior is presented. This investigation is being conducted as a result of restart problems encountered during life test of a 2 m. radiation cooled heat pipe. The results of a series of shut-down tests from power and temperature are given and probable causes of the restart problem discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Liquid-fluidized-bed heat exchanger flow distribution models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Allied Chemical Corporation at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is developing liquid-fluidized-bed shell-and-tube heat exchangers for geothermal applications. Sand fluidized by geothermal water on the shell side prevents scaling and increases heat transfer coefficients over conventional heat exchangers. Tests were conducted on two instrumented fluidized-bed heat exchanger models, constructed primarily of plexiglass, which differ in tube bundle orientation. One contains a horizontal bundle and the other a vertical tube bundle. Plexiglass construction allowed visual observation of flow patterns. The vertical model proved to have more uniform flow distribution and higher heat transfer coefficients than the horizontal model. The horizontal heat exchanger experienced piling on top of the tubes and areas of poor fluidization existed in the bed. Geometric considerations show that a horizontal design is more conducive to large flow rates than a vertical design. New design concepts for both vertical and horizontal assemblies and recommendations for further developmental work are presented.

Cole, L.T.; Allen, C.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

BTRIC - Refrigerant testing heats up  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cases and three 12 foot freezer cases are in the indoor chamber, and their condenser and compressor rack are in the outdoor one. Plastic tubs filled with water simulate...

376

Heat-Pipe Wick Characterization  

SciTech Connect

The development of liquid metal heat-pipes for use in solar powered Stirling engines has led to an in-depth analysis of heat-pipe wick properties. To model the flow of liquid sodium through the wick its two-phase permeability measurement is of interest. The permeability will be measured by constructing a test cell made up of a wick sample sintered to a manifold. Measuring the volumetric flow rate through the wick will allow for a determination of the wick's permeability as a function of pressure. Currently, simple estimates of permeability as a function of vapor fraction of a porous media are being used as a model to calculate the two-phase permeability. The above mentioned experiment will be used to test the existing formulas validity. The plan is to make use of a known procedure for testing permeability and apply those techniques to a felt-metal wick. The results will be used to verify and/or modify the two-phase permeability estimates. With the increasing desire to replace directly illuminated engines with the much more efficient heat-pipe apparatus it is inherently clear that the usefulness of known wick properties will make wick permeability design a simpler process.

JONES II,JERRY LEE

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Heat-Pipe Wick Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of liquid metal heat-pipes for use in solar powered Stirling engines has led to an in-depth analysis of heat-pipe wick properties. To model the flow of liquid sodium through the wick its two-phase permeability measurement is of interest. The permeability will be measured by constructing a test cell made up of a wick sample sintered to a manifold. Measuring the volumetric flow rate through the wick will allow for a determination of the wick's permeability as a function of pressure. Currently, simple estimates of permeability as a function of vapor fraction of a porous media are being used as a model to calculate the two-phase permeability. The above mentioned experiment will be used to test the existing formulas validity. The plan is to make use of a known procedure for testing permeability and apply those techniques to a felt-metal wick. The results will be used to verify and/or modify the two-phase permeability estimates. With the increasing desire to replace directly illuminated engines with the much more efficient heat-pipe apparatus it is inherently clear that the usefulness of known wick properties will make wick permeability design a simpler process.

JONES II,JERRY LEE

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

TRANSPARENT HEAT MIRRORS FOR PASSIVE SOLAR HEATING APPLICATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deposition rates and production costs were reviewed todiscussion of heat mirror production cost Most of our effortcoating plastic film. Production costs for coating glass

Selkowitz, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Design and technology of heat pipes for cooling and heat exchange  

SciTech Connect

This new book presents a comprehensive account of heat pipe design, technology, and operation. It is based on insights and techniques developed by the author during more than twenty years of investigating high-performance heat pipe systems. The book provides information on a unique device with the capability to transport heat isothermally at high rates with no external power input. Emphasis is on high-performance liquid metal heat pipes, although nonliquid metal heat pipes are treated, as well. The first three chapters deal with the nonmathematical background for understanding heat pipe operation and heat transport capability. Remaining chapters detail heat pipe characteristics and design methods. Of special interest are simplified equations for obtaining heat pipe heat transport limits, heat pipe heat exchangers, heat pipe transient behavior, and inverted (nonwetting) heat pipes. Operational boundaries on heat pipe temperature and heat transport rate are described, and step-by-step procedures are given for involved calculations.

Silverstein, C.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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381

Fundamental heat transfer experiments of heat pipes for turbine cooling  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental heat transfer experiments were carried out for three kinds of heat pipes that may be applied to turbine cooling in future aero-engines. In the turbine cooling system with a heat pipe, heat transfer rate and start-up time of the heat pipe are the most important performance criteria to evaluate and compare with conventional cooling methods. Three heat pipes are considered, called heat pipe A, B, and C, respectively. All heat pipes have a stainless steel shell and nickel sintered powder metal wick. Sodium (Na) was the working fluid for heat pipes A and B; heat pipe C used eutectic sodium-potassium (NaK). Heat pipes B and C included noncondensible gas for rapid start-up. There were fins on the cooling section of heat pipes. In the experiments, an infrared image furnace supplied heat to the heat pipe simulating turbine blade surface conditions. In the results, heat pipe B demonstrated the highest heat flux of 17 to 20 W/cm{sup 2}. The start-up time was about 6 minutes for heat pipe B and about 6 minutes for heat pipe A. Thus, adding noncondensible gas effectively reduced start-up time. Although NaK is a liquid phase at room temperature, the start-up time of heat pipe C (about 7 to 8 minutes) was not shorter than the heat pipe B. The effect of a gravitational force on heat pipe performance was also estimated by inclining the heat pipe at an angle of 90 deg. There was no significant gravitational dependence on heat transport for heat pipes including noncondensible gas.

Yamawaki, S. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshida, T.; Taki, M.; Mimura, F. [National Aerospace Lab., Tokyo (Japan)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Colorado State University Program for developing, testing, evaluating, and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Project status report, June 1994--July 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes integrated tank/heat exchanger modeling and experiments. Experiments were performed on a Rheem wrap-around 80 gallon electric hot water heater tank with the bottom heating element replaced by a 120 feet long coil of copper tubing wrapped around the outside lower half of the tank. The bottom two-thirds of the tank is heated by hot antifreeze circulating from the solar collector through the copper coil. Results are discussed.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Heating Alloys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...are used in many varied applications--from small household appliances to large industrial process heating systems and furnaces. In appliances or industrial process heating, the heating elements are usually either open

384

Heat pipe technology issues  

SciTech Connect

Critical high temperature, high power applications in space nuclear power designs are near the current state of the art of heat pipe technology in terms of power density, operating temperature, and lifetime. Recent heat pipe development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has involved performance testing of typical space reactor heat pipe designs to power levels in excess of 19 kW/cm/sup 2/ axially and 300 W/cm/sup 2/ radially at temperatures in the 1400 to 1500 K range. Operation at conditions in the 10 kW/cm/sup 2/ range has been sustained for periods of up to 1000 hours without evidence of performance degradation. The effective length for heat transport in these heat pipes was from 1.0 to 1.5 M. Materials used were molybdenum alloys with lithium employed as the heat pipe operating fluid. Shorter, somewhat lower power, molybdenum heat pipes have been life tested at Los Alamos for periods of greater than 25,000 hours at 1700 K with lithium and 20,000 hours at 1500/sup 0/K with sodium. These life test demonstrations and the attendant performance limit investigations provide an experimental basis for heat pipe application in space reactor design and represent the current state-of-the-art of high temperature heat pipe technology.

Merrigan, M.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modeling of the complex thermal hydraulics Of reactor systems involves the use Of experimental test systems as well as numerical codes. A simulation of the loss of residual heat removal (RHR) during midloop operations was performed using the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. The experiment was conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experiment involved a 5% cold leg break along with the loss of the RHR system-The transient was simulated for 3040 seconds. The ROSA-1-V/]LsTF is one of the largest test facilities in the world and is located in Japan. It is a volumetrically scaled (1/48) full height, two loop model of a Westinghouse four loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). The facility consists of pressure vessel, two symmetric loops, a pressurizer and a full emergency core cooling system (ECCS) system. The transient was run on the CRAY-YMP supercomputer at Texas A&M university. Core boiling and primary pressurization followed the initiation of the transient. The time to core boiling was overpredicted. Almost all Primary parameters were predicted well until the occurrence of the loop seal clearing (LSC) at 2400 seconds. The secondary side temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental data until the LSC. Following the LSC, the steam condensation in the tubes was not calculated. This resulted in the overprediction of primary pressures after the LSC. Also, the temperatures in the hot and the cold legs were overpredicted. Because there was no significant condensation in the U-tubes, the core remained uncovered. Moreover, the LSC did not recover. Consequently, secondary side temperatures were underpredicted after the LSC. This indicated the deficiency of the condensation model. The core temperature excursion at the time of the LSC was not predicted, though there was good agreement between the experimental and calculated data for the rest of the transient. Severe oscillations were calculated throughout the course of the transient. Overall, there was reasonable qualitative agreement between the measured and the calculated data.

Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Infrared Thermography applied to measurement of Heat transfer coefficient of water in a pipe heated by Joule effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Internal sources of heat are due to convection from flow of the heat transfer fluid through the pipes. Heat (material, diameter, spacing, and burial depth), (4) system flow rates, (5) heat transfer fluid properties · heat transfer fluid = 42% propylene glycol @ a flow rate of 350 gpm · heat pump model = Water Furnace

387

Chemical heat pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

Greiner, Leonard (2750-C Segerstrom Ave., Santa Ana, CA 92704)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Heating Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A variety of heating technologies are available today. In addition to heat pumps, which are discussed separately, many homes and buildings use the following approaches:

389

Calculation of heating values for the high flux isotope reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments. (authors)

Peterson, J.; Ilas, G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Calculation of Heating Values for the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Calculating the amount of energy released by a fission reaction (fission Q value) and the heating rate distribution in a nuclear reactor is an important part of the safety analysis. However, these calculations can become very complex. One of the codes that can be used for this type of analyses is the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP5. Currently it is impossible to calculate the Q value and heating rate disposition for delayed beta and delayed gamma particles directly from MCNP5. The purpose of this paper is to outline a rigorous method for indirectly calculating the Q values and heating rates in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), based on previous similar studies carried out for very high-temperature reactor configurations. This method has been applied in this study to calculate heating rates for the beginning of cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) states of HFIR. In addition, the BOC results obtained for HFIR are compared with corresponding results for the Advanced Test Reactor. The fission Q value for HFIR was calculated as 200.2 MeV for the BOC and 201.3 MeV for the EOC. It was also determined that 95.1% and 95.4% of the heat was deposited within the HFIR fuel plates for the BOC and EOC models, respectively. This methodology can also be used for heating rate calculations for HFIR experiments.

Peterson, Joshua L [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Fischer Tropsch synthesis : influence of Mn on the carburization rates and activities of Fe-based catalysts by TPR-EXAFS/XANES and catalyst testing.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fe-based catalysts containing different amounts of Mn were tested for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis using a stirred tank reactor at 270 C, 1.21 MPa, and H{sub 2}:CO = 0.7. Catalyst activation by carburization with 10% CO/He was followed by Temperature Programmed Reduction/X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (TPR-EXAFS/XANES) from room temperature to 300 C. {gamma}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} was converted into iron carbides, whereas MnO{sub x} was reduced to oxygen deficient MnO. Mn hindered Fe carburization, such that the carburized catalyst displayed higher Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} content than the catalyst without Mn. EXAFS fitting indicates that the carburized catalyst contained a mixture of Hgg carbide, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}, and Mn oxides. Increasing Mn content led to higher CH{sub 4} and light product selectivities, and lower light olefin selectivities. Higher and stable conversions were obtained with a catalyst containing an almost equimolar Fe/Mn ratio relative to the catalyst without Mn. Selectivity trends are attributed to the higher WGS rates observed on the FeMn catalysts, consistent with the structural differences observed.

Ribeiro, M. C.; Jacobs, G.; Pendyala, R.; Davis, B. H.; Cronauer, D. C.; Kropf, A. J.; Marshall, C. L. (Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division); (Univ. of Kentucky)

2011-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Definition: Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heat Heat Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Heat Heat is the form of energy that is transferred between systems or objects with different temperatures (flowing from the high-temperature system to the low-temperature system). Also referred to as heat energy or thermal energy. Heat is typically measured in Btu, calories or joules. Heat flow, or the rate at which heat is transferred between systems, has the same units as power: energy per unit time (J/s).[1][2][3][4] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition In physics and chemistry, heat is energy in transfer between a system and its surroundings other than by work or transfer of matter. The transfer can occur in two simple ways, conduction, and radiation, and in a more complicated way called convective circulation. Heat is not a property

393

Fouling reduction characteristics of a no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger for flue gas heat recovery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional flue gas heat recovery systems, the fouling by fly ashes and the related problems such as corrosion and cleaning are known to be major drawbacks. To overcome these problems, a single-riser no-distributor-fluidized-bed heat exchanger is devised and studied. Fouling and cleaning tests are performed for a uniquely designed fluidized bed-type heat exchanger to demonstrate the effect of particles on the fouling reduction and heat transfer enhancement. The tested heat exchanger model (1 m high and 54 mm internal diameter) is a gas-to-water type and composed of a main vertical tube and four auxiliary tubes through which particles circulate and transfer heat. Through the present study, the fouling on the heat transfer surface could successfully be simulated by controlling air-to-fuel ratios rather than introducing particles through an external feeder, which produced soft deposit layers with 1 to 1.5 mm thickness on the inside pipe wall. Flue gas temperature at the inlet of heat exchanger was maintained at 450{sup o}C at the gas volume rate of 0.738 to 0.768 CMM (0.0123 to 0.0128 m{sup 3}/sec). From the analyses of the measured data, heat transfer performances of the heat exchanger before and after fouling and with and without particles were evaluated. Results showed that soft deposits were easily removed by introducing glass bead particles, and also heat transfer performance increased two times by the particle circulation. In addition, it was found that this type of heat exchanger had high potential to recover heat of waste gases from furnaces, boilers, and incinerators effectively and to reduce fouling related problems.

Jun, Y.D.; Lee, K.B.; Islam, S.Z.; Ko, S.B. [Kongju National University, Kong Ju (Republic of Korea). Dept. for Mechanical Engineering

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The effect of fan and heat sink design on heat removal from microprocessor chips.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Air flow and heat removal characteristics for fan/heat sink designs used to cool Pentium class processors were analyzed. Five designs were tested for fan speed,… (more)

Baltrip, Kedra G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Test of the Specific Differential Propagation Phase Shift (KDP) Technique for Rain-Rate Estimation with a Ku-Band Rain Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variation in drop size distribution (DSD) and the attenuation at higher frequencies are the two major impairments for quantitative rain-rate estimation. The sensitivity of rain-rate estimators (such as reflectivity factor Z, differential ...

K. Isiah Timothy; Toshio Iguchi; Yuji Ohsaki; Hiroaki Horie; Hiroshi Hanado; Hiroshi Kumagai

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Broadband Heating Rate Profile (BBHRP) VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ellingson Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida M. H. Zhang State University of New York at Albany Albany, New York Stony Brook R. A. Ferrare National Aeronautics and...

397

Heat Rate Improvement Reference Manual: Training Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance optimization of fossil power plants has always been a high priority within the electric power industry. However, it has become of paramount importance in meeting the challenges mandated by operating within a competitive environment. Recently, many power producers have downsized and currently lack experienced staff required to maintain optimal performance. Thus, a resource was needed to capture the lost experience to aid in the retaining of less experienced personnel. The objective of this pro...

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

398

System for measuring the effect of fouling and corrosion on heat transfer under simulated OTEC conditions. [HTAU and LABTTF codes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A complete system designed to measure, with high precision, changes in heat transfer rates due to fouling and corrosion of simulated heat exchanger tubes, at sea and under OTEC conditions is described. All aspects of the system are described in detail, including theory, mechanical design, electronics design, assembly procedures, test and calibration, operating procedures, laboratory results, field results, and data analysis programs.

Fetkovich, J.G.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Heat pipe transient response approximation.  

SciTech Connect

A simple and concise routine that approximates the response of an alkali metal heat pipe to changes in evaporator heat transfer rate is described. This analytically based routine is compared with data from a cylindrical heat pipe with a crescent-annular wick that undergoes gradual (quasi-steady) transitions through the viscous and condenser boundary heat transfer limits. The sonic heat transfer limit can also be incorporated into this routine for heat pipes with more closely coupled condensers. The advantages and obvious limitations of this approach are discussed. For reference, a source code listing for the approximation appears at the end of this paper.

Reid, R. S. (Robert Stowers)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

Jang, J.H.; Faghri, A. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States); Chang, W.S. [Wright Research and Development Center, Wright-Patterson, OH (United States)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Analysis of Thermally Induced Changes in Fractured Rock Permeability during Eight Years of Heating and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Cooling at the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test J.mechanical analysis of the Yucca Mountain Drift Scale Test –scale heater test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. Int J Rock

Rutqvist, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

HEAT TRANSFER METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for increasing burn-out heat fluxes under nucleate boiling conditions in heat exchanger tubes without incurring an increase in pumping power requirements. This increase is achieved by utilizing a spinning flow having a rotational velocity sufficient to produce a centrifugal acceleration of at least 10,000 g at the tube wall. At this acceleration the heat-transfer rate at burn out is nearly twice the rate which can be achieved in a similar tube utilizing axial flow at the same pumping power. At higher accelerations the improvement over axial flow is greater, and heat fluxes in excess of 50 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/hr/sq ft can be achieved.

Gambill, W.R.; Greene, N.D.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

Performance Testing Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters under South- and Central-Florida Climate Conditions: Hot, Humid Climate and Warm Ground Water Pose Unusual Operating Environment for Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat pump water heaters (HPWHs) are known to provide considerable energy savings compared with electric resistance devices in many applications. However, as their performance is climate-dependent, it is important to understand their operation in extreme climates. Southern and Central Florida presents an extreme climate for HPWHs, as the air temperature, humidity, and entering water temperatures are all high nearly year-round. This report examines HPWH performance in the Florida Power & Light ...

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

404

Test and Evaluation of Two Microturbines at Customer Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program focused on installing distributed resources (DR) systems at customer sites, then performing a series of tests based on a selected protocol. Tests included evaluation of heat rate, air and noise emissions, power quality, and an economic analysis for each DR technology in the program.

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

405

Ceramic heat pipes for high temperature heat removal  

SciTech Connect

Difficulties in finding metal or protected metal components that exhibit both strength and corrosion resistance at high temperature have severely restricted the application of effective heat recovery techniques to process heat furnaces. A potential method of overcoming this restriction is to use heat pipes fabricated from ceramic materials to construct counterflow recuperators. A development program has been initiated to demonstrate the technical and eventually the economical feasibility of ceramic heat pipes and ceramic heat pipe recuperators. The prime candidate for heat pipe construction is SiC. Closed-end tubes of this material have been prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These tubes were lined internally with tungsten by a subsequent CVD operation, partially filled with sodium, and sealed by brazing a tungsten lined SiC plug into the open-end with a palladium--cobalt alloy. Heat pipes constructed in this manner have been successfully operated in vacuum at temperatures of 1225/sup 0/K and in air at a temperature of 1125/sup 0/K. The heat source used initially for the air testing was an induction heated metallic sleeve in thermal contact with the test unit. Subsequent testing has shown that a silicon carbide heat pipe can be successfully operated with natural gas burners providing the input heat. Methods of fabricating and testing these devices are described.

Keddy, E.S.; Ranken, W.A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Transient natural convection in heated inclined tubes  

SciTech Connect

To simulate natural convection flow patterns in directionally drilled wellbores, experiments and analyses were conducted for a circular tube with length-to-diameter (L/D) ratio of 36 at angles of 0{degree}, 20{degree}, and 35{degree} from the vertical. The tube was heated at the bottom and cooled at the top, and the insulation was adjusted so that approximately one- to two-thirds of the power dissipated was transferred through the tube wall to the surroundings. An aqueous solution of polyvinyl alcohol was employed as the working fluid in order to obtain low Rayleigh numbers corresponding to conditions in geothermal wellbores. Results were primarily qualitative but were useful in providing insight into the phenomena occurring. Steady-state temperature distributions were measured for the three orientations and for several heating rates to demonstrate the effects of tube angle and Rayleigh number. transient measurements of the temperature distribution were obtained during cooling from a higher temperature without a heat source to calibrate the heat losses. With the electrical heat source, temporal data were taken during heating to examine the approach to steady state. Quasi-steady flow conditions were approached rapidly, but the overall time constant of the apparatus was of the order of one-third of a day. Predictions with the three-dimensional TEMPEST code were first tested by comparison with simple conduction analyses. Comparison with actual data showed good agreement of the predicted temperature levels for the maximum inclination, 35{degree}, and slightly poorer agreement for the other limit, a vertical tube. Trends of temperature level and Nusselt number with heating rate or Rayleigh number were reasonable, but the predicted variation of the end Nusselt number versus inclination was in the opposite direction from the experiment. 75 refs., 20 figs., 8 tabs.

McEligot, D.M. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Middletown, RI (USA). Oceanic Div.); Denbow, D.A. (Software AG of North America, Inc., Lakewood, CO (USA)); Murphy, H.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Heat Conduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 2   Differential equations for heat conduction in solids...conduction in solids General form with variable thermal properties General form with constant thermal properties General form, constant properties, without heat

408

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

Daman, Ernest L. (Westfield, NJ); McCallister, Robert A. (Mountain Lakes, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products Heat Transfer in Projecting and Sloped Fenestration Products Speaker(s): Dragan Charlie Curcija Date: May 26, 2010 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The heat transfer performance of fenestration products is routinely determined using computer simulations combined with physical testing. Initial efforts to develop simulation and test procedures for the fenestration products in the 1980's focused on simple planar windows since they are the dominant share of the market. However, once these procedures were developed (with resulting ISO standards and national rating and labeling requirements), manufacturers of more physically complex fenestration products (skylights, green house windows, tubular skylights) demanded procedures for simulating and testing their products. Dr Curcija

410

Nonlinear thermomechanical finite-element modeling, analysis and characterization of multi-turn oscillating heat pipes .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oscillating heat pipes (OHPs) are promising heat dissipation devices for modern electronic systems due to their high heat transfer rate, simple construction and low manufacturing… (more)

Peng, Hao

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Technical activities report: Heat, water, and mechanical studies  

SciTech Connect

Topics in the heat studies section include: front and rear face reflector shields at the C-pile; process tube channel thermocouples; water temperature limits for horizontal rods; slug temperature and thermal conductivity calculations; maximum slug-end cap temperature; boiling consideration studies; scram time limit for Panellit alarm; heat transfer test; slug stresses; thermal insulation of bottom tube row at C-pile; flow tests; present pile enrichment; electric analog; and measurement of thermal contact resistance. Topics in the water studies section include: 100-D flow laboratory; process water studies; fundamental studies on film formation; coatings on tip-offs; can difference tests; slug jacket abrasion at high flow rates; corrosion studies; front tube dummy slugs; metallographic examination of tubes from H-pile; fifty-tube mock-up; induction heating facility; operational procedures and standards; vertical safety rod dropping time tests; recirculation; and power recovery. Mechanical development studies include: effect of Sphincter seal and lubricant VSR drop time; slug damage; slug bubble tester; P-13 removal; chemical slug stripper; effect of process tube rib spacing and width; ink facility installation; charging and discharging machines; process tube creep; flapper nozzle assembly test; test of single gun barrel assembly; pigtail fixture test; horizontal rod gland seal test; function test of C-pile; and intermediate test of Ball 3-X and VSR systems.

Alexander, W.K.

1951-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

412

Rate Schedules  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

413

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Illustrative Calculation of Economics for Heat Pump and "Grid-Enabled" Water Heaters Rate...

414

Experimental study on turbulent natural convection heat transfer in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... ments are conducted to investigate flow and heat transfer ... turbulent region, the heat transfer deterioration occurs for a bubble flow rate Q = 33 ...

415

Heat transfer via dropwise condensation on hydrophobic microstructured surfaces.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Dropwise condensation has the potential to greatly increase heat transfer rates. Heat transfer coefficients by dropwise condensation and film condensation on microstructured silicon chips were… (more)

Ruleman, Karlen E. (Karlen Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hydrogen permeation resistant heat pipe for bi-modal reactors. Final report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objective of this program was to demonstrate technology that will make a sodium heat pipe tolerant of hydrogen permeation for a bimodal space reactor application. Special focus was placed on techniques which enhance the permeation of hydrogen out of the heat pipe. Specific objectives include: define the detailed requirements for the bimodal reactor application; design and fabricate a prototype heat pipe tolerant of hydrogen permeation; and test the prototype heat pipe and demonstrate that hydrogen which permeates into the heat pipe is removed or reduced to acceptable levels. The results of the program were fully successful. Analyses were performed on two different heat pipe designs and an experimental heat pipe was fabricated and tested. A model of the experimental heat pipe was developed to predict the enhancement in the hydrogen permeation rate out of the heat pipe. A significant improvement in the rate at which hydrogen permeates out of a heat pipe was predicted for the use of the special condenser geometry developed here. Agreement between the model and the experimental results was qualitatively good. Inclusion of the additional effects of fluid flow in the heat pipe are recommended for future work.

North, M.T.; Anderson, W.G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

417

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Susanville District Heating District Heating Low Temperature...

418

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 222 194 17...

419

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,100...

420

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,928 1,316...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tested heat rate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption Survey: Energy End-Use Consumption Tables Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All...

422

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,870 1,276...

423

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings* ... 1,602 1,397...

424

Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook-  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Released: September, 2008 Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other Total Space Heating Water Heating Cook- ing Other All Buildings ... 2,037...

425

SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

Tilford, C L

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

BWRVIP-262NP: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Baseline Fracture Toughness and Crack Growth Rate Testing of Alloys X-750 and XM-19 (Idaho National Laboratory Phase I)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) based at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) formed an agreement to test representative alloys used as reactor structural materials in a pilot program intended to establish guidelines for future ATR NSUF research programs. This report contains results from the portion of this program established as Phase 1 (of three phases), which entails baseline fracture toughness, stress corrosion cr...

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

427

Rates - WAPA-137 Rate Order  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WAPA-137 Rate Order WAPA-137 Rate Order 2009 CRSP Management Center Customer Rates Second Step Presentation from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Handout Materials from the June 25, 2009, Customer Meeting Customer Comment Letters ATEA CREDA Farmington ITCA AMPUA Rate Adjustment Information The second step of WAPA-137 SLCA/IP Firm Power, CRSP Transmission and Ancillary Services rate adjustment. FERC Approval of Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Notice Of Filing for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Final FRN for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Letter to Customers regarding the published Notice of Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 Published Extension of Public Process for Rate Order No. WAPA-137 FRN Follow-up Public Information and Comment Forum Flier WAPA-137 Customer Meetings and Rate Adjustment Schedule

428

Microchannel Heat Exchangers with Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the present study was to determine the performance of CO{sub 2} microchannel evaporators and gas coolers in operational conditions representing those of residential heat pumps. A set of breadboard prototype microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was developed and tested. The refrigerant in the heat exchangers followed a counter cross-flow path with respect to the airflow direction. The test conditions corresponded to the typical operating conditions of residential heat pumps. In addition, a second set of commercial microchannel evaporators and gas coolers was tested for a less comprehensive range of operating conditions. The test results were reduced and a comprehensive data analysis, including comparison with the previous studies in this field, was performed. Capacity and pressure drop of the evaporator and gas cooler for the range of parameters studied were analyzed and are documented in this report. A gas cooler performance prediction model based on non-dimensional parameters was also developed and results are discussed as well. In addition, in the present study, experiments were conducted to evaluate capacities and pressure drops for sub-critical CO{sub 2} flow boiling and transcritical CO{sub 2} gas cooling in microchannel heat exchangers. An extensive review of the literature failed to indicate any previous systematic study in this area, suggesting a lack of fundamental understanding of the phenomena and a lack of comprehensive data that would quantify the performance potential of CO{sub 2} microchannel heat exchangers for the application at hand. All experimental tests were successfully conducted with an energy balance within {+-}3%. The only exceptions to this were experiments at very low saturation temperatures (-23 C), where energy balances were as high as 10%. In the case of evaporators, it was found that a lower saturation temperature (especially when moisture condensation occurs) improves the overall heat transfer coefficient significantly. However, under such conditions, air side pressure drop also increases when moisture condensation occurs. An increase in airflow rate also increases the overall heat transfer coefficient. Air side pressure drop mainly depends on airflow rate. For the gas cooler, a significant portion of the heat transfer occurred in the first heat exchanger module on the refrigerant inlet side. The temperature and pressure of CO{sub 2} significantly affect the heat transfer and fluid flow characteristics due to some important properties (such as specific heat, density, and viscosity). In the transcritical region, performance of CO{sub 2} strongly depends on the operating temperature and pressure. Semi-empirical models were developed for predictions of CO{sub 2} evaporator and gas cooler system capacities. The evaporator model introduced two new factors to account for the effects of air-side moisture condensate and refrigerant outlet superheat. The model agreed with the experimental results within {+-}13%. The gas cooler model, based on non-dimensional parameters, successfully predicted the experimental results within {+-}20%. Recommendations for future work on this project include redesigning headers and/or introducing flow mixers to avoid flow mal-distribution problems, devising new defrosting techniques, and improving numerical models. These recommendations are described in more detail at the end of this report.

Zhao, Y.; Ohadi, M.M.; Radermacher, R.

2001-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Class of Single- and Dual-Frequency Algorithms for Rain-Rate Profiling from a Spaceborne Radar. Pad I: Principle and Tests from Numerical Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A class of single- and dual-frequency algorithms that can be used to infer rain-rate profile from a downward-looking spaceborne radar operating at attenuating frequencies is presented. These algorithms rely on use of power-law relations between ...

Mongi Marzoug; Paul Amayenc

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

An Experimental Test of a Theoretical Model to Determine the Rate at which Freely Falling Water Drops Scavenge SO2 in Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental method involving the UCLA Rain Shaft is described. This method allows determining the rate at which SO2 is scavenged from air by freely falling water drops. In the present experiment water drops of radii near 300 ?m were allowed ...

C. Walcek; P. K. Wang; J. H. Topalian; S. K. Mitra; H. R. Pruppacher