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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

2

Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gen-set A1, utility connected Test a single line-to-groundgen-set B1, utility connected Test a single line-to-groundsets (A1+B1), utility connected Test a single line-to-ground

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of AEPSC. DTC Registered Procedure CERTS Microgrid Test PlanTarget Group: Assigned Procedure Review Date: 23 Feb. 2008document is to establish procedures for testing of the CERTS

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

Craig W. Collar

2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

6

High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project, Final Test Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

EPRI is leading a project team to develop and implement the first five years of a Test Plan to collect data from a SNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel.12 The Test Plan defined in this document outlines the data to be collected, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan.13 The main goals of the proposed test are to provide confirmatory data14 for models, future SNF dry storage cask design, and to support license renewals and new licenses for ISFSIs. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must mimic real conditions that high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to the ISFSI for multi-year storage.15 Along with other optional modeling, SETs, and SSTs, the data collected in this Test Plan can be used to evaluate the integrity of dry storage systems and the high burnup fuel contained therein over many decades. It should be noted that the Test Plan described in this document discusses essential activities that go beyond the first five years of Test Plan implementation.16 The first five years of the Test Plan include activities up through loading the cask, initiating the data collection, and beginning the long-term storage period at the ISFSI. The Test Plan encompasses the overall project that includes activities that may not be completed until 15 or more years from now, including continued data collection, shipment of the Research Project Cask to a Fuel Examination Facility, opening the cask at the Fuel Examination Facility, and examining the high burnup fuel after the initial storage period.

none,

2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

7

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services1 #12;Project Final Report UBC LBS Project Services2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The purpose of the UBC Project Services web-based project management portal project on campus within Project Services, and with the rest of the UBC community. We began this project by defining

8

Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for ``data frac`` stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

Glaspey, Douglas J.

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

10

HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

HERTING DL

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

11

Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

Ortego, P.K.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Project ACHIEVE final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project ACHIEVE was a math/science academic enhancement program aimed at first year high school Hispanic American students. Four high schools -- two in El Paso, Texas and two in Bakersfield, California -- participated in this Department of Energy-funded program during the spring and summer of 1996. Over 50 students, many of whom felt they were facing a nightmare future, were given the opportunity to work closely with personal computers and software, sophisticated calculators, and computer-based laboratories -- an experience which their regular academic curriculum did not provide. Math and science projects, exercises, and experiments were completed that emphasized independent and creative applications of scientific and mathematical theories to real world problems. The most important outcome was the exposure Project ACHIEVE provided to students concerning the college and technical-field career possibilities available to them.

NONE

1997-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

13

Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed overarching goal for this project was the following: Data integration, simulation and visualization will facilitate metabolic and regulatory network prediction, exploration, and formulation of hypotheses. We stated three specific aims to achieve the overarching goal of this project: (1) Integration of multiple levels of information such as mRNA and protein levels, predicted protein-protein interactions/associations and gene function will enable construction of models describing environmental response and dynamic behavior. (2) Flexible tools for network inference will accelerate our understanding of biological systems. (3) Flexible exploration and queries of model hypotheses will provide focus and reveal novel dependencies. The underlying philosophy of these proposed aims is that an iterative cycle of experiments, experimental design, and verification will lead to a comprehensive and predictive model that will shed light on systems level mechanisms involved in responses elicited by living systems upon sensing a change in their environment. In the previous years report we demonstrated considerable progress in development of data standards, regulatory network inference and data visualization and exploration. We are pleased to report that several manuscripts describing these procedures have been published in top international peer reviewed journals including Genome Biology, PNAS, and Cell. The abstracts of these manuscripts are given and they summarize our accomplishments in this project.

Nitin S. Baliga and Leroy Hood

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

14

Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project pursued innovations to improve energy efficiency and indoor environmental quality (IEQ) in commercial and residential buildings. For commercial buildings, the project developed a testbed for “intelligent nested environmental systems technologies (iNEST),” which monitor and control energy flows and IEQ across a cascade of spaces from individuals’ desktops to office suites to floors to whole buildings. An iNEST testbed was constructed at Syracuse University and was used to assess the use of devices such as personal badges and CO2 sensors to study how reduced energy use and improved IEQ could be achieved. For residential buildings, resources were targeted in support of DoE’s Builders Challenge Program and to recruit Syracuse, NY builders. Three homes in Syracuse’s Near Westside neighborhood were also registered under the program by Syracuse University team, with an additional home registered by one of the builders. Findings from the work at the iNEST testbed facility, and results from other related projects were disseminated through Syracuse Center of Excellence in Environmental and Energy Systems (SyracuseCoE) 2008 Annual Symposium, the 9th International Healthy Buildings 2009 Conference & Exhibition, and through SyracuseCoE’s website and eNewsletters to inform the broader community of researchers, designers and builders. These public communication activities helped enhance the understanding of high performance buildings and facilitate further market acceptance.

Bogucz, E A

2010-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

15

Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this entire project period from 2005-2014, we have made significant progress in developing novel nanostructures of metal oxides (MOs) for solar hydrogen generation based on photoelectrochemical (PEC). Materials investigated are focused on 1D and 0D MO nanostructures of TiO2, WO3, ZnO, and Fe2O3 in conjunction with quantum dot (QD) sensitization and chemical doping (N or H) to alter their electronic band structures for both visible light absorption and for facilitating interfacial charge transport. In addition, we have used plasmonic metal nanostructures to enhance the PEC performance by improving light absorption of QDs via enhanced scattering of the plamonic metal. Most importantly, we have discovered a multipronged strategy for improving PEC performance: using plasmonic metal nanostructure to enhance light absorption, QDs to improve charge transfer, and chemical doping to increase charge transport in metal oxides for PEC. The combination is critical for overall high efficiency of PEC. This strategy is developed and demonstrated for the first time to our best knowledge.

Zhang, Jin [University of California Santa Cruz; Zhao, Yiping [University of Georgia at Athens

2014-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center Systems Engineering Research Center Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report Editors Jonathan project titled "Massively Deployed Sensors," PSERC project T-31. We express our appreciation

17

Final report: Long Term Test of a Gear-Type Pump for the Am/Cm Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the Immobilization Technology section, the Experimental Thermal Fluids group carried out a test to determine the operational characteristics of a gear-type pump. This pump was under consideration as a replacement for the air-lift melter feed pumping system of the Americium and Curium Project.

Duignan, M.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

EIS-0470: Cape Wind Energy Project, Final General Conformity...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

70: Cape Wind Energy Project, Final General Conformity Determination EIS-0470: Cape Wind Energy Project, Final General Conformity Determination Cape Wind Energy Project, Final...

19

Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of the Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Project, which was funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management. The project had two objectives: (a) to develop and demonstrate a prototype of production-scale equipment for the dry, horizontal consolidation and packaging of spent nuclear fuel rods from commercial boiling water reactor and pressurized water reactor fuel assemblies, and (b) to report the development and demonstration results to the US Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office. This report summarizes the activities and conclusions of the project management contractor, EG&G Idaho, Inc., and the fabrication and testing contractor, NUS Corporation (NUS). The report also presents EG&G Idaho`s assessments of the equipment and procedures developed by NUS.

Gili, J.A.; Poston, V.K.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Tribology of improved transformation-toughened ceramics-heat engine test. Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A short term study has been carried out to evaluate the suitability as cam roller followers of three ceria zirconia toughened aluminas and two yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconias (YTZPs) previously enhanced in programs supported by ORNL. Norton Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (NBD-100) was also included in this study as a reference material, because it was known from work at Northwestern University that Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} to experienced little or no wear in this application, and NBD-100 is currently a successful commercial bearing material. The tribological studies were subcontracted to the Torrington Company. They found that in cam roller follower simulated tests that there was essentially no wear after 1 hour and 5 hours of testing detectable by weighing and concluded that all of these ceramics are, therefore, candidate materials. Because of the minute amounts of wear it was not possible to identify the wear mechanism or to make any correlations with the other physical properties which were evaluated such as MOR, K{sub IC} hardness, density and grain size. Phase transformation during rolling has been of interest in the tribology of zirconia contain materials. The least stable of the ceria zirconia toughened aluminas resulted in as much as 33% monoclinic phase after testing whereas the yttria stabilized (TTZ) contained very little of this transformed phase. The results of this study show that oxide materials can now be considered as candidates for cam roller followers in heat engines.

Lilley, E.; Rossi, G.A.; Pelletier, P.J. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

FINAL REPORT ARIZONA WATER INSTITUTE PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1-17-08 FINAL REPORT ARIZONA WATER INSTITUTE PROJECT "ARIZONA TRIBAL APPROACHES TO WATER of Arizona. The project, "Arizona Tribal Approaches to Water Management," focused OIl developing research and analysis to support tribal water resources management. The project workplan included development of a core

Fay, Noah

22

COST 526 Project CH4 Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 COST 526 ­ Project CH4 Final Report Modelling, Simulating and Analysing EQ-Casting and Quenching. Remark: Due to the delay of the funding of the proposed investment casting project we change the focus of the project. The development of an Open Source optimization tool (see collaboration) was a relevant

23

Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern Study Area Final Report Wind Forecast Improvement Project Southern...

24

Reactor physics project final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the final report in an experimental and theoretical program to develop and apply single- and few-element methods for the determination of reactor lattice parameters. The period covered by the report is January 1, ...

Driscoll, Michael J.

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Green Schools Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Alliance to Save Energy has responded to interest in the Green Schools concept from the New England states of Maine, New Hampshire and Vermont. The Alliance conducted a train-the-trainers workshop in Augusta, Maine March 17--18, 1999. This work is part of a Green Schools replication project leveraged by funds from another source, NORDAX, which contributed $80,000 to provide partial support to staff at the Maine Energy Education Project (MEEP), Vermont Energy Education Program (VEEP), and New Hampshire Governor's Office to develop Green Schools Projects. DOE funds were used to conduct training, develop a network of state and local government, business and school partners to support school efficiency activities in those three states.

Verdict, M.

2000-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

26

Vaccine refrigerator testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the Central American Health Clinic Project initiated in 1986, Sandia National Laboratories and the Florida Solar Energy Center recognized the need for a test and evaluation program for vaccine refrigeration systems. At the Florida Solar Energy Center, side-by-side testing of three photovoltaic powered vaccine refrigerators began in 1987. The testing was expanded in 1988 to include a kerosene absorption refrigerator. This report presents observations, conclusions, and recommendations derived from testing the four vaccine refrigeration systems. Information is presented pertaining to the refrigerators, photovoltaic arrays, battery subsystems, charge controllers, and user requirements. This report should be of interest to designers, manufacturers, installers, and users of photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigeration systems and components.

Ventre, G.G. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Kilfoyle, D.; Marion, B. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Final Cut Pro Starting project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Setup- DV-NTSC (for mini dv tape) HD- 720 or 1080 (what format did you shoot your film?) Click setup In FCP: File: Save project as (title of your movie) Save to your hard drive Desktop display File: Window and insert with/out transition Capturing only audio or only video Log and capture window Go to clip settings

Bordenstein, Seth

28

The LiveWire Project final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilities across the US have begun pilot testing a variety of hardware and software products to develop a two-way communications system between themselves and their customers. Their purpose is to reduce utility operating costs and to provide new and improved services for customers in light of pending changes in the electric industry being brought about by deregulation. A consortium including utilities, national labs, consultants, and contractors, with the support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), initiated a project that utilized a hybrid fiber-coax (HFC) wide-area network integrated with a CEBus based local area network within the customers home. The system combined energy consumption data taken within the home, and home automation features to provide a suite of energy management services for residential customers. The information was transferred via the Internet through the HFC network, and presented to the customer on their personal computer. This final project report discusses the design, prototype testing, and system deployment planning of the energy management system.

Brown, C.D.; Nelson, T.T. [Enova Technology, San Diego, CA (United States); Kelly, J.C.; Dominguez, H.A. [Paragon Consulting Services, La Verne, CA (United States)

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Energy Storage and Distributed Energy Generation Project, Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report serves as a Final Report under the “Energy Storage and Distribution Energy Generation Project” carried out by the Transportation Energy Center (TEC) at the University of Michigan (UM). An interdisciplinary research team has been working on fundamental and applied research on: -distributed power generation and microgrids, -power electronics, and -advanced energy storage. The long-term objective of the project was to provide a framework for identifying fundamental research solutions to technology challenges of transmission and distribution, with special emphasis on distributed power generation, energy storage, control methodologies, and power electronics for microgrids, and to develop enabling technologies for novel energy storage and harvesting concepts that can be simulated, tested, and scaled up to provide relief for both underserved and overstressed portions of the Nation’s grid. TEC’s research is closely associated with Sections 5.0 and 6.0 of the DOE "Five-year Program Plan for FY2008 to FY2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs, August 2006.”

Schwank, Johannes; Mader, Jerry; Chen, Xiaoyin; Mi, Chris; Linic, Suljo; Sastry, Ann Marie; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Thompson, Levi; Varde, Keshav

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

TX-100 manufacturing final project report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the work completed under the TX-100 blade manufacturing portion of the Carbon-Hybrid Blade Developments: Standard and Twist-Coupled Prototype project. The TX-100 blade is a 9 meter prototype blade designed with bend-twist coupling to augment the mitigation of peak loads during normal turbine operation. This structural coupling was achieved by locating off axis carbon fiber in the outboard portion of the blade skins. The report will present the tooling selection, blade production, blade instrumentation, blade shipping and adapter plate design and fabrication. The baseline blade used for this project was the ERS-100 (Revision D) wind turbine blade. The molds used for the production of the TX-100 were originally built for the production of the CX-100 blade. The same high pressure and low pressure skin molds were used to manufacture the TX-100 skins. In order to compensate for the difference in skin thickness between the CX-100 and the TX-100, however, a new TX-100 shear web plug and mold were required. Both the blade assembly fixture and the root stud insertion fixture used for the CX-100 blades could be utilized for the TX-100 blades. A production run of seven TX-100 prototype blades was undertaken at TPI Composites during the month of October, 2004. Of those seven blades, four were instrumented with strain gauges before final assembly. After production at the TPI Composites facility in Rhode Island, the blades were shipped to various test sites: two blades to the National Wind Technology Center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, two blades to Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, New Mexico and three blades to the United States Department of Agriculture turbine field test facility in Bushland, Texas. An adapter plate was designed to allow the TX-100 blades to be installed on existing Micon 65/13M turbines at the USDA site. The conclusion of this program is the kick-off of the TX-100 blade testing at the three testing facilities.

Ashwill, Thomas D.; Berry, Derek S. (TPI Composites, Inc., Warren, RI)

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Final Report Continued research, development and test of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Report - Public - Continued research, development and test of SOFC Technology PSO Project No .....................................................................................................10 3.3.2 >8000 hours stack test with new stack technology...............................................12 3.4.2 Stacks for in-house research, development and testing ....................................12

32

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DRILLING AND TESTING5002013083AP Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Layman Energy Associates, Inc. #12; PREPARED BY: Primary Author(s): Erik B. Layman Layman Energy Associates, Inc. 1584 Cordova Drive San Luis

33

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DRILLING AND TESTING Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Layman Energy Associates, Inc. #12; PREPARED BY: Primary Author(s): Erik B. Layman Layman Energy Associates, Inc. 1584 Cordova Drive San Luis

34

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEVELOPMENT OF NEW TESTING PROTOCOLS FOR MEASURING THE PERFORMANCE OF SHOWERHEADS MARCH 2010 CEC-500-2013-130 Prepared for: California Energy: California Energy Commission Brad Meister Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency

35

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VALIDATION OF A 25 KILOWATT DUAL SHELL STIRLING ENGINE APRIL 2009 CEC5002009061 Prepared for: California · Transportation Proof of Concept and Test Validation of a 25 kW Dualshell Stirling Engine final report for the 25kW Dualshell Stirling Engine Project (Contract Number 50004017) conducted by ADI Thermal Power

36

Final Project Due: May 18, 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Geos 206 Final Project Due: May 18, 2010 Save the trees, and the music stands: An Energy: Monthly totals Total Electricity in kWh Average kWh per day Cost $.11/kWh Emissions .41 kg/kWh (unit in kg electricity bill, cost and emissions of the Bernhard/Chapin complex. 4 Figure 3: This graph provides a monthly

Aalberts, Daniel P.

37

Helical Screw Expander Evaluation Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A functional 1-MW geothermal electric power plant that featured a helical screw expander was produced and then tested in Utah in 1978 to 1979 with a demonstrated average performance of approximately 45% machine efficiency over a wide range of test conditions in noncondensing operation on two-phase geothermal fluids. The Project also produced a computer-equipped data system, an instrumentation and control van, and a 1000-kW variable load bank, all integrated into a test array designed for operation at a variety of remote test sites. Additional testing was performed in Mexico in 1980 under a cooperative test program using the same test array, and machine efficiency was measured at 62% maximum with the rotors partially coated with scale, compared with approximately 54% maximum in Utah with uncoated rotors, confirming the importance of scale deposits within the machine on performance. Data are presented for the Utah testing and for the noncondensing phases of the testing in Mexico. Test time logged was 437 hours during the Utah tests and 1101 hours during the Mexico tests.

McKay, R.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

SINGLE HEATER TEST FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Single Heater Test is the first of the in-situ thermal tests conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of its program of characterizing Yucca Mountain in Nevada as the potential site for a proposed deep geologic repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level nuclear waste. The Site Characterization Plan (DOE 1988) contained an extensive plan of in-situ thermal tests aimed at understanding specific aspects of the response of the local rock-mass around the potential repository to the heat from the radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. With the refocusing of the Site Characterization Plan by the ''Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program Plan'' (DOE 1994), a consolidated thermal testing program emerged by 1995 as documented in the reports ''In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (DOE 1995) and ''Updated In-Situ Thermal Testing Program Strategy'' (CRWMS M&O 1997a). The concept of the Single Heater Test took shape in the summer of 1995 and detailed planning and design of the test started with the beginning fiscal year 1996. The overall objective of the Single Heater Test was to gain an understanding of the coupled thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are anticipated to occur in the local rock-mass in the potential repository as a result of heat from radioactive decay of the emplaced waste. This included making a priori predictions of the test results using existing models and subsequently refining or modifying the models, on the basis of comparative and interpretive analyses of the measurements and predictions. A second, no less important, objective was to try out, in a full-scale field setting, the various instruments and equipment to be employed in the future on a much larger, more complex, thermal test of longer duration, such as the Drift Scale Test. This ''shake down'' or trial aspect of the Single Heater Test applied not just to the hardware, but also to the teamwork and cooperation between multiple organizations performing their part in the test.

J.B. Cho

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

RESEM-CA Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the final deliverable for Project 2.2-Retrofit Tools, in the California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program for High Performance Commercial Building Systems (PIER-HPCBS). The objective of Project 2.2 is to deliver an updated and California-Customized retrofit analysis tool based on the earlier federally funded RESEM (Retrofit Energy Savings Estimation Method) tool [1]. Specific tasks to accomplish this were identified in PIER HPCBS Report No. E2P2.2T1c, and addressed (a) modernization, (b) enhancement of basic analysis methods and capabilities, (c) adding, modifying, or updating databases for California building types, systems, components, utility rate structures, and weather.

Carroll, William

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

WSF Biodiesel Demonstration Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2004, WSF canceled a biodiesel fuel test because of “product quality issues” that caused the fuel purifiers to clog. The cancelation of this test and the poor results negatively impacted the use of biodiesel in marine application in the Pacific Northwest. In 2006, The U.S. Department of Energy awarded the Puget Sound Clean Air Agency a grant to manage a scientific study investigating appropriate fuel specifications for biodiesel, fuel handling procedures and to conduct a fuel test using biodiesel fuels in WSF operations. The Agency put together a project team comprised of experts in fields of biodiesel research and analysis, biodiesel production, marine engineering and WSF personnel. The team reviewed biodiesel technical papers, reviewed the 2004 fuel test results, designed a fuel test plan and provided technical assistance during the test. The research reviewed the available information on the 2004 fuel test and conducted mock laboratory experiments, but was not able to determine why the fuel filters clogged. The team then conducted a literature review and designed a fuel test plan. The team implemented a controlled introduction of biodiesel fuels to the test vessels while monitoring the environmental conditions on the vessels and checking fuel quality throughout the fuel distribution system. The fuel test was conducted on the same three vessels that participated in the canceled 2004 test using the same ferry routes. Each vessel used biodiesel produced from a different feedstock (i.e. soy, canola and yellow grease). The vessels all ran on ultra low sulfur diesel blended with biodiesel. The percentage of biodiesel was incrementally raised form from 5 to 20 percent. Once the vessels reached the 20 percent level, they continued at this blend ratio for the remainder of the test. Fuel samples were taken from the fuel manufacturer, during fueling operations and at several points onboard each vessel. WSF Engineers monitored the performance of the fuel systems and engines. Each test vessel did experience a microbial growth bloom that produced a build up of material in the fuel purifiers similar to material witnessed in the 2004 fuel test. A biocide was added with each fuel shipment and the problem subsided. In January of 2009, the WSF successfully completed an eleven month biodiesel fuel test using approximately 1,395,000 gallons of biodiesel blended fuels. The project demonstrated that biodiesel can be used successfully in marine vessels and that current ASTM specifications are satisfactory for marine vessels. Microbial growth in biodiesel diesel interface should be monitored. An inspection of the engines showed no signs of being negatively impacted by the test.

Washington State University; University of Idaho; The Glosten Associates, Inc.; Imperium Renewables, Inc.

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Confined zone dispersion project. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the performance of the confined zone dispersion (CZD) flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system in removing sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) from flue gas in the coal-fired boiler. The CZD-FGD system, installed at Pennsylvania Electric Company`s (Penelec`s) Seward Power Station, was designed to remove 50% of the SO{sub 2} from one-half of Unit No. 5`s flue gas when the boiler is fired with 1.5% sulfur coal. Section 1 discusses the significance of CZD, the purpose of this report, the history of the project, and the role of DOE in the project, describes the project organization, and lists the six design areas involving proprietary information. Section 2 presents project location, objectives, and phases, and discusses the test program. Section 3 explains the process flow diagram, piping and instrumentation diagrams and operating controls, site plan, equipment layouts, and process equipment. Section 4 provides an integrated discussion of all the test results obtained during the test program, backed by tabulations and graphics. Section 5 describes the testing failures and corrective actions taken. Section 6, reliability/availability/maintainability analysis data of major equipment, covers the following systems: atomizing, sootblowing, lime, flue gas, and controls and instrumentation. Section 7 summarizes the capital cost requirements for the Seward CZD demonstration unit and discusses the capital and operating costs of installing the process at plants with various unit capacities. Section 8 discusses plans to continue the CZD demonstration to achieve longer term continuous operation at SO{sub 2} removals of 50%. Section 9 presents the principal findings of the CZD demonstration and recommends additional testing.

NONE

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Final Report for the NERI Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report summarizes the research activities during the entire performance period of the NERI grant, including the extra 9 months granted under a no-cost time extension. Building up on the 14 quarterly reports submitted through October 2008, we present here an overview of the research accomplishments under the five tasks originally proposed in July 2004, together with citations for publications resulting from the project. The AFCI-NERI project provided excellent support for two undergraduate and 10 graduates students at the University of Michigan during a period of three years and nine months. Significant developments were achieved in three areas: (1) Efficient deterministic fuel cycle optimization algorithms both for PWR and SFR configurations, (2) Efficient search algorithm for PWR equilibrium cycles, and (3) Simplified Excel-based script for dynamic fuel cycle analysis of diverse cycles. The project resulted in a total of 8 conference papers and three journal papers, including two that will be submitted shortly. Three pending publications are attached to the report.

John C. Lee

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

43

Advanced Blade Manufacturing Project - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The original scope of the project was to research improvements to the processes and materials used in the manufacture of wood-epoxy blades, conduct tests to qualify any new material or processes for use in blade design and subsequently build and test six blades using the improved processes and materials. In particular, ABM was interested in reducing blade cost and improving quality. In addition, ABM needed to find a replacement material for the mature Douglas fir used in the manufacturing process. The use of mature Douglas fir is commercially unacceptable because of its limited supply and environmental concerns associated with the use of mature timber. Unfortunately, the bankruptcy of FloWind in June 1997 and a dramatic reduction in AWT sales made it impossible for ABM to complete the full scope of work. However, sufficient research and testing were completed to identify several promising changes in the blade manufacturing process and develop a preliminary design incorporating these changes.

POORE, ROBERT Z.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Griffith Energy Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Griffith Energy Limited Liability Corporation (Griffith) proposes to construct and operate the Griffith Energy Project (Project), a natural gas-fuel, combined cycle power plant, on private lands south of Kingman, Ariz. The Project would be a ''merchant plant'' which means that it is not owned by a utility and there is currently no long-term commitment or obligation by any utility to purchase the capacity and energy generated by the power plant. Griffith applied to interconnect its proposed power plant with the Western Area Power Administration's (Western) Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie and Parker-Davis transmission systems. Western, as a major transmission system owner, needs to provide access to its transmission system when it is requested by an eligible organization per existing policies, regulations and laws. The proposed interconnection would integrate the power generated by the Project into the regional transmission grid and would allow Griffith to supply its power to the competitive electric wholesale market. Based on the application, Western's proposed action is to enter into an interconnection and construction agreement with Griffith for the requested interconnections. The proposed action includes the power plant, water wells and transmission line, natural gas pipelines, new electrical transmission lines and a substation, upgrade of an existing transmission line, and access road to the power plant. Construction of segments of the transmission lines and a proposed natural gas pipeline also require a grant of right-of-way across Federal lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management. Public comments on the Draft EIS are addressed in the Final EIS, including addenda and modifications made as a result of the comments and/or new information.

N /A

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

45

MIT LMFBR blanket research project. Final summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a final summary report on an experimental and analytical program for the investigation of LMFBR blanket characteristics carried out at MIT in the period 1969 to 1983. During this span of time, work was carried out on a wide range of subtasks, ranging from neutronic and photonic measurements in mockups of blankets using the Blanket Test Facility at the MIT Research Reactor, to analytic/numerical investigations of blanket design and economics. The main function of this report is to serve as a resource document which will permit ready reference to the more detailed topical reports and theses issued over the years on the various aspects of project activities. In addition, one aspect of work completed during the final year of the project, on doubly-heterogeneous blanket configurations, is documented for the record.

Driscoll, M.J.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Innovative subsurface stabilization project -- Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report of results of applying four innovative grouting materials and one commercially available material for creating monoliths out of buried waste sites using jet grouting. The four innovative materials included a proprietary water-based epoxy, an Idaho National Engineering Laboratory-developed two-component grout that resembles hematite when cured with soil, molten low-temperature paraffin, and a proprietary iron oxide cement-based grout called TECT. The commercial grout was Type-H high-sulfate-resistant cement. These materials were tested in specially designed cold test pits that simulate buried transuranic waste at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In addition to the grouting studies, specially designed field-scale permeameters were constructed to perform full-scale controlled mass balance hydraulic conductivity studies. An ungrouted field-scale permeameter contained simulated buried waste and soil and was left ungrouted, and a second identical field-scale permeameter was grouted with commercial-grade Type-H cement. The field demonstrations were performed in an area referred to as the Cold Test Pit at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The Cold Test Pit is adjacent to the laboratory`s Radioactive Waste Management Complex. At the complex, 2 million ft{sup 3} of transuranic waste is commingled with 6--8 million ft{sup 3} of soil in shallow land burial, and improving the confinement of this waste is one of the options for final waste disposition. This report gives results of grouting, coring, hydraulic conductivity, and destructive examination of the grouted buried waste matrix.

Loomis, G.G.; Zdinak, A.P.; Bishop, C.W.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT FLEXIBLE owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the California Energy Commission nor Energy Resource Utility Interface System is the final report for the Interconnection, Grid Effects

48

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

supplies, dry cooling systi Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT INLET AIR SPRAY COOLINGUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Inlet Air Spray Cooling

49

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT SMART GRID ROADMAP FOR RENEWABLES INTEGRATION JULY 2013 CEC5002010029 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: California Energy Commission Dave Michel Project Manager Mike Gravely Office Manager Energy Efficiency

50

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The California Energy Commission's Geothermal Resources Development Account Geothermal Planning Projects support of geothermal resource elements, or geothermal components of energy elements, for inclusion in the localPublic Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT STRUCTURING A DIRECT

51

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT SMUD OFFPEAK OVERCOOLING PROJECT DECEMBER 2007 CEC5002013066 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Davis Energy Group #12; PREPARED BY: Primary Author(s): David Springer Davis Energy Group Davis, CA

52

DOE Issues Test Procedure Final Rule & Publishes Energy Conservation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Test Procedure Final Rule & Publishes Energy Conservation Standards NOPR for Electric Motors DOE Issues Test Procedure Final Rule & Publishes Energy Conservation Standards NOPR for...

53

Biodiesel Engine Testing MECH-457 Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biodiesel Engine Testing MECH-457 Final Report Submitted to Jon Mikkelsen April 11, 2005 Darren at UBC has begun producing biodiesel fuel from waste cooking oils acquired from campus kitchens. Using biodiesel in a four-cylinder, 30 hp Kubota engine (V1305). This engine was chosen because it is used

54

Final Turbine and Test Facility Design Report Alden/NREC Fish Friendly Turbine  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The final report provides an overview of the Alden/NREC Fish Friendly turbine design phase, turbine test plan, preliminary test results, costs, schedule, and a hypothetical application at a real world project.

55

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009.   Inverter  Test Procedures Solar Generation Impact Conditioner Testing Procedures  Appendix B: Air Conditioner air conditioner testing procedures and results from studies 

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Aerogel commercialization pilot project. Final program report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aerogels are extremely light weight, high surface area, very insulative materials that offer many potential improvements to commercial products. Aerogels have been the subject of extensive research at Department of Energy Laboratories and have been considered one of the technology most ready for commercialization. However, commercialization of the technology had been difficult for the National Laboratories since end users were not interested in the high temperature and high pressure chemical processes involved in manufacturing the raw material. Whereas, Aerojet as a supplier of rocket fuels, specialty chemicals and materials had the manufacturing facilities and experience to commercially produce aerogel-type products. Hence the TRP provided a link between the technology source (National Laboratories), the manufacturing (Aerojet) and the potential end users (other TRP partners). The program successfully produced approximately 500 ft{sup 2} of organic aerogel but failed to make significant quantities of silica aerogel. It is significant that this production represents both the largest volume and biggest pieces of organic aerogel ever produced. Aerogels, available from this program, when tested in several prototype commercial products were expected to improve the products performance, but higher than expected projected production costs for large scale manufacture of aerogels has limited continued commercial interest from these partners. Aerogels do, however, offer potential as a specialty material for some high value technology and defense products.

NONE

1996-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

57

Electric Power Delivery Testing Feasibility Study Task 6 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report is covers the completion of the Electric Power Delivery Testing Feasibility Study. The objective of this project was to research, engineer, and demonstrate high-power laboratory testing protocols to accurately reproduce the conditions on the electric power grid representing both normal load switching and abnormalities such as short-circuit fault protection. Test circuits, equipment, and techniques were developed and proven at reduced power levels to determine the feasibility of building a large-scale high-power testing laboratory capable of testing equipment and systems at simulated high-power conditions of the U.S. power grid at distribution levels up through 38 kiloVolts (kV) and transmission levels up through 230 kV. The project delivered demonstrated testing techniques, high-voltage test equipment for load testing and synthetic short-circuit testing, and recommended designs for future implementation of a high-power testing laboratory to test equipment and systems, enabling increased reliability of the electric transmission and distribution grid.

Thomas Tobin

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

9   1.2.1.   Air Conditioner Testing and 16   2.0   Air Conditioner Results of Residential Air Conditioner Testing in WECC,” 

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

MATH 498/598 Spatial Statistics Final Project Poster Session  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geophysics 8 #12;1 Undergraduate Math/Computer Science PROJECT 1 Author(s): Angela Bauer, Regeena Martinez Graduate Math/Computer Science PROJECT 4 Author(s): Chris Bukowski Title: Investigating spatial correlationMATH 498/598 Spatial Statistics Final Project Poster Session Tuesday, May 10th 3:15-5:15 pm GRL

60

Smart Gun Technology project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Smart Gun Technology project is to eliminate the capability of an unauthorized user form firing a law officer`s firearm by implementing user-recognizing-and-authorizing (or {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes}) surety technologies. This project was funded by the National Institute of Justice. This report lists the findings and results of the project`s three primary objectives. First, to find and document the requirements for a smart firearm technology that law enforcement officers will value. Second, to investigate, evaluate, and prioritize technologies that meet the requirements for a law enforcement officer`s smart firearm. Third, to demonstrate and document the most promising technology`s usefulness in models of a smart firearm.

Weiss, D.R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

NTRCI Legacy Engine Research and Development Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Legacy engine is a completely new design, transitional diesel engine, replacing the reciprocating engine with a rotary engine. The Legacy engine offers significant advances over conventional internal combustion engines in 1) power to weight ratio; 2) multiple fuel acceptance; 3) fuel economy; and 4) environmental compliance. These advances are achieved through a combination of innovative design geometry, rotary motion, aspiration simplicity, and manufacturing/part simplicity. The key technical challenge to the Legacy engineâ??s commercialization, and the focus of this project, was the development of a viable roton tip seal. The PST concept for the roton tip seal was developed into a manufacturable design. The design was evaluated using a custom designed and fabricated seal test fixture and further refined. This design was incorporated into the GEN2.5A prototype and tested for achievable compression pressure. The Decision Point at the end of Phase 1 of the project (described below) was to further optimize the existing tip seal design. Enhancements to the tip seal design were incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Compression pressures adequate for compression ignition of diesel fuel were achieved, although not consistently in all combustion volumes. The variation in compression pressures was characterized versus design features. As the roton tip seal performance was improved, results pointed toward inadequate performance of the housing side seals. Enhancement of the housing side seal system was accomplished using a custom designed side seal test fixture. The design enhancements developed with the test fixture were also incorporated into the GEN2.5B prototype and tested and evaluated using the iterative research strategy described below. Finally, to simplify the requirements for the roton tip seals and to enhance the introduction and combustion of fuel, a flush-mount fuel injector was designed, manufactured and demonstrated in the GEN2.5B prototype.

Connie Smith-Holbert; Joseph Petrolino; Bart Watkins; David Irick

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

62

TESTING OF TMR SAND MANTIS FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Screening tests of Sand Mantis candidate materials selected for erosion resistance have been completed. The results of this testing identified that over a relatively short period of operation (<1 hour), measurable erosion will occur in each of the candidate zoom tube materials given equal operating exposure. Additionally, this testing has shown that erosion of the rubber discharge hose directly downstream of the vehicle could be expected to limit the service life of the discharge hose. On the basis of these test results, SRNL recommends the following; {lg_bullet} redesign of critical system components (e.g., zoom tube, discharge hose) should be conducted to improve system characteristics relative to erosion and capitalize on the results of this testing, {lg_bullet} continued efforts to deploy the Sand Mantis should include testing to better define and optimize operating parameters, and gain an understanding of system dynamics, {lg_bullet} discontinue wear testing with the selected materials pending redesign of critical system components (1st recommendation) and inclusion of other candidate materials. The final selection of additional candidate materials should be made following design changes, but might include a Stellite alloy or zirconia.

Krementz, D; William Daugherty, W

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

63

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Conditioner Testing in WECC,” IEEE Power  Engineering Air Conditioner Modeling, WECC Load Modeling Task  Force in power system studies: WECC progress update,? Power and 

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOAD MODELING TRANSMISSION RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

32   Figure  13  Voltage  Oscillation  Test.   The  applied calculated from measurements for the voltage oscillation from  measurements  for  the  voltage  oscillation 

Lesieutre, Bernard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Project AIRSTREAM: Trace gas final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of 10 years of sampling for trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are presented. These samples were collected under the auspices of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Department of Energy (DOE). Almost 1000 whole air samples were collected during the years 1973 to 1983 under Project AIRSTREAM. Project AIRSTREAM was part of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory`s (EML, at that time called the Health and Safety Laboratory/HASL) research effort to investigate the impact of the injection of radionuclides and stable compounds into the stratosphere. One or more of the following compounds were analyzed: CCl{sub 3}F, CCl{sub 2}F{sub 2}, CCl{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SF{sub 6}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CH{sub 3}CCl{sub 3}, and COS. Details of the Project`s quality assurance program are discussed. Also included in the report are two-dimensional plots of the concentration of CCl{sub 3}F and a complete tabulation of the data.

Leifer, R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Performance Metrics Research Project - Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NREL began work for DOE on this project to standardize the measurement and characterization of building energy performance. NREL's primary research objectives were to determine which performance metrics have greatest value for determining energy performance and to develop standard definitions and methods of measuring and reporting that performance.

Deru, M.; Torcellini, P.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

SAT-WIND project Final report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-2840 ISBN 87-550-3570-1 The SAT-WIND project `Winds from satellites for offshore and coastal wind energy) technologies for wind energy tools for wind resources and wind-indexing. The study area was the Danish Seas microwave polarimetric 223.3.1 History 3.3.2 Measurement principle 22 223.3.3 WindSat (passive microwave

68

Vermont gasifier project. Final report, Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents an engineering status report for the Vermont gasifier project. Technical areas of concern are discussed with the cyclone performance, agglomeration problems in the combustor, particlate emissions, valve design, deflagration venting, gasifier and combustion blower surge control, and other related areas. Attachments pertaining to the drawing and specification register are included.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT UC DAVIS TECHNOLOGY. 2005. UC Davis Technology Assessment for Advanced Biomass Power Generation. California Energy Davis, CA 95616 Contract Number: 500-00-034 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Hassan Mohammed

70

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND BIOFUEL DEMONSTRATION PROJECT Oceanside Water Pollution Control Plant Prepared forRelated Environmental Research · Energy Systems Integration · Environmentally Preferred Advanced Generation Brown Grease Recovery and Biofuel Demonstration: Oceanside Water Pollution Control Plant Final Report

71

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Office Manager Energy Efficiency Research Office Laurie ten Hope Deputy Director RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT Innovations Small Grants · EnergyRelated Environmental Research · Energy Systems IntegrationPublic Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT HOW LOW CAN YOU GO

72

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT Demonstration: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Electric Power Research Institute #12; Prepared by: Primary: California Energy Commission Jamie Patterson Contract Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy Efficiency

73

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ASSESSMENT OF LARVAL Coastal Boundary Layer Flow SEPTEMBER 2007 CEC5002013049 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Energy Commission Joe O'Hagan Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy Generation Research

74

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGYEFFICIENT Energy Commission Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory #12; PREPARED BY: Primary.lbl.gov Contract Number: 500-06-053 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Paul Roggensack Contract Manager

75

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT SAIC SOLAR DISH CONCENTRATOR WITH STIRLING ENGINE DECEMBER 2007 CEC5002013068 Prepared for: California Energy Commission: 500-00-034-15 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Hassan Mohammed Contract Manager Linda

76

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT HYBRID SOLAR LIGHTING5002013067 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Oakridge National Laboratory Insert-04-034-18 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Hassan Mohammed Contract Manager Linda Speigel Office Manager

77

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT AUTOMATED ROOFTOP CEC5002013042 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Energy Commission Brad Meister Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy Efficiency Research

78

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT A SEASONAL DECEMBER 2011 CEC5002013035 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 96270 Contract Number: 500-02-004 Prepared for: California Energy

79

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT AN ASSESSMENT: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California, Davis #12; PREPARED BY: Primary Number: 500-01-016 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prab Sethi Contract Manager Linda Spiegel

80

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEVELOPMENT OF STEAM5002013092AP Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California #12 Energy Commission David Effross Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy Generation Research

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGYEFFICIENT HIGHTECH BUILDINGS DECEMBER 2008 CEC5002013062 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by-06-053 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Paul Roggensack Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager

82

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT EFFICIENCY CHARACTERISTICS AND OPPORTUNITIES FOR NEW CALIFORNIA HOMES (ECO) MARCH 2011, Ltd. Rick Chitwood, Chitwood Energy Management, Inc. Bruce A. Wilcox, P.E. Proctor Engineering Group

83

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Dean Fennell at the Energy Information Administration; Larry Hunsaker, Marc Vayssieres, and Webster Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT CALIFORNIA ENERGY BALANCE UPDATE AND DECOMPOSITION ANALYSIS FOR THE INDUSTRY AND BUILDING SECTORS APRIL 2013

84

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a transport membrane condenser for recovering both energy and water from the lowgrade waste heat streams Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Gas Technology Institute #12; Prepared by: Primary Author

85

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are either present or past employees of Solazyme, Inc. #12;2 PREFACE The California Energy Commission Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT PRODUCTION OF SOLADIESEL RD® FROM CELLULOSIC FEEDSTOCKS JULY 2011 CEC5002013019 Prepared for: California Energy

86

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT Developing5002013109 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Growpro Inc #12; Prepared by Waimauku, New Zealand Contract Number: PIR-07-001 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Abolghasem

87

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEVELOPMENT Energy Commission Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory #12; PREPARED BY: Primary-09-010 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Matthew Fung Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy

88

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT LIGHTING CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE RetrofitIntegrated Classroom Lighting System (RICLS) Prepared for: California Energy Commission Managed by: Architectural Energy Corporation Prepared by: Finelite Inc. FEBRUARY 2013 CEC

89

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT GREENGUIDE FOR SUSTAINABLE ENERGY EFFICIENT REFRIGERATED STORAGE FACILITIES MARCH 2013 CEC-500-2013-145 Prepared for: California Energy for: California Energy Commission Anish Gautam Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager Energy

90

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT PRELIMINARY ESTIMATES5002013051 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: 500-99-013 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Steve Ghadiri Contract Manager Fernando Piña

91

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS FROM RENEWABLE ENERGY AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY IN CALIFORNIA AIR QUALITY MANAGEMENT DISTRICTS DECEMBER 2011 CEC5002013047 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Synapse Energy

92

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: San Diego State Research Foundation #12: California Energy Commission Raquel Kravitz Program Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy Systems

93

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT PLANNING ALTERNATIVE5002013021 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Facet Decision Systems, Inc. #12-08-030 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Linda Spiegel Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager

94

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT Technology MARCH 2013 CEC5002012077 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Heschong Mahone-03-026 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Kristy Chew Contract Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy

95

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT COMMERCIALIZING ZERO ENERGY NEW HOME COMMUNITIES Appendices MARCH 2010 CEC5002014007AP Prepared for: California Energy SunPower Corporation Contract Number: 500-04-022 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Golam

96

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: San Diego State Research Foundation #12 Energy Commission Raquel E. Kravitz Program Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy Systems Research

97

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ASSESSMENT OF PIEZOELECTRIC MATERIALS FOR ROADWAY ENERGY HARVESTING Cost of Energy and Demonstration Roadmap Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: DNV KEMA Energy & Sustainability JANUARY 2014 CEC5002013007

98

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT Renewable Resource/Transmission Development Scenarios Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Center for Energy Efficiency.D. David Olsen Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Technologies Sacramento, California 95814

99

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEMANDCONTROLLED VENTILATION AND CLASSROOM VENTILATION SEPTEMBER 2009 CEC5002013057 Prepared for: California Energy. Sullivan Indoor Environment Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Lawrence Berkeley

100

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Creating Incentives for Electricity Prov Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT CREATING INCENTIVES Incentives for Electricity Providers to Integrate Distributed Energy Resources. EPRI, Palo Alto, CA

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Klickitat Cogeneration Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet BPA`s contractual obligation to supply electrical power to its customers, BPA proposes to acquire power generated by Klickitat Cogeneration Project. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment evaluating the proposed project. Based on the EA analysis, BPA`s proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 for the following reasons: (1)it will not have a significant impact land use, upland vegetation, wetlands, water quality, geology, soils, public health and safety, visual quality, historical and cultural resources, recreation and socioeconomics, and (2) impacts to fisheries, wildlife resources, air quality, and noise will be temporary, minor, or sufficiently offset by mitigation. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI (Finding of No Significant Impact).

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Klickitat Energy Partners

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Alaska Wood Biomass Energy Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Craig Wood Fired Boiler Project is to use waste wood from local sawmilling operations to provide heat to local public buildings, in an effort to reduce the cost of operating those buildings, and put to productive use a byproduct from the wood milling process that otherwise presents an expense to local mills. The scope of the project included the acquisition of a wood boiler and the delivery systems to feed wood fuel to it, the construction of a building to house the boiler and delivery systems, and connection of the boiler facility to three buildings that will benefit from heat generated by the boiler: the Craig Aquatic Center, the Craig Elementary School, and the Craig Middle School buildings.

Jonathan Bolling

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

103

Enforcement Project Management Handbook. Directive (Final)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The publication is a basic reference and training manual to assist EPA Superfund field personnel (Remedial Project Managers and On Scene Coordinators) in planning, negotiating, and managing potentially responsible party (PRP) searches and PRP-lead actions at Superfund sites. It provides an overview of each phase of the Superfund enforcement process and discusses specific roles and responsibilities of the RPM/OSC in the process.

Not Available

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Fuel Cell Forklift Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project addresses the DOE’s priorities related to acquiring data from real-world fuel cell operation, eliminating non-technical barriers, and increasing opportunities for market expansion of hydrogen fuel cell technologies. The project involves replacing the batteries in a complete fleet of class-1 electric lift trucks at FedEx Freight’s Springfield, MO parcel distribution center with 35 Plug Power GenDrive fuel cell power units. Fuel for the power units involves on-site hydrogen handling and dispensing equipment and liquid hydrogen delivery by Air Products. The project builds on FedEx Freight’s previous field trial experience with a handful of Plug Power’s GenDrive power units. Those trials demonstrated productivity gains and improved performance compared to battery-powered lift trucks. Full lift truck conversion at our Springfield location allows us to improve the competitiveness of our operations and helps the environment by reducing greenhouse gas emissions and toxic battery material use. Success at this distribution center may lead to further fleet conversions at some of our distribution centers.

Cummings, Clifton C

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

105

Project AIRSTREAM: Trace gas final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of 10 years of sampling for trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere are presented. These samples were collected under the auspices of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and the Department of Energy (DOE). Almost 1000 whole air samples were collected during the years 1973 to 1983 under Project AIRSTREAM. Project AIRSTREAM was part of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's (EML, at that time called the Health and Safety Laboratory/HASL) research effort to investigate the impact of the injection of radionuclides and stable compounds into the stratosphere. One or more of the following compounds were analyzed: CCl[sub 3]F, CCl[sub 2]F[sub 2], CCl[sub 4], N[sub 2]O, SF[sub 6], CO[sub 2], CH[sub 4], CH[sub 3]CCl[sub 3], and COS. Details of the Project's quality assurance program are discussed. Also included in the report are two-dimensional plots of the concentration of CCl[sub 3]F and a complete tabulation of the data.

Leifer, R.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT TIME OF USE WATER METER IMPACTS · Transportation Time-of-Use Water Meter Impacts on Customer Water Use is the final report for the Time of Use This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission. It does

107

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT INTEGRATING BIOENERGETICS, SPACIAL for patiently assisting us with budget and final report submission. i #12;PREFACE The California Energy for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California, Santa Barbara #12;PREPARED BY

108

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT NATURAL GAS OPTIMIZED ADVANCED HEAVY · Environmentally Preferred Advanced Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Natural Gas-optimized Advanced Heavy-duty Engine is the final

109

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT Integrated CHP Using UltraLow NOx Supplemental Firing MARCH 2013 CEC5002013043 Prepared for: California Energy://www.gastechnology.org Contract Number: PNG-07-006 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Gail Wiggett Project Manager Linda

110

Combined Final Report for Colony II Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

(This report was originally submmited by the lead PI (Terry Jones, ORNL) on October 22, 2013 to the program manager, Lucy Nowell. It is being submitted from University of Illinois in accordance with instructions). HPC Colony II seeks to provide portable performance for leadership class machines. Our strategy is based on adaptive system software that aims to make the intelligent decisions necessary to allow domain scientists to safely focus on their task at hand and allow the system software stack to adapt their application to the underlying architecture. This report describes the research undertaken towards these objectives and the results obtained over the performance period of the project.

Kale, Laxmikant [University of Illinois] [University of Illinois; Jones, Terry [Oak Ridge National Laboratory] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Moreira, Jose [IBM Corp.] [IBM Corp.

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

111

Cryogenic Barrier Demonstration Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term frozen soil barrier was implemented at the HRE (Homogeneous Reactor Experiment) Pond facility at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 1997. This was performed to verify the technical feasibility and costs of deploying a frozen barrier at a radiologically contaminated site. Work began in September 1996 and progressed through to December 1999. The frozen barrier has been operational since November 1997. Verification of the barrier integrity was performed independently by the EPA's SITE Program. This project showed frozen barriers offer a proven technology to retain below grade hazardous substances at relatively low costs with minimal effect on the environment.

Johnson, L.A.; Yarmak, E.; Long, E.L.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective for the Fairbanks Geothermal Energy Project is to provide another source of base-load renewable energy in the Fairbanks North Star Borough (FNSB). To accomplish this, Chena Hot Springs Resort (Chena) drilled a re-injection well to 2700 feet and a production well to 2500 feet. The re-injection well allows a greater flow of water to directly replace the water removed from the warmest fractures in the geothermal reservoir. The new production will provide access to warmer temperature water in greater quantities.

Karl, Bernie [CHSR,LLC Owner] [CHSR,LLC Owner

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

113

Final Report Navajo Transmission Project (NTP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Diné Power Authority is developing the Navajo Transmission Project (NTP) to relieve the constraints on the transmission of electricity west of the Four Corners area and to improve the operation flexibility and reliability of the extra-high-voltage transmission system in the region. The NTP creates the wholesale transmission capacity for more economical power transfers, sales, and purchases in the region. It will facilitate the development of Navajo energy resources, improve economic conditions on the Navajo Nation as well as allow DPA to participate in the western electrical utility industry.

Bennie Hoisington; Steven Begay

2006-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

114

Emergency Fish Restoration Project; Final Report 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lake Roosevelt is a 151-mile impoundment created by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam during the early 1940's. The construction of the dam permanently and forever blocked the once abundant anadromous fish runs to the upper Columbia Basin. Since the construction of Grand Coulee Dam in 1943 and Chief Joseph Dam in 1956 this area is known as the blocked area. The blocked area is totally dependant upon resident fish species to provide a subsistence, recreational and sport fishery. The sport fishery of lake Roosevelt is varied but consists mostly of Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka), Walleye (Stizostedion vitreum) Small mouth bass (Micropterus dolomieui) and white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus). Currently, Bonneville Power Administration funds and administers two trout/kokanee hatcheries on Lake Roosevelt. The Spokane Tribe of Indians operates one hatchery, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife the other. In addition to planting fish directly into Lake Roosevelt, these two hatcheries also supply fish to a net pen operation that also plants the lake. The net pen project is administered by Bonneville Power funded personnel but is dependant upon volunteer labor for daily feeding and monitoring operations. This project has demonstrated great success and is endorsed by the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe of Indians, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, local sportsmen associations, and the Lake Roosevelt Forum. The Lake Roosevelt/Grand Coulee Dam area is widely known and its diverse fishery is targeted by large numbers of anglers annually to catch rainbow trout, kokanee salmon, small mouth bass and walleye. These anglers contribute a great deal to the local economy by fuel, grocery, license, tackle and motel purchases. Because such a large portion of the local economy is dependant upon the Lake Roosevelt fishery and tourism, any unusual operation of the Lake Roosevelt system may have a substantial impact to the economy. During the past several years the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement project has been collecting data pertaining to fish entraining out of the lake through Grand Coulee Dam. During 1996 and 1997 the lake was deeply drawn down to accommodate the limited available water during a drought year and for the highly unusual draw-down of Lake Roosevelt during the critical Northwest power shortage. The goal of the project is to enhance the resident rainbow trout fishery in Lake Roosevelt lost as a result of the unusual operation of Grand Coulee dam during the drought/power shortage.

LeCaire, Richard

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Physics of Correlated Systems, Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The funding of this DOE project has enabled the P.I. and his collaborators to tackle a number of problems involving nonperturbatively coupled atomic systems, including their interactions with each other and/or with an external electromagnetic field of the type provided by either a continuous-wave or a femtosecond short-pulse laser. The progress includes a new, deeper understanding of an old and famous theory of autoionization lineshapes, developed initially by Ugo Fano in 1935 and later extended in a highly cited 1961 article; the new result specifically is that in a collaboration with the Heidelberg group we have been able to demonstrate an unexpectedly simple behavior in the time domain that is relevant for modern short-pulse lasers. This study also demonstrates a way to modify and even control the lineshapes of unstable atomic and molecular energy levels.

Greene, Chris H. [University of Colorado at Boulder] [University of Colorado at Boulder

2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

116

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA proposes to fund several fishery-related activities in the Yakima River Basin. These activities, known as the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP), would be jointly managed by the State of Washington and the Yakima Indian Nation. The YFP is included in the Northwest Power Planning Council`s (Council`s) fish and wildlife program. The Council selected the Yakima River system for attention because fisheries resources are severely reduced from historical levels and because there is a significant potential for enhancement of these resources. BPA`s proposed action is to fund (1) information gathering on the implementation of supplementation techniques and on feasibility of reintroducing coho salmon in an environment where native populations have become extinct; (2) research activities based on continuous assessment, feedback and improvement of research design and activities ({open_quotes}adaptive management{close_quotes}); and (3) die construction, operation, and maintenance of facilities for supplementing populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon. Examined in addition to No Action are two alternatives for action: (1) supplementation of depressed natural populations of upper Yakima spring chinook and (2) that same supplementation plus a study to determine the feasibility of reestablishing naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho in the Yakima Basin. Alternative 2 is the preferred action. A central hatchery would be built for either alternative, as well as three sites with six raceways each for acclimation and release of spring chinook smolts. Major issues examined in the Revised Draft EIS include potential impacts of the project on genetic and ecological resources of existing fish populations, on water quality and quantity, on threatened and endangered species listed under the Endangered Species Act, and on the recreational fishery.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Baltimore Zoo digester project. Final report. [Elephants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a project to produce methane using the manure from zoo animals as a feedstock is presented. Two digesters are in operation, the first (built in 1974) utilizing wastes from the Hippo House and a second (built in 1980) utilizing wastes from the Elephant House. Demonstrations on the utilization of the gas were performed during zoo exhibits. The Elephant House Digester has a capacity of 4200 gallons and a floating gas dome which can retain at least 150 cu ft of gas. Solar energy has been incorporated into the design to maintain digester temperature at 95/sup 0/F. The system produces 50 cu ft per day. After cleaning the gas, it is used to generate electricity to power an electric light, a roof fan, and an air conditioner. The gas is also used to operate a gas range and a gas lamp. During the opening day exhibit, 50 meals were cooked using the bio-gas from just 2 elephants. (DMC)

Gibson, P.W.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Colorado Better Buildings Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Colorado Better Buildings project intended to bring new and existing energy efficiency model programs to market with regional collaboration and funding partnerships. The goals for Boulder County and its program partners were to advance energy efficiency investments, stimulate economic growth in Colorado and advance the state’s energy independence. Collectively, three counties set out to complete 9,025 energy efficiency upgrades in 2.5 years and they succeeded in doing so. Energy efficiency upgrades have been completed in more than 11,000 homes and businesses in these communities. Boulder County and its partners received a $25 million BetterBuildings grant from the U.S. Department of Energy under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in the summer of 2010. This was also known as the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants program. With this funding, Boulder County, the City and County of Denver, and Garfield County set out to design programs for the residential and commercial sectors to overcome key barriers in the energy upgrade process. Since January 2011, these communities have paired homeowners and business owners with an Energy Advisor – an expert to help move from assessment to upgrade with minimal hassle. Pairing this step-by-step assistance with financing incentives has effectively addressed many key barriers, resulting in energy efficiency improvements and happy customers. An expert energy advisor guides the building owner through every step of the process, coordinating the energy assessment, interpreting results for a customized action plan, providing a list of contractors, and finding and applying for all available rebates and low-interest loans. In addition to the expert advising and financial incentives, the programs also included elements of social marketing, technical assistance, workforce development and contractor trainings, project monitoring and verification, and a cloud-based customer data system to coordinate among field advisors and across local governments and local service vendors. A portion of the BetterBuildings grant went to the Metro Mayors Caucus (MMC) who worked in partnership with the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) to conduct a series of 10 energy efficiency workshops for local government officials and other interested parties. The workshops helped showcase lessons learned on energy efficiency and helped guide other local governments in the establishment of similar programs. The workshops covered a wide range of energy efficiency and renewable energy topics such as clean energy finance, social mobilization and communications, specific case studies of Colorado towns, energy efficiency codes, net zero buildings and solar power. Since the programs launched in January 2011, these communities have collectively spurred economic investments in energy efficiency, achieved greater than 5:1 leveraging of grant funds, saved energy and reduced greenhouse gas emissions, provided trainings for a robust local energy contractor network, and proved out viable and replicable program models that local utilities and other communities are adopting, with long lasting market transformation.

Strife, Susie; Yancey, Lea

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

Self-Correcting HVAC Controls Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document represents the final project report for the Self-Correcting Heating, Ventilating and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) Controls Project jointly funded by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Program (BTP). The project, initiated in October 2008, focused on exploratory initial development of self-correcting controls for selected HVAC components in air handlers. This report, along with the companion report documenting the algorithms developed, Self-Correcting HVAC Controls: Algorithms for Sensors and Dampers in Air-Handling Units (Fernandez et al. 2009), document the work performed and results of this project.

Fernandez, Nicholas; Brambley, Michael R.; Katipamula, Srinivas; Cho, Heejin; Goddard, James K.; Dinh, Liem H.

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

120

DOE NN-20 microboreholes project. Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and its contractors have developed a conceptual design for a directional microborehole drilling system for hard-rock boring. Analytical calculations, simulations, and the results of laboratory testing of critical prototype drilling components have influenced the design. Two reduced-size drilling systems to produce small diameter, 500-ft-long, directionally drilled river crossing trajectories are proposed to prove feasibility of the concept: (1) a 2-1/4-in. diameter, early demonstration unit to drill directional ultraslimholes; and (2) a 1-1/8-in. diameter, ultimate design to drill directional microboreholes. Both concepts use versatile, coiled-tubing-deployed, hydraulically-powered drilling assemblies, and a surface platform that includes a tubing injector unit to develop high load insertion (snubbing) of the tubing into the sealed borehole. Surface injection will be used to develop the required bit thrust, and both concepts provide for the use of a commercial, real-time, location and steering system that is readily and routinely adapted for deployment on a coiled-tubing drilling platform. The conceptual drilling platform and its subassemblies are shown.

Dreesen, D.S.

1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and UC Davis student volunteers. For the UC Davis contingent, we thank Andy Bookter for serving as leadEnergy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT 21st CENTURY INSTREAM FLOW ASSESSMENT FRAMEWORK FOR MOUNTAIN STREAMS MARCH 2011 CEC5002013059 Prepared for: California Energy

122

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Perez Clean Power Research Napa, California 94558 and Albany, New York 12203 Contract Number: 500Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT UTILITY SYSTEM CAPACITY AND CUSTOMER DEMAND VALUE OF PHOTOVOLTAIC Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Clean

123

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in their areas of expertise. Dr. Ruth Yanai (State University of New York, College of Environmental SciencePublic Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT POTENTIAL POSITIVE Energy Commission Prepared by: William Stewart, Robert F. Powers, Kathyrn McGown, Lindsay Chiono

124

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT MT SURVEY 2007 CEC5002013063APIL Prepared for: California Energy Commission ­ Geothermal Resources Development(s): William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa CA 95405-7841 Randall Mackie GSY

125

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT MT SURVEY 2007 CEC5002013063APWX Prepared for: California Energy Commission ­ Geothermal Resources Development(s): William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa CA 95405-7841 Randall Mackie GSY

126

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT MT SURVEY CEC5002013063APR Prepared for: California Energy Commission ­ Geothermal Resources Development(s): William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa CA 95405-7841 Randall Mackie GSY

127

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT MT SURVEY 2007 CEC5002013063APMQ Prepared for: California Energy Commission ­ Geothermal Resources Development(s): William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa CA 95405-7841 Randall Mackie GSY

128

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT MT SURVEY CEC5002013063APV Prepared for: California Energy Commission ­ Geothermal Resources Development(s): William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa CA 95405-7841 Randall Mackie GSY

129

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT MT SURVEY 2007 CEC5002013063APFH Prepared for: California Energy Commission ­ Geothermal Resources Development(s): William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa CA 95405-7841 Randall Mackie GSY

130

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT MT SURVEY 2007 CEC5002013063APAE Prepared for: California Energy Commission ­ Geothermal Resources Development(s): William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa CA 95405-7841 Randall Mackie GSY

131

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT MT SURVEY 2007 CEC5002013063APSU Prepared for: California Energy Commission ­ Geothermal Resources Development(s): William Cumming Cumming Geoscience 4728 Shade Tree Lane Santa Rosa CA 95405-7841 Randall Mackie GSY

132

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT NOVEMBER 2010 CEC5002013048 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: California Biomass Collaborative BIOFUELS as the result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission. It does not necessarily represent the views

133

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT AN ECONOMIC ANALYSIS OF SIX DAIRY DIGESTER SYSTEMS IN CALIFORNIA Volume 2 MARCH 2013 CEC-500-2014-001-V2 Prepared for: California Energy: California Energy Commission Abolghasem Edalati Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy

134

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT CALIFORNIA AUTONOMOUS UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE AIR POLLUTION PROFILING STUDY DECEMBER 2009 CEC-500-2011-039 Prepared for: California Energy-07-014 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Guido Franco Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager

135

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT NEW ENGINE TECHNOLOGY FOR CALIFORNIA'S COMBINED HEAT AND POWER MARKET MARCH 2013 CEC-500-2013-119 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Waltham, MA 02451 781-466-6431 www.tecogen.com Contract Number: PIR-08-022 Prepared for: California Energy

136

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT PROBABILISTIC TRANSMISSION CONGESTION FORECASTING DECEMBER 2012 CEC-500-2013-120 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Electric Research Institute Contract Number: UC MR-052 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Jamie Patterson

137

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT LIFE-CYCLE ASSESSMENT AND URBAN SUSTAINABILITY OCTOBER 2010 CEC-500-2013-129 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University for: California Energy Commission Erik Stokes Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy

138

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEVELOPMENT OF STEAM for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California #12; PREPARED BY: Primary-781-5791 951-781-5790 (fax) Contract Number: 500-09-008 Prepared for: California Energy Commission David

139

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT REDUCTIONS IN URBAN OUTDOOR WATER USE-2013-152 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California #12;PREPARED BY: Primary of California, Los Angeles Contract Number: PIR-08-005 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Joseph O

140

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT COMPENSATION CEC5002013114 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Stratus Consulting Inc. #12-04-025 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Joe O'Hagan Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT THE ICHTHYOPLANKTON OF KING HARBOR, REDONDO BEACH, CALIFORNIA 19742006 APRIL 2008 CEC5002013053 Prepared for: California Energy Angeles, CA 90041 Contract Number: 500-04-025 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Joseph O

142

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT THE VALUE OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE-2013-131 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: ICF International #12;PREPARED BY: Primary Author: California Energy Commission David Michel Contract Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy Systems

143

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT Production of Substituted Natural 2012 CEC5002013104 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California-781-5791 951-781-5790 (fax) www.ucr.edu Contract Number: 500-11-004 Prepared for: California Energy Commission

144

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT EVALUATION OF NUMERICAL WEATHER PREDICTION FOR SOLAR FORECASTING Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: California Solar Energy Collaborative University of California, San Diego APRIL 2012 CEC-500-2013-115 #12;PRIMARY AUTHOR

145

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ADVANCED CHARACTERIZATION OF WIND RESOURCES IN SELECTED FOCUS AREAS OF CALIFORNIA Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: AWS-06-024 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Mike Kane Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy

146

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT CALIFORNIA TRANSMISSION CONGESTION ASSESSMENT DECEMBER 2007 CEC-500-2011-007 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Electric Pasadena, CA Contract Number: BOA-142 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Jamie Patterson Contract

147

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEMONSTRATION OF ADVANCED-2013-147 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Electric Power Group, LLC #12;PREPARED BY: Primary: California Energy Commission Jamie Patterson Contract Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy Systems

148

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT LIFECYCLE ENERGY: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California, Berkeley Department of Civil-1712 510-642-7300 Contract Number: 500-02-004 Work Authorization MR-048 Prepared for: California Energy

149

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY INNOVATIONS: California Energy Commission Prepared by: San Diego State Research Foundation #12; Prepared by: Primary Diego, CA 92182-1858 (619) 594-1900 Contract Number: 500-98-014 Prepared for: California Energy

150

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT SUMMARY OF RECENT WIND INTEGRATION STUDIES Experience from 2007-2010 APRIL 2012 CEC-500-2013-124 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: California Wind Energy Collaborative #12;PRIMARY AUTHOR(S): Phillip de Mello C.P. (Case) van

151

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY REDUCTION IN MEMBRANE-2013-132 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: University of California, Irvine and Kennedy Main Street, Suite 140 Irvine, CA 92614 Contract Number: MRA-02-082 Prepared for: California Energy

152

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT RANKING AND PRIORITIZING THE DEPLOYMENT OF COMMUNITY- SCALE ENERGY MEASURES BASED ON THEIR INDIRECT EFFECTS IN CALIFORNIA'S CLIMATE ZONES MARCH 2013 CEC-500-2013-122 ALTOSTRATUS Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by

153

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT LOW­COST, ENERGY­SAVING, SOLID STATE SMART WINDOWS AUGUST 2012 CEC5002013026 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Number: PIR-10-049 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Dustin Davis Contract Manager Virginia Lew

154

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY INNOVATIONS: California Energy Commission Prepared by: San Diego State Research Foundation #12; Prepared by: Primary-1858 (619) 594-1900 Contract Number: 500-98-014 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Raquel E. Kravitz

155

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT TECHNICAL BRIEFS: California Energy Commission Prepared by: E SOURCE #12; PREPARED BY: Primary Author(s): Ira Krepchin-03-005 Prepared for: California Energy Commission David Weightman Contract Manager Virginia Lew Office Manager

156

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT PILOT PHASE OF A FIELD STUDY TO DETERMINE WASTE OF WATER AND ENERGY IN RESIDENTIAL HOT WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS JULY 2009 CEC-500-2013-135 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory #12;PREPARED

157

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT COMMERCIALIZING ZERO ENERGY NEW HOME COMMUNITIES MARCH 2010 CEC-500-2014-007 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Sun: 500-04-022 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Golam Kibrya Contract Manager Linda Spiegel

158

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ADVANCED POWER ELECTRONICS INTERFACE-2014-006 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: National Renewable Energy Laboratory #12;PREPARED Harrison National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Contract Number

159

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Summers Consulting, LLC #12;PREPARED BY: Primary Author(s): Matthew-041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Abolghasem Edalati Contract Manager Linda Spiegel Office Manager

160

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT POTENTIAL TARGETS AND BENEFITS FOR URBAN ENERGY SYSTEMS RESEARCH MAY 2009 CEC-500-2010-009 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Institute of the Environment Los Angeles, CA Contract Number: BOA-99-207-P Prepared for: California Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT STANDARDS, RULES, AND ISSUES FOR INTEGRATION OF RENEWABLE RESOURCES SEPTEMBER 2010 CEC-500-2013-149 Prepared for: California Energy Commission for: California Energy Commission Steve Ghadiri Contract Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy

162

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT ADVANCED EPI TOOLS Energy Commission Prepared by: Applied Materials, Inc. #12; Prepared by: Primary Author(s): Nag-563-5224 Contract Number: PIR-10-055 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Dustin Davis Contract Manager

163

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT RADIANT HEATING AND COOLING AND MEASURED HOME PERFORMANCE FOR CALIFORNIA HOMES JUNE 2013 CEC-500-2013-153 Prepared for: California Energy-Use Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Radiant Heating and Cooling

164

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT EVALUATION OF EXISTING This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission. It does: California Energy Commission Prepared by: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory #12;Prepared by: Primary

165

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT UNISOLAR: LAMINATE AND BATTEN Director DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the California Energy rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the California Energy Commission nor has

166

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT INTEGRATING BUILDING COMMISSIONING DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as the result of work sponsored by the California Energy Commission rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the California Energy Commission nor has

167

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT ENERGY upon privately owned rights. This report has not been approved or disapproved by the California Energy in this report. #12;i PREFACE The California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program

168

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT DEMONSTRATION OF ZBB upon the accuracy or adequacy of the information in this report. #12;i Acknowledgements ZBB Energy Please cite this report as follows: Lex, Peter (ZBB Energy Corporation). 2008. Demonstration of ZBB

169

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Green USA Santa Monica, CA 90405 Contract Number: 500-04-023 Prepared for: California Energy Green USA to partner with a pair of nonprofit housing developers to build two Zero Energy MultifamilyPublic Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT AFFORDABLE MULTIFAMILY

170

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT SMART GRID INFORMATION ASSURANCE report, Smart Grid Information Assurance and Security Technology Assessment was prepared on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants

171

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND CARB EMISSIONS COMPLIANT HPDI LNG TRUCK APRIL 2011 CEC-500-2013-128 Prepared for: California Energy of a 2010 CARB and EPA Emissions Compliant HPDI LNG Truck is the final report for the Certification and Field Demonstration of a 0.2g/bhp-hr NOx HPDI LNG Truck project (contract number 500-08-043) conducted

172

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Franco Program Area Lead Energy-Related Environmental Research Linda Spiegel Office Manager Energy on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Energy Innovations Small Grants Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT AIRQUALITY IMPACTS OF HEAT

173

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

efforts are focused on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · EnergyPublic Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT Experimental Study, Efficient and Low Emissions Gas Turbine Applications JANUARY 2012 CEC5002012001 Prepared for

174

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT COMMERCE ENERGY BIOGAS/PV MINIGRID Wheless, Los Angeles Sanitation District Mr. V. John White, Center for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Authority Mr. Robert Ooten, Orange County Sanitation District ii #12;PREFACE The California Energy

175

Real Time PMU-Based Stability Monitoring Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real Time PMU-Based Stability Monitoring Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research@eecs.wsu.edu Phone: 509-335-1150 Power Systems Engineering Research Center The Power Systems Engineering Research Center (PSERC) is a multi-university Center conducting research on challenges facing the electric power

176

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that use natural gas water heaters could see their annual natural gas water heating consumption drop by 35Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT WATER HEATING DESIGN GUIDE DECEMBER · Environmentally Preferred Advanced Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water End-Use Energy Efficiency

177

Final Scientific/Technical Report for Project entitled "Mechanism of Uranium Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Scientific/Technical Report for Project entitled "Mechanism of Uranium Reduction by Shewanella oneidensis"

DiChristina, Thomas J. [Georgia Tech

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

178

Spent nuclear fuel project - criteria document spent nuclear fuel final safety analysis report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The criteria document provides the criteria and planning guidance for developing the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). This FSAR will support the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office decision to authorize the procurement, installation, installation acceptance testing, startup, and operation of the SNF Project facilities (K Basins, Cold Vacuum Drying Facility, and Canister Storage Building).

MORGAN, R.G.

1999-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Yucca Mountain Project drift scale test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project is currently evaluating the coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological-chemical (TMHC) response of the potential repository host rock through an in situ thermal testing program. A drift scale test (DST) was constructed during 1997 and heaters were turned on in December 1997. The DST includes nine canister-sized containers with thirty operating heaters each located within the heated drift (HD) and fifty wing heaters located in boreholes in both ribs with a total power output of nominally 210kW. A total of 147 boreholes (combined length of 3.3 km) houses most of the over 3700 TMHC sensors connected with 201 km of cabling to a central data acquisition system. The DST is located in the Exploratory Studies Facility in a 5-m diameter drift approximately 50 m in length. Heating will last up to four years and cooling will last another four years. The rock mass surrounding the DST will experience a harsh thermal environment with rock surface temperatures expected to reach a maximum of about 200 C. This paper describes the process of designing the DST. The first 38 m of the 50-m long Heated Drift (HD) is dedicated to collection of data that will lead to a better understanding of the complex coupled TMHC processes in the host rock of the proposed repository. The final 12 m is dedicated to evaluating the interactions between the heated rock mass and cast-in-place (CIP) concrete ground support systems at elevated temperatures. In addition to a description of the DST design, data from site characterization, and a general description of the analyses and analysis approach used to design the test and make pretest predictions are presented. Test-scoping and pretest numerical predictions of one way thermal-hydrologic, thermal-mechanical, and thermal-chemical behaviors have been completed (TRW, 1997a). These analyses suggest that a dry-out zone will be created around the DST and a 10,000 m{sup 3} volume of rock will experience temperatures above 100 C. The HD will experience large stress increases, particularly in the crown of the drift. Thermoelastic displacements of up to about 16 mm are predicted for some thermomechanical gages. Additional analyses using more complex models will be performed during the conduct of the DST and the results compared with measured data.

Finley, R.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Blair, S.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Labs., CA (United States); Boyle, W.J. [Dept. of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (United States)] [and others

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

were completed while Unit 1 was operating at 90% of full load (84MW) or greater. Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DOE Publishes Final Rule for Residential Furnace Fan Test Procedure...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Furnace Fan Test Procedure DOE Publishes Final Rule for Residential Furnace Fan Test Procedure January 3, 2014 - 12:00am Addthis The Department of Energy (DOE) has...

182

Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support...

183

Greenbuilt Retrofit Test House Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Greenbuilt house, is an all-electric, 1980's era home in the eastern Sacramento suburb of Fair Oaks that was retrofit by Greenbuilt Construction as part of Sacramento Municipal Utility District's (SMUD) Energy Efficient Remodel Demonstration (EERD) Program. The project was a joint effort between the design-build team at Greenbuilt Construction, led by Jim Bayless, SMUD and their project manager Mike Keesee, and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The goal of the Energy Efficient Remodel Demonstration program is to work with local builders to renovate homes with cost-effective energy efficient retrofit measures. The homes remodeled under the EERD program are intended to showcase energy efficient retrofit options for homeowners and other builders. The Greenbuilt house is one of five EERD projects that NREL has supported. NREL's main role in these projects is to provide energy analysis and to monitor the home's performance after the retrofit to verify that the energy consumption is in line with the modeling predictions. NREL also performed detailed monitoring on the more innovative equipment included in these remodels, such as an add-on heat pump water heater.

Sparn, B.; Hudon, K.; Earle, L.; Booten, C.; Tabares-Velasco, P. C.; Barker, G.; Hancock, C. E.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Wind Powering America State Outreach Project was to facilitate the adoption of effective state legislation, policy, finance programs, and siting best practices to accelerate public acceptance and development of wind energy. This was accomplished by Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) through provision of informational tools including reports and webinars as well as the provision of technical assistance to state leaders on wind siting, policy, and finance best practices, identification of strategic federal-state partnership activities for both onshore and offshore wind, and participation in regional wind development collaboratives. The Final Scientific Report - Wind Powering America State Outreach Project provides a summary of the objectives, activities, and outcomes of this project as accomplished by CESA over the period 12/1/2009 - 11/30/2011.

Sinclair, Mark; Margolis, Anne

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project : Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This notice announces BPA`S`s decision to fund the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW), the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and the Clatsop Economic Development Committee for the Lower Columbia River Terminal Fisheries Research Project (Project). The Project will continue the testing of various species/stocks, rearing regimes, and harvest options for terminal fisheries, as a means to increase lower river sport and commercial harvest of hatchery fish, while providing both greater protection of weaker wild stocks and increasing the return of upriver salmon runs to potential Zone 6 Treaty fisheries. The Project involves relocating hatchery smolts to new, additional pen locations in three bays/sloughs in the lower Columbia River along both the Oregon and Washington sides. The sites are Blind Slough and Tongue Point in Clatsop County, Oregon, and Grays Bay/Deep River, Wahkiakum County, Washington. The smolts will be acclimated for various lengths of time in the net pens and released from these sites. The Project will expand upon an existing terminal fisheries project in Youngs Bay, Oregon. The Project may be expanded to other sites in the future, depending on the results of this initial expansion. BPA`S has determined the project is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required, and BPA`S is issuing this FONSI.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. The fractured crust will provide a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed and contribute to terminating the core-concrete interaction. Thus, one of the key aims of the current program was to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit, the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in previous

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

187

Final Reclamation Report: Basalt Waste Isolation Project exploratory shaft site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The restoration of areas disturbed by activities of the Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP) constitutes a unique operation at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site, both from the standpoint of restoration objectives and the time frame for accomplishing these objectives. The BWIP reclamation program comprises three separate projects: borehole reclamation, Near Surface Test Facility (NSTF) reclamation, and Exploratory Shaft Facility (ESF) reclamation. The main focus of this report is on determining the success of the revegetation effort 1 year after work was completed. This report also provides a brief overview of the ESF reclamation program. 21 refs., 7 figs., 14 tabs.

Brandt, C.A.; Rickard, W.H. Jr.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Final Technical Report - Kotzebue Wind Power Project - Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kotzebue Wind Power Project is a joint undertaking of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); Kotzebue Electric Association (KEA); and the Alaska Energy Authority (AEA). The goal of the project is to develop, construct, and operate a wind power plant interconnected to a small isolated utility grid in an arctic climate in Northwest Alaska. The primary objective of KEA’s wind energy program is to bring more affordable electricity and jobs to remote Alaskan communities. DOE funding has allowed KEA to develop a multi-faceted approach to meet these objectives that includes wind project planning and development, technology transfer, and community outreach. The first wind turbines were installed in the summer of 1997 and the newest turbines were installed in the spring of 2007. The total installed capacity of the KEA wind power project is 1.16 MW with a total of 17 turbines rated between 65 kW and 100 kW. The operation of the wind power plant has resulted in a wind penetration on the utility system in excess of 35% during periods of low loads. This document and referenced attachments are presented as the final technical report for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant agreement DE-FG36-97GO10199. Interim deliverables previously submitted are also referenced within this document and where reasonable to do so, specific sections are incorporated in the report or attached as appendices.

Rana Zucchi, Global Energy Concepts, LLC; Brad Reeve, Kotzebue Electric Association; DOE Project Officer - Doug Hooker

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

189

FINAL REPORT UFP RESTART AND SPARGER TESTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following a Design Basis Event (DBE), potential plugging of the PJM systems is highly probable after air compressors and/or electric power become unavailable for up to 100 hrs. Under such conditions, the rheologically bounding yield stress of the pretreated sludge simulant could reach 300-625 Pa. (Defined in WTP-RPP-100, Rev. 0, Sec. 6.1. [1] and WTP-RPP-98, Rev. 0, Secs. 5.1 and 5.2 [2].) The tests covered under this report are conservative since this range of bounding yield stress is based on the settled solids component in the tank. Also, note that CCN 065607 states that the design basis is 70 Pa for 'gelled material' over the entire tank. Three issues must be addressed by these tests: (1) Determine the required pressure and air flow to overcome the plugged sparger tube resistance following a DBE event. (2) Can the UFP PJMs be restarted with or without assistance from air spargers? (3) Show that solids can be mixed by air spargers following a DBE to allow generated hydrogen gas to rise and be vented to the vessel head space. This is to limit hydrogen concentrations below LFL level. In the first test, a full-scale sparger was simulated by a 2-inch dia. Schedule 160 pipe, installed in an 18-inch diameter plastic tank, 37-foot high (full scale height), 6-inch from the bottom. The bottom 5-ft. lower section was clear to facilitate visual observations. Two simulants were used: a 120 Pa Laponite solution and a 30 Pa/30 cP kaolin:bentonite clay mixture, which filled the tank to the 32-foot level. The first test with 120 Pa Laponite demonstrated breakthrough at an air pressure of 14.6 psig. The second test with the clay simulant resulted in breakthrough at 16.7 psig. Given the specific gravities of these simulants, the breakthrough pressures are very close to the hydrostatic pressures corresponding to the simulant elevations inside the sparger. The CRV test stand at the Engineering Development Laboratory, SRNL, was used to simulate the UFP at 1/4-scale, where the tank diameter was 40.5-inches. The simulant was a 30 Pa/30 cP kaolin:bentonite mixture loaded with 3.3 wt% dry laponite, which successfully achieved a 596 Pa yield stress (vane method) after 14 hrs. However, it apparently had a thicker consistency than the 30 Pa/30 cP rheology of real waste under flowing conditions. The vessel was filled to a H/D of 1.38 and the PJMs were initially filled to approximately full height (39-inch). During the initial drive phase, starting from the full PJM level, application of the same PJM air pressure during normal operation did push the gelled simulant the full travel distance. But on the refill or suction phase, the maximum simulant height in the PJM was only about a third (9.2-inch) of the original travel (27-inch). After 20 cycles of PJM operation only, air sparging, starting at 7 scfm, increasing to 10 scfm was introduced. This increased the PJM drive distance to a stable value of 64% of the full travel after 327 cycles. Visual observation suggests that the simulant was moving up and down as a solid plug and that the cavern may be very limited. Thus, air sparging did not reestablish full PJM operation, but this could be due to the higher consistency of the simulant as compared to the actual waste. A third test utilized 5 mm glass beads deposited at the bottom of the CRV vessel, which was filled with water. Enough glass beads were added to cover the tank bottom surface with a one-bead-thick layer. Based on empirical correlations, the glass beads simulate the behavior of solid particles in the waste. Two spargers were tested: a 2-inch dia. Sch. 160 pipe with straight end, and a 2-inch dia. Sch. 160 pipe with 4 (45 deg) notches around the perimeter, 3/4-inch deep. The objectives were to determine the required distance between the sparger end and the vessel bottom, air pressures, and air flows required to lift the glass beads off the vessel bottom. The test started with the spargers 6 inches from the bottom. For the flat faced sparger, no lifting was observed up to 50 scfm. Liftoff was observed only when the sparger end was 1-inch off

Guerrero, H; Michael Restivo, M

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

Power System Equipment Module Test Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology of electric power generation when applying the binary process to hydrothermal resources had not yet been demonstrated in the United States. Accordingly, on November 10, 1977, the Electric Power Research Institute and the Department of Energy, acting through the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, agreed to cofund the Power System Equipment Module Test Project. The Power System Equipment Module Test Project consisted of a field test program to accomplish the objectives listed below while heating hydrocarbon fluids to above their critical points, expanding these fluids, and subsequently, condensing them below their critical points: (1) Verify the performance of state-of-the-art heat exchangers in geothermal service; (2) Verify the heat exchangers' performance heating either selected pure light hydrocarbons or selected mixtures of light hydrocarbons in the vicinity of their respective critical pressures and temperatures; (3) Establish overall heat transfer coefficients that might be used for design of commercial-size geothermal power plants using the same geothermal brine and light hydrocarbon working fluids; (4) Perform and investigate the above under representative fluid operating conditions during which the production wells would be pumped. The project was accomplished by diverting approximately 200 gpm of the flow from one of Magma Power Company's geothermal wells in the East Mesa Geothermal Field. After the heat was removed from the geothermal brine flow, the cooled flow was returned to Magma Power Company and recombined with the main brine stream for disposal by reinjection. Approximately five thermal megawatts was transferred from geothermal brine to hydrocarbon working fluids in a closed system. This heat was removed from the working fluids in a condenser and subsequently rejected to the environment by a wet cooling tower. The thermodynamic performance of both the working fluids and the system components was measured during the test program to achieve the project's objectives.

Schilling, J.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Turbine test report. Addendum to final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radial inflow turbine developed for the NASA 404 program 25-ton solar air conditioner (RCWS-2-2753-GO) was tested for performance. Using the converging-only nozzles designed for this system, a peak efficiency of 86% was measured at a pressure ratio of 2.7 and a velocity ratio of 0.66. Near the design pressure ratio of 3.5 and velocity ratio of 0.645, the measured pressure ratio of 3.5 and velocity of 0.645, the measured efficiency was 84% instead of the predicted 82%. Data are presented for pressure ratios of 2.7, 3.6, and velocity ratio ranges of 0.20 to 0.85. This covers the normal operating range of interest in this machine. The performance is better than predicted. This indicates that some of the loss coefficient values assumed during the original analysis were conservative.

Elliott, T.J.; Batton, W.D.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests, Final Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is the final report for ASHRAE Research Project 1004-RP: Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests. This report presents the results of the development and application of the methodology to Case Study #2...

Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Ferrocyanide safety project ferrocyanide aging studies. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report gives the results of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) from FY 1992 to FY 1996 on the Ferrocyanide Aging Studies, part of the Ferrocyanide Safety Project. The Ferrocyanide Safety Project was initiated as a result of concern raised about the safe storage of ferrocyanide waste intermixed with oxidants, such as nitrate and nitrite salts, in Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs). In the laboratory, such mixtures can be made to undergo uncontrolled or explosive reactions by heating dry reagents to over 200{degrees}C. In 1987, an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), published by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Final Environmental Impact Statement, Disposal of Hanford Defense High-Level Transuranic and Tank Waste, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington, included an environmental impact analysis of potential explosions involving ferrocyanide-nitrate mixtures. The EIS postulated that an explosion could occur during mechanical retrieval of saltcake or sludge from a ferrocyanide waste tank, and concluded that this worst-case accident could create enough energy to release radioactive material to the atmosphere through ventilation openings, exposing persons offsite to a short-term radiation dose of approximately 200 mrem. Later, in a separate study (1990), the General Accounting Office postulated a worst-case accident of one to two orders of magnitude greater than that postulated in the DOE EIS. The uncertainties regarding the safety envelope of the Hanford Site ferrocyanide waste tanks led to the declaration of the Ferrocyanide Unreviewed Safety Question (USQ) in October 1990.

Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.; Alderson, E.V. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Advanced exterior sensor project : final report, September 2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report (1) summarizes the overall design of the Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES) system to include detailed descriptions of system components, (2) describes the work accomplished throughout FY04 to evaluate the current health of the original prototype and to return it to operation, (3) describes the status of the AES and the AES project as of September 2004, and (4) details activities planned to complete modernization of the system to include development and testing of the second-generation AES prototype.

Ashby, M. Rodema

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Mk12A/W78 ground test project (u)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The slides present the scope, objectives and status of the Mk12A1W78 Ground Test Project for the purpose of updating the ICBM Project Officers Group. In addition, project constraints and risks are discussed.

Stokes, Kyle R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project : Final Siting Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of site analysis for the Umatilla Satellite and Release Sites Project. The purpose of this project is to provide engineering services for the siting and conceptual design of satellite and release facilities for the Umatilla Basin hatchery program. The Umatilla Basin hatchery program consists of artificial production facilities for salmon and steelhead to enhance production in the Umatilla River as defined in the Umatilla master plan approved in 1989 by the Northwest Power Planning Council. Facilities identified in the master plan include adult salmon broodstock holding and spawning facilities, facilities for recovery, acclimation, and/or extended rearing of salmon juveniles, and development of river sites for release of hatchery salmon and steelhead. The historic and current distribution of fall chinook, summer chinook, and coho salmon and steelhead trout was summarized for the Umatilla River basin. Current and future production and release objectives were reviewed. Twenty seven sites were evaluated for the potential and development of facilities. Engineering and environmental attributes of the sites were evaluated and compared to facility requirements for water and space. Site screening was conducted to identify the sites with the most potential for facility development. Alternative sites were selected for conceptual design of each facility type. A proposed program for adult holding facilities, final rearing/acclimation, and direct release facilities was developed.

Montgomery, James M.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D&T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D&T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D&T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the plutonium-containing ceramic forms within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2006 and be completed within 10 years.

Kan, T.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) has been prepared for waste characterization activities to be conducted by the Transuranic (TRU) Project at the Hanford Site to meet requirements set forth in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan (WIPP) Hazardous Waste Facility Permit, 4890139088-TSDF, Attachment B, including Attachments B1 through B6 (WAP) (DOE, 1999a). The QAPjP describes the waste characterization requirements and includes test methods, details of planned waste sampling and analysis, and a description of the waste characterization and verification process. In addition, the QAPjP includes a description of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) requirements for the waste characterization program. Before TRU waste is shipped to the WIPP site by the TRU Project, all applicable requirements of the QAPjP shall be implemented. Additional requirements necessary for transportation to waste disposal at WIPP can be found in the ''Quality Assurance Program Document'' (DOE 1999b) and HNF-2600, ''Hanford Site Transuranic Waste Certification Plan.'' TRU mixed waste contains both TRU radioactive and hazardous components, as defined in the WLPP-WAP. The waste is designated and separately packaged as either contact-handled (CH) or remote-handled (RH), based on the radiological dose rate at the surface of the waste container. RH TRU wastes are not currently shipped to the WIPP facility.

GREAGER, T.M.

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

200

LIMB Demonstration Project Extension and Coolside Demonstration. [Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents results from the limestone Injection Multistage Burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension. LIMB is a furnace sorbent injection technology designed for the reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired utility boilers. The testing was conducted on the 105 Mwe, coal-fired, Unit 4 boiler at Ohio Edison`s Edgewater Station in Lorain, Ohio. In addition to the LIMB Extension activities, the overall project included demonstration of the Coolside process for S0{sub 2} removal for which a separate report has been issued. The primary purpose of the DOE LIMB Extension testing, was to demonstrate the generic applicability of LIMB technology. The program sought to characterize the S0{sub 2} emissions that result when various calcium-based sorbents are injected into the furnace, while burning coals having sulfur content ranging from 1.6 to 3.8 weight percent. The four sorbents used included calcitic limestone, dolomitic hydrated lime, calcitic hydrated lime, and calcitic hydrated lime with a small amount of added calcium lignosulfonate. The results include those obtained for the various coal/sorbent combinations and the effects of the LIMB process on boiler and plant operations.

Goots, T.R.; DePero, M.J.; Nolan, P.S.

1992-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many obvious and significant concerns arise when considering the concept of small-scale biodiesel production. Does the fuel produced meet the stringent requirements set by the commercial biodiesel industry? Is the process safe? How are small-scale producers collecting and transporting waste vegetable oil? How is waste from the biodiesel production process handled by small-scale producers? These concerns and many others were the focus of the research preformed in the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation project over the last three years. This project was a unique research program in which undergraduate engineering students at Messiah College set out to research the feasibility of small-biodiesel production for application on a campus of approximately 3000 students. This Department of Energy (DOE) funded research program developed out of almost a decade of small-scale biodiesel research and development work performed by students at Messiah College. Over the course of the last three years the research team focused on four key areas related to small-scale biodiesel production: Quality Testing and Assurance, Process and Processor Research, Process and Processor Development, and Community Education. The objectives for the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project included the following: 1. Preparing a laboratory facility for the development and optimization of processors and processes, ASTM quality assurance, and performance testing of biodiesel fuels. 2. Developing scalable processor and process designs suitable for ASTM certifiable small-scale biodiesel production, with the goals of cost reduction and increased quality. 3. Conduct research into biodiesel process improvement and cost optimization using various biodiesel feedstocks and production ingredients.

Zummo, Michael M; Munson, J; Derr, A; Zemple, T; Bray, S; Studer, B; Miller, J; Beckler, J; Hahn, A; Martinez, P; Herndon, B; Lee, T; Newswanger, T; Wassall, M

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Pretreatment Engineering Platform Phase 1 Final Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI) on the River Protection Project, Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) project to conduct testing to demonstrate the performance of the WTP Pretreatment Facility (PTF) leaching and ultrafiltration processes at an engineering-scale. In addition to the demonstration, the testing was to address specific technical issues identified in Issue Response Plan for Implementation of External Flowsheet Review Team (EFRT) Recommendations - M12, Undemonstrated Leaching Processes.( ) Testing was conducted in a 1/4.5-scale mock-up of the PTF ultrafiltration system, the Pretreatment Engineering Platform (PEP). Parallel laboratory testing was conducted in various PNNL laboratories to allow direct comparison of process performance at an engineering-scale and a laboratory-scale. This report presents and discusses the results of those tests.

Kurath, Dean E.; Hanson, Brady D.; Minette, Michael J.; Baldwin, David L.; Rapko, Brian M.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Daniel, Richard C.; Eslinger, Paul W.; Huckaby, James L.; Billing, Justin M.; Sundar, Parameshwaran S.; Josephson, Gary B.; Toth, James J.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Baer, Ellen BK; Barnes, Steven M.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Rassat, Scot D.; Brown, Christopher F.; Geeting, John GH; Sevigny, Gary J.; Casella, Amanda J.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Aker, Pamela M.; Guzman-Leong, Consuelo E.; Kimura, Marcia L.; Sundaram, S. K.; Pires, Richard P.; Wells, Beric E.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

203

AGR-2 IRRADIATION TEST FINAL AS-RUN REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

Blaise, Collin

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Final report for 1.7 megajoule prototype bank testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

American Control Engineering is pleased to submit to LLNL this Final Report describing the final assembly and preliminary testing of the 1.7 megajoule prototype capacitor bank that is located at our facility. The purpose of this test program was to evaluate and characterize the performance of this capacitor bank. These tests were necessary in order to proceed with the design of a final building block module that is to be used to create a reliable and cost effective multi-hundred megajoule energy storage system. The period of performance covered by this contract is from January 1, 1991 through August 31, 1992. American Control Engineering has provided all of the necessary facilities, personnel and materials that were required to perform this testing effort (except for the existing capacitor bank, the LLNL provided flashlamp assembly and E-size ignitron switch tube), An overall view of the assembled capacitor bank system as it appeared at the completion of this subcontract is shown. The initial statement-of-work for the testing and characterization of the capacitor bank was as follows: (1) Measure all of the principal electrical parameters for the 1.7 megajoule prototype capacitor bank at low voltage before proceeding to high voltage testing. This low voltage testing is to include measurement of both normal and fault current and voltage waveforms, starting with the smallest building block grouping and proceeding systematically through to the capacitor bank load. (2) Assemble and attach each of the major subsystem elements to the capacitor bank as they are required for low voltage testing including the ignition output switch structure, coaxial transmission line and load assembly. (3) Make comparison of the test results collected through low voltage testing with those forecasted by the computer mode. Evaluate and resolve any discrepancies between the two results until the computer model achieves reasonable agreement with the actual measured test results.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2?10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

Blaise P. Collin

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Blade System Design Study. Part II, final project report (GEC).  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Low Wind Speed Turbine program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC)1 has studied alternative composite materials for wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt size range. This work in one of the Blade System Design Studies (BSDS) funded through Sandia National Laboratories. The BSDS program was conducted in two phases. In the Part I BSDS, GEC assessed candidate innovations in composite materials, manufacturing processes, and structural configurations. GEC also made recommendations for testing composite coupons, details, assemblies, and blade substructures to be carried out in the Part II study (BSDS-II). The BSDS-II contract period began in May 2003, and testing was initiated in June 2004. The current report summarizes the results from the BSDS-II test program. Composite materials evaluated include carbon fiber in both pre-impregnated and vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) forms. Initial thin-coupon static testing included a wide range of parameters, including variation in manufacturer, fiber tow size, fabric architecture, and resin type. A smaller set of these materials and process types was also evaluated in thin-coupon fatigue testing, and in ply-drop and ply-transition panels. The majority of materials used epoxy resin, with vinyl ester (VE) resin also used for selected cases. Late in the project, testing of unidirectional fiberglass was added to provide an updated baseline against which to evaluate the carbon material performance. Numerous unidirectional carbon fabrics were considered for evaluation with VARTM infusion. All but one fabric style considered suffered either from poor infusibility or waviness of fibers combined with poor compaction. The exception was a triaxial carbon-fiberglass fabric produced by SAERTEX. This fabric became the primary choice for infused articles throughout the test program. The generally positive results obtained in this program for the SAERTEX material have led to its being used in innovative prototype blades of 9-m and 30-m length, as well as other non-wind related structures.

Griffin, Dayton A. (DNV Global Energy Concepts Inc., Seattle, WA)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Final Turbine and Test Facility Design Report Alden/NREC Fish...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Final Turbine and Test Facility Design Report AldenNREC Fish Friendly Turbine Final Turbine and Test Facility Design Report AldenNREC Fish Friendly Turbine The final report...

208

NEET Micro-Pocket Fission Detector – Final Project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A collaboration between the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), the Kansas State University (KSU), and the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission, Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, (CEA), is fundedby the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program to develop and test Micro-Pocket Fission Detectors (MPFDs), which are compact fission chambers capable of simultaneously measuring thermal neutron flux, fast neutron flux and temperature within a single package. When deployed, these sensors will significantly advance flux detection capabilities for irradiation tests in US Material Test Reactors (MTRs). Ultimately, evaluations may lead to a more compact, more accurate, and longer lifetime flux sensor for critical mock-ups, and high performance reactors, allowing several Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) programs to obtain higher accuracy/higher resolution data from irradiation tests of candidate new fuels and materials. Specifically, deployment of MPFDs will address several challenges faced in irradiations performed at MTRs: • Current fission chamber technologies do not offer the ability to measure fast flux, thermal flux and temperature within a single compact probe; MPFDs offer this option. • MPFD construction is very different than current fission chamber construction; the use of high temperature materials allow MPFDs to be specifically tailored to survive harsh conditions encountered in-core of high performance MTRs. • The higher accuracy, high fidelity data available from the compact MPFD will significantly enhance efforts to validate new high-fidelity reactor physics codes and new multi-scale, multi-physics codes. • MPFDs can be built with variable sensitivities to survive the lifetime of an experiment or fuel assembly in some MTRs, allowing for more efficient and cost effective power monitoring. • The small size of the MPFDs allows multiple sensors to be deployed, offering the potential to accurately measure the flux and temperature profiles in the reactor. This report summarizes the status at the end of year two of this three year project. As documented in this report, all planned accomplishments for developing this unique new, compact, multipurpose sensor have been completed.

Joy Rempe; Douglas McGregor; Philip Ugorowski; Michael Reichenberger; Takashi Ito

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and project oversight. Integrated Combined Heat and Power Systems Corporation, Gearoid Foley for the Combined Heat and Power project (Contr INTEGRATED COOLING, HEATING AND ENGINE POWER MODULE FEBRUARY 2010 CEC5002009098 Prepared for: California

210

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the 225bus WECC model. · The Project Advisory Committee (PAC) for its candid and insightful input

211

Final Independent External Peer Review for the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Final Independent External Peer Review for the Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands Project Implementation-TERM ANALYSIS SERVICE (STAS) on Final Independent External Peer Review Report Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands COASTAL WETLANDS PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The Biscayne Bay Coastal Wetlands (BBCW

US Army Corps of Engineers

212

Final EIS for Champlain Hudson Power Express Transmission Project...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

1021). The proposed DOE action addressed in the Final EIS is to issue a Presidential permit to the Applicant, Champlain Hudson Power Express, Inc. (CHPEI), that would allow...

213

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF TECHNOLOGIES FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION ALTERNATIVES JUNE 2013 CEC5002013024 Prepared for: California for Carbon Sequestration Alternatives is the final report for the Roadmap on Innovative Technologies

214

High Performance Building Facade Solutions PIER Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building facades directly influence heating and cooling loads and indirectly influence lighting loads when daylighting is considered, and are therefore a major determinant of annual energy use and peak electric demand. Facades also significantly influence occupant comfort and satisfaction, making the design optimization challenge more complex than many other building systems.This work focused on addressing significant near-term opportunities to reduce energy use in California commercial building stock by a) targeting voluntary, design-based opportunities derived from the use of better design guidelines and tools, and b) developing and deploying more efficient glazings, shading systems, daylighting systems, facade systems and integrated controls. This two-year project, supported by the California Energy Commission PIER program and the US Department of Energy, initiated a collaborative effort between The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and major stakeholders in the facades industry to develop, evaluate, and accelerate market deployment of emerging, high-performance, integrated facade solutions. The LBNL Windows Testbed Facility acted as the primary catalyst and mediator on both sides of the building industry supply-user business transaction by a) aiding component suppliers to create and optimize cost effective, integrated systems that work, and b) demonstrating and verifying to the owner, designer, and specifier community that these integrated systems reliably deliver required energy performance. An industry consortium was initiated amongst approximately seventy disparate stakeholders, who unlike the HVAC or lighting industry, has no single representative, multi-disciplinary body or organized means of communicating and collaborating. The consortium provided guidance on the project and more importantly, began to mutually work out and agree on the goals, criteria, and pathways needed to attain the ambitious net zero energy goals defined by California and the US.A collaborative test, monitoring, and reporting protocol was also formulated via the Windows Testbed Facility in collaboration with industry partners, transitioning industry to focus on the importance of expecting measured performance to consistently achieve design performance expectations. The facility enables accurate quantification of energy use, peak demand, and occupant comfort impacts of synergistic facade-lighting-HVAC systems on an apples-to-apples comparative basis and its data can be used to verify results from simulations. Emerging interior and exterior shading technologies were investigated as potential near-term, low-cost solutions with potential broad applicability in both new and retrofit construction. Commercially-available and prototype technologies were developed, tested, and evaluated. Full-scale, monitored field tests were conducted over solstice-to-solstice periods to thoroughly evaluate the technologies, uncover potential risks associated with an unknown, and quantify performance benefits. Exterior shading systems were found to yield net zero energy levels of performance in a sunny climate and significant reductions in summer peak demand. Automated interior shading systems were found to yield significant daylighting and comfort-related benefits.In support of an integrated design process, a PC-based commercial fenestration (COMFEN) software package, based on EnergyPlus, was developed that enables architects and engineers to quickly assess and compare the performance of innovative facade technologies in the early sketch or schematic design phase. This tool is publicly available for free and will continue to improve in terms of features and accuracy. Other work was conducted to develop simulation tools to model the performance of any arbitrary complex fenestration system such as common Venetian blinds, fabric roller shades as well as more exotic innovative facade systems such as optical louver systems.

Lee, Eleanor; Selkowitz, Stephen

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Long-term Performance of Engineered Barrier Systems (PEBS) - An International EURATOM Project on the Study and Testing of Engineered Barriers for the Final Disposal of HAW Using PEBS as an Example - 13299  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main aim of the PEBS project is to evaluate the sealing and barrier performance of the EBS over time, through development of a comprehensive approach involving experiments, model development, and consideration of the potential impacts on long-term safety functions. The experiments and models cover the full range of conditions, from initial emplacement of wastes (high heat generation and EBS re-saturation) through to later stage establishment of near steady state conditions, i.e. full re-saturation and thermal equilibrium with the host rock. These aspects will be integrated in a manner that will lead to greater certainty and thus greater confidence regarding the development from the initial transient state of the EBS to its long-term state, which provides the required isolation of the wastes. The work proposed within the project builds on existing knowledge and experience generated during recent years and supported by ongoing national and EC research programs. The project aims to provide a more complete description of the THM and THMC (thermo-hydro-mechanical- chemical) evolution of the EBS system, a more quantitative basis for relating the evolutionary behavior to the safety functions of the system, and a further clarification of the significance of residual uncertainties for long-term performance assessment. The importance of uncertainties arising from potential disagreement between the process models and the laboratory and in-situ experiments to be performed within PEBS, and their implications for an extrapolation of the results, will be reviewed, with particular emphasis on possible impacts on safety functions. In addition to the scientific-technical aims, the consortium will disseminate the basic findings to the broad scientific community within the EU, China and Japan, use expertise gained for public information purposes, and promote knowledge and technology transfer through training. (authors)

Mente, M. [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany)] [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (BGR), Stilleweg 2, 30655 Hannover (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Licensing plan for UMTRA project disposal sites. Final [report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office developed a plan to define UMTRA Project licensing program objectives and establish a process enabling the DOE to document completion of remedial actions in compliance with 40 CFR 1 92 and the requirements of the NRC general license. This document supersedes the January 1987 Project Licensing Plan (DOE, 1987). The plan summarizes the legislative and regulatory basis for licensing, identifies participating agencies and their roles and responsibilities, defines key activities and milestones in the licensing process, and details the coordination of these activities. This plan provides an overview of the UMTRA Project from the end of remedial actions through the NRC`s acceptance of a disposal site under the general license. The licensing process integrates large phases of the UMTRA Project. Other programmatic UMTRA Project documents listed in Section 6.0 provide supporting information.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Mississippi Ethanol Gasification Project, Final Scientific / Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Mississippi Ethanol (ME) Project is a comprehensive effort to develop the conversion of biomass to ethanol utilizing a proprietary gasification reactor technology developed by Mississippi Ethanol, LLC. Tasks were split between operation of a 1/10 scale unit at the Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) of Mississippi State University (MSU) and the construction, development, and operation of a full scale pilot unit located at the ME facility in Winona, Mississippi. In addition to characterization of the ME reactor gasification system, other areas considered critical to the operational and economic viability of the overall ME concept were evaluated. These areas include syngas cleanup, biological conversion of syngas to alcohol, and effects of gasification scale factors. Characterization of run data from the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units has allowed development of the factors necessary for scale-up from the small unit to the larger unit. This scale range is approximately a factor of 10. Particulate and tar sampling gave order of magnitude values for preliminary design calculations. In addition, sampling values collected downstream of the ash removal system show significant reductions in observed loadings. These loading values indicate that acceptable particulate and tar loading rates could be attained with standard equipment additions to the existing configurations. Overall operation both the Pre-Pilot and Pilot Units proceeded very well. The Pilot Unit was operated as a system, from wood receiving to gas flaring, several times and these runs were used to address possible production-scale concerns. Among these, a pressure feed system was developed to allow feed of material against gasifier system pressure with little or no purge requirements. Similarly, a water wash system, with continuous ash collection, was developed, installed, and tested. Development of a biological system for alcohol production was conducted at Mississippi State University with much progress. However, the current state of biological technology is not deemed to be ready commercially. A preliminary estimate of capital and operating costs of a 12000 gallon per day gasification/biological facility was developed for comparison purposes. In addition, during the biological organism screening and testing, some possible alternative products were identified. One such possibility is the biological production of bio-diesel. Additional research is necessary for further evaluation of all of the biological concepts.

Pearson, Larry, E.

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Project Closeout: Guidance for Final Evaluation of Building America Communities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents guidelines for Project Closeout. It is used to determine whether the Building America program is successfully facilitating improved design and practices to achieve energy savings goals in production homes. Its objective is to use energy simulations, targeted utility bill analysis, and feedback from project stakeholders to evaluate the performance of occupied BA communities.

Norton, P.; Burch, J.; Hendron, B.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FERMENTATION OF CALIFORNIA CELLULOSIC AGRICULTURAL WASTE INTO BIOFUEL DECEMBER 2011 CEC5002013034Related Environmental Research · Energy Systems Integration · Environmentally Preferred Advanced Generation OnSite Aerobic Fermentation of California Cellulosic Agricultural Waste into Biofuel is the final

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

BMDO: New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project. Interim final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The BMDO-New Mexico Technology Transfer Demonstration Project(BMDO-NM) was a collaborative effort among the national laboratories to identify and evaluate the commercial potential of selected SDI-funded technologies. The project was funded by BMDO (formerly known as the Strategic Defense Initiative Office or SDIO), the Technology Enterprise Division (NM-TED) of the NM Economic Development Division, and the three National Laboratories. The project was managed and supervised by SAGE Management Partners of Albuquerque, and project funding was administered through the University of New Mexico. The BMDO-NM Demonstration Project focused on the development of a process to assist technology developers in the evaluation of selected BMDO technology programs so that commercialization decisions can be made in an accelerated manner. The project brought together BMDO, the NM-TED, the University of New Mexico, and three New Mexico Federal laboratories -- Los Alamos (DOE), Phillips (DOD) and Sandia (DOE). Each national laboratory actively participated throughout the project through its technology transfer offices. New Mexico was selected as the site for the Demonstration Program because of its three national and federal research laboratories engaged in BMDO programs, and the existing relationship among state govemment, the labs, universities and local economic development and business assistance organizations. Subsequent Commercialization and Implementation phases for the selected technologies from LANL and SNL were completed by SAGE and the Project Team. Funding for those phases was provided by the individual labs as well as BMDO and NM-TED in kind services. NM-TED played a proactive role in this New Mexico partnership. Its mandate is to promote technology-based economic development, with a commitment to facilitate the use of technology by industry and business statewide. TED assumed the role of program manager and executing agent for BMDO in this demonstration project.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Final report on LDRD project : advanced optical trigger systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Advanced optically-activated solid-state electrical switch development at Sandia has demonstrated multi-kA/kV switching and the path for scalability to even higher current/power. Realization of this potential requires development of new optical sources/switches based on key Sandia photonic device technologies: vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) and photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been used to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. In VCSEL arrays, adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and are lithographically patterned to the required dimensions. We have demonstrated multiple-line filament triggering using VCSEL arrays to approximate line generation. These arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs have fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. Using these arrays, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices. Photoconductive semiconductor switch (PCSS) devices offer advantages of high voltage operation (multi-kV), optical isolation, triggering with laser pulses that cannot occur accidentally in nature, low cost, high speed, small size, and radiation hardness. PCSS devices are candidates for an assortment of potential applications that require multi-kA switching of current. The key to increasing the switching capacity of PCSS devices to 5kV/5kA and higher is to distribute the current in multiple parallel line filaments triggered by an array of high-brightness line-shaped illuminators. Commercial mechanically-stacked edge-emitting lasers have been demonstrated to trigger multiple filaments, but they are difficult to scale and manufacture with the required uniformity. As a promising alternative to multiple discrete edge-emitting lasers, a single wafer of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) can be lithographically patterned to achieve the desired layout of parallel line-shaped emitters, in which adjacent lasers utilize identical semiconductor material and thereby achieve a degree of intrinsic optical uniformity. Under this LDRD project, we have fabricated arrays of uncoupled circular-aperture VCSELs to approximate a line-shaped illumination pattern, achieving optical fill factors ranging from 2% to 30%. We have applied these VCSEL arrays to demonstrate single and dual parallel line-filament triggering of PCSS devices. Moreover, we have developed a better understanding of the illumination requirements for stable triggering of multiple-filament PCSS devices using VCSEL arrays. We have found that reliable triggering of multiple filaments requires matching of the turn-on time of adjacent VCSEL line-shaped-arrays to within approximately 1 ns. Additionally, we discovered that reliable triggering of PCSS devices at low voltages requires more optical power than we obtained with our first generation of VCSEL arrays. A second generation of higher-power VCSEL arrays was designed and fabricated at the end of this LDRD project, and testing with PCSS devices is currently underway (as of September 2008).

Roose, Lars D.; Hadley, G. Ronald; Mar, Alan; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Sullivan, Charles Thomas; Keeler, Gordon Arthur; Bauer, Thomas M. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM); Peake, Gregory Merwin; Loubriel, Guillermo Manuel; Montano, Victoria A. (LMATA Government Services, LLC., Albuquerque, NM)

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Fast Flux Test Facility final safety analysis report. Amendment 73  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) Amendment 73 for incorporation into the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTR) FSAR set. This page change incorporates Engineering Change Notices (ECNs) issued subsequent to Amendment 72 and approved for incorparoration before May 6, 1993. These changes include: Chapter 3, design criteria structures, equipment, and systems; chapter 5B, reactor coolant system; chapter 7, instrumentation and control systems; chapter 9, auxiliary systems; chapter 11, reactor refueling system; chapter 12, radiation protection and waste management; chapter 13, conduct of operations; chapter 17, technical specifications; chapter 20, FFTF criticality specifications; appendix C, local fuel failure events; and appendix Fl, operation at 680{degrees}F inlet temperature.

Gantt, D.A.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intruders and environmental hazards at electric transmission towers and substations using a new generation of components of the transmission system. This project designed and fabricated two types of wireless sensor

225

Final Report - Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project - FY2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Navajo Electrification Demonstration Project (NEDP) is a multi-year projects which addresses the needs of unserved Navajo Nation residents without basic electricity services. The Navajo Nation is the United States' largest tribe, in terms of population and land. An estimated 18,000 Navajo Nation homes do not have basic grid-tied electricity--and this third year of funding, known as NEDP-3, provided 351 power line extensions to Navajo families.

Kenneth L. Craig, Interim General Manager

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

Newberry Geothermal Pilot Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA has decided to acquire 20 average megawatts (aMW) of electrical power from a privately-owned geothermal power plant on the west flank of Newberry Volcano in Deschutes County, Oregon. The Newberry Project will generate 30 aMW and will be developed, owned, and operated by CE Newberry, Inc. of Portland, Oregon. In addition, BPA has decided to grant billing credits to EWEB for 10 aMW of electrical power and to provide wheeling services to EWEB for the transmission of this power to their system. BPA expects the Newberry Project to be in commercial operation by November 1997. BPA has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility industrial and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. The Newberry Project will be used to meet the electrical power supply obligations of these customers. The Newberry Project will also demonstrate the availability of geothermal power to meet power supply needs in the Pacific Northwest and is expected to be the first commercial geothermal plant in the region. The Newberry Project was selected under the BPA Geothermal Pilot Project Program. The goal of the Program is to initiate development of the Pacific Northwest`s large, but essentially untapped, geothermal resources, and to confirm the availability of this resource to meet the energy needs of the region. The primary underlying objective of this Program is to assure the supply of alternative sources of electrical power to help meet growing regional power demands and needs.

US Forest Service; US Bureau of Land Management; US Bonneville Power Administration

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

High Performance Building Facade Solutions PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

established test methods and procedures, and gathered dataany lengthly start-up procedures to calibrate it to localconstraints of the field test procedure: the 7 cm (2.75 in)

Lee, Eleanor

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Stress Testing Projected Capitalized Farmland Values  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that current year real cash rent can be best explained by current year real net farm income, lagged real net farm income over a period of years, and real cash rent in the previous year. A spreadsheet simulation model is used to project capitalized farmland...

Gao, Bo 1988-

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Improving Efficiency of SparkIgnited, Stoichiometrically Operated Natural Gas Engines is the final report for the Improving Efficiency Of SparkIgnited, Stoichiometric Operated Natural Gas Engine

230

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

· Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Assessment of Fort Bidwell Geothermal Well FB4 is the final Geothermal Well FB4. California Energy Commission, PIER Renewables Program. CEC-500-2012-061. i #12;ii #12's Renewable Energy Technologies Program. For more information about the PIER Program, please visit

231

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSISTED LEAN OPERATION TO BIOGAS FUELED RECIPROCATING ENGINES (BioHALO) Prepared for: California · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy Technologies · Transportation Application of Hydrogen Assisted Lean Operation to BiogasFueled Reciprocating Engines (BioHALO) is the final

232

UMTRA Surface Project management action process document: Final. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title 1 of the UMTRCA authorized the DOE to undertake remedial actions at these designed sites and associated vicinity properties (VP), which contain uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials (RRM) derived from the processing sites. Title 2 of the UMTRCA addresses uranium mill sites that were licensed at the time the UMTRCA was enacted. Cleanup of these Title 2 sites is the responsibility of the licensees. The cleanup of the Title 1 sites has been split into two separate projects: the Surface Project, which deals with the mill buildings, tailings, and contaminated soils at the sites and VPs; and the Ground Water Project, which is limited to the contaminated ground water at the sites. This management action process (MAP) document discusses the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Surface Project. Since its inception through March 1996, the Surface Project (hereinafter called the Project) has cleaned up 16 of the 24 designated processing sites and approximately 5,000 VPs, reducing the risk to human health and the environment posed by the uranium mill tailings. Two of the 24 sites, Belfield and Bowman, North Dakota, will not be remediated at the request of the state, reducing the total number of sites to 22. By the start of FY1998, the remaining 6 processing sites and associated VPs will be cleaned up. The remedial action activities to be funded in FY1998 by the FY1998 budget request are remediation of the remaining Grand Junction, Colorado, VPs; closure of the Cheney disposal cell in Grand Junction, Colorado; and preparation of the completion reports for 4 completed sites.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

NONE

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

234

Healy Clean Coal Project, Healy, Alaska final Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) provides the mechanism to evaluate the integrated coal combustion/emission control system being demonstrated by the Healy Clean Coal Project (HCCP) as part-of the third solicitation of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT-III). The EMP monitoring is intended to satisfy two objectives: (1) to develop the information base necessary for identification, assessment, and mitigation of potential environmental problems arising from replication of the technology and (2) to identify and quantify project-specific and site-specific environmental impacts predicted in the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) documents (Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision). The EMP contains a description of the background and history of development of the project technologies and defines the processes that will take place in the combustion and spray dryer absorber systems, including the formation of flash-calcined material (FCM) and its use in sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) removal from the flue gases. It also contains a description of the existing environmental resources of the project area. The EMP includes two types of environmental monitoring that are to be used to demonstrate the technologies of the HCCP: compliance monitoring and supplemental monitoring. Compliance monitoring activities include air emissions, wastewater effluents, and visibility. Monitoring of these resources provide the data necessary to demonstrate that the power plant can operate under the required state and federal statutes, regulations, and permit requirements.

Not Available

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

Final Hanford Site Transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization QA Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transuranic Waste Characterization Quality Assurance Program Plan required each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site that characterizes transuranic waste to be sent the Waste Isolation Pilot Plan that addresses applicable requirements specified in the quality assurance project plan (QAPP).

GREAGER, T.M.

1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

236

Urban Options Solar Greenhouse Demonstration Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following are included: the design process, construction, thermal performance, horticulture, educational activities, and future plans. Included in appendices are: greenhouse blueprints, insulating curtain details, workshop schedules, sample data forms, summary of performance calculations on the Urban Options Solar Greenhouse, data on vegetable production, publications, news articles on th Solar Greenhouse Project, and the financial statement. (MHR)

Cipparone, L.

1980-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Federation of California · Ed Cazalet, MegaWatt Storage Farms, Inc. · Larry Chaset, Sustainable Energy OF ENERGY STORAGE IN CALIFORNIA Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by in this report. #12; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The project titled 2020 Strategic Analysis of Energy Storage

238

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

equipment is the advanced compressed air energy storage plant. The project team recommends use problem and identifies the preferred type of electric energy storage plants to manage the impacts of wind an energy storage plant at specified sites. Three candidate sites, all located in Kern County, were

239

Game Theory Final Project Lucas Majerowicz id: 329012637  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this project is to improve the results presented in the "On Bitcoins and Red Balloons" paper. For this, I to a more general model than its authors assume. Motivation ­ The Bitcoin Protocol Bitcoin of its transactions. Suppose that Alice wants to transfer 10 bitcoins to Bob. In order to do this, Alice

Fiat, Amos

240

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy for natural gas RD&D. The PIER program strives to conduct the most promising public interest energy: · Buildings EndUse Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and demonstration (RD&D) projects to benefit the electricity and natural gas ratepayers in California. The Energy EndUse Energy Efficiency · Industrial/Agricultural/Water EndUse Energy Efficiency · Renewable Energy for natural gas RD&D. PIER funding efforts are focused on the following RD&D program areas: · Buildings

242

Economic Contributions of the Turfgrass Industry Final Project Report to the Florida Turfgrass Association  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Contributions of the Turfgrass Industry in Florida Final Project Report to the Florida of Food and Agricultural Sciences Food and Resource Economics Department Gainesville, FL Corresponding.....................................................................................................................................................21 Economic Contribution Analysis

Florida, University of

243

Integrated Performance Testing for Nonproliferation Support Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this workshop is to provide participants with training in testing techniques and methodologies for assessment of the performance of: Physical Protection system elements; Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) system elements.

Johns, Russell; Bultz, Garl Alan; Byers, Kenneth R.; Yaegle, William

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

244

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

was outstanding, while manufacturers' contribution of water heaters for testing was vital to its outcome water heaters for testing. We would like to recognize The American Council for an Energy Potential of Gas Fired Commercial Water Heating Equipment in Foodservice Facilities OCTOBER 2010 CEC

245

Evaluation of solar radiation measurement systems: EPRI/NREL final test report. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measured solar radiation resource data are needed by electric utilities to evaluate the potential of renewable energy options like photovoltaics in their service territory. In this final test report, we document a cooperative project of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to compare available measurement system options for performing solar radiation resource assessments. We present the detailed results of a 6-month field comparison of thermopile-based pyranometer and pyrheliometer solar irradiance measurement systems with two different implementations of the rotating shadowband radiometer (RSR) concept installed at NREL`s Solar Radiation Research Laboratory (SRRL) in Golden, Colorado.

Stoffel, T.; Riordan, C.; Bigger, J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

THz transceiver characterization : LDRD project 139363 final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LDRD Project 139363 supported experiments to quantify the performance characteristics of monolithically integrated Schottky diode + quantum cascade laser (QCL) heterodyne mixers at terahertz (THz) frequencies. These integrated mixers are the first all-semiconductor THz devices to successfully incorporate a rectifying diode directly into the optical waveguide of a QCL, obviating the conventional optical coupling between a THz local oscillator and rectifier in a heterodyne mixer system. This integrated mixer was shown to function as a true heterodyne receiver of an externally received THz signal, a breakthrough which may lead to more widespread acceptance of this new THz technology paradigm. In addition, questions about QCL mode shifting in response to temperature, bias, and external feedback, and to what extent internal frequency locking can improve stability have been answered under this project.

Nordquist, Christopher Daniel; Wanke, Michael Clement; Cich, Michael Joseph; Reno, John Louis; Fuller, Charles T.; Wendt, Joel Robert; Lee, Mark; Grine, Albert D.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Encoal mild coal gasification project: Final design modifications report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, construction and operation Phases of the Encoal Mild Coal Gasification Project have been completed. The plant, designed to process 1,000 ton/day of subbituminous Power River Basin (PRB) low-sulfur coal feed and to produce two environmentally friendly products, a solid fuel and a liquid fuel, has been operational for nearly five years. The solid product, Process Derived Fuel (PDF), is a stable, low-sulfur, high-Btu fuel similar in composition and handling properties to bituminous coal. The liquid product, Coal Derived Liquid (CDL), is a heavy, low-sulfur, liquid fuel similar in properties to heavy industrial fuel oil. Opportunities for upgrading the CDL to higher value chemicals and fuels have been identified. Significant quantities of both PDF and CDL have been delivered and successfully burned in utility and industrial boilers. A summary of the Project is given.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-University of Arizona Faculty Development Project on Energy successfully completed a faculty development program. There were three phases of the program consisting of: a three week energy workshop for teachers, participation and cooperation with Students for Safe Energy in presentation of an Alternative Energy Festival at the University of Arizona, and workshops for teachers conducted at Flowing Wells School District. Each of these is described. Attendees are listed and a director's evaluation of the workshop is given.

None

1980-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

249

Canister Cleaning System Final Design Report Project A-2A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 2,300 metric tons Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are currently stored within two water filled pools, the 105 K East (KE) fuel storage basin and the 105 K West (KW) fuel storage basin, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The SNF Project is responsible for operation of the K Basins and for the materials within them. A subproject to the SNF Project is the Debris Removal Subproject, which is responsible for removal of empty canisters and lids from the basins. The Canister Cleaning System (CCS) is part of the Debris Removal Project. The CCS will be installed in the KW Basin and operated during the fuel removal activity. The KW Basin has approximately 3600 canisters that require removal from the basin. The CCS is being designed to ''clean'' empty fuel canisters and lids and package them for disposal to the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility complex. The system will interface with the KW Basin and be located in the Dummy Elevator Pit.

FARWICK, C.C.

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Yakima Fisheries Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement : Summary.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) proposes to fund the Yakima Fisheries Project (YFP) to undertake fishery research and mitigation activities in the Yakima River Basin. The State of Washington and the Yakama Indian Nation (YIN) would jointly direct the project. In cooperation with BPA, the project managers propose to construct, operate and maintain anadromous (e.g. salmon) fish production facilities The goal is to conduct research activities designed to increase knowledge of supplementation techniques. These techniques would be applied to rebuild naturally spawning anadromous fish stocks historically present in the Yakima River Basin and, ultimately, those throughout the Columbia River Basin. Eventually, the YFP might involve the supplementation of all stocks of anadromous fish known to have occurred in the Yakima Basin. However, at this time only two action alternatives have been proposed, in addition to the No Action alternative: Alternative (1) would supplement depressed naturally spawning populations of upper Yakima spring chinook salmon; Alternative (2) (preferred) would include all actions under Alternative 1; it would also add a study to determine the feasibility of re-establishing a naturally spawning population and a significant fall fishery for coho salmon in the Yakima Basin (Coho smolts are currently being imported from another basin under the Columbia River Basin Fish Management Plan; the stock is now virtually eliminated from the Basin.)

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Washington (State). Dept. of Fish and Wildlife; Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, Washington.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Final Scientifc Report - Hydrogen Education State Partnership Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the leadership of the Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells program, Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA) educated and worked with state leaders to encourage wider deployment of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Through outreach to state policymakers, legislative leaders, clean energy funds, energy agencies, and public utility commissions, CESA worked to accomplish the following objectives of this project: 1. Provide information and technical assistance to state policy leaders and state renewable energy programs in the development of effective hydrogen fuel cell programs. 2. Identify and foster hydrogen program best practices. 3. Identify and promote strategic opportunities for states and the Department of Energy (DOE) to advance hydrogen technology deployment through partnerships, collaboration, and targeted activities. Over the three years of this project, CESA, with our partner National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL), was able to provide credible information on fuel cell policies, finance, and technical assistance to hundreds of state officials and other stakeholders. CESA worked with its membership network to effectively educate state clean energy policymakers, program managers, and decision makers about fuel cell and hydrogen technologies and the efforts by states to advance those technologies. With the assistance of NCSL, CESA gained access to an effective forum for outreach and communication with state legislators from all 50 states on hydrogen issues and policies. This project worked to educate policymakers and stakeholders with the potential to develop and deploy stationary and portable fuel cell technologies.

Leon, Warren

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM/FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program INTERIM/FINAL PROJECT REPORT Maximum Power Point Inverter for Photovoltaic Systems With Energy Storage and Dispatchability is the final report for the SMUD Tracker Inverter for Photovoltaic Systems with Energy Storage and Dispatchability DECEMBER 2011 CEC

254

Sweep-twist adaptive rotor blade : final project report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knight & Carver was contracted by Sandia National Laboratories to develop a Sweep Twist Adaptive Rotor (STAR) blade that reduced operating loads, thereby allowing a larger, more productive rotor. The blade design used outer blade sweep to create twist coupling without angled fiber. Knight & Carver successfully designed, fabricated, tested and evaluated STAR prototype blades. Through laboratory and field tests, Knight & Carver showed the STAR blade met the engineering design criteria and economic goals for the program. A STAR prototype was successfully tested in Tehachapi during 2008 and a large data set was collected to support engineering and commercial development of the technology. This report documents the methodology used to develop the STAR blade design and reviews the approach used for laboratory and field testing. The effort demonstrated that STAR technology can provide significantly greater energy capture without higher operating loads on the turbine.

Ashwill, Thomas D.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the static switch will lockout and go to the “Fault” state,the static switch will lockout and go to the “Fault” state,the static switch will lockout and go to the “Fault” state,

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distributed generation (DG), energy storage, etc. ) into the electric utilitydistributed generation (DG), energy storage, etc. ) into the electric utilitydistributed generation (DG), energy storage, etc. ) into the electric utility

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power components, (e) frequency, and (f) differential and zero- and negative-sequence current components, negative- sequence voltage component at the transformerpower components, (e) frequency, and (f) differential and zero- and negative-sequence current components, negative- sequence voltage component at the transformerpower components, (e) frequency, and (f) differential and zero- and negative-sequence current components, negative- sequence voltage component at the transformer

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an Inverter-Based Combined Heat and Power Module for Specialan Inverter-Based Combined Heat and Power Module for Specialan Inverter-Based Combined Heat and Power Module for Special

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat distribution systems and system reliability, and b)the heat distribution systems and system reliability, and b)of reliability than that provided by the distribution system

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Company Mark McGranaghan, EPRI Solutions Narain Hingorani,CERTS CHP DC DER DOE EMS EPRI Energy Commission IEEE LBNLPower Research Institute (EPRI) with expertise in power

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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261

Final Report Limited Soil Investigation of Project Chariot Test Holes  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\l p :.;LIST OFK I N

262

Final Technical Report - Modernization of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Project (BCH) was purchased by the City of Boulder, CO (the city) in 2001. Project facilities were originally constructed in 1910 and upgraded in the 1930s and 1940s. By 2009, the two 10 MW turbine/generators had reached or were nearing the end of their useful lives. One generator had grounded out and was beyond repair, reducing plant capacity to 10 MW. The remaining 10 MW unit was expected to fail at any time. When the BCH power plant was originally constructed, a sizeable water supply was available for the sole purpose of hydroelectric power generation. Between 1950 and 2001, that water supply had gradually been converted to municipal water supply by the city. By 2001, the water available for hydroelectric power generation at BCH could not support even one 10 MW unit. Boulder lacked the financial resources to modernize the facilities, and Boulder anticipated that when the single, operational historical unit failed, the project would cease operation. In 2009, the City of Boulder applied for and received a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) grant for $1.18 million toward a total estimated project cost of $5.155 million to modernize BCH. The federal funding allowed Boulder to move forward with plant modifications that would ensure BCH would continue operation. Federal funding was made available through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009. Boulder determined that a single 5 MW turbine/generator would be the most appropriate capacity, given the reduced water supply to the plant. Average annual BCH generation with the old 10 MW unit had been about 8,500 MW-hr, whereas annual generation with a new, efficient turbine could average 11,000 to 12,000 MW-hr. The incremental change in annual generation represents a 30% increase in generation over pre-project conditions. The old turbine/generator was a single nozzle Pelton turbine with a 5-to-1 flow turndown and a maximum turbine/generator efficiency of 82%. The new unit is a double nozzle Pelton turbine with a 10-to-1 flow turndown and a maximum turbine/generator efficiency of 88%. This alone represents a 6% increase in overall efficiency. The old turbine operated at low efficiencies due to age and non-optimal sizing of the turbine for the water flow available to the unit. It was shut down whenever water flow dropped to less than 4-5 cfs, and at that flow, efficiency was 55 to 60%. The new turbine will operate in the range of 70 to 88% efficiency through a large portion of the existing flow range and would only have to be shut down at flow rates less than 3.7 cfs. Efficiency is expected to increase by 15-30%, depending on flow. In addition to the installation of new equipment, other goals for the project included: �¢���¢ Increasing safety at Boulder Canyon Hydro �¢���¢ Increasing protection of the Boulder Creek environment �¢���¢ Modernizing and integrating control equipment into Boulder�¢����s municipal water supply system, and �¢���¢ Preserving significant historical engineering information prior to power plant modernization. From January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2012, combined consultant and contractor personnel hours paid for by both the city and the federal government have totaled approximately 40,000. This equates roughly to seven people working full time on the project from January 2010 through December 2012. This project also involved considerable material expense (steel pipe, a variety of valves, electrical equipment, and the various components of the turbine and generator), which were not accounted for in terms of hours spent on the project. However, the material expense related to this project did help to create or preserve manufacturing/industrial jobs throughout the United States. As required by ARRA, the various components of the hydroelectric project were manufactured or substantially transformed in the U.S. BCH is eligible for nomination to

Joe Taddeucci, P E

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

263

Hooper Springs Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana.ProgramJulietip sheetK-4In 2013 many|HumansDepartment ofLogoDepartment ofFinal

264

Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

A. B. Culp

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

265

Final Independent External Peer Review Report for the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project General Reevaluation Report EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Savannah Harbor is a deep and 600 feet wide from deep water in the ocean (River Mile 11.4B) to the channel between the jettiesFinal Independent External Peer Review Report for the Savannah Harbor Expansion Project General

US Army Corps of Engineers

266

Final Map Draft Comparison Report WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

II Final Map Draft Comparison Report #12;WIND ENERGY RESOURCE MODELING AND MEASUREMENT PROJECT Tel: 978-749-9591 Fax: 978-749-9713 mbrower@awstruewind.com August 10, 2004 #12;2 WIND ENERGY RESOURCE issues. 1 Background In Task 2 of the project, five promising areas of the state for wind energy

267

Technology and Education: Putting it in context A summary of the final Capital Research Project report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Technology and Education: Putting it in context A summary of the final Capital Research Project-00593093,version1-13May2011 #12;1 Box 1: Capital Project Capital (Curriculum and Pedagogy in Technology media and research claims such as these about the educational value of new technologies. But often

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

268

Fabrications of PVDF gratings :final report for LDRD project 79884.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to do some preliminary studies and process development on electroactive polymers to be used for tunable optical elements and MEMS actuators. Working in collaboration between Sandia National Labs and The University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, we have successfully developed a process for applying thin films of poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) onto glass substrates and patterning these using a novel stamping technique. We observed actuation in these structures in static and dynamic measurements. Further work is needed to characterize the impact that this approach could have on the field of tunable optical devices for sensing and communication.

Rogers, J. A. (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign); Carr, Dustin Wade; Bogart, Gregory R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Engine testing of ceramic cam-roller followers. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For several years, DDC has been developing monolithic ceramic heat engine components. One of the components, developed for an application in our state-of-the-art on-highway, heavy-duty diesel engine, the Series 60, is a silicon nitride cam-roller follower. Prior to starting this program, each valve train component in the Series 60 was considered for conversion to a ceramic material. Many advantages and disadvantages (benefits and risks) were considered. From this effort, one component was selected, the cam-roller follower. Using a system design approach, a ceramic cam-roller follower offered functional improvement at a reasonable cost. The purpose of the project was to inspect and test 100 domestically produced silicon nitride cam-roller followers built to the requirements of the DDC series 60 engine.

Kalish, Y. [Detroit Diesel Corp., MI (United States)

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States); [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and distribution modeling tool, monitoring of conventional and advanced water heater performance in the field, creation of advanced water heater models, and oversight of draft standards activities; · Carl Hiller Services for laboratory performance testing of conventional and advanced storage water heaters; · Gary

272

Molten-Caustic-Leaching (Gravimelt) system integration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were to design, construct, shakedown and operate an integrated MCL test circuit to demonstrate the technical capability of the process for producing a demineralized and desulfurized coal that meets New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), to test process conditions aimed at lower costs, and to deliver product coal. These objectives were met by the procurement, construction, and operation of the integrated test circuit. Shakedown and a 63-test process matrix resulted in the production of about 3,700 pounds of treated coal. Product MCL coal may be used to displace oil in some turbine and diesel engines and may be used in the retrofit of oil-fired boilers. Two high sulfur, high ash coals and one medium sulfur, high ash coal representative of the Eastern United States coal production were processed: Pittsburgh No. 8 (Powhatan No. 6 mine), Kentucky No. 9, and Pittsburgh No. 8 (Blacksville No. 2 mine). Although mild kiln operating conditions (325 to 415{degree}C and 1 to 2.3 hours residence time) and low caustic to coal ratios (1:1 to 3:1) were used, the combination of continuous operation and rigorous exclusion of air from the system allowed the production of MCL coal that had product sulfur content was well below NSPS standards, very low carbonate production, very little volatile losses, and low alkali retention by the product MCL coal. Optimization testing resulted in a product coal containing 0.2 to 0.4 percent sulfur (0.26 to 0.6 lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu) and 0.15 to 0.5 percent ash with more than 90 percent organic sulfur removal, {approximately}95 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from run-of-mine coal, {approximately}91 percent SO{sub 2} reduction from precleaned process feed coal, and with heat content of about 14,000 Btu per pound.

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Decontamination and decommissioning of the Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR): Project final report, Argonne National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Report for the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) of the Argonne National Laboratory - East (ANL-E) Experimental Boiling Water Reactor (EBWR) facility contains the descriptions and evaluations of the activities and the results of the EBWR D&D project. It provides the following information: (1) An overall description of the ANL-E site and EBWR facility. (2) The history of the EBWR facility. (3) A description of the D&D activities conducted during the EBWR project. (4) A summary of the final status of the facility, including the final and confirmation surveys. (5) A summary of the final cost, schedule, and personnel exposure associated with the project, including a summary of the total waste generated. This project report covers the entire EBWR D&D project, from the initiation of Phase I activities to final project closeout. After the confirmation survey, the EBWR facility was released as a {open_quotes}Radiologically Controlled Area,{close_quotes} noting residual elevated activity remains in inaccessible areas. However, exposure levels in accessible areas are at background levels. Personnel working in accessible areas do not need Radiation Work Permits, radiation monitors, or other radiological controls. Planned use for the containment structure is as an interim transuranic waste storage facility (after conversion).

Fellhauer, C.R.; Boing, L.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Aldana, J. [NES, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

BPA-Solicited Technical Review of "Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge: Final Report for 2001 Baseline", Technical Report 2004.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report was to provide, at BPA's request, a technical review of interim products received for Project 2001-015-00 under contract 6925. BPA sometimes solicits technical reviews for Fish and Wildlife products or issues where outside expertise is required. External review of complex project deliverables assures BPA as a funding agency that the contractor is continuing with scientifically-credible experimental techniques envisioned in the original proposal. If the project's methodology proves feasible, there could be potential applications beyond the project area to similar situations in the Columbia Basin. The Experiment involves artificial flooding during high flow periods and a determination of the portion of the return flows that end up in the Umatilla River during low flow months and within acceptable water quality parameters (e.g., low temperature, few contaminants). Flooding could be a critical water source for aquatic organisms at times of the year when flows in the lower reaches of the Umatilla River are low and water is warmer than would be desired. The experiment was proposed to test whether 'this process, recharges the shallow aquifers of the old flood plain, for natural filtration through the alluvial soils as it returns to the Umatilla River, cleaner and cooler (about 50 degree Fahrenheit) five to six month later (about July and August) substantially cooling the river and [making it] more beneficial to anadromous [fish]'. A substantial amount of preliminary data had been collected and preliminary results were submitted in an interim report 'Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge: Final Report for 2001 Baseline (December 2002)'. A substantial amount of addition funding was provided for the last cycle of flooding (Phases II) and final analyses of the full compliment of data collected over the life of the contract (Phase III). Third party scientific review may assist the contractor in producing a higher quality Final Report with completion of the final 2 phases of the project.

Morgan, David

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Final Report for the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Planning Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2011 the Tribe was awarded funds from the Department of Energy to formulate the Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan. This will be a guiding document used throughout the planning of projects focused on energy reduction on the Reservation. The Soboba Strategic Tribal Energy Plan's goal is to create a Five Year Energy Plan for the Soboba Band of Luiseno Indians in San Jacinto, California. This plan will guide the decision making process towards consistent progress leading to the Tribal goal of a 25% reduction in energy consumption in the next five years. It will additionally outline energy usage/patterns and will edentify areas the Tribe can decrease energy use and increase efficiency. The report documents activities undertaken under the grant, as well as incldues the Tribe's strategif energy plan.

Miller, Kim [EPA Specialist] [EPA Specialist

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

276

Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Colorado-Ute Electric Association began a study to evaluate options for upgrading and extending the life of its Nucla power station in 1982. Located in southwestern Colorado near the town of Nucla, this station was commissioned in 1959 with a local bituminous coal as its design fuel for three identical stoker-fired units, each rated at 12.6 MW(e). Poor station efficiency, high fuel costs, and spiraling boiler maintenance costs forced the Nucla Station into low priority in the CUEA dispatch order as early as 1981. Among the options CUEA considered was to serve as a host utility to demonstrate Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (AFBC) technology. The anticipated environmental benefits and apparent attractive economics of a circulating AFBC led to Colorado-Ute`s decision to proceed with the design and construction of a demonstration project in 1984 at the Nucla facility.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Final report and recommendations of the ESnet Authentication Pilot Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To conduct their work, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) researchers require access to a wide range of computing systems and information resources outside of their respective laboratories. Electronically communicating with peers using the global Internet has become a necessity to effective collaboration with university, industrial, and other government partners. DOE`s Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) needs to be engineered to facilitate this {open_quotes}collaboratory{close_quotes} while ensuring the protection of government computing resources from unauthorized use. Sensitive information and intellectual properties must be protected from unauthorized disclosure, modification, or destruction. In August 1993, DOE funded four ESnet sites (Argonne National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Energy Research Supercomputer Center, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory) to begin implementing and evaluating authenticated ESnet services using the advanced Kerberos Version 5. The purpose of this project was to identify, understand, and resolve the technical, procedural, cultural, and policy issues surrounding peer-to-peer authentication in an inter-organization internet. The investigators have concluded that, with certain conditions, Kerberos Version 5 is a suitable technology to enable ESnet users to freely share resources and information without compromising the integrity of their systems and data. The pilot project has demonstrated that Kerberos Version 5 is capable of supporting trusted third-party authentication across an inter-organization internet and that Kerberos Version 5 would be practical to implement across the ESnet community within the U.S. The investigators made several modifications to the Kerberos Version 5 system that are necessary for operation in the current Internet environment and have documented other technical shortcomings that must be addressed before large-scale deployment is attempted.

Johnson, G.R.; Moore, J.P. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Athey, C.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Engert, D.E. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ramus, J.E. [National Energy Research Supercomputer Center, Livermore, CA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Expedient methods of respiratory protection. II. Leakage tests. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following readily-available materials were tested on a manikin connected to a breathing simulator to determine the fraction of an approximately 2-..mu..m-diameter aerosol that would leak around the seal of the materials to the manikin's face: cotton/polyester shirt material, cotton handkerchief material, toweling (a wash cloth), a surgical mask (Johnson and Johnson Co., model HRI 8137), and a NIOSH-approved disposable face mask (3M, model number 8710). The leakage tests were performed to supplement the measurements of penetration through the materials, conducted as the first phase of this investigation. The leakage tests were performed with the materials held on to the face by three methods, leakage fractions being determined from comparisons with the penetration of the same aerosol for the materials fully taped to the face. At a breathing rate of 37 liters per minute, mean leakages ranged from 0.0 percent to 63 percent. Mean penetrations exclusive of leakage ranged from 0.6 percent to 39 percent. Use of nylon hosiery material (panty hose) to hold the handkerchief material or the disposable face mask to the face was found to be very effective in preventing leakage. Such a combination could be expected to reduce leakage around the handkerchief to about ten percent or less in practice, and around the mask to less than one percent, offering substantial protection from accidentally generated aerosols. The reduction in leakage around the mask provided by the hosiery material suggests the adaptation and use of such an approach in regular industrial hygiene practice. The third and final phase of this investigation is underway, in which the penetration of the materials by particles with diameters between 0.05 and 0.5 ..mu..m is being measured and the effectiveness of the methods for dose reduction in the presence of radioactive aerosols is being modeled.

Cooper, D.W.; Hinds, W.C.; Price, J.M.; Weker, R.; Yee, H.S.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

US Department of Energy Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action ground water Project. Revision 1, Version 1: Final project plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The scope of the Project is to develop and implement a ground water compliance strategy for all 24 UMTRA processing sites. The compliance strategy for the processing sites must satisfy requirements of the proposed EPA ground water cleanup standards in 40 CFR Part 192, Subparts B and C (1988). This scope of work will entail the following activities, on a site-specific basis: Development of a compliance strategy based upon modification of the UMTRA Surface Project remedial action plans (RAP) or development of Ground Water Project RAPs with NRC and state or tribal concurrence on the RAP; implementation of the RAP to include establishment of institutional controls, where appropriate; institution of long-term verification monitoring for transfer to a separate DOE program on or before the Project end date; and preparation of completion reports and final licensing on those sites that will be completed prior to the Project end date.

Not Available

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

280

Phase II Final Project Report SBIR Project: "A High Efficiency PV to Hydrogen Energy System"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The innovative research conducted for this project contributed greatly to the understanding of generating low-cost hydrogen from solar energy. The project’s research identified two highly leveraging and complementary pathways. The first pathway is to dramatically increase the efficiency of converting sunlight into electricity. Improving solar electric conversion efficiency directly increases hydrogen production. This project produced a world record efficiency for silicon solar cells and contributed to another world record efficiency for a solar concentrator module using multijunction solar cells. The project’s literature review identified a second pathway in which wasted heat from the solar concentration process augments the electrolysis process generating hydrogen. One way to do this is to use a “heat mirror” that reflects the heat-producing infrared and transmits the visible spectrum to the solar cells; this also increases solar cell conversion efficiency. An economic analysis of this concept confirms that, if long-term concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) and solid-oxide electrolyzer cost goals can be achieved, hydrogen will be produced from solar energy cheaper than the cost of gasoline. The potential public benefits from this project are significant. The project has identified a potential energy source for the nation’s future electricity and transportation needs that is entirely “home grown” and carbon free. As CPV enter the nation’s utility markets, the opportunity for this approach to be successful is greatly increased. Amonix strongly recommends further exploration of this project’s findings.

Slade, A; Turner, J; Stone, K; McConnell, R

2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

BACA Project: geothermal demonstration power plant. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various activities that have been conducted by Union in the Redondo Creek area while attempting to develop the resource for a 50 MW power plant are described. The results of the geologic work, drilling activities and reservoir studies are summarized. In addition, sections discussing the historical costs for Union's involvement with the project, production engineering (for anticipated surface equipment), and environmental work are included. Nineteen geothermal wells have been drilled in the Redondo Creek area of the Valles Caldera: a prominent geologic feature of the Jemez mountains consisting of Pliocene and Pleistocene age volcanics. The Redondo Creek area is within a complex longitudinal graben on the northwest flank of the resurgent structural dome of Redondo Peak and Redondo Border. The major graben faults, with associated fracturing, are geologically plausible candidates for permeable and productive zones in the reservoir. The distribution of such permeable zones is too erratic and the locations too imprecisely known to offer an attractive drilling target. Log analysis indicates there is a preferred mean fracture strike of N31W in the upper portion of Redondo Creek wells. This is approximately perpendicular to the major structure in the area, the northeast-striking Redondo Creek graben. The geothermal fluid found in the Redondo Creek reservoir is relatively benign with low brine concentrations and moderate H/sub 2/S concentrations. Geothermometer calculations indicate that the reservoir temperature generally lies between 500/sup 0/F and 600/sup 0/F, with near wellbore flashing occurring during the majority of the wells' production.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Characterization of the radon source in North-Central Florida. Final report part 1 -- Final project report; Final report part 2 -- Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains two separate parts: Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (final report part 1 -- final project report); and Characterization of the Radon Source in North-Central Florida (technical report). The objectives were to characterize the radon 222 source in a region having a demonstrated elevated indoor radon potential and having geology, lithology, and climate that are different from those in other regions of the U.S. where radon is being studied. Radon availability and transport in this region were described. Approaches for predicting the radon potential of lands in this region were developed.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

The Carolina Bay Restoration Project - Final Report 2000-2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Wetlands Mitigation Bank was established at SRS in 1997 as a compensatory alternative for unavoidable wetland losses. Prior to restoration activities, 16 sites included in the project were surveyed for the SRS Site Use system to serve as a protective covenant. Pre-restoration monitoring ended in Fall 2000, and post restoration monitoring began in the Winter/Spring of 2001. The total interior harvest in the 16 bays after harvesting the trees was 19.6 ha. The margins in the opencanopy, pine savanna margin treatments were thinned. Margins containing areas with immature forested stands (bay 5184 and portions of bay 5011) were thinned using a mechanical shredder in November 2001. Over 126 hectares were included in the study areas (interior + margin). Planting of two tree species and the transplanting of wetland grass species was successful. From field surveys, it was estimated that approximately 2700 Nyssa sylvatica and 1900 Taxodium distichum seedlings were planted in the eight forested bays resulting in an average planting density of ? 490 stems ha-1. One hundred seedlings of each species per bay (where available) were marked to evaluate survivability and growth. Wetland grass species were transplanted from donor sites on SRS to plots that ranged in size from 100 – 300 m2, depending on wetland size. On 0.75 and 0.6 meter centers, respectively, 2198 plugs of Panicum hemitomon and 3021 plugs Leersia hexandra were transplanted. New shoots originating from the stumps were treated with a foliar herbicide (Garlon® 4) during the summer of 2001 using backpack sprayers. Preliminary information from 2000-2004 regarding the hydrologic, vegetation and faunal response to restoration is presented in this status report.

Barton, Christopher

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

284

Amyris, Inc. Integrated Biorefinery Project Summary Final Report - Public Version  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Amyris pilot-scale Integrated Biorefinery (IBR) leveraged Amyris synthetic biology and process technology experience to upgrade Amyris’s existing Emeryville, California pilot plant and fermentation labs to enable development of US-based production capabilities for renewable diesel fuel and alternative chemical products. These products were derived semi-synthetically from high-impact biomass feedstocks via microbial fermentation to the 15-carbon intermediate farnesene, with subsequent chemical finishing to farnesane. The Amyris IBR team tested and provided methods for production of diesel and alternative chemical products from sweet sorghum, and other high-impact lignocellulosic feedstocks, at pilot scale. This enabled robust techno-economic analysis (TEA), regulatory approvals, and a basis for full-scale manufacturing processes and facility design.

Gray, David; Sato, Suzanne; Garcia, Fernando; Eppler, Ross; Cherry, Joel

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

285

Final report for the mobile node authentication LDRD project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In hostile ad hoc wireless communication environments, such as battlefield networks, end-node authentication is critical. In a wired infrastructure, this authentication service is typically facilitated by a centrally-located ''authentication certificate generator'' such as a Certificate Authority (CA) server. This centralized approach is ill-suited to meet the needs of mobile ad hoc networks, such as those required by military systems, because of the unpredictable connectivity and dynamic routing. There is a need for a secure and robust approach to mobile node authentication. Current mechanisms either assign a pre-shared key (shared by all participating parties) or require that each node retain a collection of individual keys that are used to communicate with other individual nodes. Both of these approaches have scalability issues and allow a single compromised node to jeopardize the entire mobile node community. In this report, we propose replacing the centralized CA with a distributed CA whose responsibilities are shared between a set of select network nodes. To that end, we develop a protocol that relies on threshold cryptography to perform the fundamental CA duties in a distributed fashion. The protocol is meticulously defined and is implemented it in a series of detailed models. Using these models, mobile wireless scenarios were created on a communication simulator to test the protocol in an operational environment and to gather statistics on its scalability and performance.

Michalski, John T.; Lanzone, Andrew J.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

(Energy related business development grant project): Final technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CONSERVE, Inc., a private, not-for-profit organization, was launched in 1986 to provide energy conservation and weatherization services to low-income neighborhoods throughout New York City. Founded by three non-profit community development groups - Northern Manhattan Improvement Corporation, Operation Open City and the Coalition Management Training Company - CONSERVE, Inc., couples NYS Weatherization Assistance Program funds with privately leveraged dollars to achieve more thorough workscopes and higher energy savings in multi-family buildings housing low-income tenants. CONSERVE's services include: energy audit and workscope preparation, financial analysis and packaging and construction management. During its first year of operation, CONSERVE's primary goal was to test the feasibility of coordinating the services described above by making them available to owners of multi-family buildings and potential lenders. First-year findings proved conclusively CONSERVE's viability as an energy conservation resource for owners and tenants of low-income, multi-family buildings in New York City. Based on its accomplishments as well as its potential, the organization has received full funding for the 1987-88 fiscal year from the NYS Energy Office and the NYS Weatherization Assistance Program. This report documents the organization's activities over the last year.

Not Available

1987-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

287

Volcanism Studies: Final Report for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report synthesizes the results of volcanism studies conducted by scientists at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and collaborating institutions on behalf of the Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Project. An assessment of the risk of future volcanic activity is one of many site characterization studies that must be completed to evaluate the Yucca Mountain site for potential long-term storage of high-level radioactive waste. The presence of several basaltic volcanic centers in the Yucca Mountain region of Pliocene and Quaternary age indicates that there is a finite risk of a future volcanic event occurring during the 10,000-year isolation period of a potential repository. Chapter 1 introduces the volcanism issue for the Yucca Mountain site and provides the reader with an overview of the organization, content, and significant conclusions of this report. The risk of future basaltic volcanism is the primary topic of concern including both events that intersect a potential repository and events that occur near or within the waste isolation system of a repository. Future volcanic events cannot be predicted with certainty but instead are estimated using formal methods of probabilistic volcanic hazard assessment (PVHA). Chapter 2 describes the volcanic history of the Yucca Mountain region (YMR) and emphasizes the Pliocene and Quaternary volcanic record, the interval of primary concern for volcanic risk assessment. The distribution, eruptive history, and geochronology of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers are described by individual center emphasizing the younger postcaldera basalt (<5 Ma). The Lathrop Wells volcanic center is described in detail because it is the youngest basalt center in the YMR. The age of the Lathrop Wells center is now confidently determined to be about 75 thousand years old. Chapter 3 describes the tectonic setting of the YMR and presents and assesses the significance of multiple alternative tectonic models. The Crater Flat volcanic zone is defined and described as one of many alternative models of the structural controls of the distribution of Plio-Quaternary basalt centers in the YMR. Geophysical data are described for the YMR and are used as an aid to understand the distribution of basaltic volcanic centers. Chapter 4 discusses the petrologic and geochemical features of basaltic volcanism in the YMR, the southern Great Basin and the Basin and Range province. Geochemical and isotopic data are presented for post-Miocene basalts of the Yucca Mountain region. Alternative petrogenetic models are assessed for the formation of the Lathrop Wells volcanic center. Based on geochemical data, basaltic ash in fault trenches near Yucca Mountain is shown to have originated from the Lathrop Wells center. Chapter 5 synthesizes eruptive and subsurface effects of basaltic volcanism on a potential repository and summarizes current concepts of the segregation, ascent, and eruption of basalt magma. Chapter 6 synthesizes current knowledge of the probability of disruption of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain. In 1996, an Expert Elicitation panel was convened by DOE that independently conducted PVHA for the Yucca Mountain site. Chapter 6 does not attempt to revise this PVHA; instead, it further examines the sensitivity of variables in PVHA. The approaches and results of PVHA by the expert judgment panel are evaluated and incorporated throughout this chapter. The disruption ratio (E2) is completely re-evaluated using simulation modeling that describes volcanic events based on the geometry of basaltic feeder dikes. New estimates of probability bounds are developed. These comparisons show that it is physically implausible for the probability of magmatic disruption of the Yucca Mountain site to be > than about 7 x 10{sup {minus}8} events yr{sup {minus}1} . Simple probability estimates are used to assess possible implications of not drilling aeromagnetic anomalies in the Amargosa Valley. The sensitivity of the disruption probability to the location of northeast boundaries of volcanic zones near the Yucca Mountain si

Bruce M. Crowe; Frank V. Perry; Greg A. Valentine; Lynn M. Bowker

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

accomplished across the wellfield. Authors Glaspey and Douglas J. Published DOE Information Bridge, 1302008 DOI 10.2172922630 Citation Glaspey, Douglas J. . 1302008. Final...

289

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 5 of Volume IV, discusses: Corrective maintenance procedures; Calibration procedures; Surveillance procedures; Equipment changeover procedures; Decontamination procedures; Recovery procedures; and Cable schedule.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 4, Operations and maintenance manual, Book 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Phase III of the Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase II Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase III effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. Volume IV provides the Operating and Maintenance Manual for the Prototypical Rod Consolidation System that was installed at the Cold Test Facility. This document, Book 4 of Volume IV, discusses: Off-normal operating and recovery procedures; Emergency response procedures; Troubleshooting procedures; and Preventive maintenance procedures.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Final Treatment Center Project for Liquid and Wet Radioactive Waste in Slovakia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Final Treatment Center (FTC) for Mochovce nuclear power plant (NPP) is designed for treatment and final conditioning of radioactive liquid and wet waste produced from plant operation. Mochovce NNP uses a Russian VVER-440 type reactor. Treated wastes comprise radioactive concentrates, spent resin and sludge. VUJE Inc. as an experienced company in field of treatment of radioactive waste in Slovakia has been chosen as main contractor for technological part of FTC. This paper describes the capacity, flow chart, overall waste flow and parameters of the main components in the FTC. The initial project was submitted for approval to the Slovak Electric plc. in 2003. The design and manufacture of main components were performed in 2004 and 2005. FTC construction work started early in 2004. Initial non-radioactive testing of the system is planned for summer 2006 and then radioactive tests are to be followed. A one-year trial operation of facility is planned for completion in 2007. SE - VYZ will be operates the FTC during trial operation and after its completion. SE - VYZ is subsidiary company of Slovak Electric plc. and it is responsible for treatment with radioactive waste and spent fuel in the Slovak republic. SE - VYZ has, besides of other significant experience with operation of Jaslovske Bohunice Treatment Centre. The overall capacity of the FTC is 870 m{sup 3}/year of concentrates and 40 m{sup 3}/year of spent resin and sludge. Bituminization and cementation were provided as main technologies for treatment of these wastes. Treatment of concentrate is performed by bituminization. Concentrate and bitumen are metered into a thin film evaporator with rotating wiping blades. Surplus water is evaporated and concentrate salts are embedded in bitumen. Bitumen product is discharged into 200 l steel drums. Spent resin and sludge are decanted, dried and mixed with bitumen. These mixtures are also discharged into 200 l steel drums. Drums are moved along bituminization line on a roller conveyor. After the drums cool, they are capped and removed from the conveyor and placed in a storage hall. Drums with bitumen product are loaded into Fiber Reinforced Concrete containers (FRC) and grouted with cement. Cement grout is prepared from mixture of cement, additive and radioactive concentrates. By formulating the cement grout with evaporator concentrates the maximum radioactivity is fixed in cement matrix and volume of final waste product is minimized. A batch mixer with rotating blades is used produce the cement grout. FRCs loaded with bitumen drums are placed on roller conveyor and moved along the cementation line. Grouted FRCs are stored in the expedition hall for 28 days of curing and then transported to final disposal. After placed in operation the FTC provides treatment for all liquid and wet LLW produced from the operation of the Mochovce NPP. The final product of the FTC is a FRC loaded with 7 drums of waste fixed in bitumen and the space between the drums is grouted with cement. This container meets all limits for final disposal in the National Radioactive Waste Repository at Mochovce. (authors)

Kravarik, K.; Stubna, M.; Pekar, A.; Krajc, T.; Zatkulak, M.; Holicka, Z. [VUJE, Inc., Okruzna 5, 918 64 Trnava (Slovakia); Slezak, M. [SE - VYZ, 919 31 Jaslovske Bohunice (Slovakia)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Final report for the flow excursion follow-on testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Mark 22 Flow Excursion Follow-On testing was to investigate the theory that approximately 15% of the flow bypassed the primary flow channels in previous testing, whereas the design called for only a 3% bypass. The results of the follow-on tests clearly confirmed this theory. The testing was performed in two phases. During the first phase, characterization tests performed during the earlier test program were repeated.

Nash, C.A.; Walters, T.W.

1992-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

293

Amorphous Diamond Flat Panel Displays - Final Report of ER-LTR CRADA project with SI Diamond Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Energy under a CRADA (Cooperative Research andnm in size. Page 4 of 7 SIDT CRADA Final Report In order toFinal report of ER-LTR CRADA Project Lawrence Berkeley

Ager III, Joel W.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

SOLERAS - Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project. Final report, Volume 1. Project summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of the Solar Controlled Environment Agriculture Project is presented. The design of the greenhouses include transparent double pane glass roof with channels for fluid between the panes, inner pane tinted and double pane extruded acrylic aluminized mylar shade and diffuser. Solar energy technologies provide power for water desalination, for pumping irrigation water, and for cooling and heating the controlled environment space so that crops can grow in arid lands. The project is a joint effort between the United States and Saudi Arabia. (BCS)

Not Available

1985-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

Analysis of the optics of the Final Focus Test Beam using Lie algebra based techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses the analysis of the beam optics of the final focus test beam at the Stanford Linear Collider using Lie algebra. (LSP).

Roy, G.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Final Technical Report: The Water-to-Wire (W2W) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the Free Flow Power (FFP) Water-to-Wire Project (Project) was to evaluate and optimize the performance, environmental compatibility, and cost factors of FFP hydrokinetic turbines through design analyses and deployments in test flumes and riverine locations.

Lissner, Daniel N.; Edward, Lovelace C.

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

297

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA project site Rifle, Colorado. Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final audit report summarizes the assessments performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration Division (ERD) and its Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) of remedial action compliance with approved plans, specifications, standards, and 40 CFR Part 192 at the Rifle, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site. Remedial action construction was directed by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC).

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Temperature Dependence of Conductivity in Graphene Final Project in the Computational Physics course  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Temperature Dependence of Conductivity in Graphene Final Project in the Computational Physics. The Ohmic resistivity of the graphene electrons is calculated by the nite-temperature Drude-Boltzmann theory of graphene and the experimental results of the temperature dependence of conductivity, there is an extensive

Adler, Joan

299

FINAL YEAR PROJECT TECHNICAL PAPER PAGE 2222 DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL AND ELECTRONICS ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interface". · WWW is the abbreviation of "World Wide Web". · RCS is the abbreviation of "Revision Control THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG 1. INTRODUCTION This document is the final year project technical paper produced " own achievement. In this document, the system developed by the team will not be described in details

Cheng, Reynold Cheng Chun

300

NSF ITR Project General Notes on Trypsin Test Procedure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NSF ITR Project Fall 2004 General Notes on Trypsin Test Procedure: Automated performance procedure the assay still work"?) Calculation of the Z' ­ Factor (quality criteria) Manual performance procedure: (Uses/purpose of procedure: Setup a new assay. Use as basis for comparison with automated version

Kaber, David B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SOLERAS - Photovoltaic Power Systems Project. Rural solar applications. Final report: project summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saudi Solar Village Project photovoltaic system is described, consisting of 160 arrays, a computerized control system, 1100 kW of electrical storage in lead-acid batteries, and an automatic weather data gathering system. Satisfactory overall system performance is reported. Performance degradation due to dust on the array lenses was determined. Field operational problems are discussed. (LEW)

Not Available

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a Wave Energy Test Facility that will be located near Newport, Oregon. The testing facility will be located within Oregon territorial waters, near the Hatfield Marine Science Center and close to onshore roads and marine support services. The site will not only allow testing of new wave energy technologies, but will also be used to help study any potential environmental impacts on sediments, invertebrates and fish. The project is being jointly funded by the State of Oregon and DOE.

303

TITLE: HVAC TESTING & BALANCING FOR MAJOR AND MINOR PROJECTS OBJECTIVE AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TITLE: HVAC TESTING & BALANCING FOR MAJOR AND MINOR PROJECTS OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE: To provide an independent test & balance for the adjustment of all HVAC systems in all major projects and minor projects

Fernandez, Eduardo

304

Final Report for Phase I Northern California CO2 Reduction Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On June 8, 2009, the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory released a Funding Opportunity Announcement (DE-FOA 0000015) with the title, Recovery Act: Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO{sub 2} Use. C6 Resources (C6), an affiliate of Shell Oil Company, responded with a proposal for Technology Area 1: Large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) projects from industrial sources. As DOE Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC) Contractors, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LBNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL) proposed to collaborate with C6 and perform technical tasks, which C6 included in the C6 proposal, titled the Northern California CO{sub 2} Reduction Project. The proposal was accepted for Phase I funding and C6 received DOE Award DEFE0002042. LLNL and LBNL each received Phase I funding of $200,000, directly from DOE. The essential task of Phase I was to prepare a proposal for Phase II, which would be a five-year, detailed technical proposal, budget, and schedule for a complete carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage project, with the objective of starting the injection of 1 million tons per year of industrial CO2 by the end of FY2015. LLNL and LBNL developed technical proposals (and DOE Field Work Proposals [FWPs]) for many aspects of the geologic testing and CO{sub 2} monitoring that were included in the C6 Phase II proposal, which C6 submitted by the deadline of April 16, 2010. This document is the Final Report for LLNL's Phase I efforts and is presented in two parts. Part 1 is the complete text of the technical proposal provided to C6 by LLNL and LBNL for inclusion in the C6 Phase II proposal. Because of space limitations, however, C6 may not have included all of this information in their proposal. In addition to developing the proposal presented below, LLNL's Bill Foxall and Laura Chiarmonte, in collaboration with LBNL, undertook preliminary technical work evaluating the potential for induced seismicity in Solano County. Part 2 presents technical work preformed during Phase I in the development of a preliminary Certification Framework: Leakage Risk Assessment for CO{sub 2} Injection at the Montezuma Hills Site, Solano County, California, co-authored by LLNL and LBNL collaborators.

Wagoner, J

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

Hsu, F.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Technical assistance for Meharry Medical College Energy Efficiency Project. Final project status and technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a program to provide technical assistance to Meharry Medical College. The purpose of the program is to facilitate Meharry`s effort to finance a campus-wide facility retrofit. The US Department of Energy (USDOE) funded the program through a grant to the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development (TECD). The University of Memphis-Technology and Energy Services (UM-TES), under contract to TECD, performed program services. The report has three sections: (1) introduction; (2) project definition, financing, and participants; and (3) opportunities for federal participation.

NONE

1996-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

307

Progress on Plasma Lens Experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam *  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Progress on Plasma Lens Experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam * S. Chattopadhyay 1 , P. Chen 2 Collaboration proposed and has been approved to perform the Plasma Lens Experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam of the experiment are to study plasma focusing of high energy, high density particle beams; to investigate plasma

308

NERI PROJECT 99-119. TASK 1. ADVANCED CONTROL TOOLS AND METHODS. FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear plants of the 21st century will employ higher levels of automation and fault tolerance to increase availability, reduce accident risk, and lower operating costs. Key developments in control algorithms, fault diagnostics, fault tolerance, and communication in a distributed system are needed to implement the fully automated plant. Equally challenging will be integrating developments in separate information and control fields into a cohesive system, which collectively achieves the overall goals of improved performance, safety, reliability, maintainability, and cost-effectiveness. Under the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI), the U. S. Department of Energy is sponsoring a project to address some of the technical issues involved in meeting the long-range goal of 21st century reactor control systems. This project, ''A New Paradigm for Automated Development Of Highly Reliable Control Architectures For Future Nuclear Plants,'' involves researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of Tennessee, and North Carolina State University. This paper documents a research effort to develop methods for automated generation of control systems that can be traced directly to the design requirements. Our final goal is to allow the designer to specify only high-level requirements and stress factors that the control system must survive (e.g. a list of transients, or a requirement to withstand a single failure.) To this end, the ''control engine'' automatically selects and validates control algorithms and parameters that are optimized to the current state of the plant, and that have been tested under the prescribed stress factors. The control engine then automatically generates the control software from validated algorithms. Examples of stress factors that the control system must ''survive'' are: transient events (e.g., set-point changes, or expected occurrences such a load rejection,) and postulated component failures. These stress factors are specified by the designer and become a database of prescribed transients and component failures. The candidate control systems are tested, and their parameters optimized, for each of these stresses. Examples of high-level requirements are: response time less than xx seconds, or overshoot less than xx% ... etc. In mathematical terms, these types of requirements are defined as ''constraints,'' and there are standard mathematical methods to minimize an objective function subject to constraints. Since, in principle, any control design that satisfies all the above constraints is acceptable, the designer must also select an objective function that describes the ''goodness'' of the control design. Examples of objective functions are: minimize the number or amount of control motions, minimize an energy balance... etc.

March-Leuba, J.A.

2002-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

309

LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Microsoft Word - NTS Performance Test Rpt - Final.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The command post tabletop performance test (TTPT) scenario involved a simulated subcritical experiment assembly at the U1a facility that was deliberately set on fire by a...

311

Policy and procedures for classification of Class III groundwater at UMTRA Project sites. Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has recently proposed groundwater regulations for the US Department of Energy`s )DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. These regulations allow the application of supplemental standards at UMTRA Project sites in specific situations. The designation of groundwater as Class III permits the application of supplemental standards. This document discusses a final UMTRA Project policy and procedures for identifying Class III groundwater, including identification of a review area, definition of water quality, quantification of aquifer yield, and identification of methods reasonably employed for public water supply systems. These items, either individually or collectively, need to be investigated in order to determine if groundwaters at UMTRA Project sites are Class III. This document provides a framework for the DOE to determine Class III groundwaters.

Not Available

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

Saurwein, John

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Final Proposal : Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study and Documentation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Section 7(b)(2) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Northwest Power Act), 16 U.S.C. {section} 839e(b)(2), directs the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to conduct, after July 1, 1985, a comparison of the projected rates to be charged its preference and Federal agency customers for their firm power requirements, over the rate test period plus the ensuing 4 years, with the costs of power (hereafter called rates) to those customers for the same time period if certain assumptions are made. The effect of this rate test is to protect BPA's preference and Federal agency customers wholesale firm power rates from certain specified costs resulting from certain provisions of the Northwest Power Act. The rate test can result in a reallocation of costs from the general requirements loads of preference and Federal agency customers to other BPA loads. The rate test involves the projection and comparison of two sets of wholesale power rates for the general requirement loads of BPA's public body, cooperative, and Federal agency customers (collectively, the 7(b)(2) Customers). The two sets of rates are: (1) a set for the test period and the ensuing four years assuming that Section 7(b)(2) is not in effect (known as Program Case rates); and (2) a set for the same period taking into account the five assumptions listed in section 7(b)(2) (known as 7(b)(2) Case rates). Certain specified costs allocated pursuant to section 7(g) of the Northwest Power Act are subtracted from the Program Case rates. Next, each nominal rate is discounted to the beginning of the test period of the relevant rate case. The discounted Program Case rates are averaged, as are the 7(b)(2) Case rates. Both averages are rounded to the nearest tenth of a mill for comparison. If the average of the Program Case rates is greater than the average of the 7(b)(2) Case rates, the rate test triggers. The difference between the average of the Program Case rates and the average of the 7(b)(2) Case rates determines the amount to be reallocated from the 7(b)(2) Customers to other BPA loads in the rate test period. The purpose of this Study is to describe the application of the ''Section 7(b)(2) Implementation Methodology (Implementation Methodology)'' and the results of such application. The accompanying Section 7(b)(2) Rate Test Study Documentation, WP-07-FS-BPA-06A, contains the documentation of the computer models and data used to perform the 7(b)(2) rate test. This Study is organized into three major sections. The first section provides an introduction to the study, as well as a summary of the section ''7(b)(2) Legal Interpretation and Implementation Methodology''. The second section describes the methodology used in conducting the rate test. It provides a discussion of the calculations performed to project the two sets of power rates that are compared in the rate test. The third section presents a summary of the results of the rate test for the WP-07 Final Rate Proposal.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Final Project Report for project titled "Fluoroalkylphosphonic-acid-based proton conductors"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this research was to create new proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for use in energy conversion devices including hydrogen fuel cells that could operate at high temperatures (95-130 C) and under low relative humidity (< 50% RH) conditions. The new polymers were based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) groups (see illustration below) which offer prospects for rapid proton transport by a proton-hopping mechanism similar to that which operates in phosphoric acid, a well-known proton-transporting electrolyte that is used in a class of hydrogen fuel cells that work well under the conditions noted above and are already commercially successful. The two specific project objectives were as follows: (1) synthesize and characterize new proton-conducting electrolytes based on the fluoroalkylphosphonic and phosphinic acid (FPA) functional groups; and (2) create and apply new computer models to study protonic conduction in FPA-based electrolytes. The project was successful in creating the desired polymer electrolytes and also a series of molecular model compounds which were used to study proton transport in FPA electrolytes in general. Computer models were created to study both structure and proton-transport dynamics in the electrolytes, particularly the molecular model compounds. Rapid proton transport by a hopping mechanism was found in many of the model compounds and correlations with transport rates with molecular structure were identified. Several polymeric analogs of FPA model compounds were prepared and studied, however FPA-based polymeric materials having very high protonic conductivities under either wet or dry conditions were not obtained. Several possible reasons for the failure of polymeric materials to exhibit the expected high protonic conductivities were identified, including a failure of the polymers to adopt the phase-separated secondary structure/morphology necessary for high proton conductivity, and an unexpected polymer crosslinking effect of acidic groups having two P-OH groups. The project has lent insight into how FPA groups transport protons in both liquid and polymeric forms, which provides guidance to future efforts to design and prepare future generations of proton-conducting polymer electrolytes for hydrogen fuel cells and other types of electrochemical energy conversion and storage devices.

Stephen Creager

2011-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

315

SAE J2579 Validation Testing Program: Powertech Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Safety Working Group at the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has developed a new 'systems-level' document for hydrogen vehicles. This document, SAE TIR J2579, is a new approach to certification standards for components. The document eliminates the need for dozens of test samples, tested in isolation from each other. SAE TIR J2579 describes the components which create the 'high-pressure envelope', the components whose primary function is the containment of the high-pressure hydrogen on-board the vehicle, and has created a sequential test based on those specific components.

McDougall, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Zachary-Fort Lauderdale pipeline construction and conversion project: final supplement to final environmental impact statement. Docket No. CP74-192  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Supplement to the Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final Supplement) evaluates the economic, engineering, and environmental aspects of newly developed alternatives to an abandonment/conversion project proposed by Florida Gas Transmission Company (Florida Gas). It also updates the staff's previous FEIS and studies revisions to the original proposal. Wherever possible, the staff has adopted portions of its previous FEIS in lieu of reprinting portions of that analysis which require no change. 60 references, 8 figures, 35 tables.

None

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Coal slurry letdown valve-concept test phase. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of the concept test phase of a novel pressure letdown device indicate usefulness of the concept. The device, using staged letdown, was designed to minimize erosion damage by minimizing slurry velocities through the pressure restrictions. Tests were performed on air, steam/water and a coal slurry with a flashing component. Two valve sizes were used. Based on the results of these tests, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) the basic operating principle of designing for a constant velocity through the orifice restrictions is correct; (2) multiphase pressure letdown can be modeled; (3) temperature profiles are predictable; and (4) erosion in three-phase flow is a complex phenomenon. Recommendations for further work on the device include: (1) development of a controllable device; (2) correlation of further test data; and (3) study of flow regimes where erosion is minimized. 9 refs., 48 figs., 6 tabs.

Collins, E.R. Jr.; Suitor, J.W.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Demonstration, testing, & evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Draft final report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a draft final report (Volume 1) for US DOE contract entitled, {open_quotes}Demonstration Testing and Evaluation of In Situ Soil Heating,{close_quotes} Contract No. DE-AC05-93OR22160, IITRI Project No. C06787. This report is presented in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cu. yd. of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. When scaled up, this process can be used for the environmental clean up and restoration of DOE sites contaminated with VOCs and other organic chemicals boiling up to 120{degrees} to 130{degrees}C in the vadose zone. Although it may applied to many types of soil formations, it is particularly attractive for low permeability clayey soil where conventional in situ venting techniques are limited by low air flow.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Saboto, W.

1996-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResourcesFLASH2011-11-OPAMFY 2007 TotalFinal Design Review Module March7,Generating

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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321

Final Report_Production Hydrualic Packer Test.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office ProgramsFinal7,Administrator'sCENTER

322

Final Test Report for BioCOPE.PDF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicyFeasibilityField Office Final Tank Closure and Waste Management33

323

Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

Morris, R.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Continuous fiber ceramic composite cladding for commercial water reactor fuel; Final Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is a research effort to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of an improved ceramics-based cladding material for water reactor fuel, which will be significantly more resistant to structural damage during a LOCA accident than the current Zircaloy cladding material. Specifically, the goal of this NERI project is to determine, via engineering type tests, the feasibility of substituting such advanced ceramic materials for the Zircaloy cladding now in use. This report presents the project research and development activities, which included prototype material design, fabrication, characterization, LOCA type of thermal shock testing, and in-reactor irradiation/corrosion testing. The report also presents the technical finding and discussions of results. The technical task were performed in collaboration with four subcontractors: The Advanced Materials Section of McDermott Technology Incorporated (MTI), the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory of Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MTI), Swales Aerospace Inc., and the Thin Film Laboratory of Northwestern University.

Herbert Feinroth

2001-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Barber-Nichols has completed the design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below ground test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility to attract the largest number of potential users. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

East Mesa geothermal pump test facility (EMPTF). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design, fabrication and installation of a geothermal pump test facility (EMPFT) at the DOE geothermal site at East Mesa, California which is capable of testing 70 to 750 horsepower downwell pumps in a controlled geothermal environment were completed. The facility consists of a skid-mounted brine control module, a 160 foot below test well section, a hydraulic turbine for power recovery, a gantry-mounted hoist for pump handling and a 3-phase, 480 VAC, 1200 amp power supply to handle pump electric requirements. Geothermal brine is supplied to the EMPTF from one of the facility wells at East Mesa. The EMPTF is designed with a great amount of flexibility. The 20-inch diameter test well can accommodate a wide variety of pumps. The controls are interactive and can be adjusted to obtain a full complement of pump operation data, or set to maintain constant conditions to allow long-term testing with a minimum of operator support. The hydraulic turbine allows the EMPTF user to recover approximately 46% of the input pump power to help defray the operating cost of the unit. The hoist is provided for material handling and pump servicing and reduces the equipment that the user must supply for pump installation, inspection and removal.

Olander, R.G.; Roberts, G.K.

1984-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Resource Contingency Program - Oregon : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hermiston Power Project.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) has statutory responsibilities to supply electrical power to its utility, industrial, and other customers in the Pacific Northwest. In 1990, to cover the outer range of potential load growth with new resources, BPA embarked upon the Resource Contingency Program (RCP). Instead of buying or building generating plants now, BPA has purchased options to acquire power later, if and when it is needed. The decision to acquire any of these option energy projects to fulfill statutory supply obligations will be influenced by Federal system load growth, the outcome of BPA`s Business Plan, required operational changes in Columbia-Snake River Hydroelectric facilities, and the loss of major generating resources. In September 1993, three option development agreements were signed with three proposed natural gas-fired, combined cycle combustion turbine CT projects near Chehalis and Satsop, Washington, and near Hermiston, Oregon. Together these three projects could supply BPA with 1,090 average megawatts (aMW) of power. Under these agreements, sponsors are obtaining permits and conducting project design work, and BPA is completing this EIS process. In September 1993, BPA published a Notice of Intent to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) on these three proposed gas-fired combustion turbine projects and held public scoping meetings in October 1993 at each site. In February 1994, BPA released an Implementation Plan on the proposed scope of the EIS. A draft EIS on the three proposed projects was published in February 1995. The impacts of the Chehalis and Satsop projects located in Washington State will be covered in one EIS document, while the impacts of the Hermiston project located in Oregon are covered in this final EIS document. It is BPA`s intent to continue to base the analysis of impacts on the assumption that all three projects may be constructed at some point in the future.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Repository-relevant testing applied to the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A repository environment poses a challenge to developing a testing program because of the diverse nature of conditions that may exist at a given time during the life of the repository. A starting point is to identify whether any potential waste-water contact modes are particularly deleterious to the waste form performance, and whether any interactions between materials present in the waste package environment need to be accounted for during modeling the waste form reaction. The Unsaturated Test method in one approach that has been developed by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to investigate the above issues, and a description of results that have been obtained during the testing of glass and unirradiated UO{sub 2} are the subject of this report. 10 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Veleckis, E.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Research on droplet formation for application to kraft black liquors---Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to generate technical data to guide the design of new nozzles for kraft black liquor recovery boilers. The goal of new nozzle designs would be to narrow the droplet size distribution compared to current nozzles and to adjust for changing black liquor properties and production requirements. Uniform droplets in a recovery boiler should reduce fouling of superheater tubes and caused a more efficient burning of the black liquor, both of which result in improved energy efficiency. The research was organized into five tasks which are described in the next chapter. This fifth and final project report contains the details of Task 4 and 5 and further analysis of Task 1 results. The details of the other tasks are reported in previous technical reports. The major results from the entire project are highlighted in this section in order of significance.

Bousfield, D.W.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Wireless Roadside Inspection Proof of Concept Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) FMCSA commissioned the Wireless Roadside Inspection (WRI) Program to validate technologies and methodologies that can improve safety through inspections using wireless technologies that convey real-time identification of commercial vehicles, drivers, and carriers, as well as information about the condition of the vehicles and their drivers. It is hypothesized that these inspections will: -- Increase safety -- Decrease the number of unsafe commercial vehicles on the road; -- Increase efficiency -- Speed up the inspection process, enabling more inspections to occur, at least on par with the number of weight inspections; -- Improve effectiveness -- Reduce the probability of drivers bypassing CMV inspection stations and increase the likelihood that fleets will attempt to meet the safety regulations; and -- Benefit industry -- Reduce fleet costs, provide good return-on-investment, minimize wait times, and level the playing field. The WRI Program is defined in three phases which are: Phase 1: Proof of Concept Test (POC) Testing of commercially available off-the-shelf (COTS) or near-COTS technology to validate the wireless inspection concept. Phase 2: Pilot Test Safety technology maturation and back office system integration Phase 3: Field Operational Test Multi-vehicle testing over a multi-state instrumented corridor This report focuses on Phase 1 efforts that were initiated in March, 2006. Technical efforts dealt with the ability of a Universal Wireless Inspection System (UWIS) to collect driver, vehicle, and carrier information; format a Safety Data Message Set from this information; and wirelessly transmit a Safety Data Message Set to a roadside receiver unit or mobile enforcement vehicle.

Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Knee, Helmut E [ORNL; Plate, Randall S [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Final Technical Report of project: "Contactless Real-Time Monitoring of Paper Mechanical Behavior During Papermaking"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The early precursors of laser ultrasonics on paper were Prof. Y. Berthelot from the Georgia Institute of Technology/Mechanical Engineering department, and Prof. P. Brodeur from the Institute of Paper Science and Technology, both located in Atlanta, Georgia. The first Ph.D. thesis that shed quite some light on the topic, but also left some questions unanswered, was completed by Mont A. Johnson in 1996. Mont Johnson was Prof. Berthelot's student at Georgia Tech. In 1997 P. Brodeur proposed a project involving himself, Y. Berthelot, Dr. Ken Telschow and Mr. Vance Deason from INL, Honeywell-Measurex and Dr. Rick Russo from LBNL. The first time the proposal was not accepted and P. Brodeur decided to re-propose it without the involvement from LBNL. Rick Russo proposed a separate project on the same topic on his side. Both proposals were finally accepted and work started in the fall of 1997 on the two projects. Early on, the biggest challenge was to find an optical detection method which could detect laser-induced displacements of the web surface that are of the order of .1 micron in the ultrasonic range. This was to be done while the web was having an out-of-plane amplitude of motion in the mm range due to web flutter; while moving at 10 m/s to 30 m/s in the plane of the web, on the paper machine. Both teams grappled with the same problems and tried similar methods in some cases, but came up with two similar but different solutions one year later. The IPST, GT, INL team found that an interferometer made by Lasson Technologies Inc. using the photo-induced electro-motive force in Gallium Arsenide was able to detect ultrasonic waves up to 12-15 m/s. It also developed in house an interferometer using the Two-Wave Mixing effect in photorefractive crystals that showed good promises for on-line applications, and experimented with a scanning mirror to reduce motion-induced texture noise from the web and improve signal to noise ratio. On its side, LBNL had the idea to combine a commercial Mach-Zehnder interferometer to a spinning mirror synchronized to the web speed, in order to make almost stationary measurements. The method was demonstrated at up to 10 m/s. Both teams developed their own version of a web simulator that was driving a web of paper at 10 m/s or higher. The Department of Energy and members of the Agenda 2020 started to make a push for merging the two projects. This made sense because their topics were really identical but this was not well received by Prof. Brodeur. Finally IPST decided to reassign the direction of the IPST-INL-GT project in the spring of 1999 to Prof. Chuck Habeger so that the two teams could work together. Also at this time, Honeywell-Measurex dropped as a member of the team. It was replaced by ABB Industrial Systems whose engineers had extensive previous experience of working with ultrasonic sensors on paperboard. INL also finished its work on the project as its competencies were partly redundant with LBNL. From the summer of 1999, the IPST-GT and LBNL teams were working together and helped each other often by collaborating and visiting either laboratory when was necessary. Around the beginning of 2000, began an effort at IPST to create an off-line laser-ultrasonics instrument that could perform automated measurements of paper and paperboard's bending stiffness. It was widely known that the mechanical bending tests of paper used for years by the paper industry were very inaccurate and exhibited poor reproducibility; therefore the team needed a new instrument of reference to validate its future on-line results. In 1999-2000, the focus of the on-line instrument was on a pre-industrial demonstration on a pilot coater while reducing the damage to the web caused by the generation laser, below the threshold where it could be visible by the naked eye. During the spring of 2000 Paul Ridgway traveled to IPST and brought with him a redesigned system still using the same Mach-Zehnder interferometer as before, but this time employing an electric motor-driven spinning mirror instead of the previously belt-driven m

Emmanuel Lafond; Paul Ridgway; Ted Jackson; Rick Russo; Ken Telschow; Vance Deason; Yves Berthelot; David Griggs; Xinya Zhang; Gary Baum

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

334

UHM/HNEI EV test and evaluation program. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electric vehicle (EV) program of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) focuses primarily on the field testing of promising EV/traction batteries. The intent is to utilize typical driving cycles to develop information that verifies or refutes what is obtained in the laboratory. Three different types of battery were assigned by the US DOE for testing in this program: Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160, Exide GC-5, Trojan T-145. We added the following battery to the test program: ALCO2200. HNEI`s existing EVs were utilized as test beds. The following EVs were chosen in our program: Converted Ford Escort station wagon, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Dodge van (typically daily driving distances, 10--30 miles). Capacity testing is a very effective way of monitoring the status of battery modules. Based on capacity tests, corrective action such as battery replacement, additional charging, adjusting terminal connections, etc., may be taken to maintain good performance. About 15,500 miles and 600 cycles have been accumulated on the Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160 battery pack. Five of its 18 modules have been changed. Based on DOE`s standard, the battery has reached the end of its useful life. Nevertheless, the battery pack is still operational and its operating range is still greater than 40 miles per charge. It is too early to evaluate the life expectancy of the other three batteries, the Trojan T-145, Exide GC-5, and Alco 2200. No module has been replaced in these three packs. The Trojan T-145 battery is a very promising EV traction battery in terms of quality and reliability versus price. HNEI will keep the Trojan and Exide battery packs in operation. The Alco 2200 batteries will be transferred to another vehicle. The Additional Charging Method seems to be an effective way of restoring weak modules. The ``Smart Voltmeter`` developed by HNEI is a promising way of monitoring the remaining range for an EV.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Prototype Spallation Neutron Source Rotating Target Assembly Final Test Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full-scale prototype of an extended vertical shaft, rotating target assembly based on a conceptual target design for a 1 to 3-MW spallation facility was built and tested. Key elements of the drive/coupling assembly implemented in the prototype include high integrity dynamic face seals, commercially available bearings, realistic manufacturing tolerances, effective monitoring and controls, and fail-safe shutdown features. A representative target disk suspended on a 3.5 meter prototypical shaft was coupled with the drive to complete the mechanical tests. Successful operation for 5400 hours confirmed the overall mechanical feasibility of the extended vertical shaft rotating target concept. The prototype system showed no indications of performance deterioration and the equipment did not require maintenance or relubrication.

McManamy, Thomas J [ORNL; Graves, Van [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Garmendia, Amaia Zarraoa [IDOM Bilbao; Sorda, Fernando [ESS Bilbao; Etxeita, Borja [IDOM Bilbao; Rennich, Mark J [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Final report : testing and evaluation for solar hot water reliability.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar hot water (SHW) systems are being installed by the thousands. Tax credits and utility rebate programs are spurring this burgeoning market. However, the reliability of these systems is virtually unknown. Recent work by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that few data exist to quantify the mean time to failure of these systems. However, there is keen interest in developing new techniques to measure SHW reliability, particularly among utilities that use ratepayer money to pay the rebates. This document reports on an effort to develop and test new, simplified techniques to directly measure the state of health of fielded SHW systems. One approach was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and is based on the idea that the performance of the solar storage tank can reliably indicate the operational status of the SHW systems. Another approach, developed by the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses adaptive resonance theory, a type of neural network, to detect and predict failures. This method uses the same sensors that are normally used to control the SHW system. The NREL method uses two additional temperature sensors on the solar tank. The theories, development, application, and testing of both methods are described in the report. Testing was performed on the SHW Reliability Testbed at UNM, a highly instrumented SHW system developed jointly by SNL and UNM. The two methods were tested against a number of simulated failures. The results show that both methods show promise for inclusion in conventional SHW controllers, giving them advanced capability in detecting and predicting component failures.

Caudell, Thomas P. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Menicucci, David F. (Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM) [Building Specialists, Inc., Albuquerque, NM; Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM) [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM; Burch, Jay (National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO) [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Field testing advanced geothermal turbodrill (AGT). Phase 1 final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Maurer Engineering developed special high-temperature geothermal turbodrills for LANL in the 1970s to overcome motor temperature limitations. These turbodrills were used to drill the directional portions of LANL`s Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Wells at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. The Hot Dry Rock concept is to drill parallel inclined wells (35-degree inclination), hydraulically fracture between these wells, and then circulate cold water down one well and through the fractures and produce hot water out of the second well. At the time LANL drilled the Fenton Hill wells, the LANL turbodrill was the only motor in the world that would drill at the high temperatures encountered in these wells. It was difficult to operate the turbodrills continuously at low speed due to the low torque output of the LANL turbodrills. The turbodrills would stall frequently and could only be restarted by lifting the bit off bottom. This allowed the bit to rotate at very high speeds, and as a result, there was excessive wear in the bearings and on the gauge of insert roller bits due to these high rotary speeds. In 1998, Maurer Engineering developed an Advanced Geothermal Turbodrill (AGT) for the National Advanced Drilling and Excavation Technology (NADET) at MIT by adding a planetary speed reducer to the LANL turbodrill to increase its torque and reduce its rotary speed. Drilling tests were conducted with the AGT using 12 1/2-inch insert roller bits in Texas Pink Granite. The drilling tests were very successful, with the AGT drilling 94 ft/hr in Texas Pink Granite compared to 45 ft/hr with the LANL turbodrill and 42 ft/hr with a rotary drill. Field tests are currently being planned in Mexico and in geothermal wells in California to demonstrate the ability of the AGT to increase drilling rates and reduce drilling costs.

Maurer, W.C.; Cohen, J.H.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

2014-04-10 Issuance: Test Procedures for Refrigerators, Refrigerator-Freezers, and Freezers; Final Rule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding test procedures for residential refrigerators and freezers, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on April 10, 2014.

340

Advanced ThioClear process testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wet scrubbing is the leading proven commercial post-combustion FGD technology available to meet the sulfur dioxide reductions required by the Clean Air Act Amendments. To reduce costs associated with wet FGD, Dravo Lime Company has developed the ThioClear process. ThioClear is an ex-situ forced oxidation magnesium-enhanced lime FGD process. ThioClear process differs from the conventional magnesium-enhanced lime process in that the recycle liquor has minimal suspended solids and the by-products are wallboard quality gypsum and magnesium hydroxide, an excellent reagent for water treatment. The process has demonstrated sulfur dioxide removal efficiencies of +95% in both a vertical spray scrubber tower and a horizontal absorber operating at gas velocities of 16 fps, respectively. This report details the optimization studies and associated economics from testing conducted at Dravo Lime Company`s pilot plant located at the Miami Fort Station of the Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company.

Lani, B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Proposed modifications to the Lower Mokelumne River Project, California: FERC Project No. 2916-004. Final environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final environmental impact statement (FEIS) has been prepared for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) to consider modifications to the existing Lower Mokelumne River Project (LMRP) (FERC Project No. 2916-004) in California. Chinook salmon and steelhead trout populations in the lower Mokelumne River have experienced recent declines and fish kills associated, in part, with discharges from Camanche Dam. The California Department of Fish and Game and the California Sportfishing Protection Alliance have asked the Commission to investigate and correct these problems. A wide range of different mitigation actions has been proposed by parties participating in the scoping of this proceeding, and staff has evaluated these proposed actions in this assessment. The staff is recommending a combination of flow and non-flow modifications to the existing license, including new minimum flow and minimum pool elevation requirements at Camanche Reservoir, ramping rates on dam releases, interim attraction and out-migrant spike flows, instream habitat improvements, and a series of studies and monitoring to determine feasible means for solving off-site fish passage problems.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Smart Infrared Inspection System Field Operational Test Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Smart InfraRed Inspection System (SIRIS) is a tool designed to assist inspectors in determining which vehicles passing through the SIRIS system are in need of further inspection by measuring the thermal data from the wheel components. As a vehicle enters the system, infrared cameras on the road measure temperatures of the brakes, tires, and wheel bearings on both wheel ends of commercial motor vehicles (CMVs) in motion. This thermal data is then presented to enforcement personal inside of the inspection station on a user friendly interface. Vehicles that are suspected to have a violation are automatically alerted to the enforcement staff. The main goal of the SIRIS field operational test (FOT) was to collect data to evaluate the performance of the prototype system and determine the viability of such a system being used for commercial motor vehicle enforcement. From March 2010 to September 2010, ORNL facilitated the SIRIS FOT at the Greene County Inspection Station (IS) in Greeneville, Tennessee. During the course of the FOT, 413 CMVs were given a North American Standard (NAS) Level-1 inspection. Of those 413 CMVs, 384 were subjected to a SIRIS screening. A total of 36 (9.38%) of the vehicles were flagged by SIRIS as having one or more thermal issues; with brakes issues making up 33 (91.67%) of those. Of the 36 vehicles flagged as having thermal issues, 31 (86.11%) were found to have a violation and 30 (83.33%) of those vehicles were placed out-of-service (OOS). Overall the enforcement personnel who have used SIRIS for screening purposes have had positive feedback on the potential of SIRIS. With improvements in detection algorithms and stability, the system will be beneficial to the CMV enforcement community and increase overall trooper productivity by accurately identifying a higher percentage of CMVs to be placed OOS with minimal error. No future evaluation of SIRIS has been deemed necessary and specifications for a production system will soon be drafted.

Siekmann, Adam [ORNL; Capps, Gary J [ORNL; Franzese, Oscar [ORNL; Lascurain, Mary Beth [ORNL

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Final Report for "Community Petascale Project for Accelerator Science and Simulations".  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report describes the work that has been accomplished over the past 5 years under the Community Petascale Project for Accelerator and Simulations (ComPASS) at Tech-X Corporation. Tech-X had been involved in the full range of ComPASS activities with simulation of laser plasma accelerator concepts, mainly in collaboration with LOASIS program at LBNL, simulation of coherent electron cooling in collaboration with BNL, modeling of electron clouds in high intensity accelerators, in collaboration with researchers at Fermilab and accurate modeling of superconducting RF cavity in collaboration with Fermilab, JLab and Cockcroft Institute in the UK.

Cary, J. R.; Bruhwiler, D. L.; Stoltz, P. H.; Cormier-Michel, E.; Cowan, B.; Schwartz, B. T.; Bell, G.; Paul, K.; Veitzer, S.

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

344

[Tampa Electric Company IGCC project]. Final public design report; Technical progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final Public Design Report (PDR) provides completed design information about Tampa Electric Company`s Polk Power Station Unit No. 1, which will demonstrate in a commercial 250 MW unit the operating parameters and benefits of the integration of oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification with advanced combined cycle technology. Pending development of technically and commercially viable sorbent for the Hot Gas Cleanup System, the HGCU also is demonstrated. The report is organized under the following sections: design basis description; plant descriptions; plant systems; project costs and schedule; heat and material balances; general arrangement drawings; equipment list; and miscellaneous drawings.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Terahertz spectral signatures :measurement and detection LDRD project 86361 final report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LDRD Project 86361 provided support to upgrade the chemical and material spectral signature measurement and detection capabilities of Sandia National Laboratories using the terahertz (THz) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, which includes frequencies between 0.1 to 10 THz. Under this project, a THz time-domain spectrometer was completed. This instrument measures sample absorption spectra coherently, obtaining both magnitude and phase of the absorption signal, and has shown an operating signal-to-noise ratio of 10{sub 4}. Additionally, various gas cells and a reflectometer were added to an existing high-resolution THz Fourier transform spectrometer, which greatly extend the functionality of this spectrometer. Finally, preliminary efforts to design an integrated THz transceiver based on a quantum cascade laser were begun.

Wanke, Michael Clement; Brener, Igal; Lee, Mark

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Final Technical Report: Controlled Hydrogen Fleet and Infrastructure Demonstration and Validation Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-FC36-04GO14285 by Mercedes-Benz & Research Development, North America (MBRDNA), Chrysler, Daimler, Mercedes Benz USA (MBUSA), BP, DTE Energy and NextEnergy to validate fuel cell technologies for infrastructure, transportation as well as assess technology and commercial readiness for the market. The Mercedes Team, together with its partners, tested the technology by operating and fueling hydrogen fuel cell vehicles under real world conditions in varying climate, terrain and driving conditions. Vehicle and infrastructure data was collected to monitor the progress toward the hydrogen vehicle and infrastructure performance targets of $2.00 to 3.00/gge hydrogen production cost and 2,000-hour fuel cell durability. Finally, to prepare the public for a hydrogen economy, outreach activities were designed to promote awareness and acceptance of hydrogen technology. DTE, BP and NextEnergy established hydrogen filling stations using multiple technologies for on-site hydrogen generation, storage and dispensing. DTE established a hydrogen station in Southfield, Michigan while NextEnergy and BP worked together to construct one hydrogen station in Detroit. BP constructed another fueling station in Burbank, California and provided a full-time hydrogen trailer at San Francisco, California and a hydrogen station located at Los Angeles International Airport in Southern, California. Stations were operated between 2005 and 2011. The Team deployed 30 Gen I Fuel Cell Vehicles (FCVs) in the beginning of the project. While 28 Gen I F-CELLs used the A-Class platform, the remaining 2 were Sprinter delivery vans. Fuel cell vehicles were operated by external customers for real-world operations in various regions (ecosystems) to capture various driving patterns and climate conditions (hot, moderate and cold). External operators consisted of F-CELL partner organizations in California and Michigan ranging from governmental organizations, for-profit to and non-profit entities. All vehicles were equipped with a data acquisition system that automatically collected statistically relevant data for submission to National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), which monitored the progress of the fuel cell vehicles against the DOE technology validation milestones. The Mercedes Team also provided data from Gen-II vehicles under the similar operations as Gen I vehicles to compare technology maturity during program duration.

Ronald Grasman

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Independent management and financial review, Yucca Mountain Project, Nevada. Final report, Appendix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (Public Law 97-425), as amended by Public Law 100-203, December 22, 1987, established the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the Department of Energy (DOE), and directed the Office to investigate a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to determine if this site is suitable for the construction of a repository for the disposal of high level nuclear waste. Work on site characterization has been under way for several years. Thus far, about $1.47 billion have been spent on Yucca Mountain programs. This work has been funded by Congressional appropriations from a Nuclear Waste Fund to which contributions have been made by electric utility ratepayers through electric utilities generating power from nuclear power stations. The Secretary of Energy and the Governor of the State of Nevada have appointed one person each to a panel to oversee an objective, independent financial and management evaluation of the Yucca Mountain Project. The Requirements for the work will include an analysis of (1) the Yucca Mountain financial and, contract management techniques and controls; (2) Project schedules and credibility of the proposed milestones; (3) Project organizational effectiveness and internal planning processes, and (4) adequacy of funding levels and funding priorities, including the cost of infrastructure and scientific studies. The recipient will provide monthly progress report and the following reports/documents will be presented as deliverables under the contract: (1) Financial and Contract Management Preliminary Report; (2) Project Scheduling Preliminary Report; (3)Project Organizational Effectiveness Preliminary Report; (4) Project Funding Levels and Funding Priorities Preliminary Report; and (5) Final Report.

NONE

1995-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Advanced secondary recovery project for the Sooner D Sand Unit, Weld County, Colorado: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to increase production at the Sooner D Sand Unit through geologically targeted infill drilling and improved reservoir management of waterflood operations. The Sooner D Sand Unit demonstration project should be an example for other operators to follow for reservoir characterization and exploitation methodologies to increase production by waterflood from the Cretaceous D Sandstone in the Denver-Julesburg (D-J) Basin. This project involved multi-disciplinary reservoir characterization using high-density 3D seismic, detailed stratigraphy and reservoir simulation studies. Infill drilling, water-injection conversion and re-completing some wells to add short-radius laterals were based on the results of the reservoir characterization studies. Production response were evaluated using reservoir simulation and production tests. Technology transfer utilized workshops, presentations and technical papers which emphasized the economic advantages of implementing the demonstrated technologies.

Sippel, M.A.; Cammon, T.J.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

FinalReport for completed IPP-0110 and 0110A Projects:"High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE-supported IPP (Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention) Project, IPP-0110, and its accompanying 'add-on project' IPP-0110A, entitled 'High Energy Ion Technology of Interfacial Thin Film Coatings for Electronic, Optical and Industrial Applications' was a collaborative project involving the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the U.S. DOE lab; the US surface modification company, Phygen, Inc., as the US private company involved; and the High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk, Siberia, Russia, as the NIS Institute involved. Regular scientific research progress meetings were held to which personnel came from all participating partners. The meetings were held mostly at the Phygen facilities in Minneapolis, Minnesota (with Phygen as host) with meetings also held at Tomsk, Russia (HCEI as host), and at Berkeley, California (LBNL as host) In this way, good exposure of all researchers to the various different laboratories involved was attained. This report contains the Final Reports (final deliverables) from the Russian Institute, HCEI. The first part is that for IPP-0110A (the 'main part' of the overall project) and the second part is that for the add-on project IPP-0110A. These reports are detailed, and contain all aspects of all the research carried out. The project was successful in that all deliverables as specified in the proposals were successfully developed, tested, and delivered to Phygen. All of the plasma hardware was designed, made and tested at HCEI, and the performance was excellent. Some of the machine and performance parameters were certainly of 'world class'. The goals and requirements of the IPP Project were well satisfied. I would like to express my gratitude to the DOE IPP program for support of this project throughout its entire duration, and for the unparalleled opportunity thereby provided for all of the diverse participants in the project to join in this collaborative research. The benefits are superb, as measured in quite a number of different ways.

Brown, Ian

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

Operational test report -- Project W-320 cathodic protection systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems.

Bowman, T.J.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

352

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Final report on LDRD project : single-photon-sensitive imaging detector arrays at 1600 nm.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The key need that this project has addressed is a short-wave infrared light detector for ranging (LIDAR) imaging at temperatures greater than 100K, as desired by nonproliferation and work for other customers. Several novel device structures to improve avalanche photodiodes (APDs) were fabricated to achieve the desired APD performance. A primary challenge to achieving high sensitivity APDs at 1550 nm is that the small band-gap materials (e.g., InGaAs or Ge) necessary to detect low-energy photons exhibit higher dark counts and higher multiplication noise compared to materials like silicon. To overcome these historical problems APDs were designed and fabricated using separate absorption and multiplication (SAM) regions. The absorption regions used (InGaAs or Ge) to leverage these materials 1550 nm sensitivity. Geiger mode detection was chosen to circumvent gain noise issues in the III-V and Ge multiplication regions, while a novel Ge/Si device was built to examine the utility of transferring photoelectrons in a silicon multiplication region. Silicon is known to have very good analog and GM multiplication properties. The proposed devices represented a high-risk for high-reward approach. Therefore one primary goal of this work was to experimentally resolve uncertainty about the novel APD structures. This work specifically examined three different designs. An InGaAs/InAlAs Geiger mode (GM) structure was proposed for the superior multiplication properties of the InAlAs. The hypothesis to be tested in this structure was whether InAlAs really presented an advantage in GM. A Ge/Si SAM was proposed representing the best possible multiplication material (i.e., silicon), however, significant uncertainty existed about both the Ge material quality and the ability to transfer photoelectrons across the Ge/Si interface. Finally a third pure germanium GM structure was proposed because bulk germanium has been reported to have better dark count properties. However, significant uncertainty existed about the quantum efficiency at 1550 nm the necessary operating temperature. This project has resulted in several conclusions after fabrication and measurement of the proposed structures. We have successfully demonstrated the Ge/Si proof-of-concept in producing high analog gain in a silicon region while absorbing in a Ge region. This has included significant Ge processing infrastructure development at Sandia. However, sensitivity is limited at low temperatures due to high dark currents that we ascribe to tunneling. This leaves remaining uncertainty about whether this structure can achieve the desired performance with further development. GM detection in InGaAs/InAlAs, Ge/Si, Si and pure Ge devices fabricated at Sandia was shown to overcome gain noise challenges, which represents critical learning that will enable Sandia to respond to future single photon detection needs. However, challenges to the operation of these devices in GM remain. The InAlAs multiplication region was not found to be significantly superior to current InP regions for GM, however, improved multiplication region design of InGaAs/InP APDs has been highlighted. For Ge GM detectors it still remains unclear whether an optimal trade-off of parameters can achieve the necessary sensitivity at 1550 nm. To further examine these remaining questions, as well as other application spaces for these technologies, funding for an Intelligence Community post-doc was awarded this year.

Childs, Kenton David; Serkland, Darwin Keith; Geib, Kent Martin; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Klem, John Frederick; Sheng, Josephine Juin-Jye; Patel, Rupal K.; Bolles, Desta; Bauer, Tom M.; Koudelka, Robert

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

BLAST FURNACE GRANULAR COAL INJECTION SYSTEM. Final Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bethlehem Steel Corporation (BSC) requested financial assistance from the Department of Energy (DOE), for the design, construction and operation of a 2,800-ton-per-day blast furnace granulated coal injection (BFGCI) system for two existing iron-making blast furnaces. The blast furnaces are located at BSC's facilities in Burns Harbor, Indiana. The demonstration project proposal was selected by the DOE and awarded to Bethlehem in November 1990. The design of the project was completed in December 1993 and construction was completed in January 1995. The equipment startup period continued to November 1995 at which time the operating and testing program began. The blast furnace test program with different injected coals was completed in December 1998.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

356

Macroencapsulation of mixed waste debris at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation -- Final project report by AST Environmental Services, LLC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of a full-scale demonstration of a high density polyethylene (HDPE) package, manufactured by Arrow Construction, Inc. of Montgomery, Alabama. The HDPE package, called ARROW-PAK, was designed and patented by Arrow as both a method to macroencapsulation of radioactively contaminated lead and as an improved form of waste package for treatment and interim and final storage and/or disposal of drums of mixed waste. Mixed waste is waste that is radioactive, and meets the criteria established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) for a hazardous material. Results from previous testing conducted for the Department of Energy (DOE) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in 1994 found that the ARROW-PAK fabrication process produces an HDPE package that passes all helium leak tests and drop tests, and is fabricated with materials impervious to the types of environmental factors encountered during the lifetime of the ARROW-PAK, estimated to be from 100 to 300 years. Arrow Construction, Inc. has successfully completed full-scale demonstration of its ARROW-PAK mixed waste macroencapsulation treatment unit at the DOE Hanford Site. This testing was conducted in accordance with Radiological Work Permit No. T-860, applicable project plans and procedures, and in close consultation with Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc.`s project management, health and safety, and quality assurance representatives. The ARROW-PAK field demonstration successfully treated 880 drums of mixed waste debris feedstock which were compacted and placed in 149 70-gallon overpack drums prior to macroencapsulation in accordance with the US EPA Alternate Debris Treatment Standards, 40 CFR 268.45. Based on all of the results, the ARROW-PAK process provides an effective treatment, storage and/or disposal option that compares favorably with current mixed waste management practices.

Baker, T.L.

1998-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the Comments and Responses to Comments volume of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report prepared for the proposed Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project (Final EIS/EIR). This volume of the Final EIS/EIR provides copies of the written comments received on the Draft EIS/EIR and the leady agency responses to those comments in conformance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The intermountain power project commissioning - Subsynchronous torsional interaction tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Subsyncronous torsional vibration as a result of electrochemical interaction between the HVDC controls and a turbine-generator was first discovered during the commissioning of the Square Butte Project in 1977. The level of interaction between the HVDC controls and the turbine-generator depends on several interacting factors: the characteristic torsional frequencies of the turbine-generator, the bandwidth of the HVDC controls and the relative strength of the connecting ac system. For the Intermountain Power Project (IPP), early analysis of these interacting factors indicated that there exist definite potential for subsynchronous oscillation to occur. The calculated torsional frequencies of the IPP units showed that the first mode frequency is 14.0 Hz and is within the typical bandwidth of an HVDC control which is between 10-20 Hz. The HVDC controls, therefore, can influence the torsional stability of the IPP units. Further, the IPP turbine-generators are required to operate isolated on the HVDC rectifier terminal, with no other interconnecting ac network. This ''radial'' mode of operation will result in maximum interaction between the converter station and the IPP units. It became obvious that special measure must be implemented in the design of the IPP HVDC control system to modify its typical characteristics to avoid the occurrence of the subsynchronous oscillation. This paper presents the results of the subsynchronous torsional interaction (SSTI) tests that were performed during the commissioning of the IPP Unit 1 and the HVDC Transmission system.

Wu, C.T.; Peterson, K.J. (Dept. of Water and Power, Los Angeles, CA (US)); Pinko, R.J.; Kankam, M.D.; Baker, D.H. (General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (US))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

HANFORD CONTAINERIZED CAST STONE FACILITY TASK 1 PROCESS TESTING & DEVELOPMENT FINAL TEST REPORT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory testing and technical evaluation activities on Containerized Cast Stone (CCS) were conducted under the Scope of Work (SOW) contained in CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) Contract No. 18548 (CHG 2003a). This report presents the results of testing and demonstration activities discussed in SOW Section 3.1, Task I--''Process Development Testing'', and described in greater detail in the ''Containerized Grout--Phase I Testing and Demonstration Plan'' (CHG, 2003b). CHG (2003b) divided the CCS testing and evaluation activities into six categories, as follows: (1) A short set of tests with simulant to select a preferred dry reagent formulation (DRF), determine allowable liquid addition levels, and confirm the Part 2 test matrix. (2) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF and a backup DRF, as selected in Part I, and using low activity waste (LAW) simulant. (3) Waste form performance testing on cast stone made from the preferred DRF using radioactive LAW. (4) Waste form validation testing on a selected nominal cast stone formulation using the preferred DRF and LAW simulant. (5) Engineering evaluations of explosive/toxic gas evolution, including hydrogen, from the cast stone product. (6) Technetium ''getter'' testing with cast stone made with LAW simulant and with radioactive LAW. In addition, nitrate leaching observations were drawn from nitrate leachability data obtained in the course of the Parts 2 and 3 waste form performance testing. The nitrate leachability index results are presented along with other data from the applicable activity categories.

LOCKREM, L L

2005-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

360

Environmental Assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped from the EA/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. A new drying process was subsequently developed and is analyzed in Section 2.1.2 of this document. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and acquisition of reservoir property measurements. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October, a contract was awarded for the Installation of a Devonian Shale Reservoir Testing Facility and Acquisition of Reservoir Property measurements from wells in the Michigan, Illinois, and Appalachian Basins. Geologic and engineering data collected through this project will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms and conditions controlling shale gas production. This report summarizes the results obtained from the various testing procedures used at each wellsite and the activities conducted at the Reservoir Testing Facility.

Locke, C.D.; Salamy, S.P.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Solar energy system performance evaluation - final report for Honeywell OTS 45, Salt River Project, Phoenix, Arizona  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the operation and technical performance of the Solar Operational Test Site (OTS 45) at Salt River Project in Phoenix, Arizona, based on the analysis of data collected between April 1981 and March 31, 1982. The following topics are discussed: system description, performance assessment, operating energy, energy savings, system maintenance, and conclusions. The solar energy system at OTS 45 is a hydronic heating and cooling system consisting of 8208 square feet of liquid-cooled flat-plate collectors; a 2500-gallon thermal storage tank; two 25-ton capacity organic Rankine-cycle-engine-assisted water chillers; a forced-draft cooling tower; and associated piping, pumps, valves, controls and heat rejection equipment. The solar system has eight basic modes of operation and several combination modes. The system operation is controlled automatically by a Honeywell-designed microprocessor-based control system, which also provides diagnostics. Based on the instrumented test data monitored and collected during the 8 months of the Operational Test Period, the solar system collected 1143 MMBtu of thermal energy of the total incident solar energy of 3440 MMBtu and provided 241 MMBtu for cooling and 64 MMBtu for heating. The projected net annual electrical energy savings due to the solar system was approximately 40,000 kWh(e).

Mathur, A K

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site: Final. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thorium 230 (Th-230) at the Gunnison, Colorado processing site will require remediation, however, a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table at the site significantly complicates conventional remedial action with respect to cleanup. Therefore, to effectively remediate the site with respect to Radium 226 (Ra-226) and Th-230, the following supplemental standard is proposed: In situ Ra-26 will be remediated to the EPA soil cleanup standards independent of groundwater considerations. In situ Th-230 concentrations will be remediated in the region above the encountered water table so the 1000-year projected Ra-226 concentration complies with the EPA soil cleanup concentration limits. If elevated Th-230 persists to the water table, an additional foot of excavation will be performed and the grid will be backfilled. Excavated grids will be backfilled to the final remedial action grade with clean cobbly soil. Final grid verification that is required below the water table will be performed by extracting and analyzing a single bulk soil sample with the bucket of a backhoe. Modeled surface radon flux values will be estimated and documented. A recommendation will be made that land records should be annotated to identify the presence of residual Th-230.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

Blaise Collin

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

AGR-2 irradiation test final as-run report, Rev. 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities; (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing; and, (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

Collin, Blaise P.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

HFC-134A and HCFC-22 supermarket refrigeration demonstration and laboratory testing. Phase I. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aspen Systems and a team of nineteen agencies and industry participants conducted a series of tests to determine the performance of HFC-134a, HCFC-22, and CFC-502 for supermarket application. This effort constitutes the first phase of a larger project aimed at carrying out both laboratory and demonstration tests of the most viable HFC refrigerants and the refrigerants they replace. The results of the Phase I effort are presented in the present report. The second phase of the project has also been completed. It centered on testing all viable HFC replacement refrigerants for CFC-502. These were HFC-507, HFC-404A, and HFC-407A. The latter results are published in the Phase II report for this project. As part of Phase I, a refrigeration rack utilizing a horizontal open drive screw compressor was constructed in our laboratory. This refrigeration rack is a duplicate of one we have installed in a supermarket in Clifton Park, NY.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Falls City, Texas, site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final audit report for the Falls City, Texas, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project site summarizes the radiological audits and the quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, audits, and final close-out inspection performed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC). It also summarizes U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) surveillances. One radiological audit and three radiological surveillances were performed at the Falls City site. These surveillances and audit, which resulted in 31 observations, focused primarily on processing site activities and were performed on the following dates: 3-6 August 1992, 29-30 October 1992, 22-26 March 1993, and 1-3 November 1993. All outstanding radiological issues were closed out at the completion of the construction activities. Six QA in-process surveillances, which resulted in 71 observations, were performed at the Falls City site on the following dates: 22-24 July 1992, 23-25 November 1992, 17-19 May 1993, 16-18 August 1993, 13-15 October 1993, and 2-4 February 1994. All outstanding issues were closed out with the February surveillance on 3 March 1994. The DOE/TAC remedial action close-out inspections of the Falls City site, which resulted in 56 observations, were conducted 9-10 June 1994 and 26 July 1994. The inspections were closed out on 26 January 1995. The NRC performed three on-site construction reviews (OSCR), resulting in seven observations of remedial action construction activities that occurred during site visits. The OSCRs were performed 9 December 1992, 12 May 1993, and 25 October 1993. Since all audit and surveillance observations and recommendations have been closed out, this final audit report segment of the site certification process is complete.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

AN E&E PUBLISHING SERVICE ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Tenn. project to test range of residential upgrades  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AN E&E PUBLISHING SERVICE ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Tenn. project to test range of residential upgrades has done on common residential construction near the Oak Ridge lab. In one such project, Christian

370

Recovery efficiency test project, Phase 2 activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency of gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. This volume contains appendices for: (1) supporting material and procedures for data frac'' stimulation of zone 6 using nitrogen and nitrogen foam; (2) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 1 nitrogen gas frac on zone no. 1; (3) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 2 in zone no. 1 using liquid CO{sub 2}; (4) supporting material and procedures for frac no. 3 on zone no.1 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (5) supporting material and procedures for stimulation no. 4 in zones 2--3 and 4 using nitrogen foam and proppant; (6) supporting materials and procedures for stimulation no. 5 in zones 5 and 8; and (7) fracture diagnostics reports and supporting materials.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Salamy, S.P.; Locke, C.D.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Use of Energy Management and Control Systems for Performance Monitoring of Retrofit Projects: Final Summary Report for USDOE Office of Conservation and Energy, Final Revision, March 1993  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ESL-TR-91/09-02 Use of Energy Management and Control Systems for Performance Monitoring of Retrofit Projects Final Summary Report Grant # DE-FG01-90CE21003 David E. Claridge, Ph.D., P.E., Co-Principal Investigator, Jeff S. Haberl, Ph.D., P.E., Co... for Appropriate Technology, Butte, Montana September 1991, First Revision March 1992, Final Revision March 1993 USDOE EMCS Report p. i 1.0 Executive Summary Traditionally, Energy Management and Control Systems (EMCSs) have been used to control HVAC, lighting, fire...

Claridge, D. E.; Haberl, J. S.; Sparks, R. J.; Bryant, J.; Poyner, B.; Belur, R.; Bryant, J.; Akbari, H.; Heinemeier, K. E.; Lippman, R.; McBride, J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

FINAL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy andExsolutionFES Committees of VisitorsASCRReal-time2 FINAL

373

Barometric pressure transient testing applications at the Nevada Test Site: formation permeability analysis. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report evaluates previous investigations of the gas permeability of the rock surrounding emplacement holes at the Nevada Test Site. The discussion sets the framework from which the present uncertainty in gas permeability can be overcome. The usefulness of the barometric pressure testing method has been established. Flow models were used to evaluate barometric pressure transients taken at NTS holes U2fe, U19ac and U20ai. 31 refs., 103 figs., 18 tabs. (ACR)

Hanson, J.M.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

AGR-1 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report , Rev 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-1 irradiation experiment. AGR-1 is the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment was irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total duration of 620 effective full power days of irradiation. Irradiation began on December 24, 2006 and ended on November 6, 2009 spanning 13 ATR cycles and approximately three calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule contained 12 compacts of a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-1 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 11.5 to 19.6 %FIMA, while fast fluence values ranged from 2.21 to 4.39 ?1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV). We’ll say something here about temperatures once thermal recalc is done. Thermocouples performed well, failing at a lower rate than expected. At the end of the irradiation, nine of the originally-planned 19 TCs were considered functional. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In most capsules, R/B values at the end of the irradiation were at or below 10-7 with only one capsule significantly exceeding this value. A maximum R/B of around 2?10-7 was reached at the end of the irradiation in Capsule 5. Several shakedown issues were encountered and resolved during the first three cycles. These include the repair of minor gas line leaks; repair of faulty gas line valves; the need to position moisture monitors in regions of low radiation fields for proper functioning; the enforcement of proper on-line data storage and backup, the need to monitor thermocouple performance, correcting for detector spectral gain shift, and a change in the mass flow rate range of the neon flow controllers.

Blaise P. Collin

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

California Food Processing Industry Wastewater Demonstration Project: Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater treatment is an energy-intensive process and electricity demand is especially high during the utilities summer peak electricity demand periods. This makes wastewater treatment facilities prime candidates for demand response programs. However, wastewater treatment is often peripheral to food processing operations and its demand response opportunities have often been overlooked. Phase I of this wastewater demonstration project monitored wastewater energy and environmental data at Bell-Carter Foods, Inc., California's largest olive processing plant. For this monitoring activity the project team used Green Energy Management System (GEMS) automated enterprise energy management (EEM) technologies. This report presents results from data collected by GEMS from September 15, 2008 through November 30, 2008, during the olive harvest season. This project established and tested a methodology for (1) gathering baseline energy and environmental data at an industrial food-processing plant and (2) using the data to analyze energy efficiency, demand response, daily peak load management, and environmental management opportunities at the plant. The Phase I goals were to demonstrate the measurement and interrelationship of electricity demand, electricity usage, and water quality metrics and to estimate the associated CO{sub 2} emissions.

Lewis, Glen; Atkinson, Barbara; Rhyne, Ivin

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

376

Advanced emissions control development project. Phase I, Final report, November 1, 1993--February 19, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. B&W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) and the AECDP equipment combined to form a state-of-the-art facility for integrated evaluation of combustion and post-combustion emissions control options. Phase 1 activities were primarily aimed at providing a reliable, representative test facility for conducting air toxic emissions control development work later in the project. This report summarizes the AECDP Phase I activities which consisted of the design, installation, shakedown, verification, and air toxics benchmarking of the AECDP facility. All verification and air toxic tests were conducted with a high sulfur, bituminous Ohio coal.

NONE

1996-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

377

Failure Forewarning in NPP Equipment NERI2000-109 Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is forewarning of machine failures in critical equipment at next-generation nuclear power plants (NPP). Test data were provided by two collaborating institutions: Duke Engineering and Services (first project year), and the Pennsylvania State University (Applied Research Laboratory) during the second and third project years. New nonlinear methods were developed and applied successfully to extract forewarning trends from process-indicative, time-serial data for timely, condition-based maintenance. Anticipation of failures in critical equipment at next-generation NPP will improve the scheduling of maintenance activities to minimize safety concerns, unscheduled non-productive downtime, and collateral damage due to unexpected failures. This approach provides significant economic benefit, and is expected to improve public acceptance of nuclear power. The approach is a multi-tiered, model-independent, and data-driven analysis that uses ORNL's novel nonlinear method to extract forewarning of machine failures from appropriate data. The first tier of the analysis provides a robust choice for the process-indicative data. The second tier rejects data of inadequate quality. The third tier removes signal artifacts that would otherwise confound the analysis, while retaining the relevant nonlinear dynamics. The fourth tier converts the artifact-filtered time-serial data into a geometric representation, that is then transformed to a discrete distribution function (DF). This method allows for noisy, finite-length datasets. The fifth tier obtains dissimilarity measures (DM) between the nominal-state DF and subsequent test-state DFs. Forewarning of a machine failure is indicated by several successive occurrences of the DM above a threshold, or by a statistically significant trend in the DM. This paradigm yields robust nonlinear signatures of degradation and its progression, allowing earlier and more accurate detection of the machine failure.

Hively, LM

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

378

Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring Project: Phase I Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a proof of concept tested in an operational context, the Global Radiological Source Sorting, Tracking, and Monitoring (GRadSSTraM) Project successfully demonstrated that radio frequency identification (RFID) and Web 2.0* technologies can be deployed to track controlled shipments between the United States and the European Union. Between November 2009 and May 2010, a total of 19 shipments were successfully shipped from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) by the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) and tracked to their delivery at England's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) by the United Kingdom Royal Mail. However, the project can only be viewed as a qualified success as notable shortcomings were observed. Although the origin and terminus of all RFID-enabled shipments were recorded and no shipments were lost, not all the waypoints between ORNL and NPL were incorporated into the pilot. Given limited resources, the project team was able to install RFID listeners/actuators at three waypoints between the two endpoints. Although it is likely that all shipments followed the same route between ORNL and NPL, it cannot be determined beyond question that all 19 shipments were routed on identical itineraries past the same three waypoints. The pilot also raises the distinct possibility that unattended RFID tracking alone, without positive confirmation that a tagged item has been properly recorded by an RFID reader, does not meet a rigorous standard for shipping controlled items. Indeed, the proof of concept test strongly suggests that a multifaceted approach to tracking may be called for, including tracking methods that are capable of reading and accepting multiple inputs for individual items [e.g., carrier-provided tracking numbers, Universal Product Codes (UPCs), and RFID tags]. For controlled items, another apparent requirement is a confirmation feature, human or otherwise, which can certify that an item's RFID tag, UPC, or tracking number has been recorded.

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 48" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Final  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR-246 October 2003 Economic and Conservation Evaluation of Capital Renovation Projects: Brownsville Irrigation District – 72" and 48" Pipeline Replacing Main Canal – Final M. Edward Rister Ronald D. Lacewell Allen W. Sturdivant John R. C. Robinson... estimates of water-savings (i.e., seepage and evaporation) and the initial construction cost. Also, an engineering design change resulted in the east and west forks of the Main Canal being replaced with 48" instead of 54" pipeline. This Final document...

Rister, M. Edward; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Sturdivant, Allen W.; Robinson, John R.C.; Popp, Michael C.

380

The UC Davis Emerging Lithium Battery Test Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

35 degC to 150 degC 4. Test procedures The various cells anda consistent set of test procedures intended to determineapplications. The test procedures are summarized in Table 4.

Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Washington Facilities (Intrastate) Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared for BPA in fulfillment of section 1004 (b)(1) of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, to review the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation program at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Projects addressed are: Merwin Dam; Swift Project; Yale Project; Cowlitz River; Boundary Dam; Box Canyon Dam; Lake Chelan; Condit Project; Enloe Project; Spokane River; Tumwater and Dryden Dam; Yakima; and Naches Project.

Howerton, Jack

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Yucca Mountain Project Integrated Data System (IDS); Final report, October 1, 1989--December 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report for LANL Subcontract 9-XS8-2604-1 includes copies of all formal letters, memorandums, and reports provided by CAG to support the IDS effort in the LANL Test Managers Office, Las Vegas, Nevada from October 1, 1989 through the end of the contract on December 31, 1990. The material is divided into two sections; the Functional Requirements Document (FRD) and other reports, letters, and memorandums. All documents are arranged in chronological order with most recent last. Numerous draft copies of the FRD were prepared and cover sheets for all drafts are included. The complete text of only the last version supplied (July 27, 1990) is included in this document.

NONE

1991-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

383

Guidance for implementing the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program. Final report, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has issued a general license for the custody and long-term care of US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project permanent disposal sites. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA disposal sites will be cared for in such a manner as to protect the public health and safety and the environment upon completion of remedial actions. The general license will be in effect for a disposal site when NRC accepts the disposal site long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) that meets the requirements of 10 CFR 40.27. The site LTSP describes in detail the long-term surveillance program, including any monitoring, maintenance, and emergency measures necessary to fulfill the conditions of the general license. This guidance document provides (1) instructions for preparing the disposal site LTSPs and (2) instructions for carrying out the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program, including any monitoring that may be required. The information provided in this document also is in accordance with the regulatory requirements set forth in 40 CFR 192. On January 5, 1985, the US Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals remanded the groundwater standards, 40 CFR 192.02. Proposed groundwater standards were issued for comment on September 24, 1987 (52 FR 3600). When the groundwater standards become final, this document will be revised, as appropriate. This document also will be updated in response to any changes to 10 CFR 40, or in response to changes in the manner in which the long-term care of the licensed disposal sites is carried out.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

South Dakota Geothermal Commercialization Project. Final report, July 1979-October 1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the activities of the South Dakota Energy Office in providing technical assistance, planning, and commercialization projects for geothermal energy. Projects included geothermal prospect identification, area development plans, and active demonstration/commercialization projects. (ACR)

Wegman, S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

GTS Duratek, phase I Hanford low-level waste melter tests: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multiphase program was initiated in 1994 to test commercially available melter technologies for the vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream from defense waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Phase 1 of the melter demonstration tests using simulated LLW was completed during fiscal year 1995. This document is the final report on testing performed by GTS Duratek Inc. in Columbia, Maryland. GTS Duratek (one of the seven vendors selected) was chosen to demonstrate Joule heated melter technology under WHC subcontract number MMI-SVV-384215. The report contains description of the tests, observations, test data and some analysis of the data as it pertains to application of this technology for LLW vitrification. The document also contains summaries of the melter offgas reports issued as separate documents for the 100 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-028) and for the 1000 kg melter (WHC-SD-WM-VI-029).

Eaton, W.C.

1995-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

Selected Area Fishery Evaluation Project Economic Analysis Study Final Report, Final Draft Revision 4: November 10, 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Study is to provide an economic review of current and proposed changes to the Select Area Fishery Evaluation Project (SAFE or Project). The Study results are the information requested in comments made on the Project by a joint review dated March 2005 by the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC) Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) and Independent Economic Analysis Board (IEAB). North et al. (2006) addressed technical questions about operations and plans, and this report contains the response information for comments concerning Project economics. This report can be considered an economic feasibility review meeting guidelines for cost-effective analysis developed by the IEAB (2003). It also contains other economic measurement descriptions to illustrate the economic effects of SAFE. The SAFE is an expansion of a hatchery project (locally called the Clatsop Economic Development Council Fisheries Project or CEDC) started in 1977 that released an early run coho (COH) stock into the Youngs River. The Youngs River entrance to the Columbia River at River Mile 12 is called Youngs Bay, which is located near Astoria, Oregon. The purpose of the hatchery project was to provide increased fishing opportunities for the in-river commercial fishing gillnet fleet. Instead of just releasing fish at the hatchery, a small scale net pen acclimation project in Youngs Bay was tried in 1987. Hirose et al. (1998) found that 1991-1992 COH broodstock over-wintered at the net pens had double the smolt-to-adult return rate (SAR) of traditional hatchery release, less than one percent stray rates, and 99 percent fishery harvests. It was surmised that smolts from other Columbia River hatcheries could be hauled to the net pens for acclimation and release to take advantage of the SAR's and fishing rates. Proposals were tendered to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and other agencies to fund the expansion for using other hatcheries smolts and other off-channel release sites. The BPA, who had been providing funds to the Project since 1982, greatly increased their financial participation for the experimental expansion of the net pen operations in 1993. Instead of just being a funding partner in CEDC operations, the BPA became a major financing source for other hatchery production operations. The BPA has viewed the 10 plus years of funding since then as an explorative project with two phases: a 'research' phase ending in 1993, and a 'development' phase ending in 2006. The next phase is referred to in proposals to BPA for continued funding as an 'establishment' phase to be started in 2007. There are three components of SAFE: (1) The CEDC owns and operates the net pens in the Columbia River estuary on the Oregon side. The CEDC also owns and operates a hatchery on the South Fork Klaskanine River. (2) There are many other hatcheries contributing smolts to the net pen operations. The present suite of hatcheries are operated by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). The WDFW owns and operates the net pens at Deep River on the Washington side of the Columbia River. (3) The monitoring and evaluation (M&E) responsibilities are performed by employees of WDFW and ODFW. BPA provides funding for all three components as part of NPCC Project No. 199306000. The CEDC and other contributing hatcheries have other sources of funds that also support the SAFE. BPA's minor share (less than 10 percent) of CEDC funding in 1982 grew to about 55 percent in 1993 with the beginning of the development phase of the Project. The balance of the CEDC budget over the years has been from other federal, state, and local government programs. It has also included a 10 percent fee assessment (five percent of ex-vessel value received by harvesters plus five percent of purchase value made by processors) on harvests that take place in off-channel locations near the release sites. The CEDC total annual budget in the last several years has been in the $600 to $700 thousand range. The Project over

Bonneville Power Administration; Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Project W-314 Specific Test and Evaluation Plan 241-AN-A Valve Pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system's performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP).

HAMMERS, J.S.

1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

388

West Hackberry Brine Disposal Project pre-discharge characterization. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The physical, chemical and biological attributes are described for: (1) a coastal marine environment centered about a Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) brine disposal site 11.4 km off the southwest coast of Louisiana; and (2) the lower Calcasieu and Sabine estuarine systems that provide leach waters for the SPR project. A three month sampling effort, February through April 1981, and previous investigations from the study area are integrated to establish baseline information for evaluation of impacts from brine disposal in the nearshore marine waters and from freshwater withdrawal from the coastal marsh of the Chenier Plain. January data are included for some tasks that sampled while testing and mobilizing their instruments prior to the February field effort. The study addresses the areas of physical oceanography, estuarine hydrology and hydrography, water and sediment quality, benthos, nekton, phytoplankton, zooplankton, and data management.

DeRouen, L.R.; Hann, R.W.; Casserly, D.M.; Giammona, C. (eds.) [eds.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Algae Biofuels Collaborative Project: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-10-371  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to advance biofuels research on algal feedstocks and NREL's role in the project is to explore novel liquid extraction methods, gasification and pyrolysis as means to produce fuels from algae. To that end several different extraction methods were evaluated and numerous gasification and pyrolysis conditions were explored. It was found that mild hydrothermal treatment is a promising means to improve the extraction and conversion of lipids from algae over those produced by standard extraction methods. The algae were essentially found to gasify completely at a fairly low temperature of 750 degrees C in the presence of oxygen. Pyrolysis from 300-550 degrees C showed sequential release of phytene hydrocarbons, glycerides, and aromatics as temperature was increased. It appears that this has potential to release the glycerides from the non-fatty acid groups present in the polar lipids to produce a cleaner lipid. Further research is needed to quantify the pyrolysis and gasification yields, analyze the liquids produced and to test strategies for removing organic-nitrogen byproducts produced because of the high protein content of the feed. Possible strategies include use of high-lipid/low-protein algae or the use of catalytic pyrolysis.

French, R. J.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Final report on LDRD project : biodiesel production from vegetable oils using slit-channel reactors.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents work done for a late-start LDRD project, which was carried out during the last quarter of FY07. The objective of this project was to experimentally explore the feasibility of converting vegetable (e.g., soybean) oils to biodiesel by employing slit-channel reactors and solid catalysts. We first designed and fabricated several slit-channel reactors with varying channel depths, and employed them to investigate the improved performance of slit-channel reactors over traditional batch reactors using a NaOH liquid catalyst. We then evaluated the effectiveness of several solid catalysts, including CaO, ZnO, MgO, ZrO{sub 2}, calcium gluconate, and heteropolyacid or HPA (Cs{sub 2.5}H{sub 0.5}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}), for catalyzing the soybean oil-to-biodiesel transesterification reaction. We found that the slit-channel reactor performance improves as channel depth decreases, as expected; and the conversion efficiency of a slit-channel reactor is significantly higher when its channel is very shallow. We further confirmed CaO as having the highest catalytic activity among the solid catalysts tested, and we demonstrated for the first time calcium gluconate as a promising solid catalyst for converting soybean oil to biodiesel, based on our preliminary batch-mode conversion experiments.

Kalu, E. Eric (FAMU-FSU College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL); Chen, Ken Shuang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Final West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement, Cattaraugus County, West Valley, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the ''Final West Valley Demonstration Project Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement'' is to provide information on the environmental impacts of the Department of Energy's proposed action to ship radioactive wastes that are either currently in storage, or that will be generated from operations over the next 10 years, to offsite disposal locations, and to continue its ongoing onsite waste management activities. Decommissioning or long-term stewardship decisions will be reached based on a separate EIS that is being prepared for that decisionmaking. This EIS evaluates the environmental consequences that may result from actions to implement the proposed action, including the impacts to the onsite workers and the offsite public from waste transportation and onsite waste management. The EIS analyzes a no action alternative, under which most wastes would continue to be stored onsite over the next 10 years. It also analyzes an alternative under which certain wastes would be shipped to interim offsite storage locations prior to disposal. The Department's preferred alternative is to ship wastes to offsite disposal locations.

N /A

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

392

Final Scientific/Technical Report for DOE/EERE project Advanced Magnetic Refrigerant Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A team led by GE Global Research developed new magnetic refrigerant materials needed to enhance the commercialization potential of residential appliances such as refrigerators and air conditioners based on the magnetocaloric effect (a nonvapor compression cooling cycle). The new magnetic refrigerant materials have potentially better performance at lower cost than existing materials, increasing technology readiness level. The performance target of the new magnetocaloric material was to reduce the magnetic field needed to achieve 4 °C adiabatic temperature change from 1.5 Tesla to 0.75 Tesla. Such a reduction in field minimizes the cost of the magnet assembly needed for a magnetic refrigerator. Such a reduction in magnet assembly cost is crucial to achieving commercialization of magnetic refrigerator technology. This project was organized as an iterative alloy development effort with a parallel material modeling task being performed at George Washington University. Four families of novel magnetocaloric alloys were identified, screened, and assessed for their performance potential in a magnetic refrigeration cycle. Compositions from three of the alloy families were manufactured into regenerator components. At the beginning of the project a previously studied magnetocaloric alloy was selected for manufacturing into the first regenerator component. Each of the regenerators was tested in magnetic refrigerator prototypes at a subcontractor at at GE Appliances. The property targets for operating temperature range, operating temperature control, magnetic field sensitivity, and corrosion resistance were met. The targets for adiabatic temperature change and thermal hysteresis were not met. The high thermal hysteresis also prevented the regenerator components from displaying measurable cooling power when tested in prototype magnetic refrigerators. Magnetic refrigerant alloy compositions that were predicted to have low hysteresis were not attainable with conventional alloy processing methods. Preliminary experiments with rapid solidification methods showed a path towards attaining low hysteresis compositions should this alloy development effort be continued.

Johnson, Francis

2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Final environment impact report supplement: Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a supplement to the final environmental impact report (FEIR) published in October 1994 on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electrification from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. The purpose of this supplement is to provide additional information relative to: the Roxbury Substation Alternative Analysis; an expanded discussion on mitigation of potential adverse impacts; draft Section 61 findings; the Memorandum of Understanding between Amtrak and the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA) for Route 128 Station; Amtrak`s draft outreach program; and to address other Massachusetts Environmental Policy Act concerns.

NONE

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Analysis of lead-acid battery accelerated testing data. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Battelle conducted an independent review and analysis of the accelerated test procedures and test data obtained by Exide in the 3-year Phase I program to develop advanced lead-acid batteries for utility load leveling. Of special importance is the extensive data obtained in deep-discharge cycling tests on 60 cells at elevated temperatures over a 2-1/2 year period. The principal uncertainty in estimating cell life relates to projecting cycle life data at elevated temperature to the lower operating temperatures. The accelerated positive-grid corrosion test involving continuous overcharge at 50/sup 0/C provided some indication of the degree of grid corrosion that might be tolerable before failure. The accelerated positive-material shedding test was not examined in any detail. Recommendations are made for additional studies.

Clifford, J.E.; Thomas, R.E.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

2015-01-28 Issuance: Test Procedure for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Final Rule Correction  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule correction regarding test procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on January 28, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

396

Demonstration of coal reburning for cyclone boiler NO{sub x} control. Final project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Innovative Clean Coal Technology Program, under Round 2, a project for Full Scale Demonstration of Coal Reburning for Cyclone Boiler Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x},) Control was selected. DOE sponsored The Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) Company, with Wisconsin Power & Light (WP&L) as the host utility, to demonstrate coal reburning technology at WP&L`s 110 MW{sub c}, cyclone-fired Unit No.2 at the Nelson Dewey Generating Station in Cassville, Wisconsin. The coal reburning demonstration was justified based on two prior studies. An Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and B&W sponsored engineering feasibility study indicated that the majority of cyclone-equipped boilers could successfully apply reburning technology to reduce NO{sub x}, emissions by 50 to 70%. An EPRI/Gas Research Institute (GRI)/B&W pilot-scale evaluation substantiated this conclusion through pilot-scale testing in B&W`s 6 million Btu/hr Small Boiler Simulator. Three different reburning fuels, natural gas, No. 6 oil, and pulverized coal were tested. This work showed that coal as a reburning fuel performs nearly as well as gas/oil without deleterious effects of combustion efficiency. Coal was selected for a full scale demonstration since it is available to all cyclone units and represents the highest level of technical difficulty-in demonstrating the technology.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

McNary-John Day Transmission Line Project, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bonneville is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain a 79-mile-long 500-kilovolt-transmission line in Benton and Klickitat Counties, Washington, and Umatilla and Sherman Counties, Oregon. The new line would start at Bonneville's McNary Substation in Oregon and would cross the Columbia River just north of the substation into Washington. The line would then proceed west for about 70 miles along the Columbia River. At the John Day Dam, the line would again cross the Columbia River into Oregon and terminate at Bonneville's John Day Substation. The new line would parallel existing transmission lines for the entire length; mostly within existing available right-of-way. Presently, the existing transmission lines in the area are operating at capacity. These lines help move power from the east side of the Cascades to the west side, where there is a high need for electricity (cities along the I-5 corridor). Because the Northwest has only recently recovered from a shortfall in electric energy supply and a volatile wholesale power market in which prices reached record highs, there are many new proposals for facilities to generate new power. Some of these facilities are in the vicinity of the McNary-John Day project; the proposed line would help insure that existing and newly generated power could move through the system. Bonneville is also considering the No Action Alternative and several short-line routing alternatives. The short routing alternatives include three half-mile-long routes for getting from the McNary Substation to the Columbia River crossing; three two-mile-long routes where the Hanford-John Day transmission line joins the existing corridor; two 1,000-foot-long routes at corridor mile 32; and two 500-foot-long routes at corridor mile 35. This abbreviated final EIS consists of an introduction to the document, changes to the draft EIS, copies of all the comments received on the draft EIS, and Bonneville's written responses to the comments. The final EIS should be used as a companion document to the draft EIS (dated February 2002), which contains the full text of the affected environment, environmental analysis, and appendices.

N /A

2002-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Advanced Petroleum-Based Fuels -- Diesel Emissions Control Project (APBF-DEC): Lubricants Project, Phase 2 Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the second phase of a lubricants project, which investigated the impact of engine oil formulation on diesel vehicle emissions and the performance of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst (NAC).

Not Available

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Project W-314 specific test and evaluation plan for AZ tank farm upgrades  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made by the addition of the SN-631 transfer line from the AZ-O1A pit to the AZ-02A pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system`s performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation P1 an (TEP). Testing includes Validations and Verifications (e.g., Commercial Grade Item Dedication activities, etc), Factory Tests and Inspections (FTIs), installation tests and inspections, Construction Tests and Inspections (CTIs), Acceptance Test Procedures (ATPs), Pre-Operational Test Procedures (POTPs), and Operational Test Procedures (OTPs). The STEP will be utilized in conjunction with the TEP for verification and validation.

Hays, W.H.

1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

400

Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Rank test for multivariate two sample data using projection pursuit.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Construction of an asymptotically distribution free test for the hypothesis that two multivariate random samples are identically distributed has been a topic among many statisticians… (more)

Gunathilaka, Unawatuna Gamage

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

ATHOS3 computer code verification: Volume 1, 2/3-scale test: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of an ATHOS3 code verification program as it relates to flow-induced tube vibration prediction, Westinghouse was contracted by the Steam Generator Project Office of EPRI in Project S-310-8, Part I to analyze the flow field in a Westinghouse 2/3 scale test model of the first pass of the preheat section of a Model D4 steam generator. The predicted velocities were to be compared with the test data obtained at midpoints between tube centers at tube Rows 49 (first row of tubes from feedwater entrance), 47, 45, and other locations. The tests were conducted with water at 60 psig and 100/degree/F. The tested water flow rate simulated the feedwater flow rate at full power conditions of a D4 steam generator. Analysis models in both cylindrical and Cartesian coordinates and different flow cell sizes were used in the code predictions. The measured total RMS forces on four front row tubes were also correlated with measured velocities at the four tubes. The results of the code verification with the test data are presented in this report.

Lee, A.Y.; Masiello, P.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Final waste forms project: Performance criteria for phase I treatability studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document defines the product performance criteria to be used in Phase I of the Final Waste Forms Project. In Phase I, treatability studies will be performed to provide {open_quotes}proof-of-principle{close_quotes} data to establish the viability of stabilization/solidification (S/S) technologies. This information is required by March 1995. In Phase II, further treatability studies, some at the pilot scale, will be performed to provide sufficient data to allow treatment alternatives identified in Phase I to be more fully developed and evaluated, as well as to reduce performance uncertainties for those methods chosen to treat a specific waste. Three main factors influence the development and selection of an optimum waste form formulation and hence affect selection of performance criteria. These factors are regulatory, process-specific, and site-specific waste form standards or requirements. Clearly, the optimum waste form formulation will require consideration of performance criteria constraints from each of the three categories. Phase I will focus only on the regulatory criteria. These criteria may be considered the minimum criteria for an acceptable waste form. In other words, a S/S technology is considered viable only if it meet applicable regulatory criteria. The criteria to be utilized in the Phase I treatability studies were primarily taken from Environmental Protection Agency regulations addressed in 40 CFR 260 through 265 and 268; and Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations addressed in 10 CFR 61. Thus the majority of the identified criteria are independent of waste form matrix composition (i.e., applicable to cement, glass, organic binders etc.).

Gilliam, T.M. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hutchins, D.A. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chodak, P. III [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.

Roscha, V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

Neural networks for modelling the final target cost of water projects   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Producing reasonably accurate cost estimates at the planning stage of a project important for the subsequent success of the project. The estimator has to be able to make judgement on the cost influence of a number of factors ...

Ahiaga-Dagbui, Dominic D; Smith, Simon D

406

Final Report for Project "Framework Application for Core-Edge Transport Simulations (FACETS)"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for the Colorado State University Component of the FACETS Project. FACETS was focused on the development of a multiphysics, parallel framework application that could provide the capability to enable whole-device fusion reactor modeling and, in the process, the development of the modeling infrastructure and computational understanding needed for ITER. It was intended that FACETS be highly flexible, through the use of modern computational methods, including component technology and object oriented design, to facilitate switching from one model to another for a given aspect of the physics, and making it possible to use simplified models for rapid turnaround or high-fidelity models that will take advantage of the largest supercomputer hardware. FACETS was designed in a heterogeneous parallel context, where different parts of the application can take advantage through parallelism based on task farming, domain decomposition, and/or pipelining as needed and applicable. As with all fusion simulations, an integral part of the FACETS project was treatment of the coupling of different physical processes at different scales interacting closely. A primary example for the FACETS project is the coupling of existing core and edge simulations, with the transport and wall interactions described by reduced models. However, core and edge simulations themselves involve significant coupling of different processes with large scale differences. Numerical treatment of coupling is impacted by a number of factors including, scale differences, form of information transferred between processes, implementation of solvers for different codes, and high performance computing concerns. Operator decomposition involving the computation of the individual processes individually using appropriate simulation codes and then linking/synchronizing the component simulations at regular points in space and time, is the defacto approach to high performance simulation of multiphysics, multiscale systems. Various forms of operator decomposition are used in nearly all fusion simulations. However, operator decomposition generally has a complex effect on accuracy and stability of numerical simulations. Yet, these effects can be difficult to detect. The Colorado State University component of the FACETS team led by P. I. D. Estep was focused on analyzing the effects of operator decomposition on fusion simulations. The approach was based on a posteriori error analysis employing adjoint problems, computable residuals, and variational analysis to produce accurate computational error estimates for quantities of interest. Computable residuals are used to quantify the effects of various discretization choices. The generalized Greens function satisfying the adjoint problem quantities the effects of stability. Technical issues to be addressed included: (1) defining appropriate adjoint operators for operator decomposition discretizations; (2) determining the appropriate residuals for the multifaceted aspects involved with multiphysics discretizations; (3) producing the estimates within the computational framework of existing fusion codes; (4) carrying out the analysis for discretizations used in fusion simulations; and (5) devising efficient approaches to mitigating the effects of discretization. This report provides a summary of the accomplished research and a detailed description of personnel, activities, outcomes and achievements.

Estep, Donald [Colorado State University] [Colorado State University

2014-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

407

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Superfund state-lead remedial project-management handbook. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The handbook defines the roles and responsibilities of the Remedial Project Officer (RPM) with regard to State-lead remedial projects at uncontrolled hazardous-waste sites. It also discusses project-management techniques and the resources available to the RPM for accomplishing his mission.

Winter, B.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Superfund federal-lead remedial project-management handbook. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The handbook defines the roles and responsibilities of the Remedial Project Officer (RPM) with regard to Federal-lead remedial projects at uncontrolled hazardous-waste sites. It also discusses project management techniques and the resources available to the RPM for accomplishing his mission.

Hooper, S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Final Report for DOE grant project FG02-07ER41458 [Dense Quark Matter in Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Final Report for DOE grant DE-FG02-07ER41458. This grant was originally a three-year project. However, this final report summarizes the results of the first two years, as at the end of the second year of the grant the PIs moved to a new university and the grant was closed. The work done under the first two years of the DOE grant led to several papers and presentations. It also served to train one undergraduate and three graduate students.

Incera, Vivian

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

413

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: Underwater Active Acoustic Monitoring Network For Marine And Hydrokinetic Energy Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project saw the completion of the design and development of a second generation, high frequency (90-120 kHz) Subsurface-Threat Detection Sonar Network (SDSN). The system was deployed, operated, and tested in Cobscook Bay, Maine near the site the Ocean Renewable Power Company TidGen™ power unit. This effort resulted in a very successful demonstration of the SDSN detection, tracking, localization, and classification capabilities in a high current, MHK environment as measured by results from the detection and tracking trials in Cobscook Bay. The new high frequency node, designed to operate outside the hearing range of a subset of marine mammals, was shown to detect and track objects of marine mammal-like target strength to ranges of approximately 500 meters. This performance range results in the SDSN system tracking objects for a significant duration - on the order of minutes - even in a tidal flow of 5-7 knots, potentially allowing time for MHK system or operator decision-making if marine mammals are present. Having demonstrated detection and tracking of synthetic targets with target strengths similar to some marine mammals, the primary hurdle to eventual automated monitoring is a dataset of actual marine mammal kinematic behavior and modifying the tracking algorithms and parameters which are currently tuned to human diver kinematics and classification.

Stein, Peter J.; Edson, Patrick L.

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Final audit report of remedial action construction at the UMTRA Project Mexican Hat, Utah -- Monument Valley, Arizona, sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final audit report for remedial action at the Mexican Hat, Utah, Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites consists of a summary of the radiological surveillances/audits, quality assurance (QA) in-process surveillances, and QA remedial action close-out inspections performed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC); on-site construction reviews (OSCR) performed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC); and a surveillance performed by the Navajo Nation. This report refers to remedial action activities performed at the Mexican Hat, Utah--Monument Valley, Arizona, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project sites.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

E-Print Network 3.0 - array project final Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sciences 33 Computers for Physicists 2nd Semester '04 Summary: char name50; int id; int exgrades5; int projectgrade; int examgrade; int final... be referenced as in...

416

Determining Long-Term Performance of Cool Storage Systems from Short-Term Tests; Literature Review, Preliminary Methodology Description, and Final Site Selection (Final Revision of Nov. 1997 Report)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This preliminary report contains the literature review, a preliminary description of the methodologies that have been chosen for the project and final site selection recommendations for ASHRAE Research Project RP 1004 ~ "Determining Long...

Reddy, T. A.; Elleson, J.; Haberl, J. S.; Claridge, D. E.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

CISC 327 -Fall 2014 ! Course Project Assignment #5 -Back End Unit Testing!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CISC 327 - Fall 2014 ! ! Course Project Assignment #5 - Back End Unit Testing! !Due Wednesday Nov 19! !In this assignment, you will practice (partial) white box testing of the Back Office you programmed in assignment #4. ! !You are to create two separate sets of white box unit tests, one

Cordy, James R.

418

Reduced order models for thermal analysis : final report : LDRD Project No. 137807.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This LDRD Senior's Council Project is focused on the development, implementation and evaluation of Reduced Order Models (ROM) for application in the thermal analysis of complex engineering problems. Two basic approaches to developing a ROM for combined thermal conduction and enclosure radiation problems are considered. As a prerequisite to a ROM a fully coupled solution method for conduction/radiation models is required; a parallel implementation is explored for this class of problems. High-fidelity models of large, complex systems are now used routinely to verify design and performance. However, there are applications where the high-fidelity model is too large to be used repetitively in a design mode. One such application is the design of a control system that oversees the functioning of the complex, high-fidelity model. Examples include control systems for manufacturing processes such as brazing and annealing furnaces as well as control systems for the thermal management of optical systems. A reduced order model (ROM) seeks to reduce the number of degrees of freedom needed to represent the overall behavior of the large system without a significant loss in accuracy. The reduction in the number of degrees of freedom of the ROM leads to immediate increases in computational efficiency and allows many design parameters and perturbations to be quickly and effectively evaluated. Reduced order models are routinely used in solid mechanics where techniques such as modal analysis have reached a high state of refinement. Similar techniques have recently been applied in standard thermal conduction problems e.g. though the general use of ROM for heat transfer is not yet widespread. One major difficulty with the development of ROM for general thermal analysis is the need to include the very nonlinear effects of enclosure radiation in many applications. Many ROM methods have considered only linear or mildly nonlinear problems. In the present study a reduced order model is considered for application to the combined problem of thermal conduction and enclosure radiation. The main objective is to develop a procedure that can be implemented in an existing thermal analysis code. The main analysis objective is to allow thermal controller software to be used in the design of a control system for a large optical system that resides with a complex radiation dominated enclosure. In the remainder of this section a brief outline of ROM methods is provided. The following chapter describes the fully coupled conduction/radiation method that is required prior to considering a ROM approach. Considerable effort was expended to implement and test the combined solution method; the ROM project ended shortly after the completion of this milestone and thus the ROM results are incomplete. The report concludes with some observations and recommendations.

Hogan, Roy E., Jr.; Gartling, David K.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Coordinated Fault-Tolerance for High-Performance Computing Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the Coordinated Infrastructure for Fault Tolerance Systems (CIFTS, as the original project came to be called) project, our aim has been to understand and tackle the following broad research questions, the answers to which will help the HEC community analyze and shape the direction of research in the field of fault tolerance and resiliency on future high-end leadership systems. #15; Will availability of global fault information, obtained by fault information exchange between the different HEC software on a system, allow individual system software to better detect, diagnose, and adaptively respond to faults? If fault-awareness is raised throughout the system through fault information exchange, is it possible to get all system software working together to provide a more comprehensive end-to-end fault management on the system? #15; What are the missing fault-tolerance features that widely used HEC system software lacks today that would inhibit such software from taking advantage of systemwide global fault information? #15; What are the practical limitations of a systemwide approach for end-to-end fault management based on fault awareness and coordination? #15; What mechanisms, tools, and technologies are needed to bring about fault awareness and coordination of responses on a leadership-class system? #15; What standards, outreach, and community interaction are needed for adoption of the concept of fault awareness and coordination for fault management on future systems? Keeping our overall objectives in mind, the CIFTS team has taken a parallel fourfold approach. #15; Our central goal was to design and implement a light-weight, scalable infrastructure with a simple, standardized interface to allow communication of fault-related information through the system and facilitate coordinated responses. This work led to the development of the Fault Tolerance Backplane (FTB) publish-subscribe API specification, together with a reference implementation and several experimental implementations on top of existing publish-subscribe tools. #15; We enhanced the intrinsic fault tolerance capabilities representative implementations of a variety of key HPC software subsystems and integrated them with the FTB. Targeting software subsystems included: MPI communication libraries, checkpoint/restart libraries, resource managers and job schedulers, and system monitoring tools. #15; Leveraging the aforementioned infrastructure, as well as developing and utilizing additional tools, we have examined issues associated with expanded, end-to-end fault response from both system and application viewpoints. From the standpoint of system operations, we have investigated log and root cause analysis, anomaly detection and fault prediction, and generalized notification mechanisms. Our applications work has included libraries for fault-tolerance linear algebra, application frameworks for coupled multiphysics applications, and external frameworks to support the monitoring and response for general applications. #15; Our final goal was to engage the high-end computing community to increase awareness of tools and issues around coordinated end-to-end fault management.

Panda, Dhabaleswar Kumar [The Ohio State University; Beckman, Pete

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

MHK Projects/QSEIF Grant Sea Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHK Projects3.362°duInformation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

MHK Projects/WEST Testing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat JumpIncMAKGalway Bay IE < MHK ProjectRoseInformationWEC 1 <

422

Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, Livingston Parish, Louisiana. Volume I. Completion and testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Crown Zellerbach Well No. 2, approximately 23 miles east of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, is the eighth successful test of a geopressured-geothermal aquifer under the DOE Wells of Opportunity program. The well was tested through the annulus between 7-inch casing and 2-3/8 inch tubing. Two flow tests and one reservoir pressure buildup test were conducted on the lower zone during a 13-day period. A total of 12,489 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3887 BWPD. One flow test followed by a buildup period was conducted on the combined upper and lower zones during a 3-day period. A total of 4739 barrels of water was produced. The highest flow rate achieved was about 3000 BWPD. The gas/water ratio measured during testing was about 32.0 SCF/BBL for the lower zone. The extrapolated latoratory data indicates that the solubility of the gas is 55.7 SCF/BBL. It appears that the reservoir brine is considerably undersaturated. The methane content of the flare line gas averaged 71.0 mole percent. Crown Zellerbach Company carefully studied the commercial feasibility of using the well to produce energy for a wood-drying facility and decided against the project.

Not Available

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

2014-06-27 Issuance: Test Procedures for Residential and Commercial Water Heaters; Final Rule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding test procedures for residential and commercial water heaters, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on June 27, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

424

Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

Irene Farnham

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Washoe Tribe Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Washoe Tribe of Nevada and California was awarded funding from the Department of Energy to complete the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium Energy Organization Enhancement Project. The main goal of the project was to enhance the capacity of the Nevada Inter-Tribal Energy Consortium (NITEC) to effectively assist tribes within Nevada to technically manage tribal energy resources and implement tribal energy projects.

Johnson, Jennifer [Washoe Tribe of NV and Ca

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

426

National Conference of State Legislatures Geothermal Project. Final report, February 1978--September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the NCSL Geothermal Project was to stimulate and assist state legislative action to encourage the efficient development of geothermal resources, including the use of groundwater heat pumps. The project had the following work tasks: (1) initiate state geothermal policy reviews; (2) provide technical assistance to state geothermal policy reviews; (3) serve as liaison with geothermal community; and (4) perform project evaluation.

None

1983-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Demonstration, testing, and evaluation of in situ heating of soil. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a final reports in two volumes. Volume I contains the technical report and Volume II contains appendices with background information and data. In this project approximately 300 cubic yards of clayey soil containing a low concentration plume of volatile organic chemicals was heated in situ by the application of electrical energy. It was shown that as a result of heating the effective permeability of soil to air flow was increased such that in situ soil vapor extraction could be performed. The initial permeability of soil was so low that the soil gas flow rate was immeasurably small even at high vacuum levels. It was demonstrated that the mass flow rate of the volatile organic chemicals was enhanced in the recovered soil gas as a result of heating.

Dev, H.; Enk, J.; Jones, D.; Sabato, W.

1996-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

428

The Human Genome Project: Information access, management, and regulation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Human Genome Project is a large, internationally coordinated effort in biological research directed at creating a detailed map of human DNA. This report describes the access of information, management, and regulation of the project. The project led to the development of an instructional module titled The Human Genome Project: Biology, Computers, and Privacy, designed for use in high school biology classes. The module consists of print materials and both Macintosh and Windows versions of related computer software-Appendix A contains a copy of the print materials and discs containing the two versions of the software.

McInerney, J.D.; Micikas, L.B.

1996-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

430

Repository relevant testing applied to the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The tuff beds of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, are currently being investigated as a site for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste in an underground repository. If this site is found suitable, the repository would be located in the unsaturated zone above the water table, and a description of the site and the methodology of assessing the performance of the repository are described in the Site Characterization Plan (SCP). While many factors are accounted for during performance assessment, an important input parameter is the degradation behavior of the waste forms, which may be either spent fuel or reprocessed waste contained in a borosilicate glass matrix. To develop the necessary waste form degradation input, the waste package environment needs to be identified. This environment will change as the waste decays and also is a function of the repository design which has not yet been finalized. At the present time, an exact description of the waste package environment is not available. The SCP does provide an initial description of conditions that can be used to guide waste form evaluation. However, considerable uncertainty exists concerning the conditions under which waste form degradation and radionuclide release may occur after the waste package containment barriers are finally breached. The release conditions that are considered to be plausible include (1) a {open_quotes}bathtub{close_quotes} condition in which the waste becomes fully or partially submerged in water that enters the breached container and accumulates to fill the container up to the level of the breach opening, (2) a {open_quotes}wet drip{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}trickle through{close_quotes} condition in which the waste form is exposed to dripping water that enters through the top and exits the bottom of a container with multiple holes, and (3) a {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} condition in which the waste form is exposed to a humid air environment.

Bates, J.K.; Woodland, A.B.; Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Cunnane, J.C.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Final test results for the Schott HCE on a LS-2 collector.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has completed thermal performance testing on the Schott parabolic trough receiver using the LS-2 collector on the Sandia rotating platform at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, NM. This testing was funded as part of the US DOE Sun-Lab USA-Trough program. The receiver tested was a new Schott receiver, known as Heat Collector Elements (HCEs). Schott is a new manufacturer of trough HCEs. The Schott HCEs are 4m long; therefore, two were joined and mounted on the LS-2 collector module for the test. The Schott HCE design consists of a 70mm diameter high solar absorptance coated stainless steel (SS) tube encapsulated within a 125mm diameter Pyrex{reg_sign} glass tube with vacuum in the annulus formed between the SS and glass tube to minimize convection heat losses. The Schott HCE design is unique in two regards. First, the bellows used to compensate for the difference in thermal expansion between the metal and glass tube are inside the glass envelope rather than outside. Second, the composition of materials at the glass-to-metal seal has very similar thermal expansion coefficients making the joint less prone to breakage from thermal shock. Sandia National Laboratories provided both the azimuth and elevation collector module tracking systems used during the tests. The test results showed the efficiency of the Schott HCE to be very similar to current HCEs being manufactured by Solel. This testing provided performance verification for the use of Schott tubes with Solargenix trough collector assemblies at currently planned trough power plant projects in Arizona and Nevada.

Moss, Timothy A.; Brosseau, Douglas A.

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF UNDERBALANCED DRILLING PRODUCTS. Final Report, Oct 1995 - July 2001  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underbalanced drilling is experiencing growth at a rate that rivals that of horizontal drilling in the mid-1980s and coiled-tubing drilling in the 1990s. Problems remain, however, for applying underbalanced drilling in a wider range of geological settings and drilling environments. This report addresses developments under this DOE project to develop products aimed at overcoming these problems. During Phase I of the DOE project, market analyses showed that up to 12,000 wells per year (i.e., 30% of all wells) will be drilled underbalanced in the U.S.A. within the next ten years. A user-friendly foam fluid hydraulics model (FOAM) was developed for a PC Windows environment during Phase I. FOAM predicts circulating pressures and flow characteristics of foam fluids used in underbalanced drilling operations. FOAM is based on the best available mathematical models, and was validated through comparison to existing models, laboratory test data and field data. This model does not handle two-phase flow or air and mist drilling where the foam quality is above 0.97. This FOAM model was greatly expanded during Phase II including adding an improved foam rheological model and a ''matching'' feature that allows the model to be field calibrated. During Phase I, a lightweight drilling fluid was developed that uses hollow glass spheres (HGS) to reduce the density of the mud to less than that of water. HGS fluids have several advantages over aerated fluids, including they are incompressible, they reduce corrosion and vibration problems, they allow the use of mud-pulse MWD tools, and they eliminate high compressor and nitrogen costs. Phase II tests showed that HGS significantly reduce formation damage with water-based drilling and completion fluids and thereby potentially can increase oil and gas production in wells drilled with water-based fluids. Extensive rheological testing was conducted with HGS drilling and completion fluids during Phase II. These tests showed that the HGS fluids act similarly to conventional fluids and that they have potential application in many areas, including underbalanced drilling, completions, and riserless drilling. Early field tests under this project are encouraging. These led to limited tests by industry (which are also described). Further field tests and cost analyses are needed to demonstrate the viability of HGS fluids in different applications. Once their effectiveness is demonstrated, they should find widespread application and should significantly reduce drilling costs and increase oil and gas production rates. A number of important oilfield applications for HGS outside of Underbalanced Drilling were identified. One of these--Dual Gradient Drilling (DGD) for deepwater exploration and development--is very promising. Investigative work on DGD under the project is reported, along with definition of a large joint-industry project resulting from the work. Other innovative products/applications are highlighted in the report including the use of HGS as a cement additive.

William C. Maurer; William J. McDonald; Thomas E. Williams; John H. Cohen

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Klondike III/Biglow Canyon Wind Integration Project; Final Environmental Impact Statement, September 2006.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA has been asked by PPM Energy, Inc. to interconnect 300 megawatts (MW) of electricity generated from the proposed Klondike III Wind Project to the Federal Columbia River Transmission System. Orion Energy LLC has also asked BPA to interconnect 400 MW of electricity from its proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm, located north and east of the proposed Klondike III Wind Project. (Portland General Electric recently bought the rights to develop the proposed Biglow Canyon Wind Farm from Orion Energy, LLC.) Both wind projects received Site Certificates from the Oregon Energy Facility Siting Council on June 30, 2006. To interconnect these projects, BPA would need to build and operate a 230-kV double-circuit transmission line about 12 miles long, expand one substation and build one new substation. The wind projects would require wind turbines, substation(s), access roads, and other facilities. Two routes for the transmission line are being considered. Both begin at PPM's Klondike Schoolhouse Substation then travel north (Proposed Action) or north and westerly (Middle Alternative) to a new BPA 230-kV substation next to BPA's existing John Day 500-kV Substation. BPA is also considering a No Action Alternative in which BPA would not build the transmission line and would not interconnect the wind projects. The proposed BPA and wind projects would be located on private land, mainly used for agriculture. If BPA decides to interconnect the wind projects, construction of the BPA transmission line and substation(s) could commence as early as the winter of 2006-07. Both wind projects would operate for much of each year for at least 20 years. The proposed projects would generally create no or low impacts. Wildlife resources and local visual resources are the only resources to receive an impact rating other than ''none'' or ''low''. The low to moderate impacts to wildlife are from the expected bird and bat mortality and the cumulative impact of this project on wildlife when combined with other proposed wind projects in the region. The low to high impacts to visual resources reflect the effect that the transmission line and the turbine strings from both wind projects would have on viewers in the local area, but this impact diminishes with distance from the project.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Status and specifications of a Project X front-end accelerator test facility at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the construction and operational status of an accelerator test facility for Project X. The purpose of this facility is for Project X component development activities that benefit from beam tests and any development activities that require 325 MHz or 650 MHz RF power. It presently includes an H- beam line, a 325 MHz superconducting cavity test facility, a 325 MHz (pulsed) RF power source, and a 650 MHz (CW) RF power source. The paper also discusses some specific Project X components that will be tested in the facility. Fermilab's future involves new facilities to advance the intensity frontier. In the early 2000's, the vision was a pulsed, superconducting, 8 GeV linac capable of injecting directly into the Fermilab Main Injector. Prototyping the front-end of such a machine started in 2005 under a program named the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS). While the HINS test facility was being constructed, the concept of a new, more versatile accelerator for the intensity frontier, now called Project X, was forming. This accelerator comprises a 3 GeV CW superconducting linac with an associated experimental program, followed by a pulsed 8 GeV superconducting linac to feed the Main Injector synchrotron. The CW Project X design is now the model for Fermilab's future intensity frontier program. Although CW operation is incompatible with the original HINS front-end design, the installation remains useful for development and testing many Project X components.

Steimel, J.; Webber, R.; Madrak, R.; Wildman, D.; Pasquinelli, R.; Evans-Peoples, E.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

UMTRA Project Office Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health Program Plan. Final draft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document establishes the Federal Employee Occupational Safety and Health (FEOSH) Program for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Office. This program will ensure compliance with the applicable requirements of DOE Order 3790.1 B and DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (AL) Order 3790.1A. FEOSH Program responsibilities delegated by the DOE-AL to the UMTRA Project Office by AL Order 3790.1A also are assigned. The UMTRA Project Office has developed the UMTRA Project Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) Plan (DOE, 1992), which establishes the basic programmatic ES&H requirements for all participants on the UMTRA Project. The ES&H plan is designed primarily to cover remedial action activities at UMTRA sites, and defines the ES&H responsibilities of both the UMTRA Project Office and its contractors. The UMTRA FEOSH Program described herein is a subset of the overall UMTRA ES&H program and covers only the federal employees working on the UMTRA Project.

Young, B.H.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

FINAL REPORT TESTS ON THE DURAMELTER 1200 HLW PILOT MELTER SYSTEM USING AZ-101 HLW SIMULANTS VSL-02R0100-2 REV 1 2/17/03  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the final report on data and results obtained from a series of nine tests performed on the one-third scale DuraMelter{trademark} 1200 (DM1200) HLW Pilot Melter system that has been installed at VSL with an integrated prototypical off-gas treatment system. That system has replaced the DM1000 system that was used for HLW throughput testing during Part B1 [1]. Both melters have similar melt surface areas (1.2 m{sup 2}) but the DM1200 is prototypical of the present RPP-WTP HLW melter design whereas the DM1000 was not. These tests were performed under a corresponding RPP-WTP Test Specification and associated Test Plans. The nine tests reported here were preceded by an initial series of short-duration tests conducted to support the start-up and commissioning of this system. This report is a followup to the previously issued Preliminary Data Summary Reports. The DM1200 system was deployed for testing and confirmation of basic design, operability, flow sheet, and process control assumptions as well as for support of waste form qualification and permitting. These tests include data on processing rates, off-gas treatment system performance, recycle stream compositions, as well as process operability and reliability. Consequently, this system is a key component of the overall HLW vitrification development strategy. The primary objective of the present series of tests was to determine the effects of a variety of parameters on the glass production rate in comparison to the RPP-WTP HL W design basis of 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d. Previous testing on the DMIOOO system [1] concluded that achievement of that rate with simulants of projected WTP melter feeds (AZ-101 and C-106/AY-102) was unlikely without the use of bubblers. As part of those tests, the same feed that was used during the cold-commissioning of the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) HLW vitrification system was run on the DM1000 system. The DM1000 tests reproduced the rates that were obtained at the larger WVDP facility, lending confidence to the tests results [1]. Since the inclusion or exclusion of a bubbler has significant design implications, the Project commissioned further tests to address this issue. In an effort to identify factors that might increase the glass production rate for projected WTP melter feeds, a subsequent series of tests was performed on the DM100 system. Several tests variables led to glass production rate increases to values significantly above the 400 kg/m2/d requirement. However, while small-scale melter tests are useful for screening relative effects, they tend to overestimate absolute glass production rates, particularly for un-bubbled tests. Consequently, when scale-up effects were taken into account, it was not clear that any of the variables investigated would conclusively meet the 400 kg/m{sup 2}/d requirement without bubbling. The present series of tests was therefore performed on the DM1200 one-third scale HLW pilot melter system to provide the required basis for a final decision on whether bubblers would be included in the HLW melter. The present tests employed the same AZ-101 waste simulant and glass composition that was used for previous testing for consistency and comparability with the results from the earlier tests.

KRUGER AA; MATLACK KS; KOT WK; BARDAKCI T; GONG W; D'ANGELO NA; SCHATZ TR; PEGG IL

2011-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

437

Final Project Report: Tools for the Development of High Performance Energy Applications and Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project concentrated on various aspects of creating tool infrastructure to make it easier to program large-scale parallel computers. The research conducted during this project is summarized in this report. The complete details of the work are available in the ten publications listed at the end of the report. Many of the concepts created during this project have been incorporated into tools and made available as freely downloadable software (at www.dyninst.org). It also supported the Ph.D. studies of three students.

Hollingsworth, Jeff

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

438

Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Final Report - Spent Nuclear Fuel Retrieval System Manipulator System Cold Validation Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Manipulator system cold validation testing (CVT) was performed in support of the Fuel Retrieval System (FRS) Sub-Project, a subtask of the Spent Nuclear Fuel Project at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. The FRS will be used to retrieve and repackage K-Basin Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) currently stored in old K-Plant storage basins. The FRS is required to retrieve full fuel canisters from the basin; clean the fuel elements inside the canister to remove excessive uranium corrosion products (or sludge); remove the contents from the canisters; and sort the resulting debris, scrap, and fuel for repackaging. The fuel elements and scrap will be collected in fuel storage and scrap baskets in preparation for loading into a multi canister overpack (MCO), while the debris is loaded into a debris bin and disposed of as solid waste. The FRS is composed of three major subsystems. The Manipulator Subsystem provides remote handling of fuel, scrap, and debris; the In-Pool Equipment subsystem performs cleaning of fuel and provides a work surface for handling materials; and the Remote Viewing Subsystem provides for remote viewing of the work area by operators. There are two complete and identical FRS systems, one to be installed in the K-West basin and one to be installed in the K-East basin. Another partial system will be installed in a cold test facility to provide for operator training.

D.R. Jackson; G.R. Kiebel

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

440

Final Technical Report for Project "Improving the Simulation of Arctic Clouds in CCSM3"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project has focused on the simulation of Arctic clouds in CCSM3 and how the modeled cloud amount (and climate) can be improved substantially by altering the parameterized low cloud fraction. The new formula, dubbed 'freeezedry', alleviates the bias of excessive low clouds during polar winter by reducing the cloud amount under very dry conditions. During winter, freezedry decreases the low cloud amount over the coldest regions in high latitudes by over 50% locally and more than 30% averaged across the Arctic (Fig. 1). The cloud reduction causes an Arctic-wide drop of 15 W m{sup -2} in surface cloud radiative forcing (CRF) during winter and about a 50% decrease in mean annual Arctic CRF. Consequently, wintertime surface temperatures fall by up to 4 K on land and 2-8 K over the Arctic Ocean, thus significantly reducing the model's pronounced warm bias (Fig. 1). While improving the polar climate simulation in CCSM3, freezedry has virtually no influence outside of very cold regions (Fig. 2) or during summer (Fig. 3), which are space and time domains that were not targeted. Furthermore, the simplicity of this parameterization allows it to be readily incorporated into other GCMs, many of which also suffer from excessive wintertime polar cloudiness, based on the results from the CMIP3 archive (Vavrus et al., 2008). Freezedry also affects CCSM3's sensitivity to greenhouse forcing. In a transient-CO{sub 2} experiment, the model version with freezedry warms up to 20% less in the North Polar and South Polar regions (1.5 K and 0.5 K smaller warming, respectively) (Fig. 4). Paradoxically, the muted high-latitude response occurs despite a much larger increase in cloud amount with freezedry during non-summer months (when clouds warm the surface), apparently because of the colder modern reference climate. These results of the freezedry parameterization have recently been published (Vavrus and D. Waliser, 2008: An improved parameterization for simulating Arctic cloud amount in the CCSM3 climate model. J. Climate, 21, 5673-5687.). The article also provides a novel synthesis of surface- and satellite-based Arctic cloud observations that show how much the new freezedry parameterization improves the simulated cloud amount in high latitudes (Fig. 3). Freezedry has been incorporated into the CCSM3.5 version, in which it successfully limits the excessive polar clouds, and may be used in CCSM4. Material from this work is also appearing in a synthesis article on future Arctic cloud changes (Vavrus, D. Waliser, J. Francis, and A. Schweiger, 'Simulations of 20th and 21st century Arctic cloud amount in the global climate models assessed in the IPCC AR4', accepted in Climate Dynamics) and was used in a collaborative paper on Arctic cloud-sea ice coupling (Schweiger, A., R. Lindsay, S. Vavrus, and J. Francis, 2008: Relationships between Arctic sea ice and clouds during autumn. J. Climate, 21, 4799-4810.). This research was presented at the 2007 CCSM Annual Workshop, as well as the CCSM's 2007 Atmospheric Model Working Group and Polar Working Group Meetings. The findings were also shown at the 2007 Climate Change Prediction Program's Science Team Meeting. In addition, I served as an instructor at the International Arctic Research Center's (IARC) Summer School on Arctic Climate Modeling in Fairbanks this summer, where I presented on the challenges and techniques used in simulating polar clouds. I also contributed to the development of a new Arctic System Model by attending a workshop in Colorado this summer on this fledgling project. Finally, an outreach activity for the general public has been the development of an interactive web site () that displays Arctic cloud amount in the CMIP3 climate model archive under present and future scenarios. This site allows users to make polar and global maps of a variety of climate variables to investigate the individual and ensemble-mean GCM response to greenhouse warming and the extent to which models adequately represent Arctic clouds in the modern clima

Stephen J. Vavrus

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test project final" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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441

Final Technical Report for the Neutron Detection without Helium-3 Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report details the results of the research and development work accomplished for the ‘Neutron Detection without Helium-3’ project conducted during the 2011-2013 fiscal years. The primary focus of the project was to investigate commercially available technologies that might be used in safeguards applications in the relatively near term. Other technologies that are being developed may be more applicable in the future, but were outside the scope of this study.

Ely, James H.; Bliss, Mary; Kouzes, Richard T.; Lintereur, Azaree T.; Robinson, Sean M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Swinhoe, Martyn T.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report (Final EIS/EIR) has been prepared to meet the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). The Proposed Action includes the construction, operation, and decommissioning of a 48 megawatt (gross) geothermal power plant with ancillary facilities (10-12 production well pads and 3-5 injection well pads, production and injection pipelines), access roads, and a 230-kilovolt (kV) transmission line in the Modoc National Forest in Siskiyou County, California. Alternative locations for the power plant site within a reasonable distance of the middle of the wellfield were determined to be technically feasible. Three power plant site alternatives are evaluated in the Final EIS/EIR.

None

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Engineering Ralstonia eutropha for Production of Isobutanol (IBT) Motor Fuel from Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen Project Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research project is a collaboration between the Sinskey laboratory at MIT and the Worden laboratory at Michigan State University. The goal of the project is to produce Isobutanol (IBT), a branched-chain alcohol that can serve as a drop-in transportation fuel, through the engineered microbial biosynthesis of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrogen, and Oxygen using a novel bioreactor. This final technical report presents the findings of both the biological engineering work at MIT that extended the native branched-chain amino acid pathway of the wild type Ralstonia eutropha H16 to perform this biosynthesis, as well as the unique design, modeling, and construction of a bioreactor for incompatible gasses at Michigan State that enabled the operational testing of the complete system. This 105 page technical report summarizing the three years of research includes 72 figures and 11 tables of findings. Ralstonia eutropha (also known as Cupriavidus necator) is a Gram-negative, facultatively chemolithoautotrophic bacteria. It has been the principle organism used for the study of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) polymer biosynthesis. The wild-type Ralstonia eutropha H16 produces PHB as an intracellular carbon storage material while under nutrient stress in the presence of excess carbon. Under this stress, it can accumulate approximately 80 % of its cell dry weight (CDW) as this intracellular polymer. With the restoration of the required nutrients, the cells are then able to catabolize this polymer. If extracted from the cell, this PHB polymer can be processed into biodegradable and biocompatible plastics, however for this research, it is the efficient metabolic pathway channeling the captured carbon that is of interest. R. eutropha is further unique in that it contains two carbon-fixation Calvin–Benson–Bassham cycle operons, two oxygen-tolerant hydrogenases, and several formate dehydrogenases. It has also been much studied for its ability in the presence of oxygen, to fix carbon dioxide into complex cellular molecules using the energy from hydrogen. In this research project, engineered strains of R. eutropha redirected the excess carbon from PHB storage into the production of isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol (branched-chain higher alcohols). These branched-chain higher alcohols can be used directly as substitutes for fossil-based fuels and are seen as alternative biofuels to ethanol and biodiesel. Importantly, these alcohols have approximately 98 % of the energy content of gasoline, 17 % higher than the current gasoline additive ethanol, without impacting corn market production for feed or food. Unlike ethanol, these branched-chain alcohols have low vapor pressure, hygroscopicity, and water solubility, which make them readily compatible with the existing pipelines, gasoline pumps, and engines in our transportation infrastructure. While the use of alternative energies from solar, wind, geothermal, and hydroelectric has spread for stationary power applications, these energy sources cannot be effectively or efficiently employed in current or future transportation systems. With the ongoing concerns of fossil fuel availability and price stability over the long term, alternative biofuels like branched-chain higher alcohols hold promise as a suitable transportation fuel in the future. We showed in our research that various mutant strains of R. eutropha with isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase activity, in combination with the overexpression of plasmid-borne, native branched-chain amino acid biosynthesis pathway genes and the overexpression of heterologous ketoisovalerate decarboxylase gene, would produce isobutanol and 3-methyl-1-butanol when initiated during nitrogen or phosphorus limitation. Early on, we isolated one mutant R. eutropha strain which produced over 180 mg/L branched-chain alcohols in flask culture while being more tolerant of isobutanol toxicity. After the targeted elimination of genes encoding several potential carbon sinks (ilvE, bkdAB, and aceE), the production titer of the improved to 270 mg/L isobutanol and 40 mg/L 3-methyl-1-butanol.

Sinskey, Anthony J. [MIT] [MIT; Worden, Robert Mark [Michigan State University MSU] [Michigan State University MSU; Brigham, Christopher [MIT] [MIT; Lu, Jingnan [MIT] [MIT; Quimby, John Westlake [MIT] [MIT; Gai, Claudia [MIT] [MIT; Speth, Daan [MIT] [MIT; Elliott, Sean [Boston University] [Boston University; Fei, John Qiang [MIT] [MIT; Bernardi, Amanda [MIT] [MIT; Li, Sophia [MIT] [MIT; Grunwald, Stephan [MIT] [MIT; Grousseau, Estelle [MIT] [MIT; Maiti, Soumen [MSU] [MSU; Liu, Chole [MSU] [MSU

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

444

Development of a vortex combustor (VC) for space/water heating applications (combustion tests). Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for Interagency Agreement DE-AI22-87PC79660 on ``Combustion Test`` for vortex combustor (VC) development for commercial applications. The work culminated in the successful demonstration of a 2 MB/H proof-of-concept (POC) model firing coal-water fuel (CWF). This development is concerned with a new concept in combustion, and was a general lack of relevant information. The work therefore began (in addition to the companion cold flow modeling study) with the design and test of two subscale models (0.15 and 0.3 MB/H) and one full scale model (3 MB/H) to obtain the needed information. With the experience gained, the 2 MB/H POC model was then designed and demonstrated. Although, these models were designed somewhat differently from one another, they all performed well and demonstrated the superiority of the concept. In summary, test results have shown that VC can be fired on several coal fuels (CWF, dry ultrafine coal, utility grind pulverized coal) at high combustion efficiency (>99%), high firing intensity (up to 0.44 MB/H-ft{sup 3}), and at temperatures sufficiently low or dry ash removal. The combustion process is completed totally inside the combustor. Conventional combustion enhancement techniques such as: preheating (air and/or fuel), pre-combustion, and post combustion are not needed.

Fu, T.T. [Naval Civil Engineering Lab., Port Hueneme, CA (United States); Nieh, S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Combustion and Multiphase Flows Lab.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project : Rainwater Wildlife Area Final Management Plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Draft Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary.

Childs, Allen

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 3: Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP) will provide background concentration levels of selected metals, organic compounds, and radionuclides in soils from uncontaminated on-site areas at the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and off-site in the western part of Roane County and the eastern part of Anderson County. The BSCP will establish a database, recommend how to use the data for contaminated site assessment, and provide estimates of the potential human health and environmental risks associated with the background level concentrations of potentially hazardous constituents. ORR background soil characterization data will be used for two purposes. The first application will be in differentiating between naturally occurring constituents and site-related contamination. This is a very important step in a risk assessment because if sufficient background data are not available, no constituent known to be a contaminant can be eliminated from the assessment even if the sampled concentration is measured at a minimum level. The second use of the background data will be in calculating baseline risks against which site-specific contamination risks can be compared.

Hatmaker, T.L.; Hook, L.A.; Jackson, B.L. [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

447