Sample records for test peak pulse

  1. AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) for development of the DR Automation Server System This project could not have been completed without extensive: Greg Watson and Mark Lott · C&C Building Automation: Mark Johnson and John Fiegel · Chabot Space AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS

  2. A wedged-peak-pulse design with medium fuel adiabat for indirect-drive fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Zhengfeng; Ren, Guoli; Liu, Bin; Wu, Junfeng [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); He, X. T.; Liu, Jie; Wang, L. F.; Ye, Wenhua [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Center for Applied Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present letter, we propose the design of a wedged-peak pulse at the late stage of indirect drive. Our simulations of one- and two-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics show that the wedged-peak-pulse design can raise the drive pressure and capsule implosion velocity without significantly raising the fuel adiabat. It can thus balance the energy requirement and hydrodynamic instability control at both ablator/fuel interface and hot-spot/fuel interface. This investigation has implication in the fusion ignition at current mega-joule laser facilities.

  3. Peak Doubling in SPDC Coincidence Spectra with a Short-Pulse Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikhail V. Fedorov; Julia M. Mikhailova; Peter A. Volkov

    2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a double-peak structure of the coincidence spectrum of biphoton states in the process of spontaneous parametric down-conversion with a pump having the form of short pulses. The effect is shown to arise owing to the obligatory symmetry of bihoton wave functions, as wave functions describing states of two bozons obeying the Bose-Einstein statistics. Parameters of the peaks are found and conditions necessary for experimental observation of the effect are determined.

  4. A low-power, CMOS peak detect and hold circuit for nuclear pulse spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ericson, M.N.; Simpson, M.L.; Britton, C.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Allen, M.D. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States); Kroeger, R.A. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Inderhees, S.E. [Alexandria, VA (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-power CMOS peak detecting track and hold circuit optimized for nuclear pulse spectroscopy is presented. The circuit topology eliminates the need for a rectifying diode, reducing the effect of charge injection into the hold capacitor, incorporates a linear gate at the input to prevent pulse pileup, and uses dynamic bias control that minimizes both pedestal and droop. Both positive-going and negative-going pulses are accommodated using a complementary set of track and hold circuits. Full characterization of the design fabricated in 1.2{mu}m CMOS including dynamic range, integral nonlinearity, droop rate, pedestal, and power measurements is presented. Additionally, analysis and design approaches for optimization of operational characteristics are discussed.

  5. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Descriptionand Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    California utilities have been exploring the use of critical peak prices (CPP) to help reduce needle peaks in customer end-use loads. CPP is a form of price-responsive demand response (DR). Recent experience has shown that customers have limited knowledge of how to operate their facilities in order to reduce their electricity costs under CPP (Quantum 2004). While the lack of knowledge about how to develop and implement DR control strategies is a barrier to participation in DR programs like CPP, another barrier is the lack of automation of DR systems. During 2003 and 2004, the PIER Demand Response Research Center (DRRC) conducted a series of tests of fully automated electric demand response (Auto-DR) at 18 facilities. Overall, the average of the site-specific average coincident demand reductions was 8% from a variety of building types and facilities. Many electricity customers have suggested that automation will help them institutionalize their electric demand savings and improve their overall response and DR repeatability. This report focuses on and discusses the specific results of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing (Auto-CPP, a specific type of Auto-DR) tests that took place during 2005, which build on the automated demand response (Auto-DR) research conducted through PIER and the DRRC in 2003 and 2004. The long-term goal of this project is to understand the technical opportunities of automating demand response and to remove technical and market impediments to large-scale implementation of automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and industry. A second goal of this research is to understand and identify best practices for DR strategies and opportunities. The specific objectives of the Automated Critical Peak Pricing test were as follows: (1) Demonstrate how an automated notification system for critical peak pricing can be used in large commercial facilities for demand response (DR). (2) Evaluate effectiveness of such a system. (3) Determine how customers will respond to this form of automation for CPP. (4) Evaluate what type of DR shifting and shedding strategies can be automated. (5) Explore how automation of control strategies can increase participation rates and DR saving levels with CPP. (6) Identify optimal demand response control strategies. (7) Determine occupant and tenant response.

  6. High peak power test of S-band waveguide switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nassiri, A.; Grelick, A.; Kustom, R.L.; White, M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The injector and source of particles for the Advanced Photon Source (APS) is a 2856-MHz S-band electron-positron linear accelerator (linac) which produces electrons with energies up to 650 MeV or positrons with energies up to 450 MeV. To improve the linac rf system availability, an additional modulator-klystron subsystem is being constructed to provide a switchable hot spare unit for each of the five existing S-band transmitters. The switching of the transmitters will require the use of SF6-pressurized waveguide switches at a peak operating power of 35 MW. A test stand was set up at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) Klystron-Microwave laboratory to conduct tests characterizing the power handling capability of these waveguide switches. Test results are presented.

  7. Controlling Peak Power During Scan Testing Ranganathan Sankaralingam and Nur A. Touba

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Touba, Nur A.

    Controlling Peak Power During Scan Testing Ranganathan Sankaralingam and Nur A. Touba Computer effective in controlling peak power. 1. Introduction The peak power drawn in a single clock cycle during. The average power dissipation during scan testing can be controlled by reducing the scan clock frequency

  8. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Internet relay during the Auto-CPP tests due to their2004 tests, five of the 18 sites used an Internet relay thatCPP test. Ten sites used the Internet relay to communicate

  9. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Information Systems (EIS) and Energy Management andstudy used their existing EIS systems for the Auto-DR test.different types of EMCS and EIS systems, they were “unified”

  10. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael K.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro

    2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid. The tests were conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants, and the test data were used to develop models predicting two measures of mixing performance for full-scale WTP vessels. The models predict the cloud height (the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action) and the critical suspension velocity (the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids are suspended off the floor, though not fully mixed). From the cloud height, the concentration of solids at the pump inlet can be estimated. The predicted critical suspension velocity for lifting all solids is not precisely the same as the mixing requirement for 'disturbing' a sufficient volume of solids, but the values will be similar and closely related. These predictive models were successfully benchmarked against larger scale tests and compared well with results from computational fluid dynamics simulations. The application of the models to assess mixing in WTP vessels is illustrated in examples for 13 distinct designs and selected operational conditions. The values selected for these examples are not final; thus, the estimates of performance should not be interpreted as final conclusions of design adequacy or inadequacy. However, this work does reveal that several vessels may require adjustments to design, operating features, or waste feed properties to ensure confidence in operation. The models described in this report will prove to be valuable engineering tools to evaluate options as designs are finalized for the WTP. Revision 1 refines data sets used for model development and summarizes models developed since the completion of Revision 0.

  11. Pulse Jet Mixing Tests With Noncohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Sundaram, S. K.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Smith, Gary L.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Baer, Ellen BK; Snyder, Sandra F.; White, Michael; Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Bailey, Sharon A.; Bower, John C.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Eakin, David E.; Elmore, Monte R.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Hurley, David E.; Johnson, Michael D.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Lawler, Bruce D.; Loveland, Jesse S.; Mullen, O Dennis; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Peters, Timothy J.; Robinson, Peter J.; Russcher, Michael S.; Sande, Susan; Santoso, Christian; Shoemaker, Steven V.; Silva, Steve M.; Smith, Devin E.; Su, Yin-Fong; Toth, James J.; Wiberg, John D.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zuljevic, Nino

    2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes results from pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid conducted during FY 2007 and 2008 to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tests were conducted at three geometric scales using noncohesive simulants. The test data were used to independently develop mixing models that can be used to predict full-scale WTP vessel performance and to rate current WTP mixing system designs against two specific performance requirements. One requirement is to ensure that all solids have been disturbed during the mixing action, which is important to release gas from the solids. The second requirement is to maintain a suspended solids concentration below 20 weight percent at the pump inlet. The models predict the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action, and the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids have been lifted from the floor. From the cloud height estimate we can calculate the concentration of solids at the pump inlet. The velocity needed to lift the solids is slightly more demanding than "disturbing" the solids, and is used as a surrogate for this metric. We applied the models to assess WTP mixing vessel performance with respect to the two perform¬ance requirements. Each mixing vessel was evaluated against these two criteria for two defined waste conditions. One of the wastes was defined by design limits and one was derived from Hanford waste characterization reports. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy the performance criteria used for any of the conditions evaluated. The remaining three vessel types provide varying assessments when the different particle characteristics are evaluated. The assessment predicts that three vessel types will satisfy the design criteria for all conditions evaluated. Seven vessel types will not satisfy the performance criteria used for any of the conditions evaluated. The remaining three vessel types provide varying assessments when the different particle characteristics are evaluated. The HLP-022 vessel was also evaluated using 12 m/s pulse jet velocity with 6-in. nozzles, and this design also did not satisfy the criteria for all of the conditions evaluated.

  12. Spectrometric Analysis for Pulse Jet Mixer Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZEIGLER, KRISTINE

    2004-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Analytical Development Section (ADS) was tasked with providing support for a Hanford River Protection Program-Waste Treatment Program (RPP-WTP) project test involving absorption analysis for non-Newtonian pulse jet mixer testing for small scale (PJM) and prototype (CRV) tanks with sparging. Tanks filled with clay were mixed with various amounts of powdered dye as a tracer. The objective of the entire project was to determine the best mixing protocol (nozzle velocity, number of spargers used, total air flow, etc.) by determining the percent mixed volume through the use of an ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectrometer. The dye concentration within the sample could be correlated to the volume fraction mixed in the tank. Samples were received in vials, a series of dilutions were generated from the clay, allowed to equilibrate, then centrifuged and siphoned for the supernate liquid to analyze by absorption spectroscopy. Equilibration of the samples and thorough mixing of the samples were a continuous issue with dilution curves being difficult to obtain. Despite these technical issues, useful data was obtained for evaluation of various mix conditions.

  13. Generation of high peak power pulse using 2 stage erbium-doped fiber amplifier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyung-Woo

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results obtained from generation of high repetition rate, high power output pulse using an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA). Two stage amplification was employed. The first stage setup used 980nm pump laser to pump erbium...

  14. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Rose, Peter

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  15. First Tracer Test After Circulation in Desert Peak 27-15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Peter

    2013-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the successful stimulation of Desert Peak target EGS well 27-15, a circulation test was initiated by injecting a conservative tracer (1,5-nds) in combination with a reactive tracer (7-amino-1,3-naphthalene disulfonate). The closest production well 74-21 was monitored over the subsequent several months.

  16. Adjustable Shock Test Sled for Haversine Pulses at 250 fps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy Hartwig; Brent Hower; Aaron Seaholm

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    New test requirements were developed by Sandia National Laboratory to simulate a regime of shock testing not previously performed at the Kansas City Plant operated by Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies. These environments were unique in that they involved amplitude of shock >1000g with relatively long pulse durations (greater 5 ms but less than 10 ms) and involved velocity changes up to 235 ft/sec. Ten months were available to develop, design, manufacture and prove-in this new capability. We designed a new shock sled to deliver this new family of shock environments in a laboratory test. The performance range of the new sled includes five specific shocks (1000 g – 8 ms, 1300 - 6 ms, 1500 g – 5.4 ms, 1950 g – 6 ms, 2250 g – 5.4 ms; all haversine shaped), and it also incorporates adjustability to accommodate new shocks within this range. These shock environments result in velocity changes ranging from 160 fps to 250 fps. The test sled accommodates test articles weighing up to 20 lbs and measuring up to 10” along any axis.

  17. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dethlefsen, R.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

  18. Structural-Based Power-Aware Assignment of Don't Cares for Peak Power Reduction during Scan Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Structural-Based Power-Aware Assignment of Don't Cares for Peak Power Reduction during Scan Testing on ISCAS'89 and ITC'99 benchmark circuits with the proposed structural-based power- aware X, and the resulting excessive power consumption can cause structural damage or severe decrease in reliability

  19. PULSE COMBUSTOR DESIGN QUALIFICATION TEST AND CLEAN COAL FEEDSTOCK TEST - VOLUME I AND VOLUME II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    For this Cooperative Agreement, the pulse heater module is the technology envelope for an indirectly heated steam reformer. The field of use of the steam reformer pursuant to this Cooperative Agreement with DOE is for the processing of sub-bituminous coals and lignite. The main focus is the mild gasification of such coals for the generation of both fuel gas and char--for the steel industry is the main focus. An alternate market application for the substitution of metallurgical coke is also presented. This project was devoted to qualification of a 253-tube pulse heater module. This module was designed, fabricated, installed, instrumented and tested in a fluidized bed test facility. Several test campaigns were conducted. This larger heater is a 3.5 times scale-up of the previous pulse heaters that had 72 tubes each. The smaller heater has been part of previous pilot field testing of the steam reformer at New Bern, North Carolina. The project also included collection and reduction of mild gasification process data from operation of the process development unit (PDU). The operation of the PDU was aimed at conditions required to produce char (and gas) for the Northshore Steel Operations. Northshore Steel supplied the coal for the process unit tests.

  20. CORRELATION BETWEEN THE ISOTROPIC ENERGY AND THE PEAK ENERGY AT ZERO FLUENCE FOR THE INDIVIDUAL PULSES OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: TOWARD A UNIVERSAL PHYSICAL CORRELATION FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Basak, Rupal; Rao, A. R., E-mail: rupalb@tifr.res.in, E-mail: arrao@tifr.res.in [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We find a strong correlation between the peak energy at zero fluence (E{sub peak,0}) and the isotropic energy (E{sub {gamma},iso}) of the 22 pulses of nine gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) detected by the Fermi satellite. The correlation holds for the individual pulses of each GRB, which shows the reality of the correlation. The derived correlation (Spearman correlation coefficient, r, which is 0.96) is much stronger compared to the correlations using E{sub peak} (in place of E{sub peak,0}) determined from the time-integrated spectrum (r = 0.8), the time-resolved spectrum without accounting for broad pulse structures (r = 0.37), or the pulsewise spectrum (r = 0.89). Though the improvement in the E{sub peak}-E{sub {gamma},iso} relation (the Amati relation) for a pulsewise analysis is known earlier, this is the first time a parameter derived from a joint spectral and timing fit to the data is shown to improve the correlation. We suggest that E{sub peak,0}, rather than E{sub peak}, is intrinsic to a GRB pulse and a natural choice as the parameter in pulsewise correlation studies.

  1. Development of Modulator Pulse Stability Measurement Device and Test Results at SLAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, C.; Burkhart, C.; Kemp, M.; Morris, B.; Beukers, T.; Ciprian, R.; Nguyen, M.; /SLAC

    2011-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the development of a pulse stability measurement device is presented. The measurement accuracy is better than 250uV, about 4.2ppm of a typical 60V input pulse. Pulse signals up to +/- 80V peak can be measured. The device works together with an oscilloscope. The primary function of the measurement device is to provide a precision offset, such that variations in the flattop of the modulator voltage pulse can be accurately resolved. The oscilloscope records the difference between the pulse flattop and the reference for a series of waveforms. The scope math functions are utilized to calculate the rms variations over the series. The frequency response of the device is characterized by the measured cutoff frequency of about 6.5MHz. In addition to detailing the design and calibration of the precision pulse stability device, measurements of SLAC line-type linac modulators and recently developed induction modulators will be presented. Factors affecting pulse stability will be discussed.

  2. Testing a scale pulsed modulator for an IEC neutron source into a resistive load

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wheat, Robert M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragonez, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1/10th scaled prototype pulse modulator for an Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) neutron source has been designed and tested at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The scaled prototype modulator is based on a solid-state Marx architecture and has an output voltage of 13 kV and an output current of 10 A. The modulator has a variable pulse width between 50 {micro}s and 1 ms with < 5% droop at all pulse widths. The modulator operates with a duty factor up to 5% and has a maximum pulse repetition frequency of 1 kHz. The use of a solid-state Marx modulator in this application has several potential benefits. These benefits include variable pulse width and amplitude, inherent switch overcurrent and transient overvoltage protection, and increased efficiency over DC supplies used in this application. Several new features were incorporated into this design including inductorless charging, fully snubberless operation, and stage fusing. The scaled prototype modulator has been tested using a 1 k{Omega} resistive load. Test results are given. Short (50 {micro}s) and long (1 ms) pulses are demonstrated as well as high duty factor operation (1 kHz rep rate at a 50 {micro}s pulse width for a 5% duty factor). Pulse agility of the modulator is demonstrated through turning the individual Marx stages on and off in sequence producing ramp, pyramid, and reverse pyramid waveforms.

  3. Method and apparatus for electrical cable testing by pulse-arrested spark discharge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnum, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Warne, Larry K. (Albuquerque, NM); Jorgenson, Roy E. (Albuquerque, NM); Schneider, Larry X. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2005-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for electrical cable testing by Pulse-Arrested Spark Discharge (PASD) uses the cable response to a short-duration high-voltage incident pulse to determine the location of an electrical breakdown that occurs at a defect site in the cable. The apparatus for cable testing by PASD includes a pulser for generating the short-duration high-voltage incident pulse, at least one diagnostic sensor to detect the incident pulse and the breakdown-induced reflected and/or transmitted pulses propagating from the electrical breakdown at the defect site, and a transient recorder to record the cable response. The method and apparatus are particularly useful to determine the location of defect sites in critical but inaccessible electrical cabling systems in aging aircraft, ships, nuclear power plants, and industrial complexes.

  4. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges in overhead power lines. Part I. Fast pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramrus, A.

    1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objective of the study was to create conceptual designs of high voltage pulsers capable of simulating two types of electromagnetic pulses (EMPs) caused by a high-altitude nuclear burst; the slow rise time magnetohydrodynamic (MHD-EMP) and the fast rise time high-altitude EMP (HEMP). The pulser design was directed towards facilities capable of performing EMP vulnerability testing of components used in the national electric power system.

  5. Biaxial testing of high strength carbon fiber composite cylinders for pulsed magnet reinforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    envelope) of composite materials. This methodology was applied to two different carbon/epoxy basedBiaxial testing of high strength carbon fiber composite cylinders for pulsed magnet reinforcement N A methodology is introduced to test carbon-fiber-reinforced, hoop-wound composite cylinders for their biaxial

  6. Determination of the length and compass orientation of hydraulic fractures by pulse testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manohar, Madan Mohan

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S3HAIDVHi OIlflVHOAH i0 NOIlVIN3IHO SSVHWOO QNV HlBN31 3Wl iO NOIlVNIWH3l30 DETERMINATION OF THE LENGTH AND COMPASS ORIENTATION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURES BY PULSE TESTING A Thesis by MADAN MOHAN MANOHAR Approved as to Style and Content by: Wi... liam J. Lee (Ch ai rman of Commi t tee ) Le a M. Je Member) Richard A. Morse (Member) D. Yon Gonten ( d of Department) December 1984 ABSTRACT Determination of the Length and Compass Drientat1on of Hydraulic Fractures by Pulse Testing...

  7. High poloidal beta long-pulse experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauel, Michael E.

    High poloidal beta long-pulse experiments in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor* J. Kesner+ Plasma stability and confinement. As the current profile evolved, a significantly reduced beta limit was observed after the current ramp-down carried negative current. At later times in lower flN discharges, beta

  8. RF PULSED TESTS ON 3GHZ NIOBIUM CAVITIES J. Le Duff, C. Thomas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RF PULSED TESTS ON 3GHZ NIOBIUM CAVITIES J. Le Duff, C. Thomas , G. Bienvenu, H.Sun LAL, Orsay limits have been pushed back thanks to improvements of niobium purity, cavity preparation, as- sembling mT or 50MV/m accelerating field Eacc for TESLA shape bulk niobium (Nb) cavities at T = 0 K

  9. Detailed design, fabrication and testing of an engineering prototype compensated pulsed alternator. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bird, W.L. Jr.; Woodson, H.H.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design, fabrication, and test results of a prototype compensated pulsed alternator are discussed. The prototype compulsator is a vertical shaft single phase alternator with a rotating armature and salient pole stator. The machine is designed for low rep rate pulsed duty and is sized to drive a modified 10 cm Beta amplifier. The load consists of sixteen 15 mm x 20 mm x 112 cm long xenon flashlamps connected in parallel. The prototype compulsator generates an open circuit voltage of 6 kV, 180 Hz, at a maximum design speed of 5400 rpm. At maximum speed, the inertial energy stored in the compulsator rotor is 3.4 megajoules.

  10. Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Roger A. (Amsterdam, NY)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Circuitry for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrut to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on.

  11. Electronic constant current and current pulse signal generator for nuclear instrumentation testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, R.A.

    1994-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Circuitry is described for testing the ability of an intermediate range nuclear instrument to detect and measure a constant current and a periodic current pulse. The invention simulates the resistance and capacitance of the signal connection of a nuclear instrument ion chamber detector and interconnecting cable. An LED flasher/oscillator illuminates an LED at a periodic rate established by a timing capacitor and circuitry internal to the flasher/oscillator. When the LED is on, a periodic current pulse is applied to the instrument. When the LED is off, a constant current is applied. An inductor opposes battery current flow when the LED is on. 1 figures.

  12. In Situ Characterization of a Single Fracture Hydromechanical Behavior from Hydraulic Pulse Tests coupled to Simultaneous Pressure Normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallée, Martin

    In Situ Characterization of a Single Fracture Hydromechanical Behavior from Hydraulic Pulse Tests of the other surrounding fractures of the network. 1 INTRODUCTION Hydraulic pulse injection testing in single borehole has previously been applied to determine hydraulic properties of rock fractures, including

  13. An Audio Compressor/Peak Limiter Circuit -Part III The object of this lab is to test your compressor/limiter with a "real-world" audio signal.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leach Jr.,W. Marshall

    An Audio Compressor/Peak Limiter Circuit - Part III The object of this lab is to test your compressor/limiter with a "real-world" audio signal. Allen Robinson has set up a microphone the oscilloscope. · Verify that your compressor is working before doing the following steps. · Connect the output

  14. International Journal of Rock Mechanics & Mining Sciences 43 (2006) 10621082 Hydromechanical modelling of pulse tests that measure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallée, Martin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fracture depend not only on its hydraulic and ARTICLE IN PRESS www.elsevier.com/locate/ijrmms 1365 deformation and fluid flow interactions are investigated through a series of hydraulic pulse injection tests

  15. Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

  16. Pulse stretcher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Horton, J.A.

    1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for increasing the length of a laser pulse to reduce its peak power without substantial loss in the average power of the pulse is disclosed. The apparatus uses a White cell having a plurality of optical delay paths of successively increasing number of passes between the field mirror and the objective mirrors. A pulse from a laser travels through a multi-leg reflective path between a beam splitter and a totally reflective mirror to the laser output. The laser pulse is also simultaneously injected through the beam splitter to the input mirrors of the optical delay paths. The pulses from the output mirrors of the optical delay paths go simultaneously to the laser output and to the input mirrors of the longer optical delay paths. The beam splitter is 50% reflective and 50% transmissive to provide equal attenuation of all of the pulses at the laser output. 6 figures.

  17. Integrated testing of the Thales LPT9510 pulse tube cooler and the iris LCCE electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Dean L.; Rodriguez, Jose I.; Carroll, Brian A. [The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bustamante, John G. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States); Kirkconnell, Carl S.; Luong, Thomas T.; Murphy, J. B.; Haley, Michael F. [Iris Technology, Irvine, CA 92616 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has identified the Thales LPT9510 pulse tube cryocooler as a candidate low cost cryocooler to provide active cooling on future cost-capped scientific missions. The commercially available cooler can provide refrigeration in excess of 2 W at 100K for 60W of power. JPL purchased the LPT9510 cooler for thermal and dynamic performance characterization, and has initiated the flight qualification of the existing cooler design to satisfy near-term JPL needs for this cooler. The LPT9510 has been thermally tested over the heat reject temperature range of 0C to +40C during characterization testing. The cooler was placed on a force dynamometer to measure the selfgenerated vibration of the cooler. Iris Technology has provided JPL with a brass board version of the Low Cost Cryocooler Electronics (LCCE) to drive the Thales cooler during characterization testing. The LCCE provides precision closed-loop temperature control and embodies extensive protection circuitry for handling and operational robustness; other features such as exported vibration mitigation and low frequency input current filtering are envisioned as options that future flight versions may or may not include based upon the mission requirements. JPL has also chosen to partner with Iris Technology for the development of electronics suitable for future flight applications. Iris Technology is building a set of radiation-hard, flight-design electronics to deliver to the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Test results of the thermal, dynamic and EMC testing of the integrated Thales LPT9510 cooler and Iris LCCE electronics is presented here.

  18. Pulse Jet Mixer Overblow Testing for Assessment of Loadings During Multiple Overblows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfund, David M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Michener, Thomas E.; Nigl, Franz; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Leigh, Richard J.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Baumann, Aaron W.; Kurath, Dean E.; Hoza, Mark; Combs, William H.; Fort, James A.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. The WTP consists of three primary facilities: pretreatment, low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification, and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. The pretreatment facility will receive waste feed from the Hanford tank farms and separate it into 1) a high-volume, low-activity liquid stream stripped of most solids and radionuclides and 2) a much smaller volume of HLW slurry containing most of the solids and most of the radioactivity. Many of the vessels in the pretreatment facility will contain pulse jet mixers (PJMs) that will provide some or all of the mixing in the vessels. This technology was selected for use in so-called “black cell” regions of the WTP, where maintenance capability will not be available for the operating life of the WTP. PJM technology was selected for use in these regions because it has no moving mechanical parts that require maintenance. The vessels with the most concentrated slurries will also be mixed with air spargers and/or steady jets in addition to the mixing provided by the PJMs. This report contains the results of single and multiple PJM overblow tests conducted in a large, ~13 ft-diameter × 15-ft-tall tank located in the high bay of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 336 Building test facility. These single and multiple PJM overblow tests were conducted using water and a clay simulant to bound the lower and upper rheological properties of the waste streams anticipated to be processed in the WTP. Hydrodynamic pressures were measured at a number of locations in the test vessel using an array of nine pressure sensors and four hydrophones. These measurements were made under normal and limiting vessel operating conditions (i.e., maximum PJM fluid emptying velocity, maximum and minimum vessel contents for PJM operation, and maximum and minimum rheological properties). Test data collected from the PJM overblow tests were provided to Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) for assessing hydrostatic, dynamic, and acoustic pressure loadings on in-tank structures during 1) single overblows; 2) multiple overlapping overblows of two to four PJMs; 3) simultaneous overblows of pairs of PJMs.

  19. Pulse Jet Mixer Overblow Testing for Assessment of Loadings During Multiple Overblows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfund, David M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Michener, Thomas E.; Nigl, Franz; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Leigh, Richard J.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Baumann, Aaron W.; Kurath, Dean E.; Hoza, Mark; Combs, William H.; Fort, James A.; Bredt, Ofelia P.

    2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pretreat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. The WTP consists of three primary facilities: pretreatment, low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification, and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. The pretreatment facility will receive waste feed from the Hanford tank farms and separate it into 1) a high-volume, low-activity liquid stream stripped of most solids and radionuclides and 2) a much smaller volume of HLW slurry containing most of the solids and most of the radioactivity. Many of the vessels in the pretreatment facility will contain pulse jet mixers (PJMs) that will provide some or all of the mixing in the vessels. This technology was selected for use in so-called “black cell” regions of the WTP, where maintenance capability will not be available for the operating life of the WTP. PJM technology was selected for use in these regions because it has no moving mechanical parts that require maintenance. The vessels with the most concentrated slurries will also be mixed with air spargers and/or steady jets in addition to the mixing provided by the PJMs. This report contains the results of single and multiple PJM overblow tests conducted in a large, ~13 ft-diameter × 15-ft-tall tank located in the high bay of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 336 Building test facility. These single and multiple PJM overblow tests were conducted using water and a clay simulant to bound the lower and upper rheological properties of the waste streams anticipated to be processed in the WTP. Hydrodynamic pressures were measured at a number of locations in the test vessel using an array of nine pressure sensors and four hydrophones. These measurements were made under normal and limiting vessel operating conditions (i.e., maximum PJM fluid emptying velocity, maximum and minimum vessel contents for PJM operation, and maximum and minimum rheological properties). Test data collected from the PJM overblow tests were provided to Bechtel National, Inc. (BNI) for assessing hydrostatic, dynamic, and acoustic pressure loadings on in-tank structures during 1) single overblows; 2) multiple overlapping overblows of two to four PJMs; 3) simultaneous overblows of pairs of PJMs.

  20. 4 ESS switch electromagnetic pulse assessment. Volume 1. Test-bed design installation, and baselining. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The content of this report is defined by paragraph 3/1 of the Statement of Work for contract DCA100-88-C-0027. This report documents Task 1 and 2, Test-Bed Design, Installation, and Baselining of the 4 ESS Switch Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Assessment Program. ATT has engineered an operational digital 4 ESS switch for the purpose of testing the susceptibility of 4 ESS switch systems to high-altitude EMP. The switch is installed in two specially designed trailers that are transparent to electro-magnetic radiation and is located in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where current-injection testing and further performance baselining is presently underway. Batteries, air conditioning, and spare parts are housed in two additional trailers. ATT Bell Laboratories has developed and implemented a test system for generating current pulses, monitoring the pulses, generating calls, and measuring switch performance. Digital traffic has been successfully generated and switched for three signaling systems: Multifrequency (MF); Common Channel Signaling System 7 (CCS7); and Q.931 (used on direct Integrated Services Digital Network connections). Due to problems in acquiring properly engineered signaling-translation software, however, the CCS7 and Q.931 signaling systems have not yet been implemented with a full complement of trunk assignments. Subsequent tasks will entail further baselining, provisioning of backup methods for the operating software, and current-injection testing of the switch.

  1. Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Mixing Cavern Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Barnes, Steven M.; Etchells, Arthur W.

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies undertaken to establish a methodology to perform reduced-scale mixing tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids. A theoretical model for mixing cavern formation from steady and pulsed jets is developed and compared with data from a single unsteady jet in a yield stress simulant. Dimensional analysis is used to identify the important dimensionless parameters affecting mixing performance in more complex systems. Scaling laws are proposed based on the modeling and dimensional analysis. Experimental validation of the scaling laws governing unsteady jet mixing in non-Newtonian fluids are also presented. Tests were conducted at three scales using two non-Newtonian simulants. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were confirmed. The key dimensionless parameters were found to be the Strouhal number (which describes unsteady pulse jet mixer operation), the yield Reynolds number (which governs cavern formation due to non-Newtonian fluid behavior), and the viscous Reynolds number (which determines the flow regime and the degree of turbulence). The experimentally validated scaling laws provide the basis for reduced scale testing of prototypic WTP mixing systems. It is argued that mixing systems developed from reduced scale testing will produce conservative designs at full scale.

  2. Development and testing of radiation- and electromagnetic-pulse hardened silicon-carbide-based electronics. Quarterly report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmond, J.A.; Palmour, J.W.

    1990-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    There were three primary objectives. The first was the reverse avalanche testing of diodes exhibiting (a) microplasma dominated breakdown, (b) a combination of microplasma and bulk avalanche breakdown and (c) bulk avalanche breakdown only. These glass encapsulated devices were tested at approximately 1 us, approximately 10 us and 100 us pulses. The second objective was to fabricate and characterize Shockley diodes in chip form showing proper breakdown in forward and reverse bias and a forward bias turn-on of approximately 2.6 V. The third objective was to fabricate and characterize 6H-SiC JFET structures in chip form.

  3. Oil Peak or Panic?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, David L [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this balanced consideration of the peak-oil controversy, Gorelick comes down on the side of the optimists.

  4. Effects of High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) on the Northern Telecom Inc. DMS-100 (trademark) switch. Volume 2. Test program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is part of a three volume set that presents the results of simulated High-Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse (HEMP) testing of a DMS-100 Switching System. This volume is a detailed description of the test procedures, test results, and the mitigation alternatives evaluated. This volume also presents a discussion of the conclusion and recommendations of the program.

  5. Peak power tracking for a solar buck charger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Jeremy Michael, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis discusses the design, implementation, and testing of a buck converter with peak power tracking. The peak power tracker uses a perturb and observe algorithm to actively track the solar panel's peak power point ...

  6. Thermal performance testing of two Thales 9310 pulse-tube cryocoolers for PHyTIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paine, Christopher G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena CA 91109 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    PHyTIR is a NASA-funded technology demonstration for a near-term earth-observing instrument in the thermal infrared spectrum, intended for use in the HyspIRI mission. PHyTIR will use two Thales 9310 single-stage pulse tube cryocoolers, one to directly cool the FPA, the other to simulate a passive radiator. We report performance measurements for the two Thales 9310 cryocoolers intended for inclusion in the PHyTIR demonstrator.

  7. RF Pulse compression stabilization at the CTF3 CLIC test facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dubrovskiy, Alexey

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the CTF3 accelerator, the RF produced by each of ten 3 GHz klystrons goes through waveguides, RF pulse compressors and splitters. The RF phase and power transformation of these devices depend on their temperature. The quantitative effect of the room temperature variation on the RF was measured. It is the major source of undesired changes during the CTF3 operation. An RF phaseloop and a compressor temperature stabilization are developed to suppress the phase fluctuation and the power profile change due to the temperature variation. The implementation is transparent for operators, it does not limit anyhow the flexibility of RF manipulations. Expected and measured suppression characteristics will be given.

  8. Preliminary tests of a second harmonic rf system for the intense pulsed neutron source synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norem, J.; Brandeberry, F.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) of the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) operating at Argonne National Laboratory is presently producing intensities of 2 to 2.5 x 10/sup 12/ protons per pulse (ppp) with the addition of a new ion source. This intensity is close to the space charge limit of the machine, estimated at approx. 3 x 10/sup 12/ ppp, depending somewhat on the available aperture. Accelerator improvements are being directed at (1) increasing beam intensities for neutron science, (2) lowering acceleration losses to minimize activation, and (3) gaining better control of the beam so that losses can be made to occur when and where they can be most easily controlled. We are now proposing a third cavity for the RF system which would provide control of the longitudinal bunch shape during the cycle which would permit raising the effective space charge limit of the accelerator and reducing losses by providing more RF voltage at maximum acceleration. This paper presents an outline of the expected benefits together with recent results obtained during low energy operation with one of the two existing cavities operating at the second harmonic (2f/sub 0/).

  9. WECC and Peak Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WECC and Peak Update Transmission B O N N E V I L L E P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N Pre-decisional. For Discussion Purposes Only. WECC and Peak Background In the...

  10. BNL Pulsed Magnet Inertially Cooled , LN2 or 30K He Gas Cooled Between Shots MIT test will use only LN2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    BNL Pulsed Magnet ­Inertially Cooled , LN2 or 30K He Gas Cooled Between Shots ­MIT test will use 2.0 Objectives 3.0 Test Location 4.0 Critical Lifts 5.0 Power Supplies 6.0 Cryogenic System for MIT field (exclusive of the proton beam) Cost issues dictated a modest coil design. Power supply limitations

  11. Startup testing of Romania dual-core test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, W.L. [General Atomic Co., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Late in 1979 both the Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR) and the 14-MW steady-state reactor (SSR) were loaded to critical. The fuel loading in both was then carried to completion and low-power testing was conducted. Early in 1980 both reactors successfully underwent high-power testing. The ACPR was operated for several hours at 500 kW and underwent pulse tests culminating in pulses with reactivity insertions of $4.60, peak power levels of about 20,000 MW, energy releases of 100 MW-sec, and peak measured fuel temperatures of 830 deg. C. The SSR was operated in several modes, both with natural convection and forced cooling with one or more pumps. The reactor successfully completed a 120-hr full-power test. Subsequent fuel element inspections confirmed that the fuel has performed without fuel damage or distortion. (author)

  12. Design and test results of a pulsed quadrupole magnet with a 2. mu. s rise time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bywater, J.A.; Lari, R.J.; Ratner, L.G.; Lee, Y.Y.; Fujisaki, M.; Krisch, A.D.; Terwilliger, K.M.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Major polarization losses will be encountered during acceleration of polarized protons in the Brookhaven AGS due to eight intrinsic depolarizing resonances. Pulsing a set of 12 vertical tune shift quadrupole magnets with a 2 ..mu..s rise time, 3 ms fall, and 60 ms repetition rate should reduce these losses. This requires a gradient of 1.87 T/M over the 8.89 x 12.7 cm vacuum chamber. A ferrite core quadrupole magnet has been designed, built, and magnetically measured. The pole tip has a hyperbolic shape and the coil consists of four parallel 0.318 cm by 0.453 cm turns per pole. This approximates a current sheet 0.318 cm thick and curves to lie along a flux line. Placed as close to the vacuum chamber as possible, it minimizes the inductance of the magnet and the voltage of the power supply. Proper spacing of the four turns assures a more uniform gradient over a large aperture. Two slabs of ferrite are bonded together and machined to form one pole of half length. These are bonded end-to-end, and a prewound coil on a fiberglass support is attached. Four such pole assemblies are then assembled around the vacuum chamber and electrically connected together. The design, construction, and measurements are presented.

  13. Capacitor discharge pulse analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Michael Sean; Griffiths, Stewart K.; Tanner, Danelle Mary

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Capacitors used in firing sets and other high discharge current applications are discharge tested to verify performance of the capacitor against the application requirements. Parameters such as capacitance, inductance, rise time, pulse width, peak current and current reversal must be verified to ensure that the capacitor will meet the application needs. This report summarizes an analysis performed on the discharge current data to extract these parameters by fitting a second-order system model to the discharge data and using this fit to determine the resulting performance metrics. Details of the theory and implementation are presented. Using the best-fit second-order system model to extract these metrics results in less sensitivity to noise in the measured data and allows for direct extraction of the total series resistance, inductance, and capacitance.

  14. RECENT TEST RESULTS OF THE FAST-PULSED 4 T COS DIPOLE GSI 001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MORITZ, G.; KAUGERTS, J.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; JAIN, A.; MARONE, A.; MURATORE, J.; THOMAS, R.; WANDERER, P.; ET AL.

    2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    For the FAIR-project at GSI a model dipole was built at BNL with the nominal field of 4 T and a nominal ramp rate of 1 T/S. The magnet design was similar to the RHIC dipole, with some changes for loss reduction and better cooling. The magnet was already successfully tested in a vertical cryostat, with good training behavior. Cryogenic losses were measured and first results of field harmonics were published. However, for a better understanding of the cooling process, quench currents at several ramp rates were investigated. Detailed measurements of the field harmonics at 2 T/S between 0 and 4 T were performed.

  15. Evaluation of Light-Triggered Thyristors for Pulsed Power Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, L K; Fulkerson, E S; Goerz, D A; Speer, R D

    2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has many needs for high reliability, high peak current, high di/dt switches. Solid-state switch technology offers the demonstrated advantage of reliability under a variety of conditions. Light-triggered switches operate with a reduced susceptibility to electromagnetic interference commonly found within pulsed power environments. Despite the advantages, commercially available solid-state switches are not typically designed for the often extreme pulsed power requirements. Testing was performed to bound the limits of devices for pulsed power applications beyond the manufacturers specified ratings. To test the applicability of recent commercial light-triggered solid-state designs, an adjustable high current switch test stand was assembled. Results from testing and subsequent selected implementations are presented.

  16. Low-noise pulse conditioner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bird, David A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-noise pulse conditioner is provided for driving electronic digital processing circuitry directly from differentially induced input pulses. The circuit uses a unique differential-to-peak detector circuit to generate a dynamic reference signal proportional to the input peak voltage. The input pulses are compared with the reference signal in an input network which operates in full differential mode with only a passive input filter. This reduces the introduction of circuit-induced noise, or jitter, generated in ground referenced input elements normally used in pulse conditioning circuits, especially speed transducer processing circuits.

  17. Pulse measurement apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marciante, John R. (Webster, NY); Donaldson, William R. (Pittsford, NY); Roides, Richard G. (Scottsville, NY)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An embodiment of the invention is directed to a pulse measuring system that measures a characteristic of an input pulse under test, particularly the pulse shape of a single-shot, nano-second duration, high shape-contrast optical or electrical pulse. An exemplary system includes a multi-stage, passive pulse replicator, wherein each successive stage introduces a fixed time delay to the input pulse under test, a repetitively-gated electronic sampling apparatus that acquires the pulse train including an entire waveform of each replica pulse, a processor that temporally aligns the replicated pulses, and an averager that temporally averages the replicated pulses to generate the pulse shape of the pulse under test. An embodiment of the invention is directed to a method for measuring an optical or an electrical pulse shape. The method includes the steps of passively replicating the pulse under test with a known time delay, temporally stacking the pulses, and temporally averaging the stacked pulses. An embodiment of the invention is directed to a method for increasing the dynamic range of a pulse measurement by a repetitively-gated electronic sampling device having a rated dynamic range capability, beyond the rated dynamic range of the sampling device; e.g., enhancing the dynamic range of an oscilloscope. The embodied technique can improve the SNR from about 300:1 to 1000:1. A dynamic range enhancement of four to seven bits may be achieved.

  18. Performance of a 4 Kelvin pulse-tube cooled cryostat with dc SQUID amplifiers for bolometric detector testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, Darcy; Keating, Brian; Quillin, Ron; Stebor, Nathan; Wilson, Brandon

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The latest generation of cosmic microwave background (CMB) telescopes is searching for the undetected faint signature of gravitational waves from inflation in the polarized signal of the CMB. To achieve the unprecedented levels of sensitivity required, these experiments use arrays of superconducting Transition Edge Sensor (TES) bolometers that are cooled to sub-Kelvin temperatures for photon-noise limited performance. These TES detectors are read out using low- noise SQUID amplifiers. To rapidly test these detectors and similar devices in a laboratory setting, we constructed a cryogenic refrigeration chain consisting of a commercial two-stage pulse-tube cooler, with a base temperature of 3 K, and a closed-cycle 3He/4He/3He sorption cooler, with a base temperature of 220 mK. A commercial dc SQUID system, with sensors cooled to 4 K, was used as a highly-sensitive cryogenic ammeter. Due to the extreme sensitivity of SQUIDs to changing magnetic fields, there are several challenges involving cooling them with puls...

  19. Idaho_GrousePeak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT | NationalMentoringWindMiller204Grouse Peak

  20. Experimental Study of RF Pulsed Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurent, Lisa; Tantawi, Sami; Dolgashev, Valery; Nantista, Christopher; /SLAC; Higashi, Yasuo; /KEK, Tsukuba; Aicheler, Markus; Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter; /CERN

    2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyclic thermal stresses produced by rf pulsed heating can be the limiting factor on the attainable reliable gradients for room temperature linear accelerators. This is especially true for structures that have complicated features for wakefield damping. These limits could be pushed higher by using special types of copper, copper alloys, or other conducting metals in constructing partial or complete accelerator structures. Here we present an experimental study aimed at determining the potential of these materials for tolerating cyclic thermal fatigue due to rf magnetic fields. A special cavity that has no electric field on the surface was employed in these studies. The cavity shape concentrates the magnetic field on one flat surface where the test material is placed. The materials tested in this study have included oxygen free electronic grade copper, copper zirconium, copper chromium, hot isostatically pressed copper, single crystal copper, electroplated copper, Glidcop(reg. sign), copper silver, and silver plated copper. The samples were exposed to different machining and heat treatment processes prior to rf processing. Each sample was tested to a peak pulsed heating temperature of approximately 110 C and remained at this temperature for approximately 10 x 10{sup 6} rf pulses. In general, the results showed the possibility of pushing the gradient limits due to pulsed heating fatigue by the use of copper zirconium and copper chromium alloys.

  1. A benchmark study of 2D and 3D finite element calculations simulating dynamic pulse buckling tests of cylindrical shells under axial impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, E.L.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of tests investigating dynamic pulse buckling of a cylindrical shell under axial impact is compared to several finite element simulations of the event. The purpose of the study is to compare the performance of the various analysis codes and element types with respect to a problem which is applicable to radioactive material transport packages, and ultimately to develop a benchmark problem to qualify finite element analysis codes for the transport package design industry.

  2. Intense terahertz pulses from SLAC electron beams using coherent transition radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Ziran; Fisher, Alan S.; Hogan, Mark; Loos, Henrik [Accelerator Directorate, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Goodfellow, John [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Fuchs, Matthias [Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Daranciang, Dan [Department of Chemistry, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Lindenberg, Aaron [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    SLAC has two electron accelerators, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET), providing high-charge, high-peak-current, femtosecond electron bunches. These characteristics are ideal for generating intense broadband terahertz (THz) pulses via coherent transition radiation. For LCLS and FACET respectively, the THz pulse duration is typically 20 and 80 fs RMS and can be tuned via the electron bunch duration; emission spectra span 3-30 THz and 0.5 THz-5 THz; and the energy in a quasi-half-cycle THz pulse is 0.2 and 0.6 mJ. The peak electric field at a THz focus has reached 4.4 GV/m (0.44 V/A) at LCLS. This paper presents measurements of the terahertz pulses and preliminary observations of nonlinear materials response.

  3. Photoconductive circuit element pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rauscher, Christen (Alexandria, VA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse generator for characterizing semiconductor devices at millimeter wavelength frequencies where a photoconductive circuit element (PCE) is biased by a direct current voltage source and produces short electrical pulses when excited into conductance by short laser light pulses. The electrical pulses are electronically conditioned to improve the frequency related amplitude characteristics of the pulses which thereafter propagate along a transmission line to a device under test.

  4. Hydromechanical modeling of pulse tests that measure both fluidpressure and fracture-normal displacement of the Coaraze Laboratory site,France

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappa, F.; Guglielmi, Y.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C-F.; Thoraval, A.

    2006-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ fracture mechanical deformation and fluid flowinteractions are investigated through a series of hydraulic pulseinjection tests, using specialized borehole equipment that cansimultaneously measure fluid pressure and fracture displacements. Thetests were conducted in two horizontal boreholes spaced one meter apartvertically and intersecting a near-vertical highly permeable faultlocated within a shallow fractured carbonate rock. The field data wereevaluated by conducting a series of coupled hydromechanical numericalanalyses, using both distinct-element and finite-element modelingtechniques and both two- and three-dimensional model representations thatcan incorporate various complexities in fracture network geometry. Oneunique feature of these pulse injection experiments is that the entiretest cycle, both the initial pressure increase and subsequent pressurefall-off, is carefully monitored and used for the evaluation of the insitu hydromechanical behavior. Field test data are evaluated by plottingfracture normal displacement as a function of fluid pressure, measured atthe same borehole. The resulting normal displacement-versus-pressurecurves show a characteristic loop, in which the paths for loading(pressure increase) and unloading (pressure decrease) are different. Bymatching this characteristic loop behavior, the fracture normal stiffnessand an equivalent stiffness (Young's modulus) of the surrounding rockmass can be back-calculated. Evaluation of the field tests by couplednumerical hydromechanical modeling shows that initial fracture hydraulicaperture and normal stiffness vary by a factor of 2 to 3 for the twomonitoring points within the same fracture plane. Moreover, the analysesshow that hydraulic aperture and the normal stiffness of the pulse-testedfracture, the stiffness of surrounding rock matrix, and the propertiesand geometry of the surrounding fracture network significantly affectcoupled hydromechanical responses during the pulse injection test. Morespecifically, the pressure-increase path of the normaldisplacement-versus-pressure curve is highly dependent on thehydromechanical parameters of the tested fracture and the stiffness ofthe matrix near the injection point, whereas the pressure-decrease pathis highly influenced by mechanical processes within a larger portion ofthe surrounding fractured rock.

  5. Phase Modulator Programming to Get Flat Pulses with Desired Length and Power from the CTF3 Pulse Compressors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaker, Seyd Hamed; Skowronski, Piotr; Syratchev, Igor; Tecker, Frank

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulse compressor is located after the klystron to increase the power peak by storing the energy at the beginning and releasing it near the end of klystron output pulse. In the CTF3 pulse compressors a doubling of the peak power is achieved according to our needs and the machine parameters. The magnitude of peak power, pulse length and flatness can be controlled by using a phase modulator for the input signal of klystrons. A C++ code is written to simulate the pulse compressor behaviour according to the klystron output pulse power. By manually changing the related parameters in the code for the best match, the quality factor and the filling time of pulse compressor cavities can be determined. This code also calculates and sends the suitable phase to the phase modulator according to the klystron output pulse power and the desired pulse length and peak power

  6. Test report for photonic sensors used in electric-field measurement of simulated electromagnetic pulses. Final report, 28-30 Aug 90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blocksom, R.; Bucholz, R.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the results of tests to record and analyze the characteristic response of three photonic Electric field, E-field sensors to simulated Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP), compared to that of a reference metallic sensor. Work was performed under Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) contract N00014-89-C-2033, sponsored by Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR). Tasks included: (1) selection of candidate sensors capable of measuring the E-field content (intensity and frequency spectrum) of simulated EMP phenomena generated by the Horizontally Polarized Dipole (HPD) EMP simulator at the Naval Air Test Center (NATC), Patuxent River, MD; (2) liaison with sensor designers, NATC personnel, and others as necessary to delineate test requirements and constraints; (3) development of a sensor test plan; (4) sensor tests in the HPD EMP simulation; (5) analysis of the test data; and (6) generation of the Test Report. The activities discussed herein were performed during the period of March 1990-January 1991. Since 1985, the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and ARC Professional Services Group Defense Systems Division (ARC) have conducted an RD effort to produce a prototype fiber optic sensor system for application to EMP field measurement. The work was sponsored under Fleet Aircraft Assessment for Navy Testing and Analysis for EMP Limitation (FAANTAEL) project managed by NAVAIR Electromagnetic Environmental Effects (E3) Branch, AIR-5161.

  7. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

  8. System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ?14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS’ System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  9. Peak Oil, Peak Energy Mother Nature Bats Last

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sereno, Martin

    Peak Oil, Peak Energy Mother Nature Bats Last Martin Sereno 1 Feb 2011 (orig. talk: Nov 2004) #12;Oil is the Lifeblood of Industrial Civilization · 80 million barrels/day, 1000 barrels/sec, 1 cubicPods to the roads themselves) · we're not "addicted to oil" -- that's like saying a person has an "addiction

  10. Texas Nuclear Profile - Comanche Peak

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Comanche Peak" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

  11. Low-noise pulse conditioner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bird, D.A.

    1981-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-noise pulse conditioner is provided for driving electronic digital processing circuitry directly from differentially induced input pulses. The circuit uses a unique differential-to-peak detector circuit to generate a dynamic reference signal proportional to the input peak voltage. The input pulses are compared with the reference signal in an input network which operates in full differential mode with only a passive input filter. This reduces the introduction of circuit-induced noise, or jitter, generated in ground referenced input elements normally used in pulse conditioning circuits, especially speed transducer processing circuits. This circuit may be used for conditioning the sensor signal from the Fidler coil in a gas centrifuge for separation of isotopic gaseous mixtures.

  12. A pulse processing station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgado, A.M.L.S.; Simoes, J.B.; Landeck, J. [Univ. of Coimbra (Portugal)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first of two papers concerning the architecture, circuitry design and performance of a pulse processing system based on a digital signal processor. This multifunction system, implemented as a single PC module, incorporates a high performance 16-bit Pulse Height Analyzer (PHA) a Multichannel Scaler (MCS), a Digital Oscilloscope (DSO) and also a Digital Pulse Processor (DPP). This paper presents the PRA architecture with emphasis on the baseline restorer and peak stretcher circuits. Differential nonlinearities (DNL) are corrected by a new implementation of the sliding scale technique and performance ranges from better than 2% (at 16-bit resolution) up to less than 0.2% for 12-bit operation. The DNL correction technique is assessed for different sliding-scale ranges.

  13. Assessment of Differences in Phase 1 and Phase 2 Test Observations for Waste Treatment Plant Pulse Jet Mixer Tests with Non-Cohesive Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Perry A.; Baer, Ellen BK; Bamberger, Judith A.; Fort, James A.; Minette, Michael J.

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to assess the apparent discrepancy in critical suspension velocity (UCS) between M3 Phase 1 (Meyer et al. 2009) and Phase 2 testing conducted by Energy Solutions (ES) at Mid-Columbia Engineering (MCE) and to address the applicability of Phase 1 scale-up laws to Phase 2 test results. Three Phase 2 test sequences were analyzed in detail. Several sources of discrepancy were identified including differences in nominal versus actual velocity, definition of model input parameters, and definition of UCS. A remaining discrepancy was shown to not be solely an artifact of Phase 1 data correlations, but was fundamental to the tests. The non-prototypic aspects of Phase 1 testing were reviewed and assessed. The effects of non-prototypic refill associated with the closed loop operation of the jets, previously known to affect cloud height, can be described in terms of a modified settling velocity. When the modified settling velocity is incorporated into the Phase 1 “new” physical model the adjusted new physical model does a better job of predicting the Phase 2 test results. The adjusted new physical model was bench marked with data taken during three prototypic drive tests. Scale-up behavior of the Phase 1 tests was reviewed. The applicability of the Phase 1 scale-up behavior to Phase 2 prototypic testing was analyzed. The effects of non-prototypic refill caused measured values of UCS to be somewhat reduced at larger scales. Hence the scale-up exponents are believed to be smaller than they would have been had there been prototypic refill. Estimated scale-up exponents for the Phase 2 testing are 0.40 for 8-tube tests and 0.36 for 12-tube tests.

  14. bia-pulse | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MD PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Final Reports Pulse Combustor Design Qualification Test and Clean Coal Feedstock Test , Final Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics...

  15. Observed Temperature Effects on Hourly Residential Electric Load Reduction in Response to an Experimental Critical Peak Pricing Tariff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen B.; McAuliffe, Patrick K.; Rosenfeld, Arthur H.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical Peak Pricing Tariff Karen Herter ab* , Patrickunder critical peak pricing tariffs tested in the 2003-2004The 15-month experimental tariff gave customers a discounted

  16. Influence of laser pulse duration on laser drilled hole quality in nickel based super alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockstroh, T.J. [GE Aircraft Engines, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Chen, Xiangli; Lotshaw, W.T. [GE Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies on the title subject have been performed using different commercial and research Nd:YAG laser systems. These systems represent a large range of pulse durations from sub-nanosecond to millisecond (conventional YAG {open_quotes}driller{close_quotes} pulse durations). Correspondingly, the peak powers range from a few kilowatts to over 1 megawatt, which dramatically affect processing times, hole quality and preservation of parent material properties. The different laser systems used to generate the data have similar beam qualities ({le}3X diffraction limited), and were selected primarily to contrast peak power effects in a nominally conventional drilling application. The results show that hole quality (taper, recast, and parent metal damage) is significantly affected by the laser pulse duration as varied in these tests. The pulse energy and repetition rate also vary between the test lasers on account of their operational designs, and the effects of these parameters must also be reckoned. However, many of the marked affects can be reasonably attributed to peak power or pulse duration uniquely, and these will be discussed in greater detail below. Depending upon the thermophysical properties of the workpiece material and the design specifications for finished parts, there is probably a pulse duration/repetition rate saddle region where specifications for hole quality and process speed are simultaneously satisfied. In drilling the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) N5 alloy an upper bound on the pulsewidth range of {approximately}300 nanoseconds is so identified. In this paper the authors present results and photomicrographs of these tests, and review the processing potential of {open_quotes}high-performance{close_quotes} lamp and diode pumped Nd:YAG laser devices.

  17. Scaling Laws for Reduced-Scale Tests of Pulse Jet Mixing Systems in Non-Newtonian Slurries: Gas Retention and Release Behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stewart, Charles W.; Meyer, Perry A.; Kurath, Dean E.; Barnes, Steven M.

    2006-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) under construction at the Hanford Site will use pulse jet mixer (PJM) technology for mixing and gas retention control applications in tanks expected to contain waste slurries exhibiting a non-Newtonian rheology. This paper presents the results of theoretical and experimental studies performed to establish the methodology to perform reduced-scale gas retention and release tests with PJM systems in non-Newtonian fluids with gas generation. The technical basis for scaled testing with unsteady jet mixing systems in gas-generating non-Newtonian fluids is presented in the form of a bubble migration model that accounts for the gas generation rate, the average bubble rise velocity, and the geometry of the vessel. Scaling laws developed from the model were validated with gas holdup and release tests conducted at three scales: large scale, 1/4 scale, and 1/9 scale. Experiments were conducted with two non-Newtonian simulants with in-situ gas generation by decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The data were compared non-dimensionally, and the important scale laws were examined. From these results, scaling laws are developed which allow the design of mixing systems at a reduced scale.

  18. Peak finding using biorthogonal wavelets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, C.Y.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors show in this paper how they can find the peaks in the input data if the underlying signal is a sum of Lorentzians. In order to project the data into a space of Lorentzian like functions, they show explicitly the construction of scaling functions which look like Lorentzians. From this construction, they can calculate the biorthogonal filter coefficients for both the analysis and synthesis functions. They then compare their biorthogonal wavelets to the FBI (Federal Bureau of Investigations) wavelets when used for peak finding in noisy data. They will show that in this instance, their filters perform much better than the FBI wavelets.

  19. Method and apparatus for analog pulse pile-up rejection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for pulse pile-up rejection are disclosed. The apparatus comprises a delay value application constituent configured to receive a threshold-crossing time value, and provide an adjustable value according to a delay value and the threshold-crossing time value; and a comparison constituent configured to receive a peak-occurrence time value and the adjustable value, compare the peak-occurrence time value with the adjustable value, indicate pulse acceptance if the peak-occurrence time value is less than or equal to the adjustable value, and indicate pulse rejection if the peak-occurrence time value is greater than the adjustable value.

  20. Method and apparatus for analog pulse pile-up rejection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    De Geronimo, Gianluigi

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for pulse pile-up rejection are disclosed. The apparatus comprises a delay value application constituent configured to receive a threshold-crossing time value, and provide an adjustable value according to a delay value and the threshold-crossing time value; and a comparison constituent configured to receive a peak-occurrence time value and the adjustable value, compare the peak-occurrence time value with the adjustable value, indicate pulse acceptance if the peak-occurrence time value is less than or equal to the adjustable value, and indicate pulse rejection if the peak-occurrence time value is greater than the adjustable value.

  1. Peak Oil Food Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Butte, Colorado Zip: 81224 Website: http:www.PeakOilFoodNetwork. References: Peak Oil Food Network1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. The Peak...

  2. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project objectives: Reduce the high level of risk during the early stages of geothermal project development by conducting a multi-faceted and innovative exploration and drilling program at Silver Peak. Determine the combination of techniques that are most useful and cost-effective in identifying the geothermal resource through a detailed, post-project evaluation of the exploration and drilling program.

  3. Peak Oil Awareness Network | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Awareness Network Jump to: navigation, search Name: Peak Oil Awareness Network Place: Crested Butte, Colorado Zip: 81224 Website: http:www.PeakOilAwarenessNet Coordinates:...

  4. Pulse transformer R and D for NLC klystron pulse modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akemoto, M.; Gold, S.; Krasnykh, A.; Koontz, R.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have studied a conventional pulse transformer for the NLC klystron pulse modulator. The transformer has been analyzed using a simplified lumped circuit model. It is found that a fast rise time requires low leakage inductance and low distributed capacitance and can be realized by reducing the number of secondary turns, but it produces larger pulse droop and requires a larger core size. After making a tradeoff among these parameters carefully, a conventional pulse transformer with a rise time of 250ns and a pulse droop of 3.6% has been designed and built. The transmission characteristics and pulse time-response were measured. The data were compared with the model. The agreement with the model was good when the measured values were used in the model simulation. The results of the high voltage tests using a klystron load are also presented.

  5. Development of the pulse transformer for NLC klystron pulse modulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akemoto, M.; Gold, S.; Koontz, R.; Krasnykh, A.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a conventional pulse transformer for the NLC klystron pulse modulator. The transformer has been analyzed using a simplified lumped circuit model. It is found that a fast rise time requires low leakage inductance and low distributed capacitance and can be realized by reducing the number of secondary turns, but it produces larger pulse droop and core size. After making a tradeoff among these parameters carefully, a conventional pulse transformer with a rise time of 250ns and pulse droop of 3.6% has been designed and built. The transmission characteristics and pulse time-response were measured. The data were compared with the model. The agreement with the model was good when the measured values were used in the model simulation. The results of the high voltage tests are also presented.

  6. Texas Nuclear Profile - Comanche Peak

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5 Tables July 1996 Energy Information Administration Office ofthroughYear JanYear Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun1DecadeMonthComanche Peak"

  7. Idaho_LonePinePeak

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School footballHydrogenIT |Hot Springs Site #0104 Latitude:Peak Site

  8. RF modulation studies on the S band pulse compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, G; Pei, S; Xiao, O

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An S band SLED-type pulse compressor has been manufactured by IHEP to challenge the 100 MW maximum input power, which means the output peak power is about 500 MW at the phase reversal time. In order to deal with the RF breakdown problem, the dual side-wall coupling irises model was used. To further improve the reliability at very high power, amplitude modulation and phase modulation with flat-top output were taken into account. The RF modulation studies on an S-band SLED are presented in this paper. Furthermore, a method is developed by using the CST Microwave Studio transient solver to simulate the time response of the pulse compressor, which can be a verification of the modulate theory. In addition, the experimental setup was constructed and the flat-top output is obtained in the low power tests.

  9. RF modulation studies on the S band pulse compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Shu; F. Zhao; S. Pei; O. Xiao

    2015-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An S band SLED-type pulse compressor has been manufactured by IHEP to challenge the 100 MW maximum input power, which means the output peak power is about 500 MW at the phase reversal time. In order to deal with the RF breakdown problem, the dual side-wall coupling irises model was used. To further improve the reliability at very high power, amplitude modulation and phase modulation with flat-top output were taken into account. The RF modulation studies on an S-band SLED are presented in this paper. Furthermore, a method is developed by using the CST Microwave Studio transient solver to simulate the time response of the pulse compressor, which can be a verification of the modulate theory. In addition, the experimental setup was constructed and the flat-top output is obtained in the low power tests.

  10. Construction of an Ultra-Broad Preamplifier of a 100-TW Ultra-short Pulse Laser System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Construction of an Ultra-Broad Preamplifier of a 100-TW Ultra-short Pulse Laser System duration to obtain ultra-short and high peak power laser pulses. The amplified pulse from the output) (laser preamplifier for contrast improvement) Chirped-pulse amplificationCPA (Pulse stretcher

  11. Efficient Spectral Broadening in the 100-W Average Power Regime Using Gas Filled Kagome HC-PCF and Pulse Compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emaury, Florian; Debord, Benoit; Ghosh, Debashri; Diebold, Andreas; Gerome, Frederic; Suedmeyer, Thomas; Benabid, Fetah; Keller, Ursula

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present nonlinear pulse compression of a high-power SESAM-modelocked thin-disk laser (TDL) using an Ar-filled hypocycloid-core Kagome Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fiber (HC-PCF). The output of the modelocked Yb:YAG TDL with 127 W average power, a pulse repetition rate of 7 MHz, and a pulse duration of 740 fs was spectrally broadened 16-fold while propagating in a Kagome HC-PCF containing 13 bar of static Argon gas. Subsequent compression tests performed using 8.4% of the full available power resulted in a pulse duration as short as 88 fs using the spectrally broadened output from the fiber. Compressing the full transmitted power through the fiber (118 W) could lead to a compressed output of >100 W of average power and >100 MW of peak power with an average power compression efficiency of 88%. This simple laser system with only one ultrafast laser oscillator and a simple single-pass fiber pulse compressor, generating both high peak power >100 MW and sub-100-fs pulses at megahertz repetition rate, is very int...

  12. Ultrasonic flowmetering with reflected pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoyle, David C.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A transit time type ultrasonic flowmeter was tested with two different reflected pulse trajectories in flowing air at ambient conditions against an orifice meter. The flowmeter was designed to be highly accurate, to require ...

  13. Multi-pulse operation of a super-radiant backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandurkin, I. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Savilov, A. V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, 46 Ulyanov St., Nizhny Novgorod, 603950 (Russian Federation); Lobachevsky State University of Nizhny Novgorod, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Theory of a backward-wave electron oscillator operating in the non-stationary regime of super-radiation of short powerful rf pulses is developed. It is shown that there exist multi-frequency regimes of generation of either two-peak or three-peak output signal with different characteristic frequencies in every peak. The use of such regimes allows increasing the duration, the peak power, and the total energy of the output super-radiation rf pulse.

  14. Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures.

  15. Peak Travel, Peak Car and the Future of Mobility: Evidence, Unresolved...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Travel, Peak Car and the Future of Mobility: Evidence, Unresolved Issues, Policy Implications, and a Research Agenda Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Peak...

  16. Pulse spectral evolution of GRBs: implication as standard candle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basak, Rupal

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using an \\emph{empirical} description of a prompt GRB pulse, we analyze the individual pulses of all Fermi/GBM GRBs with known redshifts, till July 2009. This description is simultaneous in time and energy and allows one to determine the peak energy of Band spectrum at zero fluence ($E_{peak,0}$). We demonstrate, for the first time, that the $E_{peak,0}$ bears a very strong correlation with the isotropic energy of the individual pulses, and hence, each pulse can be used as a luminosity indicator. As a physical description is needed in order to use GRB pulses for cosmological purposes, we explore other physical spectral models. As pulses are the building blocks of a GRB, we choose another sample of Fermi/GBM GRBs having bright, long and single/ separable pulse(s) and fit the time-resolved spectra of the individual pulses with the Band model and a model consisting of a blackbody and a power-law. Both these models give acceptable fits. We find that the peak energy/ temperature always decreases exponentially with...

  17. Voltage controlled MESFET pulse shape generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, S.C.

    1994-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A programmable pulse shape generator capable of producing pulse shapes for Nova and Beamlet has been designed and simulated using the circuit code SPICE. The design utilizes power MESFETS, which are commonly used in microwave amplifiers. The pulse shape is varied by setting a bias voltage on each in a chain of MESFETS with a 200 ps temporal resolution. The electrical pulse then drives an integrated electro-optic modulator similar to what is on Beamlet. Pulse shapes 22 and 25, used on Nova, have been generated by this design. There is no fundamental barrier to making such a pulse generator for use on the National Ignition Facility. In fact, the longer time scales on the NIF pulse will ease the high speed requirements of the pulse shape generator allowing the use of less expensive components. The next step will be to build a prototype circuit for initial testing on Beamlet and Nova.

  18. Pulsed hydrojet

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohachevsky, I.O.; Torrey, M.D.

    1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An underwater pulsed hydrojet propulsion system is provided for accelerating and propelling a projectile or other vessel. A reactant, such as lithium, is fluidized and injected into a water volume. The resulting reaction produces an energy density in a time effective to form a steam pocket. Thrust flaps or baffles direct the pressure from the steam pocket toward an exit nozzle for accelerating a water volume to create thrust. A control system regulates the dispersion of reactant to control thrust characteristics.

  19. Pulse atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the program is the development of a pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (PAFBC) technology to burn coal and to provide heat and steam to commercial, institutional, and small industrial applications at a reasonable price in an environmentally acceptable manner. During this reporting period, a total of eight shakedown and debugging coal combustion tests were performed in the AFBC. A start-up procedure was established, system improvements implemented, and preliminary material and heat balances made based on these tests. The pulse combustor for the AFBC system was fabricated and installed and a series of tests was conducted on the system. 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellison, Chad M. (Honeywell FM& T, Kansas City, MO); Perricone, Matthew J. (R.J. Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA); Faraone, Kevin M. (BWX Technologies, Inc., Lynchburg, VA); Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  1. Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Promoting Employment Across Kansas (PEAK) allows for the retention of employee payroll withholding taxes for qualified companies or third parties performing services on behalf of such companies....

  2. Adaptive architectures for peak power management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontorinis, Vasileios

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    load – in fact, we almost completely flatten the power profilepower profiles, we investigate a number of policies for peak power shaving which react to the observed load

  3. Powerful, pulsed, THz radiation from laser accelerated relativistic electron bunches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

    by strongly focused ( 6 µm), high peak power (up to 10 TW), ultra-short ( 50 fs) laser pulses of a 10 Hz at the exit of the plasma accelerator. Keywords: ultrahigh-fields, ultra-short, laser-plasma, wakefieldPowerful, pulsed, THz radiation from laser accelerated relativistic electron bunches Cs. T´otha, J

  4. Compensated pulsed alternator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weldon, William F. (Austin, TX); Driga, Mircea D. (Austin, TX); Woodson, Herbert H. (Austin, TX)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to an electromechanical energy converter with inertial energy storage. The device, a single phase, two or multi-pole alternator with stationary field coils, and a rotating armature is provided. The rotor itself may be of laminated steel for slower pulses or for faster pulses should be nonmagnetic and electrically nonconductive in order to allow rapid penetration of the field as the armature coil rotates. The armature coil comprises a plurality of power generating conductors mounted on the rotor. The alternator may also include a stationary or counterrotating compensating coil to increase the output voltage thereof and to reduce the internal impedance of the alternator at the moment of peak outout. As the machine voltage rises sinusoidally, an external trigger switch is adapted to be closed at the appropriate time to create the desired output current from said alternator to an external load circuit, and as the output current passes through zero a self-commutating effect is provided to allow the switch to disconnect the generator from the external circuit.

  5. Tapered pulse tube for pulse tube refrigerators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swift, Gregory W. (Sante Fe, NM); Olson, Jeffrey R. (San Mateo, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal insulation of the pulse tube in a pulse-tube refrigerator is maintained by optimally varying the radius of the pulse tube to suppress convective heat loss from mass flux streaming in the pulse tube. A simple cone with an optimum taper angle will often provide sufficient improvement. Alternatively, the pulse tube radius r as a function of axial position x can be shaped with r(x) such that streaming is optimally suppressed at each x.

  6. Coulomb cluster explosion boosted by a quasi-dc pulse -- diagnostic tool and ultimate test of laser fusion efficiency in clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaplan, A E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To greatly enhance output of nuclear fusion produced neutrons in a laser-initiated Coulomb explosion of Deuterium clusters, we propose to subject the ions produced by the explosion to quasi-dc electrical pulse, to accelerate them to the energies where the D+D collision cross-section is the highest. With D+ ions shepherded then to bombard a Deuterium-rich solid-state cathode, this allows one to solve a few problems simultaneously by (a) completely removing electron cloud hindering the Coulomb explosion of ionic core, (b) utilizing up to $100 \\%$ of the cluster ions to collide with the high-density packed nuclei, and (c) reaching maximum cross-section of neutron production in a single D+D collision. We also consider the use of E-pulse acceleration for diagnostic purposes.

  7. Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plants and capital cost estimates for peaking technologies Frame, Aeroderivative, Intercooled, Reciprocating Engines Next steps 2 #12;Definitions Baseload Energy: power generated (or conserved) across a period of time to serve system demands for electricity Peaking Capacity: capability of power generating

  8. Method and apparatus for providing pulse pile-up correction in charge quantizing radiation detection systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles L. (Alcoa, TN); Wintenberg, Alan L. (Knoxville, TN)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radiation detection method and system for continuously correcting the quantization of detected charge during pulse pile-up conditions. Charge pulses from a radiation detector responsive to the energy of detected radiation events are converted to voltage pulses of predetermined shape whose peak amplitudes are proportional to the quantity of charge of each corresponding detected event by means of a charge-sensitive preamplifier. These peak amplitudes are sampled and stored sequentially in accordance with their respective times of occurrence. Based on the stored peak amplitudes and times of occurrence, a correction factor is generated which represents the fraction of a previous pulses influence on a preceding pulse peak amplitude. This correction factor is subtracted from the following pulse amplitude in a summing amplifier whose output then represents the corrected charge quantity measurement.

  9. The Boson peak in supercooled water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradeep Kumar; K. Thor Wikfeldt; Daniel Schlesinger; Lars G. M. Pettersson; H. E. Stanley

    2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform extensive molecular dynamics simulations of the TIP4P/2005 model of water to investigate the origin of the Boson peak reported in experiments on supercooled water in nanoconfined pores, and in hydration water around proteins. We find that the onset of the Boson peak in supercooled bulk water coincides with the crossover to a predominantly low-density-like liquid below the Widom line $T_W$. The frequency and onset temperature of the Boson peak in our simulations of bulk water agree well with the results from experiments on nanoconfined water. Our results suggest that the Boson peak in water is not an exclusive effect of confinement. We further find that, similar to other glass-forming liquids, the vibrational modes corresponding to the Boson peak are spatially extended and are related to transverse phonons found in the parent crystal, here ice Ih.

  10. FERROELECTRIC SWITCH FOR A HIGH-POWER Ka-BAND ACTIVE PULSE COMPRESSOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.] [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented for design of a high-power microwave switch for operation at 34.3 GHz, intended for use in an active RF pulse compressor. The active element in the switch is a ring of ferroelectric material, whose dielectric constant can be rapidly changed by application of a high-voltage pulse. As envisioned, two of these switches would be built into a pair of delay lines, as in SLED-II at SLAC, so as to allow 30-MW ?s-length Ka-band pulses to be compressed in time by a factor-of-9 and multiplied in amplitude to generate 200 MW peak power pulses. Such high-power pulses could be used for testing and evaluation of high-gradient mm-wave accelerator structures, for example. Evaluation of the switch design was carried out with an X-band (11.43 GHz) prototype, built to incorporate all the features required for the Ka-band version.

  11. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    conversations with Siemens, Honeywell, Syserco, Yamas andmet with Siemens and Honeywell to discuss the site selectiondetails of the CPP tariff. Honeywell did not nominate any

  12. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is manual demand response -- where building staff receive afor demand response analysis ?ELECTRIC Whole building powerof automated demand response (Auto-DR) in buildings and

  13. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Buildings PG&E’s Program Advisory Group (PAG) Cross Cutting Meeting PG&E Integrated Demand Side Management

  14. Pulsed field separation of biomolecules in a nanofluidic filter array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes González, Noel I. (Noel Iván)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, pulsed electric fields are introduced as a means to enhance separation efficiency of biomolecules in a nanofluidic filter array channel. Separation under pulsed fields was tested using PBR322 DNA, Lambda Hind ...

  15. Fault tolerant pulse synchronization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deconda, Keerthi

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse synchronization is the evolution of spontaneous firing action across a network of sensor nodes. In the pulse synchronization model all nodes across a network produce a pulse, or "fire", at regular intervals even without access to a shared...

  16. Design and test results of a 600-kW tetrode amplifier for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rees, D.E.; Brittain, D.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Grippe, J.M.; Marrufo, O. [Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design and testing of a pulsed 600-kW tetrode amplifier that will be used to drive a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Three stages of amplification provide a nominal gain of 77 dB and peak output power of 600 kW. The amplifier is operated at a pulse width of 100 {mu}s and a repetition frequency of 10 Hz. This paper presents the rf design and calculated operating conditions for the amplifier. Details of the electrical design are presented, along with test results.

  17. Design and test results of a 600-kW tetrode amplifier for the Superconducting Super Collider

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rees, D.E.; Brittain, D.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Grippe, J.M.; Marrufo, O. (Superconducting Super Collider Lab., Dallas, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the design and testing of a pulsed 600-kW tetrode amplifier that will be used to drive a radiofrequency quadrupole (RFQ) for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). Three stages of amplification provide a nominal gain of 77 dB and peak output power of 600 kW. The amplifier is operated at a pulse width of 100 [mu]s and a repetition frequency of 10 Hz. This paper presents the rf design and calculated operating conditions for the amplifier. Details of the electrical design are presented, along with test results.

  18. QER- Comment of Cloud Peak Energy Inc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Ms Pickett Please find attached comments from Cloud Peak Energy as input to the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review. If possible I would appreciate a confirmation that this email has been received Thank you.

  19. LNG production for peak shaving operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, B.C.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LNG production facilities are being developed as an alternative or in addition to underground storage throughout the US to provide gas supply during peak gas demand periods. These facilities typically involved a small liquefaction unit with a large LNG storage tank and gas sendout facilities capable of responding to peak loads during the winter. Black and Veatch is active in the development of LNG peak shaving projects for clients using a patented mixed refrigerant technology for efficient production of LNG at a low installed cost. The mixed refrigerant technology has been applied in a range of project sizes both with gas turbine and electric motor driven compression systems. This paper will cover peak shaving concepts as well as specific designs and projects which have been completed to meet this market need.

  20. A perspective on the CMB acoustic peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Marriage

    2002-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    CMB angular spectrum measurements suggest a flat universe. This paper clarifies the relation between geometry and the spherical harmonic index of the first acoustic peak ($\\ell_{peak}$). Numerical and analytic calculations show that $\\ell_{peak}$ is approximately a function of $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M$ where $\\Omega_K$ and $\\Omega_M$ are the curvature ($\\Omega_K > 0$ implies an open geometry) and mass density today in units of critical density. Assuming $\\Omega_K/\\Omega_M \\ll 1$, one obtains a simple formula for $\\ell_{peak}$, the derivation of which gives another perspective on the widely-recognized $\\Omega_M$-$\\Omega_\\Lambda$ degeneracy in flat models. This formula for near-flat cosmogonies together with current angular spectrum data yields familiar parameter constraints.

  1. Measured Peak Equipment Loads in Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathew, Paul A.

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical bulletin documents measured peak equipment load data from 39 laboratory spaces in nine buildings across five institutions. The purpose of these measurements was to obtain data on the actual peak loads in laboratories, which can be used to rightsize the design of HVAC systems in new laboratories. While any given laboratory may have unique loads and other design considerations, these results may be used as a 'sanity check' for design assumptions.

  2. Plasma Switch for High-Power Active Pulse Compressor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc.] [Omega-P, Inc.

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from experiments carried out at the Naval Research Laboratory X-band magnicon facility on a two-channel X-band active RF pulse compressor that employed plasma switches. Experimental evidence is shown to validate the basic goals of the project, which include: simultaneous firing of plasma switches in both channels of the RF circuit, operation of quasi-optical 3-dB hybrid directional coupler coherent superposition of RF compressed pulses from both channels, and operation of the X-band magnicon directly in the RF pulse compressor. For incident 1.2 ?s pulses in the range 0.63 ? 1.35 MW, compressed pulses of peak powers 5.7 ? 11.3 MW were obtained, corresponding to peak power gain ratios of 8.3 ? 9.3. Insufficient bakeout and conditioning of the high-power RF circuit prevented experiments from being conducted at higher RF input power levels.

  3. 4 ESS (trademark) switch electromagnetic-pulse assessment. Volume 2. Task 3 laboratory testing of the 4 ESS Switch. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 4ESS Switch was subjected to test sequences representative of electromagnetic stresses following a high-altitude nuclear blast. These laboratory tests revealed some potential equipment sensitivities requiring only minor modifications. With these modifications implemented, the 4 ESS Switch demonstrated considerable robustness in servicing calls following current injection stress. (jhd)

  4. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a long output pulse (SA) from a short pump pulse (P), using an elongated amplified fiber (11) having a doped core (12) that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding 13. A seed beam (S) of the longer wavelength is injected into the core (12) at one end of the fiber (11) and a pump pulse (P) of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding (13) at the other end of the fiber (11). The counter-propagating seed beam (S) and pump pulse (P) will produce an amplified output pulse (SA) having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse (P) through the fiber (11) plus the length of the pump pulse (P).

  5. Long pulse production from short pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, J.S.

    1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of producing a long output pulse from a short pump pulse is disclosed, using an elongated amplified fiber having a doped core that provides an amplifying medium for light of one color when driven into an excited state by light of a shorter wavelength and a surrounding cladding. A seed beam of the longer wavelength is injected into the core at one end of the fiber and a pump pulse of the shorter wavelength is injected into the cladding at the other end of the fiber. The counter-propagating seed beam and pump pulse will produce an amplified output pulse having a time duration equal to twice the transit time of the pump pulse through the fiber plus the length of the pump pulse. 3 figs.

  6. Green Bank Telescope Studies of Giant Pulses from Millisecond Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. S. Knight; M. Bailes; R. N. Manchester; S. M. Ord; B. A. Jacoby

    2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a search for giant pulses from four millisecond pulsars using the 100m Green Bank Telescope. Coherently dedispersed time-series from PSR J0218+4232 were found to contain giant pulses of very short intrinsic duration whose energies follow power-law statistics. The giant pulses are in phase with the two minima of the radio integrated pulse profile but are phase aligned with the peaks of the X-ray profile. Historically, individual pulses more than 10-20 times the mean pulse energy have been deemed to be ``giant pulses''. As only 4 of the 155 pulses had energies greater than 10 times the mean pulse-energy, we argue the emission mechanism responsible for giant pulses should instead be defined through: (a) intrinsic timescales of microsecond or nanosecond duration; (b) power-law energy statistics; and (c) emission occurring in narrow phase-windows coincident with the phase windows of non-thermal X-ray emission. Four short-duration pulses with giant-pulse characteristics were also observed from PSR B1957+20. As the inferred magnetic fields at the light cylinders of the millisecond pulsars that emit giant pulses are all very high, this parameter has previously been considered to be an indicator of giant pulse emissivity. However, the frequency of giant pulse emission from PSR~B1957+20 is significantly lower than for other millisecond pulsars that have similar magnetic fields at their light cylinders. This suggests that the inferred magnetic field at the light cylinder is a poor indicator of the rate of emission of giant pulses.

  7. Generation of Stable (3+1)-dimensional High-intensity Ultrashort Light Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todorov, T. P.; Koprinkov, I. G. [Department of Applied Physics, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorova, M. E. [College of Energetics and Electronics, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria); Todorov, M. D. [Faculty of Appl. Math. and Informatics, Technical University of Sofia, 1000 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2010-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spatiotemporal dynamics of high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses is studied within a rigorous physical model. The pulse propagation is described by the nonlinear envelope equation. The propagation and the material equations are solved self-consistently at realistic physical conditions. Self-compression of the pulse around single-cycle regime and dramatic increase of the pulse intensity is found. At certain conditions, the peak intensity, transversal width, time duration, and the spatiotemporal pulse shape remain stable with the propagation of the pulse, resembling a soliton formation process. This, to our knowledge, is the first simulation of high-intensity ultrashort soliton formation dynamics in the (3+1)-dimensional case.

  8. Test of QED at critical field strength

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

  9. Preliminary Assumptions for Natural Gas Peaking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; adjusted to 2012$, state construction cost index, vintage of cost estimate, scope of estimate to extent's Discussion Aeroderivative Gas Turbine Technology Proposed reference plant and assumptions Preliminary cost Robbins 2 #12;Peaking Power Plant Characteristics 6th Power Plan ($2006) Unit Size (MW) Capital Cost ($/k

  10. Development and testing of radiation and electromagnetic pulse-hardened silicon carbide-based electronics. Quarterly report, 1 Dec 90-28 Feb 91

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmond, J.A.; Palmour, J.W.

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    There were three primary objectives for this reporting period. The first was to electrically characterize junction diodes as a function of temperature. This included both current-voltage (I-V) and capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements. The second was to fabricate low (about 125 V) and medium (about 450 V) voltage p-n junction rectifiers for neutron and gamma exposure tests. The third objective was to fabricate JFET devices with reduced gate and drain leakage currents than those discussed in the previous report and to package these devices in preparation for radiation testing.

  11. Nerve-pulse interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, A.C.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some recent experimental and theoretical results on mechanisms through which individual nerve pulses can interact are reviewed. Three modes of interactions are considered: (1) interaction of pulses as they travel along a single fiber which leads to velocity dispersion; (2) propagation of pairs of pulses through a branching region leading to quantum pulse code transformations; and (3) interaction of pulses on parallel fibers through which they may form a pulse assembly. This notion is analogous to Hebb's concept of a cell assembly, but on a lower level of the neural hierarchy.

  12. Laser pulse stacking method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, E.I.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser pulse stacking method is disclosed. A problem with the prior art has been the generation of a series of laser beam pulses where the outer and inner regions of the beams are generated so as to form radially non-synchronous pulses. Such pulses thus have a non-uniform cross-sectional area with respect to the outer and inner edges of the pulses. The present invention provides a solution by combining the temporally non-uniform pulses in a stacking effect to thus provide a more uniform temporal synchronism over the beam diameter. 2 figs.

  13. On the role of terahertz field acceleration and beaming of surface plasmon generated ultrashort electron pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greig, S. R., E-mail: sgreig@ualberta.ca; Elezzabi, A. Y., E-mail: elezzabi@ece.ualberta.ca [Ultrafast Optics and Nanophotonics Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2V4 (Canada)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanism for control of the energy and pitch angle of surface plasmon accelerated electron pulses is proposed. Electrons generated via multi-photon absorption in a silver film on a glass prism are ponderomotively accelerated in the surface plasmon field excited by a 30 fs, 800?nm optical pulse. Through introduction of a single-cycle terahertz (THz) pulse, the energy spectrum and trajectory of the generated electron pulse can be controlled via the THz field strength. Generated electron pulses achieve peak kinetic energies up to 1.56?keV, while utilizing an incident optical field strength five times less than comparable plasmon accelerated electron pulses. These results demonstrate that THz pulses can be utilized to achieve tunable, high energy, trajectory controlled electron pulses necessary for various applications that require ultrafast electron pulse manipulation.

  14. Broadband 180 degree universal rotation pulses for NMR spectroscopy designed by optimal control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skinner, Thomas E; Nimbalkar, Manoj; Bermel, Wolfgang; Luy, Burkhard; Glaser, Steffen J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Broadband inversion pulses that rotate all magnetization components 180 degrees about a given fixed axis are necessary for refocusing and mixing in high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. The relative merits of various methodologies for generating pulses suitable for broadband refocusing are considered. The de novo design of 180 degree universal rotation pulses using optimal control can provide improved performance compared to schemes which construct refocusing pulses as composites of existing pulses. The advantages of broadband universal rotation by optimized pulses (BURBOP) are most evident for pulse design that includes tolerance to RF inhomogeneity or miscalibration. We present new modifications of the optimal control algorithm that incorporate symmetry principles and relax conservative limits on peak RF pulse amplitude for short time periods that pose no threat to the probe. We apply them to generate a set of pulses suitable for widespread use in Carbon-13 spectroscopy on the majority of available probes.

  15. Central peaking of magnetized gas discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Francis F. [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)] [Electrical Engineering Department, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Curreli, Davide [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear, Plasma and Radiological Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Partially ionized gas discharges used in industry are often driven by radiofrequency (rf) power applied at the periphery of a cylinder. It is found that the plasma density n is usually flat or peaked on axis even if the skin depth of the rf field is thin compared with the chamber radius a. Previous attempts at explaining this did not account for the finite length of the discharge and the boundary conditions at the endplates. A simple 1D model is used to focus on the basic mechanism: the short-circuit effect. It is found that a strong electric field (E-field) scaled to electron temperature T{sub e}, drives the ions inward. The resulting density profile is peaked on axis and has a shape independent of pressure or discharge radius. This “universal” profile is not affected by a dc magnetic field (B-field) as long as the ion Larmor radius is larger than a.

  16. Triangle Singularities and XYZ Quarkonium Peaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam P. Szczepaniak

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss analytical properties of partial waves derived from projection of a 4-legged amplitude with crossed-channel exchanges in the kinematic region of the direct channel that corresponds to the XYZ peaks in charmonium and bottomonium. We show that in general partial waves can develop anomalous branch points in the vicinity of the direct channel physical region. In a specific case, when these branch points lie on the opposite side of the unitary cut they pinch the integration contour in a dispersion relation and if the pinch happens close to threshold, the normal threshold cusp is enhanced. We show that this effect only occurs if masses of resonances in the crossed channel are in a specific, narrow range. We estimate the size of threshold enhancements originating from these anomalous singularities in reactions where the Zc(3900) and the Zb(10610) peaks have been observed.

  17. Triangle Singularities and XYZ Quarkonium Peaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szczepaniak, Adam P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss analytical properties of partial waves derived from projection of a 4-legged amplitude with crossed-channel exchanges in the kinematic region of the direct channel that corresponds to the XYZ peaks in charmonium and bottomonium. We show that in general partial waves can develop anomalous branch points in the vicinity of the direct channel physical region. In a specific case, when these branch points lie on the opposite side of the unitary cut they pinch the integration contour in a dispersion relation and if the pinch happens close to threshold, the normal threshold cusp is enhanced. We show that this effect only occurs if masses of resonances in the crossed channel are in a specific, narrow range. We estimate the size of threshold enhancements originating from these anomalous singularities in reactions where the Zc(3900) and the Zb(10610) peaks have been observed.

  18. A Self-Biasing Pulsed Depressed Collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, Mark A.; Jensen, Aaron; Neilson, Jeff; /SLAC

    2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Depressed collectors have been utilized successfully for many years to improve the electrical efficiency of vacuum electron devices. Increasingly, pulsed, high-peak power accelerator applications are placing a premium on electrical efficiency. As RF systems are responsible for a large percentage of the overall energy usage at accelerator laboratories, methods to improve upon the state-of-the-art in pulsed high-power sources are desired. This paper presents a technique for self-biasing the stages in a multistage depressed collector. With this technique, the energy lost during the rise and fall times of the pulse can be recovered, separate power supplies are not needed, and existing modulators can be retrofitted. Calculations show that significant cost savings can be realized with the implementation of this device in high-power systems. In this paper, the technique is described along with experimental demonstration. (auth)

  19. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, J.S.; Sheffield, R.L.

    1985-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radiofrequency-powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  20. Optically pulsed electron accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fraser, John S. (Los Alamos, NM); Sheffield, Richard L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optically pulsed electron accelerator can be used as an injector for a free electron laser and comprises a pulsed light source, such as a laser, for providing discrete incident light pulses. A photoemissive electron source emits electron bursts having the same duration as the incident light pulses when impinged upon by same. The photoemissive electron source is located on an inside wall of a radio frequency powered accelerator cell which accelerates the electron burst emitted by the photoemissive electron source.

  1. Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L.R. Modeling alternative residential peak-load electricitydemand response to residential critical peak pricing (CPP)analysis of California residential customer response to

  2. Hybrid chirped pulse amplification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid chirped pulse amplification system wherein a short-pulse oscillator generates an oscillator pulse. The oscillator pulse is stretched to produce a stretched oscillator seed pulse. A pump laser generates a pump laser pulse. The stretched oscillator seed pulse and the pump laser pulse are directed into an optical parametric amplifier producing an optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and an optical parametric amplifier output unconverted pump pulse. The optical parametric amplifier output amplified signal pulse and the optical parametric amplifier output laser pulse are directed into a laser amplifier producing a laser amplifier output pulse. The laser amplifier output pulse is compressed to produce a recompressed hybrid chirped pulse amplification pulse.

  3. Method for the Production of Ultrashort Peak Power Laser Pulses and System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighand Retrievals from aRodMIT-HarvardEnergyMethod forEnergyFor Putting

  4. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Standing Wave Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgashev, Valery; /SLAC; Tantawi, Sami; /SLAC; Yeremian, Anahid; /SLAC; Higashi, Yasuo; /KEK, Tsukuba; Spataro, Bruno; /INFN, Rome

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Our experiments are directed toward the understanding of the physics of rf breakdown in systems that can be used to accelerate electron beams at {approx}11.4 GHz. The structure geometries have apertures, stored energy per cell, and rf pulse duration close to that of the NLC or CLIC. The breakdown rate is the main parameter that we use to compare rf breakdown behavior for different structures at a given set of rf pulse parameters (pulse shape and peak power) at 60 Hz repetition rate. In our experiments, the typical range of the breakdown rate is from one per few hours to {approx}100 per hour. To date we have tested 29 structures. We consistently found that after the initial conditioning, the behavior of the breakdown rate is reproducible for structures of the same geometry and material, and the breakdown rate dependence on peak magnetic fields is stronger than on peak surface electric fields for structures of different geometries. Below we report the main results from tests of seven structures made from hard copper, soft copper alloys and hard-copper alloys. Additional details on these and other structures will be discussed in future publications.

  5. Equivalence Principle and the Baryon Acoustic Peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldauf, Tobias; Simonovi?, Marko; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dominant effect of a long wavelength density perturbation $\\delta(\\lambda_L)$ on short distance physics. In the non-relativistic limit, the result is a uniform acceleration, fixed by the equivalence principle, and typically has no effect on statistical averages due to translational invariance. This same reasoning has been formalized to obtain a "consistency condition" on the cosmological correlation functions. In the presence of a feature, such as the acoustic peak at $l_{\\rm BAO}$, this naive expectation breaks down for $\\lambda_Lpower spectrum. Finally, the success of BAO reconstruction schemes is argue...

  6. Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic WeeklyStores Catalog The AmesPeak

  7. Pilot Peak Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal PwerPerkins County, Nebraska: Energy ResourcesPicketGeothermal Project Jump to:Pilot Peak

  8. Mt Peak Utility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVistaZephyr)Mountain AirPeak Utility Jump

  9. DESIGN CONSIDERATIONS ON PEAK POWER CLIPPING THRESHOLDS IN MICROGRIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paderborn, Universität

    the utility grid. This kind of operating strategy is called e.g. "peak load shaving", "peak power reduction. This method is broadly applicable to similar applications, e.g. for peak-shaving of PV power to limit" or just "peak shaving" and is applied to diverse applications and systems. This paper presents a method

  10. Peak Oil and REMI PI+: State Fiscal Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    the possibility of multiple maxima (peaks) · There is no particular reason why peak oil in New Mexico or some to assume that these peaks will not occur at the same time. #12;The Oil Peak in New Mexico Source: Starbuck are Proved Reserves? "Proved reserves of crude oil are the estimated quantities which geological

  11. Capacitor charging FET switcher with controller to adjust pulse width

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalka, Alex M. (Livermore, CA)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A switching power supply includes an FET full bridge, a controller to drive the FETs, a programmable controller to dynamically control final output current by adjusting pulse width, and a variety of protective systems, including an overcurrent latch for current control. Power MOSFETS are switched at a variable frequency from 20-50 kHz to charge a capacitor load from 0 to 6 kV. A ferrite transformer steps up the DC input. The transformer primary is a full bridge configuration with the FET switches and the secondary is fed into a high voltage full wave rectifier whose output is connected directly to the energy storage capacitor. The peak current is held constant by varying the pulse width using predetermined timing resistors and counting pulses. The pulse width is increased as the capacitor charges to maintain peak current. A digital ripple counter counts pulses, and after the desired number is reached, an up-counter is clocked. The up-counter output is decoded to choose among different resistors used to discharge a timing capacitor, thereby determining the pulse width. A current latch shuts down the supply on overcurrent due to either excessive pulse width causing transformer saturation or a major bridge fault, i.e., FET or transformer failure, or failure of the drive circuitry.

  12. High-performance laser processing using manipulated ultrafast laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugioka, Koji; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan; Hanada, Yasutaka; Midorikawa, Katsumi [RIKEN - Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); RIKEN - Advanced Science Institute, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ manipulated ultrafast laser pulses to realize microprocessing with high-performance. Efficient microwelding of glass substrates by irradiation by a double-pulse train of ultrafast laser pulses is demonstrated. The bonding strength of two photostructurable glass substrates welded by double-pulse irradiation was evaluated to be 22.9 MPa, which is approximately 22% greater than that of a sample prepared by conventional irradiation by a single pulse train. Additionally, the fabrication of hollow microfluidic channels with a circular cross-sectional shape embedded in fused silica is realized by spatiotemporally focusing the ultrafast laser beam. We show both theoretically and experimentally that the spatiotemporal focusing of ultrafast laser beam allows for the creation of a three-dimensionally symmetric spherical peak intensity distribution at the focal spot.

  13. High voltage pulse conditioning

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Springfield, Ray M. (Sante Fe, NM); Wheat, Jr., Robert M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for conditioning high voltage pulses from particle accelerators in order to shorten the rise times of the pulses. Flashover switches in the cathode stalk of the transmission line hold off conduction for a determinable period of time, reflecting the early portion of the pulses. Diodes upstream of the switches divert energy into the magnetic and electrostatic storage of the capacitance and inductance inherent to the transmission line until the switches close.

  14. Critical pulse power components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarjeant, W.J.; Rohwein, G.J.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical components for pulsed power conditioning systems will be reviewed. Particular emphasis will be placed on those components requiring significant development efforts. Capacitors, for example, are one of the weakest elements in high-power pulsed systems, especially when operation at high-repetition frequencies for extended periods of time are necessary. Switches are by far the weakest active components of pulse power systems. In particular, opening switches are essentially nonexistent for most applications. Insulaton in all systems and components requires development and improvement. Efforts under way in technology base development of pulse power components will be discussed.

  15. Analytical modeling of pulse-pileup distortion using the true pulse shape; applications to Fermi-GBM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vandiver Chaplin; Narayana Bhat; Michael Briggs; Valerie Connaughton

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse-pileup affects most photon counting systems and occurs when photon detections occur faster than the detector's registration and recovery time. At high input rates, shaped pulses interfere and the source spectrum, as well as intensity information, get distorted. For instruments using bipolar pulse shaping there are two aspects to consider: `peak' and `tail' pileup effects, which raise and lower the measured energy, respectively. Peak effects have been extensively modeled in the past. Tail effects have garnered less attention due to the increased complexity: bipolar tails mean the tail pulse-height measurement depends on events in more than one time interval. We leverage previous work to derive an accurate, semi-analytical prediction for peak and tail pileup, up to high orders. We use the true pulse shape from the detectors of the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor. The measured spectrum is calculated by writing exposure time as a state-space expansion of overlapping pileup states and is valid up to very high rates. This expansion models losses due to fixed and extendable deadtime by averaging overlap configurations. Additionally, the model correctly predicts energy-dependent losses due to tail subtraction (sub-threshold) effects. We discuss pileup losses in terms of the true rate of photon detections versus the recorded count rate.

  16. The Pulse Scale Conjecture and the Case of BATSE Trigger 2193

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert J. Nemiroff

    2000-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The pulses that compose gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are hypothesized to have the same shape at all energies, differing only by scale factors in time and amplitude. This "Pulse Scale Conjecture" is confirmed here between energy channels of the dominant pulse in GRB 930214c (BATSE trigger 2193), the single most fluent single-pulsed GRB that occurred before May 1998. Furthermore, pulses are hypothesized to start at the same time independent of energy. This "Pulse Start Conjecture" is also confirmed in GRB 930214c. Analysis of GRB 930214c also shows that, in general, higher energy channels show shorter temporal scale factors. Over the energy range 100 KeV - 1 MeV, it is found that the temporal scale factors between a pulse measured at different energies are related to that energy by a power law, possibly indicating a simple relativistic mechanism is at work. To test robustness, the Pulse Start and Pulse Scale Conjectures were also tested on the four next most fluent single-pulse GRBs. Three of the four clearly passed, with a second smaller pulse possibly confounding the discrepant test. Models where the pulse rise and decay are created by different phenomena do not typically predict pulses that satisfy both the Pulse Start Conjecture and the Pulse Scale Conjecture, unless both processes are seen to undergo common time dilation.

  17. Uppsala High Power Test Stand for ESS Spoke Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yogi, RA; Dancila, D; Gajewski, K; Hermansson, L; Noor, M; Wedberg, R; Santiago-Kern, R; Ekelöf, T; Lofnes, T; Ziemann, V; Goryashko, V; Ruber, R

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is one of the world’s most powerful neutron source. The ESS linac will accelerate 50mA pulse current of protons to 2.5GeV in 2.86 ms long pulses at a repetition rate of 14 Hz. It produces a beam with 5MW average power and 125MW peak power. ESS Spoke Linac consist of 28 superconducting spoke cavities, which will be developed by IPN Orsay, France. These Spoke Cavities will be tested at low power at IPN Orsay and high power testing will be performed in a high power test stand at Uppsala University. The test stand consists of tetrode based RF amplifier chain (352MHz, 350 kW) power and related RF distribution. Outputs of two tetrodes shall be combined with the hybrid coupler to produce 350 kW power. Preamplifier for a tetrode shall be solid state amplifier. As the spoke cavities are superconducting, the test stand also includes horizontal cryostat, Helium liquefier, test bunker etc. The paper describes features of the test stand in details.

  18. Outliers to the Isotropic Energy - Peak Energy Relation in GRBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehud Nakar; Tsvi Piran

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peak energy - isotropic energy (EpEi) relation is among the most intriguing recent discoveries concerning GRBs. It can have numerous implications on our understanding of the emission mechanism of the bursts and on the application of GRBs for cosmological studies. However, this relation was verified only for a small sample of bursts with measured redshifts. We propose here a test whether a burst with an unknown redshift can potentially satisfy the EpEi relation. Applying this test to a large sample of BATSE bursts we find that a significant fraction of those bursts cannot satisfy this relation. Our test is sensitive only to dim and hard bursts and therefore this relation might still hold as an inequality (i.e. there are no intrinsically bright and soft bursts). We conclude that the observed relation seen in the sample of bursts with a known redshift might be influenced by observational biases and from the inability to locate and well localize hard and weak bursts that have only a small number of photons. In particular we point out that the threshold for detection, localization and redshift measurement is essentially higher than the threshold for detection alone. We predict that Swift will detect some hard and weak bursts that would be outliers to the EpEi relation. However, we cannot quantify this prediction. We stress the importance of understanding the detection-localization-redshift threshold for the coming Swift detections.

  19. STUDENT PULSE Spring 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SF STATE STUDENT PULSE SURVEY Spring 2013 Academic Planning and Development Academic Institutional Research (air.sfsu.edu) March 2013 #12;SF State Student Pulse Survey, Spring 2013 Page 1 Table of Contents is most effective. 79% of all respondents reported spending most of their time in class listening while

  20. Pulsed electrodeposition. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stimetz, C.J.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse plating of cobalt-hardened gold alloys increases the cobalt content in the alloy. At lower duty cycles, the electrodeposits become dull. Little change in the microhardness was observed between pulsed and direct current electrodeposits. The TEM and electron diffraction analyses indicated no significant difference in microstructure between pulsed and conventional gold alloy electrodeposits. Pulse plated and conventional nickel deposits have been compared for differences in morphology, mechanical properties, and microstructure. The deposits were obtained from nickel sulfamate, nickel chloride, and Watts nickel plating solutions. No significant differences were found in the direct and pulse current deposits from the sulfamate and chloride solutions; however, significant differences in microstructure, yield strength, and microhardness were observed in deposits from the Watts nickel solution.

  1. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Desert Peak Area (Wisian & Blackwell, 2004) Exploration Activity...

  2. GTA P.M. PEAK MODEL Version 2.0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    WORKING DRAFT GTA P.M. PEAK MODEL Version 2.0 And HALTON REGION SUB-MODEL Documentation & Users' Guide Prepared by Peter Dalton July 2001 #12;GTA P.M. Model Page 2 30/05/2002 Contents 1.0 P.M. Peak ................................................................................................ 4 Table 1 - Features of the P.M. Peak Period Model

  3. The University of Oklahoma Peak People Temporary Services Appointment Notification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma, University of

    The University of Oklahoma Peak People Temporary Services Appointment Notification Please read of Oklahoma. Peak Appointment -This section is to be completed by the hiring department. Print Peak Person will not be eligible for any of the University of Oklahoma's benefit programs except for the 403(b) and 457(b

  4. Reduced Peak Power Requirements in FDM and Related Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Thomas J.

    Reduced Peak Power Requirements in FDM and Related Systems Rajiv Laroia, Tom Richardson, R. This is especially true of communication systems for which the cost of peak transmitted power is critical. Often by the peak power required of the amplifier. On the other hand, the capacity of the system is proportional

  5. Single-cycle terahertz pulses with >0.2 V/A field amplitudes via coherent transition radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Source (LCLS) free-electron laser,17 using electron bunches as short as 50 fs. We observe THz pulses at half maximum (FWHM), corresponding to peak currents of up to 7 kA. After being passed through the LCLS

  6. Smart Operations of Air-Conditioning and Lighting Systems in Government Buildings for Peak Power Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Hadban, Y.; Maheshwari, G. P.; Al-Nakib, D.; Al-Mulla, A.; Alasseri, R.

    During the summer 2007 smart operation strategies for air-conditioning (A/C) and lighting systems were developed and tested in a number of governmental buildings in Kuwait as one of the solutions to reduce the national peak demand for electrical...

  7. Planar repetitively pulsed microwave-pumped CO{sub 2} laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mineev, A P; Nefedov, S M; Pashinin, Pavel P [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A planar repetitively pulsed microwave-pumped CO{sub 2} laser with discharge channel lengths of 250 and 470 mm is experimentally investigated. An average laser power of 60 W at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m is attained. A peak power of 1300 W is reached in the repetitively pulsed regime. The dependences of the shape and energy of CO{sub 2} laser pulse on the introduced power, working gas mixture composition and pressure, and pump-pulse repetition rate and width are analysed. (lasers)

  8. Pulse compression in plasma: generation of femtosecond pulses without CPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­frequency laser beam into the energy of a short lower­frequency laser pulse. The standard approach to generating high­intensity ultra­short laser pulses is Chirped Pulse Amplification [1] (CPA), in which a laser Garching, Germany Abstract: Laser pulses can be e#ciently compressed to femto­ second duration when

  9. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mook, Jr., Herbert A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The wave are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  10. Pulsed-neutron monochromator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mook, H.A. Jr.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In one aspect, the invention is an improved pulsed-neutron monochromator of the vibrated-crystal type. The monochromator is designed to provide neutron pulses which are characterized both by short duration and high density. A row of neutron-reflecting crystals is disposed in a neutron beam to reflect neutrons onto a common target. The crystals in the row define progressively larger neutron-scattering angles and are vibrated sequentially in descending order with respect to the size of their scattering angles, thus generating neutron pulses which arrive simultaneously at the target. Transducers are coupled to one end of the crystals to vibrate them in an essentially non-resonant mode. The transducers propagate transverse waves in the crystal which progress longitudinally therein. The waves are absorbed at the undriven ends of the crystals by damping material mounted thereon. In another aspect, the invention is a method for generating neutron pulses characterized by high intensity and short duration.

  11. The role of building technologies in reducing and controlling peak electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koomey, Jonathan; Brown, Richard E.

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peak power demand issues have come to the fore recently because of the California electricity crisis. Uncertainties surrounding the reliability of electric power systems in restructured markets as well as security worries are the latest reasons for such concerns, but the issues surrounding peak demand are as old as the electric utility system itself. The long lead times associated with building new capacity, the lack of price response in the face of time-varying costs, the large difference between peak demand and average demand, and the necessity for real-time delivery of electricity all make the connection between system peak demand and system reliability an important driver of public policy in the electric utility sector. This exploratory option paper was written at the request of Jerry Dion at the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE). It is one of several white papers commissioned in 2002 exploring key issues of relevance to DOE. This paper explores policy-relevant issues surrounding peak demand, to help guide DOE's research efforts in this area. The findings of this paper are as follows. In the short run, DOE funding of deployment activities on peak demand can help society achieve a more economically efficient balance between investments in supply and demand-side technologies. DOE policies can promote implementation of key technologies to ameliorate peak demand, through government purchasing, technology demonstrations, and improvements in test procedures, efficiency standards, and labeling programs. In the long run, R&D is probably the most important single leverage point for DOE to influence the peak demand issue. Technologies for time-varying price response hold great potential for radically altering the way people use electricity in buildings, but are decades away from widespread use, so DOE R&D and expertise can make a real difference here.

  12. Pulsed Zeeman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullen, Raymond Paul

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PULSED ZEEMAN SPECTROSCOPY A Thesis Raymond P. Cullen Submitted to the Graduate Collepe of the Texas MM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OE SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject: Chemistry PULSRD... ZEEHA&'I SPRCTPOSC::)Py A The. ", is by Raymond P. Cullen Approved es to style and content by: (Chairman o~ Commi. tee) August 1967 Pulsed Zceman Spectroscopy (August 1967) Raymond P. Cullen, B. S. , Texas A6M University Directed by: Dr...

  13. Pulse magnetic welder

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A welder is described for automated closure of fuel pins by a pulsed magnetic process in which the open end of a length of cladding is positioned within a complementary tube surrounded by a pulsed magnetic welder. Seals are provided at each end of the tube, which can be evacuated or can receive tag gas for direct introduction to the cladding interior. Loading of magnetic rings and end caps is accomplished automatically in conjunction with the welding steps carried out within the tube.

  14. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, Emanuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime.

  15. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1987-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime. 10 figs.

  16. Reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Honig, E.M.

    1984-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A high power reversing-counterpulse repetitive-pulse inductive storage and transfer circuit includes an opening switch, a main energy storage coil, a counterpulse capacitor and a small inductor. After counterpulsing the opening switch off, the counterpulse capacitor is recharged by the main energy storage coil before the load pulse is initiated. This gives the counterpulse capacitor sufficient energy for the next counterpulse operation, although the polarity of the capacitor's voltage must be reversed before that can occur. By using a current-zero switch as the counterpulse start switch, the capacitor is disconnected from the circuit (with a full charge) when the load pulse is initiated, preventing the capacitor from depleting its energy store by discharging through the load. After the load pulse is terminated by reclosing the main opening switch, the polarity of the counterpulse capacitor voltage is reversed by discharging the capacitor through a small inductor and interrupting the discharge current oscillation at zero current and peak reversed voltage. The circuit enables high-power, high-repetition-rate operation with reusable switches and features total control (pulse-to-pulse) over output pulse initiation, duration, repetition rate, and, to some extent, risetime.

  17. CORRELATION BETWEEN PEAK ENERGY AND PEAK LUMINOSITY IN SHORT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z. B.; Chen, D. Y. [Department of Physics, College of Sciences, Guizhou University, Guiyang 550025 (China); Huang, Y. F., E-mail: sci.zbzhang@gzu.edu.cn, E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A correlation between the peak luminosity and the peak energy has been found by Yonetoku et al. as L{sub p} {proportional_to}E{sup 2.0}{sub p,i} for 11 pre-Swift long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In this study, for a greatly expanded sample of 148 long GRBs in the Swift era, we find that the correlation still exists, but most likely with a slightly different power-law index, i.e., L{sub p} {proportional_to} E{sup 1.7}{sub p,i}. In addition, we have collected 17 short GRBs with necessary data. We find that the correlation of L{sub p} {proportional_to} E{sup 1.7}{sub p,i} also exists for this sample of short events. It is argued that the radiation mechanism of both long and short GRBs should be similar, i.e., of quasi-thermal origin caused by the photosphere, with the dissipation occurring very near the central engine. Some key parameters of the process are constrained. Our results suggest that the radiation processes of both long and short bursts may be dominated by thermal emission, rather than by the single synchrotron radiation. This might put strong physical constraints on the theoretical models.

  18. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Russell B. (Oakland, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  19. Pulse shaping with transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, R.B.

    1985-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for forming shaped voltage pulses uses passive reflection from a transmission line with nonuniform impedance. The impedance of the reflecting line varies with length in accordance with the desired pulse shape. A high voltage input pulse is transmitted to the reflecting line. A reflected pulse is produced having the desired shape and is transmitted by pulse removal means to a load. Light activated photoconductive switches made of silicon can be utilized. The pulse shaper can be used to drive a Pockels cell to produce shaped optical pulses.

  20. A long pulse modulator for reduced size and cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pfeffer, H.; Bartelson, L.; Bourkland, K.; Jensen, C.; Kerns, Q.; Prieto, P.; Saewert, G.; Wolff, D.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel modulator has been designed, built and tested for the TESLA test facility. This e{sup +} e{sup {minus}} accelerator concept uses superconducting RF cavities and requires 2ms of RF power at 10 pps. As the final accelerator will require several hundred modulators, a cost effective, space saving and high efficiency design is desired. This modulator used a modest size switched capacitor bank that droops approximately 20% during the pulse. This large droop is compensated for by the use of a resonant LC circuit. The capacitor bank is connected to the high side of a pulse transformer primary using a series GTO switch. The resonant circuit is connected to the low side of the pulse transformer primary. The output pulse is flat to within 1% for 1.9 ms during a 2.3 ms base pulse width. Measured efficiency, from breaker to klystron and including energy lost in the rise time, is approximately 85%.

  1. Efficient optical pulse stacker system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seppala, Lynn G. (Pleasanton, CA); Haas, Roger A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for spreading and angle-encoding each pulse of a multiplicity of small area, short pulses into several temporally staggered pulses by use of appropriate beam splitters, with the optical elements being arranged so that each staggered pulse is contiguous with one or two other such pulses, and the entire sequence of stacked pulses comprising a single, continuous long pulse. The single long pulse is expanded in area, and then doubly passed through a nonstorage laser amplifier such as KrF. After amplification, the physically separated, angle-encoded and temporally staggered pulses are recombined into a single pulse of short duration. This high intensity output beam is well collimated and may be propagated over long distance, or used for irradiating inertial confinement fusion targets.

  2. Pulse tube coolers for Meteosat third generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterworth, James; Aigouy, Gérald; Chassaing, Clement; Debray, Benoît; Huguet, Alexandre [Air Liquide Advanced Technologies, 2 Rue de Clémencière, F-38600 Sassenage (France)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Air Liquide's Large Pulse Tube Coolers (LPTC) will be used to cool the focal planes of the Infrared Sounder (IRS) and Flexible Combined Imager (FCI) instruments aboard the ESA/Eumetsat satellites Meteosat Third Generation (MTG). This cooler consists of an opposed piston linear compressor driving a pulse tube cold head and the associated drive electronics including temperature regulation and vibration cancellation algorithms. Preparations for flight qualification of the cooler are now underway. In this paper we present results of the optimization and qualification activities as well as an update on endurance testing.

  3. Anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors using symbolic time series analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    339 Anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors using symbolic time series analysis S Gupta1 for anomaly detection in thermal pulse combustors. The anomaly detection method has been tested on the time pulse combustor. Results are presented to exemplify early detection of combustion instability due

  4. Effect of asymmetry in peak profiles on solar oscillation frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Most helioseismic analyses are based on solar oscillations frequencies obtained by fitting symmetric peak profiles to the power spectra. However, it has now been demonstrated that the peaks are not symmetric. In this work we study the effects of asymmetry of the peak profiles on the solar oscillations frequencies of p-modes for low and intermediate degrees. We also investigate how the resulting shift in frequencies affects helioseismic inferences.

  5. On-Chip AC self-test controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flanagan, John D. (Rhinebeck, NY); Herring, Jay R. (Poughkeepsie, NY); Lo, Tin-Chee (Fishkill, NY)

    2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for performing AC self-test on an integrated circuit that includes a system clock for normal operation is provided. The system includes the system clock, self-test circuitry, a first and second test register to capture and launch test data in response to a sequence of data pulses, and a logic circuit to be tested. The self-test circuitry includes an AC self-test controller and a clock splitter. The clock splitter generates the sequence of data pulses including a long data capture pulse followed by an at speed data launch pulse and an at speed data capture pulse followed by a long data launch pulse. The at speed data launch pulse and the at speed data capture pulse are generated for a common cycle of the system clock.

  6. Microgrid Dispatch for Macrogrid Peak-Demand Mitigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeForest, Nicholas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on-peak rates from time-of-use (TOU) tariffs while enhancingTable 1 Time of Use Electricity Tariff at SRJ Period Summer

  7. affect peak oxidative: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    establish a monotonicity result that indicates fuel supply Todd, Michael J. 119 Potential Peak Load Reductions From Residential Energy Efficient Upgrades Texas A&M University -...

  8. assisting daytime peaking: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    models are deterministic Minnesota, University of 105 Distributed Battery Control for Peak Power Shaving in Datacenters Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites...

  9. artery peak systolic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power spectrum. Michael P. Hobson 1996-11-26 69 COMMITTEE FINAL REPORT REVISED SHORTTERM PEAK Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Websites Summary: , weather adjustment,...

  10. Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Structural Analysis of the Desert Peak-Brady Geothermal Fields, Northwestern Nevada: Implications for...

  11. Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reducing Peak Demand to Defer Power Plant Construction in Oklahoma Located in the heart of "Tornado Alley," Oklahoma Gas & Electric Company's (OG&E) electric grid faces significant...

  12. Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing of electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herter, Karen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to time-of-day electricity pricing: first empirical results.S. The trouble with electricity markets: understandingresidential peak-load electricity rate structures. Journal

  13. annihilation coincidence peak: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    V. Fedorov; Julia M. Mikhailova; Peter A. Volkov 2011-12-05 3 (2013) 128 Data Center Demand Response: Avoiding the Coincident Peak via Computer Technologies and Information...

  14. 650-nJ pulses from a cavity-dumped Yb:fiber-pumped ultrafast optical parametric oscillator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    650-nJ pulses from a cavity-dumped Yb:fiber- pumped ultrafast optical parametric oscillator Tobias.p.lamour@hw.ac.uk Abstract: Sub-250-fs pulses with energies of up to 650 nJ and peak powers up to 2.07 MW were generated from a cavity-dumped optical parametric oscillator, synchronously-pumped at 15.3 MHz with sub-400-fs pulses from

  15. The synchrotron peak shift during high-energy flares of blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Boettcher

    1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A prediction for the energy shift of the synchrotron spectrum of flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) during high-energy flares is presented. If the $\\gamma$-ray emission of FSRQs is produced by Comptonization of external radiation, then the peak of the synchrotron spectrum is predicted to move to lower energies in the flare state. This is opposite to the well-known broadband spectral behavior of high-frequency peaked BL-Lac objects where the external radiation field is believed to be weak and synchrotron-self Compton scattering might be the dominant $\\gamma$-ray radiation mechanism. The synchrotron peak shift, if observed in FSRQs, can thus be used as a diagnostic to determine the dominant radiation mechanism in these objects. I suggest a few FSRQs as promising candidates to test the prediction of the external-Comptonization model.

  16. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ThermoChem, under contract to the Department of Energy, conducted extensive research, development and demonstration work on a Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor (PAFBC) to confirm that advanced technology can meet these performance objectives. The ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC system integrates a pulse combustor with an atmospheric bubbling-bed type fluidized bed combustor (BFBC) In this modular configuration, the pulse combustor burns the fuel fines (typically less than 30 sieve or 600 microns) and the fluidized bed combusts the coarse fuel particles. Since the ThermoChem/MTCI PAFBC employs both the pulse combustor and the AFBC technologies, it can handle the full-size range of coarse and fines. The oscillating flow field in the pulse combustor provides for high interphase and intraparticle mass transfer rates. Therefore, the fuel fines essentially burn under kinetic control. Due to the reasonably high temperature (>1093 C but less than the temperature for ash fusion to prevent slagging), combustion of fuel fines is substantially complete at the exit of the pulse combustor. The additional residence time of 1 to 2 seconds in the freeboard of the PAFBC unit then ensures high carbon conversion and, in turn, high combustion efficiency. A laboratory unit was successfully designed, constructed and tested for over 600 hours to confirm that the PAFBC technology could meet the performance objectives. Subsequently, a 50,000 lb/hr PAFBC demonstration steam boiler was designed, constructed and tested at Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. This Final Report presents the detailed results of this extensive and successful PAFBC research, development and demonstration project.

  17. Laser pulse sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera. 5 figs.

  18. Laser pulse sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, Charles (Fremont, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Pulse Sampler (LPS) measures temporal pulse shape without the problems of a streak camera. Unlike the streak camera, the laser pulse directly illuminates a camera in the LPS, i.e., no additional equipment or energy conversions are required. The LPS has several advantages over streak cameras. The dynamic range of the LPS is limited only by the range of its camera, which for a cooled camera can be as high as 16 bits, i.e., 65,536. The LPS costs less because there are fewer components, and those components can be mass produced. The LPS is easier to calibrate and maintain because there is only one energy conversion, i.e., photons to electrons, in the camera.

  19. Pulse shaping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  20. Pulse shaping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skeldon, Mark D. (Penfield, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  1. Pulse power linac

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Villa, Francesco (Alameda, CA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear acceleration for charged particles is constructed of a plurality of transmission line sections that extend between a power injection region and an accelerating region. Each line section is constructed of spaced plate-like conductors and is coupled to an accelerating gap located at the accelerating region. Each gap is formed between a pair of apertured electrodes, with all of the electrode apertures being aligned along a particle accelerating path. The accelerating gaps are arranged in series, and at the injection region the line sections are connected in parallel. At the injection region a power pulse is applied simultaneously to all line sections. The line sections are graduated in length so that the pulse reaches the gaps in a coordinated sequence whereby pulse energy is applied to particles as they reach each of the gaps along the accelerating path.

  2. Pulsed neutron detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, deceased, J. Craig (late of Albuquerque, NM); Rowland, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

    1989-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsed neutron detector and system for detecting low intensity fast neutron pulses has a body of beryllium adjacent a body of hydrogenous material the latter of which acts as a beta particle detector, scintillator, and moderator. The fast neutrons (defined as having En>1.5 MeV) react in the beryllium and the hydrogenous material to produce larger numbers of slow neutrons than would be generated in the beryllium itself and which in the beryllium generate hellium-6 which decays and yields beta particles. The beta particles reach the hydrogenous material which scintillates to yield light of intensity related to the number of fast neutrons. A photomultiplier adjacent the hydrogenous material (scintillator) senses the light emission from the scintillator. Utilization means, such as a summing device, sums the pulses from the photo-multiplier for monitoring or other purposes.

  3. On Transforming Spectral Peaks in Voice Conversion Elizabeth Godoy 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On Transforming Spectral Peaks in Voice Conversion Elizabeth Godoy 1 , Olivier Rosec1 , Thierry.chonavel@telecom-bretagne.eu Abstract This paper explores the benefits of transforming spectral peaks in voice conversion. First, in examining classic GMM- based transformation with cepstral coefficients, we show that the lack of transformed

  4. Distributed Battery Control for Peak Power Shaving in Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    Distributed Battery Control for Peak Power Shaving in Datacenters Baris Aksanli and Tajana Rosing-physical systems with continuous performance and power measurements, and real-time control decisions related to shave peak power demands. Our novel distributed battery control design has no performance impact

  5. PEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION: IMPACTS, MITIGATION, & RISK MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    PEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION: IMPACTS, MITIGATION, & RISK MANAGEMENT Robert L. Hirsch, SAIC OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION III. WHY TRANSITION WILL BE TIME CONSUMING IV. LESSONS FROM PAST EXPERIENCE V REMARKS APPENDICES #12;4 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY The peaking of world oil production presents the U

  6. Peaks of Otter Soil and Water Conservation District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    leadership and education to sustain and utilize Bedford's natural resources in a manner that will enhancePeaks of Otter Soil and Water Conservation District Annual Report FY 2014 1071ATurnpikeRd.Bedford,VA24523 "The Peaks of Otter Soil and Water Con- servation District, with its partners, will provide

  7. Bunch Compressor for small Emittances and high Peak Currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunch Compressor for small Emittances and high Peak Currents the VUV Free­Electron Laser Frank Stulle University Hamburg #12; #12; Bunch Compressor for small Emittances and high Peak Currents the VUV longitudinally in two magnetic chicanes. first chicane modified version bunch compressor (BC2) which TTF1

  8. TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    PWP-085 TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN CALIFORNIA, California 94720-5180 www.ucei.org #12;TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING** Abstract This study analyzes state and regional electricity supply and demand trends for the eleven states

  9. P3DDT Peak Profile Analysis 4.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winokur, Michael

    81 Chapter 4 P3DDT Peak Profile Analysis 4.1 Introduction The increasing molecular level complexity of paracrystal order are given in Ref. [36]. #12; 82 CHAPTER 4. P3DDT PEAK PROFILE ANALYSIS The well are the primary reasons why few have attempted apply­ ing this methodology to polymer systems. P3DDT is a polymer

  10. Smoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang-Yang

    for autonomous demand side management within one house. The DRS devices are able to sense and control the peak energy consumption or demand. We assume that several appliances within one building access to oneSmoothing the Energy Consumption: Peak Demand Reduction in Smart Grid Shaojie Tang , Qiuyuan Huang

  11. SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, David O; Grunewald, Elliot D

    2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies applicable to SNMR pulse sequence phase cycling are disclosed, including SNMR acquisition apparatus and methods, SNMR processing apparatus and methods, and combinations thereof. SNMR acquisition may include transmitting two or more SNMR pulse sequences and applying a phase shift to a pulse in at least one of the pulse sequences, according to any of a variety cycling techniques. SNMR processing may include combining SNMR from a plurality of pulse sequences comprising pulses of different phases, so that desired signals are preserved and indesired signals are canceled.

  12. Active high-power RF switch and pulse compression system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tantawi, Sami G. (San Mateo, CA); Ruth, Ronald D. (Woodside, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Mountain View, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-power RF switching device employs a semiconductor wafer positioned in the third port of a three-port RF device. A controllable source of directed energy, such as a suitable laser or electron beam, is aimed at the semiconductor material. When the source is turned on, the energy incident on the wafer induces an electron-hole plasma layer on the wafer, changing the wafer's dielectric constant, turning the third port into a termination for incident RF signals, and. causing all incident RF signals to be reflected from the surface of the wafer. The propagation constant of RF signals through port 3, therefore, can be changed by controlling the beam. By making the RF coupling to the third port as small as necessary, one can reduce the peak electric field on the unexcited silicon surface for any level of input power from port 1, thereby reducing risk of damaging the wafer by RF with high peak power. The switch is useful to the construction of an improved pulse compression system to boost the peak power of microwave tubes driving linear accelerators. In this application, the high-power RF switch is placed at the coupling iris between the charging waveguide and the resonant storage line of a pulse compression system. This optically controlled high power RF pulse compression system can handle hundreds of Megawatts of power at X-band.

  13. HIGH ENERGY PULSED POWER SYSTEM FOR AGS SUPER NEUTRINO FOCUSING HORN.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZHANG, S.Y.; SANDBERG, J.; WENG, W.-T.

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper present a preliminary design of a 300 kA, 2.5 Hz pulsed power system. This system will drive the focusing horn of proposed Brookhaven AGS Neutrino Super Beam Facility for Very Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment. The peak output power of the horn pulsed power system will reach Giga-watts, and the upgraded AGS will be capable of delivering 1 MW in beam power.

  14. An analysis of peak traffic demand at signalized urban intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drew, Donald R

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (3 LANES) 350 705 7:15 725 7:35 7:45 7:55 805 TIME INTERVAL TYPICAL PEAK HOUR 5 MIN. TRAFFIC FLOWS 3 ? LANE FREEWAY 100 90 80 UI Z 3 70 0 PEAK RATES OF FLOW FORT WORTH UNIFORM ARRIVALS 0 ~ o170 EQUIVALENT RATE OF FLOW 60 50 O... {Figure 3), it is seen thai from 7:10 A. M. to 7:45 A. Lvf . the average hourly rate of flow is exceeded. If the mid-points of the five-minute ordinates are connected, a polygon is formed which:ntersects the PHV at the extremities of the peak period...

  15. Control system analysis for off-peak auxiliary heating of passive solar systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, H.S.; Melsa, J.L.; Balcomb, J.D.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer simulation method is presented for the design of an electrical auxiliary energy system for passive solar heated structures. The system consists of electrical mats buried in the ground underneath the structure. Energy is stored in the ground during utility off-peak hours and released passively to the heated enclosure. An optimal control strategy is used to determine the system design parameters of depth of mat placement and minimum instaled electrical heating capacity. The optimal control applies combinations of fixed duration energy pulses to the heater, which minimize the room temperature error-squared for each day, assuming advance knowledge of the day's weather. Various realizable control schemes are investigated in an attempt to find a system that approaches the performance of the optimal control system.

  16. Sequentially pulsed traveling wave accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J. (Livermore, CA); Nelson, Scott D. (Patterson, CA); Poole, Brian R. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A sequentially pulsed traveling wave compact accelerator having two or more pulse forming lines each with a switch for producing a short acceleration pulse along a short length of a beam tube, and a trigger mechanism for sequentially triggering the switches so that a traveling axial electric field is produced along the beam tube in synchronism with an axially traversing pulsed beam of charged particles to serially impart energy to the particle beam.

  17. Quantifying pharmaceutical film coating with optical coherence tomography and terahertz pulsed imaging: an evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Hungyen; Dong, Yue; Shen, Yaochun; Zeitler, J. Axel

    2015-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    thickness within the thickness tolerance. However, when the leap between neighbouring peaks becomes too large leading to diverging coating thickness, the algorithm backtracks to a previously identified peak with a thickness value that is closest... -release tablet film coating. Eur J Pharm Biopharm 71(1):117-123. 18. Shen YC, Taday PF 2008. Development and Application of Terahertz Pulsed Imaging for Nondestructive Inspection of Pharmaceutical Tablet. Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, IEEE...

  18. Rapidly pulsed TRIGA reactor: an intense source for neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whittemore, William L. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The need for ever increasing intensities of thermal neutron beams for neutron scattering experiments has stimulated the development of intense steady state research reactors such as the 53-MW ILL reactor at Grenoble. The source flux at the reactor end of the beam ports is typically 10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}.s for its thermal neutron beams. To achieve still higher source fluxes of neutrons, the family of pulsing IBR was developed. In this type of facility the pulse repetition rate is low ({approx}5/sec) typically but the instantaneous peak fluxes are high, ranging up to 5 x 10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}.s at the surface of the moderator. Another type of intense neutron source is that exemplified by the proton synchrotron accelerators with their spallation targets. The first of these has been the IPNS at Argonne National laboratory. This neutron source produces 30 pulses per second with an individual peak thermal neutron intensity of 4 x 10{sup 14}n/cm{sup 2}.s from the moderator. An equivalent, alternative intense neutron source can be based on a rapidly pulsed TRIGA reactor. With a pulsed thermal neutron intensity of more than 10{sup 15}n/cm{sup 2}.s occurring 50 times per second at the source end of beam ports, the rapidly pulsed TRIGA reactor combines some of the best features of the pulsed fast reactors such as IBR-2 and the spallation neutron sources but with the safety of a thermal neutron reactor with a large, prompt, negative temperature coefficient of reactivity. The initial concept of the rapidly pulsed TRIGA reactor was developed and initially reported in 1966. Subsequently, the standard fuel format for U-ZrH{sub x} fuel has been developed to include a small diameter fuel particularly well suited for the rapidly pulsed application. This fuel is LEU, satisfying all the requirements for non proliferation, and has a very long core life time. In the proposed application, the peak fuel temperature does not vary more than 1 deg. C from the average peak fuel temperatures during each pulse. Hence long term metallurgical stability is thus assured. With a core lifetime that can be designed for up to 10,000 MWD, operation at an average power of 10 MW (with peak pulsed powers of {approx}50 MW) with an equilibrium core can be conducted for 1000 full power days. (author)

  19. artificial extra peaks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Gas Units Peaking Hydro from manufacturer Regional utility IRPs Gas Turbine World (2013 Handbook) Black & Veatch analysis First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7...

  20. Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving , D. Craigie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Michael J.

    Optimization of Demand Response Through Peak Shaving G. Zakeri , D. Craigie , A. Philpott , M. Todd for the demand response of such a consumer. We will establish a monotonicity result that indicates fuel supply

  1. Off peak cooling using an ice storage system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quinlan, Edward Michael

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electric utilities in the United States have entered a period of slow growth due to a combination of increased capital costs and a staggering rise in the costs for fuel. In addition to this, the rise in peak power ...

  2. Potential Peak Load Reductions From Residential Energy Efficient Upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meisegeier, D.; Howes, M.; King, D.; Hall, J.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the potential peak load reductions from residential energy efficiency upgrades in hot and humid climates. First, a baseline scenario is established. Then, the demand and consumption impacts of individual upgrade measures are assessed. Several of these upgrades...

  3. Application of Thermal Storage, Peak Shaving and Cogeneration for Hospitals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, J. D.; Estes, J. M.; Estes, M. C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy costs of hospitals can be managed by employing various strategies to control peak electrical demand (KW) while at the same time providing additional security of operation in the event that an equipment failure or a disruption of power from...

  4. artery peak velocity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The time series analysis of Doppler velocity maps show enhanced power in the sunspot umbra at higher frequencies and in the penumbra at lower frequencies. We find that the peak...

  5. Peak thrust operation of linear induction machines from parameter identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Eastham, T.R.; Dawson, G.E. [Queen`s Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Various control strategies are being used to achieve high performance operation of linear drives. To maintain minimum volume and weight of the power supply unit on board the transportation vehicle, peak thrust per unit current operation is a desirable objective. True peak thrust per unit current through slip control is difficult to achieve because the parameters of linear induction machines vary during normal operation. This paper first develops a peak thrust per unit current control law based on the per-phase equivalent circuit for linear induction machines. The algorithm for identification of the variable parameters in induction machines is then presented. Application to an operational linear induction machine (LIM) demonstrates the utility of this algorithm. The control strategy is then simulated, based on an operational transit LIM, to show the capability of achieving true peak thrust operation for linear induction machines.

  6. Observation of low magnetic field density peaks in helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barada, Kshitish K.; Chattopadhyay, P. K.; Ghosh, J.; Kumar, Sunil; Saxena, Y. C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Single density peak has been commonly observed in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges. In this paper, we report the observations of multiple density peaks in low magnetic field (<100 G) helicon discharges produced in the linear helicon plasma device [Barada et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 83, 063501 (2012)]. Experiments are carried out using argon gas with m = +1 right helical antenna operating at 13.56 MHz by varying the magnetic field from 0 G to 100 G. The plasma density varies with varying the magnetic field at constant input power and gas pressure and reaches to its peak value at a magnetic field value of {approx}25 G. Another peak of smaller magnitude in density has been observed near 50 G. Measurement of amplitude and phase of the axial component of the wave using magnetic probes for two magnetic field values corresponding to the observed density peaks indicated the existence of radial modes. Measured parallel wave number together with the estimated perpendicular wave number suggests oblique mode propagation of helicon waves along the resonance cone boundary for these magnetic field values. Further, the observations of larger floating potential fluctuations measured with Langmuir probes at those magnetic field values indicate that near resonance cone boundary; these electrostatic fluctuations take energy from helicon wave and dump power to the plasma causing density peaks.

  7. Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, R.L. (SAIC); Bezdek, Roger (MISI); Wendling, Robert (MISI)

    2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

  8. Laser pulse detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mashburn, Douglas N. (Knoxville, TN); Akerman, M. Alfred (Knoxville, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser pulse detector is provided which is small and inexpensive and has the capability of detecting laser light of any wavelength with fast response (less than 5 nanoseconds rise time). The laser beam is focused onto the receiving end of a graphite rod coaxially mounted within a close-fitting conductive, open-end cylindrical housing so that ablation and electric field breakdown of the resulting plasma occurs due to a bias potential applied between the graphite rod and housing. The pulse produced by the breakdown is transmitted through a matched impedance coaxial cable to a recording device. The cable is connected with its central lead to the graphite rod and its outer conductor to the housing.

  9. Energy-Dependent Gamma-Ray Burst Peak Durations and Blast-Wave Deceleration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Chiang

    1998-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporal analyses of the prompt gamma-ray and X-ray light curves of gamma-ray bursts reveal a tendency for the burst pulse time scales to increase with decreasing energy. For an ensemble of BATSE bursts, Fenimore et al. (1995) show that the energy dependence of burst peak durations can be represented by $\\Delta t \\propto E^{-\\gamma}$ with $\\gamma \\simeq 0.4$--0.45. This power-law dependence has led to the suggestion that this effect is due to radiative processes, most notably synchrotron cooling of the non-thermal particles which produce the radiation. Here we show that a similar power-law dependence occurs, under certain assumptions, in the context of the blast-wave model and is a consequence of the deceleration of the blast-wave. This effect will obtain whether or not synchrotron cooling is important, but different degrees of cooling will cause variations in the energy dependence of the peak durations.

  10. Ptychographic ultrafast pulse reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spangenberg, D; Brügmann, M H; Feurer, T

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a new ultrafast pulse reconstruction modality which is somewhat reminiscent of frequency resolved optical gating but uses a modified setup and a conceptually different reconstruction algorithm that is derived from ptychography. Even though it is a second order correlation scheme it shows no time ambiguity. Moreover, the number of spectra to record is considerably smaller than in most other related schemes which, together with a robust algorithm, leads to extremely fast convergence of the reconstruction.

  11. Petawatt pulsed-power accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stygar, William A. (Albuquerque, NM); Cuneo, Michael E. (Albuquerque, NM); Headley, Daniel I. (Albuquerque, NM); Ives, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Ives, legal representative; Berry Cottrell (Albuquerque, NM); Leeper, Ramon J. (Albuquerque, NM); Mazarakis, Michael G. (Albuquerque, NM); Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM); Porter, John L. (Sandia Park, NM); Wagoner; Tim C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A petawatt pulsed-power accelerator can be driven by various types of electrical-pulse generators, including conventional Marx generators and linear-transformer drivers. The pulsed-power accelerator can be configured to drive an electrical load from one- or two-sides. Various types of loads can be driven; for example, the accelerator can be used to drive a high-current z-pinch load. When driven by slow-pulse generators (e.g., conventional Marx generators), the accelerator comprises an oil section comprising at least one pulse-generator level having a plurality of pulse generators; a water section comprising a pulse-forming circuit for each pulse generator and a level of monolithic triplate radial-transmission-line impedance transformers, that have variable impedance profiles, for each pulse-generator level; and a vacuum section comprising triplate magnetically insulated transmission lines that feed an electrical load. When driven by LTD generators or other fast-pulse generators, the need for the pulse-forming circuits in the water section can be eliminated.

  12. Compression of ultrashort UV pulses in a self-defocusing gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berge, Luc [CEA-DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Koehler, Christian [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Skupin, Stefan [Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems, D-01187 Dresden (Germany); Friedrich Schiller University, Institute of Condensed Matter Theory and Optics, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compression of UV femtosecond laser pulses focused into a gas cell filled with Xe is reported numerically. With a large negative Kerr index and normal dispersion, Xe promotes temporal modulational instability (MI), which can be monitored to shorten approx100 fs pulses to robust, singly peaked waveforms exhibiting a fourfold compression factor. Combining standard MI theory with a variational approach allows us to predict the beam parameters suitable for efficient compression. At powers <=30 MW, nonlinear dispersion is shown to shift the pulse temporal profile to the rear zone.

  13. Laser beam pulse formatting method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daly, T.P.; Moses, E.I.; Patterson, R.W.; Sawicki, R.H.

    1994-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for formatting a laser beam pulse using one or more delay loops is disclosed. The delay loops have a partially reflective beam splitter and a plurality of highly reflective mirrors arranged such that the laser beam pulse enters into the delay loop through the beam splitter and circulates therein along a delay loop length defined by the mirrors. As the laser beam pulse circulates within the delay loop a portion thereof is emitted upon each completed circuit when the laser beam pulse strikes the beam splitter. The laser beam pulse is thereby formatted into a plurality of sub-pulses. The delay loops are used in combination to produce complex waveforms by combining the sub-pulses using additive waveform synthesis. 8 figs.

  14. 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid - vin 4932 Advanced Vehicle Testing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Powertrain Type: Full Parallel Peak Electric Drive Power: 30 kW 2011 Hyundai Sonata Hybrid - VIN 4932 Advanced Vehicle Testing - Baseline Testing Results VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES...

  15. High-speed pulse-shape generator, pulse multiplexer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burkhart, Scott C. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention combines arbitrary amplitude high-speed pulses for precision pulse shaping for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The circuitry combines arbitrary height pulses which are generated by replicating scaled versions of a trigger pulse and summing them delayed in time on a pulse line. The combined electrical pulses are connected to an electro-optic modulator which modulates a laser beam. The circuit can also be adapted to combine multiple channels of high speed data into a single train of electrical pulses which generates the optical pulses for very high speed optical communication. The invention has application in laser pulse shaping for inertial confinement fusion, in optical data links for computers, telecommunications, and in laser pulse shaping for atomic excitation studies. The invention can be used to effect at least a 10.times. increase in all fiber communication lines. It allows a greatly increased data transfer rate between high-performance computers. The invention is inexpensive enough to bring high-speed video and data services to homes through a super modem.

  16. Control and generation of localized pulses in passively mode-locked semiconductor lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marconi, M; Camelin, P; Chaparro, D; Balle, S; Giudici, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show experimentally and theoretically that localized pulses can be generated from an electrically biased $200\\,\\mu$m multi-transverse mode Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser. The device is passively mode-locked using optical feedback from a distant Resonant Saturable Absorber Mirror and it is operated below threshold. We observe multistability between the off solution and a large variety of pulsating solutions with different number and arrangements of pulses per round-trip, thus indicating that the mode-locked pulses are localized, i.e. mutually independent. We show that a modulation of the bias current allows controlling the number of the pulses travelling within the cavity, thus suggesting that our system can be operated as an arbitrary pattern generator of 10 ps pulses and 1 W peak power.

  17. OBSERVATIONS OF CRAB GIANT PULSES IN 20-84 MHz USING LWA1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellingson, S. W.; Wolfe, C. N. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24060 (United States); Clarke, T. E.; Hicks, B. C.; Wilson, T. L. [US Naval Research Laboratory, Code 7213, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Craig, J.; Taylor, G. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM 87131 (United States); Lazio, T. J. W. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, MS 138-308, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection and observed characteristics of giant pulses from the Crab Nebula pulsar (B0531+21) in four frequency bands covering 20-84 MHz using the recently completed Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope. In 10 hr of observations distributed over a 72 day period in fall of 2012, 33 giant pulses having peak flux densities between 400 Jy and 2000 Jy were detected. Twenty-two of these pulses were detected simultaneously in channels of 16 MHz bandwidth centered at 44 MHz, 60 MHz, and 76 MHz, including one pulse which was also detected in a channel centered at 28 MHz. We quantify statistics of pulse amplitude and pulse shape characteristics, including pulse broadening. Amplitude statistics are consistent with expectations based on extrapolations from previous work at higher and lower frequencies. Pulse broadening is found to be relatively high, but not significantly greater than expected. We present procedures that have been found to be effective for observing giant pulses in this frequency range.

  18. SEPARATION OF OVERLAPPED ELECTROCHEMICAL PEAKS USING THE KALMAN FILTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, T.F.; Brown, S.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A major limitation in the use of electrochemical techniques for the quantitative analysis of mixtures is the difficulty of resolving overlapped peaks. This problem is further complicated by the low signal-to-noise ratios often encountered in trace analysis and by the use of electrochemical techniques that produce broad, asymmetric waveforms. This paper demonstrates the use of the Kalman Filter for multi-component analysis of linear sweep voltammograms. Even with the broad, asymmetric LSV waveform, synthetic data runs show that a peak separation of as little as 2.5 mV is sufficient for peak deconvolution in the presence of random noise. Besides separating overlapped peaks, the methods also filters the noise from the signal and can be used to separate the capacitive current component from the faradaic current component. The method is validated further using the Cd(II)/In(III) and Cd(II)/In(III)/Pb(II) systems which show peak separations of 40 to 200 mV. The use of the techniques with two other voltammetric waveforms is also demonstrated.

  19. Wavelet Approach for Operational Gamma Spectral Peak Detection - Preliminary Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ,

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma spectroscopy for radionuclide identifications typically involves locating spectral peaks and matching the spectral peaks with known nuclides in the knowledge base or database. Wavelet analysis, due to its ability for fitting localized features, offers the potential for automatic detection of spectral peaks. Past studies of wavelet technologies for gamma spectra analysis essentially focused on direct fitting of raw gamma spectra. Although most of those studies demonstrated the potentials of peak detection using wavelets, they often failed to produce new benefits to operational adaptations for radiological surveys. This work presents a different approach with the operational objective being to detect only the nuclides that do not exist in the environment (anomalous nuclides). With this operational objective, the raw-count spectrum collected by a detector is first converted to a count-rate spectrum and is then followed by background subtraction prior to wavelet analysis. The experimental results suggest that this preprocess is independent of detector type and background radiation, and is capable of improving the peak detection rates using wavelets. This process broadens the doors for a practical adaptation of wavelet technologies for gamma spectral surveying devices.

  20. Coiled transmission line pulse generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kenneth Fox (Columbia, MO)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

  1. Plasma dynamics in a discharge produced by a pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasma source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, Anurag; Lee, Sehan [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Yeom, Geun Y., E-mail: gyyeom@skku.edu [Department of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746, South Korea and SKKU Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology (SAINT), Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Gyeonggi-do 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a Langmuir probe, time resolved measurements of plasma parameters were carried out in a discharge produced by a pulsed dual frequency inductively coupled plasma source. The discharge was sustained in an argon gas environment at a pressure of 10 mTorr. The low frequency (P{sub 2} {sub MHz}) was pulsed at 1 kHz and a duty ratio of 50%, while high frequency (P{sub 13.56} {sub MHz}) was maintained in the CW mode. All measurements were carried out at the center of the discharge and 20?mm above the substrate. The results show that, at a particular condition (P{sub 2} {sub MHz}?=?200 W and P{sub 13.56} {sub MHz?}=?600 W), plasma density increases with time and stabilizes at up to ?200 ?s after the initiation of P{sub 2} {sub MHz} pulse at a plasma density of (2?×?10{sup 17} m{sup ?3}) for the remaining duration of pulse “on.” This stabilization time for plasma density increases with increasing P{sub 2} {sub MHz} and becomes ?300 ?s when P{sub 2} {sub MHz} is 600 W; however, the growth rate of plasma density is almost independent of P{sub 2} {sub MHz}. Interestingly, the plasma density sharply increases as the pulse is switched off and reaches a peak value in ?10 ?s, then decreases for the remaining pulse “off-time.” This phenomenon is thought to be due to the sheath modulation during the transition from “pulse on” to “pulse off” and partly due to RF noise during the transition period. The magnitude of peak plasma density in off time increases with increasing P{sub 2} {sub MHz}. The plasma potential and electron temperature decrease as the pulse develops and shows similar behavior to that of the plasma density when the pulse is switched off.

  2. SLIM, Short-pulse Technology for High Gradient Induction Accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arntz, Floyd; /Diversified Tech., Bedford; Kardo-Sysoev, A.; /Ioffe Phys. Tech. Inst.; Krasnykh, A.; /SLAC

    2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel short-pulse concept (SLIM) suited to a new generation of a high gradient induction particle accelerators is described herein. It applies advanced solid state semiconductor technology and modern microfabrication techniques to a coreless induction method of charged particle acceleration first proven on a macro scale in the 1960's. Because this approach avoids use of magnetic materials there is the prospect of such an accelerator working efficiently with accelerating pulses in the nanosecond range and, potentially, at megahertz pulse rates. The principal accelerator section is envisioned as a stack of coreless induction cells, the only active element within each being a single, extremely fast (subnanosecond) solid state opening switch: a Drift Step Recovery Diode (DSRD). Each coreless induction cell incorporates an electromagnetic pulse compressor in which inductive energy developed within a transmission-line feed structure over a period of tens of nanoseconds is diverted to the acceleration of the passing charge packet for a few nanoseconds by the abrupt opening of the DSRD switch. The duration of this accelerating output pulse--typically two-to-four nanoseconds--is precisely determined by a microfabricated pulse forming line connected to the cell. Because the accelerating pulse is only nanoseconds in duration, longitudinal accelerating gradients approaching 100 MeV per meter are believed to be achievable without inciting breakdown. Further benefits of this approach are that, (1) only a low voltage power supply is required to produce the high accelerating gradient, and, (2) since the DSRD switch is normally closed, voltage stress is limited to a few nanoseconds per period, hence the susceptibility to hostile environment conditions such as ionizing radiation, mismatch (e.g. in medical applications the peak beam current may be low), strong electromagnetic noise levels, etc is expected to be minimal. Finally, we observe the SLIM concept is not limited to linac applications; for instance, it could be employed to both accelerate the beam and to stabilize the superbunch mode of operation in circular track machines.

  3. Back-Up/ Peak Shaving Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staudt, Rhonda L.

    2008-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report covers the work executed by Plug Power from 8/11/03 – 10/31/07 statement of work for Topic 2: advancing the state of the art of fuel cell technology with the development of a new generation of commercially viable, stationary, Back-up/Peak-Shaving fuel cell systems, the GenCore II. The Program cost was $7.2 M with the Department of Energy share being $3.6M and Plug Power’s share being $3.6 M. The Program started in August of 2003 and was scheduled to end in January of 2006. The actual program end date was October of 2007. A no cost extension was grated. The Department of Energy barriers addressed as part of this program are: Technical Barriers for Distributed Generation Systems: o Durability o Power Electronics o Start up time Technical Barriers for Fuel Cell Components: o Stack Material and Manufacturing Cost o Durability o Thermal and water management Background The next generation GenCore backup fuel cell system to be designed, developed and tested by Plug Power under the program is the first, mass-manufacturable design implementation of Plug Power’s GenCore architected platform targeted for battery and small generator replacement applications in the telecommunications, broadband and UPS markets. The next generation GenCore will be a standalone, H2 in-DC-out system. In designing the next generation GenCore specifically for the telecommunications market, Plug Power is teaming with BellSouth Telecommunications, Inc., a leading industry end user. The final next generation GenCore system is expected to represent a market-entry, mass-manufacturable and economically viable design. The technology will incorporate: • A cost-reduced, polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack tailored to hydrogen fuel use • An advanced electrical energy storage system • A modular, scalable power conditioning system tailored to market requirements • A scaled-down, cost-reduced balance of plant (BOP) • Network Equipment Building Standards (NEBS), UL and CE certifications.

  4. Estimating market potential for reducing customer peak loads through photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, J. [Citizens Advisory Panel, Central Islip, NY (United States); Perez, R. [Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Atmospheric Sciences Research Center

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Past studies have quantified photovoltaics` (PV) peak load matching capability on a utility-wide scale. The purpose of this paper is to estimate the number of utility subloads (e.g., customers, substations) whose peak loads are well matched with solar availability. A simple tool based on the utility scale load-PV match is developed to estimate the market size of customer scale PV applications with high load-PV matches. Illustrative examples of customer owned PV economics are also provided. The authors show that (1) the market size of high load matching PV applications on the subload scale is significant even within utility systems whose load requirements are not particularly well matched with PV output; and (2) the cost of PV as a peak shaving resource for utility customers is approaching competitive levels.

  5. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project (Ram Power Inc.)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Clay

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data generated from the Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, encompasses a “deep-circulation (amagmatic)” meteoric-geothermal system circulating beneath basin-fill sediments locally blanketed with travertine in western Clayton Valley (lithium-rich brines from which have been mined for several decades). Spring- and shallow-borehole thermal-water geochemistry and geothermometry suggest that a Silver Peak geothermal reservoir is very likely to attain the temperature range 260- 300oF (~125-150oC), and may reach 300-340oF (~150-170oC) or higher (GeothermEx, Inc., 2006). Results of detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, and conceptual modeling of the prospect (1) support the GeothermEx (op. cit.) assertion that the Silver Peak prospect has good potential for geothermal-power production; and (2) provide a theoretical geologic framework for further exploration and development of the resource. The Silver Peak prospect is situated in the transtensional (regional shearing coupled with extension) Walker Lane structural belt, and squarely within the late Miocene to Pliocene (11 Ma to ~5 Ma) Silver Peak-Lone Mountain metamorphic core complex (SPCC), a feature that accommodated initial displacement transfer between major right-lateral strike- slip fault zones on opposite sides of the Walker Lane. The SPCC consists essentially of a ductiley-deformed lower plate, or “core,” of Proterozoic metamorphic tectonites and tectonized Mesozoic granitoids separated by a regionally extensive, low-angle detachment fault from an upper plate of severely stretched and fractured structural slices of brittle, Proterozoic to Miocene-age lithologies. From a geothermal perspective, the detachment fault itself and some of the upper-plate structural sheets could function as important, if secondary, subhorizontal thermal-fluid aquifers in a Silver Peak hydrothermal system.

  6. Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project (Ram Power Inc.)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Miller, Clay

    Data generated from the Silver Peak Innovative Exploration Project, in Esmeralda County, Nevada, encompasses a “deep-circulation (amagmatic)” meteoric-geothermal system circulating beneath basin-fill sediments locally blanketed with travertine in western Clayton Valley (lithium-rich brines from which have been mined for several decades). Spring- and shallow-borehole thermal-water geochemistry and geothermometry suggest that a Silver Peak geothermal reservoir is very likely to attain the temperature range 260- 300oF (~125-150oC), and may reach 300-340oF (~150-170oC) or higher (GeothermEx, Inc., 2006). Results of detailed geologic mapping, structural analysis, and conceptual modeling of the prospect (1) support the GeothermEx (op. cit.) assertion that the Silver Peak prospect has good potential for geothermal-power production; and (2) provide a theoretical geologic framework for further exploration and development of the resource. The Silver Peak prospect is situated in the transtensional (regional shearing coupled with extension) Walker Lane structural belt, and squarely within the late Miocene to Pliocene (11 Ma to ~5 Ma) Silver Peak-Lone Mountain metamorphic core complex (SPCC), a feature that accommodated initial displacement transfer between major right-lateral strike- slip fault zones on opposite sides of the Walker Lane. The SPCC consists essentially of a ductiley-deformed lower plate, or “core,” of Proterozoic metamorphic tectonites and tectonized Mesozoic granitoids separated by a regionally extensive, low-angle detachment fault from an upper plate of severely stretched and fractured structural slices of brittle, Proterozoic to Miocene-age lithologies. From a geothermal perspective, the detachment fault itself and some of the upper-plate structural sheets could function as important, if secondary, subhorizontal thermal-fluid aquifers in a Silver Peak hydrothermal system.

  7. Green Light Pulse Oximeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scharf, John Edward (Oldsmar, FL)

    1998-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A reflectance pulse oximeter that determines oxygen saturation of hemoglobin using two sources of electromagnetic radiation in the green optical region, which provides the maximum reflectance pulsation spectrum. The use of green light allows placement of an oximetry probe at central body sites (e.g., wrist, thigh, abdomen, forehead, scalp, and back). Preferably, the two green light sources alternately emit light at 560 nm and 577 nm, respectively, which gives the biggest difference in hemoglobin extinction coefficients between deoxyhemoglobin, RHb, and oxyhemoglobin, HbO.sub.2.

  8. Short-Pulse Lasers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch > TheNuclearHomelandMultivariate Metal-OrganicPulse Beam Transport Tube

  9. L: Shape-based peak identification for ChIPSeq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerie Hower; Steven N. Evans; Lior Pachter

    Abstract. We present a new algorithm for the identification of bound regions from ChIP-seq experiments. Our method for identifying statistically significant peaks from read coverage is inspired by the notion of persistence in topological data analysis and provides a non-parametric approach that is robust to noise in experiments. Specifically, our method reduces the peak calling problem to the study of tree-based statistics derived from the data. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method on existing datasets, and we show that it can discover previously missed regions and can more clearly discriminate between multiple binding events.

  10. Monolithically Integrated Selectable Repetition-Rate Laser Diode Source of Picosecond Optical Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Xuhan; Olle, Vojtech; Quarterman, Adrian; Wonfor, Adrian; Penty, Richard; White, Ian

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    with a record high peak power of 2.5 kW, repetition rate of 330 MHz from a distributed passively mode locked MOPA device followed by an optical isolator, a tapered amplifier and a linear pulse compressor. Ding et al. [12] have reported picosecond...

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPACT PHOTO-INJECTOR WITH RFFOCUSING LENS FOR SHORT PULSE ELECTRON SOURCE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grabenhofer, Alexander [Northern Illinois University; Eaton, Douglas W. [ScandiNova systems AB, Uppsala, Sweden

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For development of compact ultrafast electron source system, we are currently designing a short-pulse RF-gun with RF focusing structure by means of a series of comprehensive modeling analysis processes. EM design of a 2.5 cell resonant cavity with input coupler, acceleration dynamics of photo-emitted electron bunch, EM design of RF-lens with input coupler, and phasespace analysis of focused electron bunch are systematically examined with multi-physics simulators. All the features of the 2.856 GHz cavity geometry were precisely engineered for acceleration energies ranging from 100 keV to 500 keV (safety limited) to be powered by our 5 MW S-band klystron. The klystron (Thales TH2163) and modulator system (ScandiNova K1 turnkey system) were successfully installed and tested. Performance tests of the klystron system show peak output power > 5 MW, as per operation specifications. At the quasi-relativistic energies, the electron source is capable of generating 100fC – 1 pC electron bunch with pulse duration close to 30 fs – 1 ps and transverse size of a few hundred microns. PIC simulations have shown that the electron bunch undergoes fast RF acceleration, rapidly reaching the desired energies, which can be controlled by tuning RF injection phase and input driving power. It has been shown that it is possible to also focus/compress the bunch longitudinally using a RF-lens, which would allow us to control the temporal resolution of the system as well. While our primary analysis has been performed on a 2.5 cell design, we are also looking into half-cell (single cavity) design that is expected to provide the same range of beam energy with a simple configuration.

  12. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  13. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, R.S.; Todd, R.A.

    1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  14. Pulsed helium ionization detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Roswitha S. (Knoxville, TN); Todd, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helium ionization detection system is provided which produces stable operation of a conventional helium ionization detector while providing improved sensitivity and linearity. Stability is improved by applying pulsed dc supply voltage across the ionization detector, thereby modifying the sampling of the detectors output current. A unique pulse generator is used to supply pulsed dc to the detector which has variable width and interval adjust features that allows up to 500 V to be applied in pulse widths ranging from about 150 nsec to about dc conditions.

  15. LANSCE | News & Media | The Pulse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Pulse September 2012 September | In This Issue From Alex's desk Biennial national neutron scattering conference features strong Lujan Center presence Development of high...

  16. Fast pulse nonthermal plasma reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosocha, Louis A.

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast pulsed nonthermal plasma reactor includes a discharge cell and a charging assembly electrically connected thereto. The charging assembly provides plural high voltage pulses to the discharge cell. Each pulse has a rise time between one and ten nanoseconds and a duration of three to twenty nanoseconds. The pulses create nonthermal plasma discharge within the discharge cell. Accordingly, the nonthermal plasma discharge can be used to remove pollutants from gases or break the gases into smaller molecules so that they can be more efficiently combusted.

  17. Bipolar pulse forming line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Mark A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, fourth, and fifth planar conductors which form an interleaved stack with dielectric layers between the conductors. Each conductor has a first end, and a second end adjacent an acceleration axis. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, the fourth and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second ends, and the first and fifth planar conductors are connected to each other at the first ends via a shorting plate adjacent the first ends. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short a high voltage from the first end of the third planar conductor to the first end of the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  18. Switching power pulse system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aaland, K.

    1983-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source to a load using a storage capacitor charged through a rectifier, and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch and voltage comparator. A thyristor is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor and fractional turn saturable transformer having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n = n[sup 2]. The saturable reactor functions as a soaker'' while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor into the load through the coupling capacitor. The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core having two secondary windings tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network. To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core is provided around the resistive beampipe to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance until it is fully charged. 5 figs.

  19. Systematic Effects in Pulse Shape Analysis of HPGe Detector Signals for Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor M Gehman; Steven R Elliott; Dongming Mei

    2010-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse shape analysis is an important background reduction and signal identification technique for next generation of neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments examining 76Ge. We present a study of the systematic uncertainties in one such parametric pulse-shape analysis technique for separating multi-site backgrounds from single-site signal events. We examined systematic uncertainties for events in full-energy gamma peaks (predominantly multi-site), double escape peaks (predominantly single-site) and the Compton continuum near double-beta decay endpoint (which will be the dominant background for most neutrinoless double-beta decay searches). In short, we find total (statistical plus systematic) fractional uncertainties in the pulse shape cut survival probabilities of: 6.6%, 1.5% and 3.8% for double-escape, continuum and gamma-ray events respectively.

  20. Doppler cooling with coherent trains of laser pulses and a tunable velocity comb

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ilinova, Ekaterina; Ahmad, Mahmoud; Derevianko, Andrei [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility of decelerating and Doppler cooling an ensemble of two-level atoms by a coherent train of short, nonoverlapping laser pulses. We derive analytical expressions for mechanical force exerted by the train. In frequency space the force pattern reflects the underlying frequency comb structure. The pattern depends strongly on the ratio of the atomic lifetime to the repetition time between the pulses and pulse area. For example, in the limit of short lifetimes, the frequency-space peaks of the optical force wash out. We propose to tune the carrier-envelope offset frequency to follow the Doppler-shifted detuning as atoms decelerate; this leads to compression of atomic velocity distribution about comb teeth and results in a ''velocity comb''--a series of narrow equidistant peaks in the velocity space.

  1. The pulsed light curves of Her X-1 as observed by BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Dal Fiume; M. Orlandini; G. Cusumano; S. Del Sordo; M. Feroci; F. Frontera; T. Oosterbroek; E. Palazzi; A. N. Parmar; A. Santangelo; A. Segreto

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the timing analysis of the observation of the X-ray binary pulsar Her X-1 performed during the BeppoSAX Science Verification Phase. The observation covered more that two full orbital cycles near the maximum of the main-on in the 35 day cycle of Her X-1. We present the pulse profiles from 0.1 to 100 keV. Major changes are present below 1 keV, where the appearance of a broad peak is interpreted as re-processing from the inner part of the accretion disk, and above 10 keV, where the pulse profile is less structured and the main peak is appreciably harder. The hardness ratios show complex changes with pulse phase at different energies.

  2. Revised Manuscript Estimation of Peak Power Dissipation in VLSI Circuits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    and a gate-level circuit structure. Last, but not least, the proposed method produces maximum power estimatesRevised Manuscript 1 Estimation of Peak Power Dissipation in VLSI Circuits Using the Limiting Qiu, Massoud Pedram Department of EE-Systems Univ. of Southern California Los Angeles, CA 90089 Email

  3. Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

    normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper...

  4. Piton Peaks, St. Lucia 515 Caribbean Discovery V1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connor, Ed

    · · · · · #12;V1 Piton Peaks, St. Lucia 515 Caribbean Discovery V1 PRSRTSTD U.S.POSTAGE PERMIT cruise the turquoise waters of the Caribbean. Sail from Miami to the beautiful island of Tortola, home beaches, and explore colorful towns as you discover the Caribbean. Cruise to celebrated ports aboard

  5. Firing Excess Refinery Butane in Peaking Gas Turbines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavone, A.; Schreiber, H.; Zwillenberg, M.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    normal butane production, which will reduce refinery normal butane value and price. Explored is an opportunity for a new use for excess refinery normal butane- as a fuel for utility peaking gas turbines which currently fire kerosene and #2 oil. Our paper...

  6. Disturbance and Landscape Dynamics The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, 1863

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, Andrew J.

    environment. (Pickett and White 1985) Defining and Quantifying Disturbance #12;Frequency - number a specified time. Defining and Quantifying Disturbance #12;Frequency: none Frequency: 250-500 yrs SeverityBioe 515 Disturbance and Landscape Dynamics #12;The Rocky Mountains, Lander's Peak, 1863 Albert

  7. acoustic absorption peak: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic absorption peak First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 On the variations of acoustic...

  8. Bandpass calibration of a wideband spectrometer using pulse injection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patra, Nipanjana; Ekers, Ron; Roberts, Paul

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel time domain concept for determining the bandpass response of a system by injecting a nanosecond pulse and capturing the system voltage output. A pulse of sub-nanosecond duration contains all frequency components with constant amplitude up to 1~GHz. Hence, this method can accurately determine the system bandpass response to a broadband signal. A train of pulses are coherently accumulated providing very high signal-to-noise calibration. The basic concept is demonstrated using a pulse generator-accumulator setup realised in a Bedlam board which is a high speed digital signal processing unit. The same system was used at the Parkes Radio Telescope between 2--13 October 2013 and we demonstrate its powerful diagnostic capability. We also present some initial test data from this experiment.

  9. Beam dynamics in a long-pulse linear induction accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekdahl, Carl [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Abeyta, Epifanio O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragon, Paul [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Rita [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cook, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dalmas, Dale [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Esquibel, Kevin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gallegos, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garnett, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Harrison, James F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Jeffrey B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jacquez, Edward B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mc Cuistian, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Nicholas A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nath, Subrato [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nielsen, Kurt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prichard, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rose, Chris R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Manolito [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schauer, Martin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Seitz, Gerald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulze, Martin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bender, Howard A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Broste, William B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Carlson, Carl A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Frayer, Daniel K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Douglas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tom, C Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Trainham, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scarpetti, Raymond [LLNL; Genoni, Thomas [VOSS; Hughes, Thomas [VOSS; Toma, Carsten [VOSS

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The second axis of the Dual Axis Radiography of Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) facility produces up to four radiographs within an interval of 1.6 microseconds. It accomplishes this by slicing four micro-pulses out of a long 1.8-kA, 16.5-MeV electron beam pulse and focusing them onto a bremsstrahlung converter target. The long beam pulse is created by a dispenser cathode diode and accelerated by the unique DARHT Axis-II linear induction accelerator (LIA). Beam motion in the accelerator would be a problem for radiography. High frequency motion, such as from beam breakup instability, would blur the individual spots. Low frequency motion, such as produced by pulsed power variation, would produce spot to spot differences. In this article, we describe these sources of beam motion, and the measures we have taken to minimize it.

  10. Peak Dose Assessment for Proposed DOE-PPPO Authorized Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maldonado, Delis [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct a peak dose assessment in support of the Authorized Limits Request for Solid Waste Disposal at Landfill C-746-U at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (DOE-PPPO 2011a). The peak doses were calculated based on the DOE-PPPO Proposed Single Radionuclides Soil Guidelines and the DOE-PPPO Proposed Authorized Limits (AL) Volumetric Concentrations available in DOE-PPPO 2011a. This work is provided as an appendix to the Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document for the Authorized Limits Request for the C-746-U Landfill at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant, Paducah, Kentucky (ORISE 2012). The receptors evaluated in ORISE 2012 were selected by the DOE-PPPO for the additional peak dose evaluations. These receptors included a Landfill Worker, Trespasser, Resident Farmer (onsite), Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and an Offsite Resident Farmer. The RESRAD (Version 6.5) and RESRAD-OFFSITE (Version 2.5) computer codes were used for the peak dose assessments. Deterministic peak dose assessments were performed for all the receptors and a probabilistic dose assessment was performed only for the Offsite Resident Farmer at the request of the DOE-PPPO. In a deterministic analysis, a single input value results in a single output value. In other words, a deterministic analysis uses single parameter values for every variable in the code. By contrast, a probabilistic approach assigns parameter ranges to certain variables, and the code randomly selects the values for each variable from the parameter range each time it calculates the dose (NRC 2006). The receptor scenarios, computer codes and parameter input files were previously used in ORISE 2012. A few modifications were made to the parameter input files as appropriate for this effort. Some of these changes included increasing the time horizon beyond 1,050 years (yr), and using the radionuclide concentrations provided by the DOE-PPPO as inputs into the codes. The deterministic peak doses were evaluated within time horizons of 70 yr (for the Landfill Worker and Trespasser), 1,050 yr, 10,000 yr and 100,000 yr (for the Resident Farmer [onsite], Resident Gardener, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and Offsite Resident Farmer) at the request of the DOE-PPPO. The time horizons of 10,000 yr and 100,000 yr were used at the request of the DOE-PPPO for informational purposes only. The probabilistic peak of the mean dose assessment was performed for the Offsite Resident Farmer using Technetium-99 (Tc-99) and a time horizon of 1,050 yr. The results of the deterministic analyses indicate that among all receptors and time horizons evaluated, the highest projected dose, 2,700 mrem/yr, occurred for the Resident Farmer (onsite) at 12,773 yr. The exposure pathways contributing to the peak dose are ingestion of plants, external gamma, and ingestion of milk, meat and soil. However, this receptor is considered an implausible receptor. The only receptors considered plausible are the Landfill Worker, Recreational User, Outdoor Worker and the Offsite Resident Farmer. The maximum projected dose among the plausible receptors is 220 mrem/yr for the Outdoor Worker and it occurs at 19,045 yr. The exposure pathways contributing to the dose for this receptor are external gamma and soil ingestion. The results of the probabilistic peak of the mean dose analysis for the Offsite Resident Farmer indicate that the average (arithmetic mean) of the peak of the mean doses for this receptor is 0.98 mrem/yr and it occurs at 1,050 yr. This dose corresponds to Tc-99 within the time horizon of 1,050 yr.

  11. OFF-SHORE WIND AND GRID-CONNECTED PV: HIGH PENETRATION PEAK SHAVING FOR NEW YORK CITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    OFF-SHORE WIND AND GRID-CONNECTED PV: HIGH PENETRATION PEAK SHAVING FOR NEW YORK CITY Richard Perez-shore wind and PV generation using the city of New York as a test case. While wind generation is not known one year's worth of hourly site & time-specific data including electrical demand PV and off-shore wind

  12. Development of a dispatchable PV peak shaving system. Final report on PV:BONUS Phase 2 activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, W.D. [Conectiv, Inc., Wilmington, DE (United States); Nigro, R.M. [Applied Energy Group, Inc., Hauppauge, NY (United States)

    1999-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In July 1993, the Delmarva Power and Light Company (now Conectiv, Inc.) was awarded a contract for the development of a Dispatchable Photovoltaic Peak Shaving System under the US Department of Energy PV:BONUS Program. The rationale for the dispatchable PV peak shaving system is based on the coincidence between the solar resource and the electrical load in question. Where poor coincidence exists, a PV array by itself does little to offset peak demands. However, with the addition of a relatively small amount of energy storage, the energy from the PV array can be managed and the value of the PV system increases substantially. In Phase 2, Delmarva Power continued the refinement of the system deployed in Phase 1. Four additional dispatchable PV peak shaving systems were installed for extended testing and evaluation at sites in Delaware, Maryland, Wisconsin and North Carolina. A second type of system that can be used to provide back-up power as well as peak shaving was also developed in Phase 2. This PV-UPS system used a packaging approach nearly identical to the PV peak shaving system, although there were significant differences in the design of the power electronics and control systems. Conceptually, the PV-UPS system builds upon the idea of adding value to PV systems by increasing functionality. A prototype of the PV-UPS system was installed in Delaware for evaluation near the end of the contract period.

  13. Applicability of hydroxylamine nitrate reductant in pulse-column contactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reif, D.J.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium and plutonium separations were made from simulated breeder reactor spent fuel dissolver solution with laboratory-sized pulse column contactors. Hydroxylamine nitrate (HAN) was used for reduction of plutonium (1V). An integrated extraction-partition system, simulating a breeder fuel reprocessing flowsheet, carried out a partial partition of uranium and plutonium in the second contactor. Tests have shown that acceptable coprocessing can be ontained using HAN as a plutonium reductant. Pulse column performance was stable even though gaseous HAN oxidation products were present in the column. Gas evolution rates up to 0.27 cfm/ft/sup 2/ of column cross section were tested and found acceptable.

  14. Time of flight emission spectroscopy of laser produced nickel plasma: Short-pulse and ultrafast excitations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smijesh, N.; Chandrasekharan, K. [Laser and Nonlinear Optics Laboratory, Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Calicut, Calicut 673601 (India); Joshi, Jagdish C.; Philip, Reji, E-mail: reji@rri.res.in [Ultrafast and Nonlinear Optics Lab, Light and Matter Physics Group, Raman Research Institute, Bangalore 560080 (India)

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the experimental investigation and comparison of the temporal features of short-pulse (7?ns) and ultrafast (100 fs) laser produced plasmas generated from a solid nickel target, expanding into a nitrogen background. When the ambient pressure is varied in a large range of 10{sup ?6?}Torr to 10{sup 2?}Torr, the plume intensity is found to increase rapidly as the pressure crosses 1?Torr. Time of flight (TOF) spectroscopy of emission from neutral nickel (Ni I) at 361.9?nm (3d{sup 9}({sup 2}D) 4p ? 3d{sup 9}({sup 2}D) 4s transition) reveals two peaks (fast and slow species) in short-pulse excitation and a single peak in ultrafast excitation. The fast and slow peaks represent recombined neutrals and un-ionized neutrals, respectively. TOF emission from singly ionized nickel (Ni II) studied using the 428.5?nm (3p{sup 6}3d{sup 8}({sup 3}P) 4s? 3p{sup 6}3d{sup 9} 4s) transition shows only a single peak for either excitation. Velocities of the neutral and ionic species are determined from TOF measurements carried out at different positions (i.e., at distances of 2?mm and 4?mm, respectively, from the target surface) on the plume axis. Measured velocities indicate acceleration of neutrals and ions, which is caused by the Coulomb pull of the electrons enveloping the plume front in the case of ultrafast excitation. Both Coulomb pull and laser-plasma interaction contribute to the acceleration in the case of short-pulse excitation. These investigations provide new information on the pressure dependent temporal behavior of nickel plasmas produced by short-pulse and ultrafast laser pulses, which have potential uses in applications such as pulsed laser deposition and laser-induced nanoparticle generation.

  15. Reflection and diffraction corrections for nonlinear materials characterization by quasi-static pulse measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, Peter B. [School of Aerospace Systems, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States); Qu, Jianmin [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Jacobs, Laurence J. [College of Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332, Republic of Georgia (Georgia)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A harmonic acoustic tone burst propagating through an elastic solid with quadratic nonlinearity produces not only a parallel burst of second harmonic but also an often neglected quasi-static pulse associated with the acoustic radiation-induced eigenstrain. Although initial analytical and experimental studies by Yost and Cantrell suggested that the pulse might have a right-angled triangular shape with the peak displacement at the leading edge being proportional to the length of the tone burst, more recent theoretical, analytical, numerical, and experimental studies proved that the pulse has a flat-top shape and the peak displacement is proportional to the propagation length. In this paper, analytical and numerical simulation results are presented to illustrate two types of finite-size effects. First, the finite axial dimension of the specimen cannot be simply accounted for by a linear reflection coefficient that neglects the nonlinear interaction between the combined incident and reflected fields. Second, the quasistatic pulse generated by a transducer of finite aperture suffers more severe divergence than both the fundamental and second harmonic pulses generated by the same transducer. These finite-size effects can make the top of the quasi-static pulse sloped rather than flat and therefore must be taken into consideration in the interpretation of experimental data.

  16. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, John B. (Lansing, NY)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center.

  17. Switching power pulse system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aaland, Kristian (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A switching system for delivering pulses of power from a source (10) to a load (20) using a storage capacitor (C3) charged through a rectifier (D1, D2), and maintained charged to a reference voltage level by a transistor switch (Q1) and voltage comparator (12). A thyristor (22) is triggered to discharge the storage capacitor through a saturable reactor (18) and fractional turn saturable transformer (16) having a secondary to primary turn ratio N of n:l/n=n.sup.2. The saturable reactor (18) functions as a "soaker" while the thyristor reaches saturation, and then switches to a low impedance state. The saturable transformer functions as a switching transformer with high impedance while a load coupling capacitor (C4) charges, and then switches to a low impedance state to dump the charge of the storage capacitor (C3) into the load through the coupling capacitor (C4). The transformer is comprised of a multilayer core (26) having two secondary windings (28, 30) tightly wound and connected in parallel to add their output voltage and reduce output inductance, and a number of single turn windings connected in parallel at nodes (32, 34) for the primary winding, each single turn winding linking a different one of the layers of the multilayer core. The load may be comprised of a resistive beampipe (40) for a linear particle accelerator and capacitance of a pulse forming network (42). To hold off discharge of the capacitance until it is fully charged, a saturable core (44) is provided around the resistive beampipe (40) to isolate the beampipe from the capacitance (42) until it is fully charged.

  18. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  19. Scenario Analysis of Peak Demand Savings for Commercial Buildings with Thermal Mass in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Rongxin; Kiliccote, Sila; Piette, Mary Ann; Parrish, Kristen

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the potential impact of demand response (DR) strategies in commercial buildings in California based on the Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool (DRQAT), which uses EnergyPlus simulation prototypes for office and retail buildings. The study describes the potential impact of building size, thermal mass, climate, and DR strategies on demand savings in commercial buildings. Sensitivity analyses are performed to evaluate how these factors influence the demand shift and shed during the peak period. The whole-building peak demand of a commercial building with high thermal mass in a hot climate zone can be reduced by 30percent using an optimized demand response strategy. Results are summarized for various simulation scenarios designed to help owners and managers understand the potential savings for demand response deployment. Simulated demand savings under various scenarios were compared to field-measured data in numerous climate zones, allowing calibration of the prototype models. The simulation results are compared to the peak demand data from the Commercial End-Use Survey for commercial buildings in California. On the economic side, a set of electricity rates are used to evaluate the impact of the DR strategies on economic savings for different thermal mass and climate conditions. Our comparison of recent simulation to field test results provides an understanding of the DR potential in commercial buildings.

  20. Statistical distributions of level widths and conductance peaks in irregularly shaped quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alhassid, Y.; Lewenkopf, C.H. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    1995-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Analytical expressions for width and conductance peak distributions for quantum dots with multichannel leads in the Coulomb blockade regime are presented for both limits of conserved and broken time-reversal symmetry. The results are valid for any number of nonequivalent and correlated channels, and the distributions are expressed in terms of the channel correlation matrix {ital M} in each lead. The matrix {ital M} is also given in closed form. A chaotic billiard is used as a model to test numerically the theoretical predictions. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital The} {ital American} {ital Physical} {ital Society}.

  1. The determination of neutron flux in the Texas A & M triga reactor during pulse and steady-state operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, John Joseph

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Core VIIi Diagram mith 90 FLIP clemente The NSC reactor technical specification and license approved by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) limits reactor operations so that a temperature of 830 Celsius is not reached anywhere... is significantly more than that allowed for operation with Core VIII. However, a small reactivity insertion in Core VIII will produce approximately the same peak power in a pulse as the much larger reactivity insertion produced during pulse operation of Core...

  2. Long-laser-pulse method of producing thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Olander, Donald K. (Berkeley, CA); Russo, Richard E. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of depositing thin films by means of laser vaporization employs a long-pulse laser (Nd-glass of about one millisecond duration) with a peak power density typically in the range 10.sup.5 -10.sup.6 W/cm.sup.2. The method may be used to produce high T.sub.c superconducting films of perovskite material. In one embodiment, a few hundred nanometers thick film of YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x is produced on a SrTiO.sub.3 crystal substrate in one or two pulses. In situ-recrystallization and post-annealing, both at elevated temperature and in the presence of an oxidizing agen The invention described herein arose in the course of, or under, Contract No. DE-C03-76SF0098 between the United States Department of Energy and the University of California.

  3. Highly efficient second-harmonic generation of intense femtosecond pulses with a significant effect of cubic nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mironov, S Yu; Ginzburg, V N; Lozhkarev, V V; Luchinin, G A; Kirsanov, Aleksei V; Yakovlev, I V; Khazanov, Efim A; Shaykin, A A [Institute of Applied Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A highly efficient (73%) second-harmonic generation of femtosecond pulses in a 1-mm-thick KDP crystal at a fundamentalharmonic peak intensity of 2 TW cm{sup -2} has been demonstrated experimentally. In a 0.5-mm-thick KDP crystal, a 50% efficiency has been reached at a peak intensity of 3.5 TW cm{sup -2}. We examine the key factors that limit the conversion efficiency and present numerical simulation results on further temporal compression of second-harmonic pulses.

  4. Saving Power at Peak Hours (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    California needs new, responsive, demand-side energy technologies to ensure that periods of tight electricity supply on the grid don't turn into power outages. Led by Berkeley Lab's Mary Ann Piette, the California Energy Commission (through its Public Interest Energy Research Program) has established a Demand Response Research Center that addresses two motivations for adopting demand responsiveness: reducing average electricity prices and preventing future electricity crises. The research seeks to understand factors that influence "what works" in Demand Response. Piette's team is investigating the two types of demand response, load response and price response, that may influence and reduce the use of peak electric power through automated controls, peak pricing, advanced communications, and other strategies.

  5. Note on the set of Bragg peaks with high intensity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Lenz; Nicolae Strungaru

    2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider diffraction of Delone sets in Euclidean space. We show that the set of Bragg peaks with high intensity is always Meyer (if it is relatively dense). We use this to provide a new characterization for Meyer sets in terms of positive and positive definite measures. Our results are based on a careful study of positive definite measures, which may be of interest in its own right.

  6. The Homopolar Pulse Billet Heating Process 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keith, R. E.; Weldon, W. F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Institute Rept. No. IEEE Int'l. Pulsed Power Conf., 1st, NP-1285, Dec. 1979. Lubbock, TX, Nov. 9-11, 1976. 12. Driga, M. D., Nasa, S. A., Rylande~, 2. Weldon, W. F., Driga, M. D., Woodson, H. G., Weldon, W. F., and Woodson, H. H. H...., and Ryl ander, H.' G., "The H., "Fundamental Limitations and Design, Fabrication, and Testing of a Topological Considerations for Fast Five Megajoule Homopolar Discharge Homopolar Machines", IEEE Motor-Generator", Int'l. Conf. on Int'l. Conf...

  7. Deconvolution of mixed gamma emitters using peak parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadd, Milan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Garcia, Francisco [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Magadalena, Vigil M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    When evaluating samples containing mixtures of nuclides using gamma spectroscopy the situation sometimes arises where the nuclides present have photon emissions that cannot be resolved by the detector. An example of this is mixtures of {sup 241}Am and plutonium that have L x-ray emissions with slightly different energies which cannot be resolved using a high-purity germanium detector. It is possible to deconvolute the americium L x-rays from those plutonium based on the {sup 241}Am 59.54 keV photon. However, this requires accurate knowledge of the relative emission yields. Also, it often results in high uncertainties in the plutonium activity estimate due to the americium yields being approximately an order of magnitude greater than those for plutonium. In this work, an alternative method of determining the relative fraction of plutonium in mixtures of {sup 241}Am and {sup 239}Pu based on L x-ray peak location and shape parameters is investigated. The sensitivity and accuracy of the peak parameter method is compared to that for conventional peak decovolution.

  8. Relativistic Positron Creation Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Liang, E; Myatt, J; Price, D; Meyerhofer, D; Beiersdorfer, P

    2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets when illuminated with short ({approx} 1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx} 1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. Positrons produced predominately by the Bethe-Heitler process and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. The measurements indicate the laser produced, relativistic positron densities ({approx} 10{sup 16} positrons/cm{sup 3}) are the highest ever created in the laboratory.

  9. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contact your network system administrator. iii) Setup fori) Contact your network system administrator and obtain a

  10. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    °F. Heating Plant Heating lockout when OAT is over 80 °F.side economizer Cooling lockout Control system type _ Inwith EMCS (backup): (backup): Lockout outside air temp (°F):

  11. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and industrial facilities), further developing the DR Automation of industrial process control systems for  automation.  of  industrial process control  systems for automation.  

  12. Flow Test At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy Information Roosevelt

  13. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    manual  demand  response,  when  building  staff  receives Demand Response and Energy Efficiency in Commercial Buildings.    Building  Strategies  and  Techniques  for  Demand  Response.  

  14. Testing of peak demand limiting using thermal mass at a small commercial building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Braun, James E; Fredrickson, Steve; Konis, Kyle; Arens, Edward

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Figure 1. Building Picture / Satellite Photo Demand ResponseDemand Response Research Center, July 2007 https://escholarship.org/uc/item/19p737k1 The buildingbuilding in Palm Desert, California. The precooling Demand Response

  15. Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand side management (DSM) framework as  FINAL REPORT   shown in Figure 12.   DR capabilities in buildings 

  16. Plasma Imaging and Spectroscopy Diagnostics Developed on 100500-kA Pulsed Power Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plasma Imaging and Spectroscopy Diagnostics Developed on 100­500-kA Pulsed Power Devices DANIEL B-ray and ultraviolet en- ergy ranges developed and used on 100­500 kA pulsed power facil- ities. Requiring just a few people to run and modest infrastructure investment, these facilities are cost-effective test beds for new

  17. Experimental Study of Propane-Fueled Pulsed Detonation Rocket Frank K. Lu,* Jason M. Meyers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    1 Experimental Study of Propane-Fueled Pulsed Detonation Rocket Frank K. Lu,* Jason M. Meyers in comparison to cases without the spiral. Tests through a range of cycle frequencies up to 20 Hz in oxygen-propane spiral in a pulsed detonation engine operating with propane and oxygen. A high-energy igniter is used

  18. A high voltage pulsed power supply for capillary discharge waveguide applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abuazoum, S.; Wiggins, S. M.; Issac, R. C.; Welsh, G. H.; Vieux, G.; Jaroszynski, D. A. [Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Ganciu, M. [Low Temperature Plasma Department, National Institute of Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 077125, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an all solid-state, high voltage pulsed power supply for inducing stable plasma formation (density {approx}10{sup 18} cm{sup -3}) in gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides. The pulser (pulse duration of 1 {mu}s) is based on transistor switching and wound transmission line transformer technology. For a capillary of length 40 mm and diameter 265 {mu}m and gas backing pressure of 100 mbar, a fast voltage pulse risetime of 95 ns initiates breakdown at 13 kV along the capillary. A peak current of {approx}280 A indicates near complete ionization, and the r.m.s. temporal jitter in the current pulse is only 4 ns. Temporally stable plasma formation is crucial for deploying capillary waveguides as plasma channels in laser-plasma interaction experiments, such as the laser wakefield accelerator.

  19. Deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors for the diagnosis of pulsed radiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zou, Shiyang; Song, Peng; Pei, Wenbing [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)] [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China); Guo, Liang [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the conjugate gradient method, a simple algorithm is presented for deconvolving the temporal response of photoelectric x-ray detectors (XRDs) to reconstruct the resolved time-dependent x-ray fluxes. With this algorithm, we have studied the impact of temporal response of XRD on the radiation diagnosis of hohlraum heated by a short intense laser pulse. It is found that the limiting temporal response of XRD not only postpones the rising edge and peak position of x-ray pulses but also smoothes the possible fluctuations of radiation fluxes. Without a proper consideration of the temporal response of XRD, the measured radiation flux can be largely misinterpreted for radiation pulses of a hohlraum heated by short or shaped laser pulses.

  20. Tunable THz Generation by the Interaction of a Super-luminous Laser Pulse with Biased Semiconductor Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papadopoulos, K. [BAE Systems-ATI, University of Maryland, College Park MD 20742 (United States); Zigler, A. [BAE Systems-ATI, Hebrew University (Israel)

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Terahertz (THz) radiation is electromagnetic radiation in the range between several hundred and a few thousand GHz. It covers the gap between fast-wave electronics (millimeter waves) and optics (infrared). This spectral region offers enormous potential for detection of explosives and chemical/biological agents, non-destructive testing of non-metallic structural materials and coatings of aircraft structures, medical imaging, bio-sensing of DNA stretching modes and high-altitude secure communications. The development of these applications has been hindered by the lack of powerful, tunable THz sources with controlled waveform. The need for such sources is accentuated by the strong, but selective absorption of THz radiation during transmission through air with high vapor content. The majority of the current experimental work relies on time-domain spectroscopy using fast electrically biased photoconductive sources in conjunction with femto-second mode-locked Ti:Sapphire lasers. These sources known as Large Aperture Photoconductive Antennas (LAPA) have very limited tunability, relatively low upper bound of power and no bandwidth control. The paper presents a novel source of THz radiation known as Miniature Photoconductive Capacitor Array (MPCA). Experiments demonstrated tunability between .1 - 2 THz, control of the relative bandwidth {delta}f/f between .5-.01, and controlled pulse length and pulse waveform (temporal shape, chirp, pulse-to-pulse modulation etc.). Direct scaling from the current device indicates efficiency in excess of 30% at 1 THz with 1/f2 scaling at higher frequencies, peak power of 100 kW and average power between .1-1 W. The physics underlying the MPCA is the interaction of a super-luminous ionization front generated by the oblique incidence of a Ti:Sapphire laser pulse on a semiconductor crystal (ZnSe) biased with an alternating electrostatic field, similar to that of a frozen wave generator. It is shown theoretically and experimentally that the interaction results in the emission of an electromagnetic wave at the plasma frequency of the ionization front. The device resembles the well-known DARC plasma device with two significant differences. First, the frozen wave is on a semiconductor crystal and not on a gas (Azulene Vapor). Second, the ionizing front is super-luminous. These differences result in a device with superior tunability, efficiency, compactness and flexibility. The paper concludes with examples of THz imaging using the MPCA.

  1. Hyper dispersion pulse compressor for chirped pulse amplification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P. J. (Hayward, CA)

    2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A grating pulse compressor configuration is introduced for increasing the optical dispersion for a given footprint and to make practical the application for chirped pulse amplification (CPA) to quasi-narrow bandwidth materials, such as Nd:YAG. The grating configurations often use cascaded pairs of gratings to increase angular dispersion an order of magnitude or more. Increased angular dispersion allows for decreased grating separation and a smaller compressor footprint.

  2. Prefire identification for pulse power systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Longmire, Jerry L. (Los Alamos, NM); Thuot, Michael E. (Espanola, NM); Warren, David S. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prefires in a high-power, high-frequency, multi-stage pulse generator are detected by a system having an EMI shielded pulse timing transmitter associated with and tailored to each stage of the pulse generator. Each pulse timing transmitter upon detection of a pulse triggers a laser diode to send an optical signal through a high frequency fiber optic cable to a pulse timing receiver which converts the optical signal to an electrical pulse. The electrical pulses from all pulse timing receivers are fed through an OR circuit to start a time interval measuring device and each electrical pulse is used to stop an individual channel in the measuring device thereby recording the firing sequence of the multi-stage pulse generator.

  3. Research and development of RHIC injection kicker upgrade with nano second FID pulse generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Hahn, H.; Fischer, W.; Liaw, C.J.; Pai, C.; Tuozzolo, J.

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Our recent effort to test a 50 kV, 1 kA, 50 ns pulse width, 10 ns pulse rise time FID pulse generator with a 250 ft transmission cable, resistive load, and existing RHIC injection kicker magnet has produced unparalleled results. This is the very first attempt to drive a high strength fast kicker magnet with a nano second high pulsed power (50 MVA) generator for large accelerator and colliders. The technology is impressive. We report here the result and future plan of RHIC Injection kicker upgrade.

  4. Pulsed ion beam source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenly, J.B.

    1997-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved pulsed ion beam source is disclosed having a new biasing circuit for the fast magnetic field. This circuit provides for an initial negative bias for the field created by the fast coils in the ion beam source which pre-ionize the gas in the source, ionize the gas and deliver the gas to the proper position in the accelerating gap between the anode and cathode assemblies in the ion beam source. The initial negative bias improves the interaction between the location of the nulls in the composite magnetic field in the ion beam source and the position of the gas for pre-ionization and ionization into the plasma as well as final positioning of the plasma in the accelerating gap. Improvements to the construction of the flux excluders in the anode assembly are also accomplished by fabricating them as layered structures with a high melting point, low conductivity material on the outsides with a high conductivity material in the center. 12 figs.

  5. Electrodeless short pulse laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Proud, J.M.; Baird, D.H.; Kramer, J.M.; Lester, J.E.

    1986-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for the generation of coherent beams of radiation, which consists of: a tube defining a resonant cavity containing a discharge plasma capable of producing coherent radiation, the tube having an elongated shape along an optical axis along the longitudinal axis of the tube, the tube having end portions and an elongated constricted portion connecting the end portions, and the tube having laser windows sealing the end portions to form a closed envelope containing the discharge plasma, a mirror on the optical axis near at least one end of the tube, first and second external electrode means on the outside surfaces of the tube adjacent the opposite ends of the tube, the external electrode means being capacitively coupled to the discharge plasma, and means for providing a source of short pulses electrically to the first external electrode means and means for coupling the second external electrode means to a point of reference potential, further characterized by first and second internal electrode means respectively adjacent the first and second external electrode means and capacitively coupled thereto, the tube having end portions sealed to form a closed envelope containing the discharge plasma and the internal electrode means.

  6. A 1 MEGAWATT POLYPHASE BOOST CONVERTER-MODULATOR FOR KLYSTRON PULSE APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W.A. REASS; J.D. DOSS; R.F. GRIBBLE

    2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes electrical design criteria and first operational results a 140 kV, 1 MW average, 11 MW peak, zero-voltage-switching 20 kHz polyphase bridge, boost converter/modulator for klystron pulse application. The DC-DC converter derives the buss voltages from a standard 13.8 kV to 2300 Y substation cast-core transformer. Energy storage and filtering is provided by self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene traction capacitors. Three ''H-Bridge'' Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT) switching networks are used to generate the polyphase 20 kHz transformer primary drive waveforms. The 20 kHz drive waveforms are chirped the appropriate duration to generate the desired klystron pulse width. PWM (pulse width modulation) of the individual 20 kHz pulses is utilized to provide regulated output waveforms with adaptive feedforward and feedback techniques. The boost transformer design utilizes amorphous nanocrystalline material that provides the required low core loss at design flux levels and switching frequencies. Resonant shunt-peaking is used on the transformer secondary to boost output voltage and resonate transformer leakage inductance. With the appropriate transformer leakage inductance and peaking capacitance, zero-voltage-switching of the IGBT's is attained, minimizing switching losses. A review of these design parameters and the first results of the performance characteristics will be presented.

  7. Radio-Optical Study of Double-Peaked AGNs. I. 3C 390.3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Leon-Tavares; A. P. Lobanov; V. H. Chavushyan; T. G. Arshakian

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim to test the model proposed to explain the correlation between the flux density at 15 GHz of a stationary component in the parsec-scale jet and the optical continuum emission in the radio galaxy 3C~390.3. In the model, the double-peaked emission from 3C~390.3 is likely to be generated both near the disk and in a rotating subrelativistic outflow surrounding the jet, due to ionization of the outflow by the beamed continuum emission from the jet. This scenario is chosen since broad-emission lines are observed to vary following changes in the inner radio jet. For recent epochs we have imaged and modelled the radio emission of the inner jet of 3C~390.3, which was observed with very long baseline interferometry at 15 GHz, 22 GHz and 43 GHz, to image the inner part of the parsec-scale jet, locate the exact region where the bulk of the continuum luminosity is generated and search for the mechanism that drives the double-peaked profile emission. We present the preliminary results of testing the model using data from 11 years of active monitoring of 3C~390.3.

  8. Experimental test accelerator (ETA) II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fessenden, T.J.; Atchison, W.L.; Birx, D.L.

    1981-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) is designed to produce a 10 kAmp electron beam at an energy of 4.5 MeV in 40 nsec pulses at an average rate of 2 pps. The accelerator also operates in bursts of 5 pulses spaced by as little as one millisec at an average rate of 5 pps. The machine is currently operating near 80% of its design values and has accumulated over 2.5 million pulses - mostly at a rate of one pps. The plasma cathode electron source, the remainder of the accelerator, and the operating characteristics of the machine are discussed.

  9. Methods and apparatus for reducing peak wind turbine loads

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moroz, Emilian Mieczyslaw

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for reducing peak loads of wind turbines in a changing wind environment includes measuring or estimating an instantaneous wind speed and direction at the wind turbine and determining a yaw error of the wind turbine relative to the measured instantaneous wind direction. The method further includes comparing the yaw error to a yaw error trigger that has different values at different wind speeds and shutting down the wind turbine when the yaw error exceeds the yaw error trigger corresponding to the measured or estimated instantaneous wind speed.

  10. Geothermometry At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd toWell2008) | OpenSilver Peak Area (DOE GTP)

  11. Wanxiang Silicon Peak Electronics Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide Permit webpageWalthall County,Wanxiang America CorporationPeak

  12. Silver Peak, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG Solar GmbH JumpSilicium de(Redirected fromPeak,

  13. Jiminy Peak Ski Resort Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii | Wind FarmJeffersonJiminy Peak Ski Resort Wind

  14. Silver Peak, Nevada: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPowerSilcio SA JumpProject Jump to:Peak,

  15. The Near-UV Pulse Profile and Spectrum of the Pulsar PSR B0656+14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shibanov, Y A; Lundqvist, P; Gull, T R; Lindler, D; Shibanov, Yu.A.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed the middle-aged pulsar PSR B0656+14 with the prism and the NUV MAMA detector of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) to measure the pulsar spectrum and periodic pulsations in the near-ultraviolet (NUV). The pulsations are clearly detected, double-peaked and very similar to the optical pulse profile. The NUV pulsed fraction is 70 +/- 12%. The spectral slope of the dereddened phase-integrated spectrum in the 1800 - 3200 A range is 0.35 +/- 0.5 which together with the high pulse fraction indicates a non-thermal origin for the NUV emission. The total flux in the range 1700-3400 A is estimated to be 3.4 +/- 0.3e-15 erg/s/cm2 when corrected for E(B-V)=0.03. At a distance of 288 pc this corresponds to a luminosity 3.4e28 erg/s assuming isotropy of the emission. We compare the NUV pulse profile with observations from radio to gamma-rays. The first NUV sub-pulse is in phase with the gamma-ray pulse marginally detected with the EGRET, while the second NUV sub-pulse is similar both in shape a...

  16. Parameter sensitivity analysis of tailored-pulse loading stimulation of Devonian gas shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbour, T.G.; Mihalik, G.R.

    1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evaluation of three tailored-pulse loading parameters has been undertaken to access their importance in gas well stimulation technology. This numerical evaluation was performed using STEALTH finite-difference codes and was intended to provide a measure of the effects of various tailored-pulse load configurations on fracture development in Devonian gas shale. The three parameters considered in the sensitivity analysis were: loading rate; decay rate; and sustained peak pressures. By varying these parameters in six computations and comparing the relative differences in fracture initiation and propagation the following conclusions were drawn: (1) Fracture initiation is directly related to the loading rate aplied to the wellbore wall. Loading rates of 10, 100 and 1000 GPa/sec were modeled. (2) If yielding of the rock can be prevented or minimized, by maintaining low peak pressures in the wellbore, increasing the pulse loading rate, to say 10,000 GPa/sec or more, should initiate additional multiple fractures. (3) Fracture initiation does not appear to be related to the tailored-pulse decay rate. Fracture extension may be influenced by the rate of decay. The slower the decay rate, the longer the crack extension. (4) Fracture initiation does not appear to be improved by a high pressure plateau in the tailored-pulse. Fracture propagation may be enhanced if the maintained wellbore pressure plateau is of sufficient magnitude to extent the range of the tangential tensile stresses to greater radial distances. 26 figures, 2 tables.

  17. High Power RF Test Facility at the SNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y.W. Kang; D.E. Anderson; I.E. Campisi; M. Champion; M.T. Crofford; R.E. Fuja; P.A. Gurd; S. Hasan; K.-U. Kasemir; M.P. McCarthy; D. Stout; J.Y. Tang; A.V. Vassioutchenko; M. Wezensky; G.K. Davis; M. A. Drury; T. Powers; M. Stirbet

    2005-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    RF Test Facility has been completed in the SNS project at ORNL to support test and conditioning operation of RF subsystems and components. The system consists of two transmitters for two klystrons powered by a common high voltage pulsed converter modulator that can provide power to two independent RF systems. The waveguides are configured with WR2100 and WR1150 sizes for presently used frequencies: 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz. Both 402.5 MHz and 805 MHz systems have circulator protected klystrons that can be powered by the modulator capable of delivering 11 MW peak and 1 MW average power. The facility has been equipped with computer control for various RF processing and complete dual frequency operation. More than forty 805 MHz fundamental power couplers for the SNS superconducting linac (SCL) cavities have been RF conditioned in this facility. The facility provides more than 1000 ft2 floor area for various test setups. The facility also has a shielded cave area that can support high power tests of normal conducting and superconducting accelerating cavities and components.

  18. Development and Testing of the NIF Prototype Module

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adcock, J.; Harjes, C.; Mowrer, G.; Wilson, M.

    1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) is required to deliver -68 kJ to each of the 3840 flashlamp pairs in the NIF laser in a current pulse with a peak of -500 kA and rise time of- 150 µs. The PCS will consist of 192 modules each of which drive 20 lamp-pairs. Each module will basically be a 6 rnF capacitor bank with a nominal charge voltage of 23.5 kV which is switched by a single pressurized air gas switch to 20 RG-220 cables that are connected to individual lamp loads. In addition each module will have a number of subsystems including; a lamp pre-ionization system, power supplies, isolation circuits, trigger systems, safety dump systems, gas system, and an embedded control system. A module will also include components whose primary function is to limit fault currents and thus minimize collateral damage in faults. In the Prototype Development and Testing effort at Sandia National Laboratories all of these were integrated into a single system and proper fimctionality was demonstrated. Extensive testing was done at nominal operating levels into resistive dummy loads and some testing in fault modes was also done. A description of the system and a summary of testing is given in this paper.

  19. Magnetar Driven Shock Breakout and Double Peaked Supernova Light Curves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasen, Daniel; Bildsten, Lars

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The light curves of some luminous supernovae are suspected to be powered by the spindown energy of a rapidly rotating magnetar. Here we describe a possible signature of the central engine: a burst of shock breakout emission occurring several days after the supernova explosion. The energy input from the magnetar inflates a high-pressure bubble that drives a shock through the pre-exploded supernova ejecta. If the magnetar is powerful enough, that shock will near the ejecta surface and become radiative. At the time of shock breakout, the ejecta will have expanded to a large radius (~10^{14} cm) so that the radiation released is at optical/ultraviolet wavelengths (T ~ 20,000 K) and lasts for several days. The luminosity and timescale of this magnetar driven shock breakout are similar to the first peak observed recently in the double-peaked light curve of SN-LSQ14BDQ. However, for a large region of model parameter space, the breakout emission is predicted to be dimmer than the diffusive luminosity from direct magn...

  20. Nanoindentation study of niobium nitride thin films on niobium fabricated by reactive pulsed laser deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mamun, Md Abdullah; Farha, Ashraf Hassan; Ufuktepe, Y??ksel; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E.; Elmustafa, Abdelmageed A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanomechanical and structural properties of NbNX films deposited on single crystal Nb using pulsed laser deposition for different substrate temperature were previously investigated as a function of film/substrate crystal structure [Mamun et al., 2012]. In this study we focus on the effect of laser fluences and background nitrogen pressure on the nanomechanical and structural properties of NbNX films. The crystal structure and surface morphology of the thin films were tested by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Using nanoindentation, the investigation of the nanomechanical properties revealed that the hardness of the NbNX films was directly influenced by the laser fluence for low background nitrogen pressure, whereas the nanomechanical hardness showed no apparent correlation with laser fluence at high background nitrogen pressure. The NbNX film hardness measured at 30% film thickness increased from 14.0 ± 1.3 to 18.9 ± 2.4 GPa when the laser fluence was increased from 15 to 25 J/cm2 at 10.7 Pa N2 pressure. X-ray diffraction showed NbNX films with peaks that correspond to ?-NbN cubic and ?-Nb2N hexagonal phases in addition to the ??-NbN hexagonal phase. Increasing the laser fluence resulted in NbNX films with larger grain sizes.

  1. Short pulse free electron laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Szoke, Abraham (Fremont, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus for amplification of a laser pulse in a free electron laser amplifier where the laser pulse duration may be a small fraction of the electron beam pulse duration used for amplification. An electron beam pulse is passed through a first wiggler magnet and a short laser pulse to be amplified is passed through the same wiggler so that only the energy of the last fraction, f, (f<1) of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplifying the laser pulse. After suitable delay of the electron beam, the process is repeated in a second wiggler magnet, a third, . . . , where substantially the same fraction f of the remainder of the electron beam pulse is consumed in amplification of the given short laser pulse in each wiggler magnet region until the useful electron beam energy is substantially completely consumed by amplification of the laser pulse.

  2. Optical Damage Threshold of Silicon for Ultrafast Infrared Pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowan, Benjamin M.; /Tech-X, Boulder /SLAC

    2007-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the optical damage threshold of crystalline silicon in air for ultrafast pulses in the near infrared. The wavelengths tested span a range from the telecommunications band at 1550 nm, extending to 2260 nm. We discuss the motivation for the measurements and give theoretical context. We then describe the experimental setup, diagnostics, and procedure. The results show a breakdown threshold of 0.2J/cm{sup 2} at 1550 nm and 1.06 ps FWHM pulse duration, and a weak dependence on wavelength.

  3. Voltage breakdown limits at a high material temperature for rapid pulse heating in a vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pincosy, P A; Speer, R

    1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The proposed Advanced Hydro Facility (AHF) is required to produce multi-pulse radiographs. Electron beam pulse machines with sub-microsecond repetition are not yet available to test the problem of electron beam propagation through the hydro-dynamically expanding plasma from the nearby previously heated target material. A proposed test scenario includes an ohmically heated small volume of target material simulating the electron beam heating, along with an actual electron beam pulse impinging on nearby target material. A pulse power heating circuit was tested to evaluate the limits of pulse heating a small volume of material to tens of kilo-joules per gram. The main pulse heating time (50 to 100 ns) was to simulate the electron beam heating of a converter target material. To avoid skin heating non-uniformity a longer time scale pulse of a few microseconds first heats the target material to a few thousand degrees near the liquid to vapor transition. Under this state the maximum electric field that the current carrying conductor can support is the important parameter for insuring that the 100 ns heating pulse can deposit sufficient power. A small pulse power system was built for tests of this limit. Under cold conditions the vacuum electric field hold-off limit has been quoted as high as many tens of kilovolts per centimeter. The tests for these experiments found that the vacuum electric field hold-off was limited to a few kilovolts per centimeter when the material approached melting temperatures. Therefore the proposed test scenario for AHF was not achievable.*

  4. analog cmos peak: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    exercise will provide an introduction to CMOS logic circuits. You will use the Bit Bucket breadboarding system to build and test several CMOS circuits. The objectives Niu,...

  5. Participation through Automation: Fully Automated Critical PeakPricing in Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote,Sila; Linkugel, Eric

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    California electric utilities have been exploring the use of dynamic critical peak prices (CPP) and other demand response programs to help reduce peaks in customer electric loads. CPP is a tariff design to promote demand response. Levels of automation in DR can be defined as follows: Manual Demand Response involves a potentially labor-intensive approach such as manually turning off or changing comfort set points at each equipment switch or controller. Semi-Automated Demand Response involves a pre-programmed demand response strategy initiated by a person via centralized control system. Fully Automated Demand Response does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a home, building, or facility through receipt of an external communications signal. The receipt of the external signal initiates pre-programmed demand response strategies. They refer to this as Auto-DR. This paper describes the development, testing, and results from automated CPP (Auto-CPP) as part of a utility project in California. The paper presents the project description and test methodology. This is followed by a discussion of Auto-DR strategies used in the field test buildings. They present a sample Auto-CPP load shape case study, and a selection of the Auto-CPP response data from September 29, 2005. If all twelve sites reached their maximum saving simultaneously, a total of approximately 2 MW of DR is available from these twelve sites that represent about two million ft{sup 2}. The average DR was about half that value, at about 1 MW. These savings translate to about 0.5 to 1.0 W/ft{sup 2} of demand reduction. They are continuing field demonstrations and economic evaluations to pursue increasing penetrations of automated DR that has demonstrated ability to provide a valuable DR resource for California.

  6. Smirnov-SSDLTR2005 Chirped bulk Bragg gratings in PTR glass for ultrashort pulse stretching and compression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glebov, Leon

    laser applications boosted the development of optical components capable of withholding high power along with beam transformation. Especially, it related to high power femtosecond pulses where high peak power Arbor, MI 48109-2122 Tel.: (734)615-7166, Fax: (734)763-4876, e-mail: almantas@eecs.umich.edu High power

  7. Neutron and Gamma Ray Pulse Shape Discrimination with Polyvinyltoluene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lintereur, Azaree T.; Ely, James H.; Stave, Jean A.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this was research effort was to test the ability of two poly vinyltoluene research samples to produce recordable, distinguishable signals in response to gamma rays and neutrons. Pulse shape discrimination was performed to identify if the signal was generated by a gamma ray or a neutron. A standard figure of merit for pulse shape discrimination was used to quantify the gamma-neutron pulse separation. Measurements were made with gamma and neutron sources with and without shielding. The best figure of merit obtained was 1.77; this figure of merit was achieved with the first sample in response to an un-moderated 252Cf source shielded with 5.08 cm of lead.

  8. Peak Oil Netherlands Foundation (PONL) was founded in May 2005 by a group of citizens who are concerned about the effects of a premature peak in oil and other fossil fuels production. The main aims of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keeling, Stephen L.

    are concerned about the effects of a premature peak in oil and other fossil fuels production. The main aims ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 5 - 1) INTRODUCTION ­ PEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- - 25 - 7) PEAK OIL NETHERLANDS OIL PRODUCTION & PEAKING OUTLOOK ---------------------------------- - 26

  9. Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharecha, P A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

  10. Off-peak air conditioning; A major energy saver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacCracken, C.D.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, the mission given to manufacturers is changing to include saving energy (kWh). Until now, saving energy was ignored because the utilities were happy to fill their night valley to reach a higher load factor. There also was a general feeling that making ice was much less efficient than standard air conditioning, and that anyone saying otherwise was a dreamer. This article discusses the energy savings based on the more prevalent ice storage technology, the similar suction temperatures of the various types of ice storage, and how storage is applied. Included are baseload power generation, partial storage with chiller priority, using air cooled condensers when making ice at night, colder duct air, heat recovery, central rooftop systems, smart controls, electric/gas combinations, supply side transmission and distribution losses, and cooling of air entering gas turbine generators during peak conditions.

  11. Obtaining two attosecond pulses pulses for x-ray stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, Alexander

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    delay between two ultra-short laser pulses obtained from theto the timing of the ultra-short laser pulse and can easilybunch interacting with ultra-short laser pulses. Here, we

  12. Making Relativistic Positrons Using Ultra-Intense Short Pulse Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H; Wilks, S; Bonlie, J; Chen, C; Chen, S; Cone, K; Elberson, L; Gregori, G; Liang, E; Price, D; Van Maren, R; Meyerhofer, D D; Mithen, J; Murphy, C V; Myatt, J; Schneider, M; Shepherd, R; Stafford, D; Tommasini, R; Beiersdorfer, P

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new positron source produced using ultra-intense short pulse lasers. Although it has been studied in theory since as early as the 1970s, the use of lasers as a valuable new positron source was not demonstrated experimentally until recent years, when the petawatt-class short pulse lasers were developed. In 2008 and 2009, in a series of experiments performed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a large number of positrons were observed after shooting a millimeter thick solid gold target. Up to 2 x 10{sup 10} positrons per steradian ejected out the back of {approx}mm thick gold targets were detected. The targets were illuminated with short ({approx}1 ps) ultra-intense ({approx}1 x 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}) laser pulses. These positrons are produced predominantly by the Bethe-Heitler process, and have an effective temperature of 2-4 MeV, with the distribution peaking at 4-7 MeV. The angular distribution of the positrons is anisotropic. For a wide range of applications, this new laser based positron source with its unique characteristics may complements the existing sources using radioactive isotopes and accelerators.

  13. Dual Sync Pulse orbital welding of Zeron 100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warburton, G.R.; Spence, M.A. [Weir Materials Ltd., Manchester (United Kingdom); Potter, S.R. [Dimetrics, Inc., Davidson, NC (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes a new orbital GTAW welding system. Dual Synchronized Pulsation is a further development of the Sync Pulse mode of operation. In Sync Pulse operation the primary weld parameters (current, voltage and wire feed speed) are pulsed between a primary and background value together with synchronization to the torch oscillation position allied with presetting duration using in dwell, excursion and out dwell times. Dual Sync Pulse utilizes two wire feed systems feeding a chill wire directly into the rear of the weld pool on the side opposite the weld torch and the main wire feed. The chill wires fed into the trailing side of the torch absorbs energy from the weld pool effectively limiting heat transmitted to the base material. This technique provides higher deposition rates, decreased welding times and lower heat inputs per pound of deposited metal. Using Dual Sync Pulse, substantial increases in metal deposition rate compared to single wire technique were obtained together with lower heat inputs per kg (pound) of deposited metal. Both mechanical properties and corrosion test results met normal fabrication specification requirements. No evidence of intermetallic phase precipitation was found using optical microscopy. The ability to increase deposition rate without concurrent increase in heat input offers the fabricator significant advantages when welding a super duplex stainless steels such as Zeron 100. In addition, the reduced number of runs and lower heat inputs provide welds with less hoop shrinkage and lower residual stress.

  14. Tests of prototype SSC magnets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strait, J.

    1987-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Results are presented from tests of the first two full length prototype SSC dipole magnets. Magnetic field measurements have been made at currents up to 2000 A. The two magnets achieved peak currents at 4.5K of 5790 A and 6450 A, respectively, substantially below the short sample limit of 6700 A. These peak values, however, could not be achieved reproducibly. Data are presented from studies performed to try to understand the poor quench performance.

  15. Simulation of Double-Pulse Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Povarnitsyn, Mikhail E.; Khishchenko, Konstantin V.; Levashov, Pavel R. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures of RAS, Izhorskaya 13 Bldg 2, Moscow, 125412 (Russian Federation); Itina, Tatian E. [Laboratoire Hubert Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, 18 rue Benoit Lauras, Bat. F, 42000, St-Etienne (France)

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the physical reasons of a strange decrease in the ablation depth observed in femtosecond double-pulse experiments with increasing delay between the pulses. Two ultrashort pulses of the same energy produce the crater which is less than that created by a single pulse. Hydrodynamic simulation shows that the ablation mechanism is suppressed when the delay between the pulses exceeds the electron-ion relaxation time. In this case, the interaction of the second laser pulse with the expanding target material leads to the formation of the second shock wave suppressing the rarefaction wave created by the first pulse. The modeling of the double-pulse ablation for different delays between pulses confirms this explanation.

  16. Control of high power pulse extracted from the maximally compressed pulse in a nonlinear optical fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Guangye; Jia, Suotang; Mihalache, Dumitru

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the possibility to control high power pulses extracted from the maximally compressed pulse in a nonlinear optical fiber by adjusting the initial excitation parameters. The numerical results show that the power, location and splitting order number of the maximally compressed pulse and the transmission features of high power pulses extracted from the maximally compressed pulse can be manipulated through adjusting the modulation amplitude, width, and phase of the initial Gaussian-type perturbation pulse on a continuous wave background.

  17. Pulse combustor with controllable oscillations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richards, George A. (Morgantown, WV); Welter, Michael J. (Columbiana, OH); Morris, Gary J. (Morgantown, WV)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse combustor having thermally induced pulse combustion in a continuously flowing system is described. The pulse combustor is fitted with at lease one elongated ceramic body which significantly increases the heat transfer area in the combustion chamber of the combustor. The ceramic body or bodies possess sufficient mass and heat capacity to ignite the fuel-air charge once the ceramic body or bodies are heated by conventional spark plug initiated combustion so as to provide repetitive ignition and combustion of sequentially introduced fuel-air charges without the assistance of the spark plug and the rapid quenching of the flame after each ignition in a controlled manner so as to provide a selective control over the oscillation frequency and amplitude. Additional control over the heat transfer in the combustion chamber is provided by employing heat exchange mechanisms for selectively heating or cooling the elongated ceramic body or bodies and/or the walls of the combustion chamber.

  18. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  19. Method and system for an on-chip AC self-test controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flanagan, John D. (Rhinebeck, NY); Herring, Jay R. (Poughkeepsie, NY); Lo, Tin-Chee (Fishkill, NY)

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for performing AC self-test on an integrated circuit that includes a system clock for use during normal operation are provided. The method includes applying a long data capture pulse to a first test register in response to the system clock, applying an at speed data launch pulse to the first test register in response to the system clock, inputting the data from the first register to a logic path in response to applying the at speed data launch pulse to the first test register, applying an at speed data capture pulse to a second test register in response to the system clock, inputting the logic path output to the second test register in response to applying the at speed data capture pulse to the second test register, and applying a long data launch pulse to the second test register in response to the system clock.

  20. Pulsed combustion process for black liquor gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durai-Swamy, K.; Mansour, M.N.; Warren, D.W.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to test an energy efficient, innovative black liquor recovery system on an industrial scale. In the MTCI recovery process, black liquor is sprayed directly onto a bed of sodium carbonate solids which is fluidized by steam. Direct contact of the black liquor with hot bed solids promotes high rates of heating and pyrolysis. Residual carbon, which forms as a deposit on the particle surface, is then gasified by reaction with steam. Heat is supplied from pulse combustor resonance tubes which are immersed within the fluid bed. A portion of the gasifier product gas is returned to the pulse combustors to provide the energy requirements of the reactor. Oxidized sulfur species are partially reduced by reaction with the gasifier products, principally carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The reduced sulfur decomposed to solid sodium carbonate and gaseous hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S). Sodium values are recovered by discharging a dry sodium carbonate product from the gasifier. MTCI's indirectly heated gasification technology for black liquor recovery also relies on the scrubbing of H{sub 2}S for product gases to regenerate green liquor for reuse in the mill circuit. Due to concerns relative to the efficiency of sulfur recovery in the MTCI integrated process, an experimental investigation was undertaken to establish performance and design data for this portion of the system.

  1. Pulsed electrodeposition of iron-nickel alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimmett, D.L.; Schwartz, M.; Nobe, K. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (US))

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the effects of dc, pulse, and pulse reverse current waveforms on deposition of Fe-Ni alloys studied in unagitated solutions and with a rotating cylindrical electrode. A nickel sulfamate/ferrous chloride electrolyte system at pH 2 less than 2 A/dm{sup 2}. Pulse reverse plating led to a decrease in anomalous deposition at low current densities. Rotating cylindrical electrodes indicated significant mass transfer effects at high current densities. During pulse reverse plating an increase in anodic pulse magnitude decreased anomalous deposition; pulse frequency had its greatest effect in reducing anomalous deposition between 100 and 300 Hz.

  2. Pulse shortening, spatial mode cleaning, and intense terahertz generation by filamentation in xenon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akturk, Selcuk; D'Amico, Ciro; Franco, Michel; Couairon, Arnaud; Mysyrowicz, Andre [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Techniques Avancees-Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS UMR 7639 F-91761 Palaiseau Cedex, France and Centre de Physique Theorique, CNRS UMR 7644, Ecole Polytechnique, F-91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We performed a comprehensive study of filamentation in xenon. Due to its high nonlinear refraction index, but relatively low ionization potential, xenon can support filamentation at peak powers lower than in air. In our experiments, we studied pulse shortening, spatial mode cleaning, and generation of terahertz radiation. We observed that in xenon, self-compression is easily obtainable and terahertz radiation generation efficiency is significantly stronger as compared to air.

  3. Dynamic Recompartmentalization of Supported Lipid Bilayers Using Focused Femtosecond Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Atul N.

    repetition rate of 2.7 kHz at 3 nJ pulse energy for 100 ms produces a dark blurry spot (2 µm fwhm of these applications depend on high peak intensities (>1013 W/cm2) achieved within the focal volume under low-energy Information). The bilayer was maintained wet by sandwiching the sample with a DI water-filled hanging drop

  4. Attosecond X-Ray Pulses for Molecular Electronic Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Mark Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    techniques for ultrafast laser pulse characterization. Thethe ultrafast evolution of the driver pulse intensity, weisolated pulse production will enable probing of ultrafast

  5. PJM Controller Testing with Prototypic PJM Nozzle Configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Nigl, Franz; Weier, Dennis R.; Leigh, Richard J.; Johnson, Eric D.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Pfund, David M.; Baumann, Aaron W.; Wang, Yeefoo

    2009-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of River Protection’s Waste Treatment Plant (WTP) is being designed and built to pre-treat and then vitrify a large portion of the wastes in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. The WTP consists of three primary facilities—pretreatment, low-activity waste (LAW) vitrification, and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification. The pretreatment facility will receive waste piped from the Hanford tank farms and separate it into a high-volume, low-activity liquid stream stripped of most solids and radionuclides and a much smaller volume of HLW slurry containing most of the solids and most of the radioactivity. Many of the vessels in the pretreatment facility will contain pulse jet mixers (PJM) that will provide some or all of the mixing in the vessels. Pulse jet mixer technology was selected for use in black cell regions of the WTP, where maintenance cannot be performed once hot testing and operations commence. The PJMs have no moving mechanical parts that require maintenance. The vessels with the most concentrated slurries will also be mixed with air spargers and/or steady jets in addition to the mixing provided by the PJMs. Pulse jet mixers are susceptible to overblows that can generate large hydrodynamic forces, forces that can damage mixing vessels or their internal parts. The probability of an overblow increases if a PJM does not fill completely. The purpose of the testing performed for this report was to determine how reliable and repeatable the primary and safety (or backup) PJM control systems are at detecting drive overblows (DOB) and charge vessel full (CVF) conditions. Testing was performed on the ABB 800xA and Triconex control systems. The controllers operated an array of four PJMs installed in an approximately 13 ft diameter × 15 ft tall tank located in the high bay of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) 336 Building test facility. The PJMs were fitted with 4 inch diameter discharge nozzles representative of the nozzles to be used in the WTP. This work supplemented earlier controller tests done on PJMs with 2 inch nozzles (Bontha et al. 2007). Those earlier tests enabled the selection of appropriate pressure transmitters with associated piping and resulted in an alternate overblow detection algorithm that uses data from pressure transmitters mounted in a water flush line on the PJM airlines. Much of that earlier work was only qualitative, however, due to a data logger equipment failure that occurred during the 2007 testing. The objectives of the current work focused on providing quantitative determinations of the ability of the BNI controllers to detect DOB and CVF conditions. On both control systems, a DOB or CVF is indicated when the values of particular internal functions, called confidence values, cross predetermined thresholds. There are two types of confidence values; one based on a transformation of jet pump pair (JPP) drive and suction pressures, the other based on the pressure in the flush line. In the present testing, we collected confidence levels output from the ABB and Triconex controllers. These data were analyzed in terms of the true and noise confidence peaks generated during multiple cycles of DOB and CVF events. The distributions of peak and noise amplitudes were compared to see if thresholds could be set that would enable the detection of DOB and CVF events at high probabilities, while keeping false detections to low probabilities. Supporting data were also collected on PJM operation, including data on PJM pressures and levels, to provide direct experimental evidence of when PJMs were filling, full, driving, or overblowing.

  6. Satisfying winter peak-power demand with phased gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.H.; Moss, T.E.; Ravikumar, R.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study, commissioned by the Bonneville Power Administration, was to investigate application of this concept to the Pacific Northwest. Coal gasification combined-cycle (GCC) plants are receiving serious attention from eastern utilities. Potomac Electric (PEPCO) has engaged Fluor Technology to perform conceptual and preliminary engineering for a nominal 375-MW coal GCC power generation facility to be located in northern Montgomery County, Maryland. Other eastern utilities are engaged in site-specific investigations of satisfying future power requirements employing this alternative, which involves an environmentally superior method of using coal. Coal is combined with oxygen to produce a medium-heating-value fuel gas as an alternative to natural gas. The fuel gas, cleaned to remove sulfur compounds, is burned in gas turbine-generator sets. The hot exhaust gas is used to generate steam for additional power generation. The gasification combined cycle plant is highly efficient and has a high level of flexibility to meet power demands. This study provided background for consideration of one alternative for satisfying winter peak-load demand. The concept is feasible, depending on the timing of the installation of the gasification system, projections of the cost and the availability of natural gas, and restrictions on the use of natural gas. It has the advantage of deferring capacity addition and capital outlay until power is needed and economics are favorable.

  7. EIGHT CHANNEL PROGRAMMABLE PULSE GENERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Master-8 EIGHT CHANNEL PROGRAMMABLE PULSE GENERATOR Operation Manual A.M.P.I. A.M.P.I. 123Uzlel St and the programming simple and easy to learn. Master-8 is an attractive unit and you will enjoy working with its eight -- Modes of operation 11 -- Setting the parameters 13 -- Triggering 14 -- Eight stored paradigms 14

  8. Design and evaluation of seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oloyede, Isaiah Olanrewaju

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The seasonal storage hydrogen peak electricity supply system (SSHPESS) is a gigawatt-year hydrogen storage system which stores excess electricity produced as hydrogen during off-peak periods and consumes the stored hydrogen ...

  9. THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-49947 THE ROLE OF BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES IN REDUCING AND CONTROLLING PEAK ELECTRICITY DEMAND? ..................................... 8 What are the seasonal aspects of electric peak demand?............................ 9 What because of the California electricity crisis (Borenstein 2001). Uncertainties surrounding the reliability

  10. Production of Hydrogen at the Forecourt Using Off-Peak Electricity: June 2005 (Milestone Report)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levene, J. I.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This milestone report provides information about the production of hydrogen at the forecourt using off-peak electricity as well as the Hydrogen Off-Peak Electricity (HOPE) model.

  11. Microsoft Word - BUGS_The Next Smart Grid Peak Resource Final...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to engage half of the BUGS for peak reduction during 200 hours a year results in emission reduction compared to natural gas peaking units. Specifically, More than 935,000...

  12. Ultra--low noise differential AC-coupled photodetector for sensitive pulse detection applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. J. Windpassinger; M. Kubasik; M. Koschorreck; A. Boisen; N. Kjaergaard; E. S. Polzik; J. H. Mueller

    2009-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the performance of ultra low noise differential photodetectors especially designed for probing of atomic ensembles with weak light pulses. The working principle of the detectors is described together with the analysis procedures employed to extract the photon shot noise of light pulses with $\\sim1 \\mu$s duration. As opposed to frequency response peaked detectors, our approach allows for broadband quantum noise measurements. The equivalent noise charge (ENC) for two different hardware approaches is evaluated to 280 and 340 electrons per pulse, respectively which corresponds to a dark noise equivalent photon number of $n_\\mathrm{3dB}=0.8\\cdot 10^5$ and $n_\\mathrm{3dB}=1.2\\cdot 10^5$ in the two approaches. Finally, we discuss the possibility of removing classical correlations in the output signal caused by detector imperfection by using double--correlated sampling methods.

  13. Method and system for an on-chip AC self-test controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flanagan, John D.; Herring, Jay R.; Lo, Tin-Chee

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for performing AC self-test on an integrated circuit, including a system clock for use during normal operation. The method includes applying a long data capture pulse to a first test register in response to the system clock, and further applying at an speed data launch pulse to the first test register in response to the system clock. Inputting the data from the first register to a logic path in response to applying the at speed data launch pulse to the first test register. Applying at speed data capture pulse to a second test register in response to the system clock. Inputting the output from the logic path to the second test register in response to applying the at speed data capture pulse to the second register. Applying a long data launch pulse to the second test register in response to the system clock.

  14. ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huth, Michael

    ICE Pulse Oximeter Smart Alarm App Requirements 6 March 2012 Revision 0 for an Integrated Clinical Environment (ICE) pulse oximetry monitoring app that provides.2 References [Purpose: List all ICE standards, and other standards and references

  15. Novette pulse-power-system description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritton, D.G.; Christie, D.J.; Holloway, R.W.; Merritt, B.T.; Oicles, J.A.; Whitham, K.; Wilcox, R.B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is a summary of the pulse power systems for Novette; the flashlamp power system, the pulsers for the various optical shutters and the pulse power control system.

  16. Dispersion compensation in chirped pulse amplification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A chirped pulse amplification system includes a laser source providing an input laser pulse along an optical path. The input laser pulse is characterized by a first temporal duration. The system also includes a multi-pass pulse stretcher disposed along the optical path. The multi-pass pulse stretcher includes a first set of mirrors operable to receive input light in a first plane and output light in a second plane parallel to the first plane and a first diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher also includes a second set of mirrors operable to receive light diffracted from the first diffraction grating and a second diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher further includes a reflective element operable to reflect light diffracted from the second diffraction grating. The system further includes an amplifier, a pulse compressor, and a passive dispersion compensator disposed along the optical path.

  17. for Pulsed Power & erElectronics|Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gelfond, Michael

    for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics The Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics started as a Plasma research group at Texas Tech University in 1966. The initial work was concerned with har- monic ion

  18. Nonlinear pair production in scattering of photons on ultra-short laser pulses at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tuchin, Kirill

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider scattering of a photon on a short intense laser pulse at high energy. We argue that for ultra-short laser pulses the interaction is coherent over the entire length of the pulse. At low pulse intensity $I$ the total cross section for electron-positron pair production is proportional to $I$. However, at pulse intensities higher than the characteristic value $I_s$, the total cross section saturates -- it becomes proportional to the logarithm of intensity. This nonlinear effect is due to multi-photon interactions. We derive the total cross section for pair production at high energies by resuming the multi-photon amplitudes to all orders in intensity. We calculate the saturation intensity $I_s$ and show that it is significantly lower than the Schwinger's critical value. We discuss possible experimental tests.

  19. Nonlinear pair production in scattering of photons on ultra-short laser pulses at high energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirill Tuchin

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider scattering of a photon on a short intense laser pulse at high energy. We argue that for ultra-short laser pulses the interaction is coherent over the entire length of the pulse. At low pulse intensity $I$ the total cross section for electron-positron pair production is proportional to $I$. However, at pulse intensities higher than the characteristic value $I_s$, the total cross section saturates -- it becomes proportional to the logarithm of intensity. This nonlinear effect is due to multi-photon interactions. We derive the total cross section for pair production at high energies by resuming the multi-photon amplitudes to all orders in intensity. We calculate the saturation intensity $I_s$ and show that it is significantly lower than the Schwinger's critical value. We discuss possible experimental tests.

  20. Pulsed Power for Solid-State Lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gagnon, W; Albrecht, G; Trenholme, J; Newton, M

    2007-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Beginning in the early 1970s, a number of research and development efforts were undertaken at U.S. National Laboratories with a goal of developing high power lasers whose characteristics were suitable for investigating the feasibility of laser-driven fusion. A number of different laser systems were developed and tested at ever larger scale in pursuit of the optimum driver for laser fusion experiments. Each of these systems had associated with it a unique pulsed power option. A considerable amount of original and innovative engineering was carried out in support of these options. Ultimately, the Solid-state Laser approach was selected as the optimum driver for the application. Following this, the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the University of Rochester undertook aggressive efforts directed at developing the technology. In particular, at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, a series of laser systems beginning with the Cyclops laser and culminating in the present with the National Ignition Facility were developed and tested. As a result, a large amount of design information for solid-state laser pulsed power systems has been documented. Some of it is in the form of published papers, but most of it is buried in internal memoranda, engineering reports and LLNL annual reports. One of the goals of this book is to gather this information into a single useable format, such that it is easily accessed and understood by other engineers and physicists for use with future designs. It can also serve as a primer, which when seriously studied, makes the subsequent reading of original work and follow-up references considerably easier. While this book deals only with the solid-state laser pulsed power systems, in the bibliography we have included a representative cross section of papers and references from much of the very fine work carried out at other institutions in support of different laser approaches. Finally, in recent years, there has been a renewed interest in high-average-power solid-state glass lasers. Much of the prime power technology developed in support of this has definite applications in the long term for fusion power plant scenarios.

  1. Preparing for the Peak: Energy Security and Atlantic Canada 1 Larry Hughes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    region that will be particularly vulnerable to peak oil, since almost all of the region's oil is imported is destined for markets outside the region. This paper examines some of the potential impacts of peak oil the reliance on refined petroleum products for space heating and transportation. When peak oil production

  2. Result Demonstration Report Pigweed Control in Grain Sorghum Using Peak. 1996 to 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    74 78 Peak + Methylated Oil 0.75 oz + 1 pt 78 88 93 1) WAT = Weeks after treatment application. #12Result Demonstration Report Pigweed Control in Grain Sorghum Using Peak. 1996 to 1999 Brent Bean Summary Studies were conducted from 1996 to 1999 to evaluate pigweed control in grain sorghum using Peak

  3. Formation Of The Rare Earth Peak: Gaining Insight Into Late-Time r-Process Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew Mumpower; Gail McLaughlin; Rebecca Surman

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation and final structure of the rare earth peak ($A\\sim160$) of the $r$-process nucleosynthesis. The rare earth peak forms at late times in the $r$-process after neutron exhaustion (neutron-to-seed ratio unity or R=1) as matter decays back to stability. Since rare earth peak formation does not occur during \

  4. The polyphase resonant converter modulator for pulse power and plasma applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reass, W. A. (William A.); Baca, D. M. (David M.); Doss, James D.; Gribble, R. (Robert F.); North, W. R.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new technique to generate high voltage pulses (100 kV and up) with high peak power (10 MW and up) and high average power (1 MW and up) from a low voltage input source (e.g. +/- 1.2 kV). This technology is presently being used to provide cathode pulse modulation for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accelerator klystron RF amplifiers, which operate to 140 kV 11 MW peak power and 1.1 MW average power. The design of the modulator, referred to as the Polyphase Resonant Converter-Modulator takes advantage of high-power component advances, in response to the needs of the traction motor industry (in particular, railroad locomotives), such as Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBT's) and self-clearing metallized hazy polypropylene capacitors. In addition, the use of amorphous nanocrystalline transformer core alloy permits high frequency voltage and current transformation with low loss and small size. Other unique concepts embodied in the converter-modulator topology are polyphase resonant voltage multiplication and resonant rectification. These techniques further reduce size and improve electrical efficiency. Because of the resonant conversion techniques, electronic 'crowbars' and other load protective networks are not required. A shorted load detunes the circuit resonance and little power transfer can occur. This yields a high-power, high-voltage system that is inherently self-protective. To provide regulated output voltages, Pulse Width Modulation (PWM) of the individual IGBT pulses is used. A Digital signal Processor (DSP) is used to control the IGBT's, with adaptive feed forward and feedback control algorithms that improve pulse fidelity. The converter-modulator has many attributes that make it attractive to various pulse power and plasma applications such as high power RF sources, neutral beam modulators, and various plasma applications. This paper will review the design as used for the SNS accelerator and speculate on related plasma applications.

  5. STATUS OF NEW 2.5 MEV TEST FACILITY AT SNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrov, Alexander V [ORNL; Champion, Mark [FNAL; Crofford, Mark T [ORNL; Kang, Yoon W [ORNL; Menshov, Alexander A [ORNL; Roseberry, Jr., R Tom [ORNL; Stockli, Martin P [ORNL; Webster, Anthony W [ORNL; Welton, Robert F [ORNL; Zhukov, Alexander P [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new 2.5MeV beam test facility is being built at SNS. It consists of a 65 keV H- ion source, a 2.5MeV RFQ, a beam line with various beam diagnostics and a 6 kW beam dump. The facility is capable of producing one-ms-long pulses at 60Hz repetition rate with up to 50mA peak current. The commissioning with reduced average beam power is planned for fall 2014 to verify operation of all systems. The full power operation is scheduled to begin in 2015. The status of the facility will be presented as well as a discussion of the future R&D program.

  6. New Regenerator Materials for use in pulse tube coolers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Kashani; B.P.M. Helvensteijn; P. Kittel; K.A. Gschneidner,jr; V.K. Pecharsky; A.O. Pecharsky

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-stage pulse tube cooler driven by a linear compressor is being developed to provide cooling at 20 K. The first stage of the cooler will have the conventional stainless steel screen regenerator matrix. The matrix for the second stage regenerator (<60 K) will be made from a new class of Er based alloys which was recently developed at Ames Laboratory, in Ames, Iowa. These alloys exhibit heat capacities that exceed that of all other materials, including lead, over a Wide range in temperature (15 K < T C 85 K). The performance of one such alloy was shown to be better than lead when tested in a single-stage pulse tube cooler driven by a G-M compressor and operating at 2 Hz. An effort is underway to establish their suitability at frequencies above 40 IIZ. An approach to testing these alloys at low temperatures while using a low-power linear compressor is presented.

  7. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-matallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved, 1) To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug. 2) investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys. 3) Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  8. (Pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion). [Installation of the pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This second Quarterly Technical Progress Report presents the results of work accomplished during the period July 25 through October 30, 1988. The overall objective of the program is the development of a pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (PAFBC) technology to burn coal and to provide heat and steam to commercial, institutional, and small industrial applications at a reasonable price in environmentally acceptable manner. Progress during this period accelerated rapidly. The site for the installation of the PAFBC was completed. All of the system components, including the fabrication of the furnace, were also completed. Additional component testing and inspection was also completed. By the end of this period the AFBC was completely assembled and installed at the site adjacent to the MTCI facility and shakedown tests were initiated. 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Femtosecond pulse imaging: ultrafast optical oscilloscope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    Femtosecond pulse imaging: ultrafast optical oscilloscope P. C. Sun, Y. T. Mazurenko,* and Y as well as our ability to detect the shape of the ul- trashort pulses that can be seen as an ultrafast 12, 1996 A nonlinear optical processor that is capable of real-time conversion of a femtosecond pulse

  10. High-Pulse-Energy Ultrafast Laser for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    High-Pulse-Energy Ultrafast Laser for Spectroscopy & Micromachining PROBLEM THIS TECHNOLOGY SOLVES. In addition to the OPO, a custom designed ultrafast pump source, provides high pulse energy (.res.hw.ac.uk Professor Derryck Reid (Principal Investigator) www.ultrafast.hw.ac.uk BENEFITS & APPLICATIONS: · High pulse

  11. Optical precursor fields in nonlinear pulse dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oughstun, Kurt

    . Oughstun and G. C. Sherman, Electromagnetic Pulse Propagation in Causal Dielectrics (Springer-Verlag, Berlin-Heidelberg, 1994). 7. K. E. Oughstun, Electromagnetic and Optical Pulse Propagation1: Spectral, 2009). 9. K. E. Oughstun and G. C. Sherman, "Propagation of electromagnetic pulses in a linear

  12. The Near-UV Pulse Profile and Spectrum of the Pulsar PSR B0656+14

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Shibanov; J. Sollerman; P. Lundqvist; T. Gull; D. Lindler

    2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed the middle-aged pulsar PSR B0656+14 with the prism and the NUV MAMA detector of the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) to measure the pulsar spectrum and periodic pulsations in the near-ultraviolet (NUV). The pulsations are clearly detected, double-peaked and very similar to the optical pulse profile. The NUV pulsed fraction is 70 +/- 12%. The spectral slope of the dereddened phase-integrated spectrum in the 1800 - 3200 A range is 0.35 +/- 0.5 which together with the high pulse fraction indicates a non-thermal origin for the NUV emission. The total flux in the range 1700-3400 A is estimated to be 3.4 +/- 0.3e-15 erg/s/cm2 when corrected for E(B-V)=0.03. At a distance of 288 pc this corresponds to a luminosity 3.4e28 erg/s assuming isotropy of the emission. We compare the NUV pulse profile with observations from radio to gamma-rays. The first NUV sub-pulse is in phase with the gamma-ray pulse marginally detected with the EGRET, while the second NUV sub-pulse is similar both in shape and in phase with the non- thermal pulse in hard X-rays. This indicates a single origin of the non-thermal emission in the optical-NUV and in the X-rays. This is also supported by the observed NUV spectral slope, which is compatible with a blackbody plus power-law fit extended from the X-ray range, but dominated by the power-law component in most of the NUV range.

  13. Nuclear Hydrogen for Peak Electricity Production and Spinning Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy can be used to produce hydrogen. The key strategic question is this: ''What are the early markets for nuclear hydrogen?'' The answer determines (1) whether there are incentives to implement nuclear hydrogen technology today or whether the development of such a technology could be delayed by decades until a hydrogen economy has evolved, (2) the industrial partners required to develop such a technology, and (3) the technological requirements for the hydrogen production system (rate of production, steady-state or variable production, hydrogen purity, etc.). Understanding ''early'' markets for any new product is difficult because the customer may not even recognize that the product could exist. This study is an initial examination of how nuclear hydrogen could be used in two interconnected early markets: the production of electricity for peak and intermediate electrical loads and spinning reserve for the electrical grid. The study is intended to provide an initial description that can then be used to consult with potential customers (utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, etc.) to better determine the potential real-world viability of this early market for nuclear hydrogen and provide the starting point for a more definitive assessment of the concept. If this set of applications is economically viable, it offers several unique advantages: (1) the market is approximately equivalent in size to the existing nuclear electric enterprise in the United States, (2) the entire market is within the utility industry and does not require development of an external market for hydrogen or a significant hydrogen infrastructure beyond the utility site, (3) the technology and scale match those of nuclear hydrogen production, (4) the market exists today, and (5) the market is sufficient in size to justify development of nuclear hydrogen production techniques independent of the development of any other market for hydrogen. These characteristics make it an ideal early market for nuclear hydrogen.

  14. Sandia Energy - Thermal Pulses for Boeing Test Article

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol Home Distribution GridDocumentsInstitute ofSitingStaffSunshineMoltenTheThermal

  15. Pulse transmission receiver with higher-order time derivative pulse correlator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dress Jr., William B.; Smith, Stephen F.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems and methods for pulse-transmission low-power communication modes are disclosed. A pulse transmission receiver includes: a higher-order time derivative pulse correlator; a demodulation decoder coupled to the higher-order time derivative pulse correlator; a clock coupled to the demodulation decoder; and a pseudorandom polynomial generator coupled to both the higher-order time derivative pulse correlator and the clock. The systems and methods significantly reduce lower-frequency emissions from pulse transmission spread-spectrum communication modes, which reduces potentially harmful interference to existing radio frequency services and users and also simultaneously permit transmission of multiple data bits by utilizing specific pulse shapes.

  16. The effect of stabilizer on the trapped field of stacks of superconducting tape magnetized by a pulsed field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, A. G.; Patel, A.; Baskys, A.; Hopkins, S. C.; Kalitka, V.; Molodyk, A.; Glowacki, B. A.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were measured 30 s after a pulse to allow time for the most rapid flux creep, which occurs before 30 s. The IMRA pulse sequence was applied at 4 different temperatures starting with 77.4 K as detailed in Table 1. After magnetization at each... at the lowest temperature stages. For more details on this see the MPSC method of pulse magnetization (Multi-Pulse with Stepwise Cooling) [11]. For any new sample it is impossible to know the optimum IMRA sequence to apply at each temperature before testing...

  17. Dual amplitude pulse generator for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoggan, Jerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kynaston, Ronnie L. (Blackfoot, ID); Johnson, Larry O. (Island Park, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulsing circuit for producing an output signal having a high amplitude pulse and a low amplitude pulse may comprise a current source for providing a high current signal and a low current signal. A gate circuit connected to the current source includes a trigger signal input that is responsive to a first trigger signal and a second trigger signal. The first trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the high current signal to a pulse output terminal whereas the second trigger signal causes the gate circuit to connect the low current signal to the pulse output terminal.

  18. 140 GHz pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.

    1985-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency energy pulsing system suitable for use in a pulsed microwave spectrometer, including means for generating a high frequency carrier signal, and means for generating a low frequency modulating signal. The carrier signal is continuously fed to a modulator and the modulating signal is fed through a pulse switch to the modulator. When the pulse switch is on, the modulator will produce sideband signals above and below the carrier signal frequency. A frequency-responsive device is tuned to one of the sideband signals and sway from the carrier frequency so that the high frequency energization of the frequency-responsive device is controlled by the pulse switch.

  19. Ion Acceleration by Short Chirped Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jian-Xing; Keitel, Christoph H; Harman, Zoltán

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct laser acceleration of ions by short frequency-chirped laser pulses is investigated theoretically. We demonstrate that intense beams of ions with a kinetic energy broadening of about 1 % can be generated. The chirping of the laser pulse allows the particles to gain kinetic energies of hundreds of MeVs, which is required for hadron cancer therapy, from pulses of energies of the order of 100 J. It is shown that few-cycle chirped pulses can accelerate ions more efficiently than long ones, i.e. higher ion kinetic energies are reached with the same amount of total electromagnetic pulse energy.

  20. Intrinsic chirp of single-cycle pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin Qiang; Zheng Jian [Institute of Optics, Department of Physics, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Dai Jianming; Ho, I-Chen; Zhang, X.-C. [Center for Terahertz Research, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fourier transform-limited electromagnetic pulse has been regarded to be free of chirps for a long time. This is no longer true if the pulse duration goes down to or less than one optical cycle. We report the experimental observation of intrinsic chirps in such pulses with the sub-single-cycle terahertz (THz) waveforms obtained with a standard THz time-domain spectroscopy system. The results confirm the break down of the carrier-envelope (CE) expression for single-cycle optical pulses, and may influence the experimental measurements and theoretical modeling with single-cycle pulses.

  1. Adaptive control system for pulsed megawatt klystrons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolie, Victor W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides an arrangement for reducing waveform errors such as errors in phase or amplitude in output pulses produced by pulsed power output devices such as klystrons by generating an error voltage representing the extent of error still present in the trailing edge of the previous output pulse, using the error voltage to provide a stored control voltage, and applying the stored control voltage to the pulsed power output device to limit the extent of error in the leading edge of the next output pulse.

  2. Peak CO2? China's Emissions Trajectories to 2050

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David G.; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Levine, Mark

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of soaring energy demand from a staggering pace of economic growth and the related growth of energy-intensive industry, China overtook the United States to become the world's largest contributor to CO{sub 2} emissions in 2007. At the same time, China has taken serious actions to reduce its energy and carbon intensity by setting both short-term energy intensity reduction goal for 2006 to 2010 as well as long-term carbon intensity reduction goal for 2020. This study focuses on a China Energy Outlook through 2050 that assesses the role of energy efficiency policies in transitioning China to a lower emission trajectory and meeting its intensity reduction goals. In the past years, LBNL has established and significantly enhanced the China End-Use Energy Model based on the diffusion of end-use technologies and other physical drivers of energy demand. This model presents an important new approach for helping understand China's complex and dynamic drivers of energy consumption and implications of energy efficiency policies through scenario analysis. A baseline ('Continued Improvement Scenario') and an alternative energy efficiency scenario ('Accelerated Improvement Scenario') have been developed to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and potential actions, and to evaluate the potential for China to control energy demand growth and mitigate emissions. It is a common belief that China's CO{sub 2} emissions will continue to grow throughout this century and will dominate global emissions. The findings from this research suggest that this will not likely be the case because of saturation effects in appliances, residential and commercial floor area, roadways, railways, fertilizer use, and urbanization will peak around 2030 with slowing population growth. The baseline and alternative scenarios also demonstrate that the 2020 goals can be met and underscore the significant role that policy-driven energy efficiency improvements will play in carbon mitigation along with a decarbonized power supply through greater renewable and non-fossil fuel generation.

  3. Unsplit bipolar pulse forming line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rhodes, Mark A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A bipolar pulse forming transmission line module and system for linear induction accelerators having first, second, third, and fourth planar conductors which form a sequentially arranged interleaved stack having opposing first and second ends, with dielectric layers between the conductors. The first and second planar conductors are connected to each other at the first end, and the first and fourth planar conductors are connected to each other at the second end via a shorting plate. The third planar conductor is electrically connectable to a high voltage source, and an internal switch functions to short at the first end a high voltage from the third planar conductor to the fourth planar conductor to produce a bipolar pulse at the acceleration axis with a zero net time integral. Improved access to the switch is enabled by an aperture through the shorting plate and the proximity of the aperture to the switch.

  4. Pulsed Power Driven Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SLUTZ,STEPHEN A.

    1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed power is a robust and inexpensive technology for obtaining high powers. Considerable progress has been made on developing light ion beams as a means of transporting this power to inertial fusion capsules. However, further progress is hampered by the lack of an adequate ion source. Alternatively, z-pinches can efficiently convert pulsed power into thermal radiation, which can be used to drive an inertial fusion capsule. However, a z-pinch driven fusion explosion will destroy a portion of the transmission line that delivers the electrical power to the z-pinch. They investigate several options for providing standoff for z-pinch driven fusion. Recyclable Transmission Lines (RTLs) appear to be the most promising approach.

  5. Solid state pulsed power generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tao, Fengfeng; Saddoughi, Seyed Gholamali; Herbon, John Thomas

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A power generator includes one or more full bridge inverter modules coupled to a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) through an inductive resonant branch. Each module includes a plurality of switches that are switched in a fashion causing the one or more full bridge inverter modules to drive the semiconductor opening switch SOS through the resonant circuit to generate pulses to a load connected in parallel with the SOS.

  6. Performance of commercial off-the-shelf microelectromechanical systems sensors in a pulsed reactor environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobert, Keith Edwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heger, Arlen S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccready, Steven S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Prompted by the unexpected failure of piezoresistive sensors in both an elevated gamma-ray environment and reactor core pulse tests, we initiated radiation testing of several MEMS piezoresistive accelerometers and pressure transducers to ascertain their radiation hardness. Some commercial off-the-shelf sensors are found to be viable options for use in a high-energy pulsed reactor, but others suffer severe degradation and even catastrophic failure. Although researchers are promoting the use of MEMS devices in radiation-harsh environment, we nevertheless find assurance testing necessary.

  7. Pulse atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, November 1988--January 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the program is the development of a pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (PAFBC) technology to burn coal and to provide heat and steam to commercial, institutional, and small industrial applications at a reasonable price in an environmentally acceptable manner. During this reporting period, a total of eight shakedown and debugging coal combustion tests were performed in the AFBC. A start-up procedure was established, system improvements implemented, and preliminary material and heat balances made based on these tests. The pulse combustor for the AFBC system was fabricated and installed and a series of tests was conducted on the system. 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. Development of a Dispatchable PV Peak Shainv System. PV: Bonus Program - Phase 1 Report. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Delmarva Power and Light and its subcontractors in Phase 1 of the US Department of Energy's PV:BONUS Program. The purpose of the program is to develop products and systems for buildings which utilize photovoltaic (N) technology. Beginning with a cooperative research effort with the University of Delaware's Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research Delmarva Power developed and demonstrated the concept of Dispatchable PV Peak Shaving. This concept and the system which resulted horn the development work are unique from other grid-connected PV systems because it combines a PV, battery energy storage, power conversion and control technologies into an integrated package. Phase 1 began in July 1993 with the installation of a test and demonstration system at Delmarva's Northern Division General Office building near Newark, Delaware. Following initial testing throughout the summer and fall of 1993, significant modifications were made under an amendment to the DOE contract. Work on Phase 1 concluded in the early spring of 1995. Significant progress towards the goal of commercializing the system was made during Phase 1, and is summarized. Based on progress in Phase 1, a proposal to continue the work in Phase 2 was submitted to the US DOE in May 1995. A contract amendment and providing funds for the Phase 2 work is expected in July 1995.

  9. Specific energy for pulsed laser rock drilling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Z.; Reed, C. B.; Kornecki, G.; Gahan, B. C.; Parker, R. A.; Batarseh, S.; Graves, R. M.; Figueroa, H.; Skinner, N.; Technology Development

    2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of advanced high power laser technology to oil and gas well drilling has been attracting significant research interests recently among research institutes, petroleum industries, and universities. Potential laser or laser-aided oil and gas well drilling has many advantages over the conventional rotary drilling, such as high penetration rate, reduction or elimination of tripping, casing, and bit costs, and enhanced well control, perforating and side-tracking capabilities. The energy required to remove a unit volume of rock, namely the specific energy (SE), is a critical rock property data that can be used to determine both the technical and economic feasibility of laser oil and gas well drilling. When a high power laser beam is applied on a rock, it can remove the rock by thermal spallation, melting, or vaporization depending on the applied laser energy and the way the energy is applied. The most efficient rock removal mechanism would be the one that requires the minimum energy to remove a unit volume of rock. Samples of sandstone, shale, and limestone were prepared for laser beam interaction with a 1.6 kW pulsed Nd:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser beam to determine how the beam size, power, repetition rate, pulse width, exposure time and energy can affect the amount of energy transferred to the rock for the purposes of spallation, melting, and vaporization. The purpose of the laser rock interaction experiment was to determine the optimal parameters required to remove a maximum rock volume from the samples while minimizing energy input. Absorption of radiant energy from the laser beam gives rise to the thermal energy transfer required for the destruction and removal of the rock matrix. Results from the tests indicate that each rock type has a set of optimal laser parameters to minimize specific energy (SE) values as observed in a set of linear track and spot tests. As absorbed energy outpaces heat diffusion by the rock matrix, local temperatures can rise to the melting points of the minerals and quickly increase observed SE values. Tests also clearly identified the spallation and melting zones for shale samples while changing the laser power. The lowest SE values are obtained in the spalling zone just prior to the onset of mineral melt. The laser thermally spalled and saw mechanically cut rocks show similarity of surface microstructure. The study also found that increasing beam repetition rate within the same material removal mechanism would increase the material removal rate, which is believed due to an increase of maximum temperature, thermal cycling frequency, and intensity of laser-driven shock wave within the rock.

  10. Relay test program. Series 2 tests: Integral testing of relays and circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bandyopadhyay, K.K.; Kunkel, C.; Shteyngart, S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a relay test program conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The program is a continuation of an earlier test program the results of which were published in NUREG/CR-4867. The current program was carried out in two phases: electrical testing and vibration testing. The objective was primarily to focus on the electrical discontinuity or continuity of relays and circuit breaker tripping mechanisms subjected to electrical pulses and vibration loads. The electrical testing was conducted by KEMA-Powertest Company and the vibration testing was performed at Wyle Laboratories, Huntsville, Alabama. This report discusses the test procedures, presents the test data, includes an analysis of the data and provides recommendations regarding reliable relay testing.

  11. (Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (PAFBC))

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This first Quarterly Technical Progress Report presents the results of work accomplished during the period April 19 through July 24,1988. The overall objective of the program is the development of a pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (PAFBC) technology to burn coal and to provide heat and steam to commercial, institutional, and small industrial applications at a reasonable price in an environmentally acceptable manner. the program scope consisted of two tasks; the first was to establish preliminary feasibility by the use of theoretical and state-of-the-art information. This task was completed during the first quarter of the contract period and a topical report entitled, Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed combustion (PAFBC) - Preliminary Feasibility Study'' was prepared as a decision point to proceed'' deliverable in accordance with the terms of the contract. This first quarterly progress report therefore covers the contract activities subsequent to the approval of the feasibility study and the decision to proceed with the Task 2 effort. As the initial quarterly technical progress report, this document includes a subsection on background which will be omitted in subsequent reports. All effort during this period was devoted to the design and analysis of the PAFBC. Design drawings were prepared and fabrication and procurement initiated. Quotations were evaluated and a fabrication contract awarded. A site adjacent to the MTCI building was chosen for the installation of the PAFBC. Some ancillary components were purchased, renovated, and tested. Some delays in delivery of components have resulted in some schedule delay. It is anticipated that the program pace will accelerate as soon as parts are received and installation and assembly are initiated. 10 figs.,1 tab.

  12. Pulse Tidal formerly Pulse Generation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form History Facebook icon TwitterZip JumpProwindPuda Coal IncPulse Tidal

  13. SPCDC: A user-friendly computational tool for the design and refinement of practical pulse combustion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barr, P.K.; Keller, J.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kezerle, J.A. [Gas Research Institute (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the development and use of a user-friendly, PC-executable computer code that can assist engineers in designing pulse combustors for specific applications and in refining existing units. This code represents the culmination of over 10 years of research and development in the field of pulse combustion. The Sandia Pulse Combustor Design Code, or SPCDC, couples both the fuel-air injection and the energy release to the time-varying pressure wave. Because the injection and combustion processes both drive and are driven by the wave dynamics, this model couples the major processes that occur in a pulse combustor. SPCDC can supplement the time-proven method of actually building and testing a prototype unit, and significantly reduce the number of units that must be tested. It will help produce a superior pulse combustion system tailored to a specific application and should help widen the range of successful applications.

  14. SCALED EXPERIMENTS EVALUATING PULSE JET MIXING OF SLURRIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Fort, James A.; Wells, Beric E.; Minette, Michael J.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Baer, Ellen BK; Eakin, David E.; Elmore, Monte R.; Snyder, Sandra F.

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulse jet mixing (PJM) tests with noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid were conducted at three geometric scales to support the design of mixing systems for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. The test data will be used to develop mixing models. The models predict the cloud height (the height to which solids will be lifted by the PJM action) and the critical suspension velocity (the minimum velocity needed to ensure all solids have been lifted from the floor. From the cloud height estimate, the concentration of solids near the vessel floor and the minimum velocity predicted to lift solids can be calculated. The test objective was to observe the influence of vertically downward-directed jets on noncohesive solids in a series of scaled tanks with several bottom shapes. The test tanks and bottom shapes included small-and large-scale tanks with elliptical bottoms, a mid-scale tank with a spherical bottom, and a large-scale tank with an F&D bottom. During testing, the downward-directed jets were operated in either a steady flow condition or a pulsed (periodic) flow condition. The mobilization of the solids resulting from the jets was evaluated based on: the motion/agitation of the particulate on the tank floor and the elevation the solids reach within the tank; the height the solids material reaches in the tank is referred to as the cloud height (HC).

  15. Pulse

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL: Shale natural gas proved reserves,Enter

  16. Electron density measurements in a pulse-repetitive microwave discharge in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nikolic, M.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L. [Department of Physics, Center for Accelerator Science, Old Dominion University, Norfolk, Virginia 23529 (United States); Herring, G. C.; Exton, R. J. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia 23681 (United States)

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a technique for absolute measurements of electron density in pulse-repetitive microwave discharges in air. The technique is based on the time-resolved absolute intensity of a nitrogen spectral band belonging to the Second Positive System, the kinetic model and the detailed particle balance of the N{sub 2}C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu} = 0) state. This new approach bridges the gap between two existing electron density measurement methods (Langmuir probe and Stark broadening). The electron density is obtained from the time-dependent rate equation for the population of N{sub 2}C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u} ({nu} = 0) using recorded waveforms of the absolute C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{yields}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g} (0-0) band intensity, the forward and reflected microwave power density. Measured electron density waveforms using numerical and approximated analytical methods are presented for the case of pulse repetitive planar surface microwave discharge at the aperture of a horn antenna covered with alumina ceramic plate. The discharge was generated in air at 11.8 Torr with a X-band microwave generator using 3.5 {mu}s microwave pulses at peak power of 210 kW. In this case, we were able to time resolve the electron density within a single 3.5 {mu}s pulse. We obtained (9.0 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for the peak and (5.0 {+-} 0.6) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3} for the pulse-average electron density. The technique presents a convenient, non-intrusive diagnostic method for local, time-defined measurements of electron density in short duration discharges near atmospheric pressures.

  17. (Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (PAFBC)). [Comparing PAFBC vs. AFBC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fourth Quarterly Technical Progress Report presents the results of work accomplished during the period February 6 through April 30, 1989. the overall objective of the program is the development of a pulsed atmospheric, fluidized bed combustion (PAFBC) technology to burn coal and to provide heat and steam to commercial, institutional, and small industrial applications at a reasonable price in an environmentally acceptable manner. During this past quarter, a baseline for comparing PAFBC vs. AFBC performance was established and the initial series of PAFBC coal-fired combustion tests was completed. The AFBC baseline was representative of bubbling bed units with the exception of emissions which were somewhat higher and attributable to the size constraints of the AFBC unit. However, it still provided a valid baseline for referencing and optimizing PAFBC performance. Initial coal combustion tests in the pulsed fluid-bed verified enhanced performance in comparison to the non-pulsed beds, providing reduced NO{sub x}, CO, and SO{sub 2} emissions as well as higher steam generation rates and considerably lower entrainment losses. 9 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Development of the Long Pulse Negative Ion Source for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemsworth, R.S.; Svensson, L.; Esch, H.P.L. de; Krylov, A.; Massmann, P. [Association EURATOM-CEA, CEA/DSM/DRFC, CEA-Cadarache, 13108 St Paul-lez-Durance (France); Boilson, D. [Association EURATOM-DCU, PRL/NCPST, Glasnevin, Dublin 13 (Ireland); Fanz, U. [Association EURATOM-IPP, Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zaniol, B. [CONSORZIO RFX Association EURATOM-ENEA, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy)

    2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of the ion source designed for the neutral beam injectors of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the KAMABOKO III ion source, is being tested on the MANTIS test stand at the DRFC Cadarache in collaboration with JAERI, Japan, who designed and supplied the ion source. The ion source is attached to a 3 grid 30 keV accelerator (also supplied by JAERI) and the accelerated negative ion current is determined from the energy deposited on a calorimeter located 1.6 m from the source.During experiments on MANTIS three adverse effects of long pulse operation were found: The negative ion current to the calorimeter is {approx_equal}50% of that obtained from short pulse operation Increasing the plasma grid (PG) temperature results in {<=}40% enhancement in negative ion yield, substantially below that reported for short pulse operation, {>=}100%. The caesium 'consumption' is up to 1500 times that expected.Results presented here indicate that each of these is, at least partially, explained by thermal effects. Additionally presented are the results of a detailed characterisation of the source, which enable the most efficient mode of operation to be identified.

  19. Beam Homogeneity Dependence on the Magnetic Filter Field at the IPP Test Facility MANITU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franzen, P.; Fantz, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, PO Box 1533, 85740 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The homogeneity of the extracted current density from the large RF driven negative hydrogen ion sources of the ITER neutral beam system is a critical issue for the transmission of the negative ion beam through the accelerator and the beamline components. As a first test, the beam homogeneity at the IPP long pulse test facility MANITU is measured by means of the divergence and the stripping profiles obtained with a spatially resolved Doppler-shift spectroscopy system. Since MANITU is typically operating below the optimum perveance, an increase in the divergence corresponds to a lower local extracted negative ion current density if the extraction voltage is constant. The beam H{sub {alpha}} Doppler-shift spectroscopy is a rather simple tool, as no absolute calibration - both for the wavelength and the emission - is necessary. Even no relative calibration of the different used lines of sight is necessary for divergence and stripping profiles as these quantities can be obtained by the line broadening of the Doppler-shifted peak and the ratio of the integral of the stripping peak to the integral of the Doppler-shifted peak, respectively. The paper describes the H{sub {alpha}} MANITU Doppler-shift spectroscopy system which is now operating routinely and the evaluation methods of the divergence and the stripping profiles. Beam homogeneity measurements are presented for different extraction areas and magnetic filter field configurations both for Hydrogen and Deuterium operation; the results are compared with homogeneity measurements of the source plasma. The stripping loss measurements are compared with model calculations.

  20. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flesher, Dann J. (Benton City, WA); Becker, David L. (Kennewick, WA); Beem, William L. (Kennewick, WA); Berry, Tommy C. (Kennewick, WA); Cannon, N. Scott (Kennewick, WA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed.

  1. Testing of concrete by laser ablation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flesher, D.J.; Becker, D.L.; Beem, W.L.; Berry, T.C.; Cannon, N.S.

    1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for testing concrete in a structure in situ, by: directing a succession of pulses of laser radiation at a point on the structure so that each pulse effects removal of a quantity of concrete and transfers energy to the concrete; detecting a characteristic of energy which has been transferred to the concrete; determining, separately from the detecting step, the total quantity of concrete removed by the succession of pulses; and calculating a property of the concrete on the basis of the detected energy characteristic and the determined total quantity of concrete removed. 1 fig.

  2. Interaction-powered supernovae: rise-time versus peak-luminosity correlation and the shock-breakout velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofek, Eran O.; Arcavi, Iair; Tal, David; Gal-Yam, Avishay; Ben-Ami, Sagi; De Cia, Annalisa; Yaron, Ofer [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, Weizmann Institute of Science, 76100 Rehovot (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.; Cao, Yi [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Nugent, Peter E. [Computational Cosmology Center, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 5RF (United Kingdom); Cenko, S. Bradley [Astrophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Mail Code 661, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Filippenko, Alexei V. [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Fransson, Claes [Department of Astronomy, The Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm University, AlbaNova University Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kasliwal, Mansi M. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara St, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Laher, Russ; Surace, Jason [Spitzer Science Center, MS 314-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Quimby, Robert [Kavli IPMU (WPI), The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa-shi, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Interaction of supernova (SN) ejecta with the optically thick circumstellar medium (CSM) of a progenitor star can result in a bright, long-lived shock-breakout event. Candidates for such SNe include Type IIn and superluminous SNe. If some of these SNe are powered by interaction, then there should be a specific relation between their peak luminosity, bolometric light-curve rise time, and shock-breakout velocity. Given that the shock velocity during shock breakout is not measured, we expect a correlation, with a significant spread, between the rise time and the peak luminosity of these SNe. Here, we present a sample of 15 SNe IIn for which we have good constraints on their rise time and peak luminosity from observations obtained using the Palomar Transient Factory. We report on a possible correlation between the R-band rise time and peak luminosity of these SNe, with a false-alarm probability of 3%. Assuming that these SNe are powered by interaction, combining these observables and theory allows us to deduce lower limits on the shock-breakout velocity. The lower limits on the shock velocity we find are consistent with what is expected for SNe (i.e., ?10{sup 4} km s{sup –1}). This supports the suggestion that the early-time light curves of SNe IIn are caused by shock breakout in a dense CSM. We note that such a correlation can arise from other physical mechanisms. Performing such a test on other classes of SNe (e.g., superluminous SNe) can be used to rule out the interaction model for a class of events.

  3. Integration of neutron time-of-flight single-crystal Bragg peaks in reciprocal space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Arthur J [ORNL] [ORNL; Joergensen, Mads [ORNL] [ORNL; Wang, Xiaoping [ORNL] [ORNL; Mikkelson, Ruth L [ORNL] [ORNL; Mikkelson, Dennis J [ORNL] [ORNL; Lynch, Vickie E [ORNL] [ORNL; Peterson, Peter F [ORNL] [ORNL; Green, Mark L [ORNL] [ORNL; Hoffmann, Christina [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity of single crystal Bragg peaks obtained by mapping neutron time-of-flight event data into reciprocal space and integrating in various ways are compared. These include spherical integration with a fixed radius, ellipsoid fitting and integrating of the peak intensity and one-dimensional peak profile fitting. In comparison to intensities obtained by integrating in real detector histogram space, the data integrated in reciprocal space results in better agreement factors and more accurate atomic parameters. Furthermore, structure refinement using integrated intensities from one-dimensional profile fitting is demonstrated to be more accurate than simple peak-minus-background integration.

  4. Pulsed Gamma-Rays From PSR J2021 3651 with the Fermi Large Area Telescope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdo, Aous A.; /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Ackermann, M.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Ajello, Marco; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Atwood, William B.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Baldini, L.; /INFN, Pisa; Ballet, J.; /DAPNIA, Saclay; Barbiellini, Guido; /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U.; Bastieri, Denis; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Battelino, Milan; /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm; Baughman, B.M.; /Ohio State U.; Bechtol, K.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bellazzini, Ronaldo; /INFN, Pisa; Berenji, Bijan; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bloom, Elliott D.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bogaert, G.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Borgland, Anders W.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Bregeon, J.; /INFN, Pisa; Brez, A.; /INFN, Pisa; Brigida, M.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Bruel, P.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Burnett, Thompson H.; /Washington U., Seattle /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Columbia U. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /DAPNIA, Saclay /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /George Mason U. /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /IASF, Milan /IASF, Milan /NASA, Goddard /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /LPCE, Orleans /Montpellier U. /Sonoma State U. /Royal Inst. Tech., Stockholm /Stockholm U. /ASI, Rome /NRAO, Charlottesville /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C. /INFN, Trieste /Pavia U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /UC, Santa Cruz /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /CENBG, Gradignan /CENBG, Gradignan /Manchester U. /Montpellier U. /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; /more authors..

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the detection of pulsed gamma-rays from the young, spin-powered radio pulsar PSR J2021+3651 using data acquired with the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope (formerly GLAST). The light curve consists of two narrow peaks of similar amplitude separated by 0.468 {+-} 0.002 in phase. The first peak lags the maximum of the 2 GHz radio pulse by 0.162 {+-} 0.004 {+-} 0.01 in phase. The integral gamma-ray photon flux above 100 MeV is (56 {+-} 3 {+-} 11) x 10{sup -8} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. The photon spectrum is well-described by an exponentially cut-off power law of the form dF/dE = kE{sup -{Gamma}}e{sup (-E/E{sub c})} where the energy E is expressed in GeV. The photon index is {Gamma} = 1.5 {+-} 0.1 {+-} 0.1 and the exponential cut-off is E{sub c} = 2.4 {+-} 0.3 {+-} 0.5 GeV. The first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The integral photon flux of the bridge is approximately 10% of the pulsed emission, and the upper limit on off-pulse gamma-ray emission from a putative pulsar wind nebula is < 10% of the pulsed emission at the 95% confidence level. Radio polarization measurements yield a rotation measure of RM = 524 {+-} 4 rad m{sup -2} but a poorly constrained magnetic geometry. Re-analysis of Chandra data enhanced the significance of the weak X-ray pulsations, and the first peak is roughly phase-aligned with the first gamma-ray peak. We discuss the emission region and beaming geometry based on the shape and spectrum of the gamma-ray light curve combined with radio and X-ray measurements, and the implications for the pulsar distance. Gamma-ray emission from the polar cap region seems unlikely for this pulsar.

  5. Photonuclear Reactions induced by Intense Short Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dietz; H. A. Weidenmueller

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the decay in time of nuclei excited by an intense short laser pulse of energy E(0) yields the Fourier transform of the autocorrelation function of the associated scattering matrix. We determine the optimal length (in time) of the pulse and evaluate the time-decay function using random-matrix theory. That function is shown to contain information not otherwise available. We approximate that function in a manner that is useful for the analysis of data. For E(0) below the threshold energy E(n) of the first neutron channel, the time-decay function is exponential in time t while it is the product of an exponential and a power in t for E(0) > E(n). The comparison of the measured decay functions in both energy domains yields an unambiguous and novel test of random-matrix theory in nuclei.

  6. Performance of piezoresistive and piezoelectric sensors in pulsed reactor experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holbert, K. E. (Keith E.); McCready, S. S. (Steven S.); Heger, A. S. (A. Sharif); Harlow, T. H. (Thomas H.); Spearing, D. R. (Dane R.)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed reactor-based experiments require radiation tolerant sensors that do not perturb the device under test, or allow a radiation-induced signal to mask the true sensor output. Several commercial off-the-shelf accelerometers, pressure transducers, and acoustic emission sensors were subjected to multiple high-power reactor pulses. A piezoresistive accelerometer capable of operation to at least 44 kGy and 8.7 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2} is identified, and a piezoresistive pressure transducer that is resistant to about half that radiation level is selected. Further, two piezoelectric acoustic emission sensors employing lead metaniobate are also found to function to 55 kGy and 1.1 x 10{sup 16} n/cm{sup 2}.

  7. Closed-loop pulsed helium ionization detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Roswitha S. (Knoxville, TN); Todd, Richard A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helium ionization detector for gas chromatography is operated in a constant current, pulse-modulated mode by configuring the detector, electrometer and a high voltage pulser in a closed-loop control system. The detector current is maintained at a fixed level by varying the frequency of fixed-width, high-voltage bias pulses applied to the detector. An output signal proportional to the pulse frequency is produced which is indicative of the charge collected for a detected species.

  8. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted.

  9. PULSE DRYING EXPERIMENT AND BURNER CONSTRUCTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert States

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Non steady impingement heat transfer is measured. Impingement heating consumes 130 T-BTU/Yr in paper drying, but is only 25% thermally efficient. Pulse impingement is experimentally shown to enhance heat transfer by 2.8, and may deliver thermal efficiencies near 85%. Experimental results uncovered heat transfer deviations from steady theory and from previous investigators, indicating the need for further study and a better theoretical framework. The pulse burner is described, and its roll in pulse impingement is analyzed.

  10. Pulsed source ion implantation apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, K.N.

    1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new pulsed plasma-immersion ion-implantation apparatus that implants ions in large irregularly shaped objects to controllable depth without overheating the target, minimizing voltage breakdown, and using a constant electrical bias applied to the target. Instead of pulsing the voltage applied to the target, the plasma source, for example a tungsten filament or a RF antenna, is pulsed. Both electrically conducting and insulating targets can be implanted. 16 figs.

  11. Subthreshold pair production in short laser pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Nousch; D. Seipt; B. Kampfer; A. I. Titov

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The $e^+e^-$ pair production by a probe photon traversing a linearly polarized laser pulse is treated as generalized nonlinear Breit-Wheeler process. For short laser pulses with very few oscillations of the electromagnetic field we find below the perturbative weak-field threshold $\\sqrt{s} = 2m$ a similar enhancement of the pair production rate as for circular polarization. The strong subthreshold enhancement is traced back to the finite bandwidth of the laser pulse. A folding model is developed which accounts for the interplay of the frequency spectrum and the intensity distribution in the course of the pulse.

  12. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Feed Flow Loop Phase VI: PulseEcho System Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.

    2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the visual and ultrasonic PulseEcho critical velocity test results obtained from the System Performance test campaign that was completed in September 2012 with the Remote Sampler Demonstration (RSD)/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform located at the Monarch test facility in Pasco, Washington. This report is intended to complement and accompany the report that will be developed by WRPS on the design of the System Performance simulant matrix, the analysis of the slurry test sample concentration and particle size distribution (PSD) data, and the design and construction of the RSD/Waste Feed Flow Loop cold-test platform.

  13. Method and apparatus for fast laser-pulse detection using gaseous plasmas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McLellan, E.J.; Webb, J.A.

    1981-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The method and device of the instant invention is a detector of pulsed laser radiation which utilizes the electromotive force generated by the plasma formed when such radiation is focused onto a surface. Measurements are made with a 10.6 ..mu..m CO/sub 2/ laser capable of producing peak intensities of 10/sup 13/ W/cm/sup 2/ when directed through a converging lens. Evacuated detector response to such laser intensity if 1 kV signal peak amplitude and subnanosecond risetimes into a 50 ..cap omega.. load. Detector performance is found to be greatly altered with the introduction of a background gas. For example, with one atmosphere of air, the detector produces prompt signals of the order of 1 V with subnanosecond response for pulse trains lasting 100 ns. With argon, krypton, or zenon at pressures of the order of 10 torr, the detector generates trigger pulses of about 250 V amplitude and 0.2 ns risetimes. Such detectors are quite robust when irradiated with high intensity laser radiation and are useful for qualitative laser beam monitoring.

  14. (pulsed laser deposition, PLD) (ultra-short pulsed laser deposition, uPLD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (ultra-short pulsed laser deposition, uPLD) PLD (Yttrium barium copper oxide , YBa2Cu3O7-, YBCO) YBCO-2-1 YBCO http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ybco002.svg #12;3 1-3 (ultra-short pulsed laser #12;i #12;ii #12;iii #12;iv (pulsed laser deposition, PLD) PLD

  15. Broadband low-dispersion diffraction of femtosecond pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    with that of a 100-fs pulse, which is ap- proximately 10 nm (or 5 THz) at 800 nm. The large bandwidths of ultrafast-bit-rate communications.12 Pulse shaping and control of ultrafast pulses are of interest not only from the practical point for femtosecond pulse shaping and ultrafast pulse switch- ing. Bandgap engineered broadband semiconductor MQW

  16. Laser system using ultra-short laser pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dantus, Marcos (Okemos, MI); Lozovoy, Vadim V. (Okemos, MI); Comstock, Matthew (Milford, MI)

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser system using ultrashort laser pulses is provided. In another aspect of the present invention, the system includes a laser, pulse shaper and detection device. A further aspect of the present invention employs a femtosecond laser and binary pulse shaping (BPS). Still another aspect of the present invention uses a laser beam pulse, a pulse shaper and a SHG crystal.

  17. Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in OFDM based on transformation of partial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peak-to-average power ratio reduction in OFDM based on transformation of partial transmit sequences number, but T-PTS is less complex. Introduction: To avoid the occurrence of large peak power of signals G. Lu, P. Wu and C. Carlemalm-Logothetis A novel scheme (transformation of partial transmit

  18. Energy Policy 34 (2006) 515531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price shocks and economic downturns. Over the next 30 years oil demand is expected to grow by 60Energy Policy 34 (2006) 515­531 Have we run out of oil yet? Oil peaking analysis from an optimist of conventional oil production from an optimist's perspective. Is the oil peak imminent? What is the range

  19. An Approximate Method to Assess the Peaking Capability of the NW Hydroelectric System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRAFT 1 An Approximate Method to Assess the Peaking Capability of the NW Hydroelectric System September 26, 2005 The best way to assess the hydroelectric system's peaking capability is to simulate its. This is an ominous task and requires the use of sophisticated simulation software. The Bonneville Power

  20. Peak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Received 6 May 2005 Availble online 7 February 2006 Abstract The failure of a lava dam 165,000 yr ago dam-failure and unsteady flow modeling to estimate a peak discharge and flow hydrograph. FailurePeak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA Cassandra R

  1. Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Dudley

    Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles Dudley Stark School.S.A. would occur between 1965 and 1970. Oil production in the U.S.A. actually peaked in 1970 and has been declining since then. Hubbert used a logistic curve to approximate the rate of oil production. Deffeyes [2

  2. Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khare, Sanjay V.

    1 Imminence of peak in US coal production and overestimation of reserves Nathan G. F. Reaver, coal reserves, coal production forecast, peak coal, USA energy, non- linear fitting #12;3 1 fuels, coal, oil, and natural gas, it is coal that is the most carbon intensive (W. Moomaw, 2011). Due

  3. Journal of Chromatography A, 1086 (2005) 165170 Peak pattern variations related to comprehensive two-dimensional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichenbach, Stephen E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    non-linear pattern variations and changes in gas pressure generate nearly linear pattern variations Abstract Identifying compounds of interest for peaks in data generated by comprehensive two-dimensional gas and inlet gas pressure and evaluates two types of affine transformations for matching peak patterns

  4. Grain size, size-distribution and dislocation structure from diffraction peak profile analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubicza, Jenõ

    Grain size, size-distribution and dislocation structure from diffraction peak profile analysis T, Budapest, Hungary Abstract Diffraction peak profile analysis (or Line Profile Analysis, LPA) has recently and the strain diffraction profiles. Strain anisotropy is rationalized in terms of the contrast factors

  5. Statistical Analysis and Dynamic Visualization of Travis Peak Production in the Eastern Texas Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ayanbule, Babafemi O.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    , integrating data from various sources. This research will attempt to do just that for wells producing from the Travis Peak formation. Using data from HPDI L.L.C., (www.hpdi.com) a visual representation was created for the areal distribution of peak gas rates...

  6. The Houston Pollution Problem: An analysis of the primary and secondary regional pollution peak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    266 The Houston Pollution Problem: An analysis of the primary and secondary regional pollution peak was conducted in the Houston area to assess the secondary regional pollution peak that occurs at that time pollution episodes, which correlated with stagnant weather patterns and high temperatures. During spring

  7. A Queueing Study of PeakRate Enforcement for Jitter Reduction in ATM Networks \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stavrakakis, Ioannis

    A Queueing Study of Peak­Rate Enforcement for Jitter Reduction in ATM Networks \\Lambda Randall­ induced delay jitter. The adopted service policy regulates the traffic class of interest by enforcing a predetermined peak output rate. Probability distributions for delay and jitter of the regulated traffic class

  8. Jitter in ATM networks and its impact on peak rate enforcement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillemin, Fabrice

    Jitter in ATM networks and its impact on peak rate enforcement James ROBERTS FRANCE TELECOM CNET. This is the phenomenon of jitter and the aim of the present paper is to study its in uence on peak rate enforcement. We rst introduce some general characterizations of jitter and then, describe two models of jittered ows

  9. Evaluation of Travis Peak gas reservoirs, west margin of the East Texas Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yamin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    for basinward extension of Travis Peak gas production along the west margin of the East Texas Basin. Along the west margin of the East Texas Basin, southeast-trending Travis Peak sandstones belts were deposited by the Ancestral Red River fluvial-deltaic system...

  10. Submitted to Renewable Energy, 5 December 2009 The technical potential for off-peak electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    October 2009 #12;The technical potential for off-peak electricity to serve as backup in wind. This paper examines the technical potential of off-peak electricity to ensure that wind-charged thermalSubmitted to Renewable Energy, 5 December 2009 ERG/200910 The technical potential for off

  11. Stably operating pulse combustor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zinn, Ben T. (Atlanta, GA); Reiner, David (Haifa, IL)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse combustor apparatus adapted to burn either a liquid fuel or a pulverized solid fuel within a preselected volume of the combustion chamber. The combustion process is substantially restricted to an optimum combustion zone in order to attain effective pulse combustion operation.

  12. Compton Process in Intense Short Laser Pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Krajewska; J. Z. Kaminski

    2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectra of Compton radiation emitted during electron scattering off an intense laser beam are calculated using the framework of strong-field quantum electrodynamics. We model these intense laser beams as finite length plane-wave-fronted pulses, similar to Neville and Rohrlich [Phys. Rev. D {\\bf 3}, 1692 (1971)], or as trains of such pulses. Expressions for energy and angular distributions of Compton photons are derived such that a comparison of both situations becomes meaningful. Comparing frequency distributions for both an isolated laser pulse and a laser pulse train, we find a very good agreement between the results for long pulse durations which breaks down however for ultrashort laser pulses. The dependence of angular distributions of emitted radiation on a pulse duration is also investigated. Pronounced asymmetries of angular distributions are found for very short laser pulses, which gradually disappear with increasing the number of laser field oscillations. Those asymmetries are attributed to asymmetries of the vector potential describing an incident laser beam.

  13. CenterPulse ContentsDirector's Notes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    to our year-in-review newsletter, CenterPulse. Please forward it to your colleagues to help us improveCenterPulse ContentsDirector's Notes 2012 Year in Review Happy New Year, everyone! The year 2012 that recommended full continuation of funding for years 52-56 of NIH support. While the final funding level

  14. Stably operating pulse combustor and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zinn, B.T.; Reiner, D.

    1990-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse combustor apparatus is described which is adapted to burn either a liquid fuel or a pulverized solid fuel within a preselected volume of the combustion chamber. The combustion process is substantially restricted to an optimum combustion zone in order to attain effective pulse combustion operation. 4 figs.

  15. A programmable Fresnel transform pulse shaper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    A programmable Fresnel transform pulse shaper G. M´inguez-Vega1, J.D. McKinney2 and A.M. Weiner2 1@purdue.edu Abstract: We demonstrate the first reprogrammable Fresnel transform pulse shaper based on a modified direct a free-space Fresnel transform which causes quadratic dispersion of the output temporal waveform. When

  16. Optimization of the LCLS Single Pulse Shutter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adera, Solomon; /Georgia Tech., Atlanta /SLAC

    2010-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanical shutter which operates on demand is used to isolate a single pulse from a 120 Hz X-ray source. This is accomplished with a mechanical shutter which is triggered on demand with frequencies ranging from 0 to 10 Hz. The single pulse shutter is an iron blade that oscillates on a pivot in response to a force generated by a pair of pulsed electromagnets (current driven teeter-totter). To isolate an individual pulse from the X-ray beam, the motion of the mechanical shutter should be synchronized in such a way that it allows a single pulse to pass through the aperture and blocks the other incoming pulses. Two consecutive pulses are only {approx} 8 ms apart and the shutter is required to complete one full cycle such that no two pulses pass through the opening. Also the opening of the shutter blade needs to be at least 4 mm so that a 1 mm diameter rms Gaussian beam can pass through without modulation. However, the 4 mm opening is difficult to obtain due to blade rebound and oscillation of the blade after colliding with the electromagnet. The purpose of this project is to minimize and/or totally eliminate the rebound of the shutter blade in pursuit of maximizing the aperture while keeping the open window interval < {approx}12 ms.

  17. High reliability low jitter pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Savage, Mark E.; Stoltzfus, Brian S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and concomitant apparatus for generating pulses comprising providing a laser light source, disposing a voltage electrode between ground electrodes, generating laser sparks using the laser light source via laser spark gaps between the voltage electrode and the ground electrodes, and outputting pulses via one or more insulated ground connectors connected to the voltage electrode.

  18. Heart Physiology Lab Part 1: Pulse Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loughry, Jim

    Heart Physiology Lab Part 1: Pulse Rate Measure your pulse in each of the following conditions (in in the class. You may use Table 1 in the Heart Physiology Worksheet for this, if you wish. Once you have all of the class averages for each measurement. You may use Graph 1 in the Heart Physiology Worksheet for this

  19. Digital computer analysis of pulse height spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, Herman Roy

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on succeeding pages, a value listed as DFT is printed which indicates the amount of drift, if any, in that spectrum with relation to the plutonium peak which is used for drift control purposes [3]. The plutonium peak count is given for each library under... the heading FLUT. Also given with each library and sample is the peak count for each ele- ment, PKCT, and the per cent live time, PLT, Using the plutonium peaks in the library spectrum for element one and in each sample spectrum, the plutonium "weight...

  20. Infrared pulse characterization using four-wave mixing inside a few cycle pulse filament in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marceau, Claude, E-mail: claude.marceau.2@ulaval.ca; Thomas, Steven; Kassimi, Yacine; Gingras, Guillaume; Witzel, Bernd [Centre d'Optique, Photonique et Laser, Pavillon d'optique-photonique Québec (Québec), Université Laval, Québec G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate a four-wave mixing (FWM) technique to measure near- and mid-infrared (IR) laser pulse shapes in time domain. Few cycle 800?nm laser pulses were synchronized with the IR pulse and focused colinearly to generate a plasma filament in air. Second harmonic radiation around 400?nm was generated through FWM, with a yield proportional to the IR pulse intensity. Excellent signal to noise ratio was observed from 2.1??m to 18??m. With proper phase stabilization of the IR beam, this technique is a promising step toward direct electric field sensing of near-IR pulses in air.

  1. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized bed combustion. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to verify the technical feasibility of the MTCI Pulsed Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustor technology, a laboratory-scale system was designed, built and tested. Important aspects of the operational and performance parameters of the system were established experimentally. A considerable amount of the effort was invested in the initial task of constructing an AFBC that would represent a reasonable baseline against which the performance of the PAFBC could be compared. A summary comparison of the performance and emissions data from the MTCI 2 ft {times} 2 ft facility (AFBC and PAFBC modes) with those from conventional BFBC (taller freeboard and recycle operation) and circulating fluidized bed combustion (CFBC) units is given in Table ES-1. The comparison is for typical high-volatile bituminous coals and sorbents of average reactivity. The values indicated for BFBC and CFBC were based on published information. The AFBC unit that was designed to act as a baseline for the comparison was indeed representative of the larger units even at the smaller scale for which it was designed. The PAFBC mode exhibited superior performance in relation to the AFBC mode. The higher combustion efficiency translates into reduced coal consumption and lower system operating cost; the improvement in sulfur capture implies less sorbent requirement and waste generation and in turn lower operating cost; lower NO{sub x} and CO emissions mean ease of site permitting; and greater steam-generation rate translates into less heat exchange surface area and reduced capital cost. Also, the PAFBC performance generally surpasses those of conventional BFBC, is comparable to CFBC in combustion and NO{sub x} emissions, and is better than CFBC in sulfur capture and CO emissions even at the scaled-down size used for the experimental feasibility tests.

  2. Ultrafast Pulse Shaping Approaches to Quantum Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debabrata Goswami

    2003-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum computing exploits the quantum-mechanical nature of matter to exist in multiple possible states simultaneously. This new approach promises to revolutionize the present form of computing. As an approach to quantum computing, we discuss ultrafast laser pulse shaping, in particular, the acousto-optic modulator based Fourier-Transform pulse-shaper, which has the ability to modulate tunable high power ultrafast laser pulses. We show that optical pulse shaping is an attractive route to quantum computing since shaped pulses can be transmitted over optical hardware and the same infrastructure can be used for computation and optical information transfer. We also address the problem of extending coherence-times for optically induced processes.

  3. AN UPDATE ON NIF PULSED POWER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P A; James, G F; Petersen, D E; Pendleton, D L; McHale, G B; Barbosa, F; Runtal, A S; Stratton, P L

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam laser fusion driver operating at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF relies on three large-scale pulsed power systems to achieve its goals: the Power Conditioning Unit (PCU), which provides flashlamp excitation for the laser's injection system; the Power Conditioning System (PCS), which provides the multi-megajoule pulsed excitation required to drive flashlamps in the laser's optical amplifiers; and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC), which enables NIF to take advantage of a fourpass main amplifier. Years of production, installation, and commissioning of the three NIF pulsed power systems are now complete. Seven-day-per-week operation of the laser has commenced, with the three pulsed power systems providing routine support of laser operations. We present the details of the status and operational experience associated with the three systems along with a projection of the future for NIF pulsed power.

  4. 140 GHz pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.

    1987-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency energy pulsing system suitable for use in a pulsed microwave spectrometer, including means for generating a high frequency carrier signal, and means for generating a low frequency modulating signal is disclosed. The carrier signal is continuously fed to a modulator and the modulating signal is fed through a pulse switch to the modulator. When the pulse switch is on, the modulator will produce sideband signals above and below the carrier signal frequency. A frequency-responsive device is tuned to one of the sideband signals and away from the carrier frequency so that the high frequency energization of the frequency-responsive device is controlled by the pulse switch. 5 figs.

  5. 140 GHz pulsed fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolbe, William F. (Oakland, CA); Leskovar, Branko (Moraga, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency energy pulsing system suitable for use in a pulsed microwave spectrometer (10), including means (11, 19) for generating a high frequency carrier signal, and means (12) for generating a low frequency modulating signal. The carrier signal is continuously fed to a modulator (20) and the modulating signal is fed through a pulse switch (23) to the modulator. When the pulse switch (23) is on, the modulator (20) will produce sideband signals above and below the carrier signal frequency. A frequency-responsive device (31) is tuned to one of the sideband signals and away from the carrier frequency so that the high frequency energization of the frequency-responsive device (31) is controlled by the pulse switch (23).

  6. Femtosecond pulse shaping using plasmonic snowflake nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tok, Ruestue Umut; Sendur, Kuersat [Sabanci University, Orhanli-Tuzla, 34956, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have theoretically demonstrated femtosecond pulse manipulation at the nanoscale using the plasmonic snowflake antenna's ability to localize light over a broad spectrum. To analyze the interaction of the incident femtosecond pulse with the plasmonic nanoantenna, we first decompose the diffraction limited incident femtosecond pulse into its spectral components. The interaction of each spectral component with the nanoantenna is analyzed using finite element technique. The time domain response of the plasmonic antenna is obtained using inverse Fourier transformation. It is shown that the rich spectral characteristics of the plasmonic snowflake nanoantenna allow manipulation of the femtosecond pulses over a wide spectrum. Light localization around the gap region of the nanoantenna is shown for femtosecond pulses. As the alignment of incident light polarization is varied, different antenna elements oscillate, which in turn creates a different spectrum and a distinct femtosecond response.

  7. Extension of harmonic cutoff in a multicycle chirped pulse combined with a chirp-free pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Junjie; Zeng Bin; Yu Yongli [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 800-211, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate high-order harmonic generation in a wave form synthesized by a multicycle 800-nm chirped laser pulse and a chirp-free laser pulse. Compared with the case of using only a chirped pulse, both the harmonic cutoff and the extreme ultraviolet supercontinuum can be extended when a weak chirp-free pulse is combined with the chirped pulse. When chirp-free pulse intensity grows, the cutoff energy and bandwidth of the supercontinuum grow as well. It is found that the broad supercontinuum can be achieved for a driving pulse with long duration even though the driving pulse reaches 10 optical cycles. An isolated attosecond pulse with duration of about 59 as is obtained, and after appropriate phase compensation with a duration of about 11 as. In addition, by performing time-frequency analyses and the classical trajectory simulation, the difference in supercontinuum generation between the preceding wave form and a similar wave form synthesized by an 800-nm fundamental pulse and a 1600-nm subharmonic pulse is investigated.

  8. Pulsed-laser heating: a tool for studying degradation of materials subjected to repeated high-temperature excursions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, A.; Cornell, R.H.

    1980-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of pulsed-laser heating was evaluated as a means to obtain high cyclic peak temperatures with short rise times. A two-stage neodymium glass laser was used which produces a 600-..mu..s pulse with energy outputs of up to 100 J. Small disk-shaped samples of AISI 4340 steel served as targets. Some of these were coated with a tungsten deposit. The rear face of some of the targets was instrumented for evaluation of temperature, strain, and stress response. Post-shot metallographic evaluations were made on a number of targets. We saw evidence of surface melting, cracking, and phase transformation. Surface damage was related to differences in the number of pulse cycles and input energy level, variables in the target materials, and the extent of strain-induced stresses. These experiments were performed in air at 1 atm and ambient laboratory temperature. 36 figures.

  9. Ultrafast optical pulse shaping: A tutorial review Andrew M. Weiner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    Ultrafast optical pulse shaping: A tutorial review Andrew M. Weiner Purdue University, School 2011 Keywords: Ultrafast optics Pulse shaping Femtosecond optics Coherent control Optical signal programmable reshapingof ultrafast pulses, or generation of arbitrary optical waveforms, according to user

  10. Stabilized Ultrafast Pulse Generation and Optical Frequency Combs Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Stryland, Eric

    Stabilized Ultrafast Pulse Generation and Optical Frequency Combs ­ Techniques and Applications Diodes ­ Review Ultrafast Dynamics ­ Breathing Mode (Dispersion Managed Cavity) · High Pulse Energy to Make Short Pulses - Review Ultrafast Dynamics- - Dispersion Managed (Breathing Mode) MLL #12

  11. Information processing with longitudinal spectral decomposition of ultrashort pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saperstein, Robert Elliot

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decomposition of ultrafast pulses,” Appl. Opt. , doc. IDdecomposition of ultrafast pulses,” Appl. Opt. 47, A21-A31 (decomposition of ultrafast pulses,” Appl. Opt. 47, A21-A31 (

  12. The Homopolar Generator as a Pulsed Industrial Power Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weldon, J. M.; Weldon, W. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power supply for numerous industrial applications such as large metal cross section pulsed resistance welding, pulsed billet heating for subsequent hot working processes, pulsed heating for localized forging processes, and magnetic metal forming. Each...

  13. The Homopolar Generator as a Pulsed Industrial Power Supply 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weldon, J. M.; Weldon, W. F.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    power supply for numerous industrial applications such as large metal cross section pulsed resistance welding, pulsed billet heating for subsequent hot working processes, pulsed heating for localized forging processes, and magnetic metal forming. Each...

  14. Reflection and Transmission of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields through Multilayered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oughstun, Kurt

    Reflection and Transmission of Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields through Multilayered Biological Media- cally rigorous, physically correct description of the propagation of pulsed electromagnetic fields pulses through multilayered biological media consisting of three biological tissue layers rep- resenting

  15. Tailoring the surface plasmon resonance of embedded silver nanoparticles by combining nano- and femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doster, J.; Baraldi, G.; Gonzalo, J.; Solis, J.; Hernandez-Rueda, J.; Siegel, J., E-mail: j.siegel@io.cfmac.csic.es [Laser Processing Group, Instituto de Optica, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that the broad surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of a single layer of near-coalescence silver nanoparticles (NPs), embedded in a dielectric matrix can be tailored by irradiation with a single nanosecond laser pulse into a distribution featuring a sharp resonance at 435?nm. Scanning electron microscopy studies reveal the underlying mechanism to be a transformation into a distribution of well-separated spherical particles. Additional exposure to multiple femtosecond laser pulses at 400?nm or 800?nm wavelength induces polarization anisotropy of the SPR, with a peak shift that increases with laser wavelength. The spectral changes are measured in-situ, employing reflection and transmission micro-spectroscopy with a lateral resolution of 4??m. Spectral maps as a continuous function of local fluence can be readily produced from a single spot. The results open exciting perspectives for dynamically tuning and switching the optical response of NP systems, paving the way for next-generation applications.

  16. Toward TW-Level, Hard X-Ray Pulses at LCLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fawley, W.M.; Frisch, J.; Huang, Z.; Jiao, Y.; Nuhn, H.-D.; /SLAC; Pellegrini, C.; /SLAC /UCLA; Reiche, S.; /PSI, Villigen; Wu, J,; /SLAC

    2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent diffraction imaging of complex molecules such as proteins requires a large number (e.g., {approx} 10{sup 13}/pulse) of hard X-ray photons within a time scale of {approx} 10 fs or less. This corresponds to a peak power of {approx} 1 TW, much larger than that currently generated by LCLS or other proposed X-ray free electron lasers (FELs). We study the feasibility of producing such pulses using a LCLS-like, low charge electron beam, as will be possible in the LCLS-II upgrade project, employing a configuration beginning with a SASE amplifier, followed by a 'self-seeding' crystal monochromator, and finishing with a long tapered undulator. Our results suggest that TW-level output power at 8.3 keV is possible from a total undulator system length around 200 m. In addition power levels larger than 100 GW are generated at the third harmonic. We present a tapering strategy that extends the original 'resonant particle' formalism by optimizing the transport lattice to maximize optical guiding and enhance net energy extraction. We discuss the transverse and longitudinal coherence properties of the output radiation pulse and the expected output pulse energy sensitivity, both to taper errors and to power fluctuations on the monochromatized SASE seed.

  17. Short-pulse cross-phase modulation in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feizpour, Amir; Steinberg, Aephraim M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) has been proposed as a way to greatly enhance cross-phase modulation, with the possibility of leading to few-photon-level optical nonlinearities. This enhancement grows as the transparency window width, \\Delta_EIT, is narrowed. Decreasing \\Delta_EIT, however, increases the response time of the effect, suggesting that for pulses of a given duration, there could be a fundamental limit to the strength of the nonlinearity. We show that in the regimes of most practical interest - narrow EIT windows perturbed by short signal pulses- the enhancement offered by EIT is not only in the magnitude of the nonlinear phase shift but in fact also in its increased duration. That is, for the case of signal pulses much shorter (temporally) than the inverse EIT bandwidth, the narrow window serves to prolong the effect of the passing signal pulse, leading to an integrated phase shift that grows linearly with \\Delta_EIT even though the peak phase shift may saturate; the continued grow...

  18. Study on electrical characteristics of barrier-free atmospheric air diffuse discharge generated by nanosecond pulses and long wire electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Lee, E-mail: leeli@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Yun-Long; Teng, Yun; Liu, Lun; Pan, Yuan [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In room-temperature atmospheric air, the large-scale diffuse plasmas can be generated via high-voltage nanosecond pulses with short rise-time and wire electrodes. Diffuse discharge with the wire electrode length up to 110.0?cm and the discharge spacing of several centimeters has been investigated in this paper. Electrical characteristics of diffuse discharge have been analyzed by their optical photographs and measuring of the voltage and current waveforms. Experimental results show the electrode spacing, and the length of wire electrodes can influence the intensity and mode transition of diffuse discharge. The characteristic of current waveforms is that there are several current oscillation peaks at the time of applied pulsed voltage peak, and at the tail of applied pulse, the conduction current component will compensate the displacement one so that the measured current is unidirectional in diffuse discharge mode. The transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge is always with the increasing of conduction current density. As for nanosecond pulses with long tail, the long wire electrodes are help for generating non-equilibrium diffuse plasmas.

  19. Pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustor development. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion (PAFBC) is a unique and innovative coal-fueled technology that has the potential to meet these conditions and provide heat and/or process steam to small industrial, commercial, institutional and residential complexes. The potential of Pulse Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Combustion (PAFBC) technology has been amply demonstrated under the sponsorship of a previous DOE/METC contract (DE-AC21-88MC25069). The environmental performance of a coal-fired laboratory-scale system (1.5 million British Thermal Units per hour) (MMBtu/hr) significantly surpassed that of conventional bubbling and circulating fluidized-bed combustion units (see Table 1 for performance comparison). Prompted by these encouraging results in combustion, sulfur capture, emissions control, and enhanced heat transfer, Island Creek Coal Company (ICC) and Baltimore Thermal Energy Corporation expressed interest in the technology and offered to participate by providing host sites for field testing. EA`s have been submitted independently for each of these field test sites. This submission addresses the preliminary testing of the PAFBC unit at Manufacturing and Technology Conversion International`s (MTCI) Baltimore, MD facility.

  20. Precision voltage regulation on the 5 kHz, 3. 125 MW ETA-II pulsed power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, J.A.; Payne, A.N.; Sampayan, S.E.; Ollis, C.W.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each of four pulsed power units (PPUs) for the Experimental Test Accelerator 2 (ETA-2) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory delivers a 25kV, 20kA, 4{mu}S pulse at a 5kHz repetition rate into a magnetic pulse compression modulator (MAG-1D). In our present configuration, we are capable of producing a 50 pulse burst using a 1000{mu}F capacitor bank. In this configuration, the input voltage to the PPU droops 22% during the burst. Accelerator operating requirements, however, dictate {plus minus}0.1% regulation of the PPU output voltage during the burst. We are employing a de-Qing network to achieve this regulation goal. In this paper, we describe an output voltage predict-ahead scheme that we are using to generate de-Q trigger pulses at the proper time to insure accurate regulations. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  1. HEMP test of FD-565. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the FD-565 test object, the test facilities of the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center, the data collected, and the test results. Tests were performed on the FD-565 to determine its ability to survive the effects of a high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP). This test is part of the EMP Mitigation Program whose aim is to ensure that EMP would not significantly impede the reestablishment of telecommunications following an attack against the U.S. that includes high-altitude nuclear detonations. The EMP Mitigation Program attempts to maximize the value of the HEMP response data available.

  2. Decarbonization and the time-delay between peak CO2 emissions and concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshadri, Ashwin K

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon-dioxide (CO2) is the main contributor to anthropogenic global warming, and the timing of its peak concentration in the atmosphere is likely to govern the timing of maximum radiative forcing. While dynamics of atmospheric CO2 is governed by multiple time-constants, we idealize this by a single time-constant to consider some of the factors describing the time-delay between peaks in CO2 emissions and concentrations. This time-delay can be understood as the time required to bring CO2 emissions down from its peak to a small value, and is governed by the rate of decarbonizaton of economic activity. This decarbonization rate affects how rapidly emissions decline after having achieved their peak, and a rapid decline in emissions is essential for limiting peak radiative forcing. Long-term mitigation goals for CO2 should therefore consider not only the timing of peak emissions, but also the rate of decarbonization. We discuss implications for mitigation of the fact that the emissions peak corresponds to small bu...

  3. RF study and simulations of a C-band Barrel Open Cavity (BOC) pulse compressor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shu, Guan; He, Xiang

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the RF study of a C-band(5712MHz) BOC pulse compressor. The operating principle of BOC is presented and the technical specifications are determined. The main components of BOC such as the cavity, the matching waveguide, the coupling slots and the tuning rings were numerically simulated by 3-D codes software HFSS and CST Microwave Studio(MWS). The "whispering gallery" mode TM6,1,1 with an unload Q of 100000 was chosen to oscillate in the cavity. An energy multiplication factor of 1.99 and a peak power gain of 6.34 were achieved theoretically.

  4. Metastable phase diagram for Ni-implanted Al and pulse surface melted Al(Ni)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Follstaedt, D.M.; Picraux, S.T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure of <110> Al implanted with Ni was examined before and after subsequent electron beam pulsed surface melting (65 ns, 1.7 J/cm/sup 2/). Both processes were done with the Al substrate at room temperature. Implantation at several energies (160 to 15 keV) into a given sample produced a nearly constant measured Ni concentration through a approx. 0.1 ..mu..m region below the surface (7). Such samples with concentrations from 8 to 25 at. % Ni were examined, along with a sample with a peak concentration of 32 at. % Ni.

  5. Radiative Reactions and Coherence Modeling in the High Altitude Electromagnetic Pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles N. Vittitoe; Mario Rabinowitz

    2003-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A high altitude nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) with a peak field intensity of 5 x 10^4 V/m carries momentum that results in a retarding force on the average Compton electron (radiating coherently to produce the waveform) with magnitude near that of the geomagnetic force responsible for the coherent radiation. The retarding force results from a self field effect. The Compton electron interaction with the self generated magnetic field due to the other electrons accounts for the momentum density in the propagating wave; interaction with the self generated electric field accounts for the energy flux density in the propagating wave. Coherent addition of radiation is also quantitatively modeled.

  6. analog pulse shape: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems. Digital pulse shaping Krishnapura, Nagendra 2 Dynamic Matter-Wave Pulse Shaping Quantum Physics (arXiv) Summary: In this paper we discuss possibilities...

  7. A Combined Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser and Synchrotron Pulsed Field...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser and Synchrotron Pulsed Field Ionization Study of BCl. A Combined Vacuum Ultraviolet Laser and Synchrotron Pulsed Field Ionization Study of BCl. Abstract:...

  8. Spiraling Laser Pulses Could Change Nature of Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spiraling Laser Pulses Could Change Nature of Graphene Spiraling Laser Pulses Could Change Nature of Graphene Simulations Run at NERSC Show It Could Transform from Metal to...

  9. Method of multi-dimensional moment analysis for the characterization of signal peaks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Yelton, William G; Kerr, Dayle R; Bouchier, Francis A

    2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of multi-dimensional moment analysis for the characterization of signal peaks can be used to optimize the operation of an analytical system. With a two-dimensional Peclet analysis, the quality and signal fidelity of peaks in a two-dimensional experimental space can be analyzed and scored. This method is particularly useful in determining optimum operational parameters for an analytical system which requires the automated analysis of large numbers of analyte data peaks. For example, the method can be used to optimize analytical systems including an ion mobility spectrometer that uses a temperature stepped desorption technique for the detection of explosive mixtures.

  10. Damage from pulses with arbitrary temporal shapes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trenholme, J.B.

    1994-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In fusion laser designs, the laser pulse has a complicated temporal shape which undergoes significant change as it passes through the laser. Our damage data, however, was taken with pulses whose temporal shapes were (more or less) Gaussian. We want to determine the damage propensity of a material exposed to a pulse of arbitrary temporal shape , given data taken with Gaussian pulses of different pulse widths. To do so, we must adopt a physical model of damage. This model will contain some number of parameters that depend on material properties, geometry, and so forth. We determine the parameters of the model appropriate to each material by fitting the model to the Gaussian data for that material. The resulting normalized model is then applied, using the appropriate pulse shape, to find the damage level for a specific material subjected to a specific pulse. The model we shall assume is related to diffusion, although (as we shall see) the experimental results do not fit any simple diffusion model. Initially, we will discuss simple diffusion models. We then examine some experimental data, and then develop a modified diffusive model from that data. That modified model is then used to predict damage levels in various portions of the NIF laser design.

  11. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Letzring, S.A.

    1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse. 10 figures.

  12. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley (Rochester, NY); Kessler, Terrance J. (Rochester, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Honeoye Falls, NY)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse.

  13. Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

  14. Apparatus and method for optical pulse measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trebino, Rick P. (Livermore, CA); Tsang, Thomas (Brooklyn, NY); Fittinghoff, David N. (San Diego, CA); Sweetser, John N. (Livermore, CA); Krumbuegel, Marco A. (Danville, CA)

    1999-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical third-order frequency-resolved optical grating (FROG) techniques for characterization of ultrashort optical pulses are disclosed. The techniques are particularly suited to the measurement of single and/or weak optical pulses having pulse durations in the picosecond and subpicosecond regime. The relative quantum inefficiency of third-order nonlinear optical effects is compensated for through i) use of phase-matched transient grating beam geometry to maximize interaction length, and ii) use of interface-enhanced third-harmonic generation.

  15. Influence of Ar/Kr ratio and pulse parameters in a Cr-N high power pulse magnetron sputtering process on plasma and coating properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bobzin, Kirsten; Bagcivan, Nazlim; Theiß, Sebastian; Trieschmann, Jan; Brugnara, Ricardo Henrique, E-mail: brugnara@iot.rwth-aachen.de [Surface Engineering Institute, RWTH Aachen University, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Preissing, Sven; Hecimovic, Ante [Institute of Experimental Physics II, Research Department Plasmas with Complex Interactions, Ruhr-University Bochum, D- 44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Krypton is sometimes used in physical vapor deposition processes due to its greater atomic mass and size compared to argon, which leads to a lower gas incorporation and may have beneficial effects on kinetics of the coating growth. In this paper, the authors investigate the plasma composition and properties of deposited high power pulse magnetron sputtering Cr-N coatings for discharges with various Ar/Kr ratios and for various pulse lengths of 40??s, 80??s, and 200??s, keeping the average discharge power constant. The results show that an addition of Kr influences the discharge process by altering the ignition and peak values of the discharge current. This influences the metal ion generation and growth conditions on the substrate by reducing the nucleation site densities, leading to a predominantly columnar grow. However, the deposition rate is highest for an Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. The integral of the metal ion and atom emission exhibits the same trend, having a maximum for Ar/Kr ratio of 120/80. By decreasing the pulse length, the deposition rate of coatings decreases, while the hardness increases.

  16. Effect of pulse error accumulation on dynamical decoupling of the electron spins of phosphorus donors in silicon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Hui Wang; Wenxian Zhang; A. M. Tyryshkin; S. A. Lyon; J. W. Ager; E. E. Haller; V. V. Dobrovitski

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is an efficient tool for preserving quantum coherence in solid-state spin systems. However, the imperfections of real pulses can ruin the performance of long DD sequences. We investigate the accumulation and compensation of different pulse errors in DD using the electron spins of phosphorus donors in silicon as a test system. We study periodic DD sequences (PDD) based on spin rotations about two perpendicular axes, and their concatenated and symmetrized versions. We show that pulse errors may quickly destroy some spin states, but maintain other states with high fidelity over long times. Pulse sequences based on spin rotations about $x$ and $y$ axes outperform those based on $x$ and $z$ axes due to the accumulation of pulse errors. Concatenation provides an efficient way to suppress the impact of pulse errors, and can maintain high fidelity for all spin components: pulse errors do not accumulate (to first order) as the concatenation level increases, despite the exponential increase in the number of pulses. Our theoretical model gives a clear qualitative picture of the error accumulation, and produces results in quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  17. Desert Peak to Humboldt House and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A....

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Winnemucca, in: Lane, M.A., (ed) Nevada geothermal areas: Desert Peak, Humboldt House, Beoware: Guidebook for field trip Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  18. Insights from Smart Meters: The Potential for Peak-Hour Savings from Behavior-Based Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd, Annika

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2014.  Insights from Smart  Meters: The Potential for Peak available data captured by smart meters and other sources,series Insights from Smart Meters. DRAFT – DO NOT CIRCULATE

  19. Dynamical diffraction peak splitting in time-of-flight neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uestuendag, E.; Karnesky, R. A.; Daymond, M. R.; Noyan, I. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L3N6 (Canada); Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Materials Science Program, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-of-flight neutron diffraction data from 20 and 0.7 mm thick perfect Si single crystal samples, which exhibit dynamical diffraction effects associated with finite crystal size, are presented. This effect is caused by constructive interference occurring solely from thin layers bounded by the front (entry) and back (exit) surfaces of the sample with no scattering originating from the layers in between, resulting in two distinct peaks observed for each reflection. If the sample is thin and/or the instrument resolution is insufficient, these two peaks can convolve and cause peak shape aberrations which can lead to significant errors in the strain and peak-broadening parameters obtained from a kinematical diffraction analysis.

  20. Large scale flows in the solar interior: Effect of asymmetry in peak profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring diagram analysis can be used to study large scale velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone. All previous works assume that the peak profiles in the solar oscillation power spectrum are symmetric. However, it has now been demonstrated that the peaks are not symmetric. In this work we study how the explicit use of asymmetric peak profiles in ring-diagram analysis influences the estimated velocity fields. We find that the use of asymmetric profiles leads to significant improvement in the fits, but the estimated velocity fields are not substantially different from those obtained using a symmetric profile to fit the peaks. The resulting velocity fields are compared with those obtained by other investigators.

  1. The effect of external magnetic field on the Raman peaks in manganites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahu, A. K., E-mail: ajitsahu@seemantaengg.ac.in [Seemanta Engineering College, Jharpokharia, Mayurbhanj-757086, Odisha (India); Rout, G. C. [School of Applied Sciences (Physics), KIIT University, Bhubaneswar-7561024 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here a microscopic theoretical model study exhibiting the effect of external magnetic field on the Raman excitation peaks in the CMR manganite system. The Hamiltonian consists of Jahn-Teller (J-T) distortion in e{sub g} band, the double exchange interaction and the Heisenberg spin-spin interaction. Further the phonons are coupled to e{sub g} band electrons, J-T distorted e{sub g} band and the double exchange interaction. The Raman spectral intensity is calculated from the imaginary part of the phonon Green function. The spectra exhibits three peaks besides a very weak high energy peak. The magnetic field effect on these peaks are reported.

  2. Sequence Stratigraphy and Detrital Zircon Geochronology of the Swan Peak Quartzite, Southeastern Idaho 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wulf, Tracy David

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The supermature Middle-Late Ordovician Swan Peak quartz arenite was deposited on the western Laurentia passive margin and is very fine to fine grained, well-rounded, well-sorted, and silica-cemented. Laurentia was positioned ...

  3. On The Portents of Peak Oil (And Other Indicators of Resource Scarcity)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, James L.

    Although economists have studied various indicators of resource scarcity (e.g., unit cost, resource rent, and market price), the phenomenon of “peaking” has largely been ignored due to its connection to non-economic theories ...

  4. Batse observations of gamma-ray burst spectra; 2, peak energy evolution in bright, long bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, L A; Matteson, J L; Briggs, M S; Pendleton, G N; Preece, R D; Paciesas, W S; Teegarden, B J; Palmer, D M; Schaefer, B E; Cline, T L; Fishman, G J; Kouveliotou, C; Meegan, C A; Wilson, R B; Lestrade, J P

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract We investigate spectral evolution in 37 bright, long gamma-ray bursts observed with the BATSE Spectroscopy Detectors. High resolution spectra are characterized by the energy of the peak of \

  5. Changes in measured lightning return stroke peak current after the 1994 National Lightning Detection Network upgrade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wacker, Robert Scott

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since a comprehensive upgrade of the US National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) in 1994, the mean peak current of detected cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes has decreased, the number of detected flashes has increased, and the percentage...

  6. Discovery and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field: a case history. Bulletin 97

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benoit, W.R.; Hiner, J.E.; Forest, R.T.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A case history of the exploration, development (through 1980), and geology of the Desert Peak geothermal field is presented. Sections on geochemistry, geophysics, and temperature-gradient drilling are included.

  7. Using Compressed Air Efficiency Projects to Reduce Peak Industrial Electric Demands: Lessons Learned

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skelton, J.

    "To help customers respond to the wildly fluctuating energy markets in California, Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) initiated an emergency electric demand reduction program in October 2000 to cut electric use during peak periods. One component...

  8. Diversity and productivity peak at intermediate dispersal rate in evolving metacommunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochberg, Michael

    LETTERS Diversity and productivity peak at intermediate dispersal rate in evolving metacommunities * Positive relationships between species diversity and productivity have been reported for a number of understanding how diversity and productivity are linked over evolutionary timescales. Here, we investigate

  9. How are flat demand charges based on the highest peak over the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    How are flat demand charges based on the highest peak over the past 12 months designated in the database (LADWP does this) Home > Groups > Utility Rate Submitted by Marcroper on 11...

  10. Appropriate Loads for Peak-Power During Resisted Sprinting on a Non-Motorized Treadmill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andre, Matthew J.; Fry, Andrew C.; Lane, Michael T.

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine the load which allows the highest peak power for resisted sprinting on a non-motorized treadmill and to determine if other variables are related to individual differences. Thirty ...

  11. A neutron imaging device for sample alignment in a pulsed neutron scattering instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grazzi, F.; Scherillo, A.; Zoppi, M. [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron-imaging device for alignment purposes has been tested on the INES beamline at ISIS, the pulsed neutron source of Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (U.K.). Its use, in conjunction with a set of movable jaws, turns out extremely useful for scattering application to complex samples where a precise and well-defined determination of the scattering volume is needed.

  12. Mathematical Modeling of Current-Interrupt and Pulse Operation of Valve-Regulated Lead Acid Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with an in- ternal combustion engine in hybrid electric vehicles HEVs . This renewed interest has spurred reactions in the voltage response of the cell. Simulations of pulse charging and dynamic stress test of VRLA for modifying the presently used modeling approach. In addition, simulations are compared to current

  13. An insoluble residue study of the Comanche Peak and Edwards limestones of Kimble County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jurik, Paul Peter

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Previous investigations Comanche Peak and Edwards limestones. . Insoluble res idues 1 1 3 5 6 S tratigraphy Wa)nut clay. Conanche Peak limestone Edwards limestone. Georgetown limestone. 8 9 9 12 Paleontology Macropaleontology... on the basis of tha silt?clay insoluble residua y. Tectonic map of Early Cretaceous. Plate I. Vertical variation in insoluble residua content. . . . pocket vertical variation in sand-siss insoluble residue content Vertical vari. stion in sand...

  14. FEMAXI-V benchmarking study on peak temperature and fission gas release prediction of PWR rod fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suwardi; Dewayatna, W.; Briyatmoko, B. [Center for Nuclear Fuel Technology - National Nuclear Energy Agency, Puspiptek Tangerang - 15310 (Indonesia)

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper reports a study of FEMAXI-V code and related report on code benchmarking. Capabilities of the FEMAXI-V code to predict the thermal and fission gas release have been tested on MOX fuels in LWRs which has been done in SCK{center_dot}CEN and Belgonucleaire by using PRIMO MOX rod BD8 irradiation experiment after V Sobolev as reported O. J. Ott. Base irradiation in the BR3 reactor, the BD8 rod was transported to CEA-Saclay for irradiation in the OSIRIS reactor (ramp power excursion). The irradiation device used for the PRIMO ramps was the ISABELLE 1 loop, installed on a movable structure of the core periphery. The power variations were obtained by inwards/backwards movements of the loop in the core water. The preconditioning phase for rod BD8 occurred at a peak power level of 189 W/cm with a hold time of 27 hours. The subsequent power excursion rate amounted to 77 W/ (cm.min), reaching a terminal peak power level of 395 W/cm that lasted for 20 hours.

  15. A wavelet transform algorithm for peak detection and application to powder x-ray diffraction data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregoire, John M.; Dale, Darren; van Dover, R. Bruce

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peak detection is ubiquitous in the analysis of spectral data. While many noise-filtering algorithms and peak identification algorithms have been developed, recent work [P. Du, W. Kibbe, and S. Lin, Bioinformatics 22, 2059 (2006); A. Wee, D. Grayden, Y. Zhu, K. Petkovic-Duran, and D. Smith, Electrophoresis 29, 4215 (2008)] has demonstrated that both of these tasks are efficiently performed through analysis of the wavelet transform of the data. In this paper, we present a wavelet-based peak detection algorithm with user-defined parameters that can be readily applied to the application of any spectral data. Particular attention is given to the algorithm's resolution of overlapping peaks. The algorithm is implemented for the analysis of powder diffraction data, and successful detection of Bragg peaks is demonstrated for both low signal-to-noise data from theta–theta diffraction of nanoparticles and combinatorial x-ray diffraction data from a composition spread thin film. These datasets have different types of background signals which are effectively removed in the wavelet-based method, and the results demonstrate that the algorithm provides a robust method for automated peak detection.

  16. Detection of Tones and Pulses using a Large, Uncalibrated Array S.W. Ellingson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    ]; and wide- band pulses associated with (for example) gamma ray bursts [2] and intermittent "giant pulses

  17. PNGV Battery Performance Testing and Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motloch, Chester George; Belt, Jeffrey R; Christophersen, Jon Petter; Wright, Randy Ben; Hunt, Gary Lynn; Sutula, Raymond; Duong, T.Q.; Barnes, J.A.; Miller, Ted J.; Haskind, H. J.; Tartamella, T. J.

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has developed novel testing procedures and analytical methodologies to assess the performance of batteries for use in hybrid electric vehicles (HEV’s). Tests have been designed for both Power Assist and Dual Mode applications. They include both characterization and cycle life and/or calendar life. At periodic intervals during life testing, a series of Reference Performance Tests are executed to determine changes in the baseline performance of the batteries. Analytical procedures include a battery scaling methodology, the calculation of pulse resistance, pulse power, available energy, and differential capacity, and the modeling of calendar- and cycle-life data. PNGV goals, test procedures, analytical methodologies, and representative results are presented.

  18. Ultrafast Optical Pulses: Synthesis and Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Kai

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation is devoted to ultrafast waveform synthesis using coherent Raman sidebands with the assistance of pulse shapers based on acousto-optic programmable dispersive ?lter (AOPDF) or deformable mirror (DM). Ultrashort optical science has...

  19. Pulse Pressure Forming of Lightweight Materials, Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, June 7-11, 2010 -- Washington D.C. lm015smith2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Pulse-Pressure Forming of Lightweight Metals...

  20. Single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, R.P.

    1992-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A single mode pulsed dye laser oscillator is disclosed. The dye laser oscillator provides for improved power efficiency by reducing the physical dimensions of the overall laser cavity, which improves frequency selection capability. 6 figs.