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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Apparatus for tensile testing plate-type ceramic specimens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus is described for gripping a plate-type tensile specimen having generally T-shaped end regions in a dynamic tension fatigue testing apparatus comprising an annular housing having an open-ended elongated cavity therein, a plurality of hydraulic piston means supported by the housing in a spaced array about the cavity, and a specimen-supporting plate means overlying the piston means at one end of the elongated cavity and displaceable by said piston means in a longitudinal direction with respect to the longitudinal axis of the cavity, said apparatus for gripping a flat plate-type tensile specimen comprising: a pair of elongated pull rods each having oppositely disposed first and second end regions; a pair of mounting means carried by said plate means with each mounting means for pivotally attaching the first end region of each of said pull rods in a central region of said plate means for supporting said pair of elongated pull rods in a side-by-side relationship along a common longitudinal centerline within said cavity; recess means in the second end region of each of said pull rods in adjacently disposed surface regions thereof with said recess means facing one another and each adapted to receive one side of one of the generally T-shaped end regions of the plate-type tensile specimen; and load-bearing means positionable in each of said recess means and adapted to bear against a shoulder on each side of the generally T-shaped end region of the plate-type tensile specimen when a tensile loading is applied thereon.

Liu, K.C.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

2

Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: (a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; (b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; (c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and (d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen. 6 figs.

Buescher, B.J. Jr.; Lloyd, W.R.; Ward, M.B.; Epstein, J.S.

1997-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

3

Load apparatus and method for bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen load apparatus includes: a) a body having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the first end comprising an externally threaded portion sized to be threadedly received within the test specimen threaded opening; b) a longitudinal loading rod having first and second opposing longitudinal ends, the loading rod being slidably received in a longitudinal direction within the body internally through the externally threaded portion and slidably extending longitudinally outward of the body first longitudinal end; c) a force sensitive transducer slidably received within the body and positioned to engage relative to the loading rod second longitudinal end; and d) a loading bolt threadedly received relative to the body, the loading bolt having a bearing end surface and being positioned to bear against the transducer to forcibly sandwich the transducer between the loading bolt and loading rod. Also disclosed is a method of in situ determining applied force during crack propagation in a bolt-loaded compact tension test specimen.

Buescher, Jr., Brent J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lloyd, W. Randolph (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Epstein, Jonathan S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Small-scale Specimen Testing of Monolithic U-Mo Fuel Foils  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation is to develop a shear punch testing (SPT) procedure and standardize it to evaluate the mechanical properties of irradiated fuels in a hot-cell so that the tensile behavior can be predicted using small volumes of material and at greatly reduced irradiation costs. This is highly important in the development of low-enriched uranium fuels for nuclear research and test reactors. The load-displacement data obtained using SPT can be interpreted in terms of and correlated with uniaxial mechanical properties. In order to establish a correlation between SPT and tensile data, sub-size tensile and microhardness testing were performed on U-Mo alloys. In addition, efforts are ongoing to understand the effect of test parameters (such as specimen thickness, surface finish, punch-die clearance, crosshead velocity and carbon content) on the measured mechanical properties, in order to rationalize the technique, prior to employing it on a material of unknown strength.

Ramprashad Prabhakaran; Douglas E. Burkes; James I. Cole; Indrajit Charit; Daniel M. Wachs

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Improved flywheel materials : characterization of nanofiber modified flywheel test specimen.  

SciTech Connect

As alternative energy generating devices (i.e., solar, wind, etc) are added onto the electrical energy grid (AC grid), irregularities in the available electricity due to natural occurrences (i.e., clouds reducing solar input or wind burst increasing wind powered turbines) will be dramatically increased. Due to their almost instantaneous response, modern flywheel-based energy storage devices can act a mechanical mechanism to regulate the AC grid; however, improved spin speeds will be required to meet the necessary energy levels to balance thesegreen' energy variances. Focusing on composite flywheels, we have investigated methods for improving the spin speeds based on materials needs. The so-called composite flywheels are composed of carbon fiber (C-fiber), glass fiber, and aglue' (resin) to hold them together. For this effort, we have focused on the addition of fillers to the resin in order to improve its properties. Based on the high loads required for standard meso-sized fillers, this project investigated the utility of ceramic nanofillers since they can be added at very low load levels due to their high surface area. The impact that TiO2 nanowires had on the final strength of the flywheel material was determined by athree-point-bend' test. The results of the introduction of nanomaterials demonstrated an increase instrength' of the flywheel's C-fiber-resin moiety, with an upper limit of a 30% increase being reported. An analysis of the economic impact concerning the utilization of the nanowires was undertaken and after accounting for new-technology and additional production costs, return on improved-nanocomposite investment was approximated at 4-6% per year over the 20-year expected service life. Further, it was determined based on the 30% improvement in strength, this change may enable a 20-30% reduction in flywheel energy storage cost (%24/kW-h).

Boyle, Timothy J.; Bell, Nelson Simmons; Ehlen, Mark Andrew; Anderson, Benjamin John; Miller, William Kenneth

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Development of pressurized tube specimen for creep testing of beryllium  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to demonstrate that creep tests could be performed on beryllium in the same pressurized tube geometry as is commonly used in the FFTF/MOTA.

Neef, W.S.; Moir, R.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Opperman, E.K. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Hamilton, M.L. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Methods for identifying cancellous bone specimen location and size for the Reduced Platen Compression Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

method for defining the specimen thickness is to average the largest and smallest overall bone lengths in the test group and use a reference thickness of 2 millimeters as a percentage of this average length. This percentage of the overall average length...

Cowen, Kyle Ray

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

8

Alkali-silica reaction products: Comparison between samples from concrete structures and laboratory test specimens  

SciTech Connect

Alkali-silica gels (ASG) were investigated in concrete from bridge structures (constructed from the 1920s to 2000), as well as in experimental specimens; employing optical microscopy, petrographic image analysis, and scanning electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM/EDS). The main differences were found in the chemical composition and morphology of the ASGs. ASGs which had formed in older concrete samples (50-80 years old) show a partly crystalline structure and higher Ca{sup 2+} content, indicating their aging and maturation. Younger concrete samples and experimental test specimens exhibit the presence of amorphous ASG. The chemistry of ASG from experimental specimens reflects the chemical composition of accelerating solutions. - Research Highlights: {yields} Quantitative analysis of alkali-silica gels {yields} Comparison of ASR in experimental conditions with ASR in bridge structures {yields} Investigation of factors affecting alkali-silica reaction {yields} Investigation of ASR of different types of aggregates.

Sachlova, Sarka, E-mail: lukschova@seznam.cz; Prikryl, Richard; Pertold, Zdenek

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Manipulator having thermally conductive rotary joint for transferring heat from a test specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A manipulator for rotatably moving a test specimen in an ultra-high vacuum chamber includes a translational unit movable in three mutually perpendicular directions. A manipulator frame is rigidly secured to the translational unit for rotatably supporting a rotary shaft. A first copper disc is rigidly secured to an end of the rotary shaft for rotary movement within the vacuum chamber. A second copper disc is supported upon the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. A sapphire plate is interposed between the first and second discs to prevent galling of the copper material while maintaining high thermal conductivity between the first and second discs. A spring is disposed on the shaft to urge the second disc toward the first disc and compressingly engage the interposed sapphire plate. A specimen mount is secured to the first disc for rotation within the vacuum chamber. The specimen maintains high thermal conductivity with the second disc receiving the cryogenic transfer line.

Haney, Steven J. (Tracy, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA); Toly, Norman F. (Livermore, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Manipulator having thermally conductive rotary joint for transferring heat from a test specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A manipulator for rotatably moving a test specimen in an ultra-high vacuum chamber includes a translational unit movable in three mutually perpendicular directions. A manipulator frame is rigidly secured to the translational unit for rotatably supporting a rotary shaft. A first copper disc is rigidly secured to an end of the rotary shaft for rotary movement within the vacuum chamber. A second copper disc is supported upon the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. The second disc receives a cryogenic cold head and does not rotate with the first disc. A sapphire plate is interposed between the first and second discs to prevent galling of the copper material while maintaining high thermal conductivity between the first and second discs. A spring is disposed on the shaft to urge the second disc toward the first disc and compressingly engage the interposed sapphire plate. A specimen mount is secured to the first disc for rotation within the vacuum chamber. The specimen maintains high thermal conductivity with the second disc receiving the cryogenic transfer line.

Haney, S.J.; Stulen, R.H.; Toly, N.F.

1983-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

11

Apparatus for pre-stress-straining rod-type specimens in tension for in-situ passive fracture testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stress-strain testing apparatus imposes a stress-strain on a specimen while disposed in a controlled environment. Each end of the specimen is fastened to an end cap and a strain gage is attached to the specimen. An adjusting mechanism and a compression element are disposed between the end caps forming a frame for applying forces to the end caps and thereby stress-straining the specimen. The adjusting mechanism may be extended or retracted to increase or decrease the imposed stress-strain on the specimen, and the stress-strain is measured by the strain gage on the specimen while the apparatus is exposed to an environment such as high pressure hydrogen. Strain gages may be placed on the frame to measure stress-strains in the frame that may be caused by the environment.

Wang, John Jy-an (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Ken C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN)

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

Influence of Penetration Rate and Indenter Diameter in Strength Measurement by Indentation Testing on Small Rock Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Indentation testing has been developed as an unconventional method to determine intact rock strength using small rock specimens within the size of drill cuttings. In previous investigations involving indentati...

Mohammad Haftani; Bahman Bohloli; Alireza Nouri…

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Comparison of test specificity in commercial antigen and in-house PCR methods for rotavirus detection in stool specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Copyright 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. 2014 research-article Comparison of test specificity in commercial antigen and in-house PCR methods for rotavirus detection in stool specimens S Ye a b S. B. Lambert...

S Ye; S. B. Lambert; K Grimwood; S Roczo-Farkas; G. R. Nimmo; T. P. Sloots; C. D. Kirkwood; D. M. Whiley

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

14

AFCI Fuel Irradiation Test Plan, Test Specimens AFC-1Æ and AFC-1F  

SciTech Connect

The U. S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products, thereby dramatically decreasing the volume of material requiring disposition and the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository (DOE, 2003). One important component of the technology development is actinide-bearing transmutation fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes. There are little irradiation performance data available on non-fertile fuel forms, which would maximize the destruction rate of plutonium, and low-fertile (i.e., uranium-bearing) fuel forms, which would support a sustainable nuclear energy option. Initial scoping level irradiation tests on a variety of candidate fuel forms are needed to establish a transmutation fuel form design and evaluate deployment of transmutation fuels.

D. C. Crawford; S. L. Hayes; B. A. Hilton; M. K. Meyer; R. G. Ambrosek; G. S. Chang; D. J. Utterbeck

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Advances in the Hopkinson bar testing of irradiated/non-irradiated nuclear materials and large specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the twentieth century, research activity in the nuclear field of the Joint Research Centre (JRC) was concentrated on problems of nuclear reactor safety, especially...dynamic material testing programme for the high ductility...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Evaluation of the Alere i Influenza A&B Nucleic Acid Amplification Test by Use of Respiratory Specimens Collected in Viral Transport Medium  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Influenza AB Nucleic Acid Amplification Test by Use of Respiratory Specimens Collected...to 19 years. Alere i Influenza AB assay test results were compared with viral culture...assays as their first-line diagnostic test for influenza virus infections. Though...

J. Jeremiah Bell; Rangaraj Selvarangan

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Evaluation of the Cobas TaqMan MTB Test for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex According to Acid-Fast Bacilli Smear Grades in Respiratory Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...research-article Evaluation of the Cobas TaqMan MTB Test for the Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis...the performance of the Cobas TaqMan MTB Test (Roche Diagnostics, Basel, Switzerland...smear grades. The sensitivity of this test in smear-positive specimens was 95...

Hee Jae Huh; Won-Jung Koh; Dong Joon Song; Chang-Seok Ki; Nam Yong Lee

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

18

Field Evaluation of the InBios Chagas Detect Plus Rapid Test in Serum and Whole-Blood Specimens in Bolivia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the InBios Chagas Detect Plus Rapid Test in Serum and Whole-Blood Specimens in...hemagglutination assay, immunofluorescent-antibody test, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay...to those of conventional serology. The test is reliable for field surveys, requires...

Vishal Shah; Lisbeth Ferrufino; Robert H. Gilman; Margot Ramirez; Eliana Saenza; Edith Malaga; Gerardo Sanchez; Emi E. Okamoto; Jacqueline E. Sherbuck; Eva H. Clark; Gerson Galdos-Cardenas; Ricardo Bozo; Jorge Luis Flores-Franco; Rony Colanzi; Manuela Verastegui; Caryn Bern

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Biaxial Creep Specimen Fabrication  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the weld development and abbreviated weld qualification efforts performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for refractory metal and superalloy biaxial creep specimens. Biaxial creep specimens were to be assembled, electron beam welded, laser-seal welded, and pressurized at PNNL for both in-pile (JOYO reactor, O-arai, Japan) and out-of-pile creep testing. The objective of this test campaign was to evaluate the creep behavior of primary cladding and structural alloys under consideration for the Prometheus space reactor. PNNL successfully developed electron beam weld parameters for six of these materials prior to the termination of the Naval Reactors program effort to deliver a space reactor for Project Prometheus. These materials were FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, Alloy 617, Haynes 230, and Nirnonic PE16. Early termination of the NR space program precluded the development of laser welding parameters for post-pressurization seal weldments.

JL Bump; RF Luther

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

20

Apparatuses for prestressing rod-type specimens in torsion for in-situ passive fracture toughness testing in an extremely high-pressure environment of hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An in-situ specimen fixture particularly adapted for prestressing rod-type SNTT-type specimens comprising a tube and end cap wherein the specimen is secured at one end to the tube, and at the opposite end to the end cap. The end cap is rotatable relative to the tube, and may be fixedly secured for creating a torsional force prestressing the specimen enclosed within the tube.

Wang, Jy-an (Oak Ridge, TN); Liu, Ken C. (Oak Ridge, TN); Feng, Zhili (Knoxville, TN)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Hodges, Gary; Stoffel, Tom; Kutchenreiter, Mark; Kay, Bev; Habte, Aron; Ritsche, Michael; Morris, Victor; Anderberg, Mary

22

GIS Surface Effects Map Archive, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The GIS Surface Effects Map Archive contains a comprehensive collection of maps showing the surface effects produced by underground nuclear testing at the Nevada Test Site. From 1951 to 1992, scientists with the U.S. Geological Survey and agencies of the U.S. Department of Energy used field and aerial-photo mapping techniques to painstakingly map such surface effects as collapse sinks, craters, cracks, fractures, faults, and pressure ridges. Shortly after each test, a complex surface effects map was produced. Of the more than 920 underground detonations conducted at the Nevada Test Site, 688 were mapped for surface effects. This archive preserves these original maps in digital format. A Geographic Information System (GIS) was used to digitally reproduce each original, hand-drawn surface effects map and to assemble these maps into the digital data sets of this archive. The archive was designed to allow easy access to the maps, while preserving the original maps for perpetuity. Users can query the detonation sites database; prepare, view, and print individual or composite maps; and perform various types of scientific analysis and management tasks. Spatial analyses and queries can be performed on detonation sites and related surface effects in conjunction with other chronological, geographical, geological, or hydrological information via links to external maps and databases. This browser interface provides information about the archive, the history of surface effects mapping at the Nevada Test Site, the methods used to produce the digital surface effects maps, and links to published reports, data tables, and maps. Location maps show testing areas, operational areas, and detonation sites. Demonstration maps illustrate the methods used to produce the digital surface effects maps and exhibit some of the characteristics and uses for these data. Use the links below to view and print individual surface effects maps, retrieve information about the detonations and types of surface effects produced, and to learn about the organization and intended use of the map data contained in the archive.

Grasso, Dennis N.

2003-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

23

Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information  

SciTech Connect

Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

24

Test instructions for the horizontal borehole demonstration at the Near-Surface Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

This test outlines the planned activities designed to demonstrate the horizontal borehole drilling and testing operations at the Near Surface Test Facility prior to the performance of these methods within the Exploratory Shaft underground facility. This document will also lead to establishing the operating and safety procedures which will be implemented in the Exploratory Shaft long exploratory borehole drilling and testing program. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

McLellan, G.W. (Rockwell International Corp., Richland, WA (USA). Energy Systems Group)

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Optimal Positive Cutoff Points for careHPV Testing of Clinician- and Self-Collected Specimens in Primary Cervical Cancer Screening: an Analysis from Rural China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...specimens (careHPV-S), and Hybrid Capture 2 on clinician-collected...issues: lack of the necessary infrastructure and quality control systems...is the same as the one for Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2; Qiagen...capture of HPV DNA and RNA probe hybrids and chemiluminescent signal...

Le-Ni Kang; Jose Jeronimo; You-Lin Qiao; Fang-Hui Zhao; Wen Chen; Melissa Valdez; Xun Zhang; Pooja Bansil; Proma Paul; Ping Bai; Roger Peck; Jing Li; Feng Chen; Mark H. Stoler; Philip E. Castle

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

26

Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the hardware acceptance test for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS). This test verified that the mechanical and electrical features of the SMMS functioned as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The bulk of hardware testing was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. The SMMS was developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

Ritter, G.A., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

27

Appendix B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

B B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data This page intentionally left blank Infiltration Tests This page intentionally left blank 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 TIME (MIN) 200 250 TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 TIME (MIN) zoo 800 1000 TIME (MIN) 0 150 300 450 600 750 , 900 1050 1200 1350 1500 1650 1800 TIME (MIN) TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST I 300 400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST 2 200 250 300 TIME (MIN) 200 250 TIME (MIN) zoo 800 1000 TIME (MIN) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 TIME (MIN) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 TIME (MIN) September 1997 Alluvial Aquifer Tests This page intentionally left blank - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

28

Adulteration of Drugs-of-Abuse Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Persons abusing drugs attempt to adulterate urine specimens in ... fluid and various detoxifying agents available through the Internet is a common practice. Household chemicals such ... mask drug testing if the c...

Amitava Dasgupta

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Specimen illumination apparatus with optical cavity for dark field illumination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An illumination apparatus with a specimen slide holder, an illumination source, an optical cavity producing multiple reflection of illumination light to a specimen comprising a first and a second reflective surface arranged to achieve multiple reflections of light to a specimen is provided. The apparatus can further include additional reflective surfaces to achieve the optical cavity, a slide for mounting the specimen, a coverslip which is a reflective component of the optical cavity, one or more prisms for directing light within the optical cavity, antifading solutions for improving the viewing properties of the specimen, an array of materials for analysis, fluorescent components, curved reflective surfaces as components of the optical cavity, specimen detection apparatus, optical detection equipment, computers for analysis of optical images, a plane polarizer, fiberoptics, light transmission apertures, microscopic components, lenses for viewing the specimen, and upper and lower mirrors above and below the specimen slide as components of the optical cavity. Methods of using the apparatus are also provided.

Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Sudar, Damir (Walnut Creek, CA); Albertson, Donna (Lafayette, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Test probe for surface mounted leadless chip carrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A test probe for a surface mounted leadless chip carrier is disclosed. The probe includes specially designed connector pins which allow size reductions in the probe. A thermoplastic housing provides spring action to ensure good mechanical and electrical contact between the pins and the contact strips of a leadless chip carrier. Other features include flexible wires molded into the housing and two different types of pins alternately placed in the housing. These features allow fabrication of a smaller and simpler test probe. 1 fig.

Meyer, K.L.; Topolewski, J.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

31

Fasteners -- Preloading test for the detection of hydrogen embrittlement -- Parallel bearing surface method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fasteners -- Preloading test for the detection of hydrogen embrittlement -- Parallel bearing surface method

International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Biointrusion test plan for the Permanent Isolation Surface Barrier Prototype  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a testing and monitoring plan for the biological component of the prototype barrier slated for construction at the Hanford Site. The prototype barrier is an aboveground structure engineered to demonstrate the basic features of an earthen cover system. It is designed to permanently isolate waste from the biosphere. The features of the barrier include multiple layers of soil and rock materials and a low-permeability asphalt sublayer. The surface of the barrier consists of silt loam soil, covered with plants. The barrier sides are reinforced with rock or coarse earthen-fill to protect against wind and water erosion. The sublayers inhibit plant and animal intrusion and percolation of water. A series of tests will be conducted on the prototype barrier over the next several years to evaluate barrier performance under extreme climatic conditions. Plants and animals will play a significant role in the hydrologic and water and wind erosion characteristics of the prototype barrier. Studies on the biological component of the prototype barrier will include work on the initial revegetation of the surface, continued monitoring of the developing plant community, rooting depth and dispersion in the context of biointrusion potential, the role of plants in the hydrology of the surface and toe regions of the barrier, the role of plants in stabilizing the surface against water and wind erosion, and the role of burrowing animals in the hydrology and water and wind erosion of the barrier.

Link, S.O.; Cadwell, L.L.; Brandt, C.A.; Downs, J.L.; Rossi, R.E.; Gee, G.W.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Determining surface-wave magnitudes from regional Nevada Test Site data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......surface-wave magnitudes from regional Nevada Test Site data Bradley B. Woods David...surface-wave magnitudes for 190 Nevada Test Site (NTS) shots using regional...underground nuclear explosions at Nevada Test Site 1971-1980, United Kingdom......

Bradley B. Woods; David G. Harkrider

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Measurement accuracy verification of aspheric surface test with computer-generated hologram  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A convex aspheric surface using a computer-generated hologram (CGH) test plate fabricated with novel techniques and equipment is tested. However, the measurement result is not...

Liu, Hua

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Land surface cleanup of plutonium at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) covers approximately 3300 km{sup 2} of high desert and is located approximately 100 km northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Soil contaminated by plutonium exists on the NTS and surrounding areas from safety tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s. About 150 curies of contamination have been measured over 1200 hectares of land surface. Most contamination is found in the top 5 cm of soil but may be found deep as 25 cm. The cost of conventional removal and disposal of the full soil volume has been estimated at over $500,000,000. This study is directed toward minimizing the volume of waste which must be further processed and disposed of by precisely controlling soil removal depth. The following soil removal machines were demonstrated at the NTS: (1) a CMI Corporation Model PR-500FL pavement profiler, (2) a CMI Corporation Model Tr-225B trimmer reclaimer, (3) a Caterpillar Model 623 elevating scraper equipped with laser depth control, (4) a Caterpillar Model 14G motor grader equipped with laser depth control, (5) a Caterpillar Model 637 auger scraper, and (6) a XCR Series Guzzler vacuum truck. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Ebeling, L.L.; Evans, R.B.; Walsh, E.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Capillary bridge formation and breakage: a test to characterize antiadhesive surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Capillary bridge formation and breakage: a test to characterize antiadhesive surfaces TITLE RUNNING HEAD: Capillary bridge for antiadhesive surfaces. Laurianne Vagharchakian1 , Frédéric Restagno2 and then the rupture of a capillary bridge between the surface to be tested and a liquid bath. Both the shape

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

37

Friction factor data for flat plate tests of smooth and honeycomb surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

plate tester assembly. The honeycomb test specimen of figure 4 is made by attaching a honeycomb plate, made of Hastelloy " x " , a Kentucky Metals Inc. product, to a precision- ground stock base plate with a 0.24 m m thickness structual adhesive f i... downstream to control back pressure. The flowrate through the test section is measured by a 1.3 cm turbine flow meter, located in the piping upstream of the test section. Resolution of the flow meter is 5 X 1 0 - 5 ( m 3 / m m ) . Pressure and temperature...

Ha, Tae Woong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Testing for Deterministic Trends in Global Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Long-term variability in global sea surface temperature (SST) is often quantified by the slope from a linear regression fit. Attention is then focused on assessing the statistical significance of the derived slope parameter, but the adequacy of ...

Susana M. Barbosa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Water Research 38 (2004) 33313339 Testing a surface tension-based model to predict the salting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Research 38 (2004) 3331­3339 Testing a surface tension-based model to predict the salting out associated with transferring solutes from water to a salt solution to the difference in surface tensions likely reflects the inability of the simple surface tension model to account for all interactions among

Herbert, Bruce

40

Manufacturing of Plutonium Tensile Specimens  

SciTech Connect

Details workflow conducted to manufacture high density alpha Plutonium tensile specimens to support Los Alamos National Laboratory's science campaigns. Introduces topics including the metallurgical challenge of Plutonium and the use of high performance super-computing to drive design. Addresses the utilization of Abaqus finite element analysis, programmable computer numerical controlled (CNC) machining, as well as glove box ergonomics and safety in order to design a process that will yield high quality Plutonium tensile specimens.

Knapp, Cameron M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heater Experiment at Hanford. Berkeley, Lawre ;e BerkeleyTest Facility, Hole DC-11, Hanford Reservation. Prepared forof Gable Mountain Basalt Cores, Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Tests of the impact of assimilation of surface data on ocean state estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tests of the impact of assimilation of surface data on ocean state estimates The coastal ocean. The relative impact of these data on the ocean state estimate has been evaluated. Accurate prediction of the front location is important to fisheries. Prediction and forecasting of surface currents would

Kurapov, Alexander

43

Fracture toughness measurements with subsize disk compact specimens  

SciTech Connect

Special fixtures and test methods have been developed for testing small disk compact specimens (1.25 mm diam by 4.6 mm thick). Specimens of European type 316L austenitic stainless steel were irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at nominal irradiation temperatures of either 90 or 250 C and tested over a temperature range from 20 to 250 C. Results show that irradiation to this dose level at these temperatures reduces the fracture toughness but the toughness remains quite high. The toughness decreases as the test temperature increases. Irradiation at 250 C is more damaging than at 90 C, causing larger decreases in the fracture toughness. The testing shows that it is possible to generate useful fracture toughness data with a small disk compact specimens.

Alexander, D.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

J-integral values for cracks in conventional fatigue specimens  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive S-N fatigue data has been developed worldwide using conventional low-cycle fatigue tests. Such tests use smooth unnotched specimens subjected to controlled axial deflection or strain ranges. The tests must be run in the plastic regime in order to achieve the required cycles-to-failure. Recent developments have highlighted the need to understand and interpret the significance of the resulting strain range vs. cycles to failure data in terms of crack initiation and propagation. Since conventional fatigue tests are conducted in the plastic regime, linear elastic fracture mechanics cannot be used to accurately quantify crack growth in such tests. Elastic-plastic J-integral theory, however, has been shown to provide excellent correlations of crack growth in the elastic, elastic-plastic and grossly-plastic regimes for a wide range of geometric and loading conditions. The authors are applying this theory to the low-cycle fatigue specimen crack behavior. As cracks progress in conventional fatigue specimens, bending becomes significant. Since fatigue testing machines are quite stiff relative to the small fatigue specimens, the ends of the specimen are constrained to remain parallel, and this reduces bending in the cracked cross-section. Three-dimensional finite element elastic-plastic analyses are required to include these constraints in the J-integral solutions.

O`Donnell, T.P.; O`Donnell, W.J. [O`Donnell Consulting Engineers, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Capillary Bridge Formation and Breakage: A Test to Characterize Antiadhesive Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to characterize very weak adhesive surfaces, we have developed a quantitative test inspired by the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts adhesion test for soft adhesives, which relies on the formation and then the rupture of a capillary bridge between the surface to be tested and a liquid bath. Both the shape and the kinetics of breakage of the capillary bridge for various coatings put into contact with liquids of various viscosities and surface tensions have been studied. Several pull off regimes can be distinguished. For low pull off velocities, a quasi-static regime is observed, well described by capillary equations and sensitive to the hysteresis of the contact angle of the fluid on the coating. Above a critical pull off velocity that depends on the fluid viscosity, a dynamic regime is observed, characterized by the formation of a flat pancake of fluid on the coating that recedes more slowly than the capillary bridge itself. After the breakage of the capillary bridge, a small drop can remain attached to the surface. The volume of this drop depends on the dynamical regime and is strongly affected by very small differences between the coatings. The aptitude of this test in characterizing very weakly adhesive surfaces is exemplified by a comparison between three different perfluorinated coatings.

Laurianne Vagharchakian; Frederic Restagno; Liliane Leger

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

GIS surface effects archive of underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a new comprehensive, digital archive of more than 40 years of geologic surface effects maps produced at individual detonation sites throughout the Yucca Flat and Pahute Mesa nuclear testing areas of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The Geographic Information System (GIS) surface effects map archive on CD-ROM (this report) comprehensively documents the surface effects of underground nuclear detonations conducted at two of the most extensively used testing areas of the Nevada Test Site. Between 1951 and 1992, numerous investigators of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency meticulously mapped the surface effects caused by underground nuclear testing. Their work documented the effects of more than seventy percent of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Yucca Flat and all of the underground nuclear detonations conducted at Pahute Mesa.

Grasso, D.N.

2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

Application of Goubau Surface Wave Transmission Line for Improved Bench Testing of Diagnostic Beamline Elements  

SciTech Connect

In-air test fixtures for beamline elements typically utilize an X-Y positioning stage, and a wire antenna excited by an RF source. In most cases, the antenna contains a standing wave, and is useful only for coarse alignment measurements in CW mode. A surface-wave (SW) based transmission line permits RF energy to be launched on the wire, travel through the beamline component, and then be absorbed in a load. Since SW transmission lines employ travelling waves, the RF energy can be made to resemble the electron beam, limited only by ohmic losses and dispersion. Although lossy coaxial systems are also a consideration, the diameter of the coax introduces large uncertainties in centroid location. A SW wire is easily constructed out of 200 micron magnet wire, which more accurately approximates the physical profile of the electron beam. Benefits of this test fixture include accurate field mapping, absolute calibration for given beam currents, Z-axis independence, and temporal response measurements of sub-nanosecond pulse structures. Descriptions of the surface wave launching technique, transmission line, and instrumentation are presented, along with measurement data.

John Musson, Keith Cole, Sheldon Rubin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Design of field test plots for a sloped waste rock surface  

SciTech Connect

Westmin Resources Limited is a Western Canadian mining company with producing interests in base and precious metals and coals. Westmin`s Myra Falls Operations produce copper, zinc, and gold concentrates. The Myra Falls Operations are located in the central interior of Vancouver Island in a hanging glacial valley. Mean annual precipitation is approximately 3,000 mm with more than 75% occurring during the months of October to April. Historic surface deposition of waste rock has resulted in acid rock drainage (ARD). An applied research program was initiated to develop a cover system for the waste rock material at the Myra Falls site. The objective is to develop a cover system which controls the ingress of oxygen and infiltration of water, while providing a medium for sustainable vegetation that is consistent with the end land use of the area. Progress to date suggests that modified local till materials (amended with either fly ash or bentonite) can be used in soil cover construction. Four test plots were designed using two-dimensional saturated-unsaturated modelling tools to ensure that the performance of each test plot was representative of a full scale ARD cover system. This paper summarizes the design philosophy and principles of the cover system as well as the methodology for the two-dimensional numerical modelling program. Conclusions and results from the numerical modelling program are presented with a focus on implications for construction of the field test plots and installation of the performance monitoring instruments. The numerical modelling demonstrated that the hydraulic performance of a soil cover system placed on a sloped waste rock surface will be much different than that predicted by idealized one-dimensional numerical models, and in general current design methodologies. The modelling clearly demonstrated that the design of small scale field test plots was not a simple task. The physical dimensions of the field test plots had a significant impact on the ideal location for monitoring instruments and incorrect placement of instruments would lead to an erroneous measure of test plot performance.

O`Kane, M. [O`Kane Consultants, Inc., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Stoicescu, J.; Haug, M. [M.D. Haug and Associates Ltd., Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Januszewski, S. [Westmin Resources Ltd., Campbell River, British Columbia (Canada). Myra Falls Operations; Mchaina, D.M. [Westmin Resources Ltd., Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Three-point bending test at extremely high temperature enhanced by real-time observation and measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We developed a three-point bending test equipment with a heating chamber to provide a high temperature environment. An observation window was intentionally opened in the chamber wall for image capture. A high speed camera is integrated to record the surface evolution of the specimen through the observation window. The fixture stage for the specimens was made of Al2O3 ceramic (>99% pure) and could resist extremely high temperature. This testing platform provides the specimens with an environment that is up to 1600 °C in atmosphere for three-point bending test. Experiments were conducted for refractory alloy and C/SiC (carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composites) and the surface evolution of these specimens at high temperature was recorded. The crack propagation of the specimens was captured real-time and provided more detailed information for study of fracture behavior of the materials at high temperature.

Xufei Fang; Jingmin Jia; Xue Feng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Brain Tissue: A Viable Postmortem Toxicological Specimen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Short Communication Brain Tissue: A Viable Postmortem Toxicological...Minneapolis, Wichita, KS 67214, USA Brain tissue may be a valuable specimen in interpretation...protected and isolated position of the brain eliminates or at least attenuates many......

Timothy P. Rohrig; Charity A. Hicks

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Closeout of JOYO-1 Specimen Fabrication Efforts  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication was well under way for the JOYO biaxial creep and tensile specimens when the NR Space program was canceled. Tubes of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 for biaxial creep specimens had been drawn at True Tube (Paso Robles, CA), while tubes of Mo-47.5 Re were being drawn at Rhenium Alloys (Cleveland, OH). The Mo-47.5 Re tubes are now approximately 95% complete. Their fabrication and the quantities produced will be documented at a later date. End cap material for FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had been swaged at Pittsburgh Materials Technology, Inc. (PMTI) (Large, PA) and machined at Vangura (Clairton, PA). Cutting of tubes, pickling, annealing, and laser engraving were in process at PMTI. Several biaxial creep specimen sets of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, and T-111 had already been sent to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for weld development. In addition, tensile specimens of FS-85, ASTAR-811C, T-111, and Mo-47.5 Re had been machined at Kin-Tech (North Huntington, PA). Actual machining of the other specimen types had not been initiated. Flowcharts 1-3 detail the major processing steps each piece of material has experienced. A more detailed description of processing will be provided in a separate document [B-MT(SRME)-51]. Table 1 lists the in-process materials and finished specimens. Also included are current metallurgical condition of these materials and specimens. The available chemical analyses for these alloys at various points in the process are provided in Table 2.

ME Petrichek; JL Bump; RF Luther

2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of Navarro-Interra LLC, and supports environmental restoration efforts by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office. Safety decisions must be made before a surface crater area, or potential surface crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and surface crater formation are input into their safety decisions. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the surface collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty.

Pawloski, G A

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

53

Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-lived Surface Caps  

SciTech Connect

Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone's back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; (c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

Piet, S. J.; Breckenridge, R. P.; Burns, D. E.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-Lived Surface Caps  

SciTech Connect

Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone’s back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Burns, Douglas Edward

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Effect of residual stress and surface roughness on the fatigue behaviour of aluminium matrix composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this investigation the fatigue properties of specimens manufactured with different turning parameters were investigated in stress-controlled constant amplitude tests at ambient temperature. The change of feed rate and depth of cut lead to a change in the near surface microstructure. Hence the fatigue properties were influenced significantly due to different surface roughness and surface residual stress resulting from the unequal turning processes. The cyclic deformation behaviour of AMC225xe is characterised by pronounced initial cyclic hardening. Continuous load increase tests allow a reliable estimation of the endurance limit of AMC225xe with one single specimen on the basis of cyclic deformation, temperature and electrical resistance data.

M Smaga; D Eifler

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 1 INFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE ANDINFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 1 INFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE ANDINFLUENCE. Geo-Quebec 2004 2 Presentation outlinePresentation outline The need of laboratory testing behaviour Conclusions #12;11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 3 Triaxial test on solid

Prashant, Amit

57

Surface Roughening of PET Films through Blend Phase Coarsening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The pull-off adhesion test is a quantitative technique in which a metal surface called a dolly is bonded to the surface in question using an epoxy resin. ... We used aluminum dollies with a diameter of 10 and 25 mm and a two-component epoxy-based adhesive (Araldite 2011) to glue the dollies to the test specimens. ... This tester exerts tensile loads generated by an electrical hydraulic pump. ...

Ahmad Rezaei Kolahchi; Pierre J. Carreau; Abdellah Ajji

2014-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

58

COLORED PHOTOGRAPHS OF PLANT DISEASE SPECIMENS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DISEASE SPECIMENS IN the preparation of a handbook of the diseases of vegetables by the...World in 1893. In 1896 the American Electrician was established, and this magazine...a high order. In 1906 the American Electrician was absorbed by the Electrical World...

Max W. Gardner; Geo. K. K. Link

1920-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

59

One Nanometer Thickness Specimen Supporting Film  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......carbon ultra thin film coated on the micro-grid is developed for the electron microscopy...carbon ultra thin film coated on the micro-grid is developed for the electron microscopy...specimen supporting film, which is a micro-grid coated with carbon thin film of......

Shigeo Sakata; Shinsuke Hotsumi; Hiroyuki Watanabe

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Interim reclamation report, Basalt Waste Isolation Project Near Surface Test Facility 1990  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of the reclamation project for the Hanford Site Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF), its implementation, and preliminary estimates of its success. The goal of the reclamation project is to return disturbed sites as nearly as practicable to their original conditions using native species. Gable Mountain is dominated by two plant communities: a big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata) -- Sandberg's bluegrass (Poa sandbergii) community and a stiff sagebrush (Artemisia rigida) -- Sandberg's bluegrass community. Disassembly of the site installations began on March 15, 1988, and the site was returned to original contours by December 12, 1988. Two separate revegetation methods were employed at the NSTF to meet differing site constraints. Vegetative cover and density in the revegetation plots were assessed in April 1989 and again in June 1989 and 1990. It is extremely unlikely that the sand pit, borrow pit, box cuts, generator pad area, or ventilation fan area will reach the reclamation objectives set for these areas within the next 50 years without further intervention. These areas currently support few living plants. Vegetation on revegetated native soils appears to be growing as expected. Vegetation growth on the main waterline is well below the objective. To date, no shrubs have grown on the area, growth of native grasses is well below the objective, and much of the area has been covered with the pit run material, which may not support adequate growth. Without further treatments, the areas without the pit run material will likely revert to a nearly pure cheatgrass condition. 44 refs., 13 figs., 7 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.; Hefty, M.G.; Cadoret, N.A.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a motorized manipulator for positioning a TEM specimen holder with sub-micron resolution parallel to a y-z plane and rotating the specimen holder in the y-z plane, the manipulator comprising a base (2), and attachment means (30) for attaching the specimen holder to the manipulator, characterized in that the manipulator further comprises at least three nano-actuators (3.sup.a, 3.sup.b, 3.sup.c) mounted on the base, each nano-actuator showing a tip (4.sup.a, 4.sup.b, 4.sup.c), the at least three tips defining the y-z plane, each tip capable of moving with respect to the base in the y-z plane; a platform (5) in contact with the tips of the nano-actuators; and clamping means (6) for pressing the platform against the tips of the nano-actuators; as a result of which the nano-actuators can rotate the platform with respect to the base in the y-z plane and translate the platform parallel to the y-z plane.

Schmid, Andreas Karl (Berkeley, CA); Andresen, Nord (Berkeley, CA)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

62

Surface Temperatures of Insulated Glazing Units: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen Infrared Thermography Measurements of Window Thermal Test Specimen Surface Temperatures Brent T. Griffith ASHRAE Member, Howdy Goudey, and Dariush Arasteh P.E. ASHRAE Member Building Technologies Program Environment Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley CA 94720 USA August 2, 2001 This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs, Office of Building Systems of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098. Surface Temperatures of Window Specimens: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements Brent T. Griffith 1 , Howdy Goudey, and Dariush Arasteh

63

Inverse modeling of surface emissions for local pollution: A new methodology applied to academic test cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inverse modeling of surface emissions for local pollution: A new methodology applied to academic; (2) LISA Creteil France Needs: Optimize surface emissions using daily recorded ozone and NOX by PRIMEQUAL2, program of the french ministry of environment Firstguess emissions inventory for the Paris

Menut, Laurent

64

The development of a skill achievement test for beginning skiers on an artificial surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

members of the beginning ski classes at Texas A&B University. These subjects were tested with a 16-item test battery which had been consol1dated from a composite of suggestions from selected expert sk1ers at Texas A&V University. This method... was selected because of the absence of previously validated ski skills tests. The subjects' scores on the 16-item test battery were correlated wi th the total test score to 1dent1fy items with the highest correla- tion. A cluster analysis was made to place...

Gregory, William Bres

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Fatigue crack growth testing of sub-clad defects  

SciTech Connect

Fatigue crack growth tests were performed on four-point bend specimens with cracklike defects intentionally placed in A302B low-alloy pressure vessel steel clad with 308/309L weld-deposited stainless steel. The defects were placed in the base metal under the cladding by machining a cavity from the side opposite the cladding, electric-discharge machining a very sharp flaw, fatigue precracking the flaw, and then filling up the cavity by a weld repair process. The specimens were stress relieved before fatigue testing. The specimens were fatigue cycled at positive load ratios until the defects broke through to the surface. The specimens were then fractured at liquid nitrogen temperatures to reveal the fracture surfaces. Seven different sub-clad flaw specimens were tested in room temperature air and each test provides a record of cycles to defect breakthrough. Changes in defect size and shape as a function of applied load cycles were obtained by beach-marking the crack at various stages of the load history. The results provide a set of embedded defect data which can be used for qualifying fatigue crack growth analysis procedures such as those in Section XI of the ASME boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. A comparison between calculated and measured values shows that the ASME B and PV Section XI fatigue crack growth procedures conservatively predict cycles to defect breakthrough for small sub-clad defects.

Jones, D.P.; Leax, T.R. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., West Mifflin, PA (United States). Bettis Atomic Power Lab.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

The development of scratch test methodology and characterization of surface damage of polypropylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

found that n = 2 for glassy polymers such as poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) [5,6] and polystyrene (PS) [7]. Similar results were also found for semicrystalline polymers such as PP [8]. Scratch hardness is defined as the normal load... on quantification of surface damage and scratch evaluation will also be addressed. 3.2 The Surface Phenomena of Scratch A paper titled ?The hardness of poly(methylmethacrylate)? (PMMA) published by Briscoe et al. [9] in 1996 proposed the basic...

Wong, Min Hao

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Testing a Dynamical Model for Mid-Latitude Sea Surface Temperature Anomalies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A slab model of the oceanic mixed layer is used to predict the statistical characteristics of the sea surface temperature anomalies that are forced by day-to-day changes in air-sea fluxes in the presence of a mean current. Because of the short ...

Claude Frankignoul; Richard W. Reynolds

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier  

SciTech Connect

Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and post-burn to determine changes in the gravel content of the surface layer so as to quantify inflationary or deflationary responses to fire and to reveal the ability of the surface to resist post-fire erosive stresses. Measures of bulk density, water repellency, water retention, and hydraulic conductivity will be used to characterize changes in infiltration rates and water storage capacity following the fire. Samples will also be analyzed to quantify geochemical changes including changes in soil pH, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, and the concentration of macro nutrients (e.g. N, P, K) and other elements such as Na, Mg, Ca, that are critical to the post-fire recovery revegetation. Soil CO2 emissions will be measured monthly for one year following the burn to document post-fire stimulation of carbon turnover and soil biogenic emissions. Surface and subsurface temperature measurements at and near monitoring installations will be used to document fire effects on electronic equipment. The results of this study will be used to bridge the gaps in knowledge on the effects of fire on engineered ecosystems (e.g. surface barriers), particularly the hydrologic and biotic characteristics that govern the water and energy balance. These results will also support the development of practical fire management techniques for barriers that are compatible with wildfire suppression strategies. Furthermore, lessons learned will be use to develop installation strategies needed to protect electronic monitoring equipment from the intense heat of fire and the potential damaging effects of smoke and fire extinguishing agents. Such information is needed to better understand long-term barrier performance under extreme conditions, especially if site maintenance and operational funding is lost for activities such as barrier revegetation.

Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Calibration of the modulation transfer function of surface profilometers with binary pseudo-random test standards: expanding the application range  

SciTech Connect

A modulation transfer function (MTF) calibration method based on binary pseudo-random (BPR) gratings and arrays [Proc. SPIE 7077-7 (2007), Opt. Eng. 47, 073602 (2008)] has been proven to be an effective MTF calibration method for a number of interferometric microscopes and a scatterometer [Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A616, 172 (2010)]. Here we report on a further expansion of the application range of the method. We describe the MTF calibration of a 6 inch phase shifting Fizeau interferometer. Beyond providing a direct measurement of the interferometer's MTF, tests with a BPR array surface have revealed an asymmetry in the instrument's data processing algorithm that fundamentally limits its bandwidth. Moreover, the tests have illustrated the effects of the instrument's detrending and filtering procedures on power spectral density measurements. The details of the development of a BPR test sample suitable for calibration of scanning and transmission electron microscopes are also presented. Such a test sample is realized as a multilayer structure with the layer thicknesses of two materials corresponding to BPR sequence. The investigations confirm the universal character of the method that makes it applicable to a large variety of metrology instrumentation with spatial wavelength bandwidths from a few nanometers to hundreds of millimeters.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Anderson, Erik H.; Barber, Samuel K.; Bouet, Nathalie; Cambie, Rossana; Conley, Raymond; McKinney, Wayne R.; Takacs, Peter Z.; Voronov, Dmitriy L.

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada Appendix D - Corrective Action Investigation Report, Central Nevada Test Area, CAU 417  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, and consisting of three separate land withdrawal areas (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4), CAU 417 is comprised of 34 corrective action sites (CASs) including 2 underground storage tanks, 5 septic systems, 8 shaker pad/cuttings disposal areas, 1 decontamination facility pit, 1 burn area, 1 scrap/trash dump, 1 outlier area, 8 housekeeping sites, and 16 mud pits. Four field events were conducted between September 1996 and June 1998 to complete a corrective action investigation indicating that the only contaminant of concern was total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) which was found in 18 of the CASs. A total of 1,028 samples were analyzed. During this investigation, a statistical approach was used to determine which depth intervals or layers inside individual mud pits and shaker pad areas were above the State action levels for the TPH. Other related field sampling activities (i.e., expedited site characterization methods, surface geophysical surveys, direct-push geophysical surveys, direct-push soil sampling, and rotosonic drilling located septic leachfields) were conducted in this four-phase investigation; however, no further contaminants of concern (COCs) were identified. During and after the investigation activities, several of the sites which had surface debris but no COCs were cleaned up as housekeeping sites, two septic tanks were closed in place, and two underground storage tanks were removed. The focus of this CADD was to identify CAAs which would promote the prevention or mitigation of human exposure to surface and subsurface soils with contaminant concentrations above preliminary action levels. Based on the potential exposure pathways, several risk-based CAAs were developed and evaluated against the individual CAS requirements. It was determined that a combination of the CAAs would be recommended to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of these sites and to eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the TPH-contaminated soils.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations office

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

71

A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surfaceBozeman, MT 59717, USA e-mail: spangler@montana.edu K. S.Bozeman, MT 59717, USA A. B. Cunningham Department of Civil

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surfaceBozeman, MT 59717, USA, e-mail: spangler@montana.edu, Tel. :Bozeman, MT 59717, USA A. B. Cunningham Department of Civil

Benson, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Soil surface stabilization using an in situ plutonium coating techniuqe at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), in collaboration with the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR), has developed and is investigating an in situ plutonium treatment for soils at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The concept, conceived by Dr. T. Tamura and refined at HAZWRAP, was developed during the Nevada Applied Ecology Program investigation. In analyzing for plutonium in soils, it was noted that the alpha emanation of plutonium was greatly attenuated if traces of iron or manganese oxides were present in the final electroplating stage. The technique would reduce resuspension of alpha particles into the air by coating the contaminants in soils in situ with an environmentally compatible, durable, and nontoxic material. The coating materials (calcium hydroxide, ferrous sulfate) reduce resuspension by providing a cementitious barrier against radiation penetration while retaining soil porosity. This technique not only stabilizes plutonium-contaminated soils, but also provides an additional protection from worker exposure to radiation during remediation activities. Additionally, the coating would decrease the water solubility of the contaminant and, thus, reduce its migration through soil and uptake by plants.

Lew, J.; Snipes, R. [Environmental Management and Enrichment Facilities, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Tamura, T.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

74

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

K. Campbell

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear tests monitoring through the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) which should detect nuclear tests down to 1 kiloton (kt) TNT equivalent anywhere on the planet. The IMS), hydroacoustic and infrasound waves will help check for underground, under-water and atmospheric nuclear testsGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

76

New Devise for Penetration of Embedding Media into Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......MICROSCOPY New Devise for Penetration of Embedding Media into Specimens...been devised to enhance the penetration of embedding media into specimens...the size of the hole and the rate of gas flow. E - H Fig...Apparatus for enhancing penetration of embedding media (A) and......

Hiroshi KUSHIDA; Kunio FUJITA

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

ORNL results for Test Case 1 of the International Atomic Energy Agency`s research program on the safety assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) started the Coordinated Research Program entitled ```The Safety Assessment of Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Facilities.`` The program is aimed at improving the confidence in the modeling results for safety assessments of waste disposal facilities. The program has been given the acronym NSARS (Near-Surface Radioactive Waste Disposal Safety Assessment Reliability Study) for ease of reference. The purpose of this report is to present the ORNL modeling results for the first test case (i.e., Test Case 1) of the IAEA NSARS program. Test Case 1 is based on near-surface disposal of radionuclides that are subsequently leached to a saturated-sand aquifer. Exposure to radionuclides results from use of a well screened in the aquifer and from intrusion into the repository. Two repository concepts were defined in Test Case 1: a simple earth trench and an engineered vault.

Thorne, D.J.; McDowell-Boyer, L.M.; Kocher, D.C.; Little, C.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Grand Junction, CO (United States); Roemer, E.K. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Hyperbolic distributions and fractal character of fracture surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The fractal character of fracture surfaces of thick-walled pressure vessels produced in the final fast fracture that terminates low-cycle-fatigue tests is compared with that of fracture surfaces produced in Charpy impact tests in samples of the same high-strength and -toughness steel (ASTM A723) alloy. Slit island analysis yielded fractal dimensions near 1.25 for the Charpy specimens, which is typical of high-strength steel alloys previously studied; however, extremely high fractal dimensions near 1.40 were determined for the low-cycle-fatigue specimens. The distributions of island and lake areas and of island and lake perimeters on random sections exhibit hyperbolic distributions analogous to those found for geographic islands and lakes.

Peter McAnulty; L. V. Meisel; P. J. Cote

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Resonance test system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus (10) for applying at least one load to a specimen (12) according to one embodiment of the invention may comprise a mass (18). An actuator (20) mounted to the specimen (12) and operatively associated with the mass (18) moves the mass (18) along a linear displacement path (22) that is perpendicular to a longitudinal axis of the specimen (12). A control system (26) operatively associated with the actuator (20) operates the actuator (20) to reciprocate the mass (18) along the linear displacement path (22) at a reciprocating frequency, the reciprocating frequency being about equal to a resonance frequency of the specimen (12) in a test configuration.

Musial, Walter (Boulder, CO); White, Darris (Superior, CO)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

80

Comparison of the results of short-term static tests and single-pass flow-through tests with LRM glass.  

SciTech Connect

Static dissolution tests were conducted to measure the forward dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 C and pH(RT) 11.7 {+-} 0.1 for comparison with the rate measured with single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests in an interlaboratory study (ILS). The static tests were conducted with monolithic specimens having known geometric surface areas, whereas the SPFT tests were conducted with crushed glass that had an uncertain specific surface area. The error in the specific surface area of the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests, which was calculated by modeling the particles as spheres, was assessed based on the difference in the forward dissolution rates measured with the two test methods. Three series of static tests were conducted at 70 C following ASTM standard test method C1220 using specimens with surfaces polished to 600, 800, and 1200 grit and a leachant solution having the same composition as that used in the ILS. Regression of the combined results of the static tests to the affinity-based glass dissolution model gives a forward rate of 1.67 g/(m{sup 2}d). The mean value of the forward rate from the SPFT tests was 1.64 g/(m{sup 2}d) with an extended uncertainty of 1.90 g/(m{sup 2}d). This indicates that the calculated surface area for the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests is less than 2% higher than the actual surface area, which is well within the experimental uncertainties of measuring the forward dissolution rate using each test method. These results indicate that the geometric surface area of crushed glass calculated based on the size of the sieves used to isolate the fraction used in a test is reliable. In addition, the C1220 test method provides a means for measuring the forward dissolution rate of borosilicate glasses that is faster, easier, and more economical than the SPFT test method.

Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ultra high vacuum heating and rotating specimen stage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating and rotating specimen stage provides for simultaneous specimen heating and rotating. The stage is ideally suited for operation in ultrahigh vacuum (1.times.10.sup.-9 torr or less), but is useful at atmosphere and in pressurized systems as well. A specimen is placed on a specimen holder that is attached to a heater that, in turn, is attached to a top housing. The top housing is rotated relative to a bottom housing and electrically connected thereto by electrically conductive brushes. This stage is made of materials that are compatible with UHV, able to withstand high temperatures, possess low outgassing rates, are gall and seize resistant, and are able to carry substantial electrical loading without overheating.

Coombs, III, Arthur W. (Patterson, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ultra high vacuum heating and rotating specimen stage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating and rotating specimen stage provides for simultaneous specimen heating and rotating. The stage is ideally suited for operation in ultrahigh vacuum (1{times}10{sup {minus}9} torr or less), but is useful at atmosphere and in pressurized systems as well. A specimen is placed on a specimen holder that is attached to a heater that, in turn, is attached to a top housing. The top housing is rotated relative to a bottom housing and electrically connected thereto by electrically conductive brushes. This stage is made of materials that are compatible with UHV, able to withstand high temperatures, possess low outgassing rates, are gall and seize resistant, and are able to carry substantial electrical loading without overheating. 5 figs.

Coombs, A.W. III

1995-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

83

Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemistry Chem 220B 3 hours Physical Chemistry Chem 230 3 hours Chemical Reactor Engineering ChBE 225 3Specimen Curriculum for Chemical Engineering Focus Area: Chemical Engineering Semester hours SOPHOMORE YEAR FALL SPRING Chem 219A

Bordenstein, Seth

84

Experimental deformation of multilithologic specimens simulating sedimentary facies changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in controlling the location of deformation. To investigate this problem, three-layered specimens of Coconino Sandstone (11 by 3 by 3 cm. , 1 cm. layer thickness), each containing a block inclusion of Indiana Limestone, polycrystalline halite, modeling clay... the stages 17 (1, 2, 3) of shortening referred to in the text. Curves are labeled according to confining pressure. Representative force-displacement curves for specimens. 18 a. Limestone inclusion, 1. 0 kb confining pressure; b. halite inclusion, 1. 0 kb...

Dyke, Lawrence Dana

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Single groove double cantilever beam fracture specimens versus Dugdale specimens for estimating shear lip propagation energies: BPA polycarbonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cracks in double cantilever beam specimens with single side grooves (S-G DCB) exhibit crack tip plastic zones that mimic closely the plastic zones that produce shear lips in mixed mode crack propagation in thi...

R. P. Kambour; S. Miller

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

WAFER TEST CAVITY -Linking Surface Microstructure to RF Performance: a ‘Short-­?Sample Test Facility’ for characterizing superconducting materials for SRF cavities.  

SciTech Connect

The Wafer Test cavity was designed to create a short sample test system to determine the properties of the superconducting materials and S?I?S hetero?structures. The project, funded by ARRA, was successful in accomplishing several goals to achieving a high gradient test system for SRF research and development. The project led to the design and construction of the two unique cavities that each severed unique purposes: the Wafer test Cavity and the Sapphire Test cavity. The Sapphire Cavity was constructed first to determine the properties of large single crystal sapphires in an SRF environment. The data obtained from the cavity greatly altered the design of the Wafer Cavity and provided the necessary information to ascertain the Wafer Test cavity’s performance.

Pogue, Nathaniel; Comeaux, Justin; McIntyre, Peter

2014-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Multicenter Clinical Evaluation of the Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay for Detection of Toxigenic Clostridium difficile Strains in Clinical Stool Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conducted a multicenter evaluation of the recently FDA-cleared Portrait Toxigenic C. difficile Assay (Great Basin, West Valley City, UT) for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile in clinical stool specimens. This test utilizes the...

Blake W. Buchan; Tami-Lea A. Mackey; Judy A. Daly; Garrison Alger; Gerald A. Denys; Lance R. Peterson; Sue C. Kehl; Nathan A. Ledeboer

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

88

Thickness dependence of Gc for shear lip propagation from a single crack propagation specimen: aluminium 6061-T6 alloy, cold-rolled copper and BPA polycarbonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

G c...and plastic zone data from specimens of both kinds are reported for aluminium 6061-T6 alloy, cold-rolled copper and BPA polycarbonate. Results of uniaxial tensile tests and....

R. P. Kambour; S. Miller

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Method for non-destructive testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-destructive testing method may include providing a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is exposed to photons. The source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen being exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. Annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen are detected.

Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

90

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (Tonopah Test Range). CAU 484 consists of sites located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 484 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites: (1) CAS RG-52-007-TAML, Davis Gun Penetrator Test; (2) CAS TA-52-001-TANL, NEDS Detonation Area; (3) CAS TA-52-004-TAAL, Metal Particle Dispersion Test; (4) CAS TA-52-005-TAAL, Joint Test Assembly DU Sites; (5) CAS TA-52-006-TAPL, Depleted Uranium Site; and (6) CAS TA-54-001-TANL, Containment Tank and Steel Structure

Bechel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Investigation of temperature dependence of fracture toughness in high-dose HT9 steel using small-specimen reuse technique  

SciTech Connect

The temperature dependence of fracture toughness in HT9 steel irradiated to 3–145 dpa at 380–503 degrees*C was investigated using miniature three-point bend (TPB) fracture specimens. A miniature-specimen reuse technique has been established: the tested halves of subsize Charpy impact specimens with dimensions of 27 mm *3mm* 4 mm were reused for this fracture test campaign by cutting a notch with a diamond-saw in the middle of each half, and by fatigue-precracking to generate a sharp crack tip. It was confirmed that the fracture toughness of HT9 steel in the dose range depends more strongly on the irradiation temperature than the irradiation dose. At an irradiation temperature <430 *degreesC, the fracture toughness of irradiated HT9 increased with the test temperature, reached an upper shelf of 180—200 MPa*m^.5 at 350–450 degrees*C, and then decreased with the test temperature. At an irradiation temperature >430 degrees*C, the fracture toughness was nearly unchanged up to about 450 *degreesC and decreased slowly with test temperatures in a higher temperature range. Such a rather monotonic test temperature dependence after high-temperature irradiation is similar to that observed for an archive material generally showing a higher degree of toughness. A brittle fracture without stable crack growth occurred in only a few specimens with relatively lower irradiation and test temperatures. In this discussion, these TPB fracture toughness data are compared with previously published data from 12.7 mm diameter disc compact tension (DCT) specimens.

Baek, Jong-Hyuk; Byun, Thak Sang; Maloy, Stuart A.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/15/05 13:40 18.08 17.75 17.91 16.84 17.43 right 8 triple/quad, 2 sputtered low-e layers, 2 layer teflon center insert clinging in center, Kr 18.26 17.58 18.05 17.23 17.67 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

93

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/11/05 11:40 18.10 17.80 18.13 17.44 17.82 right 7 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer top angled toward cold side, Kr 17.80 13.74 16.90 14.44 15.77 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

94

The evaluation of micro-surfacing mixture design procedures and the effects of material variation on the test responses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Precision Index Statements for Repeatability THE EFFECTS OF WATER, ADDITIVE AND MINERAL FILLER ON THE TEST RESPONSES OF THE MIXTURE DESIGN TESTS Page 45 63 63 66 General 66 Test Procedures 67 Analysis of Results Wet Cohesion Test (30 Minutes) Wet... 23. 30 minutes wet cohesion torque values against additive amounts with 8 percent water 84 FIGURE 24. 30 minutes wet cohesion torque values against mineral filler with 8 percent water 84 FIGURE 25. 30 minutes wet cohesion torque values against...

Andrews, Edward Mensah

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

RESULTS OF THE EXAMINATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE PROBE SPECIMENS REMOVED FROM TANK 241-AN-107 JUNE 2010  

SciTech Connect

An Integrated Multi-function Corrosion Probe (IMCP) was installed in Tank 241-AN-107 on September 20, 2006. A portion of the probe was retrieved on June 8, 2010 and the sections holding the detectors were delivered to the 222-S Laboratory for analysis. The examination and disassembly of the probe sections encountered a number of challenges. However, disassembly and relevant analyses were successfully completed. The following summarizes our observations. Brittle failure of the fiberglass probe in the middle of detector 2 resulted in the recovery of only three vapor space C-rings and six supernatant bullet specimens. The design of the bullets and how they were attached to the probe made the recovery of the components more difficult. The use of glue/epoxy on the bullets and the attachment of the flat bottom of the bullets to the curved surface of the fiberglass probe body meant that weight loss on cleaning and surface area of the specimens could not be determined with acceptable accuracy. Macrophotography of all specimens reveals that corrosion was slight in the vapor space and extremely slight in the supernatant. The one pre-cracked C-ring recovered from the vapor space still had the stress bulge visible on the polished surface, indicating that crack propagation had not occurred in the tank. No photographs were taken of the C-ring before deployment. No further analysis was conducted on this specimen. A detailed discussion and photographic documentation are provided in this report.

COOKE GA; WYRWAS RB; DUNCAN JB

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

96

Reverse?field reciprocity for conducting specimens in magnetic fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new static?electromagnetic reciprocity principle is presented extending ordinary resistive reciprocity to the case of nonzero magnetic fields by requiring the magnetic field to be reversed when the reciprocal measurement is made. The principle is supported by measurements on various types of specimens including those which exhibit the quantum?Hall effect. A derivation using elementary electromagnetic theory shows that the principle will hold provided only that the specimen is electrically linear (Ohmic) and that the Onsager form for the conductivity tensor applies throughout. The principle has important implications for electrical measurements on semiconductors in applied?magnetic fields.

H. H. Sample; W. J. Bruno; S. B. Sample; E. K. Sichel

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Measurement of surface tension and viscosity by open capillary techniques  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An open-channel capillary is provided, having preferably a v-shaped groove in a flat wettable surface. The groove has timing marks and a source marker in which the specimen to be tested is deposited. The time of passage between the timing marks is recorded, and the ratio of surface tension .gamma. to viscosity .mu. is determined from the equation given below: ##EQU1## where h.sub.0 is the groove depth, .alpha. is the groove angle, .theta. is the liquid/solid contact angle, and t is the flow time. It has been shown by the

Rye,Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM), Yost,Frederick G. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Ireland, Galway  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biomedical Engineering Specimen Curriculum National University of Ireland, Galway Fall Semester ELEC Sci, Engineering, Math Elective 6* 16 Senior Year Fall VU Spring VU BME 271 Biomedical Seminar 1 BME 273 Design of Medical Engineering Systems II 3 BME 255w Biomedical Engineering Lab 3 18 SEM

Simaan, Nabil

99

Ultrasonic Evaluation of Two Dissimilar Metal Weld Overlay Specimens  

SciTech Connect

Two dissimilar metal weld (DMW) pipe-to-nozzle specimens were implanted with thermal fatigue cracks in the 13% to 90% through-wall depth range. The specimens were ultrasonically evaluated with phased-array probes having center frequencies of 0.8, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 megahertz (MHz). An Alloy 82/182 weld overlay (WOL) was applied and the specimens were ultrasonically re-evaluated for flaw detection and characterization. The Post-WOL flaw depths were approximately 10% to 56% through-wall. This study has shown the effectiveness of ultrasonic examinations of Alloy 82/182 overlaid DMW specimens. Phased-array probes with center frequency in the 0.8- to 1.0-MHz range provide a strong coherent signal but the greater ultrasonic wavelength and larger beam spot size prevent the reliable detection of small flaws. These small flaws had nominal through-wall depths of less than 15% and length in the 50-60 mm (2-2.4 in.) range. Flaws in the 19% and greater through-wall depth range were readily detected with all four probes. At the higher frequencies, the reflected signals are less coherent but still provide adequate signal for flaw detection and characterization. A single inspection at 2.0 MHz could provide adequate detection and sizing information but a supplemental inspection at 1.0 or 1.5 MHz is recommended.

Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Prowant, Matthew S.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

100

Extreme Resistance of Superhydrophobic Surfaces to Impalement: Reversible Electrowetting Related to the Impacting/Bouncing Drop Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extreme Resistance of Superhydrophobic Surfaces to Impalement: Reversible Electrowetting Related drop impact impalement and electrowetting (EW) experiments. A correlation between the resistance) is one of the most promising techniques to carry out elementary operations on droplets, like displacement

Brunet, Philippe

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geologic and hydrologic records of observation wells, test holes, test wells, supply wells, springs, and surface water stations in the Los Alamos area  

SciTech Connect

Hundreds of holes have been drilled into the Pajarito Plateau and surrounding test areas of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the end of World War II. They range in depth from a few feet to more than 14,000 ft. The holes were drilled to provide geologic, hydrologic, and engineering information related to development of a water supply, to provide data on the likelihood or presence of subsurface contamination from hazardous and nuclear materials, and for engineering design for construction. The data contained in this report provide a basis for further investigations into the consequences of our past, present, and future interactions with the environment.

Purtymun, W.D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Off-line ionization tests using the surface and the plasma ion sources of the SPES project  

SciTech Connect

The development of new target ion source systems for the selective production of exotic species (SPES) facility is currently in progress at Legnaro National Laboratories. In this context, the study of ion sources and their performance in terms of ionization efficiency and transversal emittance is a crucial point in order to maximize the available yields, particularly for short-lived isotopes. In this work, preliminary off-line ionization efficiency and emittance measurements for the SPES surface and plasma ion sources are presented. The plasma source emittance measurements are supported by dedicated numerical calculations.

Manzolaro, M.; Vasquez, J.; Montano, J.; Andrighetto, A.; Scarpa, D. [INFN - Legnaro National Laboratories, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Manente, M. [CISAS (Centro Interdipartimentale Studi Attivita Spaziali), University of Padova, Via Venezia 1, Padova (Italy); Curreli, D.; Meneghetti, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Padova, Via Venezia 1, Padova (Italy); Pavarin, D. [CISAS (Centro Interdipartimentale Studi Attivita Spaziali), University of Padova, Via Venezia 1, Padova (Italy); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Padova, Via Venezia 1, Padova (Italy)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mixed Stream Test Rig Winter FY-2011 Report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the data and analysis of the initial testing campaign of the Mixed Stream Test Rig (MISTER) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It describes the test specimen selection, physical configuration of the test equipment, operations methodology, and data and analysis of specimens exposed in two environments designed to represent those expected for high temperature steam electrolysis (HTSE).

Chalres Park; Tedd Lister; Kevin DeWall

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Effects of oxidation on the impact energy of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 Charpy V-notch specimens heated in air at 600 to 800  

SciTech Connect

The /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat source being developed at PNL utilizes a Hastelloy S or Hastelloy C-4 outer capsule having a 0.5-in.-thick wall to contain the Hastelloy C-276 inner capsule. The primary objective of the study was to demonstrate that the air oxidation of the outer capsule that could occur during heat-source service would not degrade the ductility and Charpy impact strength of the capsule below the licensing requirements given in Section 1.1. The /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ heat source under development is intended for general-purpose use. Compatibility considerations limit the interface temperature between the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ and Hastelloy C-276 inner capsule to a maximum of 800/sup 0/C. The outer capsule surface temperature will be somewhat less than 800/sup 0/C, and depending on the service, may be substantially lower. The oxidation tests were therefore carried out at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C for exposures up to 10,000h to cover the range of temperature the outer capsule might expect to encounter in service. The results showed that the oxidation of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 in air at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C is very slow, and both alloys form adherent oxide layers that serve to protect the underlying metal. Subsurface attack of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 due to oxidation was greater than expected, considering the slow oxidation rates of the two alloys at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C. Estimates of subsurface attack, determined from micrographs of the oxidized specimens, showed erratic results and it was impossible to assign any type of rate equation to the subsurface attack. A conservative estimate of long-term effects can be made using a linear extrapolation of the test results. There were no significant differences between the room-temperature Charpy impact energy of Hastelloy S and Hastelloy C-4 specimens oxidized in air at 600/sup 0/ to 800/sup 0/C and control specimens heated in vacuum.

Fullam, H.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points Nevada Test Site, Nevada (Draft), Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit  (CAU) 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, is located in Areas 6 and 25 of the Nevada Test Site, 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: •06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well •06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole •25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping •25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

Grant Evenson

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Type Specimens of Athyridid Brachiopods from the James Hall Collection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

); Hall, 1857a, p. 94, fig. 3-4 and unnumbered; Hall, 1859b, p. 247; Hall, 1861, pl. 39. Meristella princeps (Hall, 1857a); Hall, 1860, p. 93, fig. 7; Hall, 1862, p. 180, fig. 7. Meristella laevis (Vanuxem, 1842); Miller, 1889, p. 354; Hall and Clarke... figured by Vanuxem. The well-preserved adult specimen figured by Hall (1861, pl. 39,3.1-n; see also, Hall, 1857a, p. 94, fig. 3-4 and unnumbered; 1857b, p. 54, p. 94, fig. 3-4 and unnumbered; 1860, p. 93, fig. 7; 1862, p. 180, fig. 7; Hall and Clarke, 1893...

Alvarez, Fernando; Brime, Covadonga

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Corrective Action Investigation plan for Corrective Action Unit 546: Injection Well and Surface Releases, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 546 is located in Areas 6 and 9 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 546 is comprised of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs) listed below: •06-23-02, U-6a/Russet Testing Area •09-20-01, Injection Well These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on November 8, 2007, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process has been used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 546.

Alfred Wickline

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effect of Sulfate Electrolyte Additives on LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2/graphite Pouch Cell Lifetime: Correlation between XPS Surface Studies and Electrochemical Test Results.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Sulfate Electrolyte Additives on LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2/graphite Pouch Cell Lifetime: Correlation between XPS Surface Studies and Electrochemical Test Results. ...

Lénaïc Madec; Jian Xia; Remi Petibon; Kathlyne J Nelson; Jon-Paul Sun; Ian G. Hill; Jeff R Dahn

2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

110

Influence of specimen design on the ductility of zircaloy cladding: Experiment and analysis  

SciTech Connect

In a reactivity-initiated accident (RIA), a control rod ejection or drop causes a sudden increase in reactor power, which in turn deposits a large amount of energy into the fuel. The resulting thermal expansion and fission gas release loads the cladding into the plastic regime and may cause it to fail. In order to predict cladding survivability, there has been considerable interest and effort in supplementing integral WA tests with separate-effects ring tests of cladding tubes. Such tests can give one insight into failure mechanisms and measure relevant mechanical properties (such as yield strength, uniform elongation, uniaxial stress-strain curve, etc.), for use in computer codes that attempt to predict cladding response during an RIA. The accuracy of such model predictions obviously depends on appropriate and accurate failure data. This study concerns itself with the proper development of ring tensile tests that (i) are similar to the loading conditions present in an RIA, (ii) measure the relevant mechanical properties and (iii) provide insight regarding the influence of the strain paths on the failure mechanisms present if Zircaloy cladding. Based on both experiments and computational modeling, the authors investigate the failure of Zircaloy tubing as a function of specimen geometry, and discuss the limitations of certain ring-test geometries in yielding failure ductility data that are applicable to RIA situations.

Bates, D. W.; Majumdar, S.; Koss, D. A.; Motta, A. T.

1999-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Focused ion beam specimen preparation for electron holography of electrically biased thin film solar cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, biased TEM specimen, thin film solar cell, FIB Thin films of hydrogenated Si (Si:H) can be used as active for electron holography of a thin film solar cell using conventional lift-out specimen preparation and a homeFocused ion beam specimen preparation for electron holography of electrically biased thin film

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

112

Specimen coordinate automated measuring machine/fiducial automated measuring machine  

SciTech Connect

The Specimen coordinate Automated Measuring Machine (SCAMM) and the Fiducial Automated Measuring Machine (FAMM) is a computer controlled metrology system capable of measuring length, width, and thickness, and of locating fiducial marks. SCAMM and FAMM have many similarities in their designs, and they can be converted from one to the other without taking them out of the hot cell. Both have means for: supporting a plurality of samples and a standard; controlling the movement of the samples in the +/- X and Y directions; determining the coordinates of the sample; compensating for temperature effects; and verifying the accuracy of the measurements and repeating as necessary. SCAMM and FAMM are designed to be used in hot cells.

Hedglen, Robert E. (Bethel Park, PA); Jacket, Howard S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Schwartz, Allan I. (Turtle Creek, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Discovering Discriminative Cell Attributes for HEp-2 Specimen Image Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

test results. This paper describes a novel CAD system for the Anti-Nuclear Antibody (ANA) test via the proposed approach to various state-of-the- art approaches on a novel HEp-2 cell dataset which the existence of con- nective tissue diseases is via the Anti-Nuclear Antibody (ANA) test using Indirect

Sanderson, Conrad

114

A comparison of the toughness of ductile iron to cast steel using modified charpy test specimens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

parameters from Charpy V-notch results are desirable (. '12]. Rolfe and Barsom [1] suggest that one may correlate Klc with total Charpy fracture energy on the upper shelf using the relationship (Klc/YS) = A(CVN-YS/20)/YS (2) where K1c is the static...

McKinney, Keith Elison

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

115

Novel scheme for the preparation of transmission electron microscopy specimens with a focused ion beam  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A novel scheme is presented for the preparation of cross?section transmission electron microscopy(TEM) specimens with a focused ion beam(FIB). This scheme is particularly suitable for highly structured substrates such as integrated circuits. The specimen is made by cutting a thin slice of material from the substrate by sputtering with the FIB. The position of the specimen can be selected with submicron resolution. The specimen is subsequently removed from the substrate and transported to a standard TEM?specimen holder. A specimen ready for TEM inspection can be prepared within 2 hs. The samples are of excellent quality as is illustrated with cross?section TEM images of FIB?made specimens of an electrically programmable read?only memory.

M. H. F. Overwijk; F. C. van den Heuvel; C. W. T. Bulle?Lieuwma

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Optical caliper with compensation for specimen deflection and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical non-contact profilometry system and method provided by an optical caliper with matched optical sensors that are arranged conjugate to each other so that the surface profile and thickness of an article can be measured without using a fixed reference surface and while permitting the article to deflect in space within the acquisition range of the optical sensors. The output signals from the two optical sensors are algebraically added to compensate for any such deflection of the article and provide a so compensated signal, the balance and sign of which provides a measurement of the actual thickness of the article at the optical sensors.

Bernacki, Bruce E. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Miniature Specimen Testing The Small Punch Test (SPT) has successfully been used in the US and in Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and in Japan to assess the material behavior of steels in nuclear reactor and pressure vessels as well

Berlin,Technische Universität

118

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial specimens intravaskulaere Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

across Arterial and Venous Endothelium in Rats Studies with Evans Blue... of fluorescent spots for EBA leakage. The HRP specimens were subjected to histochemicai treatment,...

119

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004  

SciTech Connect

This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A versatile elevated-pressure reactor combined with an ultrahigh vacuum surface setup for efficient testing of model and powder catalysts under clean gas-phase conditions  

SciTech Connect

A small-volume reaction cell for catalytic or photocatalytic testing of solid materials at pressures up to 1000 Torr has been coupled to a surface-science setup used for standard sample preparation and characterization under ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The reactor and sample holder designs allow easy sample transfer from/to the UHV chamber, and investigation of both planar and small amounts of powder catalysts under the same conditions. The sample is heated with an infrared laser beam and its temperature is measured with a compact pyrometer. Combined in a regulation loop, this system ensures fast and accurate temperature control as well as clean heating. The reaction products are automatically sampled and analyzed by mass spectrometry and/or gas chromatography (GC). Unlike previous systems, our GC apparatus does not use a recirculation loop and allows working in clean conditions at pressures as low as 1 Torr while detecting partial pressures smaller than 10{sup ?4} Torr. The efficiency and versatility of the reactor are demonstrated in the study of two catalytic systems: butadiene hydrogenation on Pd(100) and CO oxidation over an AuRh/TiO{sub 2} powder catalyst.

Morfin, Franck; Piccolo, Laurent [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256 CNRS and Université Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, F-69626 Villeurbanne (France)] [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l'environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256 CNRS and Université Lyon 1, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, F-69626 Villeurbanne (France)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of data collected during the annual post-closure site inspections conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May 2011 and July 2012. The annual post-closure site inspections included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspections conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated that the site and soil cover were in good condition. No new fractures or extension of existing fractures were observed and no issues with the fence or gate were identified. The vegetation on the cover continues to look healthy, but the biennial vegetation survey conducted during the 2012 inspection indicated that the total foliar cover was slightly higher in 2009 than in 2012. This may be indicative of a decrease in precipitation observed during the 2-year monitoring period. The precipitation totaled 9.9 inches from July 1, 2010, through June 30, 2011, and 5 inches from July 1, 2011, through June 30, 2012. This decrease in precipitation is also evident in the soil moisture data obtained from the time domain reflectometry sensors. Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 cover is performing as designed, and evapotranspiration is effectively removing water from the cover.

None

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Corrective Action Decision Document/ Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada with Errata Sheet, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD)/Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit 556, Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, located at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008). Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 556 is comprised of four corrective action sites (CASs): • 06-20-04, National Cementers Dry Well • 06-99-09, Birdwell Test Hole • 25-60-03, E-MAD Stormwater Discharge and Piping • 25-64-01, Vehicle Washdown and Drainage Pit The purpose of this CADD/CR is to provide justification and documentation supporting the recommendation for closure of CAU 556 with no further corrective action. To achieve this, corrective action investigation (CAI) activities began on February 7 and were completed on June 19, 2008, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 556: Dry Wells and Surface Release Points, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (NNSA/NSO, 2007). The purpose of the CAI was to fulfill the following data needs as defined during the data quality objective (DQO) process: • Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. • If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent. • Provide sufficient information and data to complete appropriate corrective actions. The CAU 556 data were evaluated based on the data quality assessment process, which demonstrated the quality and acceptability of the data for use in fulfilling the DQO data needs. Analytes detected during the CAI were evaluated against appropriate final action levels (FALs) to identify the COCs for each CAS. The results of the CAI identified COCs at one of the four CASs in CAU 556 that required the completion of a corrective action. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities conducted at CAU 556 revealed the following: • Corrective Action Sites 06-20-04, 06-99-09, and 25-64-01 do not contain contamination at concentrations exceeding the FALs. • Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) contamination above the FAL was identified in the surface and/or shallow subsurface soils at the outfall and around Catch Basin 2, and in soils contained within the catch basins and the manhole at CAS 25-60-03. A corrective action of close in place with a soil removal action and use restriction (UR) was completed at CAS 25-60-03. The PCB-contaminated soils were removed from the outfall area and around Catch Basin 2, and disposed of at a Nevada Test Site landfill as part of a removal action. The catch basins and the manhole were sealed shut by filling them with grout. The end of the outfall pipe was plugged using grout, covered with soil, and the area was regraded. A UR was applied to the entire stormwater system at CAS 25-60-03, which includes the three catch basins, manhole, and associated piping. No further action is the corrective action for CASs 06-20-04, 06-99-09, and 25-64-01. The liquids in the test holes at CAS 06-99-09 were removed for disposal and the features were filled with grout as a best management practice. The drainage pipe between the vehicle washdown pad and the drainage pit at CAS 25-64-01 was sealed at each end as a best management practice. The corrective actions were evaluated on technical merit focusing on performance, reliability, feasibility, safety, and cost. They were judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated. The corrective actions meet all applicable federal and state regulations for closure of the site and will reduce potential exposure pathways to the contaminated media to an acceptable level at CAU 556. Therefore, the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office provides the following recommendations: • Maintain a UR for the entire stormwater drainage system (i.e., three catch basins, one manhole, and associated piping) at CAS 25-60-03. • No further corrective action for CAU 556. • A Notice of Completion to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada

Grant Evenson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

124

Simple test for dissimilar-metal welds  

SciTech Connect

A simplified accelerated test procedure has been developed for testing dissimilar-metal welds between austenitic stainless steels and low-alloy ferritic steels. The failure of these welded joints in operating steam generators of fossil-fired power plants has become an increasing problem for the utility industry. The proposed test is a three-point loading, bent-beam test that uses sheet specimens taken from a dissimilar-metal weldment. Tests were conducted in a simple test fixture where the specimens are loaded with a set-screw. To determine whether the test produces the same type of failure as those produced in a power plant, tests were conducted on specimens taken from a weld between Type 316 stainless steel and 2 1/4 Cr-1 Mo steel plates using Type 309 stainless steel filler metal. The specimens were loaded in the test fixture at room temperature and then thermally cycled between room temperature and 593/sup 0/C (1099/sup 0/F) by placing the test apparatus in a box furnace (thermal cycling during power plant operation plays a major role in the weld failure during service). The specimens were kept in the furnace for 20 to 70 hours (h), cooled to room temperature, and then the cycle was repeated. Metallographic examination of specimens cycled as few as 64 times with a total of 2300 h at 593/sup 0/C revealed that the specimens contained cracks similar to the cracks observed on dissimilar-metal welds cut from steam tubes after long-time elevated-temperature service racks similar to the cracks observed on dissimilar-metal welds cut from steam tubes after longtime elevated-temperature service in a fossil-fired steam generator. All indications are that this simple accelerated test could be used as a screening procedure to compare the relative behavior of ''improved'' welds in future research and development programs.

Klueh, R.L.; King, J.F.; Griffith, J.L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Analyses of surface displacements of Zircaloy fuel cladding in the HOBBIE creepdown irradiation experiments  

SciTech Connect

This report presents descriptions and results for seven of the eight in-reactor creepdown tests of Zircaloy fuel cladding. These tests, part of a joint program between the US NRC and Energieonderzoek Centrum Nederland, were conducted to study the behavior of Zircaloy fuel cladding under conditions that approximate those found in an operating pressurized-water power reactor. We present radial surface displacements as functions of time, average diametral or circumferential strains as a function of time, and isochronal deformation surfaces. These tests were conducted at 343/sup 0/C with external pressures from 13.3 to 18.7 MPa. Three of the specimens were subjected to stress reversal during their test runs, after which they were pressurized internally to pressures from 3.5 to 6.9 MPa. Fast flux (>1.0 MeV (0.16 pJ)) ranged from 3.8 x 10/sup 17/ to 5.0 x 10/sup 17/ n/(m/sup 2/.s). The most important conclusion to be drawn from this study involves the deformation of the cladding during testing. Contrary to similar tests conducted out of reactor, the in-reactor specimens did not deform uniformly, that is, by diametral contraction and smooth ovalization. Rather, the deformation surfaces were nonuniform - hills and valleys formed at irregular intervals. This implies that conventional concepts of creep rate and simplified modeling procedures are insufficient for predicting cladding behavior. Sufficient data have been collected in this program to supply modelers with detailed, virtually hour by hour, descriptions of the cladding surface shapes. From these data new interpretations can be derived to predict cladding behavior.

Hobson, D.O.; Thoms, K.R.; Dodd, C.V.; van der Kaa, T.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites, CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit, and CAS 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill, and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits (5), an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action.

None

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 4/14/05 17:22 18.51 17.42 17.76 17.67 16.61 17.18 right 15 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, dense sun screen center layer, Kr 19.33 17.07 13.77 18.00 14.20 16.26 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

128

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 1/31/06 16:22 17.15 15.06 16.46 15.32 13.91 14.68 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.53 17.87 16.90 17.71 16.41 17.11 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

129

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer, Kr 3/24/05 12:40 17.51 17.52 17.63 16.30 17.03 right 9 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 72% open insect screen center layer, Kr 17.12 13.05 17.65 13.84 15.91 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average 1.12 0.00 0.39 4.47 21.36 20.68 21.02 20.8

130

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/25/05 16:15 18.47 17.37 17.87 17.40 16.11 16.82 right 20 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, folded Lexan center layer, Kr 18.63 17.24 16.06 17.51 15.64 16.67 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

131

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 23 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/16" acrylic with gap at bottom only, Kr 9/22/06 9:42 18.28 18.07 17.38 17.66 16.79 17.27 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.34 17.70 16.83 17.57 16.28 16.98 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

132

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/20/05 18:05 18.33 16.96 17.89 17.27 16.04 16.71 right 19 double, 1 sputtered low-e glass layer, 3/8" gap, Kr 15.73 15.53 14.97 14.51 13.65 14.13 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average 2.59 2.60 1.43 2.92 21.54 20.61 21.08 20.85

133

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 5/4/05 21:29 18.57 17.93 17.92 17.66 16.52 17.13 right 18 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated glass center layer in traditional broken spacer, Kr 18.54 18.38 17.67 17.81 16.85 17.37 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

134

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 23 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/16" acrylic with gap at top only, Kr 6/28/06 23:48 18.39 17.74 17.53 17.48 16.45 17.00 right 22 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, 1/8" folded edge polycarbonate center layer, Kr 18.40 17.74 16.71 17.56 16.09 16.88 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

135

HiR Thermal Testing Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 position specimen # specimen description (test conditions: cold side -18°C, warm side 21°C) date + time 100 mm from head TC center of glass TC 100 mm from sill TC upper IR line average lower IR line average complete IR line average left 6 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer in grooved spacer (rebuilt), Kr 4/29/05 16:09 18.54 17.98 17.98 17.85 16.77 17.34 right 17 triple, 2 sputtered low-e glass layers, uncoated acrylic center layer with 1/16" perimeter gap, Kr 18.88 16.14 16.08 17.71 14.41 16.15 - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - - Back to Summary - delta T line average delta T 100mm from head delta T center of glass delta T 100mm from sill ambient high ambient low ambient average six surface average

136

New calibration method for high and low triaxiality and validation on SENT specimens of API X70  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The determination of the exact mechanical properties of material is essential for an optimal and safe design of linepipes. It is especially important for the prevention of over-engineering and the reliable assessment of complex accidental loading, such as extreme bending due to loss of buoyancy of support, or abrupt ground movement. Currently, the focus of research in offshore deepwater installations and linepipes is towards pre-cracked structures with high triaxiality stress states and complex loading histories. At the same time, low triaxiality stress states must be correctly studied in order to represent shear dominated failure in pipes. A comprehensive experimental and numerical program was undertaken to determine the mechanical properties of the traditional API X70 grade of steel. The material was characterized for anisotropic plasticity, fracture initiation and uncracked ductility for various states of stress. The same material was also used for pre-cracked fracture toughness assessment. The experimental program included flat and round specimens. The first type of tests on flat butterfly-shaped, central hole, notched and circular disk specimens; were selected to address the low stress triaxiality range. Tests on round notched bar specimens and SENT fracture mechanics tests extended the characterization and verification process to higher stress triaxiality values. This program covered a wide range of stress conditions and demonstrated their effect on the material resistance to crack extension. Each test conducted was numerically simulated using solid finite element models, matching the exact geometric and loading history features. The numerical simulation provided information on the local stress and strain fields around the location of the potential or existing cracks. Based on the above hybrid experimental/numerical technique tailored for pipe applications, the MMC fracture model was calibrated. The model relates the material ductility not only to stress triaxiality but also to the Lode parameter. The predictive capabilities of the MMC were then evaluated in the case of SENT testing, used extensively in the pipeline industry. It was shown that the present fracture model calibration can describe fracture behavior of SENT experiments.

Kirki Kofiani; Aida Nonn; Tomasz Wierzbicki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Non-destructive testing method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Non-destructive testing apparatus may comprise a photon source and a source material that emits positrons in response to bombardment of the source material with photons. The source material is positionable adjacent the photon source and a specimen so that when the source material is positioned adjacent the photon source it is exposed to photons produced thereby. When the source material is positioned adjacent the specimen, the specimen is exposed to at least some of the positrons emitted by the source material. A detector system positioned adjacent the specimen detects annihilation gamma rays emitted by the specimen. Another embodiment comprises a neutron source and a source material that emits positrons in response to neutron bombardment.

Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

138

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada, for Calendar Year 2007  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data collected during the annual post-closure site inspection conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area Surface Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 in May 2007. The annual post-closure site inspection included inspections of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 sites in accordance with the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the CAU 417 Closure Report (NNSA/NV 2001). The annual inspection conducted at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) indicated the site and soil cover were in good condition. No new cracks or fractures were observed in the soil cover during the annual inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover was observed during the last quarterly inspection in December 2006. This crack was filled with bentonite as part of the maintenance activities conducted in February 2007 and will be monitored during subsequent annual inspections. The vegetation on the soil cover was adequate but showing signs of the area's ongoing drought. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. New DOE Office of Legacy Management signs with updated emergency phone numbers were installed as part of this annual inspection, no issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The annual subsidence survey was conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C as part of the maintenance activities conducted in February 2007. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. A vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas was conducted as part of the annual inspection in May 2007. The vegetation survey indicated that revegetation continues to be successful, although stressed due to the area's prevailing drought conditions. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and to identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action to maintain a viable vegetation cover on the site. It is suggested that future vegetation surveys be conducted once every 2 years or as needed to help monitor the health of the vegetation.

None

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

SciTech Connect: Charpy impact test results on five materials...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Conference: Charpy impact test results on five materials and NIST verification specimens using instrumented 2-mm and 8-mm strikers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Charpy...

140

Insights Gained from Ultrasonic Testing of Piping Welds Subjected to the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in leak-before-break piping systems. Part of this involves determining whether inspections alone, or inspections plus mitigation, are needed. This work addresses the reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) of cracks that have been mitigated by the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). The MSIP has been approved by the NRC (NUREG-0313) since 1986 and modifies residual stresses remaining after welding with compressive, or neutral, stresses near the inner diameter surface of the pipe. This compressive stress is thought to arrest existing cracks and inhibit new crack formation. To evaluate the effectiveness of the MSIP and the reliability of ultrasonic inspections, flaws were evaluated both before and after MSIP application. An initial investigation was based on data acquired from cracked areas in 325-mm-diameter piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. In a follow-on exercise, PNNL acquired and evaluated similar UT data from a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) specimen containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks. The DMW specimen is a carbon steel nozzle-to-safe end-to-stainless steel pipe section that simulates a pressurizer surge nozzle. The flaws were implanted in the nozzle-to-safe end Alloy 82/182 butter region. Results are presented on the effects of MSIP on specimen surfaces, and on UT flaw responses.

Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Moran, Traci L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

DNA Synthetic Activity of Right and Left Ventricular Biopsy Specimens in Patients with Cardiomyopathy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This investigation was designed to evaluate the difference in DNA activity between biopsy specimens obtained from right and left ventricles. Nucleic DNA in the myocardial cells of hypertrophied and congestive ...

Y. Yabe; H. Abe; Y. Kashiwakura

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

RIS-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RISÃ?-M-2586 ELASTIC-PLASTIC FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSIS OF A CT-SPECIMEN - A TWO-DIMENSIONAL APPROACH Gunner C. Larsen Abstract. This report documents the results obtained from an elastic-plastic

143

Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen Altered for 25 Years  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. Nano-Continuum Modeling of aNano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen AlteredSignature on File) iv Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear

Steefel, Carl

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of Mechanical Systems for Automated Medical Slide Specimen Storage and Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and intriguing considering that improving medical systems can save the lives of patients. The Intelligent System and Automation Laboratory at the University of Kansas has created a prototype machine with the goal of making the process of medical slide specimen...

Wurtz, Joshua James

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

Investigation Of The Friction Factor Behavior for Flat Plate Tests Of Smooth And Roughened Surfaces With Supply Pressures Up To 84 Bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

friction factor data and measure dynamic pressure oscillations. A detailed description of the test facility is described, and a theory for determining the friction factor is reviewed. Three clearances were investigated: 0.635, 0.381, and 0.254 mm. Tests...

Kheireddin, Bassem A.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

146

A comparison of several surface finish measurement methods as applied to ground ceramic and metal surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Surface finish is one of the most common measures of surface quality of ground ceramics and metal parts and a wide variety of methods and parameters have been developed to measure it. The purpose of this investigation was to compare the surface roughness parameters obtained on the same two specimens from three different types of measuring instruments: a traditional mechanical stylus system, a non-contact laser scanning system, and the atomic force microscope (two different AFM systems were compared). The same surface-ground silicon nitride and Inconel 625 alloy specimens were used for all measurements in this investigation. Significant differences in arithmetic average roughness, root-mean-square roughness, and peak-to-valley roughness were obtained when comparing data from the various topography measuring instruments. Non-contact methods agreed better with the others on the metal specimen than on the ceramic specimen. Reasons for these differences include the effective dimensions and geometry of the probe with respect to the surface topography; the reflectivity of the surface, and the type of filtering scheme Results of this investigation emphasize the importance of rigorously specifying the manner of surface roughness measurement when either reporting roughness data or when requesting that roughness data be provided.

Blau, P.J.; Martin, R.L.; Riester, L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Determination of the profile of the surface of a test object during automated nondestructive ultrasonic testing in the immersion mode and reconstruction of flaw images using the SAFT method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The problem of using an elastic organosilicon polymer (“aquapolymer”) as an immersion medium for providing a stable acoustic contact between a test object and a piezoprobe in the process of automated ultrasonic t...

E. G. Bazulin; N. V. Rukhailo

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

An unstructured C-grid based method for 3-D global ocean dynamics: Free-surface formulations and tidal test cases  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and tidal test cases G.R. Stuhne *, W.R. Peltier Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George rights reserved. 1. Introduction In a previous paper (Stuhne and Peltier, 2006, hereafter SP), we

Peltier, W. Richard

149

A stochastic Monte Carlo computer simulation of the drop-weight test for the determination of nil-ductility transition temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the surface of the specimen blank can produce heat affected zones that are tougher than the base metal, which could lead to artificially low predictions of NDIT [17[. In such m O zS O e O 0 LU 4 CR ki ?E O Z -I of 0 tiE I- O z 1 V gm 0) c e H N... aside, the manner in which test temperatures are chosen may contribute most to the variance and bias inherent in the drO-wweigh test method (ASTM E 208) for determining the nil-ductility transition temperature, NDTI; for ferritic steels...

Lambert, Michael Andrew

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with bentonite during the first quarter of 2006 and monitored during subsequent inspections. The cover vegetation was healthy and well established. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The inspections at UC-3 indicated that the sites are in excellent condition. All monuments and signs showed no displacement, damage, or removal. A small erosion gully from spring rain runoff was observed during the June inspection, but it did not grow to an actionable level during 2005. No other issues or concerns were identified. Inspections performed at UC-4 Mud Pit C cover revealed that erosion rills were formed during March and September exposing the geosynthetic clay liner. Both erosion rills were repaired within 90 days of reporting. Sparse vegetation is present on the cover. The overall condition of the monuments, fence, and gate are in good condition. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other four UC-4 locations. Subsidence surveys were conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in March and September of 2005. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. The June vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas indicated that the revegetation has been very successful. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action in order to maintain a viable vegetative cover on the site. Vegetation surveys should be conducted only as required. Precipitation during 2005 was above average, with an annual rainfall total of 21.79 centimeters (8.58 inches). Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 CMP cover is performing as designed, with evapotranspiration effectively removing water from the cover. It is recommended to continue quarterly site inspections and the collection of soil moisture data for the UC-1 CMP cove

NONE

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Advanced Duct Sealing Testing  

SciTech Connect

Duct leakage has been identified as a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have typically shown that these seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been testing sealant durability for several years. Typical duct tape (i.e. fabric backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) was found to fail more rapidly than all other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing of five UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (three cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The first test involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars, and sheet metal ''collar-to-plenum joints'' pressurized with 200 F (93 C) air. The second test consisted of baking duct tape specimens in a constant 212 F (100 C) oven following the UL 181B-FX ''Temperature Test'' requirements. Additional tests were also performed on only two tapes using sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints. Since an unsealed flexible duct joint can have a variable leakage depending on the positioning of the flexible duct core, the durability of the flexible duct joints could not be based on the 10% of unsealed leakage criteria. Nevertheless, the leakage of the sealed specimens prior to testing could be considered as a basis for a failure criteria. Visual inspection was also documented throughout the tests. The flexible duct core-to-collar joints were inspected monthly, while the sheet metal collar-to-plenum joints were inspected weekly. The baking test specimens were visually inspected weekly, and the durability was judged by the observed deterioration in terms of brittleness, cracking, flaking and blistering (the terminology used in the UL 181B-FX test procedure).

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

In-Situ Creep Testing Capability for the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

An instrumented creep testing capability is being developed for specimens irradiated in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) coolant conditions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The test rig has been developed such that samples will be subjected to stresses ranging from 92 to 350 MPa at temperatures between 290 and 370 °C up to at least 2 dpa (displacement per atom). The status of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) efforts to develop the test rig in-situ creep testing capability for the ATR is described. In addition to providing an overview of in-pile creep test capabilities available at other test reactors, this paper reports efforts by INL to evaluate a prototype test rig in an autoclave at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). Initial data from autoclave tests with 304 stainless steel (304 SS) specimens are reported.

B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Process for measuring low cadmium levels in blood and other biological specimens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for measuring low levels of cadmium in blood and other biological specimens is provided without interference from high levels of alkali metal contaminants by forming an aqueous solution and without contamination by environmental cadmium absent the proteins from the specimen, selectively removing cadmium from the aqueous solution on an anion exchange resin, thereby removing the alkali metal contaminants, resolubilizing cadmium from the resin to form a second solution and analyzing the second solution for cadmium, the process being carried out in a cadmium-free environment.

Peterson, David P. (Orland Park, IL); Huff, Edmund A. (Lemont, IL); Bhattacharyya, Maryka H. (Naperville, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Revision 0)  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484 Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) activities called for the identification and remediation of surface hot spot depleted uranium (DU) with some excavation to determine the vertical extent of contamination (NNSA/NSO, 2004). During the CAU 484 SAFER investigation (conducted November 2003 through August 2007), approximately 50 locations containing DU were identified on Antelope Lake. All but four locations (CA-1, SA-5-9, SA-12-15, and SA-4) were remediated. Figure 1-1 shows locations of the four use restriction (UR) sites. The four locations were determined to have failed the SAFER conceptual site model assumption of a small volume hot spot. Two of the locations (CA-1 and SA-5-9) were excavated to depths of 3.5 to 7 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), and a third location (SA-12-15) with a footprint of 30 by 60 ft was excavated to a depth of 0.5 ft. At the fourth site (SA-4), the discovery of unexploded ordnance (UXO) halted the excavation due to potential safety concerns. Remediation activities on Antelope Lake resulted in the removal of approximately 246 cubic yards (yd3) of DU-impacted soil from the four UR sites; however, Kiwi surveys confirmed that residual DU contamination remained at each of the four sites. (The Kiwi was a Remote Sensing Laboratory [RSL] vehicle equipped with a data-acquisition system and four sodium iodide gamma detectors. Surveys were conducted with the vehicle moving at a rate of approximately 10 miles per hour with the gamma detectors positioned 14 to 28 inches [in.] above the ground surface [NNSA/NSO, 2004]).

Mark Burmeister

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Plasma sprayed coatings as surface treatments of aluminum adherends  

SciTech Connect

Plasma sprayed coatings have been evaluated as surface treatments for aluminum substrates being prepared for adhesive bonding. Blends of an aluminum-silicon alloy and polyester give the best performance. To establish durability performance, wedge tests were done using four common epoxy adhesives without primers. In all cases, the 60%Al-Si/40%polyester coating gave results superior to those of FPL-etched specimens and, in some cases, performance equivalent to PAA specimens. This roughness provides excellent opportunity for mechanical interlocking or physical bonding and allows a complex interphase to be formed as the adhesive penetrates into the coating. Crack growth measurements and subsequent failure analysis using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that crack propagation occurs within this complex interphase. The results also show that the aluminum and polyester components are synergistic and blends of the two give better performance than either component by itself The aluminum gives strength to the coating while the polyester provides toughness and improves moisture resistance.

Davis, G.D.; Whisnant, P.L.; Groff, G.B.; Shaffer, D.K. [Lockheed Martin, Baltimore, MD (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

156

A proposed benchmark for simulation in radiographic testing  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this benchmark study is to compare simulation results predicted by various models of radiographic testing, in particular those that are capable of separately predicting primary and scatter radiation for specimens of arbitrary geometry.

Jaenisch, G.-R.; Deresch, A.; Bellon, C. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Schumm, A.; Guerin, P. [EDF R and D, 1 avenue du Général de Gaulle, 92141 Clamart (France)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

157

Testing the Influence of Surface Tension and Finite Width of QGP Bags on the QCD Matter EOS Properties at NICA Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Here I give some strong arguments that the central issues for theoretical studies of the (tri)critical endpoint of the QCD phase diagram are the surface tension of large/heavy QGP bags and their medium dependent width. Then I discuss three major directions to further develop the realistic exactly solvable statistical models which simultaneously are able to describe the 1-st order deconfinement phase transition, the 2-nd order one and the cross-over. Also I analyze the most necessary projects that have to be studied in order to formulate the reliable and convincing signals of the mixed phase formation at NICA energies.

Kyrill A. Bugaev

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

158

A shallow subsurface controlled release facility in Bozeman, Montana, USA, for testing near surface CO2 detection techniques and transport models  

SciTech Connect

A facility has been constructed to perform controlled shallow releases of CO2 at flow rates that challenge near surface detection techniques and can be scalable to desired retention rates of large scale CO2 storage projects. Preinjection measurements were made to determine background conditions and characterize natural variability at the site. Modeling of CO2 transport and concentration in saturated soil and the vadose zone was also performed to inform decisions about CO2 release rates and sampling strategies. Four releases of CO2 were carried out over the summer field seasons of 2007 and 2008. Transport of CO2 through soil, water, plants, and air was studied using near surface detection techniques. Soil CO2 flux, soil gas concentration, total carbon in soil, water chemistry, plant health, net CO2 flux, atmospheric CO2 concentration, movement of tracers, and stable isotope ratios were among the quantities measured. Even at relatively low fluxes, most techniques were able to detect elevated levels of CO2 in the soil, atmosphere, or water. Plant stress induced by CO2 was detectable above natural seasonal variations.

Spangler, Lee H.; Dobeck, Laura M.; Repasky, Kevin S.; Nehrir, Amin R.; Humphries, Seth D.; Barr, Jamie L.; Keith, Charlie J.; Shaw, Joseph A.; Rouse, Joshua H.; Cunningham, Alfred B.; Benson, Sally M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Wells, Arthur W.; Diehl, J. R.; Strazisar, Brian; Fessenden, Julianna; Rahn, Thom A.; Amonette, James E.; Barr, Jonathan L.; Pickles, William L.; Jacobson, James D.; Silver, Eli A.; Male, Erin J.; Rauch, Henry W.; Gullickson, Kadie; Trautz, Robert; Kharaka, Yousif; Birkholzer, Jens; Wielopolski, Lucien

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Observations of unstained biological specimens using a low-energy, high-resolution STEM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......film, such as a thin slice on a micro-grid. In the present study, we observed...about 30-40 nm was skimmed on a micro-grid. We observed the specimen with...of this sample was dropped on a micro-grid on ice and the glycerol was decomposed......

Akio Takaoka; Toshiaki Hasegawa

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

James C. Parks Herbarium specimen collection of Solanaceae, deadly nightshade family  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important plants, the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and for that reason is sometimes known as the Potato family. Both potatoes and tomatoes (Solanum lycopersicum L.) are found in the nightshade genus and have is unknown, but it is common in fields, roadsides and waste areas (Rhoades & Block). The two specimens found

Hardy, Christopher R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

XPS analysis of 440C steel surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyethers under sliding conditions in high vacuum  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the results of the X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of AISI 440C ball surfaces lubricated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE) oils after friction experiments under sliding conditions at high load in air and vacuum environments. The PFPE lubricants tested were Demnum S100, Fomblin Z-25, and Krytox 143AB. It was found that all the PFPE lubricants were degraded by sliding contact causing the formation of inorganic fluorides on the metallic surfaces and a layer of organic decomposition products. KRYTOX 143AB was the least reactive of the three lubricants tested. It was also found that metal fluoride formed at off-scar areas. This suggests the formation of reactive species, such as COF2 or R[sub f]COF, during sliding experiments, which can diffuse through the lubricant film and react with the metallic surfaces away from the contact region. Comparison of reference specimens before sliding with those that had undergone the sliding tests showed that the amount of non-degraded PFPE remaining on the surface of the balls after the sliding experiments was greater than that of the balls without sliding.

Herrera-Fierro, P.; Masuko, M.; Jones, W.R. Jr.; Pepper, S.V.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

A technical note on performance testing of a solar box cooker provided with sensible storage material on the surface of absorbing plate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A box type solar cooker having a double glass cover and a plane mirror reflector has been tested for its thermal performance. In the present study, performance of solar box cooker has been compared by using two different sensible heat storage materials (sand and granular carbon). By using these materials as a mixture and spread it over absorber tray in the form of thin layer and fully packed with a float glass shows the significant improvement in the performance of box type solar cooker.

Abhishek Saxena; Varun; Ghanshyam Srivastava

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Design of a non-contact vibration measurement and analysis system for electronic board testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional vibration measurement methods involve placing accelerometers at discrete locations on a test object. In cases where the test specimen is small in mass, the addition of these measurement transducers can alter ...

Arn, Krissa Elizabeth, 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Office of Evaluation and Testing General Testing Rules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Evaluation and Testing General Testing Rules Identification: You must present to the test center or your scores may be withheld or canceled if you can't present acceptable ID on the testing surface and must be placed in an area designated by the testing staff. Electronic Devices: Cell

Brinkmann, Peter

165

Methods for reduced platen compression (RPC) test specimen cutting locations using micro-CT and planar radiographs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to complete an RPC analysis and improving the quality of the obtained results. High-resolution micro-CT scans are used to gain a better understanding of rat long bone anatomy by quantifying the location, shape, and orientation of the growth plate, primary...

Lemmon, Heber

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

Surface sampling concentration and reaction probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of analyzing a chemical composition of a specimen is described. The method can include providing a probe comprising an outer capillary tube and an inner capillary tube disposed co-axially within the outer capillary tube, where the inner and outer capillary tubes define a solvent capillary and a sampling capillary in fluid communication with one another at a distal end of the probe; contacting a target site on a surface of a specimen with a solvent in fluid communication with the probe; maintaining a plug volume proximate a solvent-specimen interface, wherein the plug volume is in fluid communication with the probe; draining plug sampling fluid from the plug volume through the sampling capillary; and analyzing a chemical composition of the plug sampling fluid with an analytical instrument. A system for performing the method is also described.

Van Berkel, Gary J; Elnaggar, Mariam S

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

Surface modification of several dental substrates by non-thermal, atmospheric plasma brush  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective The purpose of this study was to reveal the effectiveness of non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush in surface wettability and modification of four dental substrates. Methods Specimens of dental substrates including dentin, enamel, and two composites Filtek Z250, Filtek LS Silorane were prepared (?2 mm thick, ?10 mm diameter). The prepared surfaces were treated for 5–45 s with a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 36 to 38 °C. The plasma-treatment effects on these surfaces were studied with contact-angle measurement, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush was very efficient in improving the surface hydrophilicity of four substrates studied. The results indicated that water contact angle values decreased considerably after only 5 s plasma treatment of all these substrates. After 30 s treatment, the values were further reduced to plasma treatment. SEM surface images indicated that no significant morphology change was induced on these dental substrates after exposure to plasmas. Significance Without affecting the bulk properties, a super-hydrophilic surface could be easily achieved by the plasma brush treatment regardless of original hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of dental substrates tested.

Mingsheng Chen; Ying Zhang; M. Sky Driver; Anthony N. Caruso; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Ecosystem feedbacks to climate change in California: Development, testing, and analysis using a coupled regional atmosphere and land-surface model (WRF3-CLM3.5)  

SciTech Connect

A regional atmosphere model [Weather Research and Forecasting model version 3 (WRF3)] and a land surface model [Community Land Model, version 3.5 (CLM3.5)] were coupled to study the interactions between the atmosphere and possible future California land-cover changes. The impact was evaluated on California's climate of changes in natural vegetation under climate change and of intentional afforestation. The ability of WRF3 to simulate California's climate was assessed by comparing simulations by WRF3-CLM3.5 and WRF3-Noah to observations from 1982 to 1991. Using WRF3-CLM3.5, the authors performed six 13-yr experiments using historical and future large-scale climate boundary conditions from the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Climate Model version 2.1 (GFDL CM2.1). The land-cover scenarios included historical and future natural vegetation from the Mapped Atmosphere-Plant-Soil System-Century 1 (MC1) dynamic vegetation model, in addition to a future 8-million-ha California afforestation scenario. Natural vegetation changes alone caused summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature changes of -0.7 to +1 C in regions without persistent snow cover, depending on the location and the type of vegetation change. Vegetation temperature changes were much larger than the 2-m air temperature changes because of the finescale spatial heterogeneity of the imposed vegetation change. Up to 30% of the magnitude of the summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature increase and 70% of the magnitude of the 1600 local time (LT) vegetation temperature increase projected under future climate change were attributable to the climate-driven shift in land cover. The authors projected that afforestation could cause local 0.2-1.2 C reductions in summer daily-mean 2-m air temperature and 2.0-3.7 C reductions in 1600 LT vegetation temperature for snow-free regions, primarily because of increased evapotranspiration. Because some of these temperature changes are of comparable magnitude to those projected under climate change this century, projections of climate and vegetation change in this region need to consider these climate-vegetation interactions.

Subin, Z.M.; Riley, W.J.; Kueppers, L.M.; Jin, J.; Christianson, D.S.; Torn, M.S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Nano-Continuum Modeling of a Nuclear Glass Specimen Altered for 25 Years  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this contribution is to report on preliminary nano-continuum scale modeling of nuclear waste glass corrosion. The focus of the modeling is an experiment involving a French glass SON68 specimen leached for 25 years in a granitic environment. In this report, we focus on capturing the nano-scale concentration profiles. We use a high resolution continuum model with a constant grid spacing of 1 nanometer to investigate the glass corrosion mechanisms.

Steefel, Carl

2014-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

170

Specimen Chamber Geometry?A Possible Source of Error in Quantitative X-Ray Microanalysis in STEM  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......used both the normal specimen holder and the specimen holder for EDX. X-ray microanalysis was carried out using a PGT 1000 XCEL microanalysis system (Princeton Gamma Tech, Princeton, U.S.A.). Sections through organic element standards which were......

Monika GROTE; Hans Georg FROMME

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Identification of Friction Parameters from the Inverse Analysis of a Direct Extrusion Test  

SciTech Connect

This work proposes to use a special upsetting test and an optimal direct extrusion one performed to identify the constitutive equation of the material behavior and the friction coefficients directly from the load-stroke curves. The proposed friction test has the advantage to permit to take into account contact phenomena corresponding to new specimen surfaces created during a real bulk cold forming process. A lot of numerical simulations are made with the commercial software FORGE2 in order to study the influence of some design and process parameters. Different friction laws will be identified starting from the classical Coulomb and Tresca ones. All the parameter identifications are made using the Inverse Analysis principle.

Adinel, Gavrus; Thien, Pham Duc [LGCGM Laboratory, EA 3913, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France); Henri, Francillette [SCR/CM, UMR 6226, INSA de RENNES, UEB, CS70839, F-35708, Rennes-Cedex 7 (France)

2011-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

172

Status of Stellite 6 friction testing  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, have been investigating the performance of motor-operated valves subjected to design basis flow and pressure loads. Part of this research addresses the friction that occurs at the interface between the valve disc and the valve body seats during operation of a gate valve. In most gate valves, these surfaces are hardfaced with Stellite 6, a cobalt-based alloy. Analytical methods exist for predicting the thrust needed to operate these valves at specific pressure conditions. To produce accurate valve thrust predictions, the analyst must have a reasonably accurate, though conservative, estimate of the coefficient of friction at the disc-to-seat interface. One of the questions that remains to be answered is whether, and to what extent, aging of the disc and seat surfaces effects the disc-to-seat coefficient of friction. Specifically, does the environment in a nuclear plants piping system cause the accumulation of an oxide film on these surfaces that increases the coefficient of friction; and if so, how great is the increase? This paper presents results of specimen tests addressing this issue, with emphasis on the following: (1) the characteristics and thickness of the oxide film that develops on Stellite 6 as it ages; (2) the change in the friction coefficient of Stellite 6 as it ages, including the question of whether the friction coefficient eventually reaches a plateau; and (3) the effect in-service cycling has on the characteristics and thickness of the oxide film and on the friction coefficient.

Watkins, J.C.; DeWall, K.G. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Weidenhamer, G.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission (United States)

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Measuring the Fracture Toughness of TZM and ODS Molybdenum Alloys Using Standard and Sub-Sized Bend Specimens  

SciTech Connect

Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) and TZM molybdenum have excellent creep resistance and strength at high temperatures in inert atmospheres. Fracture toughness and tensile testing was performed at temperatures between -150 degrees C and 450 degrees C to characterize 6.35 mm thick plate material of ODS and TZM molybdenum. A transition from low fracture toughness values (5.8 to 29.6 MPa square root m) to values greater than 30 MPa square root m is observed for TZM molybdenum in the longitudinal orientation at 100 degrees C and in the transverse orientation at 150 degrees C. These results are consistent with data reported in literature for molybdenum. A transition to low fracture toughness values (less than 30 MPa square root m) was not observed for longitudinal ODS molybdenum at temperatures greater than or equal to -150 degrees C, while a transition to low fracture toughness values (12.6 to 25.4 MPa square root m) was observed for the transverse orientation at room-temperature. The fi ne spacing of La-oxide precipitates that are present in ODS molybdenum result in a transition temperature that is significantly lower than any molybdenum alloy reported to date, with upper bound fracture toughness values that bound the literature data. A comparison of fracture toughness values obtained using a 1T, 0.5T, and 0.25T Charpy shows that a 0.5T Charpy could be used as a sub-sized specimen geometry.

Cockeram, B. V.

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Accelerated Wear Tests on Common Floor-covering Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials indicated there are variations in the changes of appearance and wear in these materials. Solid sheet vinyls and rubber tiles showed significantly less wear than asphalt tiles, vinyl- asbestos tiles, linoleums and cork. Asphalt tiles showed... in home installations. Six common floor covering materials-solid .sheet vinyls, rubber tiles, vinyl-asbestos tiles, J linoleums, corks and asphalt tiles-were used to construct 63 test specimens 2 x 2 feet in size. 1 T'ariations in specimens were...

Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Effect of coating time on corrosion behavior of electroless nickel-phosphorus coated powder metallurgy iron specimens  

SciTech Connect

Powder metallurgy iron specimens with porosities in the range 0% to 2% were electroless coated with nickel-phosphorus alloy from baths containing sodium hypophosphite (NaH{sub 2}PO{sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O). The effect of coating time on thickness and phosphorus content of the deposit was analyzed. The free corrosion potentials and corrosion rates of the coated specimens were obtained by the Tafel extrapolation method in 1.0 M hydrochloric acid (HCl) solution. Corrosion rates of the coated specimens after heat treatment also were studied. The observed corrosion characteristics were explained by the mixed-potential theory.

Singh, D.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Dube, R.K. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Kanpur (India). Dept. of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Surface premelting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The most important results obtained in the theory of surface premelting of crystals are briefly discussed on the basis of the vibration-positional model, the quasiliquid layer model, the surface roughness model, and in the case of ice, the model of the oriented dipoles at the surface. A review of the existing experimental results on surface premelting is presented, these results being obtained by investigating the crystal morphology, the polar diagram of the specific surface energy, the surface self-diffusion, the thermal emissivity, as well as upon application of LEED, NMR, Rutherford backscattering at proton channeling and ellipsometry. The agreement between theoretical and experimental data is discussed.

D. Nenow

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

A system for combined three-dimensional morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue specimens  

SciTech Connect

We present a new system for simultaneous morphological and molecular analysis of thick tissue samples. The system is composed of a computer assisted microscope and a JAVA-based image display, analysis and visualization program that allows acquisition, annotation, meaningful storage, three-dimensional reconstruction and analysis of structures of interest in thick sectioned tissue specimens. We describe the system in detail and illustrate its use by imaging, reconstructing and analyzing two complete tissue blocks which were differently processed and stained. One block was obtained from a ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lumpectomy specimen and stained alternatively with Hematoxilyn and Eosin (H&E), and with a counterstain and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to the ERB-B2 gene. The second block contained a fully sectioned mammary gland of a mouse, stained for Histology with H&E. We show how the system greatly reduces the amount of interaction required for the acquisition and analysis and is therefore suitable for studies that require morphologically driven, wide scale (e.g., whole gland) analysis of complex tissue samples or cultures.

Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Jones, Arthur; Garcia-Rodriguez, Enrique; Yuan Chen, Ping; Idica, Adam; Lockett, Stephen J.; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos

2002-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

178

cDNA Microarray Analysis of Serially Sampled Cervical Cancer Specimens From Patients Treated With Thermochemoradiotherapy  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To elucidate changes in gene expression after treatment with regional thermochemoradiotherapy in locally advanced squamous cell cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Tru-Cut biopsy specimens were serially collected from 16 patients. Microarray gene expression levels before and 24 h after the first and second trimodality treatment sessions were compared. Pathway and network analyses were conducted by use of Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA; Ingenuity Systems, Redwood City, CA). Single gene expressions were analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Results: We detected 53 annotated genes that were differentially expressed after trimodality treatment. Central in the three top networks detected by IPA were interferon alfa, interferon beta, and interferon gamma receptor; nuclear factor kappaB; and tumor necrosis factor, respectively. These genes encode proteins that are important in regulation cell signaling, proliferation, gene expression, and immune stimulation. Biological processes over-represented among the 53 genes were fibrosis, tumorigenesis, and immune response. Conclusions: Microarrays showed minor changes in gene expression after thermochemoradiotherapy in locally advanced cervical cancer. We detected 53 differentially expressed genes, mainly involved in fibrosis, tumorigenesis, and immune response. A limitation with the use of serial biopsy specimens was low quality of ribonucleic acid from tumors that respond to highly effective therapy. Another 'key limitation' is timing of the post-treatment biopsy, because 24 h may be too late to adequately assess the impact of hyperthermia on gene expression.

Borkamo, Erling Dahl, E-mail: borkamo@gmail.co [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Schem, Baard-Christian [Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Fluge, Oystein; Bruland, Ove [Center for Medical Genetics and Molecular Medicine, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway); Dahl, Olav; Mella, Olav [Section of Oncology, Institute of Medicine, University of Bergen, Bergen (Norway); Department of Oncology and Medical Physics, Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen (Norway)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Assessing Diet and Seasonality in the Lower Pecos Canyonlands: An Evaluation of Coprolite Specimens as Records of Individual Dietary Decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents an evaluation of coprolite specimens from the Lower Pecos canyonlands as records of individual dietary decisions. Prior studies of coprolites from this region have greatly expanded our knowledge of Archaic subsistence...

Riley, Timothy

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

180

Material test machine for tension-compression tests at high temperature  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus providing a device for testing the properties of material specimens at high temperatures and pressures in controlled water chemistries includes, inter alia, an autoclave housing the specimen which is being tested. The specimen is connected to a pull rod which couples out of the autoclave to an external assembly which includes one or more transducers, a force balance chamber and a piston type actuator. The pull rod feeds through the force balance chamber and is compensated thereby for the pressure conditions existing within the autoclave and tending to eject the pull rod therefrom. The upper end of the push rod is connected to the actuator through elements containing a transducer comprising a linear variable differential transformer (LVDT). The housing and coil assembly of the LVDT is coupled to a tube which runs through a central bore of the pull rod into the autoclave where it is connected to one side of the specimen. The movable core of the LVDT is coupled to a stem which runs through the tube where it is then connected to the other side of the specimen through a coupling member. A transducer in the form of a load cell including one or more strain gages is located on a necked-down portion of the upper part of the pull rod intermediate the LVDT and force balance chamber.

Cioletti, Olisse C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Field Notes and Specimen Catalog, Numbers 56-877 (1933-1934)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A l l specimens l i s t e d h e r e i n , unless otherwise s t a t e d , are i n the c o l l e c t i o n 9 LIBRARY BINDING COMPANY P.O. BOX 7217 WACO. 1,K.\\AS 76710, ? ? - -Name of ]) e p-t. PWSf 'P AMU Library Ooile^e Station, 77843... ? Bind a| j$ h missing issues or missing pages ? BINDERY COPY LOT NO: CRM Write 6*i type tfffe, volume, months, page nos., year call nos., imprint in the exact order to be stamped on the spine. Fi e l d Notod and Catalog Davis Numbers 56...

Davis, William B.

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

182

Effects of testing and storage environments on mechanical properties of Ni-plated and bare U-3/4 wt% Ti  

SciTech Connect

It was found that storage environments with an adequate supply of oxygen can effectively minimize moisture corrosion of bare U-3/4 Ti. In particular, 0.75 cm/sup 3/ of dry air is calculated to protect 1 cm/sup 2/ of U-3/4 Ti for 20 years storage at room temperature. Consideration of the geometric details of U-3/4 Ti alloy specimens and the free volumes of air (and hence O/sub 2/) available can satisfactorily explain discrepancies in corrosion behavior between recent tests and previously reported data. The storage environment at 70/sup 0/C produces a minor strength increase in bare samples with increasing time. Decreases in ductility are observed for testing conditions of low temperature, low strain rate, and/or high humidity. Surface cracks occur under the same conditions conducive to corrosion, i.e., moderate temperatures, low strain rates, and high humidity. Significant increases in strength result under low-temperature and high-strain-rate conditions of tensile testing. Residual chloride contamination may be responsible for the occasional and otherwise unexplained large scatter in ductility for nominally similar specimens and test conditions. Nickel plating is observed to cause a statistically significant decrease in tensile strength, but no effect on the yield strength or ductility was observed and the presence of high explosive during the aging of tensile bars was observed to have no effect on mechanical properties.

Zehr, S.W.; Johnson, H.R.; Smugeresky, J.E.; Pashman, K.A.; Nagelberg, A.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Agreement between Self- and Clinician-Collected Specimen Results for Detection and Typing of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Specimens from Women in Gugulethu, South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...still fair, with the Digene Hybrid Capture 2 test (HC2), with...significant clinical and laboratory infrastructure, trained cytologists or pathologists...of Cape Town with the Digene Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) High-Risk...Shah, et al. 1999. Use of a hybrid capture assay of self-collected...

Heidi E. Jones; Bruce R. Allan; Janneke H. H. M. van de Wijgert; Lydia Altini; Sylvia M. Taylor; Alana de Kock; Nicol Coetzee; Anna-Lise Williamson

2007-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

184

Surface Decontamination of System Components in Uranium Conversion Plant at KAERI  

SciTech Connect

A chemical decontamination process using nitric acid solution was selected as in-situ technology for recycle or release with authorization of a large amount of metallic waste including process system components such as tanks, piping, etc., which is generated by dismantling a retired uranium conversion plant at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The applicability of nitric acid solution for surface decontamination of metallic wastes contaminated with uranium compounds was evaluated through the basic research on the dissolution of UO2 and ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) powder. Decontamination performance was verified by using the specimens contaminated with such uranium compounds as UO2 and AUC taken from the uranium conversion plant. Dissolution rate of UO2 powder is notably enhanced by the addition of H2O2 as an oxidant even in the condition of a low concentration of nitric acid and low temperature compared with those in a nitric acid solution without H2O2. AUC powders dissolve easily in nitric acid solutions until the solution pH attains about 2.5 {approx} 3. Above that solution pH, however, the uranium concentration in the solution is lowered drastically by precipitation as a form of U3(NH3)4O9 . 5H2O. Decontamination performance tests for the specimens contaminated with UO2 and AUC were quite successful with the application of decontamination conditions obtained through the basic studies on the dissolution of UO2 and AUC powders.

Choi, W. K.; Kim, K. N.; Won, H. J.; Jung, C. H.; Oh, W. Z.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

185

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

186

Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/?-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/?-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/?-TCP scaffolds.

Yu-Ri Choi; Jae-Sung Kwon; Doo-Hoon Song; Eun Ha Choi; Yong-Keun Lee; Kyoung-Nam Kim; Kwang-Mahn Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Stellite 6 Friction Changes Due to Aging and In-Service Testing  

SciTech Connect

For the past several years, researchers at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, have been investigating the ability of motor-operated valves to close or open when subjected to design basis flow and pressure loads. Part of this research addresses the friction that occurs at the interface between the valve disc and the valve body seats during operation of a gate valve. In most gate valves, these surfaces are hardfaced with Stellite 6, a cobalt-based alloy. The nuclear industry has developed methods to analytically predict the thrust needed to operate these valves at specific pressure conditions. To produce accurate valve thrust predictions; the analyst must have a reasonably accurate, though conservative, estimate of the coefficient of friction at the disc-to-seat interface. One of the questions that remains to be answered is whether, and to what extent, aging of the disc and seat surfaces affects the disc-to-seat coefficient of friction. Specifically, does the accumulation of a surface film due to aging of these surfaces increase the coefficient of friction and if so, how much? This paper presents results of specimen tests addressing this issue with emphasis on the following: • The change in the friction coefficient of Stellite 6 as it ages and whether the friction reaches a plateau. • The effect periodic gate valve cycling due to in-service testing has on the friction coefficient. • The results of an independent review of the test methods, processes, and the results of the research to date. • The status of ongoing aging and friction testing.

Watkins, John Clifford; DeWall, Kevin George

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Corrosion testing using isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested is described composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness. 3 figs.

Hohorst, F.A.

1995-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Corrosion testing using isotopes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for determining the corrosion behavior of a material with respect to a medium in contact with the material by: implanting a substantially chemically inert gas in a matrix so that corrosion experienced by the material causes the inert gas to enter the medium; placing the medium in contact with the material; and measuring the amount of inert gas which enters the medium. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a body of the material, which body has a surface to be contacted by the medium; and a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the body to a depth below the surface. A test sample of a material whose resistance to corrosion by a medium is to be tested, composed of: a substrate of material which is easily corroded by the medium, the substrate having a surface; a substantially chemically inert gas implanted into the substrate; and a sheet of the material whose resistance to corrosion is to be tested, the sheet being disposed against the surface of the substrate and having a defined thickness.

Hohorst, Frederick A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

190

Standard Test Method for Measurement of Hydrogen Embrittlement Threshold in Steel by the Incremental Step Loading Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method establishes a procedure to measure the susceptibility of steel to a time-delayed failure such as that caused by hydrogen. It does so by measuring the threshold for the onset of subcritical crack growth using standard fracture mechanics specimens, irregular-shaped specimens such as notched round bars, or actual product such as fasteners (2) (threaded or unthreaded) springs or components as identified in SAE J78, J81, and J1237. 1.2 This test method is used to evaluate quantitatively: 1.2.1 The relative susceptibility of steels of different composition or a steel with different heat treatments; 1.2.2 The effect of residual hydrogen in the steel as a result of processing, such as melting, thermal mechanical working, surface treatments, coatings, and electroplating; 1.2.3 The effect of hydrogen introduced into the steel caused by external environmental sources of hydrogen, such as fluids and cleaners maintenance chemicals, petrochemical products, and galvanic coupling in an aqueous enviro...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Automated Flaw Detection Scheme For Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Specimens Using Hilbert Huang Transform Of Ultrasonic Phased Array Data  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is to develop processing algorithms to detect and localize the flaws using NDE ultrasonic data. Data was collected using cast austenitic stainless steel (CASS) weld specimens on-loan from the U.S. nuclear power industry’s Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) specimen set. Each specimen consists of a centrifugally cast stainless steel (CCSS) pipe section welded to a statically cast (SCSS) or wrought (WRSS) section. The paper presents a novel automated flaw detection and localization scheme using low frequency ultrasonic phased array inspection signals in the weld and heat affected zone of the base materials. The major steps of the overall scheme are preprocessing and region of interest (ROI) detection followed by the Hilbert Huang transform (HHT) of A-scans in the detected ROIs. HHT offers time-frequency-energy distribution for each ROI. The accumulation of energy in a particular frequency band is used as a classification feature for the particular ROI.

Khan, T.; Majumdar, Shantanu; Udpa, L.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Anderson, Michael T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Simulation of hardened layer formation at micro-arc oxidation of aluminum specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, some model representations on a process of hardened surface layer formation are presented; they were developed on the basis of the analysis of physical processes that occur in the course of micro-arc

N. Yu. Dudareva

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Linseed Oil-Based Concrete Surface Treatment -for Building and Highway Structures in Hong Kong Y using jour Canadian linseed oil- based sealants on concrete specimens madejrom G30120 and G45120 Keywords: Unseed Oil, Concrete Surface Treatment, Salt Spray Resistance, Carbonation, Bond Strength, Ultra

194

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials July 20, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects the mechanical properties of copper. By using a specialized in situ mechanical testing device in a transmission electron microscope at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, the team could examine — with nanoscale resolution — the localized nature of this deformation. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects

195

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials Researchers Devise New Stress Test for Irradiated Materials July 20, 2011 - 3:58pm Addthis Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects the mechanical properties of copper. By using a specialized in situ mechanical testing device in a transmission electron microscope at the National Center for Electron Microscopy, the team could examine — with nanoscale resolution — the localized nature of this deformation. | Courtesy of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Scientists conducted compression tests of copper specimens irradiated with high-energy protons, designed to model how damage from radiation affects

196

Programmable surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Robotic vehicles walk on legs, roll on wheels, are pulled by tracks, pushed by propellers, lifted by wings, and steered by rudders. All of these systems share the common character of momentum transport across their surfaces. ...

Sun, Amy (Amy Teh-Yu)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Random Testing versus Partition Testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The difference between Partition Testing and Random Testing has been thoroughlyinvestigated theoretically. In this thesis we present a practical study ofthe differences between random… (more)

Oftedal, Kristian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

High–rate material modelling and validation using the Taylor cylinder impact test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...validation using the Taylor cylinder impact test P. J. Maudlin G. T. Gray III C. M...topography) with measured shapes from post-test Taylor specimens and quasi-static compression...extracted from the experimental post-test geometries using classical r-value definitions...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Particularities of high-voltage electron microscopy: instrument design, defect imaging and in situ investigation in 'thick' specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......microscopy: instrument design, defect imaging and in situ investigation in 'thick' specimens Roger Valle1 and Alain Marraud2 'DMSC, ONERA, 29 Av. de la Division Leclerc, F-92322 Chatillon Cedex and 2 LMSSM, ECP, Grande Voie des Vignes, F-92295 Chatenay-Malabry......

Roger Valle; Alain Marraud

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Surface hardening of Fe-based alloy powders by Nd:YAG laser cladding followed by electrospark deposition with WC-Co cemented carbide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study concerned with the surface hardening of Fe-based alloys and WC-8Co cemented carbide by integrating laser cladding and the electrospark deposition processes. Specimens of...

Jiansheng Wang; Huimin Meng; Hongying Yu; Zishuan Fan; Dongbai Sun

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

High Strain Rate Tensile Testing of DOP-26 Iridium  

SciTech Connect

The iridium alloy DOP-26 was developed through the Radioisotope Power Systems Program in the Office of Nuclear Energy of the Department of Energy. It is used for clad vent set cups containing radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for spacecraft. This report describes mechanical testing results for DOP-26. Specimens were given a vacuum recrystallization anneal of 1 hour at 1375 C and tested in tension in orientations parallel and perpendicular to the rolling direction of the sheet from which they were fabricated. The tests were performed at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1090 C and strain rates ranging from 1 x 10{sup -3} to 50 s{sup -1}. Room temperature testing was performed in air, while testing at elevated temperatures was performed in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup -4} Torr. The yield stress (YS) and the ultimate tensile stress (UTS) decreased with increasing temperature and increased with increasing strain rate. Between 600 and 1090 C, the ductility showed a slight increase with increasing temperature. Within the scatter of the data, the ductility did not depend on the strain rate. The reduction in area (RA), on the other hand, decreased with increasing strain rate. The YS and UTS values did not differ significantly for the longitudinal and transverse specimens. The ductility and RA values of the transverse specimens were marginally lower than those of the longitudinal specimens.

Schneibel, Joachim H [ORNL; Carmichael Jr, Cecil Albert [ORNL; George, Easo P [ORNL

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Mechanical Testing of TR-55 Rubber Thermally Aged Under Tensile Strain  

SciTech Connect

TR-55 rubber specimens were previously subjected to an aging process consisting of the application of a tensile strain of approximately 67%, 100%, 133%, or 167% elongation for 4, 8, 12, or 16 h at either 250 C or room temperature. Control specimens at the same temperatures/durations were not subjected to tensile strain. The specimens were allowed to recover at room temperature without external stimuli for over 100 days before tensile testing. A single dog bone was cut from each specimen and a stress-strain curve was obtained. The elastic modulus of each specimen was calculated. Specimens aged under tensile strain exhibited rubber-like behavior dependent on the aging elongation and duration. This behavior was not evident in the unstrained controls. For the unstrained controls, exposure to 250 C resulted in an increase in modulus relative to the unheated material independent of the heating duration. The tensile strain applied during the aging process caused a reduction in modulus relative to the controls; lower moduli were observed for the shorter aging durations. Slippage of the specimens in the grips prevented determination of ultimate strength, as all specimens either slipped completely out of the grip before failure or failed at the original grip edge after slipping.

Small IV, W; Alviso, C T; Wilson, T S; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

203

High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Materials Degradation: Preliminary Results of Corrosion Tests on Ceramatec Electrolysis Cell Components  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion tests were performed on stainless steel and nickel alloy coupons in H2O/H2 mixtures and dry air to simulate conditions experienced in high temperature steam electrolysis systems. The stainless steel coupons were tested bare and with one of three different proprietary coatings applied. Specimens were corroded at 850°C for 500 h with weight gain data recorded at periodic intervals. Post-test characterization of the samples included surface and cross-section scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and area-specific resistance measurements. The uncoated nickel alloy outperformed the ferritic stainless steel under all test conditions based on weight gain data. Parabolic rate constants for corrosion of these two uncoated alloys were consistent with values presented in the literature under similar conditions. The steel coatings reduced corrosion rates in H2O/H2 mixtures by as much as 50% compared to the untreated steel, but in most cases showed negligible corrosion improvement in air. The use of a rare-earth-based coating on stainless steel did not result in a significantly different area specific resistance values after corrosion compared to the untreated alloy. Characterization of the samples is still in progress and the findings will be revised when the complete data set is available.

Paul Demkowicz; Prateek Sachdev; Kevin DeWall; Pavel Medvedev

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Laser surface cleaning  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work is a laboratory demonstration that red-lead primer and two-part epoxy paints can be stripped from concrete and metal surfaces using surface cleaning systems based on pulsed-repetition CO{sub 2} lasers. The three goals are to: (1) demonstrate coatings removal, including surface pore cleaning; (2) demonstrate that there is negligible release of ablated contaminants to the environment; and (3) demonstrate that the process will generate negligible amounts of additional waste compared to competing technologies. Phase 1 involved site visits to RMI and Fernald to assess the cleaning issues for buildings and parts. In addition, Phase 1 included detailed designs of a more powerful system for industrial cleaning rates, including laser, articulating optics, ablated-material capture suction nozzle attached to a horizontal raster scanner for floor cleaning, and filtration system. Some concept development is also being done for using robots, and for parts cleaning. In Phase 2 a transportable 6 kW system will be built and tested, with a horizontal surface scanner for cleaning paint from floors. The laboratory tests will again be instrumented. Some concept development will continue for using robots, and for parts cleaning. This report describes Phase 1 results.

Freiwald, J.G.; Freiwald, D.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

205

Metal Surface Decontamination by the PFC Solution  

SciTech Connect

PFC (per-fluorocarbon) spray decontamination equipment was fabricated and its decontamination behavior was investigated. Europium oxide powder was mixed with the isotope solution which contains Co-60 and Cs-137. The different shape of metal specimens artificially contaminated with europium oxide powder was used as the surrogate contaminants. Before and after the application of the PFC spray decontamination method, the radioactivity of the metal specimens was measured by MCA. The decontamination factors were in the range from 9.6 to 62.4. The spent PFC solution was recycled by distillation. Before and after distillation, the turbidity of PFC solution was also measured. From the test results, it was found that more than 98% of the PFC solution could be recycled by a distillation. (authors)

Hui-Jun Won; Gye-Nam Kim; Wang-Kyu Choi; Chong-Hun Jung; Won-Zin Oh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, P.O.Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, Korea, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods  

SciTech Connect

Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Mobile Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobile apps are everywhere. Some apps entertain and others enable business transactions. Apps increasingly interact with complex IT landscapes. For example, a banking app on a mobile device acts as a front end that invokes services on a back-end server ... Keywords: mobile apps, mobile devices, software quality management, software testing, test automation, test strategy

Klaus Haller

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENTBEAM TESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CORROSION PERFORMANCE OF EPOXY-COATED REINFORCEMENT­BEAM TESTS by Khaled Z. Kahhaleh, Enrique Vaca which simulate a highly corrosive environment and under loading conditions producing concrete cracking was intended to produce a very aggressive environment and to accelerate corrosion of the specimens. The state

Texas at Austin, University of

209

Performance Evaluation of Three On-Site Adulterant Detection Devices for Urine Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......prepared with the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration...Sensitivity and Specificity Substance Abuse Detection methods Substance-Related...specimenscollected for drug-of-abuse testing was evaluated: the...and readily available via the internet and drug para- phernalia magazines......

Michelle R. Peace; Lisa D. Tarnai

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Environmental wear testing of nonmetallic materials for compressor applications  

SciTech Connect

A full-size prototypical test facility was designed and built to test nonmetallic materials in support of reciprocating compressor applications. Conventional test rigs utilize a pin- or ring-on-disk configuration to produce wear data in rotary motion under relatively low applied loads. In contrast, the subject test facility is constructed around a 9-inch (23-cm) stroke compressor frame. The test specimen and counterface configurations are similar to compressor packing rings and piston rods, respectively, and specimens are spring-loaded to variable levels encompassing actual compressor conditions. Testing to date has been performed at 500 rpm, 200 F (93 C), and three different load levels [65, 130 and 195 psi (450, 900 and 1,350 kPa)]. Material wear rate in air versus specimen pressure reveals a linear relationship with a slope of approximately 0.12 mils/day/psi (0.44 {micro}m/day/kPa). The wear performance of six different materials has been ranked in air. Future testing will focus on creating a database for material wear rates in air and nitrogen.

Parrington, R.J.; Hinchliff, E.M.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Standard test method for static leaching of monolithic waste forms for disposal of radioactive waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method provides a measure of the chemical durability of a simulated or radioactive monolithic waste form, such as a glass, ceramic, cement (grout), or cermet, in a test solution at temperatures radioactive waste forms in various leachants under the specific conditions of the test based on analysis of the test solution. Data from this test are used to calculate normalized elemental mass loss values from specimens exposed to aqueous solutions at temperatures <100°C. 1.3 The test is conducted under static conditions in a constant solution volume and at a constant temperature. The reactivity of the test specimen is determined from the amounts of components released and accumulated in the solution over the test duration. A wide range of test conditions can be used to study material behavior, includin...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Relative Location of Seismic Events Using Surface Waves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......The BOXCAR explosion at the Nevada Test Site was located with surface waves...activity in the Pahute Mesa area, Nevada Test Site, December 8, 1968-June 30...The BOXCAR explosion at the Nevada Test Site was located with surfacewavesusingboth......

David von Seggern

1972-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

IFP --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --(Script : 1er specimen) --1 --Oil & Gas Science and Technology --rev. IFP, Vol. xx (2009), No X, pp. 00-00  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 1 -- Oil & Gas Science2010 Author manuscript, published in "Oil & Gas Science and Technology - Rev. IFP, 65, 3 (2010) 435-444" DOI : 10.2516/ogst/2010007 #12;IFP -- Oil & Gas Science and Technology -- (Script : 1er specimen) -- 2

Boyer, Edmond

214

Acoustical performance testing of duct silencers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The test method used in North America to evaluate the acoustical performance of duct silencers is ASTM E477. The ASTM standard provides an approved method for measuring the aerodynamic pressure drop dynamic insertion loss and self?generated noise of duct silencers. Unfortunately restrictions on the construction of the test duct in the current standard cause erroneous results in the measurement of insertion loss at low frequencies. These errors are due to acoustic resonances that occur naturally in the empty test duct. It is recommended that the standard be modified to require anechoic terminations at both ends of the test duct. It is also recommended that more specific design criteria for the source chamber be established and that a new section be added to provide for the measurement of the radiated noise from the casing of the test specimen. Specific recommendations relating to all of these issues will be provided.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling experiments are conducted for saturation and subcooled conditions. Three...). .................................................................................................68 Fig. 19. Plots comparing the heat flux through the enhanced test surfaces (qw”) with the heat flux through the bare test surface (qb”) under 10 °C sub-cooling condition for both nulceate and film boiling regimes. Heat flux data...

Sriraman, Sharan Ram

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

216

LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010  

SciTech Connect

An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development of the pitting susceptibility of carbon steel in alkaline solutions.

Zapp, P.

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

217

Clip gage attachment for frictionless measurement of displacement during high-temperature mechanical testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An attachment for placement between a test specimen and a remote clip gage extensometer providing improved fracture toughness tests of materials at elevated temperature. Using a cylindrical tube and axial rod in new relationship, the device transfers the displacement signal of the fracture toughness test specimen directly to a clip gage extensometer located outside the high temperature furnace. Virtually frictionless operation is assured by having the test specimen center one end of the rod in one end of the tube, while the clip gage extensometer arms center the other end of the rod in the other end of the tube. By providing positive control over both ends of both rod and tube, the attachment may be operated in orientations other than vertical.

Alexander, David J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Clip gage attachment for frictionless measurement of displacement during high-temperature mechanical testing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An attachment for placement between a test specimen and a remote clip gage extensometer providing improved fracture toughness tests of materials at elevated temperature is described. Using a cylindrical tube and axial rod in new relationship, the device transfers the displacement signal of the fracture toughness test specimen directly to a clip gage extensometer located outside the high temperature furnace. Virtually frictionless operation is assured by having the test specimen center one end of the rod in one end of the tube, while the clip gage extensometer arms center the other end of the rod in the other end of the tube. By providing positive control over both ends of both rod and tube, the attachment may be operated in orientations other than vertical. 1 figure.

Alexander, D.J.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

219

Testing and evaluation of damaged tubular jacket braces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In addition, crack growth at welded connections may also occur due to corrosion. Due to the high costs and dire consequences of catastrophic failure of an offshore platform, there exists the need to assess the structural integrity of platforms... will be presented. Experimental results of pure compression tests on undamaged, steel, tubular columns were reported by Bouwkamp (1975). Three fabricated electric-weld pipes and four seamless pipe were used for this study. The specimens were tested in pure...

Moehlman, Scott Alan

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Methodology for Mechanical Property Testing of Fuel Cladding Using a Expanded Plug Wedge Test  

SciTech Connect

An expanded plug method was developed earlier for determining the tensile properties of irradiated fuel cladding. This method tests fuel rod cladding ductility by utilizing an expandable plug to radially stretch a small ring of irradiated cladding material. The circumferential or hoop strain is determined from the measured diametrical expansion of the ring. A developed procedure is used to convert the load circumferential strain data from the ring tests into material pseudo-stress-strain curves, from which material properties of the cladding can be extracted. However, several deficiencies existed in this expanded-plug test that can impact the accuracy of test results, such as that the large axial compressive stress resulted from the expansion plug test can potentially induce the shear failure mode of the tested specimen. Moreover, highly nonuniform stress and strain distribution in the deformed clad gage section and significant compressive stresses, induced by bending deformation due to clad bulging effect, will further result in highly nonconservative estimates of the mechanical properties for both strength and ductility of the tested clad. To overcome the aforementioned deficiencies associated with the current expansion plug test, systematic studies have been conducted. By optimizing the specific geometry designs, selecting the appropriate material for the expansion plug, and adding new components into the testing system, a modified expansion plug testing protocol has been developed. A general procedure was also developed to determine the hoop stress in the tested ring specimen. A scaling factor, -factor, was used to convert the ring load Fring into hoop stress , and is written as _ = F_ring/tl , where t is the clad thickness and l is the clad length. The generated stress-strain curve agrees well with the associated tensile test data in both elastic and plastic deformation regions.

Jiang, Hao [ORNL; Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Scaleless Snake: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer Reprinted: Tests of the Role of Reptilian Scales in Water Loss and Heat Transfer A unique specimen of gopher snake of pulmocutaneous water loss and heat transfer, no difference was observed between the scale- less animal

Bennett, Albert F.

222

A surface ionization source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Einzel Lens. 2 The Quadrupole Triplet . . 3. The Beam Scanner. . . 4 The Four-plate Detectors and Faraday Cups. III TESTING AND OPTIMIZING THE BEAM LINE 10 12 13 A. Initial Results. IV THE THEORY OF SURFACE IONIZATION . . . . . V ION SOURCES. 21... aperture and through a beam scanner. The scanner translates the beam's cross-section to an image visible on the oscilloscope A movable Faraday cup connected to a sensitive electrometer is used to maximize the beam transmission at the opening into the 2...

Buzatu, Daniel J.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

223

On the Influence of Laser Cladding and Post-processing Strategies on Residual Stresses in Steel Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Thermal cycles during laser cladding can alter mechanical properties of the original part significantly. In case of cyclically loaded parts residual stresses are suspected to be a property strongly determining fatigue life. Therefore, in this paper the influence of processing and post-processing strategies on resulting residual stresses are determined by neutron-diffraction. A low-alloy as well as a high-alloy steel have been considered within this study, both cladded with the Co-based superalloy Stellite 21. Processing speed and post-treatment by laser annealing and by deep rolling strategies have been tested. Residual stresses in low-alloyed steel show high sensitivity on applied treatment strategies. In the present study only deep rolling induced compressive residual stress close to the part surface. In high-alloy steel compressive stress in this area resulted directly after laser cladding, where its magnitude depends on processing speed. A compressive residual stress statewhich is suspected to be beneficial for fatigue strength could be achieved at the two representative steels.

H. Köhler; R. Rajput; P. Khazan; J. Rebelo Kornmeier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Measurement of the in-plane shear modulus of medium-density fibreboard by torsional and flexural vibration tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The in-plane shear modulus (IPSM) of medium-density fibreboard (MDF) was obtained via a torsional vibration (TV) test using the specimen with various configurations and a subsequent numerical analysis. Because the out-of-plane shear modulus (OPSM) of MDF was much lower than the IPSM, the difference between the IPSM and OPSM had to be considered in the TV test. Therefore, the OPSM value was measured from the flexural vibration (FV) tests, and it was applied for the calculation of the IPSM value. The experimental and numerical results indicated that the TV test is effective to obtain the IPSM of MDF accurately under various configurations of the specimen.

Hiroshi Yoshihara; Masahiro Yoshinobu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ion beam induced surface and interface engineering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The injection of material into a target specimen in the form of an accelerated ion beam offers a most valuable tool for altering its physical, chemical, structural, surface and interface properties in a controlled manner and tailoring new materials for basic and applied research for science and technology. The present review describes experimental, theoretical and recent aspects of ion beam modifications at various solids, thin films, and multilayered systems covering wider energy ranges including the older basic concepts which are now of interest. These results reveal that the ion–solid interaction physics provides a unique way for controlling the produced defects of the desired type at a desired location. These interests have been stimulated by the possibilities of synthesizing novel materials with potential applications in the field of thin films, surfaces and interface science. Many applications of ion induced engineering are being developed for various sciences of high technological interest for future aspects.

I.P. Jain; Garima Agarwal

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Tubes by Means of Tube Bulge Test  

SciTech Connect

Mechanical properties of friction stir welded joints are generally evaluated by means of conventional tensile test. This testing method might provide insufficient information because maximum strain obtained in tensile test before necking is small; moreover, the application of tensile test is limited when the joint path is not linear or even when the welds are executed on curved surfaces. Therefore, in some cases, it would be preferable to obtain the joints properties from other testing methods. Tube bulge test can be a valid solution for testing circumferential or longitudinal welds executed on tubular workpieces. The present work investigates the mechanical properties and the formability of friction stir welded tubes by means of tube bulge tests. The experimental campaign was performed on tubular specimens having a thickness of 3 mm and an external diameter of 40 mm, obtained starting from two semi-tubes longitudinally friction stir welded. The first step, regarding the fabrication of tubes, was performed combining a conventional forming process and friction stir welding. Sheets in Al-Mg-Si-Cu alloy AA6060 T6 were adopted for this purpose. Plates having a dimension of 225x60 mm were bent (with a bending axis parallel to the main dimension) in order to obtain semi-tubes. A particular care was devoted to the fabrication of forming devices (punch and die) in order to minimize the springback effects. Semi-tubes were then friction stir welded by means of a CNC machine tool. Some preliminary tests were carried out by varying the welding parameters, namely feed rate and rotational speed. A very simple tool having flat shoulder and cylindrical pin was used. The second step of the research was based on testing the welded tubes by means of tube bulge test. A specific equipment having axial actuators with a conical shape was adopted for this study. Some analyses were carried out on the tubes bulged up to a certain pressure level. In particular, the burst pressure and the wall thickness were measured for each tested tube.

D'Urso, G.; Longo, M.; Giardini, C. [University of Bergamo-Dept. of Design and Technologies-Italy-Viale Marconi 5, 24044 Dalmine (Italy)

2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

227

Test Comparability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

Mousavi, Mohammad

229

Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing Introduction Test Selection Test Minimization Test Prioritization Summary Software Testing and Maintenance 2 What is it? Regression testing refers to the portion of the test cycle in which a program is tested to ensure that changes do not affect

Lei, Jeff Yu

230

Hydrostatic and shear consolidation tests with permeability measurements on Waste Isolation Pilot Plant crushed salt  

SciTech Connect

Crushed natural rock salt is a primary candidate for use as backfill and barrier material at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and therefore Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been pursuing a laboratory program designed to quantify its consolidation properties and permeability. Variables that influence consolidation rate that have been examined include stress state and moisture content. The experimental results presented in this report complement existing studies and work in progress conducted by SNL. The experiments described in this report were designed to (1) measure permeabilities of consolidated specimens of crushed salt, (2) determine the influence of brine saturation on consolidation under hydrostatic loads, and 3) measure the effects of small applied shear stresses on consolidation properties. The laboratory effort consisted of 18 individual tests: three permeability tests conducted on specimens that had been consolidated at Sandia, six hydrostatic consolidation and permeability tests conducted on specimens of brine-saturated crushed WIPP salt, and nine shear consolidation and permeability tests performed on crushed WIPP salt specimens containing 3 percent brine by weight. For hydrostatic consolidation tests, pressures ranged from 1.72 MPa to 6.90 MPa. For the shear consolidation tests, confining pressures were between 3.45 MPa and 6.90 MPa and applied axial stress differences were between 0.69 and 4.14 MPa. All tests were run under drained conditions at 25{degrees}C.

Brodsky, N.S. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

SUPER HARD SURFACED POLYMERS  

SciTech Connect

High energy ion beam surface treatments were applied to a selected group of polymers. Of the six materials in the present study, four were thermoplastics (polycarbonate, polyethylene, polyethylene terephthalate, and polystyrene) and two were thermosets (epoxy and polyimide). The particular epoxy evaluated in this work is one of the resins used in formulating fiber reinforced composites for military helicopter blades. Measures of mechanical properties of the near surface regions were obtained by nanoindentation hardness and pin on disk wear. Attempts were also made to measure erosion resistance by particle impact. All materials were hardness tested. Pristine materials were very soft, having values in the range of approximately 0.1 to 0.5 GPa. Ion beam treatment increased hardness by up to 50 times compared to untreated materials. For reference, all materials were hardened to values higher than those typical of stainless steels. Wear tests were carried out on three of the materials, PET, PI and epoxy. On the ion beam treated epoxy no wear could be detected, whereas the untreated material showed significant wear.

Mansur, Louis K [ORNL] [ORNL; Bhattacharya, R [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH] [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH; Blau, Peter Julian [ORNL] [ORNL; Clemons, Art [ORNL] [ORNL; Eberle, Cliff [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans, H B [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH] [UES, Incorporated, Dayton, OH; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL] [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL; Lee, E H [Consultant, Milpitas, CA] [Consultant, Milpitas, CA; Leonard, Keith J [ORNL] [ORNL; Trejo, Rosa M [ORNL] [ORNL; Rivard, John D [ORNL] [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Solid-Phase Extraction of 11-Nor-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol-9-Carboxylic Acid from Urine Drug-Testing Specimens with the Cerex PolyCrom-THC™ Column  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Confirmation of drugs of abuse by gas chromatography-mass...Sensitivity and Specificity Substance Abuse Detection methods Tetrahydrocannabinol...Abstract Confirmation of drugs of abuse by gaschromatography-mass...store and or- dered from an Internet website. Apparatus ACerex SPE......

David K. Crockett; Gordon Nelson; Philip Dimson; Francis M. Urry

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Rapid electrochemical screening of engine coolants. Correlation of electrochemical potentiometric measurements with ASTM D 1384 glassware corrosion test  

SciTech Connect

Engine coolants are typically subjected to comprehensive performance evaluations that involve multiple laboratory and field tests. These tests can take several weeks to conduct and can be expensive. The tests can involve everything from preliminary chemical screening to long term fleet tests. An important test conducted at the beginning of coolant formula development to screen the corrosion performance of engine coolants is described in ASTM D 1384. If the coolant formula passes the test, it is then subjected to more rigorous testing. Conducting the test described in ASTM D 1384 takes two weeks, and determining the coolant corrosion performance under several test parameters can takes resources and time that users seldom have. Therefore, it is very desirable to have tests that can be used for rapid screening and quality assurance of coolants. The purpose of this study was to conduct electrochemical tests that can ultimately be used for quick initial screening of engine coolants. The specific intent of the electrochemical tests is to use ASTM D 1384 as a model and to attempt to duplicate its results. Implementation of the electrochemical tests could accelerate the process of selecting promising coolant formulas and reduce coolant evaluation time and cost. Various electrochemical tests were conducted to determine the corrosion performance of several engine coolant formulas. The test results were compared to those obtained from the ASTM D 1384 test. These tests were conducted on the same metal specimens and under similar conditions as those used in the ASTM D 1384 test. The electrochemical tests included the determination of open circuit potential (OCP) for the various metal specimens, anodic and cathodic polarization curves for the various metal specimens, corrosion rate for metal specimens involved in a galvanic triad, and critical pitting potential (CPP) for aluminum (pitting of aluminum engine components and cooling systems is a cause for concern). The details for the methods and the correlation of the results to ASTM D 1384 tests results will be presented.

Doucet, G.P. [Shell Chemical Co., Houston, TX (United States); Jackson, J.M.; Kriegel, O.A.; Passwater, D.K. [Shell Oil Products Co., Houston, TX (United States); Prieto, N.E. [Petroferm Inc., Fernandina Beach, FL (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

test | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

test test test test More Documents & Publications 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 Final ECR 2008 Report Environmental Conflict Resolution...

235

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAM III PROJECT SAM III PROJECT Sandia National laboratories Prepared for: Project File Documentation Prepared by: MICHAEL J. TAYLOR Project Manager March 31, 1998 JO 850200 : FC 970009 ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a demonstration of the Surface Area Modulation Downhole Telemetry System (SAM 111) at the Department of Energy's Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), in partnership with Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The project encompassed the testing of a real-time wireless telemetry system in a simulated Measurement-While-Drilling (MWD) environment. A Surface Area Modulation (SAM) technique demonstrated data transmission rates greater than present techniques, in a deployment mode which requires

236

Tests for the Expansion of the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Almost all cosmologists accept nowadays that the redshift of the galaxies is due to the expansion of the Universe (cosmological redshift), plus some Doppler effect of peculiar motions, but can we be sure of this fact by means of some other independent cosmological test? Here I will review some recent tests: CMBR temperature versus redshift, time dilation, the Hubble diagram, the Tolman or surface brightness test, the angular size test, the UV surface brightness limit and the Alcock--Paczy\\'nski test. Some tests favour expansion and others favour a static Universe. Almost all the cosmological tests are susceptible to the evolution of galaxies and/or other effects. Tolman or angular size tests need to assume very strong evolution of galaxy sizes to fit the data with the standard cosmology, whereas the Alcock--Paczynski test, an evaluation of the ratio of observed angular size to radial/redshift size, is independent of it.

Lopez-Corredoira, Martin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Surface Treatment by Laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By this treatment, new hardenings of the surface can occur; the surface is higher alloyed by remelting, or layers...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Surface hardening of metallic alloys by electrospark deposition followed by plasma nitriding  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a study concerned with the surface hardening of nonferrous and ferrous alloys, by integrating the electrospark deposition and plasma nitriding processes. Specimens of an aluminium bronze and of a grey cast iron were firstly electrospark coated with AISI-304 stainless steel and, then, ion nitrided in a 25%N2 + 75%H2 dc plasma. It is shown that by using these two treatments, the surface hardness of this two materials can be substantially increased.

M.A. Béjar; W. Schnake; W. Saavedra; J.P. Vildósola

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling...

Sriraman, Sharan Ram

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

Peters, Dennis

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface Energy,Surface Energy, Surface Tension & Shape of CrystalsSurface Tension & Shape of shapes of crystals are important: (i) growth shape and (ii) equilibrium shape Surface/interface energy surfaces. The joining of two phases creates an interface. (Two orientations of the same crystalline phase

Subramaniam, Anandh

242

Development of spiral notch torsion test: A new Fracture mechanics approach to determination of KISCC  

SciTech Connect

SNTT utilizes an extremely innovative concept of testing round-rod specimens having a V-grooved spiral notch line with a 45 a-pitch angle. The paper discusses the validity of SNTT in determining the fracture toughness, KIC, as established at ORNL. The paper also presents preliminary results of a collaborative research program of Monash University, NRL, ORNL and DSTO, for development and use of the novel technique of Spiral Notch Torsion Test (SNTT) for determination of threshold stress intensity for stress corrosion cracking, i.e., KISCC. SNTT experiments have been carried out in chloride and air environments, using fatigue pre-cracked SNTT specimens of Al-alloy, 7075.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Singh, R. K. [Monash University, Australia; Bayles, Robert [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C.; Knight, S. P. [Monash University, Australia; Hinton, B. R.W. [Defence Science and Technology Organisation, Australia; Muddle, B. C. [Monash University, Australia

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

244

Completely Superhydrophobic PDMS Surfaces for Microfluidics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Completely Superhydrophobic PDMS Surfaces for Microfluidics ... The microfluidic platforms in focus are lateral flow tests, linear actuated devices, pressure driven laminar flow, microfluidic large scale integration, segmented flow microfluidics, centrifugal microfluidics, electrokinetics, electrowetting, surface acoustic waves, and dedicated systems for massively parallel anal. ...

Artur Tropmann; Laurent Tanguy; Peter Koltay; Roland Zengerle; Lutz Riegger

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

245

Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

246

A Mix Testing Process Integrating Two Manual Testing Approaches: Exploratory Testing and Test Case Based Testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Software testing is a key phase in software development lifecycle. Testing objectives corresponds to the discovery and detection of faults, which can be attained by… (more)

Shah, Syed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Irradiated test fuel shipment plan for the LWR MOX fuel irradiation test project  

SciTech Connect

This document outlines the responsibilities of DOE, DOE contractors, the commercial carrier, and other organizations participating in a shipping campaign of irradiated test specimen capsules containing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel from the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The shipments described here will be conducted according to applicable regulations of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and all applicable DOE Orders. This Irradiated Test Fuel Shipment Plan for the LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project addresses the shipments of a small number of irradiated test specimen capsules and has been reviewed and agreed to by INEEL and ORNL (as participants in the shipment campaign). Minor refinements to data entries in this plan, such as actual shipment dates, exact quantities and characteristics of materials to be shipped, and final approved shipment routing, will be communicated between the shipper, receiver, and carrier, as needed, using faxes, e-mail, official shipping papers, or other backup documents (e.g., shipment safety evaluations). Any major changes in responsibilities or data beyond refinements of dates and quantities of material will be prepared as additional revisions to this document and will undergo a full review and approval cycle.

Shappert, L.B.; Dickerson, L.S.; Ludwig, S.B.

1998-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

248

Heavy-duty fleet test evaluation of recycled engine coolant  

SciTech Connect

A 240,000 mile (386,232 km) fleet test was conducted to evaluate recycled engine coolant against factory fill coolant. The fleet consisted of 12 new Navistar International Model 9600 trucks equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 60 engines. Six of the trucks were drained and filled with the recycled engine coolant that had been recycled by a chemical treatment/filtration/reinhibited process. The other six test trucks contained the factory filled coolant. All the trucks followed the same maintenance practices which included the use of supplemental coolant additives. The trucks were equipped with metal specimen bundles. Metal specimen bundles and coolant samples were periodically removed to monitor the cooling system chemistry. A comparison of the solution chemistry and metal coupon corrosion patterns for the recycled and factory filled coolants is presented and discussed.

Woyciesjes, P.M.; Frost, R.A. [Prestone Products Corp., Danbury, CT (United States). Coolant Group

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Seismic response and damping tests of small bore LMFBR piping and supports  

SciTech Connect

Seismic testing and analysis of a prototypical Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) small bore piping system is described. Measured responses to simulated seismic excitations are compared with analytical predictions based on NRC Regulatory Guide 1.61 and measured system damping values. The test specimen was representative of a typical LMFBR insulated small bore piping system, and it was supported from a rigid test frame by prototypic dead weight supports, mechanical snubbers and pipe clamps.

Barta, D.A.; Anderson, M.J.; Severud, L.K.; Lindquist, M.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Round-robin artificial contamination test on high voltage dc insulators  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the results of a worldwide round-robin test of high voltage dc (HVDC) insulators, which was carried out in six laboratories aiming at standardization of the method for artificial contamination tests on HVDC insulators. Flashover characteristics of three kinds of specimens were evaluated by the clean fog and the salt fog procedures. Sufficient information is now available to allow the preparation of provisional international specifications for artificial contamination testing of HVDC insulators.

Naito, K.; Schneider, H.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE PERMANENT DOWNHOLE PRESSURE GAUGE MARCH 15, 1998 FC9553/96PT16 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Sperry-Sun Permanent Downhole Pressure Gauge PROJECT TEST RESULTS March 16, 1998 Michael R. Tyler Project Manager Abstract The Sperry-Sun Downhole Permanent Pressure Gauge (DPPG) is a pressure gauge that is designed to remain in the well for long periods of time providing real time surface data on borehole pressures. The DPPG was field tested at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center in well 63-TPX-10. The instrument was attached to the production string directly above a submersible pump. It was expected to monitor pressure draw-down and build-ups during normal production cycles. During the first two months of the test, the tool worked fine providing a pressure up survey that

252

G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume I. Completion and testing: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The acquisition, completion, and testing of a geopressured-geothermal well are described. The following are covered: geology; petrophysics; re-entry and completion operations - test well; drilling and completion operations - disposal well; test objectives; surface testing facilities; pre-test operations; test sequence; test results and analysis; and return of wells and location to operator. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Corrosion Test of US Steels in Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) and Kinetic Modeling of Corrosion in LBE Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Corrosion Test of US Steels in Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) and Kinetic Modeling of Corrosion Federation Abstract We present the LBE corrosion test results of several US steels, and a preliminary analysis using a kinetic model for corrosion in LBE systems. Tube and rod specimens of austenitic steels

McDonald, Kirk

254

Construction and testing of a flue-gas corrosion probe  

SciTech Connect

The selection of suitable materials for industrial, waste-heat- recovery systems requires assessment of corrosion of materials in various flue-gas environments. Such assessments involve exposing candidate materials to high-temperature flue gases and analyzing the effects of the exposure conditions. Because corrosion is related to flue-gas chemical composition and temperature, variations in temperature complicate the determination of corrosion rates and corrosion mechanisms. Conversely, a relatively constant temperature allows a more accurate determination of the effects of exposure conditions. For this reason, controlled-temperature flue-gas corrosion probes were constructed and tested for exposure tests of materials. A prototype probe consisted of a silicon carbide tube specimen, supporting hardware, and instrumentation for controlling temperature by internal heating and cooling. An advanced probe included other tubular specimens. Testing of the probes in an industrial-type furnace at a nominal flue-gas temperature of 1200{degree}C revealed that temperature control was inadequate. The cooling mode imposed a substantial axial-temperature gradient on the specimens; while the heating mode imposed a smaller gradient, the heating capacity was very limited. 10 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

Federer, J.I.; McEvers, J.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Corrosion testing of a plutonium-loaded lanthanide borosilicate glass made with Frit B.  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory tests were conducted with a lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass made with Frit B and added PuO2 (the glass is referred to herein as Pu LaBS-B glass) to measure the dependence of the glass dissolution rate on pH and temperature. These results are compared with the dependencies used in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model that was developed to account for HLW glasses in total system performance assessment (TSPA) calculations for the Yucca Mountain repository to determine if that model can also be used to represent the release of radionuclides from disposed Pu LaBS glass by using either the same parameter values that are used for HLW glasses or parameter values specific for Pu LaBS glass. Tests were conducted by immersing monolithic specimens of Pu LaBS-B glass in six solutions that imposed pH values between about pH 3.5 and pH 11, and then measuring the amounts of glass components released into solution. Tests were conducted at 40, 70, and 90 C for 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 days at low glass-surface-area-to-solution volume ratios. As intended, these test conditions maintained sufficiently dilute solutions that the impacts of solution feedback effects on the dissolution rates were negligible in most tests. The glass dissolution rates were determined from the concentrations of Si and B measured in the test solutions. The dissolution rates determined from the releases of Si and B were consistent with the 'V' shaped pH dependence that is commonly seen for borosilicate glasses and is included in the Defense HLW Glass Degradation Model. The rate equation in that model (using the coefficients determined for HLW glasses) provides values that are higher than the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution rates that were measured over the range of pH and temperature values that were studied (i.e., an upper bound). Separate coefficients for the rate expression in acidic and alkaline solutions were also determined from the test results to model Pu LaBS-B glass dissolution directly. The releases of Gd, Hf, and Pu from the glass were also measured. The release of Pu was significantly less than Si at all temperatures and pH values (on a normalized basis). More Gd than Pu or Hf was released from the glass in acidic solutions, but more Pu than Gd or Hf was released in alkaline solutions. Almost all of the released Gd remained in solution in tests conducted in Teflon vessels, whereas about half of the released Pu and Hf became fixed to the Teflon. In tests conducted in Type 304L stainless steel vessels, most of the released Gd, Hf, and Pu became fixed to the steel. The aqueous concentrations of Gd, Hf, and Pu decreased from about 2 x 10{sup -5}, 2 x 10{sup -8}, and 1 x 10{sup -7} M in tests solutions near pH 3.7 to about 1 x 10{sup -9}, 8 x 10{sup -10}, and 1 x 10{sup -8} M in test solutions near pH 10.8, respectively, in the 90 C tests in Teflon vessels (the solutions were not filtered prior to analysis). Vapor hydration tests (VHTs) were conducted at 120 and 200 C with Pu LaBS-B glass and SRL 418 glass, which was made to represent the HLW glass that will be used to macro-encapsulate LaBS glass within the waste form. Some VHTs were conducted with specimens of Pu LaBS-B and SRL 418 glasses that were in contact to study the effect of the solution generated as HLW glass dissolves on the corrosion behavior of Pu LaBS-B glass. Other VHTs were conducted in which the glasses were not in contact. The Pu LaBS-B glass is more durable than the HLW glass under these accelerating test conditions, even when the glasses are in contact. The presence of the SRL 418 glass did not promote the dissolution of the Pu LaBS-B glass significantly. However, Gd, Hf, and Pu were detected in alteration phases formed on the Pu LaBS-B glass surface and in (or on) phases formed by SRL 418 glass degradation, such as analcime. This indicates that Gd, Hf, and Pu were transported from the LaBS glass, through the water film formed on the specimens, and to the SRL 418 glass during the test. The disposition of the PuO{sub 2} inclusion phases as the Pu LaBS-B glass dissolved was not det

Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

6230 surface treatment [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

constr. (Surfacing of manufactured stone products, metals, wood,...Specific term for surface treatment of stones with hammer and chisel tooling); syn. surfacing [n] (2);s tratamiento [m] de superfici...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

An improved method for interpreting API filter press hydraulic conductivity test results  

SciTech Connect

The American Petroleum Institute (API) filter press is frequently used to measure the hydraulic conductivity of soil-bentonite backfill during the mix design process and as part of construction quality controls. However, interpretation of the test results is complicated by the fact that the seepage-induced consolidation pressure varies from zero at the top of the specimen to a maximum value at the bottom of the specimen. An analytical solution is available which relates the stress, compressibility, and hydraulic conductivity in soil consolidated by seepage forces. This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation undertaken to support application of this theory to API hydraulic conductivity tests. When the API test results are interpreted using seepage consolidation theory, they are in good agreement with the results of consolidometer permeameter tests. Limitations of the API test are also discussed.

Heslin, G.M.; Baxter, D.Y.; Filz, G.M. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Davidson, R.R. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Surface geometry of Cu{531}  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a combined quantitative low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and density-functional theory (DFT) study of the chiral Cu{531} surface. The surface shows large inward relaxations with respect to the bulk interlayer distance of the first two layers and a large expansion of the distance between the fourth and fifth layers. (The latter is the first layer having the same coordination as the Cu atoms in the bulk.) Additional calculations have been performed to study the likelihood of faceting by comparing surface energies of possible facet terminations. No overall significant reduction in energy with respect to planar {531} could be found for any of the tested combinations of facets, which is in agreement with the experimental findings.

G. Jones; M. J. Gladys; J. Ottal; S. J. Jenkins; G. Held

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

259

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit Running a test case: 1 Get the component to a known state (set up). 2 Cause some event (the test case). 3 Check the behaviour. · Record pass/fail · Track statistics · Typically we want to do a lot of test cases so it makes sense to automate. · Test cases

Peters, Dennis

260

surface science | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface science surface science Leads No leads are available at this time. Metal-Insulator Photocathode Heterojunction for Directed Electron Emission. Abstract: New photocathode...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Comparison of transient-heating burst test results of unirradiated and irradiated Zircaloy-4 fuel rod cladding  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission supported an experimental program to study the mechanical properties of both unirradiated and irradiated fuel rod cladding. The program was designed to produce a mechanical property data base for use in developing modeling codes which could then be used to predict the performance of Zircaloy-4 clad fuel rods under various reactor loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) conditions. Transient-heating burst tests were conducted at Argonne, Battelle Columbus, and ORNL. A brief description of the testing methods, specimens, equipment, and procedures illustrates the similarities and differences in tests conducted at each laboratory. The data obtained from tests conducted in steam and utilizing test specimens with internal heaters or specimens containing alumina mandrels or pellets were compared for heating rates of 5, 28, and 55 C/sec. Both burst pressure and circumferential failure strain data versus burst temperature were plotted and compared in the range of 650 to 1250/sup 0/C. It was found that testing methods, specimen oxidation layer, and irradiation affected the transient-heating burst test data.

Lowry, L.M. (Battelle Columbus Labs., OH); Perrin, J.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Yucca Mountain project prototype testing  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. DOE is responsible for characterizing the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada to determine its suitability for development as a geologic repository to isolate high-level nuclear waste for at least 10,000 years. This unprecedented task relies in part on measurements made with relatively new methods or applications, such as dry coring and overcoring for studies to be conducted from the land surface and in an underground facility. The Yucca Mountain Project has, since 1988, implemented a program of equipment development and methods development for a broad spectrum of hydrologic, geologic, rock mechanics, and thermomechanical tests planned for use in an Exploratory Shaft during site characterization at the Yucca Mountain site. A second major program was fielded beginning in April 1989 to develop and test methods and equipment for surface drilling to obtain core samples from depth using only air as a circulating medium. The third major area of prototype testing has been during the ongoing development of the Instrumentation/ Data Acquisition System (IDAS), designed to collect and monitor data from down-hole instrumentation in the unsaturated zone, and store and transmit the data to a central archiving computer. Future prototype work is planned for several programs including the application of vertical seismic profiling methods and flume design to characterizing the geology at Yucca Mountain. The major objectives of this prototype testing are to assure that planned Site Characterization testing can be carried out effectively at Yucca Mountain, both in the Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF), and from the surface, and to avoid potential major failures or delays that could result from the need to re-design testing concepts or equipment. This paper will describe the scope of the Yucca Mountain Project prototype testing programs and summarize results to date. 3 figs.

Hughes, W.T.; Girdley, W.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Microstructural, Electrical, and Mechanical Properties of Graphene Films on Flexible Substrate Determined by Cyclic Bending Test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three kinds of graphene/polyimide specimen were prepared via transfer from graphene with thicknesses of 1, 2, and 3 nm, respectively. A self-designed bending tester was applied to carry out cyclic bending tests with various bending cycles and bending ...

Ba-Son Nguyen; Jen Fin Lin; Dung-Ching Perng

2014-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fluid squeeze-out between solids with rough surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the fluid squeeze-out from the interface between an elastic solid with a flat surface and a rigid solid with a randomly rough surface. As an application we discuss fluid squeeze-out between a tire tread block and a road surface. Some implications for the leakage of seals are discussed, and experimental data are presented to test the theory.

B. Lorenz; B. N. J. Persson

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

265

Single crystal metal wedges for surface acoustic wave propagation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultrasonic testing device has been developed to evaluate flaws and inhomogeneities in the near-surface region of a test material. A metal single crystal wedge is used to generate high frequency Rayleigh surface waves in the test material surface by conversion of a slow velocity, bulk acoustic mode in the wedge into a Rayleigh wave at the metal-wedge test material interface. Particular classes of metals have been found to provide the bulk acoustic modes necessary for production of a surface wave with extremely high frequency and angular collimation. The high frequency allows flaws and inhomogeneities to be examined with greater resolution. The high degree of angular collimation for the outgoing ultrasonic beam permits precision angular location of flaws and inhomogeneities in the test material surface.

Fisher, E.S.

1980-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

266

Accelerated Testing Validation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the University of California. Accelerated Testing Validationmaterials requires relevant Accelerated Stress Tests (ASTs),

Mukundan, Rangachary

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Torsion Testing of Diffusion Bonded LIGA Formed Nickel  

SciTech Connect

A test technique has been devised which is suitable for the testing of the bond strength of batch diffusion bonded LIGA or DXRL defined structures. The method uses a torsion tester constructed with the aid of LIGA fabrication and distributed torsion specimens which also make use of the high aspect ratio nature of DXRL based processing. Measurements reveal achieved bond strengths of 130MPa between electroplated nickel with a bond temperature of 450 C at 7 ksi pressure which is a sufficiently low temperature to avoid mechanical strength degradation.

Buchheit, T.E.; Christenson, T.R.; Schmale, D.T.

1999-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

268

Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orion Flight Test Exploration Flight Test-1 PRESS KIT/December 2014 www.nasa.gov NP-2014-11-020-JSC National Aeronautics and Space Administration #12;#12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Contents Section Page ........................................................................................... 28 i #12;Orion Flight Test ii December 2014 #12;Orion Flight Test December 2014 Flight Overview

Waliser, Duane E.

269

TESTING AND ANALYSIS OF CAP CONCRETE STRESS AND STRAIN DUE TO SHRINKAGE, CREEP, AND EXPANSION FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

In-situ decommissioning of Reactors P- and R- at the Savannah River Site will require filling the reactor vessels with a special concrete based on materials such as magnesium phosphate, calcium aluminate or silica fume. Then the reactor vessels will be overlain with an 8 ft. thick layer of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) steel reinforced concrete, called the 'Cap Concrete'. The integrity of this protective layer must be assured to last for a sufficiently long period of time to avoid ingress of water into the reactor vessel and possible movement of radioactive contamination into the environment. During drying of this Cap Concrete however, shrinkage strains are set up in the concrete as a result of diffusion and evaporation of water from the top surface. This shrinkage varies with depth in the poured slab due to a non-uniform moisture distribution. This differential shrinkage results in restraint of the upper layers with larger shrinkage by lower layers with lesser displacements. Tensile stresses can develop at the surface from the strain gradients in the bulk slab, which can lead to surface cracking. Further, a mechanism called creep occurs during the curing period or early age produces strains under the action of restraining forces. To investigate the potential for surface cracking, an experimental and analytical program was started under TTQAP SRNL-RP-2009-01184. Slab sections made of Cap Concrete mixture were instrumented with embedded strain gages and relative humidity sensors and tested under controlled environmental conditions of 23 C and relative humidities (RH) of 40% and 80% over a period of 50 days. Calculation methods were also developed for predictions of stress development in the full-scale concrete placement over the reactor vessels. These methods were evaluated by simulating conditions for the test specimens and the calculation results compared to the experimental data. A closely similar test with strain gages was performed by Kim and Lee for a concrete mixture that did not employ humidity sensors and the admixtures used in this program. Yuan and Wan tried to predict the shrinkage strains and stresses in the Kim and Lee experiment, but did not include a creep analysis. Grasley and Lange conducted full restraint load tests on a concrete prism instrumented with humidity sensors over a 7 day curing period. The hypothetical case of full-scale placement of the Cap Concrete was also analyzed using the developed analytical methods. The calculation performed in this report is for scoping purposes only.

Guerrero, H.; Restivo, M.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Transmission electron microscopy and atom probe specimen preparation from mechanically alloyed powder using the focused ion-beam lift-out technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......prepared by consolidation of amorphous powders in the supercooled liquid region. Intermetallics (2004) 12:1109-1113. 6 Overwijk M H F , Van Den Heuvel F C, Bulle-Lieuwma C W T. Novel scheme for the preparation of transmission electron microscopy specimens......

Pyuck-Pa Choi; Young-Soon Kwon; Ji-Soon Kim; Tala?at Al-Kassab

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility (IMET) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility May 30, 2013 The Irradiated Material Examination and Testing (IMET) Facility was designed and built as a hot cell facility. It is a two-story block and brick structure with a two-story high bay that houses six heavily shielded cells and an array of sixty shielded storage wells. It includes the Specimen Prep Lab (SPL) with its associated laboratory hood and glove boxes, an Operating Area, where the control and monitoring instruments supporting the in-cell test equipment are staged, a utility corridor, a hot equipment storage area, a tank vault room, office space, a trucking area with access to the high bay, and an outside steel building for storage. The tests and examinations are conducted in six examination "hot" cells

272

Test to Determine Margin-to-Failure for Hy-100 Steel with Undermatched Welds  

SciTech Connect

This test program was undertaken to determine the flaw tolerance and to quantify the strength margin-to-failure of high yield strength steel fillet welded specimens. The tests demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure for HY-100 specimens fabricated with matched welding systems. In the use of high yield (HY) steel materials in designs required to accommodate rapidly applied dynamic loads, the concern was raised where the possibility of decreased flaw tolerance and premature failure by unstable ductile tearing could limit their use. Tests were developed and conducted to demonstrate adequate margin-to-failure in HY-100 fillet and partial penetration welded structures. In addition, inelastic analytical predictions were performed to assess the accuracy of such predictive tools compared to actual test data. Results showed that adequate margin-to-failure exists when using matched welding systems.

K.R. Arpin; T.F. Trimble

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Bone Surface and Whole Bone as Biomarkers for Acute Fluoride Exposure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......whole bone Fas a function oftime after the F doseswere tested for statistically significant differences by the Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's multiple comparison test. The correlation between bone surface and whole bone F concentrations......

Marília Afonso Rabelo Buzalaf; Elide Escolástico Caroselli; Juliane Guimarães de Carvalho; Rodrigo Cardoso de Oliveira; Vanessa Eid da Silva Cardoso; Gary Milton Whitford

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Computer aided surface representation  

SciTech Connect

The aims of this research are the creation of new surface forms and the determination of geometric and physical properties of surfaces. The full sweep from constructive mathematics through the implementation of algorithms and the interactive computer graphics display of surfaces is utilized. Both three-dimensional and multi- dimensional surfaces are considered. Particular emphasis is given to the scientific computing solution of Department of Energy problems. The methods that we have developed and that we are proposing to develop allow applications such as: Producing smooth contour maps from measured data, such as weather maps. Modeling the heat distribution inside a furnace from sample measurements. Terrain modeling based on satellite pictures. The investigation of new surface forms includes the topics of triangular interpolants, multivariate interpolation, surfaces defined on surfaces and monotone and/or convex surfaces. The geometric and physical properties considered include contours, the intersection of surfaces, curvatures as a interrogation tool, and numerical integration.

Barnhill, R E

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Surface permeability tests: experiments and modelling for estimating effective permeability  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...effective permeabilities in a two-dimensional domain with anisotropic effective permeabilities. The procedures put forward in this...1991Analytical models of the effective permeability of sand-shale reservoirsGeophys. J. Int. 105 513527( doi:10.1111...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Performance Testing of Radiant Barriers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERFORMANCE TESTING OF RADIANT BARRIERS JAMES A. HALL TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY Chattanooga, Tennessee ABSTRACT TVA has conducted a study to determine the effects of radiant barriers (RBI (i.e., a mterial with a low emissivity surface facing...Conservation of Radiative Heat Transfer Tnrough Fibrous Insulation." University of Mississippi, Sponsored by Tennessee Valley Authority, Contract TV-641 l5A, December 1985. 3. Davies, &en L., I1Tne Design and Analysis of Industrial Experiments, Hafher Publishing...

Hall, J. A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Surface effects of underground nuclear explosions  

SciTech Connect

The effects of nuclear explosions have been observed and studied since the first nuclear test (code named Trinity) on July 16, 1945. Since that first detonation, 1,053 nuclear tests have been conducted by the US, most of which were sited underground at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The effects of underground nuclear explosions (UNEs) on their surroundings have long been the object of much interest and study, especially for containment, engineering, and treaty verification purposes. One aspect of these explosion-induced phenomena is the disruption or alteration of the near-surface environment, also known as surface effects. This report was prepared at the request of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to bring together, correlate, and preserve information and techniques used in the recognition and documentation of surface effects of UNEs. This report has several main sections, including pertinent background information (Section 2.0), descriptions of the different types of surface effects (Section 3.0), discussion of their application and limitations (Section 4.0), an extensive bibliography and glossary (Section 6.0 and Appendix A), and procedures used to document geologic surface effects at the NTS (Appendix C). Because a majority of US surface-effects experience is from the NTS, an overview of pertinent NTS-specific information also is provided in Appendix B. It is not within the scope of this report to explore new relationships among test parameters, physiographic setting, and the types or degree of manifestation of surface effects, but rather to compile, summarize, and capture surface-effects observations and interpretations, as well as documentation procedures and the rationale behind them.

Allen, B.M.; Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Townsend, M.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Test Advising Framework.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Test cases are represented in various formats depending on the process, the technique or the tool used to generate the tests. While different test case… (more)

Wang, Yurong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Directed Test Suite Augmentation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Test suite augmentation techniques are used in regression testing to identify code elements affected by changes and to generate test cases to cover those elements.… (more)

Xu, Zhihong

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Surface Chemical Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Chemical Dynamics Surface Chemical Dynamics The goal of the Surface Chemical Dynamics Program is to elucidate the underlying physical processes that determine the products (selectivity) and yield (efficiency) of chemical transformations relevant to energy-related chemistry on catalytic and nanostructured surfaces. Achieving this end requires understanding the evolution of the reactant-molecule/surface complex as molecules adsorb, bonds dissociate, surface species diffuse, new bonds form and products desorb. The pathways and time scales of these processes are ultimately determined by a multidimensional potential energy surface that is a function of the geometric and electronic structures of the surface and the reactant, product, intermediate and transition-state molecular and atomic species.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

surface chemistry | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface chemistry surface chemistry Leads No leads are available at this time. FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMössbauer Spectroscopic Study....

282

Advanced Vehicle Testing - Beginning-of-Test Battery Testing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2.5 V Thermal Mgmt.: Passive, Vacuum-Sealed Unit Pack Weight: 294 kg BATTERY LABORATORY TEST RESULTS SUMMARY Vehicle Mileage and Testing Date Vehicle Odometer: 6,696 mi Date of...

283

SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS CONCLUDING REMARKS DYNAMIC TRANSITIONS OF SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION H.Dijkstra T. Sengul S. Wang #12;SURFACE TENSION DRIVEN CONVECTION DIJKSTRA, SENGUL, WANG INTRODUCTION LINEAR THEORY MAIN THEOREMS

Wang, Shouhong

284

Ion Surface Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ion Surface Engineering Southwest Research Institute® San Antonio, Texas surfaceengineering.swri.com #12;he ion surface engineering program at Southwest Research Institute (SwRI® ) is dedicated, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. SwRI's ion surface engineering activities include: s Thin

Chapman, Clark R.

285

Testing dynamically reconfigurable FPGAs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, testing methods are proposed to test the ics. logic resources and the interconnect structure of dynamically reconfigurable FPGAS. Testing methods are also proposed for testing the dedicated CPU interface in these FPGAS. A BIST...

Ruiwale, Sameer Jagadish

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

286

Validation of LC–TOF-MS Screening for Drugs, Metabolites, and Collateral Compounds in Forensic Toxicology Specimens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......quantitation of multiclass drugs of abuse and pharmaceuticals in hair...pharmaceuticals and drugs of abuse in hair using UPLC-TOF-MS...toxicology of emerging drugs of abuse. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring...police investigation of a Danish Internet company. Drug Testing and Analysis......

Fessessework Guale; Shahriar Shahreza; Jeffrey P. Walterscheid; Hsin-Hung Chen; Crystal Arndt; Anna T. Kelly; Ashraf Mozayani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

TEST SYSTEM FOR EVALUATING SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL BENDING STIFFNESS AND VIBRATION INTEGRITY  

SciTech Connect

Transportation packages for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) must meet safety requirements specified by federal regulations. For normal conditions of transport, vibration loads incident to transport must be considered. This is particularly relevant for high-burnup fuel (>45 GWd/MTU). As the burnup of the fuel increases, a number of changes occur that may affect the performance of the fuel and cladding in storage and during transportation. The mechanical properties of high-burnup de-fueled cladding have been previously studied by subjecting defueled cladding tubes to longitudinal (axial) tensile tests, ring-stretch tests, ring-compression tests, and biaxial tube burst tests. The objective of this study is to investigate the mechanical properties and behavior of both the cladding and the fuel in it under vibration/cyclic loads similar to the sustained vibration loads experienced during normal transport. The vibration loads to SNF rods during transportation can be characterized by dynamic, cyclic, bending loads. The transient vibration signals in a specified transport environment can be analyzed, and frequency, amplitude and phase components can be identified. The methodology being implemented is a novel approach to study the vibration integrity of actual SNF rod segments through testing and evaluating the fatigue performance of SNF rods at defined frequencies. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has developed a bending fatigue system to evaluate the response of the SNF rods to vibration loads. A three-point deflection measurement technique using linear variable differential transformers is used to characterize the bending rod curvature, and electromagnetic force linear motors are used as the driving system for mechanical loading. ORNL plans to use the test system in a hot cell for SNF vibration testing on high burnup, irradiated fuel to evaluate the pellet-clad interaction and bonding on the effective lifetime of fuel-clad structure bending fatigue performance. Technical challenges include pure bending implementation, remote installation and detachment of the SNF test specimen, test specimen deformation measurement, and identification of a driving system suitable for use in a hot cell. Surrogate test specimens have been used to calibrate the test setup and conduct systematic cyclic tests. The calibration and systematic cyclic tests have been used to identify test protocol issues prior to implementation in the hot cell. In addition, cyclic hardening in unidirectional bending and softening in reverse bending were observed in the surrogate test specimens. The interface bonding between the surrogate clad and pellets was found to impact the bending response of the surrogate rods; confirming this behavior in the actual spent fuel segments will be an important aspect of the hot cell test implementation,

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL] [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL] [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL] [ORNL; Flanagan, Michelle [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission] [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Surface Temperature of IGUs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

117 117 Surface Temperatures of Insulated Glazing Units: Infrared Thermography Laboratory Measurements Brent T. Griffith, Daniel Türler, and Dariush Arasteh Building Technologies Program Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California Berkeley, CA 94720 USA Fax: 510-486-6046, email: D_Arasteh@lbl.gov Abstract Data are presented for the distribution of surface temperatures on the warm-side surface of seven different insulated glazing units. Surface temperatures are measured using infrared thermography and an external referencing technique. This technique allows detailed mapping of surface temperatures that is non-intrusive. The glazings were placed between warm and cold environmental chambers that were operated at conditions

289

Surface cleanliness measurement procedure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Design and Testing of Prototypic Elements Containing Monolithic Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The US fuel development team has performed numerous irradiation tests on small to medium sized specimens containing low enriched uranium fuel designs. The team is now focused on qualification and demonstration of the uranium-molybdenum Base Monolithic Design and has entered the next generation of testing with the design and irradiation of prototypic elements which contain this fuel. The designs of fuel elements containing monolithic fuel, such as AFIP-7 (which is currently under irradiation) and RERTR-FE (which is currently under fabrication), are appropriate progressions relative to the technology life cycle. The culmination of this testing program will occur with the design, fabrication, and irradiation of demonstration products to include the base fuel demonstration and design demonstration experiments. Future plans show that design, fabrication, and testing activities will apply the rigor needed for a demonstration campaign.

N.E. Woolstenhulme; M.K. Meyer; D.M. Wachs

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

GR via Characteristic Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reformulate the Einstein equations as equations for families of surfaces on a four-manifold. These surfaces eventually become characteristic surfaces for an Einstein metric (with or without sources). In particular they are formulated in terms of two functions on R4xS2, i.e. the sphere bundle over space-time, - one of the functions playing the role of a conformal factor for a family of associated conformal metrics, the other function describing an S2's worth of surfaces at each space-time point. It is from these families of surfaces themselves that the conformal metric - conformal to an Einstein metric - is constructed; the conformal factor turns them into Einstein metrics. The surfaces are null surfaces with respect to this metric.

Simonetta Frittelli; Carlos Kozameh; Ted Newman

1995-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

292

Surface preparation for high purity alumina ceramics enabling direct brazing in hydrogen atmospheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a method for preparing the surface of a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen that enables direct brazing in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active braze alloy. The present invention also relates to a method for directly brazing a high purity alumina ceramic or sapphire specimen to a ceramic or metal member using this method of surface preparation, and to articles produced by this brazing method. The presence of silicon, in the form of a SiO.sub.2 -containing surface layer, can more than double the tensile bond strength in alumina ceramic joints brazed in a hydrogen atmosphere using an active Au-16Ni-0.75 Mo-1.75V filler metal. A thin silicon coating applied by PVD processing can, after air firing, produce a semi-continuous coverage of the alumina surface with a SiO.sub.2 film. Room temperature tensile strength was found to be proportional to the fraction of air fired surface covered by silicon-containing films. Similarly, the ratio of substrate fracture versus interface separation was also related to the amount of surface silicon present prior to brazing. This process can replace the need to perform a "moly-manganese" metallization step.

Cadden, Charles H. (Danville, CA); Yang, Nancy Yuan Chi (Lafayette, CA); Hosking, Floyd M. (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Unit Testing Discussion C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unit Testing Discussion C #12;Unit Test public Method is smallest unit of code Input/output transformation Test if the method does what it claims Not exactly black box testing #12;Test if (actual result Expected Computed Input #12;Functionality Computation ­ Easy to test Time based Asynchronous interaction

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

294

Iterative Antirandom Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Antirandom testing is a variation of pure random testing, which is the process of generating random patterns and applying it to a system under test (both software systems and hardware systems). However, research studies have shown that pure random testing ... Keywords: Antirandom test, Fault coverage, Maximal minimal hamming distance, Random tests

Ireneusz Mrozek; Vyacheslav N. Yarmolik

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Advanced spectroscopic analysis of coal surfaces during beneficiation  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary FTIR spectra are reported on coals undergoing flotation where enhanced recovery was achieved by ultrasonic or chemical treatments. The spectra of sonicated coals indicate that ultrasonic treatment (10 kHz Swen Sonic) reduces the surface oxidation of heavily oxidized coal. Spectra of chemically treated coal indicate that a higher mineral concentration is present on or near the surface of float coal suggesting that a slime might be present. Spectra are reported for coal-, mineral-, and crystal-derived pyrite which show a strong absorbance band at 420 cm{sup {minus}1}. Spectra of eight Argonne Premium Coal Library specimens have been examined in the 420 cm{sup {minus}1} spectral region and are found to have numerous overlapping bands. 4 figs.

McClelland, J.F.; Oh, J.S.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Pressure Change Measurement Leak Testing Errors  

SciTech Connect

A pressure change test is a common leak testing method used in construction and Non-Destructive Examination (NDE). The test is known as being a fast, simple, and easy to apply evaluation method. While this method may be fairly quick to conduct and require simple instrumentation, the engineering behind this type of test is more complex than is apparent on the surface. This paper intends to discuss some of the more common errors made during the application of a pressure change test and give the test engineer insight into how to correctly compensate for these factors. The principals discussed here apply to ideal gases such as air or other monoatomic or diatomic gasses; however these same principals can be applied to polyatomic gasses or liquid flow rate with altered formula specific to those types of tests using the same methodology.

Pryor, Jeff M [ORNL] [ORNL; Walker, William C [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Surface Impedance in the Surface Superconducting State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To enable a simple calculation of the microwave surface resistance, the surface superconducting state is approximated by a model in which a layer of uniform order parameter is considered superposed on the normal bulk. Appropriate values for the order parameter and thickness of this layer were chosen with the use of the numerical solutions of the Ginsburg-Landau equations by Fink and Kessinger. A Gorter-Casimir temperature dependence was used for the order parameter and the Maki temperature dependence for ?. Our experiments on Pb-In alloys at frequencies of 9.5, 23, and 55 Gc/sec are in good agreement with the calculations.

Allen Rothwarf; Jonathan I. Gittleman; Bruce Rosenblum

1967-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

298

Tools for Surface Analysis | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface analysis methods. Guides to surface analysis methods (see below) - (XPS, AES, SIMS, etc.) Data useful for surface analysis (see below) - (binding energies, sputter rates...

299

Amphetamines Detected in Exhaled Breath from Drug Addicts: A New Possible Method for Drugs-of-Abuse Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......testing and sample matrices alternative to urine such as blood, sweat...Cone Collision Ion Ion Voltage Energy Analyte m/z m/z (V...aromatics (16). The collection car- tridge material used in the...Caplan and B. Goldberger. Alternative specimens for work- place......

Olof Beck; Kathinka Leine; Göran Palmskog; Johan Franck

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ARM - Measurement - Surface condition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

condition condition ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface condition State of the surface, including vegetation, land use, surface type, roughness, and such; often provided in model output. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments NAV : Navigational Location and Attitude SURFLOG : SGP Surface Conditions Observations by Site Technicians S-TABLE : Stabilized Platform MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Standard Test Method for Measuring Dose for Use in Linear Accelerator Pulsed Radiation Effects Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers a calorimetric measurement of the total dose delivered in a single pulse of electrons from an electron linear accelerator or a flash X-ray machine (FXR, e-beam mode) used as an ionizing source in radiation-effects testing. The test method is designed for use with pulses of electrons in the energy range from 10 to 50 MeV and is only valid for cases in which both the calorimeter and the test specimen to be irradiated are“thin” compared to the range of these electrons in the materials of which they are constructed. 1.2 The procedure described can be used in those cases in which (1) the dose delivered in a single pulse is 5 Gy (matl) (500 rd (matl)) or greater, or (2) multiple pulses of a lower dose can be delivered in a short time compared to the thermal time constant of the calorimeter. Matl refers to the material of the calorimeter. The minimum dose per pulse that can be acceptably monitored depends on the variables of the particular test, including pulse rate, pulse uniformity...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Surface Water Quality Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SURFACE WATER QUALITY STANDARDS AAs part of the ongoing program to manage Texaswater quality, the Texas Commission onEnvironmental Quality (TCEQ) is currently review- ing the Texas Surface Water Quality Standards, including the standards... for contact recreation use. Preliminary public comment plus input from the Surface Water Quality Standards Advisory Work Group have provided guidance on options available for revising the standards, said Jim Davenport, leader of the TCEQ Water Quality...

Wythe, Kathy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Surface modification to waveguides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of treating the interior surfaces of a waveguide to improve power transmission comprising the steps of mechanically polishing to remove surface protrusions; electropolishing to remove embedded particles; ultrasonically cleaning to remove any residue; coating the interior waveguide surfaces with an alkyd resin solution or electrophoretically depositing carbon lamp black suspended in an alkyd resin solution to form a 1.mu. to 5.mu. thick film; vacuum pyrolyzing the film to form a uniform adherent carbon coating.

Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ); Ruzic, David N. (Kendall Park, NJ); Moore, Richard L. (Princeton, NJ); Cohen, Samuel A. (Pennington, NJ); Manos, Dennis M. (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Comparison of glass surfaces as a countertop material to existing surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Gleen Glass, a small production glass company that creates countertops, was selected for the Technology Assistance Program through Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Gleen Glass was seeking material property analysis comparing glass as a countertop material to current surfaces (i.e. marble, granite and engineered stone). With samples provided from Gleen Glass, testing was done on granite, marble, and 3 different glass surfaces ('Journey,' 'Pebble,' and 'Gleen'). Results showed the glass surfaces have a lower density, lower water absorption, and are stronger in compressive and flexural tests as compared to granite and marble. Thermal shock tests showed the glass failed when objects with a high thermal mass are placed directly on them, whereas marble and granite did not fracture under these conditions.

Turo, Laura A.; Winschell, Abigail E.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Laboratory creep and mechanical tests on salt data report (1975-1996): Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) thermal/structural interactions program  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a facility located in a bedded salt formation in Carlsbad, New Mexico, is being used by the U.S. Department of Energy to demonstrate the technology for safe handling and disposal of transuranic wastes produced by defense activities in the United States. In support of that demonstration, mechanical tests on salt were conducted in the laboratory to characterize material behavior at the stresses and temperatures expected for a nuclear waste repository. Many of those laboratory test programs have been carried out in the RE/SPEC Inc. rock mechanics laboratory in Rapid City, South Dakota; the first program being authorized in 1975 followed by additional testing programs that continue to the present. All of the WIPP laboratory data generated on salt at RE/SPEC Inc. over the last 20 years is presented in this data report. A variety of test procedures were used in performance of the work including quasi-static triaxial compression tests, constant stress (creep) tests, damage recovery tests, and multiaxial creep tests. The detailed data is presented in individual plots for each specimen tested. Typically, the controlled test conditions applied to each specimen are presented in a plot followed by additional plots of the measured specimen response. Extensive tables are included to summarize the tests that were performed. Both the tables and the plots contain cross-references to the technical reports where the data were originally reported. Also included are general descriptions of laboratory facilities, equipment, and procedures used to perform the work.

Mellegard, K.D. [RE/SPEC Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Kicked surface muon beams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of splitting a surface muon beam into three separate components using an ... and could be very effectively used to provide muons to time differential ?SR experiments.

J. L. Beveridge

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

EMSL - ion surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surfaces en Physical Properties of Ambient and Laboratory-Generated Secondary Organic Aerosol. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsphysical-properties-ambient-and-laborato...

308

EMSL - surface chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface-chemistry en FeSSZ-13 as an NH3-SCR Catalyst: A Reaction Kinetics and FTIRMössbauer Spectroscopic Study. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublications...

309

Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Association Conference Transportation Association Conference Vancouver, Canada December 2005 Hybrid Electric Vehicle Testing Jim Francfort U.S. Department of Energy - FreedomCAR & Vehicle Technologies Program, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity INL/CON-05-00964 Presentation Outline * Background & goals * Testing partners * Hybrid electric vehicle testing - Baseline performance testing (new HEV models) - 1.5 million miles of HEV fleet testing (160k miles per vehicle in 36 months) - End-of-life HEV testing (rerun fuel economy & conduct battery testing @ 160k miles per vehicle) - Benchmark data: vehicle & battery performance, fuel economy, maintenance & repairs, & life-cycle costs * WWW information location Background * Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - part of the

310

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Zero cross-over firing SCR circuits. Various types ofcircuit (1) Of these, the two that seem the most promising are the "Buck/Boost" and the "Zero cross-over firing

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

channel Ice-Point References (IPR) for thermocouples, threein Sweden. In the case of IPR units, each output should bethermocouple channels per IPR chassis. A good compromise

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Concrete Pavement Surface Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

log ISO 13473 #12;Friction Testing: DFT and Skid Trailer ASTM E 274 ASTM E 1911 #12;Noise Testing: OBSI AASHTO TP 76 #12;Friction vs. Noise Do Friction and Noise Relate? 100 102 104 106 108 110 112 10

313

Searching for Saddle Points of Potential Energy Surfaces by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

used for steplength tests and for the ring closure of azidoazo- methine to 1H-tetrazole. The results surface; HCN | CNH isomerization; azidoazomethine2 | 1H-tetrazole isomerization Correspondence to: W

Quapp, Wolfgang

314

ZiaTest  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ZiaTest ZiaTest Description This test executes a new proposed standard benchmark method for MPI startup that is intended to provide a realistic assessment of both launch and...

315

Test Herrera Report Template  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development are described in detail in the following section. The model was run in six test sites: Test Site 1 is along the Cowlitz River (Segment 3); Test Site 2 includes the...

316

Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Hydrogen-Assisted Fracture: Materials Testing and Variables Governing Fracture Brian Somerday, Chris San Marchi, and Dorian Balch Sandia National Laboratories Livermore, CA Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop Augusta, GA August 30-31, 2005 SNL has 40+ years experience with effects of high-pressure hydrogen gas on materials * Design and maintenance of welded stainless steel pressure vessels for containment of high-pressure H 2 isotopes - Extensive testing of stainless steels exposed to high-pressure H 2 gas * Six-year program in 1970s focused on feasibility of using natural gas pipeline network for H 2 gas - Materials testing in high-pressure H 2 gas using laboratory specimens and model pipeline - Examined fusion zone and heat affected zones of welds * Active SNL staff have authored 70+ papers and organized 6

317

An evaluation of mechanical anisotropy of Zircaloy using (impression testing)  

SciTech Connect

A knowledge of the mechanical anisotropy is important for predictability of dimensional changes and stability of fuel rods in service. In addition, the anisotropy parameters control formability and the ease with which Zircaloy tubing can be pilgered from tube-reduced extrusions (TREX). The mechanical anisotropy parameters are usually determined using tensile and internal pressurization tests while monitoring the biaxial (hoop and axial) strains; the parameters are evaluated INDIRECTLY from stresses and strains. We report here the application of the recently developed impression test method in evaluating these anisotropy parameters relatively more DIRECTLY from yield and flow stresses along the three orthogonal directions, namely axial, hoop and radial directions of the tubing. In addition, this type of testing can be made on relatively small specimens, which is of great advantage in investigating radiation effects on materials.

Murty, K.L.; Hussein, S.; Jong, Y.H.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Lighting Test Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Custom Projects Lighting Test Facilities SSL Guidelines Industrial Federal Agriculture LED Street and Area Lighting Field Test of Exterior LED Down Lights Abstract Outdoor...

319

CANbus. , Testing software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, , CANbus. , , . , . , , . Testing software for devices with CANbus interface functions of software, results of testing and examples of real applications. © . .. #12

Kozak, Victor R.

320

Chapter 13 - Testing Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Summary This chapter focuses on testing of data. Testing of data involves checking data that the team receives to detect defects. These defects can arise at data extraction, data receipt, and at data load into the team’s Data Manipulation Environment (DME). You will learn about the five ways in which data can be tested in Guerrilla Analytics. These are (1) completeness, (2) correctness, (3) consistency, (4) coherence, and (5) accountability. This chapter will also describe some tips for successful data testing including scopes of tests, storage of test results, common test routines, and automation of testing.

Enda Ridge

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High School Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The High School Testing Program has been suspended. Jerry Woodward High School Testing Program Mathematical Sciences Building 150 N. University Street

322

Limited Test Ban Treaty  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Detection System (USNDS), which monitors compliance with the international Limited Test Ban Treaty (LTBT). The LTBT, signed by 108 countries, prohibits nuclear testing in the...

323

Westinghouse Test Stand Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2014 Westinghouse Electric Company LLC. All Rights Reserved MT-14-12 Westinghouse VERA Test Stand Zero Power Physics Test Simulations for the AP1000 PWR Fausto Franceschini,...

324

Fully relativistic surface green function and its application to surface spectroscopies  

SciTech Connect

A fully relativistic layer-KKR formalism was developed and implemented for calculating the single-particle Green function in atomic layers parallel to crystalline surfaces magnetic and non magnetic materials: The method was applied to the calculation surface spectroscopies, such as low energy electron diffraction (LEED), angle-resolve ultraviolet photo emission spectroscopy (UPS), and photoelectron scattering. Numeric tests were performed for non magnetic actinide surfaces and magnetic Fe surface Theoretical angle-resolved UPS spectra are presented for uranium monolayers on Pt(111) and for f.c.c. u(lll) surfaces. We find that u island formation can take place if a peak in the UPS spectra appears just before the Fermi energy immediately as u is deposited on P and we suggest an experimental procedure for testing this prediction. An intensity map photo excited electrons from the 2p{sub 3/2} core states of Fe(110) surface is also show Sizable magnetic anisotropy is found due to the interference between exchange and spin-orbit interaction, which is suitable for studying a possible surface-induced magnetism actinide adlayers.

Tamura, E. [Seaborg (Glenn T.) Inst. for Transactinium Science, Livermore, CA (United States)

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comparison of interfacial shear strength from fibre pull out and mechanical testing in polypropylene sisal composites  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we investigated the interfacial shear strength for the system sisal polypropylene. Composites containing different chop lengths were produced via extrusion and injection moulding. These test specimens were investigated for tensile and impact properties, as well as the final fibre length in the composite was determined. A simple rule of mixtures model was applied to evaluate the mechanical testing for the interfacial shear strength, which was compared with the one retrieved from single fibre pull out tests. We found good applicability of the rule of mixtures to evaluate the composite for the interfacial shear strength.

Christoph Burgstaller

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

THERMAL TESTING OF PROTOTYPE GENERAL PURPOSE FISSILE PACKAGES USING A FURNACE  

SciTech Connect

The 9977/9978 General Purpose Fissile Package (GPFP) was designed by SRNL to replace the DOT 6M Specification Package and ship Plutonium and Uranium metals and oxides. Urethane foam was used for the overpack to ensure the package would withstand the 10CFR71.73(c)(2) crush test, which is a severe test for drum-type packages. In addition, it was necessary to confirm that the urethane foam configuration provided adequate thermal protection for the containment vessel during the subsequent 10CFR71.73(c)(4) thermal test. Development tests were performed on early prototype test specimens of different diameter overpacks and a range of urethane foam densities. The thermal test was performed using an industrial furnace. Test results were used to optimize the selection of package diameter and foam density, and provided the basis for design enhancements incorporated into the final package design.

Smith, A; Lawrence Gelder, L; Paul Blanton, P

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

328

Butyl rubber O-ring seals: Revision of test procedures for stockpile materials  

SciTech Connect

Extensive testing showed little correlation between test slab and O-ring performance. New procedures, comparable to those used with the traditional test slabs, were defined for hardness, compression set, and tensile property testing on sacrificial O-ring specimens. Changes in target performance values were made as needed and were, in one case, tightened to reflect the O-ring performance data. An additional study was carried out on O-ring and slab performance vs cure cycle and showed little sensitivity of material performance to large changes in curing time. Aging and spectra of certain materials indicated that two sets of test slabs from current vendor were accidently made from EPDM rather than butyl rubber. Random testing found no O-rings made from EPDM. As a result, and additional spectroscope test will be added to the product acceptance procedures to verify the type of rubber compound used.

Domeier, L.A.; Wagter, K.R.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

de Sitter Extremal Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study extremal surfaces in de Sitter space in the Poincare slicing in the upper patch, anchored on spatial subregions at the future boundary ${\\cal I}^+$, restricted to constant boundary Euclidean time slices (focussing on strip subregions). We find real extremal surfaces of minimal area as the boundaries of past lightcone wedges of the subregions in question: these are null surfaces with vanishing area. We find also complex extremal surfaces as complex extrema of the area functional, and the area is not always real-valued. In $dS_4$ the area is real and has some structural resemblance with entanglement entropy in a dual $CFT_3$. There are parallels with analytic continuation from the Ryu-Takayanagi expressions for holographic entanglement entropy in $AdS$. We also discuss extremal surfaces in the $dS$ black brane and the de Sitter "bluewall" studied previously. The $dS_4$ black brane complex surfaces exhibit a real finite cutoff-independent extensive piece. In the bluewall geometry, there are real surface...

Narayan, K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Seakeeping response of a Surface Effect Ship in near-shore transforming seas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Scale model tests are conducted of a Surface Effect Ship in a near-shore developing sea. A beach is built and installed in a wave tank,… (more)

Kindel, Michael.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for Toxic Algae By Tadd Barrow UNL Extension Educator, Water Quality Algae is a microscopic plant that occurs in all water. However, only certain conditions bring algae to the surface, making it toxic to animals, especially humans and dogs. Toxic algae often are naturally occurring from high

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

332

Failure surface model for oil shale  

SciTech Connect

One promising means of recovering oil from oil shale is to retort the shale in situ. Currently, modified in situ technology requires the construction of extensive underground openings or retorts. The remaining media (structure left around these retorts must support the overburden and contain the retorting shale. A failure criterion for oil shale, which is presented in this paper, was developed so that regions in the retort structure where the shale may be approaching failure can be identified. This criterion, adapted from composite materials applications, is essentially a closed surface in six-dimensional stress space and makes it possible to describe the anisotropic nature of failure in layered materials. The failure surface can be defined by five parameters which are determined from five simple laboratory tests. The surface is developed for a 80 ml/kg kerogen content shale and its features are discussed in detail. The predictions of the model are found to be in agreement with the results of a large number of laboratory tests, including uniaxial and triaxial compression tests. One unique (for rocks) test series is discussed which involves the failure of thin-walled tubes under combined compression and torsion. Finally, it is shown how the model can be extended to include the variation of material properties with kerogen content and temperature.

Costin, L.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing, 2013 Mousavi: Path Testing #12;Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Outline Structural

Mousavi, Mohammad

334

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Path Testing Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing, 2012 Mousavi: Path Testing #12;Structural Testing: An Introduction Flow Graphs Path Testing Conclusions Outline Structural

Mousavi, Mohammad

335

Testing gravitational physics with superconducting gravimeters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconducting gravimeters are the most sensitive instruments to measure surface gravity changes at low frequencies. Currently, about twenty five superconducting gravimeters are operating in the world and their global network has been developed. We investigate possible applications of the superconducting gravimeters to tests of gravitational physics. Previous experimental searches for spatial anisotropies in the gravitational constant G and for gravitational waves, performed with gravimeters in 1960's to 1970's, can be improved by applications of the current superconducting gravimeters. Also, we describe other proposed applications of testing the universality of free-fall and searching for composition-dependent dilatonic waves, and discuss future works necessary for these geophysical tests.

Sachie Shiomi

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

Surfaces and roughening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Some recent results in the application of statistical mechanics to surfaces are discussed. Only exactly soluable models are described. First, we consider phase separation below the critical temperature in unia...

D. B. Abraham

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Entropy and surfaceness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The layer of the Earth's atmosphere which contains clouds and weather systems is a thin thermoregulatory surface. It maintains an exact energy budget between the Earth and the Sun. Recent work in theoretical physics is ...

Casper, James Kyle

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Structured surfaces for hemocompatibility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The rise of micro- and nano-technologies has brought to light intriguing examples of scale-driven performance in a diverse array of fields. The quest to create highly hydrophobic surfaces is one such field. The application ...

Schrauth, Anthony J

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Designing biomimetic antifouling surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...extreme environment where wave-swept rocky coasts place substantial hydrodynamic forces...2000) have been studied and modelled for flat surfaces using two- and three-dimensional...to biocorrosion, resulting in increased safety and financial concerns (Busalmen et al...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

ARM - Measurement - Surface albedo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

albedo albedo ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Surface albedo The fraction of incoming solar radiation at a surface (i.e. land, cloud top) that is effectively reflected by that surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MFR : Multifilter Radiometer External Instruments ETA : Eta Model Runs ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Diagnostic Analyses ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Bespoke Materials Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bespoke Materials Surfaces Bespoke Materials Surfaces Background The Department of Energy (DOE) has established performance and efficiency goals for power generation systems which will improve the ability of the U.S. energy sector to produce electricity efficiently with less impact to the environment. Power systems showing the most promise for reaching these goals require corrosion resistance alloys able to perform at very high pressures and temperatures. Increasing both the

342

Portable basketball rim testing device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable basketball rim rebound testing device 10 is illustrated in two preferred embodiments for testing the rebound or energy absorption characteristics of a basketball rim 12 and its accompanying support to determine likely rebound or energy absorption charcteristics of the system. The apparatus 10 includes a depending frame 28 having a C-clamp 36 for releasably rigidly connecting the frame to the basketball rim 12. A glide weight 60 is mounted on a guide rod 52 permitting the weight 60 to be dropped against a calibrated spring 56 held on an abutment surface on the rod to generate for deflecting the basketball rim and then rebounding the weight upwardly. A photosensor 66 is mounted on the depending frame 28 to sense passage of reflective surfaces 75 on the weight to thereby obtain sufficient data to enable a processing means 26 to calculate the rebound velocity and relate it to an energy absorption percentage rate of the rim system 12. A readout is provided to display the energy absorption percentage.

Abbott, W. Bruce (610 Clover St., Cheney, WA 99004); Davis, Karl C. (Box 722, Richland, WA 99352)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Nondestructive testing using stress waves: wave propagation in layered media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of stress waves in several civil engineering applications such as nondestructive testing of soil deposits or pavement systems has become extremely popular over the last few years. In all cases, a dynamic impulse is applied to the surface...

Ortega, Jose Alberto

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

344

Nonchemical surface treatment for aluminum alloys. Final report, 1 April--1 September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The state-of-the-art chemical surface treatments for adhesive bonding of aluminum alloys, such as phosphoric acid anodizing (PAA) are the basis of the present high-strength and durable adhesive bonds. Because of increasingly strict regulations on the use of wet chemicals, the Materials Directorate at Wright Laboratories initiated a research program to develop alternative nonchemical techniques that do not produce waste and are not detrimental to health and environment. This report describes the development of a nonchemical process, based on ion beam enhanced deposition (IBED). The process consists of various steps, the major ones being grit blasting with 50 micrometers Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} grit and deposition of (proportional to)-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with IBED. The resulting surface is dense and corrosion resistant, and provides an excellent basis for adhesive bonding. Strength and durability studies on peel and wedge type specimens is equivalent to that of anodized specimens. Surface analytical studies, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) , and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), as well as electrochemical studies were used to characterize the surface and determine the mechanism of adhesion.

Koch, G.H.; Todd, G.L.; Deutchman, A.; Partyka, R.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Detailed Test Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Test Information Detailed Test Information EPA tests vehicles by running them through a series of driving routines, also called cycles or schedules, that specify vehicle speed for each point in time during the laboratory tests. For 2007 and earlier model year vehicles, only the city and highway schedules were used. Beginning with 2008 models, three additional tests will be used to adjust the city and highway estimates to account for higher speeds, air conditioning use, and colder temperatures. Note: EPA has established testing criteria for electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids that are slightly different than those for conventional vehicles. New Tests City Highway High Speed Air Conditioning Cold Temperature Detailed Comparison EPA Federal Test Procedure (City Schedule): Shows vehicle speed (mph) at each second of test

346

Investigation Of Breakdown Induced Surface Damage On 805 Mhz Pillbox Cavity Interior Surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MuCool Test Area (MTA) at Fermilab is a facility to develop the technology required for ionization cooling for a future Muon Collider and/or Neutrino Factory. As part of this research program, we have tested two 805 MHz vacuum RF cavities in a multi-Tesla magnetic field to study the effects of the static magnetic field on the cavity operation. This study gives useful information on field emitters in the cavity, dark current, surface conditioning, breakdown mechanisms and material properties of the cavity. All these factors determine the maximum accelerating gradient in the cavity. This paper discusses the image processing technique for quantitative estimation of spark damage spot distribution on cavity interior surfaces. The distribution is compared with the electric field distribution predicted by a computer code calculation. The local spark density is proportional to probability of surface breakdown and shows a power law dependence on the maximum electric field (E). This E dependence is consistent with ...

Jana, M R; Leonova, M; Moretti, A; Tollestrup, A; Yonehara, K; Freemire, B; Torun, Y; Bowring, D; Flanagan, G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanford's 300 Area Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed - Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed...

348

Test Anxiety What is Test Anxiety?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Physical Characteris cs Sweaty palms, faster heart rate, shallow breathing, upset stomach, vomi ng, bu a plan. Expect the ini al panic at the begin ning of the test. Take a deep breath and let it pass

Barrash, Warren

349

Nevada Test Site Sensor Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

A Sensor Test Facility (STF) was recently established at the Department of Energy`s Nevada Test Site (NTS). It has been used for a series of sensor tests that have demonstrated the usefulness of the testbed. The facility consists of a cut-and-cover bunker complex and the two square mile surrounding area. The STF was developed as a scientific testbed optimized for the development and evaluation of advanced sensor systems, including ground sensor systems designed to identify and detect hardened underground facilities. This was accomplished by identifying a facility in a remote location where seismic, acoustic, and electromagnetic interference would be minimal, establishing a testbed that would be accommodating to field testing, and conducting a thorough geophysical characterization of the area surrounding the facility in order to understand the local geology and its effects on geophysical signals emanating from the facility. The STF is representative of a number of cut-and-cover bunkers around the world that are used for the manufacture and/or storage of weapons of mass destruction. This paper provides a general description of the Nevada Test Site, the Sensor Test Facility, and the Geophysical Site Characterization.

Gomez, B.J.; Boyer, W.B.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Analog Missions and Field Tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the habitat while wearing spacesuits. Testing in the antarctic simulated what it would be like for astronauts. The Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, home of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Sanctuary, about 62 feet beneath the surface. A surface buoy provides connections for power, life

351

MHK Technologies/Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Cyclocean LLC Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description Self regulated sub surface current generators that operate independently that tether freely anchored offshore in deep waters in the Gulf Stream Current producing continuos clean energy for the eastern seaboard Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 20:10.1 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Sub_Surface_Counter_Rotation_Current_Generator&oldid=681657

352

Surface Water Quality Standards (Kansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This act states regulations for the quality of surface water in the state. It also states designated uses of classified surface waters, surface water quality criteria and an antidegradation policy...

353

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

354

Program for field validation of the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique for Ultrasonic Testing (SAFT UT). Final report  

SciTech Connect

This final report describes work performed by Southwest Research Institute for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in fulfillment of NRC Contract No. NRC-04-77-145: ''Program for Field Validation of the Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique for Ultrasonic Testing (SAFT UT).'' The purpose of the project was to validate the effectiveness of SAFT UT as a nondestructive examination technique for nuclear power and other related industries. SAFT UT is an ultrasonic imaging method for accurate measurement of the spatial location and extent of acoustically reflective surfaces (flaws) contained in objects such as structural components and weldments in nuclear power reactor systems. The increased measurement accuracy offered by SAFT, when compared with that provided by measurement methods now in use, will improve the reliability of flaw severity assessment with resultant safety and economic benefits to the nuclear power industry. This report presents a comprehensive discussion of the work accomplished in evaluating the performance capabilities of the developed SAFT UT inspection system. Inspection results obtained using both 0-degree longitudinal and angle-beam operating modes are presented. These results include laboratory and nuclear power plant field site examinations on a variety of defect types contained within carbon and stainless steel flat plate and cylindrical test specimens or components. The SAFT UT processed data flaw images are evaluated by comparing them to results obtained from destructive sectioning or by using flaw fabrication data which predicted actual flaw depth, orientation and size. On the basis of these evaluations, conclusions are presented which summarize the performance capabilities of the SAFT UT inspection technique. 116 figs.

Hamlin, D.R.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Experimental investigation of a thermionic converter with developed surface electrodes  

SciTech Connect

A thermionic converter with developed planar electrode surfaces is designed and tested. One of the electrodes has concentric circular grooves cut into its surface, while the other electrode surface is smooth. The grooves are 0.5 mm deep and 0.5 mm wide, having lands that are 1.0 mm wide. The experimental setup is flexible so that either the smooth or developed surface electrode can be operated as the emitter, with the other operating as the collector. The I-V characteristics and power output are compared for the two electrode arrangements. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

Luke, J.R.; El-Genk, M.S.; Adrian, J.M. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies/Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico87131 (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Experimental investigation of a thermionic converter with developed surface electrodes  

SciTech Connect

A thermionic converter with developed planar electrode surfaces is designed and tested. One of the electrodes has concentric circular grooves cut into its surface, while the other electrode surface is smooth. The grooves are 0.5 mm deep and 0.5 mm wide, having lands that are 1.0 mm wide. The experimental setup is flexible so that either the smooth or developed surface electrode can be operated as the emitter, with the other operating as the collector. The I-V characteristics and power output are compared for the two electrode arrangements.

Luke, James R.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.; Adrian, John M. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies/Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)

1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

357

MHL Free Surface Channel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHL Free Surface Channel MHL Free Surface Channel Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name MHL Free Surface Channel Overseeing Organization University of Michigan Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Channel Beam(m) 1.0 Depth(m) 0.6 Cost(per day) $2000 (+ Labor/Materials) Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities Yes Maximum Velocity(m/s) 2 Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Custom Data Acquisition System using National Instruments hardware; system compatible with Planing Hull and Floating Beam Dynamometers Custom Data Acquisition System using National Instruments hardware; system compatible with Planing Hull and Floating Beam Dynamometers

358

Sandia National Laboratories: Mechanical Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EnergyNuclear Energy Systems Laboratory (NESL) Brayton LabMechanical Testing Mechanical Testing Mechanical Testing Overview Mechanical 1-2 (2008). Standard Test Methods for...

359

SMVCIR Dimensionality Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combination of independent 21 random variables. Simulations are performed to corroborate these theoretic findings. Additionally, based on work by Bentler and Xie, an approximation to the test statistic reference distribution is proposed and tested...

Lindsey, Charles D.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

360

Iterative Antirandom Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Another approach to generate antirandom tests was presented in [33...]. It is called as Scalable Test Pattern Generation (STPG). Unlike pure antirandom method of the...33] introduced scalable generation method of...

Ireneusz Mrozek; Vyacheslav N. Yarmolik

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nuclear testing continues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nation's supply had literally been used up ending the war, was to prepare for additional nuclear testing. Earlier we briefly mentioned the first such test after the war. Let's...

362

Improved LWR Cladding Performance by EPD Surface Modification Technique  

SciTech Connect

This project will utilize the electro-phoretic deposition technique (EPD) in conjunction with nanofluids to deposit oxide coatings on prototypic zirconium alloy cladding surfaces. After demonstrating that this surface modification is reproducible and robust, the team will subject the modified surface to boiling and corrosion tests to characterize the improved nucleate boiling behavior and superior corrosion performance. The scope of work consists of the following three tasks: The first task will employ the EPD surface modification technique to coat the surface of a prototypic set of zirconium alloy cladding tube materials (e.g. Zircaloy and advanced alloys such as M5) with a micron-thick layer of zirconium oxide nanoparticles. The team will characterize the modified surface for uniformity using optical microscopy and scanning-electron microscopy, and for robustness using standard hardness measurements. After zirconium alloy cladding samples have been prepared and characterized using the EPD technique, the team will begin a set of boiling experiments to measure the heat transfer coefficient and critical heat flux (CHF) limit for each prepared sample and its control sample. This work will provide a relative comparison of the heat transfer performance for each alloy and the surface modification technique employed. As the boiling heat transfer experiments begin, the team will also begin corrosion tests for these zirconium alloy samples using a water corrosion test loop that can mimic light water reactor (LWR) operational environments. They will perform extended corrosion tests on the surface-modified zirconium alloy samples and control samples to examine the robustness of the modified surface, as well as the effect on surface oxidation

Michael Corradini; Kumar Sridharan

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

363

Dual surface interferometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A double-pass interferometer is provided which allows direct measurement of relative displacement between opposed surfaces. A conventional plane mirror interferometer may be modified by replacing the beam-measuring path cube-corner reflector with an additional quarterwave plate. The beam path is altered to extend to an opposed plane mirrored surface and the reflected beam is placed in interference with a retained reference beam split from dual-beam source and retroreflected by a reference cube-corner reflector mounted stationary with the interferometer housing. This permits direct measurement of opposed mirror surfaces by laser interferometry while doubling the resolution as with a conventional double-pass plane mirror laser interferometer system.

Pardue, R.M.; Williams, R.R.

1980-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

364

Performance Tested Comfort Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Showerheads Residential Weatherization Performance Tested Comfort Systems Ductless Heat Pumps New Construction Residential Marketing Toolkit Retail Sales Allocation Tool...

365

Articles about Testing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stories about testing facilities, capabilities, and certification featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program.

366

Coaxial test fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention pertains to arrangements for performing electrical tests on contact material samples, and in particular for testing contact material test samples in an evacuated environment under high current loads. Frequently, it is desirable in developing high-current separable contact material, to have at least a preliminary analysis of selected candidate conductor materials. Testing of material samples will hopefully identify materials unsuitable for high current electrical contact without requiring incorporation of the materials into a completed and oftentimes complex structure.

Praeg, W.F.

1984-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

367

H-Bomb Tested?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In furtherance of the President's announcement of Jan. 31, 1950, the test program included experiments contributing to thermonuclear weapons research. ...

1952-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

368

BENCAP, LLC: CAPSULE VELOCITY TEST  

SciTech Connect

Ben Cap, LLC, has a technology that utilizes bebtonite to plug wells. The bentonite is encapsulated in a cardboard capsule, droped down to the bottom of the well where it is allowed to hydrate, causing the bentonite to expand and plug the well. This method of plugging a well is accepted in some, but not all states. This technology can save a significant amount of money when compared to cementing methods currently used to plug and abandon wells. The test objective was to obtain the terminal velocity of the capsule delivery system as it drops through a column of water in a wellbore. Once the terminal velocity is known, the bentonite swelling action can be timed not to begin swelling until it reaches the bottom of the well bore. The results of the test showed that an average speed of 8.93 plus or minus 0.12 ft/sec was achieved by the capsule as it was falling through a column of water. Plotting the data revealed a very linear function with the capsules achieving terminal velocity shortly after being released. The interference of the capsule impacting the casing was not readily apparent in any of the runs, but a siginal sampling anomaly was present in one run. Because the anomaly was so brief and not present in any of the other runs, no solid conclusions could be drawn. Additional testing would be required to determine the effects of capsules impacting a fluid level that is not at surface.

Meidinger, Brian

2005-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

369

Testing Software with Pexpect 1 Testing Computer Algebra Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing Software with Pexpect 1 Testing Computer Algebra Systems testing software preparing the test suite replacing print with assert statements 2 Automating Tests with Pexpect testing SymPy in Sage with Pexpect running the test on SymPy in Sage applying Pexpect to test the factorizations MCS 507 Lecture 39

Verschelde, Jan

370

Testing of candidate materials for their resistance to alkali-vapor adsorption in PFBC and gasification environments. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory-scale studies were performed to identify metallic material(s) having no, or limited, affinity for alkali vapors in an environment of either the off-gas from pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) or the fuel gas from coal gasification. Such materials would be potential candidates for use as components in advanced coal-utilization systems. The following materials were tested for adsorption of NaCl vapor at 870--875 C and atmospheric pressure in a simulated PFBC off-gas (oxidizing) doped with 80 ppmW NaCl vapor: iron-based Type 304 stainless steel (304 SS), nickel-based Hastelloy C-276 and Hastelloy X alloys, cobalt-based Haynes No. 188 alloy, noble-metal-coated 304 SS, aluminized 304 SS, and ZrO{sub 2}-coated 304 SS. The Haynes No. 188 alloy and the aluminized 304 SS were also tested for their NaCl-vapor adsorption in a simulated gasification fuel gas (reducing) under the same test conditions as in the PFBC off-gas test. After 100 h of testing, the specimens were analyzed with a SEM equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer, and by an AES. The aluminized 304 SS had the least tendency to adsorb NaCl vapor, as well as an excellent resistance to corrosion as a result of the formation of a protective layer of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} on its surface. In the reducing environment, however, the aluminized 304 SS was badly corroded by H{sub 2}S attack. The Haynes No. 188 showed virtually no NaCl-vapor adsorption and only limited H{sub 2}S attack. The authors recommend further long-term parametric studies to quantitate alkali-vapor adsorption as a function of operating variables for (1) the aluminized 304 SS in the PFBC off-gas environment and (2) the Haynes No. 188 in the gasification fuel gas environment.

Lee, S.H.D.; Natesan, K.; Swift, W.M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Nanoparticle toxicity testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nanoparticle toxicity testing Nanoparticle toxicity testing 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Nanoparticle toxicity testing Assessing the potential health hazards of nanotechnology March 25, 2013 Robot In the search for more accurate and efficient techniques to evaluate the health hazards of nanoparticles, Los Alamos researchers are developing artificial human tissues and organs to replace animal test subjects. A new approach to toxicity testing under development at Los Alamos uses artificial tissue and artificial organs instead of animal testing Manufactured nanoparticles such as buckyballs and carbon nanotubes, used in products ranging from sunscreens to solar panels, are proliferating so quickly that safety testing for potential health hazards-similar to those

372

Test Cell Location  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mazda 3 i-Stop Mazda 3 i-Stop Test Cell Location APRF- 4WD Vehicle Setup Information Downloadable Dynamometer Database (D 3 )- Test Summary Sheet Vehicle Architecture Conventional- Start Stop Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] 3250 Vehicle Dynamometer Input Document Date 11/20/2012 Revision Number 1 Advanced Powertrain Research Facility Test weight [lb] Target A [lb] 3250 31.2 Target B [lb/mph] Target C [lb/mph^2] 0.462 0.014 Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package - Manual Transmission - All tests completed in ECO mode - EPA shift schedule modified based on vehicle shift light activity Revision Number 1 Notes: Fuel type EPA Tier II EEE Gasoline Test Fuel Information - Vehicle equipped with with i-Stop package

373

RMOTC - Testing - Geothermal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geothermal Testing Geothermal Testing Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. With the existing geologic structure at RMOTC, promising potential exists for Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) testing. The field also has two reliable water resources for supporting low-temperature geothermal testing.

374

Sample Proficiency Test exercise  

SciTech Connect

The current format of the OPCW proficiency tests has multiple sets of 2 samples sent to an analysis laboratory. In each sample set, one is identified as a sample, the other as a blank. This method of conducting proficiency tests differs from how an OPCW designated laboratory would receive authentic samples (a set of three containers, each not identified, consisting of the authentic sample, a control sample, and a blank sample). This exercise was designed to test the reporting if the proficiency tests were to be conducted. As such, this is not an official OPCW proficiency test, and the attached report is one method by which LLNL might report their analyses under a more realistic testing scheme. Therefore, the title on the report ''Report of the Umpteenth Official OPCW Proficiency Test'' is meaningless, and provides a bit of whimsy for the analyses and readers of the report.

Alcaraz, A; Gregg, H; Koester, C

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Decontaminating metal surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g., >600 g/1 of NaNO/sub 3/, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH < 6.

Childs, E.L.

1984-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

376

Decontaminating metal surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Radioactively contaminated surfaces can be electrolytically decontaminated with greatly increased efficiencies by using electrolytes containing higher than heretofore conventional amounts of nitrate, e.g.,>600 g/l of NaNO.sub.3, or by using nitrate-containing electrolytes which are acidic, e.g., of a pH<6.

Childs, Everett L. (Boulder, CO)

1984-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

377

Onset of surface superconductivity  

SciTech Connect

We examine the onset of superconductivity in the surface region of a metal. Surface effects are particularly important in systems with a short bulk coherence length {xi}{sub 0}. We show that, to the accuracy of the calculation, the surface transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital S}} equals the bulk transition temperature {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital B}} if the electron-electron interaction is of the standard BCS form, i.e., a single attractive square well, extending up to some critical energy {omega}{sub 0} much smaller than the Fermi energy {var epsilon}{sub {ital F}}. If one takes into account, in addition, the repulsive part of the interaction extending beyond {omega}{sub 0} up to energies of order {var epsilon}{sub {ital F}}, then one may have {ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital S}}{gt}{ital T}{sub {ital c}{ital B}} in certain cases, although, due to restrictions imposed on the parameter values by various physical conditions, the relative increase of {ital T}{sub {ital c}} is very small, typically 10{sup {minus}3}, at least in the weak coupling limit. However, we also find a considerable gap enhancement, of order 20%, near the surface which could be of interest for critical-current measurements. Therefore we suggest an experimental reexamination of systems with short {xi}{sub 0}, i.e., superconducting degenerate semiconductors and the new high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} oxides in confined geometries where the surface-to-volume ratio is non-negligible.

Giamarchi, T.; Beal-Monod, M.T. (Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud 91405 Orsay, (France)); Valls, O.T. (Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Universite Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay, (France) Center for the Science and Application of Superconductivity, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

Blaine Grover

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Smart, passive sun facing surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position. 17 figs.

Hively, L.M.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Smart, passive sun facing surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An article adapted for selectively utilizing solar radiation comprises an absorptive surface and a reflective surface, the absorptive surface and the reflective surface oriented to absorb solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively low position, and to reflect solar radiation when the sun is in a relatively high position.

Hively, Lee M. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Surface decontamination compositions and methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Clay-based compositions capable of absorbing contaminants from surfaces or objects having surface faces may be applied to a surface and later removed, the removed clay-based compositions absorbing at least a portion of the contaminant from the surface or object to which it was applied.

Wright; Karen E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cooper, David C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Demmer, Ricky L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Tripp, Julia L. (Pocatello, ID); Hull, Laurence C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

382

Effective Darcy-scale contact angles in porous media imbibing solutions of various surface tensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective Darcy-scale contact angles in porous media imbibing solutions of various surface tensions was to develop and test a methodology to determine whether these surface tension effects predictably alter of 25° for the NaNO3 solution solely on the basis of surface tension contrast. The results of this study

Selker, John

383

The triadic preference test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A triadic preference test was developed as an alternative to the paired preference test. The three stimuli in the test comprised a putatively identical placebo pair and a different stimulus. This was in contrast to the regular paired preference test that utilizes a placebo pair. Such a test requires the presentation of two pairs of stimuli: a putatively identical placebo pair and a test pair. The triadic preference test only requires one triad. With the regular test, the majority of consumers respond to the placebo pair with a preference response. It is generally assumed that these consumers are responding to extraneous factors: those factors that elicit a preference response that are different from the sensory attributes of the food under assessment. As an attempt to minimize the possibility of responses to extraneous factors when assessing the test pair, it has been suggested to only use those consumers who chose the ‘No Preference’ option for the placebo pair. However, this form of ‘screening’ is not viable because the resulting ‘screened’ sample size is greatly reduced to approximately one third. However, in the present study, with the triadic preference test, the resulting ‘screened’ sample size ranged 76.5–94% of the total. Thus, this form of ‘screening’ against consumers who demonstrated response to extraneous factors for the placebo pair, was now feasible.

Eduardo Calderón; Alondra Rivera-Quintero; Yixun Xia; Ofelia Angulo; Michael O’Mahony

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Academic Testing Services STRATEGIC PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academic Testing Services STRATEGIC PLAN 2009 MISSION STATEMENT Academic Testing Services provides proctored testing services administered in a secure and appropriate standardized testing environment. VISION STATEMENT Academic Testing Services will provide quality services that are integral to recruitment

Rock, Chris

385

Technical justifications for the tests and criteria in the waste form technical position appendix on cement stabilization  

SciTech Connect

As part of its technical assistance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a background document for the cement stabilization appendix, Appendix A, to Rev. 1 of the Technical Position on Waste Form (TP). Here we present an overview of this background document, which provides technical justification for the stability tests to be performed on cement-stabilized waste forms and for the criteria posed in each test, especially for those tests which have been changed from their counterparts in the May 1983 Rev. 0 TP. We address guidelines for procedures from Appendix A which are considered in less detail or not at all in the Rev. 0 of the TP, namely, qualification specimen preparation (mixing, curing, storage), statistical sampling and analysis, process control program specimen preparation and examination, and surveillance specimens. For each waste form qualification test, criterion or procedural guidelines, we consider the reason for its inclusion in Appendix A, the changes from Rev. 0 of the TP (if applicable), and a discussion of the justification or rationale for these changes.

Siskind, B.; Cowgill, M.G.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Technical justifications for the tests and criteria in the waste form technical position appendix on cement stabilization  

SciTech Connect

As part of its technical assistance to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) developed a background document for the cement stabilization appendix, Appendix A, to Rev. 1 of the Technical Position on Waste Form (TP). Here we present an overview of this background document, which provides technical justification for the stability tests to be performed on cement-stabilized waste forms and for the criteria posed in each test, especially for those tests which have been changed from their counterparts in the May 1983 Rev. 0 TP. We address guidelines for procedures from Appendix A which are considered in less detail or not at all in the Rev. 0 of the TP, namely, qualification specimen preparation (mixing, curing, storage), statistical sampling and analysis, process control program specimen preparation and examination, and surveillance specimens. For each waste form qualification test, criterion or procedural guidelines, we consider the reason for its inclusion in Appendix A, the changes from Rev. 0 of the TP (if applicable), and a discussion of the justification or rationale for these changes.

Siskind, B.; Cowgill, M.G.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

OTEC-1 Power System Test Program: test plan for first deployment  

SciTech Connect

This report describes in detail all tests planned for the first eight-month deployment of OTEC-1, a test facility constructed by the US Department of Energy in order to test heat exchangers for closed-cycle power plants using ocean thermal energy. Tests to be performed during the first-deployment period are aimed primarily at determining (1) the effectiveness of countermeasures in preventing biofouling of the heat exchanters, (2) the extent of environmental impacts associated with operation of an OTEC facility, and (3) the performance of a 1-MWe, titanium shell-and-tube evaporator and condenser pair. The condenser to be tested has plain tubes, and the evaporator employs the Linde High Flux surface on the working-fluid (ammonia) side to enhance the heat-transfer rate. This plan provides a statement of the objectives and priorities of the test program, describes the test equipment, gives a detailed account of all tests to be performed and the test schedule, and discusses provisions for management of the test program.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

STAR Test Environment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment STAR Test Environment These instructions describe how to set up the STAR environment independent of the production environment in order to test different installations in $OPTSTAR and $GROUP_DIR. If you want to modify those installations you will need access to the starofl account. Bypass STAR envionment login Edit your ~/.pdsf_setup file changing the STAR_LINUX_SETUP to "use_none" and start a new session. You should not see all the STAR environmental variables defined when you do this (and it will probably be much quicker than usual, too). Do a manual STAR login If you want to modify what test environment you use copy the test login scripts to your own working area: cp -r /common/star/startest /path/to/myworkdir/. If you don't want to modify these files you can source them directly from

389

RMOTC TEST REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MUD DEVIL - DEAERATOR MIXER MUD DEVIL - DEAERATOR MIXER MARCH 30, 1995 RMOTC TEST REPORT Mud Devil - Deaerator Mixer Project Test Results Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field Engineer March 30, 1995 551103/9507:jb ABSTRACT The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) conducted a field test on the MUD DEVIL - Deaerator Mixer (MDDM), at the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 3 (NOSR-3) located west of Rifle, Colorado. Industrial Screen and Maintenance of Casper, Wyoming, manufactures the MDDM high-shear pin mixing system used to blend products in drilling fluid systems. The test was a comparison between DOE Well 1 -M-1 8 drilled without the MDDM and a sidetrack Well 1-M-18 ST drilled with the MDDM. Test results show that the MDDM, when properly used, reduced the usage of drilling fluid products, decreased water

390

Advanced Technology Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) is to increase the body of knowledge as well as the awareness and acceptance of electric drive and other advanced technology vehicles (ATV). The AVTA accomplishes this goal by testing ATVs on test tracks and dynamometers (Baseline Performance testing), as well as in real-world applications (Fleet and Accelerated Reliability testing and public demonstrations). This enables the AVTA to provide Federal and private fleet managers, as well as other potential ATV users, with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance and infrastructure needs so they can make informed decisions about acquiring and operating ATVs. The ATVs currently in testing include vehicles that burn gaseous hydrogen (H2) fuel and hydrogen/CNG (H/CNG) blended fuels in internal combustion engines (ICE), and hybrid electric (HEV), urban electric, and neighborhood electric vehicles. The AVTA is part of DOE's FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program.

James Francfort

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification FSM-Based Testing Mousavi: FSM-Based Testing Part II #12;Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Outline Finite State Machines Testing problems Conformance Testing Machine Identification Mousavi

Mousavi, Mohammad

392

Pocked surface neutron detector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The detection efficiency, or sensitivity, of a neutron detector material such as of Si, SiC, amorphous Si, GaAs, or diamond is substantially increased by forming one or more cavities, or holes, in its surface. A neutron reactive material such as of elemental, or any compound of, .sup.10 B, .sup.6 Li, .sup.6 LiF, U, or Gd is deposited on the surface of the detector material so as to be disposed within the cavities therein. The portions of the neutron reactive material extending into the detector material substantially increase the probability of an energetic neutron reaction product in the form of a charged particle being directed into and detected by the neutron detector material.

McGregor, Douglas (Whitmore Lake, MI); Klann, Raymond (Bolingbrook, IL)

2003-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

393

Laser surface cleaning  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination of contaminated metal and material recycle, two of 31 priority needs identified by the D&D focus group, are the most promising applications for laser ablation within the DOE complex. F2 Associates has developed a robotic laser ablation system that is capable of high contamination rates, waste volume reduction, surface pore cleaning, and real-time characterization of materials. It is being demonstrated that this system will be the most cost-effective technology for metal decontamination and material recycle.

Crivella, E.C.; Freiwald, J.; Freiwald, D.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Accelerated Testing Validation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Accelerated Testing Validation Rangachary Mukundan (PI), Rodney Borup, John Davey, Roger Lujan Los Alamos National Laboratory Adam Z. Weber Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory...

395

Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

should be in several categories Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleTest&oldid643989" Category: RecipePage...

396

test and evaluation  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5%2A en Office of Test and Evaluation http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdefenseprogramsstockpilestewardshiptestcapabilitiesand-eval

397

CASL Test Stand Experience  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industry Test Stand Experience Stephen Hess, EPRI Heather Feldman, EPRI Brenden Mervin, EPRI Martin Pytel, EPRI Rose Montgomery, TVA Bill Bird, TVA Fausto Franceschini,...

398

MITG Test Plan  

SciTech Connect

The plan presented is for the testing of a prototypical slice of the Modular Isotopic Thermoelectric Generator (MITG). Cross Reference T48-1.

Eck, Marshall B.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Irrigation Pump Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Toolkit The Benefits of Irrigation Pump Testing & System Analysis Almost all irrigation pumps use an "impeller" to provide the centrifugal force to distribute water. Pumps with...

400

Feature - Testing the Tesla  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing the Tesla Testing the Tesla Tesla test Technician Geoff Amann takes the Tesla.through a driving cycle on Argonne's dynamometers. Argonne transportation engineers recently evaluated an all-electric Tesla Roadster at the Advanced Powertrain Research Facility's new two-wheel drive dynamometer laboratory. Data obtained from the Tesla will help researchers develop test procedures that provide an unbiased, consistent and practical approach to evaluating electric vehicles. "As we study these advanced vehicles, our knowledge base of the progression of vehicle electrification technology is enhanced," said chief engineer Mike Duoba. "In a rigorous, controlled manner, we are able to study many vehicle operating conditions to determine the impact on fuel consumption.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Additional File 1 Specimen information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.27516 -84.73164 C EU034682 MVZ 257284 GA Cherokee 34.32599 -84.32105 E EU034684 MVZ 257285 GA Cherokee 34

Vieites, David R.

402

Effect of surface treatments on radiation buildup in steam generators  

SciTech Connect

A study of the effect of surface preparation on the radiation buildup of steam generator materials of construction was conducted. The tests consisted of exposing treated manway seal plates to primary reactor coolant during the second through the fifth fuel cycle of the Chinon B1 pressurized water reactor. The pretreatments included: mechanical polishing, electropolishing (either on the as received surface or on a surface which had been previously mechanically polished), and passivation via the RCT (laboratory) process or the Framatome (in situ) process. Radioactivity buildup was determined at the end of each fuel cycle. A selected number of the seal plates were removed from the steam generators after each exposure cycle for destructive examinations. The electropolished surfaces exhibited a significantly lower radioactive buildup rate; an average factor of five less buildup compared to an as-received surface. Passivation of the electropolished surface, especially via the RCT process, reduced the buildup rate still further by a factor of two over the electropolished-only surface. Examination of the surfaces by profilometry, scanning electron microscopy, etc., after exposure indicated no detrimental effects on the surface characteristics attributable to the surface treatments. A program has now been instituted to electropolish the steam generator channel heads of all new reactors in France, as well as the steam generators intended for replacement in existing plants. 1 ref., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Not Available

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA) - Vehicle Testing and Demonstration Activities 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle...

404

ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center March 31, 1998 RMOTC Test Report GMT Production Stimulation Test Executive Summary The sulfates in oilfield...

405

Summary of Test Results for the Interagency Field Test &Evaluation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary of Test Results for the Interagency Field Test &Evaluation of Wind Turbine - Radar Interference Mitigation Technologies Summary of Test Results for the Interagency Field...

406

Ignition problems in scramjet testing  

SciTech Connect

Ignition of H{sub 2} in heated air containing H{sub 2}O, radicals, and dust was investigated for scramjet testing. Using a reduced kinetic model for H{sub 2}{minus}O{sub 2} systems, the effects of H{sub 2}O and radicals in nozzles are discussed in relation to engine testing with vitiation heaters. Analysis using linearized rate-equations suggested that the addition of O atoms was 1.5 times more effective than the addition of H atoms for ignition. This result can be applied to the problem of premature ignition caused by residual radicals and to plasma-jet igniters. Thermal and chemical effects of dust, inevitable in storage air heaters, were studied next. The effects of heat capacity and size of dust were expressed in terms of an exponential integral function. It was found that the radical termination on the surface of dust produces an effect equivalent to heat loss. The inhibition of ignition by dust may result, if the mass fraction of dust becomes 10{sup {minus}3}.

Mitani, Tohru [National Aerospace Lab., Miyagi (Japan)] [National Aerospace Lab., Miyagi (Japan)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Advanced Test Reactor Tour  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Advanced Test Reactor at Idaho National Laboratory is the foremost nuclear materials test reactor in the world. This virtual tour describes the reactor, how experiments are conducted, and how spent nuclear fuel is handled and stored. For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

Miley, Don

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

409

Distance transforms on anisotropic surfaces for surface roughness measurement  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Distance Transform on Curved Space (DTOCS) calculates distances along a gray-level height map surface In this article, the DTOCS is generalized for surfaces represented as real altitude data in an anisotropic grid The distance transform combined ...

Leena Ikonen; Toni Kuparinen; Eduardo Villanueva; Pekka Toivanen

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Diffuse scattering of hard x rays from rough surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The diffuse scattering of hard x rays from rough solid surfaces has been measured and described quantitatively in terms of an improved distorted-wave Born approximation. The rough surface is characterized by the rms roughness ?, the height-height correlation length ?, and the roughness exponent h. The value for ? is in excellent agreement with that deduced from reflectivity. The significance of the parameters ?, ?, and h is tested by comparison with the results obtained from scanning force mircoscopy.

Wolfgang Weber and Bruno Lengeler

1992-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

RMOTC - Testing - Alternative Energies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alternative Energies Alternative Energies Wind turbine at RMOTC field test site Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC provides the opportunity for its partners to field test the latest alternative energy and environmental management technologies which have specific and beneficial application in oil fields, remote sites, and

412

RMOTC - Testing - Flow Assurance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flow Assurance Flow Assurance RMOTC Flow Loop Facility Layout Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. Over a decade ago, RMOTC began cooperatively building a full-scale facility to test new flow assurance technology, mainly in the areas of hydrates and paraffins. Today, RMOTC's test facility consists of five individual loop

413

RMOTC - Testing - Exploration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exploration Helicopter flying over RMOTC testing facility for leak detection survey test Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC's extensive exploration-related data sets, including 3D and 2D seismic, wells and logging data, and cores - both physical core samples, stored in Casper, and core analysis data and reports - provide a great

414

Hypersonic flight testing  

SciTech Connect

As part of the design process for a hypersonic vehicle, it is necessary to predict the aerodynamic and aerothermodynamic environment for flight conditions. This involves combining results obtained from ground testing with analytical modeling to predict the aerodynamics and heating for all conditions of interest. The question which always arises is, how well will these models predict what is actually seen in a flight environment This paper will briefly address ground-testing and analytical modeling and discuss where each is appropriate, and the associated problems with each area. It will then describe flight test options as well as instrumentation currently available and show how flight tests can be used to validate or improve models. Finally, several results will be shown to indicate areas where ground testing and modeling alone are inadequate to accurately predict hypersonic aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics.

Williamson, W.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nanomechanical testing system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An automated testing system includes systems and methods to facilitate inline production testing of samples at a micro (multiple microns) or less scale with a mechanical testing instrument. In an example, the system includes a probe changing assembly for coupling and decoupling a probe of the instrument. The probe changing assembly includes a probe change unit configured to grasp one of a plurality of probes in a probe magazine and couple one of the probes with an instrument probe receptacle. An actuator is coupled with the probe change unit, and the actuator is configured to move and align the probe change unit with the probe magazine and the instrument probe receptacle. In another example, the automated testing system includes a multiple degree of freedom stage for aligning a sample testing location with the instrument. The stage includes a sample stage and a stage actuator assembly including translational and rotational actuators.

Vodnick, David James; Dwivedi, Arpit; Keranen, Lucas Paul; Okerlund, Michael David; Schmitz, Roger William; Warren, Oden Lee; Young, Christopher David

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

416

SOFTWARE TESTING, VERIFICATION AND RELIABILITY Softw. Test. Verif. Reliab. (2014)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. An industrial case study using reactor protection system software shows that the automatically generated test defined by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). Industrial FBD testing relies mostlySOFTWARE TESTING, VERIFICATION AND RELIABILITY Softw. Test. Verif. Reliab. (2014) Published online

417

HAPTIC RENDERING OF SURFACE-TO-SURFACE SCULPTED MODEL INTERACTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and second surface partial derivatives for both surfaces, an efficient kilohertz rate computation, the local Newton formulation, and the new velocity formulation. Figure 1: Well-behaved finger penetration into a surface shown by the "penetration cylinder". The velocity method and modified New- ton method return

Utah, University of

418

DEVELOPMENT OF BURN TEST SPECIFICATIONS FOR FIRE PROTECTION MATERIALS IN RAM PACKAGES  

SciTech Connect

The regulations in 10 CFR 71 require that the radioactive material (RAM) packages must be able to withstand specific fire conditions given in 10 CFR 71.73 during Hypothetical Accident Conditions (HAC). This requirement is normally satisfied by extensive testing of full scale test specimens under required test conditions. Since fire test planning and execution is expensive and only provides a single snapshot into a package performance, every effort is made to minimize testing and supplement tests with results from computational thermal models. However, the accuracy of such thermal models depends heavily on the thermal properties of the fire insulating materials that are rarely available at the regulatory fire temperatures. To the best of authors knowledge no test standards exist that could be used to test the insulating materials and derive their thermal properties for the RAM package design. This paper presents a review of the existing industry fire testing standards and proposes testing methods that could serve as a standardized specification for testing fire insulating materials for use in RAM packages.

Gupta, N.

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

419

Sources for Pu in near surface air  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides evidence that most of the Pu in the near surface air today is due to resuspension. Vertical and particle size distribution in near surface air over a period of three years were measured. The seasonal variations of Pu in air and the influence of meteorological parameters on these variations are shown. Samples were taken before the Chernobyl accident in an area where only Pu fallout from the atmospheric nuclear tests of the early sixties occurs. The comparison of the behavior of Pu with other trace elements, which were also measured, showed similar behavior of Pu and elements like Ca, Ti and Fe in near surface air. This confirms that most Pu is resuspended because the main source for these elements in air is the soil surface. Resuspension factors and resuspension rate are estimated for all measured elements. A resuspension factor of 0.8 X 10(-8) m-1 and a resuspension rate of 0.09 X 10(-9) s-1 is calculated for Pu.

Hartmann, G.; Thom, C.; Baechmann, K.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Atacama Surface Solar Maximum  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar radiation reaching the earth's surface is one of the major drivers of climate dynamics. By setting the surface energy balance, downwelling solar radiation indirectly heats the atmosphere and controls the hydrological cycle. Besides its critical ...

Roberto Rondanelli; Alejandra Molina; Mark Falvey

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Edit Test Options Page 1 Edit Test Options  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Edit Test Options Page 1 Edit Test Options Format Test Information 1. Enter a Name for the Test. 2. Choose a color for the title text of the Test. (Optional) 3. Enter a Description in the Text Box. The description is visible to Students before they click on the link to take the Test. (Optional) 4. If you want

Xu, Shouhuai

422

Influence of nondestructive test procedures on detection of stress-corrosion cracks  

SciTech Connect

A weld T joint from a scrapped carbon-steel digester level tank was used to test the efficacy of the nondestructive liquid-penetrant and magnetic-particle test methods commonly used for field detection of stress-corrosion cracks. The tests were conducted using three methods of surface preparation--wire brushing, light grinding, and sandblasting. Light grinding of the surface greatly increased the sensitivity of both the liquid-penetrant and magnetic-particle test methods. The most successful combination was light surface grinding followed by inspection with a fluorescent liquid.

Reid, J.C. (Industrial Nondestructive Testing Ltd., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada)); Reid, D.C. (MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., Burnaby, British Columbia (Canada))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Chapter 12 - Nonparametric Tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Most of the tests that we have learned up to this point are based on the assumption that the sample(s) came from a normal population, or at the least that the population probability distribution(s) is specified except for a set of free parameters. Such tests are called parametric tests. In general, a parametric test is known to be generally more powerful than other procedures when the underlying assumptions are met. Usually the assumption of normality or any other distributional assumption about the population is hard to verify, especially when the sample sizes are small or the data are measured on an ordinal scale such as the letter grades of a student, in which case we do not have a precise measurement. For example, incidence rates of rare diseases, data from gene-expression microarrays, and the number of car accidents in a given time interval are not normally distributed. Nonparametric tests are tests that do not make such distributional assumptions, particularly the usual assumption of normality. In situations where a distributional model for a set of data is unavailable, nonparametric tests are ideal. Even if the data are distributed normally, nonparametric methods are frequently almost as powerful as parametric methods. These tests involve only order relationships among observations and are based on ranks of the variables and analyzing the ranks instead of the original values. Distribution-free tests generally do make some weak assumptions, such as equality of population variances and/or the distribution, and are of the continuous type.

Kandethody M. Ramachandran; Chris P. Tsokos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector.

Patch, Keith D. (Lexington, MA); Morgan, Dean T. (Sudbury, MA)

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

425

Chemical enhancement of surface deposition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for increasing the deposition of ions onto a surface, such as the adsorption of uranium ions on the detecting surface of a radionuclide detector. The method includes the step of exposing the surface to a complexing agent, such as a phosphate ion solution, which has an affinity for the dissolved species to be deposited on the surface. This provides, for example, enhanced sensitivity of the radionuclide detector. 16 figs.

Patch, K.D.; Morgan, D.T.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

426

Analysis Driven Field Testing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ANALYSIS DRIVEN FIELD TESTING ANALYSIS DRIVEN FIELD TESTING Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 MODELING DRIVEN FIELD TESTING Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 MODELING DRIVEN MEASUREMENTS Greg Barker, MEP Paul Norton, NERD C.E. Hancock, MEP Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 Building America Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting Austin, TX March 2, 2012 "Modeling without measuring lacks credibility. Measuring without modeling lacks generality." Ed Hancock

427

Rough Ride Test Procedure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NTP005 NTP005 Revision 2 Effective December 1, 2004 Electric Vehicle Rough Road Course Test Prepared by Electric Transportation Applications Prepared by: _______________________________ Date:__________ Ryan Harkins Approved by: _________________________________________________ Date: _______________ Donald B. Karner ©2004 Electric Transportation Applications All Rights Reserved Procedure ETA-NTP005 Revision 2 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 Objectives 3 2.0 Purpose 3 3.0 Documentation 3 4.0 Initial Conditions and Prerequisites 4 5.0 Testing Activity Requirements 6 6.0 Glossary 12 7.0 References 14 Appendices Appendix A - Electric Vehicle Rough Road Test Data Sheet 15

428

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

EMSL: Capabilities: Spectroscopy and Diffraction: Tools for Surface  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Surface Analysis Tools for Surface Analysis This information is provided through the cooperation of EMSL and the ASTM E42 committee. This page provides information about terminology, analysis guides, recommended practices, reference data, reference materials and standards, and other tools that enable accurate analysis of surfaces. American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee E42 on Surface Analysis was established in 1976 to help improve and advance the quality of surface analysis. Through the development of terminology, conducting round robin (interlaboratory) comparison studies, and the development of recommended practices and standards, the E42 Committee has worked to advance the concepts and analysis approaches that have significantly improved the ability to obtain accurate reproducible and quantitative

430

Surface tension and contact with soft elastic solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Johnson-Kendall-Robert (JKR) theory is the basis of modern contact mechanics. It describes how two deformable objects adhere together, driven by adhesion energy and opposed by elasticity. However, it does not include solid surface tension, which also opposes adhesion by acting to flatten the surface of soft solids. We tested JKR theory to see if solid surface tension affects indentation behaviour. Using confocal microscopy, we characterised the indentation of glass particles into soft, silicone substrates. While JKR theory held for particles larger than a critical, elastocapillary lengthscale, it failed for smaller particles. Instead, adhesion of small particles mimicked the adsorption of particles at a fluid interface, with a size-independent contact angle between the undeformed surface and the particle given by a generalised version of Young's law. A simple theory quantitatively captures this behaviour, and explains how solid surface tension dominates elasticity for small-scale indentation of soft materials.

Robert W. Style; Callen Hyland; Rostislav Boltyanskiy; John S. Wettlaufer; Eric R. Dufresne

2013-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

431

6, 1205712120, 2006 Surface tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 6, 12057­12120, 2006 Surface tension: measurement, modelling and cloud activation D. O a Creative Commons License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Surface tensions of multi­12120, 2006 Surface tension: measurement, modelling and cloud activation D. O. Topping et al. Title Page

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

432

Experimental tests of irradiation-anneal-reirradiation effects on mechanical properties of RPV plate and weld materials  

SciTech Connect

The Charpy-V (C{sub V}) notch ductility and tension test properties of three reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel materials were determined for the 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated (I), 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) irradiated + 454{degree}C (850{degree}F)-168 h postirradiation annealed (IA), and 288{degree}C (550{degree}F) reirradiated (IAR) conditions. Total fluences of the I condition and the IAR condition were, respectively, 3.33 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2} and 4.18 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV. The irradiation portion of the IAR condition represents an incremental fluence increase of 1. 05 {times} 10{sup 19} n/cm{sup 2}, E > 1 MeV, over the I-condition fluence. The materials (specimens) were supplied by the Yankee Atomic Electric Company and represented high and low nickel content plates and a high nickel, high copper content weld deposit prototypical of the Yankee-Rowe reactor vessel. The promise of the IAR method for extending the fluence tolerance of radiation-sensitive steels and welds is clearly shown by the results. The annealing treatment produced full C{sub V} upper shelf recovery and full or nearly full recovery in the C{sub V} 41 J (30 ft-lb) transition temperature. The C{sub V} transition temperature increases produced by the reirradiation exposure were 22% to 43% of the increase produced by the first cycle irradiation exposure. A somewhat greater radiation embrittlement sensitivity and a somewhat greater reirradiation embrittlement sensitivity was exhibited by the low nickel content plate than the high nickel content plate. Its high phosphorus content is believed to be responsible. The IAR-condition properties of the surface vs. interior regions of the low nickel content plate are also compared.

Hawthorne, J.R. [Materials Engineering Associates, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

RMOTC - Testing - Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Management Carbon Management Ten Sleep Time Structure, 2nd Wall Creek Formation at RMOTC Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC has the field setting, infrastructure, and expertise to play an important role in carbon management testing, demonstration, and research. The unique combination of a publicly-owned and DOE-operated oil field,

434

RMOTC - Testing - Environmental  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environmental Environmental Deer at RMOTC Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC offers industrial infrastructure and has dedicated sites for long- and short-term environmental testing projects. It also maintains a close working relationship with the Wyoming Oil & Gas Conservation Commission and the Wyoming Department of Environmental

435

Advanced Windows Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Exterior of Advanced Windows Test Facility Advanced Windows Test Facility This multi-room laboratory's purpose is to test the performance and properties of advanced windows and window systems such as electrochromic windows, and automatically controlled shutters and blinds. The lab simulates real-world office spaces. Embedded instrumentation throughout the lab records solar gains and losses for specified time periods, weather conditions, energy use, and human comfort indicators. Electrochromic glazings promise to be a major advance in energy-efficient window technology, helping to achieve the goal of transforming windows and skylights from an energy liability in buildings to an energy source. The glazing can be reversibly switched from a clear to a transparent, colored

436

Gunshot triangulation device testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gunshot triangulation device testing Gunshot triangulation device testing Report to the Fermilab Community Advisory Board, Oct. 28, 2010 The Fermilab security director outlined for the board last month a recurring problem of people shooting guns near the edges of the laboratory and bullets coming onto the site. Fermilab is installing a system to triangulate the gunshots to improve police response time. This will require a set-up calibration of two dozen gunshots during a total of 6 minutes at the laboratory site. The board was asked for recommendations about how and whom to inform of the test firing. In response to the board discussion, Fermilab plans to take the following actions: ï‚· The test firing will occur during the mid-day of a week day to minimize the number of residents

437

Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Toyota Prius Plug-in 2013 Ford C-Max Hybrid 2013 Ford C-Max Energi 2013 Ford Fusion Energi 2014 VW Jetta Hybrid 2013 FLEET TEST VEHICLES 2 Honda CR-Z HEV 2...

438

Solutions to Test 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test 1. STAT 47201. Fall 2014. October 7, 2014. 1. You are given: i. Mortality follows the illustrative life table ii. 6% i = Calculate: a. The actuarial present value

Microsoft account

2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

439

Solutions to Test 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 27, 2014. Math 373. Test 2. Fall 2013. October 17, 2013. 1. You are given the following table of interest rates: Year 1. Year 2. Year 3. Portfolio. Year. 2007.

jeffb_000

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

440

Solutions to Test 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test 1. September 26, 2013. 1. Zach buys a billiards table for his apartment. The cost of the table is 4000 and he uses a loan to pay for the table. The loan will be ...

jeffb_000

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NREL: Wind Research - Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) support the installation and testing of wind turbines that range in size from 400 watts to 5.0 megawatts. Engineers provide wind...

442

Testing existence of antigravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

After a brief review of arguments in favor of antigravity (as gravitational repulsion between matter and antimatter) we present a simple idea for an experimental test using antiprotons. Different experimental realizations of the same basic idea are considered

Dragan Slavkov Hajdukovic

2006-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

443

Testing the waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

2010 The Royal Society 20 September 2010 book-review Book reviews 1007 Testing the waters Mike Jay * * mail@mikejay.net Peter Wallis (ed.), Innovation and discovery: Bath and the rise of science...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Saab Online Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saab Online Testing http://www.saab.org/actuarial.cgi. 1 of 17. 1/4/2008 12:29 PM. 1. Suppose that µx = 1. 105?x. , 0 ? x ? 105 and that the force of interest is ? ...

User

2008-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

445

Photomultiplier Tube Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Photomultiplier Tube Testing for the MiniBooNE Experiment B. T. Fleming, L. Bugel, E. Hawker, S. Koutsoliotas, S. McKenney, V. Sandberg, and D. Smith for the MiniBooNE...

446

geothermal_test.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Energy (DOE) became the exclusive operator of the site, which was called the Geothermal Test Facility, and negotiated a right-of-way agreement with BLM to operate the facility....

447

RMOTC TEST REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

896PT15 RMOTC TEST REPORT Bull Dog Auger Bull Dog Tool, Inc 243 W. County Road P.O. Box 5961 Hobbs, New Mexico 88241-5961 Leo Gianfiacomo, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield...

448

Nuclear weapons testing  

SciTech Connect

The author examines the history of efforts to ban, or at least constrain, nuclear tests. The issue has been marked by shifts in attitude by the superpowers in recent times. The Reagan Administration sees a comprehensive test ban only as a very long-term goal for the U.S. The Soviets, on the other hand, have been pushing extremely hard lately for a ban on all testing. The author discusses the pros and cons of such a ban by examining the arguments of the U.S. Department of Energy, Nobel Laureate Glenn T. Seaborg, and Associate Director for Defense Systems at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory George H. Miller. Other issues that are discussed include verification, joint testing, and reliability. He concludes with a discussion of the future of the ban.

Heylin, M.

1988-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

CALiPER Testing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The CALiPER (Commercially Available LED Product Evaluation and Reporting) program was launched by DOE in 2006 to support testing of a representative array of solid-state lighting products for general illumination, using industry-approved test procedures carried out by qualified test labs. The program has evolved right along with the SSL market and serves multiple needs. CALiPER testing and analysis identify trends, indicate SSL's suitability for particular applications, and detect secondary issues that require further scrutiny – such as glare, flicker, physical format, and reliability concerns. The program not only guides DOE planning and helps discourage low-quality products and inflated claims, but also serves as a useful tool for manufacturers seeking to improve their products, and for municipalities, utilities, and energy-efficiency programs seeking to make informed program decisions.

450

Duct Tape Durability Testing  

SciTech Connect

Duct leakage is a major source of energy loss in residential buildings. Most duct leakage occurs at the connections to registers, plenums, or branches in the duct system. At each of these connections, a method of sealing the duct system is required. Typical sealing methods include tapes or mastics applied around the joints in the system. Field examinations of duct systems have shown that taped seals tend to fail over extended periods of time. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been testing sealant durability for several years using accelerated test methods and found that typical duct tape (i.e., cloth-backed tapes with natural rubber adhesives) fails more rapidly than other duct sealants. This report summarizes the results of duct sealant durability testing over two years for four UL 181B-FX listed duct tapes (two cloth tapes, a foil tape and an Oriented Polypropylene (OPP) tape). One of the cloth tapes was specifically developed in collaboration with a tape manufacturer to perform better in our durability testing. The tests involved the aging of common ''core-to-collar joints'' of flexible duct to sheet metal collars. Periodic air leakage tests and visual inspection were used to document changes in sealant performance. After two years of testing, the flex-to-collar connections showed little change in air leakage, but substantial visual degradation from some products. A surprising experimental result was failure of most of the clamps used to mechanically fasten the connections. This indicates that the durability of clamps also need to be addressed ensure longevity of the duct connection. An accelerated test method developed during this study has been used as the basis for an ASTM standard (E2342-03).

Sherman, Max H.; Walker, Iain S.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Sparse matrix test collections  

SciTech Connect

This workshop will discuss plans for coordinating and developing sets of test matrices for the comparison and testing of sparse linear algebra software. We will talk of plans for the next release (Release 2) of the Harwell-Boeing Collection and recent work on improving the accessibility of this Collection and others through the World Wide Web. There will only be three talks of about 15 to 20 minutes followed by a discussion from the floor.

Duff, I.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Chapter 9 - Brake Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter describes and explains the role and methods of experimental testing in the design and verification of brakes and their components. It starts by discussing the increasing capability of computer-based predictive techniques, which can simulate many aspects of brake operation and save time and cost compared with previous methods of experimental evaluation. Preparation, procedures, instrumentation, data acquisition and results analysis, interpretation and reporting for experimental testing ranging from whole vehicle braking performance on a test track to component performance and material thermophysical properties in the laboratory, are explained and discussed. By the end of the chapter the design and operation of test rigs including inertia dynamometers for full-size brakes, scale rigs for small-sample friction and wear measurement, machines for cyclic loading and material property measurement, etc. are described. The importance of careful preparation of the friction pair (‘bedding-in’ and ‘burnishing’) for brake performance testing and the evaluation of variability by repeat testing is emphasised.

Andrew Day

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Diesel Engine Idling Test  

SciTech Connect

In support of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology Program Office goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of millions of gallons of diesel fuel consumed during heavy vehicle idling periods, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted tests to characterize diesel engine wear rates caused by extended periods of idling. INL idled two fleet buses equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 50 engines, each for 1,000 hours. Engine wear metals were characterized from weekly oil analysis samples and destructive filter analyses. Full-flow and the bypass filter cartridges were removed at four stages of the testing and sent to an oil analysis laboratory for destructive analysis to ascertain the metals captured in the filters and to establish wear rate trends. Weekly samples were sent to two independent oil analysis laboratories. Concurrent with the filter analysis, a comprehensive array of other laboratory tests ascertained the condition of the oil, wear particle types, and ferrous particles. Extensive ferrogram testing physically showed the concentration of iron particles and associated debris in the oil. The tests results did not show the dramatic results anticipated but did show wear trends. New West Technologies, LLC, a DOE support company, supplied technical support and data analysis throughout the idle test.

Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordon Fielding

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Tools for measuring surface cleanliness  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A procedure and tools for quantifying surface cleanliness are described. Cleanliness of a target surface is quantified by wiping a prescribed area of the surface with a flexible, bright white cloth swatch, preferably mounted on a special tool. The cloth picks up a substantial amount of any particulate surface contamination. The amount of contamination is determined by measuring the reflectivity loss of the cloth before and after wiping on the contaminated system and comparing that loss to a previous calibration with similar contamination. In the alternative, a visual comparison of the contaminated cloth to a contamination key provides an indication of the surface cleanliness.

Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Simpsonville, SC); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greenville, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

CHLORIDE WASHER PERFORMACE TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Testing was performed to determine the chloride (Cl-) removal capabilities of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) designed and built Cl- washing equipment intended for HB-Line installation. The equipment to be deployed was tested using a cerium oxide (CeO2) based simulant in place of the 3013 plutonium oxide (PuO2) material. Two different simulant mixtures were included in this testing -- one having higher Cl- content than the other. The higher Cl- simulant was based on K-Area Interim Surveillance Inspection Program (KIS) material with Cl- content approximately equal to 70,000 ppm. The lower Cl- level simulant was comparable to KIS material containing approximately 8,000-ppm Cl- content. The performance testing results indicate that the washer is capable of reducing the Cl- content of both surrogates to below 200 ppm with three 1/2-liter washes of 0.1M sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solution. Larger wash volumes were used with similar results - all of the prescribed test parameters consistently reduced the Cl- content of the surrogate to a value below 200 ppm Cl- in the final washed surrogate material. The washer uses a 20-micron filter to retain the surrogate solids. Tests showed that 0.16-0.41% of the insoluble fraction of the starting mass passed through the 20-micron filter. The solids retention performance indicates that the fissile masses passing through the 20-micron filter should not exceed the waste acceptance criteria for discard in grout to TRU waste. It is recommended that additional testing be pursued for further verification and optimization purposes. It is likely that wash volumes smaller than those tested could still reduce the Cl- values to acceptable levels. Along with reduced wash volumes, reuse of the third wash volume (in the next run processed) should be tested as a wash solution minimization plan. A 67% reduction in the number of grouted paint pails could be realized if wash solution minimization testing returned acceptable results.

Coughlin, J; David Best, D; Robert Pierce, R

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Compressive strength, plastic flow properties, and surface frictional effects of 1100, 3003 and 6061 aluminum alloys  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to find aluminum alloys that are effective for use as wire vacuum seals in the 800MeV particle accelerator located at the Louis Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) in Los Alamos, NM. Three alloys, Al 1100, Al 3003, and Al 6061, are investigated under uniaxial compression to determine stresses for a given height reduction from 0 to 70 percent, and to find plastic flow and surface interaction effects. Right-circular cylindrical specimens are compressed on-end (cylindrically) and radially (for modeling as compressed wire). Aluminum 1100 and 3003 alloys are compared for length to diameter ratios of 1 and 2 for both compression types, and are then compared to results of radial compression of annealed small diameter Al 1100 wire currently used at LAMPE. The specimens are also compressed between three different platen surfaces, polished steel, etched steel, and aluminum 6061-T6, to determine effects of friction. The Al 3003 alloy exhibits 20 to 25% lower stresses at all height reductions than Al 1100 for both cylindrical and radial compression.

Pinkerton, G.W.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

457

Monocrystalline test structures, and use for calibrating instruments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved test structure for measurement of width of conductive lines formed on substrates as performed in semiconductor fabrication, and for calibrating instruments for such measurements, is formed from a monocrystalline starting material, having an insulative layer formed beneath its surface by ion implantation or the equivalent, leaving a monocrystalline layer on the surface. The monocrystalline surface layer is then processed by preferential etching to accurately define components of the test structure. The substrate can be removed from the rear side of the insulative layer to form a transparent window, such that the test structure can be inspected by transmissive-optical techniques. Measurements made using electrical and optical techniques can be correlated with other measurements, including measurements made using scanning probe microscopy.

Cresswell, Michael W. (Frederick, MD); Ghoshtagore, R. N. (Ellicott City, MD); Linholm, Loren W. (Ijamsville, MD); Allen, Richard A. (Germantown, MD); Sniegowski, Jeffry J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Flow Test Details Activities (38) Areas (33) Regions (1) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Flow tests provide information on permeability, recharge rates, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling. Thermal: Flow tests can measure temperature variations with time to estimate characteristics about the heat source. Dictionary.png Flow Test: Flow tests are typically conducted shortly after a well has been drilled to test its productivity. The well is opened and fluids are released, the

459

Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing  

SciTech Connect

In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C. The body of this report compares these for all of the samples in the test section. The 'Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing Program' is being conducted by The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) at Reliant Energy's Niles plant in Niles, Ohio to provide full-scale, in-situ testing of recently developed boiler superheater materials. Fireside corrosion is a key issue for improving efficiency of new coal fired power plants and improving service life in existing plants. In November 1998, B&W began development of a system to permit testing of advanced tube materials at metal temperatures typical of advanced supercritical steam temperatures (1100 F and higher) in a boiler exhibiting coal ash corrosive conditions. Several materials producers including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) contributed advanced materials to the project. In the spring of 1999 a system consisting of three identical sections, each containing multiple segments of twelve different materials, was installed. The sections are cooled by reheat steam, and are located just above the furnace entrance in Niles Unit No.1, a 110 MWe unit firing high sulfur Ohio coal. In November 2001 the first section was removed for thorough metallurgical evaluation after 29 months of operation. The second section was removed in August of 2003. Its evaluation has been completed and is the subject of this report. The final section remains in service and is expected to be removed in the spring of 2005. This paper describes the program; its importance, the design, fabrication, installation and operation of the test system, materials utilized, and experience to date. This report briefly reviews the results of the evaluation of the first section and then presents the results of the evaluation of the second section.

D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

2003-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Influence of Heat Treatment on Mercury Cavitation Resistance of Surface Hardened 316LN Stainless Steel  

SciTech Connect

The cavitation-erosion resistance of carburized 316LN stainless steel was significantly degraded but not destroyed by heat treatment in the temperature range 500-800 C. The heat treatments caused rejection of some carbon from the carburized layer into an amorphous film that formed on each specimen surface. Further, the heat treatments encouraged carbide precipitation and reduced hardness within the carburized layer, but the overall change did not reduce surface hardness fully to the level of untreated material. Heat treatments as short as 10 min at 650 C substantially reduced cavitation-erosion resistance in mercury, while heat treatments at 500 and 800 C were found to be somewhat less detrimental. Overall, the results suggest that modest thermal excursions perhaps the result of a weld made at some distance to the carburized material or a brief stress relief treatment will not render the hardened layer completely ineffective but should be avoided to the greatest extent possible.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Hsu, Julia [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test specimen surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Investigation of IAQ-Relevant Surface Chemistry and Emissions on HVAC Filter Materials  

SciTech Connect

Chemical reactions involving ozone of outdoor origin and indoor materials are known to be significant sources of formaldehyde and other irritant gas-phase oxidation products in the indoor environment. HVAC filters are exposed to particularly high ozone concentrations--close to outdoor levels. In this study, we investigated chemical processes taking place on the surface of filters that included fiberglass, polyester, cotton/polyester blend and synthetic (e.g., polyolefin) filter media. Ozone reactions were studied on unused filter media, and on filters that were deployed for 3 months in two different locations: at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at the Port of Oakland. Specimens from each filter were exposed to ozone under controlled conditions in a laboratory flow tube at a constant flow of dry or humidified air (50percent relative humidity). Ozone was generated with a UV source upstream of the flow tube, and monitored using a photometric detector. Ozone breakthrough curves were recorded for each sample exposed to ~;;150 ppbv O3 for periods of ~;;1000 min, from which we estimated their uptake rate. Most experiments were performed at 1.3 L/min (corresponding to a face velocity of 0.013 m/s), except for a few tests performed at a higher airflow rate, to obtain a face velocity of 0.093 m/s, slightly closer to HVAC operation conditions. Formaldehyde and acetaldehyde, two oxidation byproducts, were collected downstream of the filter and quantified. Emissions of these volatile aldehydes were consistently higher under humidified air than under dry conditions, at which levels were near the limit of detection. Our results confirm that there are significant reactions of ozone as air containing ozone flows through HVAC filters, particularly when the filters are loaded with particles and the air is humidified. The amount of ozone reacted was not clearly related to the types of filter media, e.g., fiberglass versus synthetic. Specific fiberglass filters that were coated with an impaction oil showed significantly higher formaldehyde emissions than most other samples. Those emissions were magnified in the presence of particles (i.e., in used filters), and were observed even in the absence of ozone, which suggests that hydrolysis of filter binder or tackifier additives may be the reason for those high emissions. Mass balance calculations indicate that the emission rates of formaldehyde and acetaldehyde from the filters are generally not large enough to substantially increase indoor formaldehyde or acetaldehyde concentrations.

Destaillats, Hugo; Fisk, William J.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Evaluation of soil radioactivity data from the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Since 1951, 933 nuclear tests have been conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and test areas on the adjacent Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR). Until the early 1960s. the majority of tests were atmospheric, involving detonation of nuclear explosive devices on the ground or on a tower, suspended from a balloon or dropped from an airplane. Since the signing of the Limited Test Ban Treaty in 1963, most tests have been conducted underground, although several shallow subsurface tests took place between 1962 and 1968. As a result of the aboveground and near-surface nuclear explosions, as well as ventings of underground tests, destruction of nuclear devices with conventional explosives, and nuclear-rocket engine tests, the surface soil on portions of the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides. Relatively little consideration was given to the environmental effects of nuclear testing during the first two decades of operations at the NTS. Since the early 1970s, however, increasingly strict environmental regulations have forced greater attention to be given to contamination problems at the site and how to remediate them. One key element in the current environmental restoration program at the NTS is determining the amount and extent of radioactivity in the surface soil. The general distribution of soil radioactivity on the NTS is already well known as a result of several programs carried out in the 1970s and 1980s. However, questions have been raised as to whether the data from those earlier studies are suitable for use in the current environmental assessments and risk analyses. The primary purpose of this preliminary data review is to determine to what extent the historical data collected at the NTS can be used in the characterization/remediation process.

NONE

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Partition Testing versus Random Testing: the Influence of Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partition Testing versus Random Testing: the Influence of Uncertainty Walter J. Gutjahr Department of Statistics, O.R. and Computer Science University of Vienna Abstract --- The paper compares partition testing and random testing on the assumption that program failure rates are not known with certainty before testing

Gutjahr, Walter

464

Model-Based Testing : The Test of Formal Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model-Based Testing : The Test of Formal Models Jan Tretmans ESI & Radboud University Nijmegen #12;2 Testing (Software) Testing: checking or measuring some quality characteristics of an executing object by performing experiments in a controlled way w.r.t. a specification tester specification SUT System Under Test

465

Identification and selection of interaction test scenarios for integration testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integration testing checks for compatibility and interoperability between the components in the system. Integration test models are, typically, generated independently from the other testing level models. In our research, we aim at a model-based framework ... Keywords: components, integration, interactions, model based testing, testing

Mohamed Mussa; Ferhat Khendek

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Automated inspection of surface breaking cracks using GMR sensor arrays  

SciTech Connect

We present a prototype for automated magnetic stray field testing of ferromagnetic roller bearings. For this purpose NDE-adapted GMR sensor arrays (giant magneto resistance) are used for the detection of surface breaking cracks. The sensors are miniaturized down to the lower ?m-regime to achieve adequate spatial resolution. In doing so, sensor arrays with up to 48 elements are used to inspect the bearing surface within a few seconds only. In contrast to magnetic particle inspection (MPI), where the global magnetization requires a further inspection step and succeeding demagnetization, the presented prototype only locally magnetize the surface area in the vicinity of the GMR Sensors. For the local magnetization, the applied sub-surface magnetic field was simulated and proofed for detecting flaws with a depth of a few 10 ?m. By multiplexing the sensor array with an adapted read out electronics we quasi simultaneously detect the normal field component of about 100?m above the surface. The detection of artificial notches with a depth of 40 ?m and more could be resolved with a SNR better than 20 dB. The presented testing facility is fast and provides a step towards automated testing of safety relevant steel components.

Pelkner, Matthias; Reimund, Verena; Erthner, Thomas; Panke, Nicolai; Kreutzbruck, Marc [BAM Federal Institute for Material Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

467

geothermal_test.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) began studies The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) began studies of the geothermal resources of an area known as the East Mesa site in 1968. In 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) became the exclusive operator of the site, which was called the Geothermal Test Facility, and negotiated a right-of-way agreement with BLM to operate the facility. Geothermal test activities were discontinued in 1987 as development of commercial- scale geothermal power began to flourish in the region. In 1993, DOE agreed to remediate the site and return it to BLM. The Geothermal Test Facility is an 82-acre site located on the eastern edge of the Imperial Valley in Imperial County, California. The site is 140 miles east of San Diego and 10 miles north of the Mexico border. Topography of the area is generally flat; the site is at

468

geothermal_test.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Overview The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) began studies of the geothermal resources of an area known as the East Mesa site in 1968. In 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) became the exclusive operator of the site, which was called the Geothermal Test Facility, and negotiated a right-of-way agreement with BLM to operate the facility. Geothermal test activities were discontinued in 1987 as development of commercial- scale geothermal power began to flourish in the region. In 1993, DOE agreed to remediate the site and return it to BLM. The Geothermal Test Facility is an 82-acre site located on the eastern edge of the Imperial Valley in Imperial County, California. The site is 140 miles east of San Diego and 10 miles north of the Mexico border. Topography of the area is generally flat; the site is at an elevation of about 28 feet above sea level. The Salton Sea is approximately 40 miles northwest

469

SEU Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Logo The SEU Test Facility Logo The SEU Test Facility 1. Introduction The uninterrupted and progressive miniaturization of microelectronic devices while resulting in more powerful computers, has also made these computers more susceptible to the effects of ionizing radiation. This is of particular concern for space applications due to the radiation fields encountered outside the protective terrestrial atmosphere and magnetosphere. Starting in 1987, a coalition of US government agencies (NSA, NASA, NRL and USASSDC ) collaborated with BNL to develop a powerful and user-friendly test facility for investigating space-radiation effects on micro-electronic devices[1]. The main type of effects studied are the so called Single Event Upsets (SEUs) where ionization caused by the passage of

470

BNL | Accelerator Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Test Facility Accelerator Test Facility Home Core Capabilities Photoinjector S-Band Linac Laser Systems CO2 Laser Nd:Yag Laser Beamlines Beamline Simulation Data Beamline Parameters Beam Diagnostics Detectors Beam Schedule Operations Resources Fact Sheet (.pdf) Image Library Upgrade Proposal (.pdf) Publications ES&H Experiment Start-up ATF Handbook Laser Safety Collider-Accelerator Dept. C-AD ES&H Resources Staff Users' Place Apply for Access ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo A user facility for advanced accelerator research The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is a proposal driven, steering committee reviewed facility that provides users with high-brightness electron- and laser-beams. The ATF pioneered the concept of a user facility for studying complex properties of modern accelerators and

471

Rotating equipment shop testing  

SciTech Connect

Poor performance of machinery after commissioning at first draws comments on whether the purchase specification was in order, whether there were any lapses in stage inspection or whether the performance test procedure was inadequate. Attempts are initiated to find out whether there were any deviations in operating conditions from the purchase specifications, inadvertent lapses in operation or any mistakes by the maintenance Dept. It will be of some interest to mention here a difference between operating companies who have taken over existing plants and engineering consulting companies who have engineered and constructed the plants. The specialist rotating machinery group of engineering consultant companies have a good understanding of what can be achieved at the manufacturer's test facility due to repeated dealings with manufacturers. However, operating company understanding varies from one organization to the next. This article gives an overview of rotating machinery with respect to test objectives and field problems.

Godse, A.G. (Kuwait National Petroleum Co., Shuaiba (KW))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Which Vehicles Are Tested  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Which Vehicles Are Tested Which Vehicles Are Tested Popular Vehicles Exempt from Federal Fuel Economy Standards Prior to 2011 Pickups SUVs Vans Manufacturer Model Chevrolet Avalanche 2500 Series ¾ Ton Silverado 2500/3500 Series Dodge RAM 2500/3500 Series Ford F-250/350 Series GMC Sierra 2500/3500 Series Manufacturer Model Chevrolet Suburban ¾ Ton* Ford Excursion§ GMC Yukon XL ¾ Ton* Hummer H1§ and H2§ Manufacturer Model Chevrolet Express 2500 Passenger* Express 3500 Cargo Ford E Series Passenger (w/ 6.8L Triton or 6.0L Diesel Engine)* E Series Cargo (w/ 6.8L Triton or 6.0L Diesel Engine) GMC Savanna 2500/3500 Passenger* Savanna 3500 Cargo Note: These vehicles are given as examples. This is not a comprehensive list. * No longer exempt as of 2011 § No longer made Manufacturers do not test every new vehicle offered for sale. They are only

473

Apparatus for testing skin samples or the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing the permeability of living skin samples has a flat base with a plurality of sample-holding cavities formed in its upper surface, the samples being placed in counterbores in the cavities with the epidermis uppermost. O-rings of Teflon washers are respectively placed on the samples and a flat cover is connected to the base to press the rings against the upper surfaces of the samples. Media to maintain tissue viability and recovery of metabolites is introduced into the lower portion of the sample-holding cavities through passages in the base. Test materials are introduced through holes in the cover plate after assembly of the chamber.

Holland, J.M.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z