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1

ForCent model development and testing using the Enriched Background Isotope Study experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ForCent forest ecosystem model was developed by making major revisions to the DayCent model including: (1) adding a humus organic pool, (2) incorporating a detailed root growth model, and (3) including plant phenological growth patterns. Observed plant production and soil respiration data from 1993 to 2000 were used to demonstrate that the ForCent model could accurately simulate ecosystem carbon dynamics for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory deciduous forest. A comparison of ForCent versus observed soil pool {sup 14}C signature ({Delta} {sup 14}C) data from the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experiment (1999-2006) shows that the model correctly simulates the temporal dynamics of the {sup 14}C label as it moved from the surface litter and roots into the mineral soil organic matter pools. ForCent model validation was performed by comparing the observed Enriched Background Isotope Study experimental data with simulated live and dead root biomass {Delta} {sup 14}C data, and with soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C (mineral soil, humus layer, leaf litter layer, and total soil respiration) data. Results show that the model correctly simulates the impact of the Enriched Background Isotope Study {sup 14}C experimental treatments on soil respiration {Delta} {sup 14}C values for the different soil organic matter pools. Model results suggest that a two-pool root growth model correctly represents root carbon dynamics and inputs to the soil. The model fitting process and sensitivity analysis exposed uncertainty in our estimates of the fraction of mineral soil in the slow and passive pools, dissolved organic carbon flux out of the litter layer into the mineral soil, and mixing of the humus layer into the mineral soil layer.

Parton, W.J.; Hanson, P. J.; Swanston, C.; Torn, M.; Trumbore, S. E.; Riley, W.; Kelly, R.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

CRBR pump water test experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydraulic design features and water testing of the hydraulic scale model and prototype pump of the sodium pumps used in the primary and intermediate sodium loops of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) are described. The Hydraulic Scale Model tests are performed and the results of these tests are discussed. The Prototype Pump tests are performed and the results of these tests are discussed.

Cook, M.E.; Huber, K.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

A study of pumps for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy extraction experiment (LTFT (Long Term Flow Test))  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A set of specifications for the hot dry rock (HDR) Phase II circulation pumping system is developed from a review of basic fluid pumping mechanics, a technical history of the HDR Phase I and Phase II pumping systems, a presentation of the results from experiment 2067 (the Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test or ICFT), and consideration of available on-site electrical power limitations at the experiment site. For the Phase II energy extraction experiment (the Long Term Flow Test or LTFT) it is necessary to provide a continuous, low maintenance, and highly efficient pumping capability for a period of twelve months at variable flowrates up to 420 gpm and at surface injection pressures up to 5000 psi. The pumping system must successfully withstand attacks by corrosive and embrittling gases, erosive chemicals and suspended solids, and fluid pressure and temperature fluctuations. In light of presently available pumping hardware and electric power supply limitations, it is recommended that positive displacement multiplex plunger pumps, driven by variable speed control electric motors, be used to provide the necessary continuous surface injection pressures and flowrates for LTFT. The decision of whether to purchase the required circulation pumping hardware or to obtain contractor provided pumping services has not been made.

Tatro, C.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor experiment  

SciTech Connect

A brief review of the TFTR is given in terms of the physical size of the experiment in relation to existing and future tokamaks. Some break-even criteria are mentioned. (MOW)

Furth, H.P.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Idealized Test Cases for Dynamical Core Experiments Christiane Jablonowski (University of Michigan-13/2006 #12;Motivation · Test cases for 3D dynamical cores on the sphere ­ are hard to find in the literature groups ­ lack standardized & easy-to-use analysis techniques · Idea: Establish a collection of test cases

Jablonowski, Christiane

6

Property:Past Pertinent Test Experience | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Past Pertinent Test Experience Past Pertinent Test Experience Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Past Pertinent Test Experience Property Type Text Pages using the property "Past Pertinent Test Experience" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Rubble mounds, stepped-seawalls, recurved seawalls, floating breakwaters, pile-supported structures have been tested on the flumes 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Generalized breakwater deterioration R&D study, Lajes, Azores, Kamumalapau, Kodiak, Alaska breakwater stability study 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Used for testing sandbag configurations, CORE-LOC units, shoreline stability designs, etc. 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Studies done for Yaquina, WA, RIB floating breakwater, generalized Core-Loc stability tests, Cresent City, CA, generalized dolos structural tests, jetty stability

7

AGR-1 Irradiation Experiment Test Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the current state of planning for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, the first of eight planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. The objectives of the AGR-1 experiment are: 1. To gain experience with multi-capsule test train design, fabrication, and operation with the intent to reduce the probability of capsule or test train failure in subsequent irradiation tests. 2. To irradiate fuel produced in conjunction with the AGR fuel process development effort. 3. To provide data that will support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-1 experiment will be irradiated in the B-10 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The test will contain six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each capsule will contain a single type, or variant, of the AGR coated fuel. The irradiation is planned for about 700 effective full power days (approximately 2.4 calendar years) with a time-averaged, volume-average temperature of approximately 1050 C. Average fuel burnup, for the entire test, will be greater than 17.7 % FIMA, and the fuel will experience fast neutron fluences between 2.4 and 4.5 x 1025 n/m2 (E>0.18 MeV).

John T. Maki

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Operational experience during the LHC injection tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following the LHC injection tests of 2008. two injection tests took place in October and November 2009 as preparation for the LHC restart on November 20, 2009. During these injection tests beam was injected through the TI 2 transfer line into sector 23 of ring 1 and through TI 8 into the sectors 78, 67 and 56 of ring 2. The beam time was dedicated to injection steering, optics measurements and debugging of all the systems involved. Because many potential problems were sorted out in advance, these tests contributed to the rapid progress after the restart. This paper describes the experiences and issues encountered during these tests as well as related measurement results.

Fuchsberger, K; Arduini, G; Assmann, R; Bailey, R; Bruning, O; Goddard, B; Kain, V; Lamont, M; MacPherson, A; Meddahi, M; Papotti, G; Pojer, M; Ponce, L; Redaelli, S; Solfaroli Camillocci, M; Venturini Delsolaro, W; Wenninger, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Central Receiver Test Facility (CRTF) experiment manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Central Receiver Test Facility is operated by Sandia Laboratories for the US Department of Energy. The CRTF is being used for component and subsystem evaluation within the Solar Thermal Large Power Systems Program. This experiment manual provides users of the CRTF detailed information about: (1) implementation of testing at the CRTF; (2) details of the CRTF capabilities and interfaces, and (3) requirements of experimenters.

Holmes, J. T.; Matthews, L. K.; Seamons, L. O.; Davis, D. B.; King, D. L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Solar Thermal Test Facility experiment manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Information is provided on administrative procedures, capabilities, and requirements of experimenters using the Solar Thermal Test Facility. (MHR)

Darsey, D. M.; Holmes, J. T.; Seamons, L. O.; Kuehl, D. J.; Davis, D. B.; Stomp, J. M.; Matthews, L. K.; Otts, J. V.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Mass modification experiment definition study  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes an attempt to find an experiment that would test the Haisch, Rueda, and Puthoff (HRP) conjecture that the mass and inertia of a body are induced effects brought about by changes in the quantum-fluctuation energy of the vacuum. It was not possible, however, to identify a definitive experiment. But, it was possible to identify an experiment that might be able to prove or disprove that the inertial mass of a body can be altered by making changes in the vacuum surrounding the body. Other experiments, which do not involve mass modification, but which teach something about the vacuum, were also defined and included in a ranked list of experiments. This report also contains an annotated bibliography. An interesting point raised by this paper is this: We can estimate the `vacuum energy density` to be 10{sup 108} J/cc, and the vacuum mass density to be 10{sup 94} g/cc, much higher numbers than those associated with nuclear energy. Although the field of `electromagnetic fluctuation energy of the vacuum` is admittedly an esoteric, little-understood field, it does seem to have definite potential as an energy source. 47 refs.

Forward, R.L. [Forward Unlimited, Malibu, CA (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

12

First Subcritical Experiment Conducted at Nevada Test Site |...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Subcritical Experiment Conducted at Nevada Test Site | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear...

13

Safety Assurance for Irradiating Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), was specifically designed to provide a high neutron flux test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. This paper addresses the safety assurance process for two general types of experiments conducted in the ATR facility and how the safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore, this type of experiment is addressed in more detail in the ATR safety basis. This allows the individual safety analysis for this type of experiment to be more standardized. The second type of experiment is defined in more general terms in the ATR safety basis and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, the individual safety analysis for the second type of experiment tends to be more unique and is tailored to each experiment.

T. A. Tomberlin; S. B. Grover

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Efficiency of an AMTEC recirculating test cell, experiments and projections  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) is an electrochemical device for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy with efficiencies potentially near Carnot. The future usefulness of AMTEC for space power conversion depends on the efficiency of the devices. Systems studies have projected from 15% to 35% thermal to electric conversion efficiencies, and one experiment has demonstrated 19% efficiency for a short period of time. Recent experiments in a recirculating test cell (RTC) have demonstrated sustained conversion efficiencies as high as 10.2% early in cell life and 9.7% after maturity. Extensive thermal and electrochemical analysis of the cell during several experiments demonstrated that the efficiency could be improved in two ways. First, the electrode performance could be improved. The electrode for these tests operated at about one third the power density of state of the art electrodes. The low power density was caused by a combination of high series resistance and high mass flow resistance. Reducing these resistances could improve the efficiency to greater than 10%. Second, the cell thermal performance could be improved. Efficiencies greater than 14% could be realized through reducing the radiative thermal loss. Further improvements to the efficiency range predicted by systems studies can be accomplished through the development and use of an advanced condenser with improved reflectivity, close to that of a smooth sodium film, and the series connecting of individual cells to further reduce thermal losses.

Underwood, M.L.; O`Connor, D.; Williams, R.M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M.A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today's nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure

16

A Lepton Universality Test at CERN NA62 Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NA62 experiment at CERN collected a large sample of K+ --> enu decays during a dedicated run in 2007, aiming at a precise test of lepton universality by measurement of the helicity suppressed ratio RK = BR(K+ --> enu)/BR(K+ --> munu). A preliminary result of the analysis of a partial data sample of 51089 K+ --> enu candidates is presented.

Evgueni Goudzovski

2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

17

Superconducting radio-frequency modules test faciilty operating experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fermilab is heavily engaged and making strong technical contributions to the superconducting radio-frequency research and development program (SRF R&D). Four major SRF test areas are being constructed to enable vertical and horizontal cavity testing, as well as cryomodule testing. The existing Fermilab cryogenic infrastructure has been modified to service Fermilab SRF R&D needs. The first stage of the project has been successfully completed, which allows for distribution of cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule using the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. The cryogenic system for a single 9-cell cryomodule is currently operational. The paper describes the status, challenges and operational experience of the initial phase of the project.

Soyars, W.; Bossert, R.; Darve, C.; Degraff, B.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; /Fermilab

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Reactivity Initiated Accident Test Series Test RIA 1-2 Experiment Operating Specification  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the experiment operating specifications for the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-2 to be conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The RIA Series I research objectives are to determine fuel failure thresholds, modes and consequences as functions of enthalpy insertion, irradiation history, and fuel design. Coolant conditions of pressure, temperature, and flow rate that are typical of hot-startup conditions in commercial boiling water reactors {BWRs) will be used. The second test in Series I, Test RIA 1-2, will be comprised of four individual rods, each surrounded by a separate flow shroud. The four rods will be preirradiated. The specific objectives of the test are to: (1) characterize the response of preirradiated fuel rods during a RIA event conducted at BWR hot-startup conditions and (2) evaluate the effect of internal rod pressure on preirradiated fuel rod transient response. The test sequence will begin with steady state power operation to condition the fuel (pellet cracking and relocation) and determine the fuel rod power calibration. The loop will then be cooled down, the test train removed from the in-pile tube, and the cobalt flux wires that are mounted on each flow shroud will be replaced. The transient fuel rod energy deposition for the Test RIA 1-2 rods will be chosen from the fuel rod response vs. energy deposition observed in the first three phases of the RIA Scoping Test and the first test of Series J, Test RIA 1-1. The design of the test fuel rods, test assembly, and instrumentation associated with Test RIA 1-2 are described. The planned experiment conduct for the test is described. The data recording and reduction requirements are provided. The posttest operations support and the postirradiation examination requirements associated with Test RIA 1-2 are described.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Test experience with multiterminal HVDC load flow and stability programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A powerful new set of load flow and stability programs for the study of HVdc systems has recently been completed. During the development of the programs novel applications of multiterminal HVdc systems were investigated, firstly on a large test system and later on actual utility models. This paper describes the test systems used, the HVdc systems studied and some of the interesting system related aspects of the HVdc system performance.

Chapman, D.G.; Davies, J.B. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); McNichol, J.R. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); Gulachenski, E.M.; Doe, S. (New England Power Service Co., Westboro, MA (US)); Balu, N.J. (EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (US))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Reactivity Initiated Accident Test Series Test RIA 1-1 Experiment Operating Specification  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the experiment operating specifications for the Reactivity Initiated Accident (RIA) Test RIA 1-1 to be conducted in the Power Burst Facility (PBF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The RIA Series I research objectives are to determine fuel failure thresholds, modes and consequences as functions of enthalpy insertion, irradiation history, and fuel design. Coolant conditions of pressure, temperature, and flow rate that are typical of hot-startup conditions in commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) will be used. The first test in Series I, Test RIA 1-1, will be comprised of four individual rods, each surrounded by a separate flow shroud. Two rods will be preirradiated and two rods will be unirradiated. The specific objectives of the test are to: (1) characterize the response of unirradiated and preirradiated fuel rods during a RIA event conducted at BWR hot-startup conditions and (2) evaluate test instrumentation response during an RIA. The test sequence will begin with steady state power operation to condition the fuel (pellet cracking and relocation) and determine the fuel rod power calibration. The loop will then be cooled down, the test train removed from the in-pile tube, and one of the unirradiated rods will be removed for fission product analysis and replaced with an identical unirradiated rod. The transient fuel rod energy deposition for Test RIA 1-1 will be chosen from the fuel rod response vs. energy deposition data observed in the first three phases of the RIA Scoping Test. It is anticipated that a fuel pellet surface energy deposition of about 1100 J/g will be required to ensure cladding failure of all four rods. The design of the test fuel rods, test assembly, and instrumentation associated with Test RIA 1-1 are described. The experiment conduct for the test is described. The data recording and reduction requirements are provided. The posttest support and the postirradiation examination requirements associated with Test RIA 1-1 are described.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

TEST PLAN - SOLIDS ACCUMULATION SCOUTING STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

Duignan, M.; Steeper, T.; Steimke, J.; Fowley, M.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

Combined Experiment Phase 1. [Horizontal axis wind turbines: wind tunnel testing versus field testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

How does wind tunnel airfoil data differ from the airfoil performance on an operating horizontal axis wind turbine (HAWT) The National Renewable Energy laboratory has been conducting a comprehensive test program focused on answering this question and understanding the basic fluid mechanics of rotating HAWT stall aerodynamics. The basic approach was to instrument a wind rotor, using an airfoil that was well documented by wind tunnel tests, and measure operating pressure distributions on the rotating blade. Based an the integrated values of the pressure data, airfoil performance coefficients were obtained, and comparisons were made between the rotating data and the wind tunnel data. Care was taken to the aerodynamic and geometric differences between the rotating and the wind tunnel models. This is the first of two reports describing the Combined Experiment Program and its results. This Phase I report covers background information such as test setup and instrumentation. It also includes wind tunnel test results and roughness testing.

Butterfield, C.P.; Musial, W.P.; Simms, D.A.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

MEMS Reliability: Infrastructure, Test Structures, Experiments, and Failure Modes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The burgeoning new technology of Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) shows great promise in the weapons arena. We can now conceive of micro-gyros, micro-surety systems, and micro-navigators that are extremely small and inexpensive. Do we want to use this new technology in critical applications such as nuclear weapons? This question drove us to understand the reliability and failure mechanisms of silicon surface-micromachined MEMS. Development of a testing infrastructure was a crucial step to perform reliability experiments on MEMS devices and will be reported here. In addition, reliability test structures have been designed and characterized. Many experiments were performed to investigate failure modes and specifically those in different environments (humidity, temperature, shock, vibration, and storage). A predictive reliability model for wear of rubbing surfaces in microengines was developed. The root causes of failure for operating and non-operating MEMS are discussed. The major failure mechanism for operating MEMS was wear of the polysilicon rubbing surfaces. Reliability design rules for future MEMS devices are established.

TANNER,DANELLE M.; SMITH,NORMAN F.; IRWIN,LLOYD W.; EATON,WILLIAM P.; HELGESEN,KAREN SUE; CLEMENT,J. JOSEPH; MILLER,WILLIAM M.; MILLER,SAMUEL L.; DUGGER,MICHAEL T.; WALRAVEN,JEREMY A.; PETERSON,KENNETH A.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

OSI Passive Seismic Experiment at the Former Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

On-site inspection (OSI) is one of the four verification provisions of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). Under the provisions of the CTBT, once the Treaty has entered into force, any signatory party can request an on-site inspection, which can then be carried out after approval (by majority voting) of the Executive Council. Once an OSI is approved, a team of 40 inspectors will be assembled to carry out an inspection to ''clarify whether a nuclear weapon test explosion or any other nuclear explosion has been carried out in violation of Article I''. One challenging aspect of carrying out an on-site inspection (OSI) in the case of a purported underground nuclear explosion is to detect and locate the underground effects of an explosion, which may include an explosion cavity, a zone of damaged rock, and/or a rubble zone associated with an underground collapsed cavity. The CTBT (Protocol, Section II part D, paragraph 69) prescribes several types of geophysical investigations that can be carried out for this purpose. One of the methods allowed by the CTBT for geophysical investigation is referred to in the Treaty Protocol as ''resonance seismometry''. This method, which was proposed and strongly promoted by Russia during the Treaty negotiations, is not described in the Treaty. Some clarification about the nature of the resonance method can be gained from OSI workshop presentations by Russian experts in the late 1990s. Our understanding is that resonance seismometry is a passive method that relies on seismic reverberations set up in an underground cavity by the passage of waves from regional and teleseismic sources. Only a few examples of the use of this method for detection of underground cavities have been presented, and those were done in cases where the existence and precise location of an underground cavity was known. As is the case with many of the geophysical methods allowed during an OSI under the Treaty, how resonance seismology really works and its effectiveness for OSI purposes has yet to be determined. For this experiment, we took a broad approach to the definition of ''resonance seismometry''; stretching it to include any means that employs passive seismic methods to infer the character of underground materials. In recent years there have been a number of advances in the use of correlation and noise analysis methods in seismology to obtain information about the subsurface. Our objective in this experiment was to use noise analysis and correlation analysis to evaluate these techniques for detecting and characterizing the underground damage zone from a nuclear explosion. The site that was chosen for the experiment was the Mackerel test in Area 4 of the former Nevada Test Site (now named the Nevada National Security Site, or NNSS). Mackerel was an underground nuclear test of less than 20 kT conducted in February of 1964 (DOENV-209-REV 15). The reason we chose this site is because there was a known apical cavity occurring at about 50 m depth above a rubble zone, and that the site had been investigated by the US Geological Survey with active seismic methods in 1965 (Watkins et al., 1967). Note that the time delay between detonation of the explosion (1964) and the time of the present survey (2010) is nearly 46 years - this would not be typical of an expected OSI under the CTBT.

Sweeney, J J; Harben, P

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

26

What is tested when experiments test that quantum dynamics is linear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments that look for nonlinear quantum dynamics test the fundamental premise of physics that one of two separate systems can influence the physical behavior of the other only if there is a force between them, an interaction that involves momentum and energy. The premise is tested because it is the assumption of a proof that quantum dynamics must be linear. Here variations of a familiar example are used to show how results of nonlinear dynamics in one system can depend on correlations with the other. Effects of one system on the other, influence without interaction between separate systems, not previously considered possible, would be expected with nonlinear quantum dynamics. Whether it is possible or not is subject to experimental tests together with the linearity of quantum dynamics. Concluding comments and questions consider directions our thinking might take in response to this surprising unprecedented situation.

Thomas F. Jordan

2010-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

Statistical Considerations for Climate Experiments. Part I: Scalar Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical tests used in model intercomparisons or model/climate comparisons may be either scalar or multivariate tests. The former are employed when testing a hypothesis about a single variable observed at a single location, or through a ...

F. W. Zwiers; H. J. Thibaux

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Combinatorial Testing and Design of Experiments for Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... access control testing automation; measurement science and ... Public domain, distribution unlimited; 81 pages ... Modes in Medical Device Software: an ...

29

Testing mass-varying neutrinos with reactor experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose that reactor experiments could be used to constrain the environment dependence of neutrino mass and mixing parameters, which could be induced due to an acceleron coupling to matter fields. There are several short-baseline reactor experiment projects with different fractions of air and earth matter along the neutrino path. Moreover, the short baselines, in principle, allow the physical change of the material between source and detector. Hence, such experiments offer the possibility for a direct comparison of oscillations in air and matter. We demonstrate that for sin 2 (2?13) ? 0.04, two reactor experiments (one air, one matter) with baselines of at least 1.5 km can constrain any oscillation effect which is different in air and matter at the level of a few per cent. Furthermore, we find that using the same experiment while physically moving the material between source and detector improves systematics. PACS: 14.60.Pq

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

The US Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Study was commissioned jointly by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) to investigate the potential for future U.S. based long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments using MW class conventional neutrino beams that can be produced at FNAL. The experimental baselines are based on two possible detector locations: 1) off?axis to the existing FNAL NuMI beamline at baselines of 700 to 810 km and 2) NSF's proposed future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at baselines greater than 1000 km. Two detector technologies are considered: a megaton class Water Cherenkov detector deployed deep underground at a DUSEL site

Mary Bishai; US Long Baseline Study Group

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Experiment DTA report for semiscale transparent vessel countercurrent flow tests  

SciTech Connect

Steady state air-water tests were performed as part of the Semiscale Blowdown and Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) Project to investigate downcomer countercurrent flow and downcomer bypass flow phenomena. These tests were performed in a plexiglass representation of the Semiscale pressure vessel which allowed changes to be madein the geometry of the upper annulus and downcomer for the purpose of investigating the sensitivity of downcomer and bypass flow to changes in system geometry. Tests were also performed to investigate the effects of two-phase inlet flows and different initial system pressures on countercurrent and bypass flow. Results for each test are presented in the form of computer printout of the measurements and of a summary of the pertinent calculated flow rates, pressures, and dimensionless volumetric fluxes. Descriptions of the test facility, instrumentation, operating procedures, and test conditions are also presented. An error analysis is presented for selected volumetric flux calculations. 10 references. (auth)

Hanson, D.J.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Validating surge test standards by field experience: High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... review of the statistics of the occurrence of fuse blowing, the use of ... the current in the varis- tor resulting from the three high-energy tests discussed ...

2013-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

33

Tokamak physics experiment: Diagnostic windows study  

SciTech Connect

We detail the study of diagnostic windows and window thermal stress remediation in the long-pulse, high-power Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) operation. The operating environment of the TPX diagnostic windows is reviewed, thermal loads on the windows estimated, and cooling requirements for the windows considered. Applicable window-cooling technology from other fields is reviewed and its application to the TPX windows considered. Methods for TPX window thermal conditioning are recommended, with some discussion of potential implementation problems provided. Recommendations for further research and development work to ensure performance of windows in the TPX system are presented.

Merrigan, M.; Wurden, G.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Deviation to the Test Program and Procedures for the 710 Critical Experiment Reactor Control Drum Mockup Experiment  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a deviation from the "Test Program and Procedures for the 710 Critical Experiment Reactor Control Drum Mockup Experiment," TM-64-3-706, which was made in accordance with ITS Standard Practice J80-81 on September 14, 1964. The deviation did not involve a significant change in the safety of the operation.

Sims, F.L.

1964-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Phase-one experiment test plan solar photovoltaic/thermal residential experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objectives, rationale, and method of a one-year experiment using a residential photovoltaic/thermal power system are presented. Data will be both archived and processed to investigate: (1) series heat pump system performance, and (2) electric utility impacts. A parallel heat pump system will be investigated in a subsequent experiment.

Kern, E.C. Jr.

1979-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

ORR irradiation experiment OF-1: accelerated testing of HTGR fuel  

SciTech Connect

The OF-1 capsule, the first in a series of High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor fuel irradiations in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor, was irradiated for more than 9300 hr at full reactor power (30 MW). Peak fluences of 1.08 x 10/sup 22/ neutrons/cm/sup 2/ (> 0.18 MeV) were achieved. General Atomic Company's magazine P13Q occupied the upper two-thirds of the test space and the ORNL magazine OF-1 the lower one-third. The ORNL portion tested various HTGR recycle particles and fuel bonding matrices at accelerated flux levels under reference HTGR irradiation conditions of temperature, temperature gradient, and fast fluence exposure (> 0.18 MeV).

Tiegs, T.N.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Kania, M.J.; Thoms, K.R.; Allen, E.J.

1977-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Ground Testing a Nuclear Thermal Rocket: Design of a sub-scale demonstration experiment  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the NASA Mars Architecture Team found that the Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) was the preferred propulsion system out of all the combinations of chemical propulsion, solar electric, nuclear electric, aerobrake, and NTR studied. Recently, the National Research Council committee reviewing the NASA Technology Roadmaps recommended the NTR as one of the top 16 technologies that should be pursued by NASA. One of the main issues with developing a NTR for future missions is the ability to economically test the full system on the ground. In the late 1990s, the Sub-surface Active Filtering of Exhaust (SAFE) concept was first proposed by Howe as a method to test NTRs at full power and full duration. The concept relied on firing the NTR into one of the test holes at the Nevada Test Site which had been constructed to test nuclear weapons. In 2011, the cost of testing a NTR and the cost of performing a proof of concept experiment were evaluated.

David Bedsun; Debra Lee; Margaret Townsend; Clay A. Cooper; Jennifer Chapman; Ronald Samborsky; Mel Bulman; Daniel Brasuell; Stanley K. Borowski

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE RF GUN BASED INJECTOR FOR THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FIRST EXPERIMENTS WITH THE RF GUN BASED INJECTOR FOR THE TESLA TEST FACILITY LINAC S. Schreiber for the TESLA Collaboration, DESY, 22603 Hamburg, Germany Abstract During 1997 and 1998 a first accelerator module was tested successfully at the TESLA Test Facility Linac (TTFL) at DESY. Eight superconducting

39

An Experience in Testing an Object-Oriented Satellite Control System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents our experience in testing an object-oriented software: the Telemetry and Telecommand System (TMTC). The TMTC runs along a distributed architecture comprising microcomputers plus a Data Base server inter-connected via LAN under TCP/IP ... Keywords: hierarchical testing approach, object-oriented testing, satellite control system

Ana Maria Ambrosio; Luciana Seda C. Gonalves; Paulo Eduardo Cardoso

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Accelerated Stress Testing, Qualification Testing, HAST, Field Experience - What Do They All Mean? (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the need for a set of tests for modules that would predict their long term-field performance.

Wohlgemuth, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Status of initial testing of the H2SO4 section of the ILS experiment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A sulfuric acid catalytic decomposer section was assembled and tested for the Integrated Laboratory Scale experiments of the Sulfur-Iodine Thermochemical Cycle. This cycle is being studied as part of the U. S. Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. Tests confirmed that the 54-inch long silicon carbide bayonet could produce in excess of the design objective of 100 liters/hr of SO{sub 2} at 2 bar. Furthermore, at 3 bar the system produced 135 liters/hr of SO{sub 2} with only 31 mol% acid. The gas production rate was close to the theoretical maximum determined by equilibrium, which indicates that the design provides adequate catalyst contact and heat transfer. Several design improvements were also implemented to greatly minimize leakage of SO{sub 2} out of the apparatus. The primary modifications were a separate additional enclosure within the skid enclosure, and replacement of Teflon tubing with glass-lined steel pipes.

Moore, Robert Charles; Parma, Edward J., Jr.; Gelbard, Fred

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Testing site size requirements in chemisorption: experiment and theory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

''Ensemble requirements'' in surface chemistry refer to the number and shape of contiguous empty sites necessary for chemisorption of a particular molecule. Ensemble effects can play a major role in directing the course of surface reactions, leading, for example, to dramatic changes in catalytic selectivity when the active metal component is diluted upon alloying with an inert metal. We will review here fundamental surface science studies that have attempted to probe this site size requirement by diluting active sites on a single crystal surface with an inert metal overlayer. We will emphasize recent results in our lab on the interaction of simple molecules (CO, H/sub 2/, O/sub 2/) with Cu-, Ag-, and Bi-dosed Pt(111). Theoretical models based upon Monte-Carlo simulations will be summarized which, when compared to such data, allow more accurate determination of ensemble sizes. These models predict uptake curves that deviate strongly from the commonly used (1-theta)/sup A/ law (A = number of sites in ensemble), which is valid only for an array of isolated ensembles. 32 refs., 3 figs.

Campbell, C.T.; Paffett, M.T.; Voter, A.F.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Design and testing of an experiment to measure self-filtration in particulate suspensions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experiment for measuring self-filtration in terms of change in volume fraction downstream of a constriction compared to volume fraction upstream of said constriction was designed and tested. The user has the ability to ...

Flander, Mattias S. (Mattias Simon)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Quality of Mobile Air Temperature and Atmospheric Pressure Observations from the 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2010 Development Test Environment Experiment (DTE10) took place from 28 January to 29 March 2010 in the Detroit, Michigan, metropolitan area for the purposes of collecting and evaluating mobile data from vehicles. To examine the quality of ...

Amanda R. S. Anderson; Michael Chapman; Sheldon D. Drobot; Alemu Tadesse; Brice Lambi; Gerry Wiener; Paul Pisano

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH THE TEST FACILITIES FOR TESLA H. Weise, DESY, Hamburg, Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE WITH THE TEST FACILITIES FOR TESLA H. Weise, DESY, Hamburg, Germany Abstract The TESLA superconducting electron-positron linear collider with an integrated X-ray laser laboratory government in matters of science. In preparation of this, the TESLA Test Facility was set up at DESY. More

46

The Palo Verde Reactor Neutrino Experiment A Test for Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

:1. Our range of sensitivity is tuned to test the š¯ $ še solution of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly. 11 The Palo Verde Reactor Neutrino Experiment A Test for Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations 94305 e Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station,Tonopah AZ 85354 Our collaboration has installed a long

Piepke, Andreas G.

47

The Palo Verde Reactor Neutrino Experiment A Test for Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

\\Gamma3 eV 2 and sin 2 2\\Theta ! 0:1. Our range of sensitivity is tuned to test the š ¯ $ š e solutionThe Palo Verde Reactor Neutrino Experiment A Test for Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillations Presented 85287 S. Pittalwala, R. Wilferd, S. Young Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Tonopah AZ 85354 Our

Piepke, Andreas G.

48

B3.11 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- 1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components Introduction .A .. s defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same n

49

A Test Stand for the Muon Trigger Development for the CMS Experiment at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is one of the flagship experiments in particle physics operating at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). CMS was built to search for signatures of Higgs bosons, supersymmetry, and other new phenomena. The coming upgrade of the collider will increase the rate of collisions and expand the physics reach of CMS, but will also push the detector systems beyond their current capabilities. One critically affected element is the CMS trigger, a system responsible for making a fast decision if a particular event is of interest and trigger the readout of the detector. As saving the data from every collision would require a technically unattainable bandwidth and is not possible, triggering inefficiencies propagate into reduction of physics reach for the entire experiment. One proposal to handle the future increase in collision rates aims to combine the capabilities of the existing Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) with the newly proposed Gaseous Electron Multiplication (GEM) detectors to improve the efficiency and discriminating power of the electronics-based muon Level-1trigger. This project focuses on development of a test-stand to emulate operational conditions of such a system, taking into account geometries of the two detector elements. The results of this study will present a proof of principle that building a joint GEM-CSC trigger system is feasible and it can be used to improve trigger efficiency.

Lakdawala, Samir

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Design, construction, and testing of the direct absorption receiver panel research experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A panel research experiment (PRE) was designed, built, and tested as a scaled-down model of a direct absorption receiver (DAR). The PRE is a 3-MW{sub t}DAR experiment that will allow flow testing with molten nitrate salt and provide a test bed for DAR testing with actual solar heating. In a solar central receiver system DAR, the heat absorbing fluid (a blackened molten nitrate salt) flows in a thin film down a vertical panel (rather than through tubes as in conventional receiver designs) and absorbs the concentrated solar flux directly. The ability of the flowing salt film to absorb flux directly. The ability of the flowing salt film to absorb the incident solar flux depends on the panel design, hydraulic and thermal fluid flow characteristics, and fluid blackener properties. Testing of the PRE is being conducted to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of the DAR concept. The DAR concept is being investigated because it offers numerous potential performance and economic advantages for production of electricity when compared to other solar receiver designs. The PRE utilized a 1-m wide by 6-m long absorber panel. The salt flow tests are being used to investigate component performance, panel deformations, and fluid stability. Salt flow testing has demonstrated that all the DAR components work as designed and that there are fluid stability issues that need to be addressed. Future solar testing will include steady-state and transient experiments, thermal loss measurements, responses to severe flux and temperature gradients and determination of peak flux capability, and optimized operation. In this paper, we describe the design, construction, and some preliminary flow test results of the Panel Research Experiment. 11 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs.

Chavez, J.M.; Rush, E.E.; Matthews, C.W.; Stomp, J.M.; Imboden, J.; Dunkin, S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Field test corrosion experiences when co-firing straw and coal: 10 year status within Elsam  

SciTech Connect

In Denmark, straw is utilised for the generation of energy and district heating in power plants. Combustion of straw gives rise to high contents of potassium chloride and some sulphur dioxide in the flue gas. These compounds can lead to deposits with high content of potassium chloride and potassium sulphate on superheater tubes resulting in increased corrosion rates. From field experimental results this paper show, that by co-firing straw with coal, corrosion rates can be brought down to an acceptable level. This paper firstly deals with the results from a demonstration program co-firing coal and straw at the 150 MW pulverized coal fired boiler Studstrup unit 1. Two exposure series lasting 3000 hours each were performed for co-firing 10 and 20% of straw (% energy basis) with coal. Using built in test tubes in the hot end of the actual superheaters and air/water cooled corrosion probes, the corrosion during these experiments was monitored. Various ferritic and austenitic materials were investigated at steam temperatures ranging from 520 to 580{degree}C and flue gas temperatures ranging from 925 to 1100{degree}C. The results obtained in the demonstration program led to the rebuilding of the 350 MW pulverized coal fired boiler, Studstrup unit 4, into a co-firing boiler with straw in 2002. During the rebuilding, test tube sections of X20CrMoV12 1 and TP347H FG were built into the superheater and the reheater loops. The temperature ranges during these exposures was for the steam from 470 to 575{degree}C and for the flue gas from 1025 to 1300{degree}C. All these test tubes have been removed during the last three years at one year intervals for corrosion studies. The corrosion studies performed on all investigated tubes included measurements of the corrosion attack, light optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy of the corrosion products.

Frandsen, R.B.; Montgomery, M.; Larsen, O.H. [Elsam Engineering, Kolding (Denmark)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Qualification Tests of 474 Photomultiplier Tubes for the Inner Detector of the Double Chooz Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hemispherical 10" photomultiplier tube (PMT) R7081 from Hamamatsu Photonics K.K. (HPK) is used in various experiments in particle and astroparticle physics. We describe the test and calibration of 474 PMTs for the reactor antineutrino experiment Double Chooz. The unique test setup at Max-Planck-Institut f\\"ur Kernphysik Heidelberg (MPIK) allows one to calibrate 30 PMTs simultaneously and to characterize the single photo electron response, transit time spread, linear behaviour and saturation effects, photon detection efficiency and high voltage calibration.

C. Bauer; E. Borger; R. Hofacker; K. Jnner; F. Kaether; C. Langbrandtner; M. Lindner; S. Lucht; M. Reissfelder; S. Schnert; A. Stken; C. Wiebusch

2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

54

TESTING AND ACCEPTANCE OF FUEL PLATES FOR RERTR FUEL DEVELOPMENT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses how candidate fuel plates for RERTR Fuel Development experiments are examined and tested for acceptance prior to reactor insertion. These tests include destructive and nondestructive examinations (DE and NDE). The DE includes blister annealing for dispersion fuel plates, bend testing of adjacent cladding, and microscopic examination of archive fuel plates. The NDE includes Ultrasonic (UT) scanning and radiography. UT tests include an ultrasonic scan for areas of debonds and a high frequency ultrasonic scan to determine the "minimum cladding" over the fuel. Radiography inspections include identifying fuel outside of the maximum fuel zone and measurements and calculations for fuel density. Details of each test are provided and acceptance criteria are defined. These tests help to provide a high level of confidence the fuel plate will perform in the reactor without a breach in the cladding.

J.M. Wight; G.A. Moore; S.C. Taylor

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Case studies - combinatorial and pairwise testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Rich Web Applications. Logan, UT: Utah State Univ (2012). Compared exhaustive (discretized values) w/ CT. 2-way tests ...

56

Pyrotechnic study and test. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unidynamics/Phoenix entered into LANL contract {number_sign}9-X51-D9928-1 on March 11, 1991. The contract was to perform chemical analysis and provide analytical data, provide test data from functioning units, build and test pyrotechnic devices and fabricate and test approximately 100 pyrotechnic devices to approximate the chemical and functioning characteristics of the devices from the Army inventory. Because of government regulations, it became nearly impossible to ship the units from White Sands to Unidynamics. Consequently a series of functional tests were conducted at White Sands Missile Range. Comments on the functional tests are included herein. In addition, small scale tests were conducted at Unidynamics. These tests were to demonstrate a so called {open_quotes}line{close_quotes} charge and a {open_quotes}walking{close_quotes} charge. A discussion of these two charges is presented. The program was put on hold on November 6, 1991 and subsequently reopened to prepare and submit this report.

Smith, R.D.; Fronabarger, J.W. [Unidynamics/Phoenix, AZ (US)

1992-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

57

Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment Phase VI: Wind Tunnel Test Configurations and Available Data Campaigns  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary objective of the insteady aerodynamics experiment was to provide information needed to quantify the full-scale, three-dimensional aerodynamic behavior of horizontal-axis wind turbines. This report is intended to familiarize the user with the entire scope of the wind tunnel test and to support the use of the resulting data.

Hand, M. M.; Simms, D. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Jager, D. W.; Cotrell, J. R.; Schreck, S.; Larwood, S. M.

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Results of a one-way experiment to test the isotropy of the speed of light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the outcome of an experiment based on an improved version of Fizeau's coupled-slotted-discs that tests the fundamental postulates of Special Relativity for the one-way speed of light propagation. According to our methodology, important phenomena - a limit on and the diurnal regularity of the variation of the speed of light due to the movements of the Earth (assuming that the speed of light follows a Galilean transformation) - can be tested by the present experiment. However, these measurements do not indicate any significant diurnal variation. Consequently, the limit of the present outcome on the variation of the speed of light is insignificant. Assuming that the speed of light is not invariant and performing a rigorous statistical analysis, the limit established is approximately 1/50 of the previous Fizeau-type experiment with 95% confidence level. These outcomes are consistent with the assumptions of Einstein's Special Relativity.

Md. Farid Ahmed; Brendan M. Quine; Spiros Pagiatakis; A. D. Stauffer

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

59

On the design of experiments to study extreme field limits  

SciTech Connect

We propose experiments on the collision of high intensity electromagnetic pulses with electron bunches and on the collision of multiple electromagnetic pulses for studying extreme field limits in the nonlinear interaction of electromagnetic waves. The effects of nonlinear QED will be revealed in these laser plasma experiments.

Bulanov, S. S.; Chen, M.; Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W. P.; Bulanov, S. V.; Esirkepov, T. Zh.; Kando, M.; Koga, J. K.; Zhidkov, A. G.; Chen, P.; Mur, V. D.; Narozhny, N. B.; Popov, V. S.; Thomas, A. G. R.; Korn, G. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States) and University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Leung Center for Cosmology and Particle Astrophysics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (State University), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow 117218 (Russian Federation); University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States); Max-Planck-Institut fur Quantenoptik, Garching 85748 (Germany) and ELI Beamline Facility, Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Prague 18221 (Czech Republic)

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

60

Design Considerations and Operating Experience of the Sanford Com Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 400 MW oil-fired boiler was fitted with new burner guns and accessories to burn coal/oil mixture (COM) for a 120 full-power burn-day demonstration. Coal unloading and storage, and COM preparation and storage facilities were installed adjacent to the power house. Modifications to the steam generator and firing systems were made as the test program progressed. Burn tests through 50 percent coal (by weight) were completed, and optimization and long term test programs with 40 percent coal were completed. This paper describes the reasons for the demonstration, the project schedule, and the test facility itself. Discussions are also included of the rationale for equipment and process selection, the test program, and some of the operating experience that should be considered in the design of future permanent facilities.

Causilla, H.; Kasprik, A. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energys Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

Blaine Grover

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Test container design/fabrication/function for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox  

SciTech Connect

The gas generation experiments (GGE) are being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL0W) with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The purpose of the GGE is to determine the different quantities and types of gases that would be produced and the gas-generation rates that would develop if brine were introduced to CH-TRU waste under post-closure WIPP disposal room conditions. The experiment requires that a prescribed matrix of CH-TRU waste be placed in a 7.5 liter test container. After loaded with the CH-TRU waste, brine and inoculum mixtures (consisting of salt and microbes indigenous to the Carlsbad, New Mexico region) are added to the waste. The test will run for an anticipated time period of three to five years. The test container itself is an ASME rated pressure vessel constructed from Hastelloy C276 to eliminate corrosion that might contaminate the experimental results. The test container is required to maintain a maximum 10% head space with a maximum working pressure of 17.25 MPa (2,500 psia). The test container is designed to provide a gas sample of the head space without the removal of brine. Assembly of the test container lid and process valves is performed inside an inert atmosphere glovebox. Glovebox mockup activities were utilized from the beginning of the design phase to ensure the test container and associated process valves were designed for remote handling. In addition, test container processes (including brine addition, sparging, leak detection, and test container pressurization) are conducted inside the glovebox.

Knight, C.J.; Russell, N.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Michelbacher, J.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Test beam results on the Proton Zero Degree Calorimeter for the ALICE experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The proton Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZP) for the ALICE experiment will measure the energy of the spectator protons in heavy ion collisions at the CERN LHC. Since all the spectator protons have the same energy, the calorimeter's response is proportional to their number, providing a direct information on the centrality of the collision. The ZP is a spaghetti calorimeter, which collects and measures the Cherenkov light produced by the shower particles in silica optical fibers embedded in a brass absorber. The details of its construction will be shown. The calorimeter was tested at the CERN SPS using pion and electron beams with momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c. The response of the calorimeter and its energy resolution have been studied as a function of the beam energy. Also, the signal uniformity and a comparison between the transverse profile of the hadronic and electromagnetic shower are presented. Moreover, the differences between the calorimeter's responses to protons and pions of the same energy have been investigated, exploiting the proton contamination in the positive pion beams.

Arnaldi, R.; Chiavassa, E.; De Marco, N.; Ferretti, A.; Gagliardi, M.; Gallio, M.; Gemme, R.; Mereu, P.; Musso, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Piccotti, A.; Poggio, F.; Scomparin, E.; Stocco, D.; Vercellin, E.; Yermia, F. [Universita di Torino, Turin (Italy); INFN, Turin (Italy); Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A. [Universita di Cagliari, Cagliari (Italy); INFN, Cagliari (Italy)] (and others)

2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

64

Quantum Mechanics and CPT tests with neutral kaons at the KLOE experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutral kaons produced in the correlated pairs at the DAFNE phi-factory offer unique possibilities to perform fundamental tests of CPT invariance, as well as of the basic principles of quantum mechanics. The analysis of the data collected by the KLOE experiment allows to improve results on several parameters describing CPT violation and decoherence and to measure the regeneration cross section on the beam pipe materials.

Izabela Balwierz-Pytko

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

65

Prototype Test Results of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are currently no experiments, either satellite or ground-based, that are sensitive to astrophysical gamma-rays at energies between 20 and 250 GeV. We are developing the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) to explore this energy range. STACEE will use heliostat mirrors at a solar research facility to collect Cherenkov light from extensive air showers produced by high energy gamma-rays. Here we report on the results of prototype test work at the solar facility of Sandia National Laboratories (Albuquerque, NM). The work demonstrates that the facility is suitable for use as an astrophysical observatory. In addition, using a full scale prototype of part of STACEE, we detected atmospheric Cherenkov radiation at energies lower than any other ground-based experiment to date.

STACEE Collaboration

1997-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

66

Preparations for deuterium--tritium experiments on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The final hardware modifications for tritium operation have been completed for the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. [bold 21], 1324 (1992)]. These activities include preparation of the tritium gas handling system, installation of additional neutron shielding, conversion of the toroidal field coil cooling system from water to a Fluorinert[sup TM] system, modification of the vacuum system to handle tritium, preparation, and testing of the neutral beam system for tritium operation and a final deuterium--deuterium (D--D) run to simulate expected deuterium--tritium (D--T) operation. Testing of the tritium system with low concentration tritium has successfully begun. Simulation of trace and high power D--T experiments using D--D have been performed. The physics objectives of D--T operation are production of [approx]10 MW of fusion power, evaluation of confinement, and heating in deuterium--tritium plasmas, evaluation of [alpha]-particle heating of electrons, and collective effects driven by alpha particles and testing of diagnostics for confined [alpha] particles. Experimental results and theoretical modeling in support of the D--T experiments are reviewed.

Hawryluk, R.J.; Adler, H.; Alling, P.; Ancher, C.; Anderson, H.; Anderson, J.L.; Anderson, J.W.; Arunasalam, V.; Ascione, G.; Aschroft, D.; Barnes, C.W.; Barnes, G.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bateman, G.; Batha, S.; Baylor, L.A.; Beer, M.; Bell, M.G.; Biglow, T.S.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.; Bonoli, P.; Bretz, N.L.; Brunkhorst, C.; Budny, R.; Burgess, T.; Bush, H.; Bush, C.E.; Camp, R.; Caorlin, M.; Carnevale, H.; Chang, Z.; Chen, L.; Cheng, C.Z.; Chrzanowski, J.; Collazo, I.; Collins, J.; Coward, G.; Cowley, S.; Cropper, M.; Darrow, D.S.; Daugert, R.; DeLooper, J.; Duong, H.; Dudek, L.; Durst, R.; Efthimion, P.C.; Ernst, D.; Faunce, J.; Fonck, R.J.; Fredd, E.; Fredrickson, E.; Fromm, N.; Fu, G.Y.; Furth, H.P.; Garzotto, V.; Gentile, C.; Gettelfinger, G.; Gilbert, J.; Gioia, J.; Goldfinger, R.C.; Golian, T.; Gorelenkov, N.; Gouge, M.J.; Grek, B.; Grisham, L.R.; Hammett, G.; Hanson, G.R.; Heidbrink, W.; Hermann, H.W.; Hill, K.W.; Hirshman, S.; Hoffman, D.J.; Hosea, J.; Hulse, R.A.; Hsuan, H.; Ja

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Testing Protocols and Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI-Resnet Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testing Protocols & Results: Testing Protocols & Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI/RESNET Development Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting: Combustion Safety in Tight Houses Jim Fitzgerald Center for Energy and Environment Building Performance Institute Page 2  Weatherization, custom windows & central air conditioning  Attic insulation, wall insulation, and attic air sealing - borrowed specs from energy programs and used weatherization contractors  Average house leakage: 7.8 ACH50 before 5.4 ACH50 after MSP secret: this Airport Sound Program does weatherization work to reduce sound All Tightening of Existing Homes Can Affect Combustion Appliance Safety Tightening work was done on 3000 homes with no testing, what could possibly go wrong?

68

Two case studies in grammar-based test generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grammar-based test generation (GBTG) has seen extensive study and practical use since the 1970s. GBTG was introduced to generate source code for testing compilers from context-free grammars specifying language syntax. More recently, GBTG has been applied ... Keywords: Automated testing, Covering array, Grammar-based test generation, Really Simple Syndication (RSS), TCP, eXtended Markup Language (XML)

Daniel Hoffman; Hong-Yi Wang; Mitch Chang; David Ly-Gagnon; Lewis Sobotkiewicz; Paul Strooper

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Reducing test effort: A systematic mapping study on existing approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Context: Quality assurance effort, especially testing effort, is often a major cost factor during software development, which sometimes consumes more than 50% of the overall development effort. Consequently, one major goal is often to reduce testing ... Keywords: Efficiency improvement, Mapping study, Quality assurance, Software testing, Test effort reduction

Frank Elberzhager; Alla Rosbach; JRgen MNch; Robert Eschbach

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Students Computer Proficiencies, Perceptions and Experiences: An Exploratory Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College students use computers for many reasons. Computer experience by college students has been studied by several researchers. This is a report of an exploratory study of students using the computer laboratory of an urban university. The study shows that students use computers more for personal reasons than school works. The results shall help college administrators in deploying resources where it will be more useful for college students.

Muhammed A. Badamas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Detailed Test Plan for Simulated Leak Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field tests to be conducted during FY 2000 in support of DOE?s Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS). The VZTFS supports the Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology Initiative. The field tests will improve understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. These methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing steel-cased boreholes. Specific objectives are to 1) identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford?s waste disposal sites; 2) reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; 3) develop a detailed and accurate data base of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; and 4) identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) manages the VZTFS for DOE.

Ward, Anderson L.; Gee, Glendon W.

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Study of Experience Credit for Professional Engineering Licensure  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed a study of experience credit for professional engineering licensure for the Department of Energy's Industrial Assessment Center (IAC) Program. One of the study's goals was to determine how state licensure boards grant experience credit for engineering licensure, particularly in regards to IAC experience and experience prior to graduation. Another goal involved passing IAC information to state licensure boards to allow the boards to become familiar with the program and determine if they would grant credit to IAC graduates. The National Council of Examiners for Engineers and Surveyors (NCEES) has adopted a document, the ''Model Law''. This document empowers states to create state engineering boards and oversee engineering licensure. The board can also interpret and adopt rules and regulations. The Model Law also gives a general ''process'' for engineering licensure, the ''Model Law Engineer''. The Model Law Engineer requires that an applicant for professional licensure, or professional engineering (PE) licensure, obtain a combination of formal education and professional experience and successfully complete the fundamentals of engineering (FE) and PE exams. The Model Law states that a PE applicant must obtain four years of ''acceptable'' engineering experience after graduation to be allowed to sit for the PE exam. Although the Model Law defines ''acceptable experience,'' it is somewhat open to interpretation, and state boards decide whether applicants have accumulated the necessary amount of experience. The Model Law also allows applicants one year of credit for postgraduate degrees as well as experience credit for teaching courses in engineering. The Model Law grants states the power to adopt and amend the bylaws and rules of the Model Law licensure process. It allows state boards the freedom to modify the experience requirements for professional licensure. This power has created variety in experience requirements, and licensure requirements can differ from state to state. Before this study began, six questions were developed to help document how state boards grant experience credit. Many of the questions were formulated to determine how states deal with teaching experience, postgraduate credit, experience prior to graduation, PE and FE waivers, and the licensure process in general. Data were collected from engineering licensure boards for each of the fifty states and the District of Columbia. Telephone interviews were the primary method of data collection, while email correspondence was also used to a lesser degree. Prior to contacting each board, the researchers attempted to review each state's licensure web site. Based on the data collected, several trends and patterns were identified. For example, there is a general trend away from offering credit for experience prior to graduation. The issue becomes a problem when a PE from one state attempts to gain a license in another state by comity or endorsement. Tennessee and Kansas have recently stopped offering this credit and Mississippi cautions applicants that it could be difficult to obtain licensure in other states.

Martin, M.A.

2003-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

73

Production and Testing Experience with the SRF Cavities for the CEBAF 12 GeV Upgrade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The CEBAF recirculating CW electron linear accelerator at Jefferson Lab is presently undergoing a major upgrade to 12 GeV. This project includes the fabrication, preparation, and testing of 80 new 7-cell SRF cavities, followed by their incorporation into ten new cryomodules for subsequent testing and installation. In order to maximize the cavity Q over the full operable dynamic range in CEBAF (as high as 25 MV/m), the decision was taken to apply a streamlined preparation process that includes a final light temperature-controlled electropolish of the rf surface over the vendor-provided bulk BCP etch. Cavity processing work began at JLab in September 2010 and will continue through December 2011. The excellent performance results are exceeding project requirements and indicate a fabrication and preparation process that is stable and well controlled. The cavity production and performance experience to date will be summarized and lessons learned reported to the community.

A. Burrill, G.K. Davis, F. Marhauser, C.E. Reece, A.V. Reilly, M. Stirbet

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

MINET validation study using steam generator test data  

SciTech Connect

Three steam generator transient test cases that were simulated using the MINET computer code are described, with computed results compared against experimental data. The MINET calculations closely agreed with the experiment for both the once-through and the U-tube steam generator test cases. The effort is part of an ongoing effort to validate the MINET computer code for thermal-hydraulic plant systems transient analysis, and strongly supports the validity of the MINET models.

Van Tuyle, G.J.; Guppy, J.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Scaling studies and conceptual experiment designs for NGNP CFD assessment  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to document scaling studies and conceptual designs for flow and heat transfer experiments intended to assess CFD codes and their turbulence models proposed for application to prismatic NGNP concepts. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses have been applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant turbulent forced convection with slight transverse property variation. In a pressurized cooldown (LOFA) simulation, the flow quickly becomes laminar with some possible buoyancy influences. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple hot jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentumdominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two types of heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second type will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of CFD solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing and turbulence models for typical NGNP plenum geometries in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. As indicated by the scaling studies, in normal full power operation of a typical NGNP conceptual design, buoyancy influences should be negligible in the lower plenum. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets as they mix in flowing through the array of posts in a lower plenum en route to the single exit duct. Conceptual designs for such experiments are described.

D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Uncertainty Study of INEEL EST Laboratory Battery Testing Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INEELEXT-01-00505 December 2001 Uncertainty Study of INEEL EST Laboratory Battery Testing Systems Volume 1 Background and Derivation of Uncertainty Relationships John L. Morrison...

77

Deflagration studies on waste Tank 101-SY: Test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses test procedures and calibration of equipment to study the flammability and deflagration of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and air in waste tanks. (JL)

Cashdollar, K.L.; Zlochower, I.A.; Hertzberg, M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Status of The US Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Study was commissioned jointly by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to investigate the potential for future U.S. based long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments beyond the currently planned program. The Study focused on MW class conventional neutrino beams that can be produced at Fermilab or BNL. The experimental baselines are based on two possible detector locations: 1) off?axis to the existing Fermilab NuMI beamline at baselines of 700 to 810 km and 2) NSF's proposed future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at baselines greater than 1000 km. Two detector technologies are considered: a megaton class Water Cherenkov detector deployed deep underground at a DUSEL site

Mary Bishai; study group

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Can sick buildings be assessed by testing human performance in field experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present paper is devoted to the Sick Building Syndrome and describes an experiment comparing a diagnosed sick' with a healthy' Swedish preschool. The indoor air quality of both buildings were nearly the same and the concentrations of total separated volatile organic compounds were low according to suggested guidelines for indoor air in nonindustrial buildings. Forty-eight previously unexposed subjects were exposed to each of the two buildings for one day, and the effect of the exposure was assessed with a battery of diverse psychological test. Despite a favorable experimental situation of utilizing a building with a record of producing the Syndrome, the results of psychological tests of mental and motor performance, and therefore the answer to the question raised by the title above, were in the negative. This failure raises questions both regarding the choice of subjects and experimental methods including the selection of tests, the duration of exposure, and the environmental setting. Several combinations of experimental method and subjects which must be considered in future research on indoor pollution are discussed.

Berglund, B. (Univ. of Stockholm (Sweden)); Berglund, U. (Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden)); Engen, T. (Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Using acceptance tests as a support for clarifying requirements: A series of experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the main reasons for the failure of many software projects is the late discovery of a mismatch between the customers' expectations and the pieces of functionality implemented in the delivered system. At the root of such a mismatch is often a set ... Keywords: Acceptance testing, Empirical studies, Fit tables, Requirements

Filippo Ricca; Marco Torchiano; Massimiliano Di Penta; Mariano Ceccato; Paolo Tonella

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Case study of a stimulation experiment in a fluvial, tight-sandstone gas reservoir  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports that a successful stimulation experiment was conducted in a fluvial sandstone of the Mesaverde formation at the U.S. DOE's Multiwell Experiment (MWX) Site in the Piceance basin of Colorado. The stimulation experiment consisted of stress tests, a three-well prefracture interference test, step-rate/flowback tests, a minifracture, a full stimulation treatment borehole geophone diagnostics during fracturing, and a postfracture interference test.

Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, R.; Thorne, B.J.; Lorenz, J.C. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Branagan, P.T.; Cipolla, C.L. (CER Corp., Las Vegas, NV (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

STATUS OF THE US LONG BASELINE NEUTRINO EXPERIMENT STUDY.  

SciTech Connect

The US Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment Study was commissioned jointly by Brookhaven National Laboratory and Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory to investigate the potential for future U.S. based long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments beyond the currently planned program. The Study focused on MW class convention at neutrino beams that can be produced at Fermilab or BNL. The experimental baselines are based on two possible detector locations: (1) off-axis to the existing Fermilab NuMI beamline at baselines of 700 to 810 km and (2) NSF's proposed future Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) at baselines greater than 1000 km. Two detector technologies are considered: a megaton class Water Cherenkov detector deployed deep underground at a DUSEL site, or a 100kT Liquid Argon Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) deployed on the surface at any of the proposed sites. The physics sensitivities of the proposed experiments are summarized. We find that conventional horn focused wide-band neutrino beam options from Fermilab or BNL aimed at a massive detector with a baseline of > 1000 km have the best sensitivity to CP violation and the neutrino mass hierarchy for values of the mixing angle {theta}{sub 13} down to 2.2{sup o}.

BISHAI,M.

2006-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

83

Electrochemical Experiments Used to Study Li-ion Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the third of three talks on nanostructures for Li-ion batteries. The talks provide an up-to-date review of the issues and challenges facing Li-ion battery research with special focus on how nanostructures/nanotechnology are being applied to this field. Novel materials reported as prospective candidates for anode, cathode and electrolyte will be summarized. The expected role of nanostructures in improving the performance of Li-ion batteries and the actual pros and cons of using such structures in this device will be addressed. Electrochemical experiments used to study Li-ion batteries will also be discussed. This includes the introduction to the standard experimental set-up and how experimental data (from charge-discharge experiments, cyclic voltammetry, impedance spectroscopy, etc) are interpreted.

Mukaibo, Hitomi (University of Florida, Martin Research Group)

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today s nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. . Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of IASCC are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure to irradiation, stress, and corrosive environment for all core internal components. The objective of this effort within the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program is to evaluate the response and mechanisms of IASCC in austenitic stainless steels with single variable experiments. A series of high-value irradiated specimens has been acquired from the past international research programs, providing a valuable opportunity to examine the mechanisms of IASCC. This batch of irradiated specimens has been received and inventoried. In addition, visual examination and sample cleaning has been completed. Microhardness testing has been performed on these specimens. All samples show evidence of hardening, as expected, although the degree of hardening has saturated and no trend with dose is observed. Further, the change in hardening can be converted to changes in mechanical properties. The calculated yield stress is consistent with previous data from light water reactor conditions. In addition, some evidence of changes in deformation mode was identified via examination of the microhardness indents. This analysis may provide further insights into the deformation mode under larger scale tests. Finally, swelling analysis was performed using immersion density methods. Most alloys showed some evidence of swelling, consistent with the expected trends for this class of alloy. The Hf-doped alloy showed densification rather than swelling. This observation may be related to the formation of second-phases under irradiation, although further examination is required

Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Gussev, Maxim N [ORNL

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

A spheromak ignition experiment reusing Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on available experimental results and theory, a scenario is presented to achieve ohmic ignition in a spheromak by slow ({approximately} 10 sec.) helicity injection using power from the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) substation. Some of the other parts needed (vacuum vessel, coils, power supplies, pumps, shielded building space) might also be obtained from MFTF or other salvage, as well as some components needed for intermediate experiments for additional verification of the concept (especially confinement scaling). The proposed ignition experiment would serve as proof-of-principle for the spheromak DT fusion reactor design published by Hagenson and Krakowski, with a nuclear island cost about ten times less than a tokamak of comparable power. Designs at even higher power density and lower cost might be possible using Christofilos` concept of a liquid lithium blanket. Since all structures would be protected from neutrons by the lithium blanket and the tritium inventory can be reduced by continuous removal from the liquid blanket, environmental and safety characteristics appear to be favorable.

Fowler, T.K.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

86

Design of an Experiment to Test Quantum Probabilistic Behavior of the Financial market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent crash demonstrated (once again) that the description of the financial market by present financial mathematics cannot be considered as totally satisfactory. We remind that nowadays financial mathematics is heavily based on the use of random variables and stochastic processes which are described by Kolmogorov's measure-theoretic model for probability ("classical probabilistic model"). I speculate that the present financial crises is a sign (a kind of experiment to test validity of classical probability theory at the financial market) that the use of this model in finances should be either totally rejected or at least completed. One of the best candidates for a new probabilistic financial model is quantum probability or its generalizations, so to say quantum-like (QL) models. Speculations that the financial market may be nonclassical have been present in scientific literature for many years. The aim of this note is to move from the domain of speculation to rigorous statistical arguments in favor of probabilistic nonclassicality of the financial market. I design a corresponding statistical test which is based on violation of the formula of total probability (FTP). The latter is the basic in classical probability and its violation would be a strong sign in favor of QL behavior at the market.

Andrei Khrennikov

2009-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

87

PRELIMINARY THERMAL AND THERMOMECHANICAL MODELING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY HEATER EXPERIMENTS AT HANFORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotherms in Vertical Plane, Hanford Full-Scale Experiment:Isotherms in Vertical Plane, Hanford Full-Scale Experiment:Isotherms in Vertical Plane, Hanford Full-Scale Experiment:

chan, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Software security testing of an online banking system: a unique research experience for undergraduates and computer teachers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a unique summer project for a group of undergraduate students and high school computer teachers to gain research experiences in the area of cybersecurity. The students and teachers were selected from the participants in the NSF REU ... Keywords: access control, cybersecurity, mutation analysis, security attacks, security testing, software testing

Dianxiang Xu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Tritium experiments on components for fusion fuel processing at the Tritium Systems Test Assembly  

SciTech Connect

Under a collaborative agreement between US and Japan, two tritium processing components, a palladium diffuser and a ceramic electrolysis cell have been tested with tritium for application to a Fuel Cleanup System (FCU) for plasma exhaust processing at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The fundamental characteristics, compatibility with tritium, impurities effects with tritium, and long-term behavior of the components, were studied over a three year period. Based on these studies, an integrated process loop, JAERI Fuel Cleanup System'' equipped with above components was installed at the TSTA for full scale demonstration of the plasma exhaust reprocessing.

Konishi, S.; Yoshida, H.; Naruse, Y. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)); Carlson, R.V.; Binning, K.E.; Bartlit, J.R.; Anderson, J.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Vadose zone transport field study: Detailed test plan for simulated leak tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Groundwater/Vadose Zone Integration Project Science and Technology initiative was created in FY 1999 to reduce the uncertainty associated with vadose zone transport processes beneath waste sites at DOE's Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. This information is needed not only to evaluate the risks from transport, but also to support the adoption of measures for minimizing impacts to the groundwater and surrounding environment. The principal uncertainties in vadose zone transport are the current distribution of source contaminants and the natural heterogeneity of the soil in which the contaminants reside. Oversimplified conceptual models resulting from these uncertainties and limited use of hydrologic characterization and monitoring technologies have hampered the understanding contaminant migration through Hanford's vadose zone. Essential prerequisites for reducing vadose transport uncertainly include the development of accurate conceptual models and the development or adoption of monitoring techniques capable of delineating the current distributions of source contaminants and characterizing natural site heterogeneity. The Vadose Zone Transport Field Study (VZTFS) was conceived as part of the initiative to address the major uncertainties confronting vadose zone fate and transport predictions at the Hanford Site and to overcome the limitations of previous characterization attempts. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is managing the VZTFS for DOE. The VZTFS will conduct field investigations that will improve the understanding of field-scale transport and lead to the development or identification of efficient and cost-effective characterization methods. Ideally, these methods will capture the extent of contaminant plumes using existing infrastructure (i.e., more than 1,300 steel-cased boreholes). The objectives of the VZTFS are to conduct controlled transport experiments at well-instrumented field sites at Hanford to: identify mechanisms controlling transport processes in soils typical of the hydrogeologic conditions of Hanford's waste disposal sites; reduce uncertainty in conceptual models; develop a detailed and accurate database of hydraulic and transport parameters for validation of three-dimensional numerical models; identify and evaluate advanced, cost-effective characterization methods with the potential to assess changing conditions in the vadose zone, particularly as surrogates of currently undetectable high-risk contaminants. This plan provides details for conducting field tests during FY 2000 to accomplish these objectives. Details of additional testing during FY 2001 and FY 2002 will be developed as part of the work planning process implemented by the Integration Project.

AL Ward; GW Gee

2000-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Potential Offsite Radiological Doses Estimated for the Proposed Divine Strake Experiment, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

An assessment of the potential radiation dose that residents offsite of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) might receive from the proposed Divine Strake experiment was made to determine compliance with Subpart H of Part 61 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations, National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other than Radon from Department of Energy Facilities. The Divine Strake experiment, proposed by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, consists of a detonation of 700 tons of heavy ammonium nitrate fuel oil-emulsion above the U16b Tunnel complex in Area 16 of the NTS. Both natural radionuclides suspended, and historic fallout radionuclides resuspended from the detonation, have potential to be transported outside the NTS boundary by wind. They may, therefore, contribute radiological dose to the public. Subpart H states ''Emissions of radionuclides to the ambient air from Department of Energy facilities shall not exceed those amounts that would cause any member of the public to receive in any year an effective dose equivalent of 10 mrem/yr'' (Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] 61.92) where mrem/yr is millirem per year. Furthermore, application for U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approval of construction of a new source or modification of an existing source is required if the effective dose equivalent, caused by all emissions from the new construction or modification, is greater than or equal to 0.1 mrem/yr (40 CFR 61.96). In accordance with Section 61.93, a dose assessment was conducted with the computer model CAP88-PC, Version 3.0. In addition to this model, a dose assessment was also conducted by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This modeling was conducted to obtain dose estimates from a model designed for acute releases and which addresses terrain effects and uses meteorology from multiple locations. Potential radiation dose to a hypothetical maximally exposed individual at the closest NTS boundary to the proposed Divine Strake experiment, as estimated by the CAP88-PC model, was 0.005 mrem with wind blowing directly towards that location. Boundary dose, as modeled by NARAC, ranged from about 0.006 to 0.007 mrem. Potential doses to actual offsite populated locations were generally two to five times lower still, or about 40 to 100 times lower then the 0.1 mrem level at which EPA approval is required pursuant to Section 61.96.

Ron Warren

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The use of mutation in testing experiments and its sensitivity to external threats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mutation analysts has emerged as a standard approach for empirical assessment of testing techniques. The test practitioners decide about cost-effectiveness of testing strategies based on the number of mutants the testing techniques detect. Though fundamental ... Keywords: experimental design, hand-seeded faults, mutants, mutation testing, real faults, statistical analysis

Akbar Siami Namin; Sahitya Kakarla

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Testing the "dark-energy"-dominated cosmology via the solar-system experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the recent astronomical data, the most part of energy density in the Universe (73%) is in the "dark" form (such as the so-called "quintessence", inflaton potential, polarization of vacuum, and so on), which is effectively described by Lambda-term in the Einstein equations. All arguments in favor of the dark energy were obtained so far from the observational data related to very large (intergalactic) scales. The present letter shows that Lambda-dominated cosmology can be efficiently tested via the solar-system experiments, seeking for the effect of local Hubble expansion: if the dark energy really exists, it should increase the mean Earth-Moon distance by 2-3 cm per year, which is comparable with the effect of geophysical tides and well measurable by the lunar laser ranging. As follows from our analysis, the "local" Hubble constant should be H_0^(loc) = 56 +/- 8 (km/s)/Mpc, implying that either the total Hubble constant is H_0 = 59 +/- 8 (km/s)/Mpc (i.e. a bit less than the commonly-accepted value...

Dumin, Y V

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Experiences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Experiences Experiences with 100Gbps Network Applications Mehmet Balman, Eric Pouyoul, Yushu Yao, E. Wes Bethel Burlen Loring, Prabhat, John Shalf, Alex Sim, and Brian L. Tierney Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, CA, 94720, USA {mbalman,epouyoul,yyao,ewbethel,bloring,prabhat,jshalf,asim,btierney}@lbl.gov ABSTRACT 100Gbps networking has finally arrived, and many research and educational institutions have begun to deploy 100Gbps routers and services. ESnet and Internet2 worked together to make 100Gbps networks available to researchers at the Supercomputing 2011 con- ference in Seattle Washington. In this paper, we describe two of the first applications to take advantage of this network. We demon- strate a visualization application that enables remotely located sci- entists to gain insights from large datasets. We also demonstrate climate

95

Field testing plan for unsaturated zone monitoring and field studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Arizona, in cooperation with the Bureau of Economic Geology at The University of Texas at Austin, and Stephens and Associates in Albuquerque, New Mexico has developed a field testing plan for evaluating subsurface monitoring systems. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission has requested development of these testing plans for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites (LLW) and for monitoring at decommissioned facilities designated under the {open_quotes}Site Decommissioning Management Plan{close_quotes} (SDMP). The tests are conducted on a 50 m by 50 m plot on the University of Arizona`s Maricopa Agricultural Center. Within the 50 m by 50 m plot one finds: (1) an instrumented buried trench, (2) monitoring islands similar to those proposed for the Ward Valley, California LLW Facility, (3) deep borehole monitoring sites, (4) gaseous transport monitoring, and (5) locations for testing non-invasive geophysical measurement techniques. The various subplot areas are instrumented with commercially available instruments such as neutron probes, time domain reflectometry probes, tensiometers, psychrometers, heat dissipation sensors, thermocouples, solution samplers, and cross-hole geophysics electrodes. Measurement depths vary from ground surface to 15 m. The data from the controlled flow and transport experiments, conducted over the plot, will be used to develop an integrated approach to long-term monitoring of the vadose zone at waste disposal sites. The data will also be used to test field-scale flow and transport models. This report describes in detail the design of the experiment and the methodology proposed for evaluating the data.

Young, M.H.; Wierenga, P.J.; Warrick, A.W. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energys Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energys lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the worlds premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of the experiment. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in September 2008, and the fabrication and assembly of the experiment test train as well as installation and testing of the control and support systems that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation are being completed in early calendar 2009. The first experiment is scheduled to be ready for insertion in the ATR by April 30, 2009. This paper will discuss the design of the experiment including the test train and the temperature and compressive load monitoring, control, and data collection systems.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

REVIEW OF FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY (FFTF) FUEL EXPERIMENTS FOR STORAGE IN INTERIM STORAGE CASKS (ISC)  

SciTech Connect

Appendix H, Section H.3.3.10.11 of the Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR), provides the limits to be observed for fueled components authorized for storage in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) spent fuel storage system. Currently, the authorization basis allows standard driver fuel assemblies (DFA), as described in the FSAR Chapter 17, Section 17.5.3.1, to be stored provided decay power per assembly is {le} 250 watts, post-irradiation time is four years minimum, average assembly burn-up is 150,000 MWD/MTHM maximum and the pre-irradiation enrichment is 29.3% maximum (per H.3.3.10.11). In addition, driver evaluation (DE), core characterizer assemblies (CCA), and run-to-cladding-breach (RTCB) assemblies are included based on their similarities to a standard DFA. Ident-69 pin containers with fuel pins from these DFAs can also be stored. Section H.3.3.10.11 states that fuel types outside the specification criteria above will be addressed on a case-by-case basis. There are many different types of fuel and blanket experiments that were irradiated in the FFTF which now require offload to the spent fuel storage system. Two reviews were completed for a portion of these special type fuel components to determine if placement into the Core Component Container (CCC)/Interim Storage Cask (ISC) would require any special considerations or changes to the authorization basis. Project mission priorities coupled with availability of resources and analysts prevented these evaluations from being completed as a single effort. Areas of review have included radiological accident release consequences, radiological shielding adequacy, criticality safety, thermal limits, confinement, and stress. The results of these reviews are available in WHC-SD-FF-RPT-005, Rev. 0 and 1, ''Review of FFTF Fuel Experiments for Storage at ISA'', (Reference I), which subsequently allowed a large portion of these components to be included in the authorization basis (Table H.3.3-21). The report also identified additional components and actions in Section 3.0 and Table 3 that require further evaluation. The purpose of this report is to evaluate another portion of the remaining inventory (i.e., delayed neutron signal fuel, blanket assemblies, highly enriched assemblies, newly loaded Ident-69 pin containers, and returned fuel) to ensure it can be safely off loaded to the FFTF spent fuel storage system.

CHASTAIN, S.A.

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

98

LNG cascading damage study. Volume I, fracture testing report.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the liquefied natural gas (LNG) Cascading Damage Study, a series of structural tests were conducted to investigate the thermal induced fracture of steel plate structures. The thermal stresses were achieved by applying liquid nitrogen (LN{sub 2}) onto sections of each steel plate. In addition to inducing large thermal stresses, the lowering of the steel temperature simultaneously reduced the fracture toughness. Liquid nitrogen was used as a surrogate for LNG due to safety concerns and since the temperature of LN{sub 2} is similar (-190 C) to LNG (-161 C). The use of LN{sub 2} ensured that the tests could achieve cryogenic temperatures in the range an actual vessel would encounter during a LNG spill. There were four phases to this test series. Phase I was the initial exploratory stage, which was used to develop the testing process. In the Phase II series of tests, larger plates were used and tested until fracture. The plate sizes ranged from 4 ft square pieces to 6 ft square sections with thicknesses from 1/4 inches to 3/4 inches. This phase investigated the cooling rates on larger plates and the effect of different notch geometries (stress concentrations used to initiate brittle fracture). Phase II was divided into two sections, Phase II-A and Phase II-B. Phase II-A used standard A36 steel, while Phase II-B used marine grade steels. In Phase III, the test structures were significantly larger, in the range of 12 ft by 12 ft by 3 ft high. These structures were designed with more complex geometries to include features similar to those on LNG vessels. The final test phase, Phase IV, investigated differences in the heat transfer (cooling rates) between LNG and LN{sub 2}. All of the tests conducted in this study are used in subsequent parts of the LNG Cascading Damage Study, specifically the computational analyses.

Petti, Jason P.; Kalan, Robert J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Recent Progress of RF Cavity Study at Mucool Test Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summar of presentation is: (1) MTA is a multi task working space to investigate RF cavities for R&D of muon beam cooling channel - (a) Intense 400 MeV H{sup -} beam, (b) Handle hydrogen (flammable) gas, (c) 5 Tesla SC solenoid magnet, (d) He cryogenic/recycling system; (2) Pillbox cavity has been refurbished to search better RF material - Beryllium button test will be happened soon; (3) E x B effect has been tested in a box cavity - Under study (result seems not to be desirable); (4) 201 MHz RF cavity with SRF cavity treatment has been tested at low magnetic field - (a) Observed some B field effect on maximum field gradient and (b) Further study is needed (large bore SC magnet will be delivered end of 2011); and (5) HPRF cavity beam test has started - (a) No RF breakdown observed and (b) Design a new HPRF cavity to investigate more plasma loading effect.

Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

100

EUROPEAN GEOTHERMAL DRILLING EXPERIENCE- PROBLEM AREAS AND CASE STUDIES  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

EUROPEAN GEOTHERMAL DRILLING EXPERIENCE- EUROPEAN GEOTHERMAL DRILLING EXPERIENCE- PROBLEM AREAS AND CASE STUDIES 0. Baron and P. Ungemach Commisslon of The European Communities Belglum ABSTRACT Geothermal d r i l l i n g h a s long been restricted i n Western Europe t o t h e sole d r y s t e a m f i e l d of L a r d e r e l l o i n I t a l y . I n t h e l a s t f e w y e a r s , a wider e x p e r i e n c e i s b u i l d i n g up a s a consequence of i n t e n s i f i e d explo- r a t i o n and development programs c a r r i e d o u t for e v a l u a t i o n and produc- t i o n of both l o w - and high-enthalpy geothermal resources. A sample Of some 40 boreholes i n d i c a t e s the following problem areas. 1. Low-Enthalpy D r i l l i n 9 Due t o s i m i l a r s e t t i n g s - - h o t water system flowing i n sedimentary u n i t s a t t e m p e r a t u r e s and d e p t h s r a n g i n g f r o m 40" t o 140°C (104" t o 284°F) and from 1,000 t

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101

Aero engine test experience with CMSX-4{reg_sign} alloy single-crystal turbine blades  

SciTech Connect

A team approach involving a turbine engine company (Rolls-Royce), its single-crystal casting facilities, and a superalloy developer and ingot manufacturer (Cannon-Muskegon), utilizing the concepts of simultaneous engineering, has been used to develop CMSX-4 alloy successfully for turbine blade applications. CMSX-4 alloy is a second-generation nickel-base single-crystal superalloy containing 3 percent (wt) rhenium (Re) and 70 percent volume fraction of the coherent {gamma}{prime} precipitate strengthening phase. The paper details the single-crystal casting process and heat treatment manufacturing development for turbine blades in CMSX-4 alloy. Competitive single-crystal casting yields are being achieved in production and extensive vacuum heat treatment experience confirms CMSX-4 alloy to have a practical production solution heat treat/homogenization ``window.`` The creep-rupture data-base on CMSX-4 alloy now includes 325 data points from 17 heats including 3,630 kg (8,000 lb) production size heats. An appreciable portion of this data was machined-from-blade (MFB) properties, which indicate turbine blade component capabilities based on single-crystal casting process, component configuration, and heat treatment. The use of hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been shown to eliminate single-crystal casting micropores, which along with the essential absence of {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} eutectic phase, carbides, stable oxide, nitride and sulfide inclusions, results in remarkably high mechanical fatigue properties, with smooth and particularly notched specimens. The Re addition has been shown not only to benefit creep and mechanical fatigue strength, but also bare oxidation, hot corrosion, and coating performance. The high level of balanced properties determined by extensive laboratory evaluation has been confirmed during engine testing of the Rolls-Royce Pegasus turbofan.

Fullagar, K.P.L.; Broomfield, R.W.; Hulands, M. [Rolls-Royce PLC, Derby (United Kingdom). Aerospace Group; Harris, K.; Erickson, G.L.; Sikkenga, S.L. [Cannon-Muskegon Corp., Muskegon, MI (United States). SPS Technologies

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Case Study on Testing and Certification of Equipment for a Volt-VAR Control Application at Hydro-Qubec  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study shares the practical experience gained in the certification and testing of the various distribution devices that are part of Hydro-Qubecs voltage-var control project. The certification process at Hydro-Qubec is specifically addressed, which included testing and validation at the Hydro-Qubec Research Institute (the Institut de recherche dHydro-Qubec, or IREQ), field measurements from a pilot project, and experience related to ...

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

103

Program Experience and Its Regulatory Implications: A Case Study...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

efficiency program designs, as illustrated by a dozen recent utility programs for residential, commercial, and industrial customers. This experience is then examined in terms of...

104

Beam Breakup (BBU) instability experiments on the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and predictions for the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA)  

SciTech Connect

In linear accelerators the maximum achievable beam current is often limited by the Beam Breakup (BBU) instability. This instability arises from the interaction of a transversely displaced beam with the dipole modes of the acceleration cavities. The modes of interest have non-zero transverse magnetic fields at the center of the cavity. This oscillating field imparts a time varying transverse impulse to the beam as it passes through the accelerating gap. Of the various modes possible only the TM/sub 130/ mode has been observed on the Experimental Test Accelerator (ETA) and it is expected to surface on the Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA). The amplitude of the instability depends sensitively on two cavity parameters; Q and Z/sub perpendicular//Q. Q is the well-known qualtiy factor which characterizes the damping rate of an oscillator. Z/sub perpendicular//Q is a measure of how well the beam couples to the cavity fields of the mode and in turn, how the fields act back on the beam. Lowering the values of both these parameters reduces BBU growth.

Caporaso, G.J.; Cole, A.G.; Struve, K.W.

1983-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

105

Model-based testing in legacy software modernization: an experience report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of cloud computing more and more vendors strive to modernize legacy applications and deploy them into the cloud. In particular when the legacy system is still applied in the field, the vendor must ensure a seamless change to the modernized ... Keywords: Fokus!MBT, Model-driven modernization, UML Testing Profile (UTP), model-based testing (MBT), test automation

Marc-Florian Wendland, Marco Kranz, Christian Hein, Tom Ritter, Ana Garca Flaquer

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

How accurately can one test CPT conservation with reactor and solar neutrino experiments?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the combined data from solar neutrino experiments and from the KamLAND reactor neutrino experiment can establish an upper limit on, or detect, potential CPT violation in the neutrino sector of order 10^{-20} GeV to 10^{-21} GeV.

John N. Bahcall; V. Barger; Danny Marfatia

2002-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

107

Review of scratch test studies of abrasion mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The use of scratch tests to simulate the material removal mechanisms which occur during abrasion is reviewed. Although useful studies of the effect of the rake angle on material removal have been carried out using diamond tools, closer simulation of the mechanisms of material removal can be obtained using actual irregular individual abrasive particles as scratch tools. Previous studies are reviewed in which scratch tests have been performed with both conventional scratch test instruments and a specially designed system used for )ital in situ) scratch tests in the scanning electron microscope (SEM). Multiple-pass scratch tests over the same scratch path have been shown to create surface features and wear debris particles which are very similar to those produced by low-stress abrasion. Alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) particles have been shown to produce continuous micromachining chips from the hard, brittle carbide phase of Stellite alloys, establishing direct cutting as the important mechanism of material removal for this type of abrasive. An )ital in situ) study of material removal from white cast irons by quartz particles has provided conclusive evidence that carbide removal does not occur by direct cutting but rather always involves microfracture. Previously unpublished work which has compared scratch tests with crushed quartz and alumina particles is included. Also described is a new scratch test system which controls the depth of cut rather than the scratch load in order to simulate high-stress abrasion, in which abrasive particles are constrained to a fixed depth of cut. Preliminary new results show substantially different carbide fracture behavior under fixed-depth conditions. 8 figs., 20 refs.

Kosel, T.H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energys Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energys lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the worlds premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In addition, the purpose and differences between the two experiments will be compared and the irradiation results to date on the first experiment will be presented.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Geologic Assessment of the Damage Zone from the Second Test at Source Physics Experiment-Nevada (SPE-N)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Center for Nuclear Security (NCNS), established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, is conducting a series of explosive tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS; formerly the Nevada Test Site) that are designed to increase the understanding of certain basic physical phenomena associated with underground explosions. These tests will aid in developing technologies that might be used to detect underground nuclear explosions in support of verification activities for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). The initial NCNS project is a series of explosive tests, known collectively as the Source Physics Experiment at the NNSS (SPE-N), being conducted in granitic rocks at the Climax stock in northern Yucca Flat. The SPE-N test series is designed to study the generation and propagation of seismic waves. The data will be used to improve the predictive capability of calculational models for detecting and characterizing underground explosions. The first SPE-N test (SPE-N-1) was a calibration shot conducted in May 2011, using 100 kilograms (kg) of explosives at the depth of 54.9 meters (m) (180 feet [ft]) in the U-15n source hole. SPE-N-2 was conducted in October 2011, using 1,000 kg of explosives at the depth of 45.7 m (150 ft) in the same source hole. Following the SPE-N-2 test, the core hole U-15n#10 was drilled at an angle from the surface to intercept the SPE-N-2 shot point location to obtain information necessary to characterize the damage zone. The desire was to determine the position of the damage zone near the shot point, at least on the northeast side, where the core hole penetrated it. The three-dimensional shape and symmetry of the damage zone are unknown at this time. Rather than spherical in shape, the dimensions of the damage zone could be influenced by the natural fracture sets in the vicinity. Geologic characterization of the borehole included geophysical logging, a directional survey, and geologic description of the core to document visual evidence of damage. Selected core samples were provided to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for laboratory tests (to be reported by SNL). A significant natural fault zone was encountered in the U-15n#10 angle core hole between the drilled depths of 149 and 155 ft (straight-line distance or range station [RS] from the shot point of 7.5 to 5.7 m). However, several of the fractures observed in the U-15n#10 hole are interpreted as having been caused by the explosion. These fractures are characterized by a fresh, mechanically broken look, with uncoated and very irregular surfaces. They tend to terminate against natural fractures and have orientations that differ from the previously defined natural fracture sets. The most distant fracture from the shot point that could be interpreted as having been caused by the explosion was seen at approximately RS 10.0 m. No other possibly explosion-induced fractures are apparent above the fault, but are common starting at RS 5.4 m, which is below the fault. It is unknown how the fault zone might have affected the propagation of seismic waves or how the materials in the fault zone (altered granite, breccia, gouge) were affected by the explosion. From RS 3.3 m to the end of the recovered core at RS 1.6 m, some of the core samples are softer and lighter in color, but do not appear to be weathered. It is thought this could be indicative of the presence of distributed microfracturing.

,

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

110

Tests of the Hardware and Software for the Reconstruction of Trajectories in the Experiment MINERvA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MINERvA experiment has a highly segmented and high precision neutrino detector able to record events with high statistic (over 13 millions in a four year run). MINERvA uses FERMILAB NuMI beamline. The detector will allow a detailed study of neutrino-nucleon interactions. Moreover, the detector has a target with different materials allowing, for the first time, the study of nuclear effects in neutrino interactions. We present here the work done with the MINERvA reconstruction group that has resulted in: (a) development of new codes to be added to the RecPack package so it can be adapted to the MINERvA detector structure; (b) finding optimum values for two of the MegaTracker reconstruction package variables: PEcut = 4 (minimum number of photo electrons for a signal to be accepted) and Chi2Cut = 200 (maximum value of {chi}{sup 2} for a track to be accepted); (c) testing of the multi anode photomultiplier tubes used at MINERvA in order to determine the correlation between different channels and for checking the device's dark counts.

Palomino Gallo, Jose Luis; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

On the modeling of the Taylor cylinder impact test for orthotropic textured materials: Calculations and experiments  

SciTech Connect

Taylor impact tests using specimens cut from a rolled plate of Ta were conducted. The Ta was well-characterized in terms of flow stress and crystallographic texture. A piece-wise yield surface was interrogated from this orthotropic texture, and used in EPIC-95 3D simulations of the Taylor test. Good agreement was realized between the calculations and the post-test geometries in terms of major and minor side profiles and impact-interface footprints.

Maudlin, P.J.; Bingert, J.F.; House, J.W.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Passive test-cell experiments during the winter of 1979-1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the winter of 1979-80 the performance of a variety of passive solar heating configurations in 14 passive test cells were monitored. The cells included attached greenhouses, masonry and water walls with black-chrome absorber surfaces, night insulation, and phase-change thermal storage walls. The results of these side-by-side tests were used to make quantitative comparisons of the delivered performance of these configurations for the conditions under which they were tested.

Hyde, J.C.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

First test of Lorentz violation with a reactor-based antineutrino experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a search for Lorentz violation with 8249 candidate electron antineutrino events taken by the Double Chooz experiment in 227.9 live days of running. This analysis, featuring a search for a sidereal time dependence ...

Conrad, J. M.

114

Tests for Persistent Effects of Cloud Seeding in a Recent Australian Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analysis of cloud seeding experiments in Australia prior to 1984 that used silver iodide dispensed from aircraft as the seeding agent suggested that there were systematic aftereffects of seeding at least one month after a given seeded day, as ...

E. K. Bigg

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

An Example Crossover Experiment for Testing New Vicarious Calibration Techniques for Satellite Ocean Color Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vicarious calibration of ocean color satellites involves the use of accurate surface measurements of water-leaving radiance to update and improve the system calibration of ocean color satellite sensors. An experiment was performed to compare a ...

Kenneth J. Voss; Scott McLean; Marlon Lewis; Carol Johnson; Stephanie Flora; Michael Feinholz; Mark Yarbrough; Charles Trees; Mike Twardowski; Dennis Clark

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratory's (INL's) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a twoinch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

Douglas W. Marshall

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

RESULTS OF TESTS TO DEMONSTRATE A SIX-INCH-DIAMETER COATER FOR PRODUCTION OF TRISO-COATED PARTICLES FOR ADVANCED GAS REACTOR EXPERIMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)/Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program includes a series of irradiation experiments in Idaho National Laboratorys (INLs) Advanced Test Reactor. TRISOcoated particles for the first AGR experiment, AGR-1, were produced at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a two inch diameter coater. A requirement of the NGNP/AGR Program is to produce coated particles for later experiments in coaters more representative of industrial scale. Toward this end, tests have been performed by Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) in a six-inch diameter coater. These tests are expected to lead to successful fabrication of particles for the second AGR experiment, AGR-2. While a thorough study of how coating parameters affect particle properties was not the goal of these tests, the test data obtained provides insight into process parameter/coated particle property relationships. Most relationships for the six-inch diameter coater followed trends found with the ORNL two-inch coater, in spite of differences in coater design and bed hydrodynamics. For example the key coating parameters affecting pyrocarbon anisotropy were coater temperature, coating gas fraction, total gas flow rate and kernel charge size. Anisotropy of the outer pyrolytic carbon (OPyC) layer also strongly correlates with coater differential pressure. In an effort to reduce the total particle fabrication run time, silicon carbide (SiC) was deposited with methyltrichlorosilane (MTS) concentrations up to 3 mol %. Using only hydrogen as the fluidizing gas, the high concentration MTS tests resulted in particles with lower than desired SiC densities. However when hydrogen was partially replaced with argon, high SiC densities were achieved with the high MTS gas fraction.

Charles M Barnes

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

The D9-4 experiment: Improving on the fast flux test facility driver pin  

SciTech Connect

The driver fuel system for the fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) has proven to be a very robust and reliable spectrum liquid-metal reactor. A series of fuel assembly tests, has now been completed that incorporate unique improvements to extend the lifetime of the driver fuel design to increase the ease of fabrication, and to increase the breeding potential. The D9-4 test was a high-exposure fuel assembly in this series, and detailed examinations of this test have been completed. Commonalities with the standard FFTF driver fuel included dimensions and the use of uranium/plutonium mixed-oxide pellet fuel.

Chastain, S.A. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland, WA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Performance study of GPUs in real-time trigger applications for HEP experiments  

SciTech Connect

Graphical Processing Units (GPUs) have evolved into highly parallel, multi-threaded, multicore powerful processors with high memory bandwidth. GPUs are used in a variety of intensive computing applications. The combination of highly parallel architecture and high memory bandwidth makes GPUs a potentially promising technology for effective real-time processing for High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments. However, not much is known of their performance in real-time applications that require low latency, such as the trigger for HEP experiments. We describe an R and D project with the goal to study the performance of GPU technology for possible low latency applications, performing basic operations as well as some more advanced HEP lower-level trigger algorithms (such as fast tracking or jet finding). We present some preliminary results on timing measurements, comparing the performance of a CPU versus a GPU with NVIDIA's CUDA general-purpose parallel computing architecture, carried out at CDF's Level-2 trigger test stand. These studies will provide performance benchmarks for future studies to investigate the potential and limitations of GPUs for real-time applications in HEP experiments.

Ketchum, W.; /Chicago U.; Amerio, S.; /INFN, Padua; Bastieri, D.; Bauce, M.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Catastini, P.; /Fermilab; Gelain, S.; /Padua U.; Hahn, K.; /Fermilab; Kim, Y.K.; /Fermilab /Chicago U.; Liu, T.; /Fermilab; Lucchesi, D.; /INFN, Padua /Padua U.; Urso, G.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Fast Ion Effects During Test Blanket Module Simulation Experiments in DIII-D  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fast beam-ion losses were studied in DIII-D in the presence of a scaled mockup of two Test Blanket Modules (TBM) for ITER. Heating of the protective tiles on the front of the TBM surface was found when neutral beams were injected and the TBM fields were engaged. The fast-ion core confinement was not significantly affected. Different orbit-following codes predict the formation of a hot spot on the TBM surface arising from beam-ions deposited near the edge of the plasma. The codes are in good agreement with each other on the total power deposited at the hot spot predicting an increase in power with decreasing separation between the plasma edge and the TBM surface. A thermal analysis of the heat flow through the tiles shows that the simulated power can account for the measured tile temperature rise. The thermal analysis, however, is very sensitive to the details of the localization of the hot spot which is predicted to be different among the various codes.

Kramer, G J; Ellis, R; Gorelenkova, M; Heidbrink, W W; Kurki-Suonio, T; Nazikian, R; Salmi, A; Schaffer, M J; Shinohara, K; Snipes, J A; Spong, D A; Koskela, T

2011-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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121

Experiments in the ISX-B tokamak electron cyclotron heating, ripple studies, pellet fueling, impurity flow reversal and surface physics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The wide variety of experiments on the ISX-B tokamak includes electron cyclotron heating, ripple effects, hydrogen pellet fueling, impurity flow reversal mechanisms, plasma edge studies, and testing of limiter coatings. The most significant results in each of these areas are discussed.

Isler, R.C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, Yueng Kay Martin [ORNL

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Biosphere reserves in action: Case studies of the American experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For nearly 20 years, biosphere reserves have offered a unique framework for building the knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for conservation and sustainable use of ecosystems. The 12 case studies in this volume chronicle many of the cooperative efforts to implement the biosphere reserve concept in the United States. Considered together, these efforts involve more than 20 types of protected areas, and the participation of all levels of government, and many private organizations, academic institutions, citizens groups, and individuals. Biosphere reserves are multi-purpose areas that are nominated by the national committee of the Man and the Biosphere Program (MAB) and designated by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to serve as demonstration areas for cooperation in building harmonious relationships between human activities and the conservation of ecosystems and biological diversity. Each biosphere reserve exemplifies the characteristic ecosystems of one of the worlds biogeographical regions. It is a land or coas%arine area involving human communities as integral components and including resources managed for objectives ranging from complete protection to intensive, yet sustainable development. A biosphere reserve is envisioned as a regional ''landscape for learning'' in which monitoring, research, education, and training are encouraged to support sustainable conservation of natural and managed ecosystems. It is a framework for regional cooperation involving government decisionmakers, scientists, resource managers, private organizations and local people (i.e., the biosphere reserve ''stakeholders''). Finally, each biosphere reserve is part of a global network for sharing information and experience to help address complex problems of conservation and development. The 12 case studies presented in this report represent only a few of the possible evolutions of a biosphere reserve in its efforts to reach out to the local and regional community. As you have read, some have had great success, while others consider their successes almost negligible. All document tremendous effort from many people to improve the communication among landowners, land managers, scientists, and any others interested in the health and well-being of the natural and human environment of the biosphere reserve.

None

1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energys Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control and monitoring systems are very similar. The purpose and design of this experiment will be discussed followed by its progress and status to date.

Blaine Grover

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Experiment data report for 1-1/2-loop semiscale system isothermal tests 1008 and 1010  

SciTech Connect

Recorded test data are presented for Tests 1008 and 1010 of the isothermal portion of the Semiscale Blowdown and Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) Project. These data represent the results of the first isothermal tests utilizing an enlarged downcomer gap (1.0 inch) in the pressure vessel to investigate general system hydraulic response both with and without simulated ECC injection. The data, presented in the form of composite graphs in engineering units, have been analyzed only to the extent necessary to assume that they are reasonable and correct. (auth)

Alder, R.S.; Feldman, E.M.; Pinson, P.A.

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Status of the NGNP Graphite Creep Experiments AGC-1 and AGC-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energys Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six nuclear graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data, including irradiation creep, at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain six peripheral stacks of graphite specimens, with half of the graphite specimens in each stack under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six peripheral stacks will have different compressive loads applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks, while a seventh stack will not have a compressive load. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during irradiation of the experiment. The first experiment, AGC-1, started its irradiation in September 2009, and the irradiation was completed in January 2011. The second experiment, AGC-2, started its irradiation in April 2011 and completed its irradiation in May 2012. This paper will briefly discuss the design of the experiment and control systems, and then present the irradiation results for each experiment to date.

Blaine Grover

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Experiment Study on Tower Cooling Energy-Saving Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the transition season periods the technology of tower cooling is used to cool the internal heat source region in the buildings, which is energy saving and environment friendly technology. To aim at climatic conditions of the transition season ... Keywords: towers cooling, experiments, fluence factors, energy saving

Ji Amin; He Li; Yue Zhiqiang; Jie Li; Gang Yin; Zhang Qinggang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Nevada Test Site tortoise population monitoring study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tortoise Population Monitoring Study was initiated to determine and monitor the density of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Quadrat sampling was conducted following methodology described in the Draft Desert Tortoise Recovery Plan (FWS, 1993). So few tortoises were found that densities could not be calculated. Based on estimates of capture probabilities and densities from other studies, it was determined that 1-km{sup 2} (0.4 mi{sup 2}) plots did not contain enough tortoises for estimating densities with the Recovery Plan methods. It was recommended that additional surveys on the Nevada Test Site using those methods not be conducted. Any future efforts to monitor desert tortoise densities should start by identifying other possible methods, determining their relative power to detect changes, and estimating their cost.

Mueller, J.M.; Zander, K.K.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A new user-friendly experiment visual database system application to the gas migration test (GMT) at the Grimsel test site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Long-term integrated field investigations combine information from different groups (laboratory, modeling, experimental) often working in different locations and on different time scales. The results of these different groups are evaluated and integrated for decision making during the experiment execution, but at the end of the experiment a huge database exists, which may be difficult to use at a later stage - for example, for further modeling, benchmarking etc. How can one preserve the information obtained and present it in a transparent and user-friendly manner? A new visual database system developed is presented and its application to the 'Gas Migration in-situ Test (GMT)' is described. The GMT project has been conducted to assess the gas migration (for example from TRU waste) through the engineered barrier system and the adjacent geosphere. The experiment was initiated in 1997 under the auspices of RWMC and with primary funding by the Japanese Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. The project consists of a large-scale in-situ test, laboratory tests and numerical modeling. The in-situ test has been performed at the Grimsel Test Site (GTS) in Switzerland operated by NAGRA (National cooperative for the disposal of radioactive waste, Switzerland). Laboratory tests have been performed in facilities in Japan, Germany, Spain and Switzerland. Finally, the modeling activities, performed within the modeling group, have included teams from the US, Spain, France, Japan, Germany and Switzerland with support from organizations BGR, ENRESA, ANDRA, and RWMC. More than 250 reports document the various data and analyses. The database developed uses a three layered framework. The first (or bottom) layer is the data storage which contains all reports, publications as well as the raw data; the second layer is a data flow diagram - from material data, generation of input data to the model and output to the end user; the third layer is the interface with external users to facilitate optimal use of the database for their needs - it includes search through key words, publication year, data type etc. (authors)

Shimura, Tomoyuki; Asano, Hidekazu [RWMC, N0.15 Mori Bldg., 2-8-10, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Ando, Kenichi; Okuma, Fumiko; Yamamoto, Shuichi [Obayashi Corporation, SHinagawa InterCity B, 2-15-2, Konan, Minatoku, Tokyo, 108-8502 (Japan); Vomvoris, Stratis [NAGRA, Wettingen (Switzerland)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Active construction of experience through mobile media: a field study with implications for recording and sharing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To fully appreciate the opportunities provided by interactive and ubiquitous multimedia to record and share experiences, we report on an ethnographic investigation on the settings and nature of human memory and experience at a large-scale event. We studied ... Keywords: Active spectators, Constructive memory, Ethnographic field study, Large-scale events, Mobile and ubiquitous multimedia, Sharing experiences

Giulio Jacucci; Antti Oulasvirta; Antti Salovaara

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Distributed analysis functional testing using GangaRobot in the ATLAS experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated distributed analysis tests are necessary to ensure smooth operations of the ATLAS grid resources. In this work we present the recent developments of the ATLAS GangaRobot, a tool designed to perform regular tests of all grid sites by running arbitrary user applications with varied configurations at predifined time intervals. Specifically the GangaRobot creates and submits several real ATLAS user applications to the various grid sites using the distributed analysis framework GANGA, a front end for easy grid job definition and management. Success or failure rates of these test jobs are individually monitored. Test definitions and results are stored in a database and made available to users and site administrators through a web interface, the ATLAS Site Status Board (SSB) and the Service Availability Monitor (SAM). The test results provide on the one hand a fast way to to identify systematic or temporary site problems, and on the other hand allow for an effective distribution of the workload on the avai...

Legger, F; The ATLAS collaboration; Elmsheuser, J; Ubeda Garca, M; Gordon, A W; Jha, M K; Van der Ster, D C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

European Geothermal Drilling Experience-Problem Areas and Case Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal drilling has long been restricted in Western Europe to the sole dry steam field of Larderello in Italy. In the last few years, a wider experience is building up as a consequence of intensified exploration and development programs carried out for evaluation and production of both low- and high-enthalpy geothermal resources. A sample of some 40 boreholes indicates the problem areas which are given.

Baron, G.; Ungemach, P.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Experiments to investigate the effect of flight path on direct containment heating (DCH) in the Surtsey test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Limited Flight Path (LFP) test series was to investigate the effect of reactor subcompartment flight path length on direct containment heating (DCH). The test series consisted of eight experiments with nominal flight paths of 1, 2, or 8 m. A thermitically generated mixture of iron, chromium, and alumina simulated the corium melt of a severe reactor accident. After thermite ignition, superheated steam forcibly ejected the molten debris into a 1:10 linear scale the model of a dry reactor cavity. The blowdown steam entrained the molten debris and dispersed it into the Surtsey vessel. The vessel pressure, gas temperature, debris temperature, hydrogen produced by steam/metal reactions, debris velocity, mass dispersed into the Surtsey vessel, and debris particle size were measured for each experiment. The measured peak pressure for each experiment was normalized by the total amount of energy introduced into the Surtsey vessel; the normalized pressures increased with lengthened flight path. The debris temperature at the cavity exit was about 2320 K. Gas grab samples indicated that steam in the cavity reacted rapidly to form hydrogen, so the driving gas was a mixture of steam and hydrogen. These experiments indicate that debris may be trapped in reactor subcompartments and thus will not efficiently transfer heat to gas in the upper dome of a containment building. The effect of deentrainment by reactor subcompartments may significantly reduce the peak containment load in a severe reactor accident. 8 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.; Griffith, R.O. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Nichols, R.T. (Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fluidized-bed potato waste drying experiments at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized-bed dryer was built and operated at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site in south central Idaho to test the feasibility of using low-temperature (145/sup 0/C or lower) geothermal fluids as an energy source for drying operations. The dryer performed successfully on two potato industry waste products that had a solid content of 5 to 13%. The dried product was removed as a sand-like granular material or as fines with a flour-like texture. Test results, observations, and design recommendations are presented. Also presented is an economic evaluation for commercial-scale drying plants using either geothermal low-temperature water or oil as a heat source.

Cole, L.T.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Serendipitous, Long-Term Infiltration Experiment: Water and Tritium Circulation Beneath the CAMBRIC Ditch at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underground nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site introduced numerous radionuclides that may be used to characterize subsurface hydrologic transport processes in arid climates. A sixteen year pumping experiment designed to examine radionuclide migration away from the CAMBRIC nuclear test, conducted in groundwater beneath Frenchman Flat in 1965, gave rise to an unintended second experiment involving radionuclide infiltration through the vadose zone, as induced by seepage of pumping effluents beneath an unlined discharge trench. The combined experiments have been reanalyzed using a detailed, three-dimensional numerical model of transient, variably saturated flow and mass transport, tailored specifically for large scale and efficient calculations. Simulations have been used to estimate radionuclide travel and residence times in various parts of the system for comparison with observations in wells. Model predictions of mass transport were able to clearly demonstrate radionuclide recycling behavior between the ditch and pumping well previously suggested by isotopic age dating information; match travel time estimates for radionuclides moving between the ditch, the water table, and monitoring wells; and provide more realistic ways in which to interpret the pumping well elution curves. Collectively, the results illustrate the utility of integrating detailed numerical modeling with diverse observational data in developing accurate interpretations and forecasts of contaminant migration processes.

Maxwell, R M; Tompson, A B; Kollet, S J

2008-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Clean Critical Experiment Benchmarks for Plutonium Recycle in LWRs (Foil Activation Studies)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to provide benchmark information for testing fuel-cycle analysis methods and nuclear data libraries, EPRI supported a series of critical lattice experiments at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories' plutonium recycle critical facility. These experiments involved water-moderated uniform uranium oxide and mixed (uranium-plutonium) oxide critical lattices. This volume presents the foil activation data obtained from this experimental program.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Mass production test of Hamamatsu MPPC for T2K neutrino oscillation experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the T2K near neutrino detectors, about 60 000 Hamamatsu Multi-Pixel Photon Counters (MPPCs) will be used. The mass production of MPPC has started in February 2008.In order to perform quality assurance and to characterize each device, we have developed an MPPC test system. For each MPPC, gain, breakdown voltage, noise rate, photo detection efficiency, and cross-talk and after-pulse rate are measured as functions of the bias voltage and temperature. The design of the test system and the measurement procedure are described.

M. Yokoyama; T. Nakaya; S. Gomi; A. Minamino; N. Nagai; K. Nitta; D. Orme; M. Otani; T. Murakami; T. Nakadaira; M. Tanaka

2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

Computer-assisted comparison of analysis and test results in transportation experiments  

SciTech Connect

As a part of its ongoing research efforts, Sandia National Laboratories` Transportation Surety Center investigates the integrity of various containment methods for hazardous materials transport, subject to anomalous structural and thermal events such as free-fall impacts, collisions, and fires in both open and confined areas. Since it is not possible to conduct field experiments for every set of possible conditions under which an actual transportation accident might occur, accurate modeling methods must be developed which will yield reliable simulations of the effects of accident events under various scenarios. This requires computer software which is capable of assimilating and processing data from experiments performed as benchmarks, as well as data obtained from numerical models that simulate the experiment. Software tools which can present all of these results in a meaningful and useful way to the analyst are a critical aspect of this process. The purpose of this work is to provide software resources on a long term basis, and to ensure that the data visualization capabilities of the Center keep pace with advancing technology. This will provide leverage for its modeling and analysis abilities in a rapidly evolving hardware/software environment.

Knight, R.D. [Gram, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ammerman, D.J.; Koski, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

138

CMS validation Experience: Test-beam 2004 data vs Geant4  

SciTech Connect

A comparison between the Geant4 Monte-Carlo simulation of CMS Detector's Calorimetric System and data from the 2004 Test-Beam at CERN's SPS H2 beam-line is presented. The overall simulated response agrees quite well with the measured response. Slight differences in the longitudinal shower profiles between the MC predictions made with different Physics Lists are observed.

Piperov, Stefan [Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois (United States); INRNE-BAS, Sofia (Bulgaria)

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

139

FIRST SODIUM REACTOR EXPERIMENT (SRE) TEST OF HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY (HNPF) CONTROL MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect

An experiment was conducted in the SRE to measure temperatures and neutron flux levels in and near a boron-containing simulated control rod. The data are being used to check analytical methods developed for prediction of control rod heat generation rates and maximum temperatures in this type of control rod in the Hallam Nuclear Power Facility. The maximum observed temperatures with a reactor power level of 20 Mw were 1363 deg F for a boron-- nickel alloy ring having a 0.105-in. radial clearance with the thimble and 1100 deg F for a boron -nickel alloy ring having a 0.020-in. radial clearance. The maximum temperature difference between the coolant and the control rod was 473 deg F. It is concluded that the expected greater heat generation rates in the Hallam reactor would prohibit the use of boron-containing absorber materials in a combined a him-safety rod. (auth)

Arneson, S.O.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

MERIT Experiment On-Going Studies 1 -Target Station Beam Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MERIT Experiment On-Going Studies 1 - Target Station Beam Windows 2 - Magneto-dynamic Analysis 3 Target Assembly Concept #12;Baseline Beam Window Concept #12;CONCERNS realized in E951 experiment) for target experiment at AGS Induced shock stress in a window structure by 16 TP intensity beam and the spot

McDonald, Kirk

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector of the AMS experiment: test beam results with a prototype  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) to be installed on the International Space Station (ISS) will be equipped with a proximity Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector for measuring the velocity and electric charge of the charged cosmic particles. This detector will contribute to the high level of redundancy required for AMS as well as to the rejection of albedo particles. Charge separation up to iron and a velocity resolution of the order of 0.1% for singly charged particles are expected. A RICH protoptype consisting of a detection matrix with 96 photomultiplier units, a segment of a conical mirror and samples of the radiator materials was built and its performance was evaluated. Results from the last test beam performed with ion fragments resulting from the collision of a 158 GeV/c/nucleon primary beam of indium ions (CERN SPS) on a lead target are reported. The large amount of collected data allowed to test and characterize different aerogel samples and the sodium fluoride radiator. In addition, the reflectivity of the mirror was evaluated. The data analysis confirms the design goals.

Lusa Arruda; Fernando Baro; Patrcia Goncalves; Rui Pereira

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

142

Seismic studies of a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During a massive hydraulic fracturing experiment carried out at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, 850 microearthquakes, ranging in magnitudes from -3 to 0, were located reliably using arrival times recorded at a set of 5 downhole geophone stations. A subset of these events were located using an upgraded hodogram technique. The seismicity defines a tabular zone with horizontal extent of 900 m, vertical extent of 800 m, and thickness of 150 m. This zone strikes N340/sup 0/E, and dips 75/sup 0/ to the east; its position indicates that no hydraulic connection between the two predrilled wells could be achieved by the fracturing. The distribution of locations obtained from arrival times shows good agreement with those derived from hodograms. Well constrained fault plane solutions were determined for 26 of the larger microearthquakes observed at a surface seismic net. Most solutions display one nearly vertical nodal plane that strikes close to N - S, and a T axis that trends roughly E - W, in agreement with regional indicators of the least principal stress direction. 9 refs., 6 figs.

House, L.; Keppler, H.; Kaieda, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

1/12-Scale scoping experiments to characterize double-shell tank slurry uniformity: Test plan  

SciTech Connect

Million gallon double-shell tanks (DSTs) at Hanford are used to store transuranic, high-level, and low-level wastes. These wastes generally consist of a large volume of salt-laden solution covering a smaller volume of settled sludge primarily containing metal hydroxides. These wastes will be retrieved and processed into immobile waste forms suitable for permanent disposal. The current retrieval concept is to use submerged dual-nozzle pumps to mobilize the settled solids by creating jets of fluid that are directed at the tank solids. The pumps oscillate, creating arcs of high-velocity fluid jets that sweep the floor of the tank. After the solids are mobilized, the pumps will continue to operate at a reduced flow rate sufficient to maintain the particles in a uniform suspension. The objectives of these 1/12-scale scoping experiments are to determine how Reynolds number, Froude number, and gravitational settling parameter affect the degree of uniformity achieved during jet mixer pump operation in the full-scale double-shell tanks; develop linear models to predict the degree of uniformity achieved by jet mixer pumps operating in the full-scale double-shell tanks; apply linear models to predict the degree of uniformity that will be achieved in tank 241-AZ-101 and determine whether contents of that tank will be uniform to within {+-} 10% of the mean concentration; and obtain experimental concentration and jet velocity data to compared with the TEMPEST computational and modeling predictions to guide further code development.

Bamberger, J.A.; Liljegren, L.M.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion.

Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Indian Monsoon GCM Sensitivity Experiments Testing Tropospheric Biennial Oscillation Transition Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational studies have shown that the tropospheric biennial oscillation (TBO) involves transitions that occur from northern spring [MarchAprilMay (MAM)] to the Indian monsoon season [JuneJulyAugustSeptember (JJAS)] such that a relatively ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Julie M. Arblaster

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Simulation Experiments for Testing the Assimilation of Geostationary Satellite Temperature Retrievals into a Numerical Prediction Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent diagnostic studies using retrievals from the Visible Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer (VISSR) Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) indicate that there are limitations of gestationary satellite sounding data (poor vertical resolution of temperature and ...

Tzvi Gal-Chen; Brian D. Schmidt; Louis W. Uccellini

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

RF Breakdown Studies Using a 1.3 GHZ Test Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Recent studies have shown that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas without the need for long conditioning times, because the dense gas can dramatically reduce dark currents and multipacting. In this project we use this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry found in evacuated cavities to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. A 1.3-GHz RF test cell with replaceable electrodes (e.g. Mo, Cu, Be, W, and Nb) and pressure barrier capable of operating both at high pressure and in vacuum has been designed and built, and preliminary testing has been completed. A series of detailed experiments is planned at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator. At the same time, computer simulations of the RF Breakdown process will be carried out to help develop a consistent physics model of RF Breakdown. In order to study the effect of the radiofrequency on RF Breakdown, a second test cell will be designed, fabricated, and tested at a lower frequency, most likely 402.5 MHz.

Sah, R.; Johnson, R.P.; Neubauer, M.; /Muons Inc., Batavia; Conde, M.; Gai, W.; /Argonne; Moretti, A.; Popovic, M.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Byrd, J.; Li, D.; /LBL, Berkeley; BastaniNejad, M.; /Old Dominion U.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Empirical studies for innovation dissemination: ten years of experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Context: technology transfer and innovation dissemination are key success factors for an enterprise. The shift to a new software technology determines inevitable changes to ingrained and familiar processes and at the same time leads to changes ... Keywords: empirical studies, product and process innovation, technology and knowledge transfer

Maria Teresa Baldassarre; Danilo Caivano; Giuseppe Visaggio

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Chemical characteristics of material released during Source Term Experiments Project (STEP) in-pile tests: Part 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of four experiments aimed at characterizing the radiological source term associated with postulated severe light water reactor (LWR) accidents has been conducted at Argonne's Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT). The STEP tests drove fuel elements to the point of severe cladding disruption in steam environments by fission heating and oxidation of the Zircaloy cladding. The released fission products and volatile cladding constituents entrained in the steam/hydrogen flows were captured by the test vehicles' sampling systems and analyzed by SEM/EDX. The principal constituents of the deposits were fission product cesium, molybdenum and rubidium, and tin from the cladding. Iodine was generally seen collocated with cesium, although lone iodine deposits were observed indicating that the iodine was not completely transported as CsI. Structural material was also observed. The composition information in conjunction with counted particle distributions were used to determine the particle loading of that portion of the material released during the first test that was transported in aerosol form.

Schlenger, B.J.; Dunn, P.F.; Herceg, J.E.; Simms, R.; Horton, E.L.; Baker, L. Jr.; Ritzman, R.L.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

High Altitude test of RPCs for the ARGO-YBJ experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A 50 m**2 RPC carpet was operated at the YangBaJing Cosmic Ray Laboratory (Tibet) located 4300 m a.s.l. The performance of RPCs in detecting Extensive Air Showers was studied. Efficiency and time resolution measurements at the pressure and temperature conditions typical of high mountain laboratories, are reported.

The ARGO-YBJ Collaboration

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process equipment and that a minimum life be achieved. This paper deals with the history of the steam system/condensate systems, the setting up of the testing procedure, which traps were and were not tested and the results of the testing program to date.

Feldman, A. L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Laboratory column experiments for radionuclide adsorption studies of the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation  

SciTech Connect

Radionuclide transport experiments were carried out using intact cores obtained from the Culebra member of the Rustler Formation inside the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Air Intake Shaft. Twenty-seven separate tests are reported here and include experiments with {sup 3}H, {sup 22}Na, {sup 241}Am, {sup 239}Np, {sup 228}Th, {sup 232}U and {sup 241}Pu, and two brine types, AIS and ERDA 6. The {sup 3}H was bound as water and provides a measure of advection, dispersion, and water self-diffusion. The other tracers were injected as dissolved ions at concentrations below solubility limits, except for americium. The objective of the intact rock column flow experiments is to demonstrate and quantify transport retardation coefficients, (R) for the actinides Pu, Am, U, Th and Np, in intact core samples of the Culebra Dolomite. The measured R values are used to estimate partition coefficients, (kd) for the solute species. Those kd values may be compared to values obtained from empirical and mechanistic adsorption batch experiments, to provide predictions of actinide retardation in the Culebra. Three parameters that may influence actinide R values were varied in the experiments; core, brine and flow rate. Testing five separate core samples from four different core borings provided an indication of sample variability. While most testing was performed with Culebra brine, limited tests were carried out with a Salado brine to evaluate the effect of intrusion of those lower waters. Varying flow rate provided an indication of rate dependent solute interactions such as sorption kinetics.

Lucero, D.A.; Heath, C.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brown, G.O. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States). Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Dept.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the tokamak fusion test reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial operation of the tokamak fusion test reactor has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1--0.2 s for a line-average density range (n-bar/sub e/) of (1--2.5) x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o)approx.1.2--2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(0)approx.0.9--1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/approx.3. A comparison of Princeton large torus, poloidal divertor experiment, and tokamak fusion test reactor plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

1984-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

154

Dynamical response of the "GGG" rotor to test the Equivalence Principle: theory, simulation and experiment. Part I: the normal modes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent theoretical work suggests that violation of the Equivalence Principle might be revealed in a measurement of the fractional differential acceleration $\\eta$ between two test bodies -of different composition, falling in the gravitational field of a source mass- if the measurement is made to the level of $\\eta\\simeq 10^{-13}$ or better. This being within the reach of ground based experiments, gives them a new impetus. However, while slowly rotating torsion balances in ground laboratories are close to reaching this level, only an experiment performed in low orbit around the Earth is likely to provide a much better accuracy. We report on the progress made with the "Galileo Galilei on the Ground" (GGG) experiment, which aims to compete with torsion balances using an instrument design also capable of being converted into a much higher sensitivity space test. In the present and following paper (Part I and Part II), we demonstrate that the dynamical response of the GGG differential accelerometer set into supercritical rotation -in particular its normal modes (Part I) and rejection of common mode effects (Part II)- can be predicted by means of a simple but effective model that embodies all the relevant physics. Analytical solutions are obtained under special limits, which provide the theoretical understanding. A simulation environment is set up, obtaining quantitative agreement with the available experimental data on the frequencies of the normal modes, and on the whirling behavior. This is a needed and reliable tool for controlling and separating perturbative effects from the expected signal, as well as for planning the optimization of the apparatus.

G. L. Comandi; M. L. Chiofalo; R. Toncelli; D. Bramanti; E. Polacco; A. M. Nobili

2006-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

155

Preliminary Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density, high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. The ATR has large irradiation test volumes located in high flux areas. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2s. As a result, the ATR is a representative candidate for assessing the necessary modifications and evaluating the subsequent operating effects associated with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed for the fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU 235U enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the LEU uranium density and 235U enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent Keff between the HEU core and a LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the 235U loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in Keff between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 150 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN-2 (MCWO) method was used to calculate Keff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the LEU core conversion designer should be able to optimize the 235U content of each fuel plate, so that the Keff and relative radial fission heat flux profile are similar to the reference ATR HEU case. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) safety requirements, a further study will be required in order to investigate the detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profile variations versus EFPDs.

G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

GPHS-RTG system explosion test direct course experiment 5000. [General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect

The General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) has been designed and is being built to provide electrical power for spacecrafts to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The objective of the RTG System Explosion Test was to expose a mock-up of the GPHS-RTG with a simulated heat source to the overpressure and impulse representative of a potential upper magnitude explosion of the Space Shuttle. The test was designed so that the heat source module would experience an overpressure at which the survival of the fuel element cladding would be expected to be marginal. Thus, the mock-up was placed where the predicted incident overpressure would be 1300 psi. The mock-up was mounted in an orientation representative of the launch configuration on the spacecraft to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission. The incident overpressure measured was in the range of 1400 to 2100 psi. The mock-up and simulated heat source were destroyed and only very small fragments were recovered. This damage is believed to have resulted from a combination of the overpressure and impact by very high velocity fragments from the ANFO sphere. Post-test analysis indicated that extreme working of the iridium clad material occurred, indicative of intensive impulsive loading on the metal.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing for Earthquake Engineering Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Downhole seismic testing is one field test that is commonly used to determine compression-wave (P) and shear-wave (S) velocity profiles in geotechnical earthquake engineering investigations. These profiles are required input in evaluations of the responses to earthquake shaking of geotechnical sites and structures at these sites. In the past, traditional downhole testing has generally involved profiling in the 30- to 150-m depth range. As the number of field seismic investigations at locations with critical facilities has increased, profiling depths have also increased. An improved downhole test that can be used for wave velocity profiling to depths of 300 to 600 m or more is presented.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh; Rohay, Alan C.

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

158

Experiments to Address Lower Plenum Response Under Severe Accident Conditions: Volume 2: Data Report, Part 1: Tests 1-6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a set of experiments that were performed to address reactor pressure vessel lower plenum response under severe accident conditions. High temperature (2400 degrees K) debris was used to study the response of BWR and PWR lower head instrument tube penetrations of a BWR drain line, and of molten debris quenching in a sub-cooled water pool. The importance of water as a heat sink within the instrument tube penetrations and drain line was quantified. Furthermore, the axial penetration of ...

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

159

Experiments to Address Lower Plenum Response Under Severe Accident Conditions: Volume 2: Data Report, Part 2: Tests 7-10  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a set of experiments that were performed to address reactor pressure vessel lower plenum response under severe accident conditions. High temperature (2400 degrees K) debris was used to study the response of BWR and PWR lower head instrument tube penetrations of a BWR drain line, and of molten debris quenching in a sub-cooled water pool. The importance of water as a heat sink within the instrument tube penetrations and drain line was quantified. Furthermore, the axial penetration of ...

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ocean thermal energy conversion gas desorption studies. Volume 1. Design of experiments. [Open-cycle power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seawater deaeration is a process affecting almost all proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power systems. If the noncondensable dissolved air is not removed from a power system, it will accumulate in thecondenser, reduce the effectiveness of condensation, and result in deterioration of system performance. A gas desorption study is being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the goal of mitigating these effects; this study is designed to investigate the vacuum deaeration process for low-temperature OTEC conditions where conventional steam stripping deaeration may not be applicable. The first in a series describing the ORNL studies, this report (1) considers the design of experiments and discusses theories of gas desorption, (2) reviews previous relevant studies, (3) describes the design of a gas desorption test loop, and (4) presents the test plan for achieving program objectives. Results of the first series of verification tests and the uncertainties encountered are also discussed. A packed column was employed in these verification tests and test data generally behaved as in previous similar studies. Results expressed as the height of transfer unit (HTU) can be correlated with the liquid flow rate by HTU = 4.93L/sup 0/ /sup 25/. End effects were appreciable for the vacuum deaeration system, and a correlation of them to applied vacuum pressure was derived.

Golshani, A.; Chen, F.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

TEST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is an abstract. TEST Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Cras lacinia dui et est venenatis lacinia. Vestibulum lacus dolor, adipiscing id mattis sit amet, ultricies sed purus. Nulla consectetur aliquet feugiat. Maecenas ips

162

A Case Study to Test Mozaik for Different Optimization Problems  

SciTech Connect

We present four different shape optimization problems based on the existing beam port facility of the Penn State Breazeale Reactor and their results obtained by the modular optimization code package, MOZAIK. Each model problem has a different beam tube configuration with the same optimization goal: to determine an optimal D2O moderator tank shape for the given beam tube arrangement that maximizes the thermal neutron beam intensity at the beam tube exit end. In this study, the power of the automated search process was demonstrated and its capabilities were tested. In addition, the performance of the beam port was analyzed using alternative beam tube arrangements. All alternative arrangements indicate that higher thermal neutron beam intensity can be obtained at the beam tube exit end using a smaller volume of D2O in the system than is used in the existing beam port configuration. Moreover, the results show that MOZAIK is ready for deployment to address shape optimization problems involving radiation transport in nuclear engineering applications.

Bekar, Kursat B [ORNL; Azmy, Yousry [North Carolina State University; Unlu, Kenan [Pennsylvania State University; BrenizerJr., Jack [Pennsylvania State University

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Deflagration studies on waste Tank 101-SY: Test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste slurries produced during the recovery of plutonium and uranium from irradiated fuel are stored in underground storage tanks. While a variety of waste types have been generated, of particular concern are the wastes stored in Tank 101-SY. A slurry growth-gas evolution cycle has been observed since 1981. The waste consists of a thick slurry, consisting of a solution high in NaOH, NaNO{sub 3}, NaAlO{sub 2}, dissolved organic complexants (EDTA, HEDTA, NTA, and degradation products), other salts (sulfates and phosphates), and radionuclides (primarily cesium and strontium). During a gas release the major gaseous species identified include: hydrogen and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O). Significant amounts of nitrogen may also be present. Traces of ammonia, carbon oxides, and other nitrogen oxides are also detected. Air and water vapor are also present in the tank vapor space. The purpose of the deflagration study is to determine risks of the hydrogen, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and oxygen system. To be determined are pressure and temperature as a function of composition of reacting gases and the concentration of gases before and after the combustion event. Analyses of gases after the combustion event will be restricted to those tests that had an initial concentration of {le}8% hydrogen. This information will be used to evaluate safety issues related to periodic slurry growth and flammable gas releases from Tank 101-SY. the conditions to be evaluated will simulate gases in the vapor space above the salt cake as well as gases that potentially are trapped in pockets within/under the waste. The deflagration study will relate experimental laboratory results to conditions in the existing tanks.

Cashdollar, K.L.; Zlochower, I.A.; Hertzberg, M.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Soil fixative study progress report aerial application test:  

SciTech Connect

A soil fixative has been developed (a simple wheat flour paste mixture) and tested in the laboratory that appears suitable for the temporary fixation of radioactive dusts in case of an accidental spill. A limited field test was made and the feasibility of aircraft delivery examined. A videotape was made of the operations. 3 figs.

Teter, A.C.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Transonic Pressure-- Sensing Studies Using Drop Test Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Free-flight drop vehicle tests have been made to investigate devices for measuring ambient pressure in the vicinity of a high-fineness-ratio weapon shape throughout the transonic speed range. Various types of nose probes and trailing probes were tested.

Pepper, W.B., Jr. [Organization 5141

1954-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Risk-Informed Snubber Inservice Testing Guidelines: Pilot Project Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current industry practice of assuming nuclear power plant snubbers are a homogenous population requires more frequent examination and expanding the test samples if failures are encountered. This report proposes a risk-informed approach that would reduce snubber examination and testing scope and thereby reduce plant O&M costs, shorten plant outages, and reduce personnel radiation exposure.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

An experiment to test the viability of a gallium-arsenide cathode in a SRF electron gun  

SciTech Connect

Strained gallium arsenide cathodes are used in electron guns for the production of polarized electrons. In order to have a sufficient quantum efficiency lifetime of the cathode the vacuum in the gun must be 10{sup -11} Torr or better, so that the cathode is not destroyed by ion back bombardment or through contamination with residual gases. All successful polarized guns are DC guns, because such vacuum levels can not be obtained in normal conducting RF guns. A superconductive RF gun may provide a sufficient vacuum level due to cryo-pumping of the cavity walls. We report on the progress of our experiment to test such a gun with normal GaAs-Cs crystals.

Kewisch,J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Rao, T.; Burrill, A.; Pate, D.; Wu, Q.; Todd, R.; Wang, E.; Bluem, H.; Holmes, D.; Schultheiss, T.

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

169

ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Testing Beryllium Vendor Populations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Beryllium Testing Vendor Populations When former employees at 25 closed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) beryllium vendor companies needed an entity to provide medical screening and tests related to their beryllium exposure, the agency chose the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to manage the program. ORISE administers a brief health questionnaire and a blood test known as the beryllium lymphocyte proliferation test (BeLPT) to determine if a worker has been sensitized to the light metal or if he or she needs to be evaluated further for chronic beryllium disease (CBD). If a worker has at least one abnormal BeLPT, he or she is referred for further evaluation through the Energy Employees Occupational Illness

170

Low-Carbon Growth Country Studies: Getting Started Experience from Six  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low-Carbon Growth Country Studies: Getting Started Experience from Six Low-Carbon Growth Country Studies: Getting Started Experience from Six Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low-Carbon Growth Country Studies: Getting Started Experience from Six Countries Agency/Company /Organization: Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector: Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com//w/images/d/d1/LCCG Country: China, Indonesia, Poland, Mexico, South Africa, India Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Eastern Europe, Central America, Southern Africa, Southern Asia References: Low-Carbon Growth Country Studies: Getting Started Experience from Six Countries[1]

171

The Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA) Field Study: Objectives and Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experiment on Rapidly Intensifying Cyclones over the Atlantic (ERICA) field study is designed to determine physical mechanisms and processes, and their critical spatial and temporal combinations, which can account for the wintertime ...

Ron Hadlock; Carl W. Kreitzberg

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

International Experiments to Study Tropical Cyclones in the Western North Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four separate (but coincident in time) field experiments to study tropical cyclones in the western North Pacific area will be carried out during August/September 1990 by the United States, the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the ...

Russell L. Elsberry

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Island Thunderstorm Experiment (ITEX)A Study of Tropical Thunderstorms in the Maritime Continent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Island Thunderstorm Experiment (ITEX) is a field and modeling study of the tropical thunderstorms that form regularly over Bathurst and Melville Islands north of Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, during the transition season and breaks ...

Tom D. Keenan; Michael J. Manton; Greg J. Holland; Bruce R. Morton

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Cushioned blasting. II. Preliminary studies of gallery testing  

SciTech Connect

Results of investigation of various means employed to reduce intensity of energy from explosions in boreholes are reported. Results seem to establish that gallery testing can contribute significantly to estimates of practical effects in cushioned blasting on ignition hazards in coal mines.

Testing, G.; Denues, A.R.T.

1943-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Solair heater program: solair applications study test program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three prototypes of low cost solar forced air heating using evacuated tube collectors for application to hot water and space heating were tested in various climates in the US during the period winter/spring 1976/1977. The data acquisition and data analysis are reported. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Crack-arrest tests on two irradiated high-copper welds. Phase 2: Results of duplex-type experiments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program Sixth Irradiation Series is to determine the effect of neutron irradiation on the shift and shape of the lower-bound curve to crack-arrest toughness data. Two submerged-arc welds with copper contents of 0.23 and 0.31 wt % were commercially fabricated in 220-mm-thick plate. Crack-arrest specimens fabricated from these welds were irradiated at a nominal temperature of 288{degrees}C to an average fluence of 1.9 {times} 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (>1 MeV). This is the second report giving the results of the tests on irradiated duplex-type crack-arrest specimens. A previous report gave results of tests on irradiated weld-embrittled-type specimens. Charpy V-notch (CVN) specimens irradiated in the same capsules as the crack-arrest specimens were also tested, and a 41-J transition temperature shift was determined from these specimens. {open_quotes}Mean{close_quote} curves of the same form as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) K{sub la} curve were fit to the data with only the {open_quotes}reference temperature{close_quotes} as a parameter. The shift between the mean curves agrees well with the 41-J transition temperature shift obtained from the CVN specimen tests. Moreover, the four data points resulting from tests on the duplex crack-arrest specimens of the present study did not make a significant change to mean curve fits to either the previously obtained data or all the data combined.

Iskander, S.K.; Corwin, W.R.; Nanstad, R.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

178

FAST FUEL TEST REACTOR-FFTR CONCEPTUAL DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

The Fast Fuel Test Reactor (FFTR) is a nuclear facility for the purpose of irradiating samples of fuels and structural components for use in fast reactors. The core consisis of a plate type element in a square configuration. Beryllium metal between the fuel elements is used to obtain a neutron energy spectrum in the hard intermediate region. Cooling of the core and test specimens is accomplished by means of liquid sodium. The design concept was carried through in sufficient degree in the following areas of preliminary concern: number and size of irradiation facilities, sample power requirements, plant layout to evaluate site requirements, plant and nuclear design parameters to evaluate essential equipment requirements. plant-capital-cost estimate, annual- operating-cost estimate, and estimate of construction time schedule. (W.D.M.)

Brubaker, R.; Hummel, H.H.; McArthy, A.; Smaardyk, A.; Kittel, J.H.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A New Chicane Experiment In PEP-II to Test Mitigations of the Electron Cloud Effect for Linear Colliders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings, and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of future colliders [1-3]. The effect is expected to be particularly severe in magnetic field regions. To test possible mitigation methods in magnetic fields, we have installed a new 4-dipole chicane experiment in the PEP-II Low Energy Ring (LER) at SLAC with both bare and TiN-coated aluminum chambers. In particular, we have observed a large variation of the electron flux at the chamber wall as a function of the chicane dipole field. We infer this is a new high order resonance effect where the energy gained by the electrons in the positron beam depends on the phase of the electron cyclotron motion with respect to the bunch crossing, leading to a modulation of the secondary electron production. Presumably the cloud density is modulated as well and this resonance effect could be used to reduce its magnitude in future colliders. We present the experimental results obtained during January 2008 until the April final shut-down of the PEP-II machine.

Pivi, M.T.F.; Ng, J.S.T.; Arnett, D.; Cooper, F.; Kharakh, D.; King, F.K.; Kirby, R.E.; Kuekan, B.; Lipari, J.J.; Munro, M.; Olszewski, J.; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; Smith, B.; Spencer, C.M.; Wang, L.; Wittmer, W.; Celata, C.M.; Furman, M.A.; /SLAC /LBL, Berkeley

2008-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Pressurization test results: Bonneville Power Administration Energy Conservation Study  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of air leakage measurements in 18 single-family detached houses at the Midway substation, Hanford, Washington, performed as part of the Bonneville Power Administration's Energy Conservation Study. The change in energy consumption following various retrofit strategies is compared. Air leakage was measured in each house with the fan pressurization technique, before and after the retrofits were installed. No significant change was found in infiltration rates in those houses receiving either no retrofits or insulation only; and average reduction of 17% in leakage area was found in the houses retrofitted with storm doors and windows. There appears to be great potential for further savings in energy use from reduced infiltration, and the study is being extended to investigate this.

Krinkel, D.L.; Dickeroff, D.J.; Casey, J.; Grimsrud, D.T.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Discussion of comparison study of hydraulic fracturing models -- Test case: GRI Staged Field Experiment No. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides comments to a companion journal paper on predictive modeling of hydraulic fracturing patterns (N.R. Warpinski et. al., 1994). The former paper was designed to compare various modeling methods to demonstrate the most accurate methods under various geologic constraints. The comments of this paper are centered around potential deficiencies in the former authors paper which include: limited actual comparisons offered between models, the issues of matching predictive data with that from related field operations was lacking or undocumented, and the relevance/impact of accurate modeling on the overall hydraulic fracturing cost and production.

Cleary, M.P.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Upper-Level Frontogenesis: Two Case Studies from the FRONTS 87 Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study describes the structure of two cold fronts observed during the European experiment FRONTS 87. The selection of these two particular cases is based on the existence of well-marked upper-level features, such as strong jet streams, upper-...

Konstantinos Lagouvardos; Vassiliki Kotroni

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

What do usability evaluators do in practice?: an explorative study of think-aloud testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Think-aloud testing is a widely employed usability evaluation method, yet its use in practice is rarely studied. We report an explorative study of 14 think-aloud sessions, the audio recordings of which were examined in detail. The study shows that immediate ... Keywords: industrial software development, think aloud testing, usability evaluation, user-centered design

Mie Nrgaard; Kasper Hornbk

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Proceedings of the Symposium on the Non-Proliferation Experiment: Results and Implications for Test Ban Treaties, Rockville, Maryland, April 19-21, 1994  

SciTech Connect

To address a critical verification issue for the current Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) and for a possible future Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT), the Department of Energy sought to measure certain differences between an underground nuclear test and a chemical test in the same geology, so that other explosions could be identified. This was done in a field experiment code-named the NonProliferation Experiment (NPE).This comprehensive experiment was designed to determine the signatures of chemical explosions for a broad range of phenomena for comparison with those of previous nuclear tests. If significant differences can be measured, then these measures can be used to discriminate between the two types of explosions. In addition, when these differences are understood, large chemical explosions can be used to seismically calibrate regions to discriminate earthquakes from explosions. Toward this end, on-site and off-site measurements of transient phenomena were made, and on-site measurements of residual effects are in progress.Perhaps the most striking result was that the source function for the chemical explosion was identical to that of a nuclear one of about twice the yield. These proceedings provide more detailed results of the experiment.

Denny, Marvin D

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Deviation of the Test Program and Procedures for the 710 Critical Experiment Reactor Related to Changes in the core Material Volume Fractions  

SciTech Connect

This document describes a deviation from the "Test Program and Procedures for the 710 Critical Experiment Reactor Loading and Rod Calibrations," TM-63-1-702, which was made in accordance with ITS Standard Practice J80-81 on March 13, 1963. The deviation did not involve a significant change in the safety of the operation.

Sims, F.L.

1963-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

186

Radiological Conditions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan: Preliminary Assessment and Recommendations for Further Study  

SciTech Connect

This is a review of the book ''Radiological Conditions at the Semipalatinsk Test Site, Kazakhstan: Preliminary Assessment and Recommendations for Further Study.''

Napier, Bruce A. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB))

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Observed physical processes in mechanical tests of PBX9501 and recomendations for experiments to explore a possible plasticity/damage threshold  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo discusses observations that have been made in regards to a series of monotonic and cyclic uniaxial experiments performed on PBX9501 by Darla Thompson under Enhanced Surveilance Campaign support. These observations discussed in Section Cyclic compression observations strongly suggest the presence of viscoelastic, plastic, and damage phenomena in the mechanical response of the material. In Secton Uniaxial data analysis and observations methods are discussed for separating out the viscoelastic effects. A crude application of those methods suggests the possibility of a critical stress below which plasticity and damage may be negligible. The threshold should be explored because if it exists it will be an important feature of any constitutive model. Additionally, if the threshold exists then modifications of experimental methods may be feasible which could potentially simplify future experiments or provide higher quality data from those experiments. A set of experiments to explore the threshold stress are proposed in Section Exploratory tests program for identifying threshold stress.

Buechler, Miles A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

188

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part II: Imperfect Model Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Part I of this two-part work, the feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation through various observing system simulation experiments was demonstrated assuming a perfect forecast ...

Zhiyong Meng; Fuqing Zhang

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Effect of test conditions and sample configuration on the AMTEC electrode/electrolyte characteristics measurements in the Sodium Exposure Test Cell experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted to determine the effect of test conditions and sample configuration on the AMTEC electrode/electrolyte characteristic measurements in a Sodium Exposure Test Cell (SETC). The effect of test conditions was determined by identifying the accurate correlation between sodium temperature and vapor pressure in the correct temperature range for the SETC. In addition, temperature distribution in the sodium source in SETC was determined. A correlation was identified that accurately predicted the relationship between the sodium vapor source temperature and the vapor pressure. A means to maintain the uniformity of the temperature across the electrode/electrolyte sample and in the sodium vapor source was determined. Two electrode/electrolyte configurations (tube and disk) were tested to determine if there was a difference in the characteristics determined from the measurements. It was demonstrated that the configuration of the sample had little effect (about 15%) on the measurements at typical AMTEC operating temperatures. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) and controlled potential current-voltage curves (iV curves) techniques were used to determine these characteristics.

Azimov, Ulughbek Bakhadirovich

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

Not Available

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

Initial Scaling Studies and Conceptual Thermal Fluids Experiments for the Prismatic NGNP Point Design  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report is to document the initial high temperature gas reactor scaling studies and conceptual experiment design for gas flow and heat transfer. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/ATHENA/RELAP5-3D calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses are being applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant forced convection with slight transverse property variation. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple buoyant jets into a confined density-stratified crossflow -- with obstructions. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second experiment will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets as they mix in flowing through the array of posts in a lower plenum en route to the single exit duct. Initial conceptual designs for such experiments are described.

D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) will be the first experiment able to study high-beta plasma confined by a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fabrication status of the superconducting float- ing-coil, charging-coil, and levitation-coil. In addition, we) Vessel LDX Superconducting Coil Manufacturing Status: Floating Coil (714 turns, Nb3Sn, 5T, 1.3 MA turns&D tests of conductor, insulation, electromechanical properties · Coil winding underway · Manufacturing

193

Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information  

SciTech Connect

Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

194

Materials testing for in situ stabilization treatability study of INEEL mixed wastes soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the contaminant-specific materials testing phase of the In Situ Stabilization Comprehensive Environment Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Treatability Study (TS). The purpose of materials testing is to measure the effectiveness of grouting agents to stabilize Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Acid Pit soils and select a grout material for use in the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Treatability Study within the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). Test results will assist the selecting a grout material for the follow-on demonstrations described in Test Plan for the Cold Test Demonstration and Acid Pit Stabilization Phases of the In Situ Stabilization Treatability Study at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex.

Heiser, J.; Fuhrmann, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.  

SciTech Connect

Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

Results of molten salt panel and component experiments for solar central receivers: Cold fill, freeze/thaw, thermal cycling and shock, and instrumentation tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted with a molten salt loop at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM to resolve issues associated with the operation of the 10MW{sub e} Solar Two Central Receiver Power Plant located near Barstow, CA. The salt loop contained two receiver panels, components such as flanges and a check valve, vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters, and an impedance pressure transducer. Tests were conducted on procedures for filling and thawing a panel, and assessing components and instrumentation in a molten salt environment. Four categories of experiments were conducted: (1) cold filling procedures, (2) freeze/thaw procedures, (3) component tests, and (4) instrumentation tests. Cold-panel and -piping fill experiments are described, in which the panels and piping were preheated to temperatures below the salt freezing point prior to initiating flow, to determine the feasibility of cold filling the receiver and piping. The transient thermal response was measured, and heat transfer coefficients and transient stresses were calculated from the data. Freeze/thaw experiments were conducted with the panels, in which the salt was intentionally allowed to freeze in the receiver tubes, then thawed with heliostat beams. Slow thermal cycling tests were conducted to measure both how well various designs of flanges (e.g., tapered flanges or clamp type flanges) hold a seal under thermal conditions typical of nightly shut down, and the practicality of using these flanges on high maintenance components. In addition, the flanges were thermally shocked to simulate cold starting the system. Instrumentation such as vortex shedding and ultrasonic flow meters were tested alongside each other, and compared with flow measurements from calibration tanks in the flow loop.

Pacheco, J.E.; Ralph, M.E.; Chavez, J.M.; Dunkin, S.R.; Rush, E.E.; Ghanbari, C.M.; Matthews, M.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

HVAC and water heating system field test experiences at the Tennessee Energy Conservation in Housing (TECH) complex  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TECH complex has been utilized since 1976 as a field test site for several novel and conventional space conditioning and water heating systems. Systems tested include the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES), solar space heating systems (hydronic and air), parallel and series solar assisted heat pumps, air-type solar heating with off-peak storage, passive solar heating, two conventional air-to-air heat pumps, an air-to-air heat pump with desuperheater water heater, and horizontal coil and multiple shallow vertical coil ground-coupled heat pumps. System descriptions and test results are presented as well as performance observations.

Baxter, V.D.; McGraw, B.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

199

Ice in Clouds ExperimentLayer Clouds. Part II: Testing Characteristics of Heterogeneous Ice Formation in Lee Wave Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterogeneous ice nucleation is a source of uncertainty in models that represent ice clouds. The primary goal of the Ice in Clouds ExperimentLayer Clouds (ICE-L) field campaign was to determine if a link can be demonstrated between ice ...

P. R. Field; A. J. Heymsfield; B. J. Shipway; P. J. DeMott; K. A. Pratt; D. C. Rogers; J. Stith; K. A. Prather

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

MAINTENANCE SHOP The shop manager, Clint Steffan has over 25 years experience in Electronic design, test, and repair in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAINTENANCE SHOP The shop manager, Clint Steffan has over 25 years experience in Electronic design the capability of repairing most electronic, mechanical and electro-mechanical equipment, including refrigeration source for parts instead of buying from equipment manufacturer. Repair/recharge small refrigeration

Lajeunesse, Marc J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to assess radiological contamination have collected more than 600 soil samples and surveyed 120 acres of land for gamma radiation. Under an interagency agreement with DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conducting the study at Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) Area IV and the Northern Undeveloped Land. Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California More Documents & Publications EA-1345: Final Environmental Assessment EIS-0402: Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

202

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC36-00GO10529 for the Department of Energy, General Atomics (GA) is developing Supercritical Water Partial Oxidation (SWPO) as a means of producing hydrogen from low-grade biomass and other waste feeds. The Phase I Pilot-scale Testing/Feasibility Studies have been successfully completed and the results of that effort are described in this report. The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel (heat 9T2796) tested in high-temperature uniaxial and multiaxial experiments  

SciTech Connect

The results obtained from a number of metallographic examinations of Type 304 stainless steel specimens were compiled. Samples were obtained from uniaxial and multiaxial tests covering a very broad span of temperatures and times. Special emphasis was on the identification of failure modes, cracking patterns, grain distortion, and grain-boundary microstructures. Uniaxial specimens exhibited the following sequence of failure modes with increasing temperature and time: ductile plastic tearing, ductile plastic shear, wedge cracking, and microvoid cracking. Over most of the temperature range examined (482 to 871/sup 0/C), M/sub 23/C/sub 6/ precipitated on grain boundaries at long times. Sigma phase and possibly ferrite were often present in the stressed areas at temperatures as low as 482/sup 0/C (900/sup 0/F). These metallurgical features promoted a severe loss in creep ductility at long times and low temperatures. Most multiaxial tests were performed under conditions that promoted wedge cracking. Stress gradients also favored surface crack initiation rather than bulk damage. Testing times for multiaxial tests were less than 10,000 h; hence, there was insufficient time for the development of embrittling features such as microvoids, sigma, and ferrite. Long-time multiaxial tests to failure are recommended.

Swindeman, R.W.; Houck, C.W.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

A philosophical experiment: empirical study of knowledge production at the LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How is new knowledge produced in the natural sciences? This question has long been an issue of central relevance for philosophers, historians and sociologists of science, who have fiercely debated whether and how the emergence of new scientific knowledge can be described as following regular patterns, for example as far as the interplay of theory and experiment is concerned. To this aim, more or less recent historical examples have been used as empirical case studies, and widely diverging conclusions have at times been drawn from the same material. The interdisciplinary, DFG-funded project-cluster "Epistemology of the LHC" (University of Wuppertal, Germany) has in the past three years attempted to investigate knowledge production "in real time" by following the interplay of theory and experiment unfold during the first phase of LHC activity and how the knowledge landscape of high energy physics accordingly did (or did not) change. To try and reconstruct some aspects of this epistemic dynamics, the project ...

CERN. Geneva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Supernova / Acceleration Probe: a Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universe's expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high-efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy, including discrimination of vacuum energy due to the cosmological constant and various classes of dynamical scalar fields. If we assume we live in a cosmological-constant-dominated Universe, the matter density, dark energy density, and flatness of space can all be measured with SNAP supernova and weak-lensing measurements to a systematics-limited accuracy of 1%. For a flat universe, the density-to-pressure ratio of dark energy or equation of state w(z) can be similarly measured to 5% for the present value w{sub 0} and {approx} 0.1 for the time variation w' {triple_bond} dw/d ln a|{sub z=1}. For a fiducial SUGRA-inspired universe, w{sub 0} and w' can be measured to an even tighter uncertainty of 0.03 and 0.06 respectively. Note that no external priors are needed. As more accurate theoretical predictions for the small-scale weak-lensing shear develop, the conservative estimates adopted here for space-based systematics should improve, allowing even tighter constraints. While the survey strategy is tailored for supernova and weak gravitational lensing observations, the large survey area, depth, spatial resolution, time-sampling, and nine-band optical to NIR photometry will support additional independent and/or complementary dark-energy measurement approaches as well as a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, S.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, B.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; /LBL, Berkeley /SLAC /Stockholm U. /Fermilab /Paris U., VI-VII /Yale U. /Pennsylvania U. /UC, Berkeley /Michigan U. /Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. /Marseille, CPPM /Indiana U. /American Astron. Society /Caltech /Case Western Reserve U. /Cambridge U. /Saclay /Lyon, IPN

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

207

Supernova/Acceleration Probe: A Satellite Experiment to Study the Nature of the Dark Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Supernova/Acceleration Probe (SNAP) is a proposed space-based experiment designed to study the dark energy and alternative explanations of the acceleration of the Universes expansion by performing a series of complementary systematics-controlled astrophysical measurements. We here describe a self-consistent reference mission design that can accomplish this goal with the two leading measurement approaches being the Type Ia supernova Hubble diagram and a wide-area weak gravitational lensing survey. This design has been optimized to first order and is now under study for further modification and optimization. A 2-m three-mirror anastigmat wide-field telescope feeds a focal plane consisting of a 0.7 square-degree imager tiled with equal areas of optical CCDs and near infrared sensors, and a high efficiency low-resolution integral field spectrograph. The instrumentation suite provides simultaneous discovery and light-curve measurements of supernovae and then can target individual objects for detailed spectral characterization. The SNAP mission will discover thousands of Type Ia supernovae out to z = 3 and will obtain high-signal-to-noise calibrated light-curves and spectra for a subset of > 2000 supernovae at redshifts between z = 0.1 and 1.7 in a northern field and in a southern field. A wide-field survey covering one thousand square degrees in both northern and southern fields resolves {approx} 100 galaxies per square arcminute, or a total of more than 300 million galaxies. With the PSF stability afforded by a space observatory, SNAP will provide precise and accurate measurements of gravitational lensing. The high-quality data available in space, combined with the large sample of supernovae, will enable stringent control of systematic uncertainties. The resulting data set will be used to determine the energy density of dark energy and parameters that describe its dynamical behavior. The data also provide a direct test of theoretical models for the dark energy, including discrimination of vacuum energy due to the cosmological constant and various classes of dynamical scalar fields. If we assume we live in a cosmological-constant-dominated Universe, the matter density, dark energy density, and flatness of space can all be measured with SNAP supernova and weak-lensing measurements to a systematics-limited accuracy of 1 percent. For a flat universe, the density-to-pressure ratio of dark energy or equation of state w(z) can be similarly measured to 5 percent for the present value w0 and {approx} 0.1 for the time variation w' is defined as dw/d ln a bar z = 1. For a fiducial SUGRA-inspired universe, w0 and w' can be measured to an even tighter uncertainty of 0.03 and 0.06 respectively. Note that no external priors are needed. As more accurate theoretical predictions for the small-scale weak-lensing shear develop, the conservative estimates adopted here for space-based systematics should improve, allowing even tighter constraints. While the survey strategy is tailored for supernova and weak gravitational lensing observations, the large survey area, depth, spatial resolution, time-sampling, and nine-band optical to NIR photometry will support additional independent and/or complementary dark-energy measurement approaches as well as a broad range of auxiliary science programs.

Aldering, G.; Althouse, W.; Amanullah, R.; Annis, J.; Astier, P.; Baltay, C.; Barrelet, E.; Basa, E.; Bebek, C.; Bergstrom, L.; Bernstein, G.; Bester, M.; Bigelow, C.; Blandford, R.; Bohlin, R.; Bonissent, A.; Bower, C.; Brown, M.; Campbell, M.; Carithers, W.; Commins, E.; Craig, W.; Day, C.; DeJongh, F.; Deustua, S.; Diehl, T.; Dodelson, S.; Ealet, A.; Ellis, R.; Emmet, W.; Fouchez, D.; Frieman, J.; Fruchter, A.; Gerdes, D.; Gladney, L.; Goldhaber, G.; Goobar, A.; Groom, D.; Heetderks, H.; Hoff, M.; Holland, S.; Huffer, M.; Hui, L.; Huterer, D.; Jain, B.; Jelinsky, P.; Karcher, A.; Kent, S.; Kahn, S.; Kim, A.; Kolbe, W.; Krieger, B.; Kushner, G.; Kuznetsova, N.; Lafever, R.; Lamoureux, J.; Lampton, M.; Le Fevre, O.; Levi, M.; Limon, P.; Lin, H.; Linder, E.; Loken, S.; Lorenzon, W.; Malina, R.; Marriner, J.; Marshall, P.; Massey, R.; Mazure, A.; McKay, T.; McKee, S.; Miquel, R.; Morgan, N.; Mortsell, E.; Mostek, N.; Mufson, S.; Musser, J.; Nugent, P.; Oluseyi, H.; Pain, R.; Palaio, N.; Pankow, D.; Peoples, J.; Perlmutter, S.; Prieto, E.; Rabinowitz, D.; Refregier, A.; Rhodes, J.; Roe, N.; Rusin, D.; Scarpine, V.; Schubnell, M.; Sholl, M.; Samdja, G.; Smith, R.M.; Smoot, G.; Snyder, J.; Spadafora, A.; Stebbine, A.; Stoughton, C.; Szymkowiak, A.; Tarle, G.; Taylor, K.; Tilquin, A.; Tomasch, A.; Tucker, D.; Vincent, D.; von der Lippe, H.; Walder, J-P.; Wang, G.; Wester, W.

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

208

Experiment-Based Computational Investigation of Thermomechanical Stresses in Flip Chip BGA Using the ATC4.2 Test Vehicle  

SciTech Connect

Stress measurement test chips were flip chip assembled to organic BGA substrates containing micro-vias and epoxy build-up interconnect layers. Mechanical degradation observed during temperature cycling was correlated to a damage theory developed based on 3D finite element method analysis. Degradation included die cracking, edge delamination and radial fillet cracking.

Burchett, Steven N.; Nguyen, Luu; Peterson, David W.; Sweet, James N.

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

209

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- A Study of the Large Block Test...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

A Study of the Large Block Test as an Analog for Geothermal Site Characterization Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On Home...

210

Theoretical study of proton beam preparation for the g-2 experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Beam preparation for the g-2 experiment is studied. Because of limited 2.5-MHz rf voltage and the 66-ms limited time duration allowance for the whole process, the Booster batch must be first captured to a lower 2.5-MHz rf voltage followed by a rotation in the 2.5-MHz bucket in order to achieve the required narrow half bunch width of 50 ns. The appearance of bunch tails can be reduced by first rotation by a linear barrier voltage before the adiabatic capture.

Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Revisiting the Steam-Boiler Case Study with LUTESS : Modeling for Automatic Test Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Revisiting the Steam-Boiler Case Study with LUTESS : Modeling for Automatic Test Generation. In this paper, we apply this modeling principle to a well known case study, the steam boiler problem which has model and to assess the difficulty of such a process in a realistic case study. The steam boiler case

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

212

Rocky Flats CAAS System Recalibrated, Retested, and Analyzed to Install in the Criticality Experiments Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron detectors and control panels transferred from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) were recalibrated and retested for redeployment to the CEF. Testing and calibration were successful with no failure to any equipment. Detector sensitivity was tested at a TRIGA reactor, and the response to thermal neutron flux was satisfactory. MCNP calculated minimum fission yield ({approx} 2 x 10{sup 15} fissions) was applied to determine the thermal flux at selected detector positions at the CEF. Thermal flux levels were greater than 6.39 x 10{sup 6} (n/cm{sup 2}-sec), which was about four orders of magnitude greater than the minimum alarm flux. Calculations of detector survivable distances indicate that, to be out of lethal area, a detector needs to be placed greater than 15 ft away from a maximum credible source. MCNP calculated flux/dose results were independently verified by COG. CAAS calibration and the testing confirmed that the RFP CAAS system is performing its functions as expected. New criteria for the CAAS detector placement and 12-rad zone boundaries at the CEF are established. All of the CAAS related documents and hardware have been transferred from LLNL to NSTec for installation at the CEF high bay areas.

Kim, S; Heinrichs, D; Biswas, D; Huang, S; Dulik, G; Scorby, J; Boussoufi, M; Liu, B; Wilson, R

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

213

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive test program has been envisioned by ERDA to accomplish the OTEC program objectives of developing an industrial and technological base that will lead to the commercial capability to successfully construct and economically operate OTEC plants. This study was performed to develop alternative non-site specific OTEC test facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program including both land and floating test facilities. A progression of tests was established in which OTEC power cycle component designs proceed through advanced research and technology, component, and systems test phases. This progression leads to the first OTEC pilot plant and provides support for following developments which potentially reduce the cost of OTEC energy. It also includes provisions for feedback of results from all test phases to enhance modifications to existing designs or development of new concepts. The tests described should be considered as representative of generic types since specifics can be expected to change as the OTEC plant design evolves. Emphasis is placed on defining the test facility which is capable of supporting the spectrum of tests envisioned. All test support facilities and equipment have been identified and included in terms of space, utilities, cost, schedule, and constraints or risks. A highly integrated data acquisition and control system has been included to improve test operations and facility effectiveness through a centralized computer system capable of automatic test control, real-time data analysis, engineering analyses, and selected facility control including safety alarms. Electrical power, hydrogen, and ammonia are shown to be technically feasible as means for transmitting OTEC power to a land-based distribution point. (WHK)

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

214

Studies of Nu-mu to Nu-e Oscillation Appearance in the MINOS Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The MINOS experiment uses a long baseline neutrino beam, measured 1 km downstream from its origin in the Near Detector at Fermilab, and 734 km later in the large underground Far Detector in the Soudan mine. By comparing these two measurements, MINOS can probe the atmospheric domain of the neutrino oscillation phenomenology with unprecedented precision. Besides the ability to perform a world leading determination of the {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} and {theta}{sub 23} parameters, via {nu}{sub {mu}} flux disappearance, MINOS has the potential to make a leading measurement of {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} oscillations in the atmospheric sector by looking for {nu}{sub e} appearance at the Far Detector. The observation of {nu}{sub e} appearance, tantamount to establishing a non-zero value of the {theta}{sub 13} mixing angle, opens the way to studies of CP violation in the leptonic sector, the neutrino spectral mass pattern ordering and neutrino oscillations in matter, the driving motivations of the next generation of neutrino experiments. In this thesis, we study the MINOS potential for measuring {theta}{sub 13} in the context of the MINOS Mock Data Challenge using a multivariate discriminant analysis method. We show the method's validity in the application to {nu}{sub e} event classification and background identification, as well as in its ability to identify a {nu}{sub e} signal in a Mock Data sample generated with undisclosed parameters. An independent shower reconstruction method based on three-dimensional hit matching and clustering was developed, providing several useful discriminator variables used in the multivariate analysis method. We also demonstrate that within 2 years of running, MINOS has the potential to improve the current best limit on {theta}{sub 13}, from the CHOOZ experiment, by a factor of 2.

Pereira e Sousa, Alexandre Bruno; /Tufts U.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Joint HVAC Transmission EMF Environmental Study : Final Report on Experiment 1.  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the rationale, procedures, and results of a carefully controlled study conducted to establish whether chronic exposure of female (ewe) Suffolk lambs to the environment of a 500-kV 60-Hz transmission line would affect various characteristics of growth, endocrine function, and reproductive development. This experiment used identical housing and management schemes for control and line-exposed ewes, thus minimizing these factors as contributors to between-group experimental error. Further, throughout the 10-month duration of this study, changes in electric and magnetic fields, audible noise, and weather conditions were monitored continuously by a computerized system. Such measurements provided the opportunity to identify any relationship between environmental factors and biological responses. Because of reports in the literature that electric and magnetic fields alter concentrations of melatonin in laboratory animals, the primary objective of this study was to ascertain whether a similar effect occurs in lambs exposed to a 500-kV a-c line in a natural setting. In addition, onset of puberty, changes in body weight, wool growth, and behavior were monitored. To determine whether the environment of a 500-kV line caused stress in the study animals, serum levels of cortisol were measured. The study was conducted at Bonneville Power Administration`s Ostrander Substation near Estacada, Oregon.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration; Oregon Regional Primate Research Center

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high-flow operation to natural circulation. Low-flow coolant events are the most difficult to design for because they involve the most complex thermal-hydraulic behavior induced by the dominance of thermal-buoyancy forces acting on the coolants. Such behavior can cause multiple-component flow interaction phenomena, which are not adequately understood or appreciated by reactor designers as to their impact on reactor performance and safety. Since the early 1990s, when DOE canceled the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program, little has been done experimentally to further understand the importance of the complex thermal-buoyancy phenomena and their impact on reactor design or to improve the ability of three-dimensional (3-D) transient computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and structures codes to model the phenomena. An improved experimental data base and the associated improved validated codes would provide needed design tools to the reactor community. The improved codes would also facilitate scale-up from small-scale testing to prototype size and would facilitate comparing performance of one reactor/component design with another. The codes would also have relevance to the design and safety of water-cooled reactors. To accomplish the preceding, it is proposed to establish a national GNEP-LMR research and development center at Argonne having as its foundation state-of-art science-based infrastructure consisting of: (a) thermal-hydraulic experimental capabilities for conducting both water and sodium testing of individual reactor components and complete reactor in-vessel models and (b) a computational modeling development and validation capability that is strongly interfaced with the experimental facilities. The proposed center would greatly advance capabilities for reactor development by establishing the validity of high-fidelity (i.e., close to first principles) models and tools. Such tools could be used directly for reactor design or for qualifying/tuning of lower-fidelity models, which now require costly experimental qualification for each different type of design

Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Test Problem: Tilted Rayleigh-Taylor for 2-D Mixing Studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 'tilted-rig' test problem originates from a series of experiments (Smeeton & Youngs, 1987, Youngs, 1989) performed at AWE in the late 1980's, that followed from the 'rocket-rig' experiments (Burrows et al., 1984; Read & Youngs, 1983), and exploratory experiments performed at Imperial College (Andrews, 1986; Andrews and Spalding, 1990). A schematic of the experiment is shown in Figure 1, and comprises a tank filled with light fluid above heavy, and then 'tilted' on one side of the apparatus, thus causing an 'angled interface' to the acceleration history due to rockets. Details of the configuration given in the next chapter include: fluids, dimensions, and other necessary details to simulate the experiment. Figure 2 shows results from two experiments, Case 110 (which is the source for this test problem) that has an Atwood number of 0.5, and Case 115 (a secondary source described in Appendix B), with Atwood of 0.9 Inspection of the photograph in Figure 2 (the main experimental diagnostic) for Case 110. reveals two main areas for mix development; 1) a large-scale overturning motion that produces a rising plume (spike) on the left, and falling plume (bubble) on the right, that are almost symmetric; and 2) a Rayleigh-Taylor driven mixing central mixing region that has a large-scale rotation associated with the rising and falling plumes, and also experiences lateral strain due to stretching of the interface by the plumes, and shear across the interface due to upper fluid moving downward and to the right, and lower fluid moving upward and to the left. Case 115 is similar but differs by a much larger Atwood of 0.9 that drives a strong asymmetry between a left side heavy spike penetration and a right side light bubble penetration. Case 110 is chosen as the source for the present test problem as the fluids have low surface tension (unlike Case 115) due the addition of a surfactant, the asymmetry small (no need to have fine grids for the spike), and there is extensive reasonable quality photographic data. The photographs in Figure 2 also reveal the appearance of a boundary layer at the left and right walls; this boundary layer has not been included in the test problem as preliminary calculations suggested it had a negligible effect on plume penetration and RT mixing. The significance of this test problem is that, unlike planar RT experiments such as the Rocket-Rig (Youngs, 1984), Linear Electric Motor - LEM (Dimonte, 1990), or the Water Tunnel (Andrews, 1992), the Tilted-Rig is a unique two-dimensional RT mixing experiment that has experimental data and now (in this TP) Direct Numerical Simulation data from Livescu and Wei. The availability of DNS data for the tilted-rig has made this TP viable as it provides detailed results for comparison purposes. The purpose of the test problem is to provide 3D simulation results, validated by comparison with experiment, which can be used for the development and validation of 2D RANS models. When such models are applied to 2D flows, various physics issues are raised such as double counting, combined buoyancy and shear, and 2-D strain, which have not yet been adequately addressed. The current objective of the test problem is to compare key results, which are needed for RANS model validation, obtained from high-Reynolds number DNS, high-resolution ILES or LES with explicit sub-grid-scale models. The experiment is incompressible and so is directly suitable for algorithms that are designed for incompressible flows (e.g. pressure correction algorithms with multi-grid); however, we have extended the TP so that compressible algorithms, run at low Mach number, may also be used if careful consideration is given to initial pressure fields. Thus, this TP serves as a useful tool for incompressible and compressible simulation codes, and mathematical models. In the remainder of this TP we provide a detailed specification; the next section provides the underlying assumptions for the TP, fluids, geometry details, boundary conditions (and alternative set-ups), initial conditions, and acceleration history (an

Andrews, Malcolm J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Livescu, Daniel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Youngs, David L. [AWE

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

218

Analytical Study of High Concentration PCB Paint at the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This report provides results of an analytical study of high concentration PCB paint in a shutdown nuclear test reactor located at the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS). The study was designed to obtain data relevant for an evaluation of potential hazards associated with the use of and exposure to such paints.

Lowry, N.J.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

219

Results and Analyses of Irradiation/Anneal Experiments Conducted on Yankee Rowe Reactor Pressure Vessel Surrogate Materials: Yankee Atomic Electric Company Test Reactor Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many variables influence the response of reactor vessel steels to neutron irradiation. This study looks at the influence of irradiation temperature, steel heat treatment and microstructure, and nickel and phosphorus content on the irradiation response of high-copper reactor vessel steel. Also addressed are several studies evaluating the potential of thermal annealing to restore the mechanical properties of the steels tested.

1996-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

220

Test of the unactivated calcium fluoride crystal for use as a scintillation detector in Ca/sup 48/ double beta decay experiment  

SciTech Connect

The test results of the properties of the unactivated CaF/sub 2/ scintillation crystal detector is reported. The energy response of a small size CaF/sub 2/ crystal and a large CaF/sub 2/ crystal detector, which will be used in the Ca/sup 48/ Double Beta Decay (DBD) experiment, to gamma rays and an electron beam from 6 to 10 MeV was tested. The results indicate that the linear energy response range can be extended to 10 MeV for the large CaF/sub 2/ detector. Meanwhile, the relation of the energy resolution to the incident particle energy is represented by E/sup -1/2/ (MeV). (It is anticipated that the energy resolution at 4.27 MeV will be about 9%.)

Weihua, T.; Ke, Y.; Yucan, Z.; Wenheng, Z.; Zhipeng, Z.; Junguang, L.; Hansheng, S.; Minghan, Y.; Yanfeng, F.; Shaoxin, O.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

An Isopycnic Model Study of the North Atlantic. Part I: Model Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a 30-yr spinup experiment of the North Atlantic Ocean with the Miami isopycnic-coordinate ocean model, which, when compared with previous experiments, possesses improved horizontal resolution, surface forcing functions, and ...

A. L. New; R. Bleck; Y. Jia; R. Marsh; M. Huddleston; S. Barnard

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

FINESSE: study of the issues, experiments and facilities for fusion nuclear technology research and development. Interim report. Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The following chapters are included in this study: (1) fusion nuclear issues, (2) survey of experimental needs, (3) requirements of the experiments, (4) non-fusion facilities, (5) fusion facilities for nuclear experiments, and (6) fusion research and development scenarios. (MOW)

Abdou, M.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Parametric studies of penetration events : a design and analysis of experiments approach.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical screening study of the interaction between a penetrator and a geological target with a preformed hole has been carried out to identify the main parameters affecting the penetration event. The planning of the numerical experiment was based on the orthogonal array OA(18,7,3,2), which allows 18 simulation runs with 7 parameters at 3 levels each. The strength of 2 of the array allows also for two-factor interaction studies. The seven parameters chosen for this study are: penetrator offset, hole diameter, hole taper, vertical and horizontal velocity of the penetrator, angle of attack of the penetrator and target material. The analysis of the simulation results has been based on main effects plots and analysis of variance (ANOVA), and it has been performed using three metrics: the maximum values of the penetration depth, penetrator deceleration and plastic strain in the penetrator case. This screening study shows that target material has a major influence on penetration depth and penetrator deceleration, while penetrator offset has the strongest effect on the maximum plastic strain.

Chiesa, Michael L.; Marin, Esteban B.; Booker, Paul M.

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

SUPERCRITICAL WATER PARTIAL OXIDATION PHASE I - PILOT-SCALE TESTING / FEASIBILITY STUDIES FINAL REPORT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Key potential advantages of the SWPO process is the use of partial oxidation in-situ to rapidly heat the gasification medium, resulting in less char formation and improved hydrogen yield. Another major advantage is that the high-pressure, high-density aqueous environment is ideal for reaching and gasifying organics of all types. The high water content of the medium encourages formation of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich products and is especially compatible with high water content feeds such as biomass materials. The high water content of the medium is also effective for gasification of hydrogen-poor materials such as coal. A versatile pilot plant for exploring gasification in supercritical water has been established at GA's facilities in San Diego. The Phase I testing of the SWPO process with wood and ethanol mixtures demonstrated gasification efficiencies of about 90%, comparable to those found in prior laboratory-scale SCW gasification work carreid out at the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) as well as other biomass gasification experience with conventional gasifiers. As in the prior work at UHM, a significant amount of the hydrogen found in the gas phase products is derived from the water/steam matrix. The studies at UHM utilized an indirectly heated gasifier with an acitvated carbon catalyst. In contrast, the GA studies utilized a directly heated gasifier without catalyst, plus a surrogate waste fuel. Attainment of comparable gasification efficiencies without catalysis is an important advancement for the GA process, and opens the way for efficient hydrogen production from low-value, dirty feed materials. The Phase I results indicate that a practical means to overcome limitations on biomass slurry feed concentration and preheat temperatuare is to coprocess an auxiliary high heating value material. SWPO coprocessing of tow hgih-water content wastes, partially dewatered sewage sludge and trap grease, yields a scenario for the production of hydrogen at highly competitive prices. It is estimated that there are hundreds if not thousands of potential sites for this technology across the US and worldwide.

SPRITZER,M; HONG,G

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Design, deployment and functional tests of the on-line Event Filter for the ATLAS experiment at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Event Filter selection stage is a fundamental component of the ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition architecture. Its primary function is the reduction of data flow and rate to values acceptable by the mass storage operations and by the subsequent off-line data reconstruction and analysis steps. The computing instrument of the EF is generally organized as a set of independent sub-farms, each connected to one output of the Event Builder switch fabric. Each sub-farm comprises a number of processors analyzing several complete events in parallel. This paper describes the design of the ATLAS EF system, its deployment in the 2004 ATLAS combined test beam together with some examples of integrating selection and monitoring algorithms. Since the processing algorithms are not specially designed for EF but are inherited as much as possible from the off-line ones, special emphasis is reserved to system reliability and data security, in particular for the case of failures in the processing algorithms. Another key design...

Negri, A; Dos Anjos, A; Baines, J T M; Bee, C P; Biglietti, M; Bogaerts, J A C; Boisvert, V; Bosman, M; Caron, B; Casado, M P; Cataldi, G; Cavalli, D; Cervetto, M; Comune, G; Conde-Muo, P; De Santo, A; Daz-Gmez, M; Dosil, M; Ellis, Nick; Emeliyanov, D; Epp, B; Etienne, F; Falciano, S; Farilla, A; George, S; Gheteo, V; Gonzlez, S; Grothe, M; Kabana, S; Khomich, A; Kilvington, G; Konstantinidis, N P; Kootz, A; Lowe, A; Luminari, L; Maeno, T; Masik, J; Di Mattia, A; Meessen, C; Mello, A G; Merino, G; Moore, R; Morettini, P; Nikitin, N V; Nisatip, A; Padillaf, C; Panikashvili, N; Parodi, F; Prez-Rale, V; Pinfold, J L; Pinto, P; Qian, Z; Resconi, S; Rosati, S; Snchez, C; Santamarina-Rios, C; Scannicchio, D A; Schiavi, C; Segura, E; De Seixas, J M; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Soluk, R A; Stefanidis, E; Sushkov, S; Sutton, M; Tapprogge, Stefan; Thomas, E; Touchard, F; Venda-Pinto, B; Vercesi, V; Werner, P; Wheeler, S; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Zobernig, G; 2004 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium And Medical Imaging Conference

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

1-800-CALL-H.E.P. -- Experiences on a voice-over-IP test bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly interactive Internet applications such as Voice-over-IP are extremely sensitive to network performance. Even on high performance research networks, many cases will require the use of differentiated services to achieve high (toll) quality conversations. In this talk the authors will describe a test bed over the Energy Sciences network (ESnet) between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia). In particular the characteristics of Voice-over-IP calls between LBNL and SLAC will be reviewed and the effect of low, moderate and high congestion on the link will be quantified. The use of Per Hop Behavior (PHB) in IP headers with Weighted Fair Queuing (WFQ) in routers and the benefit they provide will be explained. A model of flows and performance will be presented and new techniques to predict the quality of calls are under development and will be reviewed. Comparisons with telephone reliability will be discussed and the feasibility of wide spread deployment of VoIP in HEP will be considered.

Matthews, W.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

227

ENDF/B-VII.1 Neutron Cross Section Data Testing with Critical Assembly Benchmarks and Reactor Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is the latest revision to the United States' Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). The ENDF library is currently in its seventh generation, with ENDF/B-VII.0 being released in 2006. This revision expands upon that library, including the addition of new evaluated files (was 393 neutron files previously, now 418 including replacement of elemental vanadium and zinc evaluations with isotopic evaluations) and extension or updating of many existing neutron data files. Complete details are provided in the companion paper [1]. This paper focuses on how accurately application libraries may be expected to perform in criticality calculations with these data. Continuous energy cross section libraries, suitable for use with the MCNP Monte Carlo transport code, have been generated and applied to a suite of nearly one thousand critical benchmark assemblies defined in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project's International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. This suite covers uranium and plutonium fuel systems in a variety of forms such as metallic, oxide or solution, and under a variety of spectral conditions, including unmoderated (i.e., bare), metal reflected and water or other light element reflected. Assembly eigenvalues that were accurately predicted with ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections such as unmoderated and uranium reflected 235U and 239Pu assemblies, HEU solution systems and LEU oxide lattice systems that mimic commercial PWR configurations continue to be accurately calculated with ENDF/B-VII.1 cross sections, and deficiencies in predicted eigenvalues for assemblies containing selected materials, including titanium, manganese, cadmium and tungsten are greatly reduced. Improvements are also confirmed for selected actinide reaction rates such as 236U capture. Other deficiencies, such as the overprediction of Pu solution system critical eigenvalues and a decreasing trend in calculated eigenvalue for 233U fueled systems as a function of Above-Thermal Fission Fraction remain. The comprehensive nature of this critical benchmark suite and the generally accurate calculated eigenvalues obtained with ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron cross sections support the conclusion that this is the most accurate general purpose ENDF/B cross section library yet released to the technical community.

G. Palmiotti

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Experiments to investigate direct containment heating phenomena with scaled models of the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in the Surtsey Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Surtsey Facility at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is used to perform scaled experiments that simulate hypothetical high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) accidents in a nuclear power plant (NPP). These experiments are designed to investigate the effect of specific phenomena associated with direct containment heating (DCH) on the containment load, such as the effect of physical scale, prototypic subcompartment structures, water in the cavity, and hydrogen generation and combustion. In the Integral Effects Test (IET) series, 1:10 linear scale models of the Zion NPP structures were constructed in the Surtsey vessel. The RPV was modeled with a steel pressure vessel that had a hemispherical bottom head, which had a 4-cm hole in the bottom head that simulated the final ablated hole that would be formed by ejection of an instrument guide tube in a severe NPP accident. Iron/alumina/chromium thermite was used to simulate molten corium that would accumulate on the bottom head of an actual RPV. The chemically reactive melt simulant was ejected by high-pressure steam from the RPV model into the scaled reactor cavity. Debris was then entrained through the instrument tunnel into the subcompartment structures and the upper dome of the simulated reactor containment building. The results of the IET experiments are given in this report.

Allen, M.D.; Pilch, M.M.; Blanchat, T.K.; Griffith, R.O. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Nichols, R.T. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

High Voltage Test Apparatus for a Neutron EDM Experiment and Lower Limit on the Dielectric Strength of Liquid Helium at Large Volumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new search for a permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron is underway using ultracold neutrons produced and held in a bath of superfluid helium. Attaining the target sensitivity requires maintaining an electric field of several tens of kilovolts per centimeter across the experimental cell, which is nominally 7.5 cm wide and will contain about 4 liters of superfluid. The electrical properties of liquid helium are expected to be sufficient to meet the design goals, but little is known about these properties for volumes and electrode spacings appropriate to the EDM experiment. Furthermore, direct application of the necessary voltages from an external source to the experimental test cell is impractical. An apparatus to amplify voltages in the liquid helium environment and to test the electrical properties of the liquid for large volumes and electrode spacings has been constructed. The device consists of a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter liquid helium dewar. Preliminary results show the breakdown strength of normal state liquid helium is at least 90 kV/cm at these volumes, at the helium vapor pressure corresponding to 4.38 K. These fields hold for more than 11 hours with leakage currents less than 170 pA (about 20% of the maximum tolerable in the EDM experiment). The system is also found to be robust against anticipated radiation backgrounds. Preliminary results for superfluid show that fields of at least 30 kV/cm can be sustained at the volumes required for the EDM experiment, about 60% of the design goal. These results are likely limited by the low pressure that must be maintained above the superfluid bath.

J. C. Long; P. D. Barnes; J. G. Boissevain; D. J. Clark; M. D. Cooper; J. J. Gomez; S. K. Lamoreaux; R. E. Mischke; S. I. Penttila

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

230

Bibliography of reports on studies of the geology, hydrogeology and hydrology at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, from 1951--1996  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was established in 1951 as a proving ground for nuclear weapons. The site had formerly been part of an Air Force bombing and gunnery range during World War II. Sponsor-directed studies of the geology, hydrogeology, and hydrology of the NTS began about 1956 and were broad based in nature, but were related mainly to the effects of the detonation of nuclear weapons. These effects included recommending acceptable media and areas for underground tests, the possibility of off-site contamination of groundwater, air blast and surface contamination in the event of venting, ground-shock damage that could result from underground blasts, and studies in support of drilling and emplacement. The studies were both of a pure scientific nature and of a practical applied nature. The NTS was the site of 828 underground nuclear tests and 100 above-ground tests conducted between 1951 and 1992 (U.S. Department of Energy, 1994a). After July 1962, all nuclear tests conducted in the United States were underground, most of them at the NTS. The first contained underground nuclear explosion was detonated on September 19, 1957, following extensive study of the underground effect of chemical explosives. The tests were performed by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Energy Research and Development Administration. As part of a nationwide complex for nuclear weapons design, testing and manufacturing, the NTS was the location for continental testing of new and stockpiled nuclear devices. Other tests, including Project {open_quotes}Plowshare{close_quotes} experiments to test the peaceful application of nuclear explosives, were conducted on several parts of the site. In addition, the Defense Nuclear Agency tested the effect of nuclear detonations on military hardware.

Seaber, P.R.; Stowers, E.D.; Pearl, R.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Study of Thermonuclear Alfven Instabilities in Next Step Burning Plasma Experiments  

SciTech Connect

A study is presented for the stability of alpha-particle driven shear Alfven Eigenmodes (AE) for the normal parameters of the three major burning plasma proposals, ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), FIRE (Fusion Ignition Research Experiment), and IGNITOR (Ignited Torus). A study of the JET (Joint European Torus) plasma, where fusion alphas were generated in tritium experiments, is also included to attempt experimental validation of the numerical predictions. An analytic assessment of Toroidal AE (TAE) stability is first presented, where the alpha particle beta due to the fusion reaction rate and electron drag is simply and accurately estimated in 7-20 keV plasma temperature regime. In this assessment the hot particle drive is balanced against ion-Landau damping of the background deuterons and electron collision effects and stability boundaries are determined. Then two numerical studies of AE instability are presented. In one the High-n stability code HINST is used . This code is capable of predicting instabilities of low and moderately high frequency Alfven modes. HINST computes the non-perturbative solution of the Alfven eigenmodes including effects of ion finite Larmor radius, orbit width, trapped electrons etc. The stability calculations are repeated using the global code NOVAK. We show that for these tokamaks the spectrum of the least stable AE modes are TAE that appear at medium-/high-n numbers. In HINST TAEs are locally unstable due to the alphas pressure gradient in all the devices under the consideration except IGNITOR. However, NOVAK calculations show that the global mode structure enhances the damping mechanisms and produces stability in all configurations considered here. A serious question remains whether the perturbation theory used in NOVAK overestimates the stability predictions, so that it is premature to conclude that the nominal operation of all three proposals are stable to AEs. In addition NBI ions produce a strong stabilizing effect for JET. However, in ITER the beam energies needed to penetrate to the core must be high so that a diamagnetic drift frequency comparable to that of the alpha particles is produced by the beam ions which induces a destabilizing effect.

N.N. Gorelenkov; H.L. Berk; R. Budny; C.Z. Cheng; G.-Y. Fu; W.W. Heidbrink; G. Kramer; D. Meade; and R. Nazikian

2002-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

232

Study of kaonic deuterium X-rays by the SIDDHARTA experiment at DAFNE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of the KbarN system at very low energies plays a key role for the understanding of the strong interaction between hadrons in the strangeness sector. At the DAFNE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati we studied kaonic atoms with Z=1 and Z=2, taking advantage of the low-energy charged kaons from Phi-mesons decaying nearly at rest. The SIDDHARTA experiment used X-ray spectroscopy of the kaonic atoms to determine the transition yields and the strong interaction induced shift and width of the lowest experimentally accessible level (1s for H and D and 2p for He). Shift and width are connected to the real and imaginary part of the scattering length. To disentangle the isospin dependent scattering lengths of the antikaon-nucleon interaction, measurements of Kp and of Kd are needed. We report here on an exploratory deuterium measurement, from which a limit for the yield of the K-series transitions was derived: Y(K_tot)<0.0143 and Y(K_alpha)<0.0039 (CL 90%). Also, the upcoming ...

Bazzi, M; Berucci, C; Bombelli, L; Bragadireanu, A M; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu, C; d'Uffizi, A; Fiorini, C; Frizzi, T; Ghio, F; Guaraldo, C; Hayano, R; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Iwasaki, M; Kienle, P; Sandri, P Levi; Longoni, A; Marton, J; Okada, S; Pietreanu, D; Ponta, T; Vidal, A Romero; Sbardella, E; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Tatsuno, H; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Oxygen enriched combustion system performance study: Volume 3, Burner tests and combustion modeling: Final report, Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

Oxygen enriched combustion (OEC) has been shown to have significant energy savings potential in industrial furnace applications. High temperature industrial furnaces, such as glass melting furnaces, appear to be the most promising applications for oxygen enriched combustion. In these applications, the principal energy savings result from minimizing the fuel energy required to heat the diluent nitrogen in air. The results of technical and economic assessment of OEC and market assessment were reported in Volume 1 and 2 of the current study. This report describes the results of burner evaluation tests over a range of oxygen enrichment and a numerical simulation study. The first part refers to the experimental results of both conventional air-fired burners and specially designed oxygen-fuel burners, evaluated at two scales. Part 2 of this report is concerned with the application of a computer code to extrapolate the results from small scale combustion tests to industrial furnaces. The experiments were designed as a comparative evaluation to: determine the operating range of different burner designs with oxygen enrichment; measure detailed flame characteristics for both air and enriched oxygen conditions; and estimate expected performance from research furnace results to actual industrial applications. 14 refs., 76 figs., 20 tabs.

Kwan, Y.; Abele, A.R.; Richter, W.; Chen, S.L.; Payne, R.; Kobayashi, H.; Silver, S.L.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Test bench for studying the outlook for industrial applications of an oxygen-iodine laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the development and tests of a chemical oxygen-iodine laser test bench based on a twisted-aerosol-flow singlet-oxygen generator and a supersonic laser model for studying the outlook for industrial applications of this laser. The maximal output power of the laser is {approx}65 kW (the average power is {approx}50 kW), corresponding to a specific output power of {approx}110 W cm{sup -2}. The maximal chemical efficiency is {approx}34%. (letters)

Adamenkov, A A; Bakshin, V V; Bogachev, A V; Buryak, E V; Vdovkin, L A; Velikanov, S D; Vyskubenko, B A; Garanin, Sergey G; Gorbacheva, E V; Grigorovich, Sergei V; Il'in, S P; Il'kaev, R I; Ilyushin, Yurii N; Kalashnik, A M; Kolobyanin, Yu V; Leonov, M L; Svischev, V V; Troshkin, M V [Russian Federal Nuclear Center 'All-Russian Scientific Research Institute of Experimental Physics', Sarov, Nizhnii Novgorod Region (Russian Federation)

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Study of correlations between photoproduced pairs of charmed particles at Experiment E831/FOCUS  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the study of the charm-pair correlations produced in photon-nucleon interactions at = 175 GeV/c, by the Fermilab fixed target experiment E831/FOCUS. The E831/FOCUS experiment produced and reconstructed over one million charm particles. This high statistics allows the reconstruction of more than 7000 charm-pair mesons D{bar D}, 10 times the statistic of former experiments, and also allows to get, for the first time, about 600 totally reconstructed charm-pairs in the DD{sub s} and D{Lambda}{sub c} channels. They were able to study, with some detail, the kinematical correlations between the charm and anticharm particle forming a pair, in the square transverse momentum (p{sub T}{sup 2}), azimuthal angle difference ({Delta}{phi}), rapidity difference ({Delta}y) and the charm-pair mass variables. They observe some correlation for the longitudinal momenta, and a significant correlation for the transverse momenta of the charm and anticharm particles. They compare the experimental distributions with theoretical predictions based on the photon-gluon fusion model (PGF), for the production of c{bar c} quarks, and the standard Lund hadronization model. These models are implemented by the PYTHIA Monte Carlo event generator. The PYTHIA program allows the inclusion, in the simulation, of non-perturbative effects that have been shown to be important for charm production. In order to compare data and simulation, they have generated two Monte Carlo samples, the first one set to favor the production of D{bar D} pairs (MCDD2), and the second one set to favor the production of DD{sub s} and D{Lambda}{sub c} pairs, where each one uses different functions and parameters values for the theoretical models in the simulation. They observe, for the correlation distributions, that the set of parameters used by the MCDD2 model together with the intrinsic transverse momentum (k{sub {perpendicular}}) of the partons inside the nucleons, has a better agreement with data distributions than the one used by the MCDSLC model. Finally, the relative pair/anti-pair yield production ratio is calculated for five sets of charm-pairs, D{sup +}D{sup 0}, D{sup +}D{sub s}{sup -}, D{sup 0}D{sub s}{sup -}, D{sup +}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup -} e D{sup 0}{Lambda}{sub c}{sup -}, both for data as well as for the two Monte Carlo samples. They observe that the MCDSLC model predicts charm-pair yield production ratios closer to the yield ratios data than the MCDD2 model.

Castromonte Flores, Cesar Manuel; /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Reflective Cracking Study: Initial Construction, Phase 1 HVS Testing, and Overlay Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a relationship between the nuclear test and laboratory test= 0.77 Air-Void Content, CT308 or Nuclear Test (%) Caltrans308 Nuclear Test Linear (Nuclear Test) Air-Void Content,

Bejarano, Manuel O.; Jones, David; Morton, Bruce S.; Scheffy, Clark

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

The Madison plasma dynamo experiment: a facility for studying laboratory plasma astrophysics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) is a novel, versatile, basic plasma research device designed to investigate flow driven magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and other high-$\\beta$ phenomena with astrophysically relevant parameters. A 3 m diameter vacuum vessel is lined with 36 rings of alternately oriented 4000 G samarium cobalt magnets which create an axisymmetric multicusp that contains $\\sim$14 m$^{3}$ of nearly magnetic field free plasma that is well confined and highly ionized $(>50\\%)$. At present, up to 8 lanthanum hexaboride (LaB$_6$) cathodes and 10 molybdenum anodes are inserted into the vessel and biased up to 500 V, drawing 40 A each cathode, ionizing a low pressure Ar or He fill gas and heating it. Up to 100 kW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) power is planned for additional electron heating. The LaB$_6$ cathodes are positioned in the magnetized edge to drive toroidal rotation through ${\\bf J}\\times{\\bf B}$ torques that propagate into the unmagnetized core plasma. Dynamo studies...

Cooper, C M; Brookhart, M; Clark, M; Collins, C; Ding, W X; Flanagan, K; Khalzov, I; Li, Y; Milhone, J; Nornberg, M; Nonn, P; Weisberg, D; Whyte, D G; Zweibel, E; Forest, C B

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Characteristics Study of Transmission Line Mechanical Research Center (TLMRC) Wind Tower Data: Notes on Field-Wind Loading Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field determination of wind loads is one of the critical areas of wind research. In the past, researchers have used different procedures to collect, reduce, and analyze wind data, making it difficult to compare results. This study focused on data acquisition and reduction techniques for field-wind experiments and their derived results. The outcome will be useful for developing a standard procedure for future field-wind loading experiments.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Mesocell Study Area Snow Distributions for the Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) had a goal of describing snow-related features over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. This required linking disparate snow tools and datasets into one coherent, integrated package. Simulating ...

Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra; Kelly Elder; Donald W. Cline

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Relativistic Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator studies at the RTA test facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype rf power source based on the Relativistic Klystron Two- Beam Accelerator (RK-TBA) concept is being constructed at LBNL to study physics, engineering, and costing issues. The prototype, called RTA, is described and compared to a full scale design appropriate for driving the Next Linear Collider. Specific details of the induction core test and pulsed power system are presented. Details of the 1-MeV, 1.2-kA induction gun currently under construction are described.

Westenskow, G.A.; Houck, T.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Anderson, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

1996-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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241

Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Solar Field for Acceptance Testing: A Case Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As deployment of parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) systems ramps up, the need for reliable and robust performance acceptance test guidelines for the solar field is also amplified. Project owners and/or EPC contractors often require extensive solar field performance testing as part of the plant commissioning process in order to ensure that actual solar field performance satisfies both technical specifications and performance guaranties between the involved parties. Performance test code work is currently underway at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in collaboration with the SolarPACES Task-I activity, and within the ASME PTC-52 committee. One important aspect of acceptance testing is the selection of a robust technology performance model. NREL1 has developed a detailed parabolic trough performance model within the SAM software tool. This model is capable of predicting solar field, sub-system, and component performance. It has further been modified for this work to support calculation at subhourly time steps. This paper presents the methodology and results of a case study comparing actual performance data for a parabolic trough solar field to the predicted results using the modified SAM trough model. Due to data limitations, the methodology is applied to a single collector loop, though it applies to larger subfields and entire solar fields. Special consideration is provided for the model formulation, improvements to the model formulation based on comparison with the collected data, and uncertainty associated with the measured data. Additionally, this paper identifies modeling considerations that are of particular importance in the solar field acceptance testing process and uses the model to provide preliminary recommendations regarding acceptable steady-state testing conditions at the single-loop level.

Wagner, M. J.; Mehos, M. S.; Kearney, D. W.; McMahan, A. C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Testing for spatial correlation and semiparametric spatial modeling of binary outcomes with application to aberrant crypt foci in colon carcinogenesis experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an experiment to understand colon carcinogenesis, all animals were exposed to a carcinogen while half the animals were also exposed to radiation. Spatially, we measured the existence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF), namely morphologically changed colonic crypts that are known to be precursors of colon cancer development. The biological question of interest is whether the locations of these ACFs are spatially correlated: if so, this indicates that damage to the colon due to carcinogens and radiation is localized. Statistically, the data take the form of binary outcomes (corresponding to the existence of an ACF) on a regular grid. We develop score??type methods based upon the Matern and conditionally autoregression (CAR) correlation models to test for the spatial correlation in such data, while allowing for nonstationarity. Because of a technical peculiarity of the score??type test, we also develop robust versions of the method. The methods are compared to a generalization of Moran??s test for continuous outcomes, and are shown via simulation to have the potential for increased power. When applied to our data, the methods indicate the existence of spatial correlation, and hence indicate localization of damage. Assuming that there are correlations in the locations of the ACF, the questions are how great are these correlations, and whether the correlation structures di?er when an animal is exposed to radiation. To understand the extent of the correlation, we cast the problem as a spatial binary regression, where binary responses arise from an underlying Gaussian latent process. We model these marginal probabilities of ACF semiparametrically, using ?xed-knot penalized regression splines and single-index models. We ?t the models using pairwise pseudolikelihood methods. Assuming that the underlying latent process is strongly mixing, known to be the case for many Gaussian processes, we prove asymptotic normality of the methods. The penalized regression splines have penalty parameters that must converge to zero asymptotically: we derive rates for these parameters that do and do not lead to an asymptotic bias, and we derive the optimal rate of convergence for them. Finally, we apply the methods to the data from our experiment.

Apanasovich, Tatiyana Vladimirovna

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

RELAP5/MOD3 simulation of the loss of residual heat removal during midloop operation experiment conducted at the ROSA-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The modeling of the complex thermal hydraulics Of reactor systems involves the use Of experimental test systems as well as numerical codes. A simulation of the loss of residual heat removal (RHR) during midloop operations was performed using the RELAP5/MOD3 thermal hydraulic code. The experiment was conducted at the Rig of Safety Assessment (ROSA)-IV/ Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experiment involved a 5% cold leg break along with the loss of the RHR system-The transient was simulated for 3040 seconds. The ROSA-1-V/]LsTF is one of the largest test facilities in the world and is located in Japan. It is a volumetrically scaled (1/48) full height, two loop model of a Westinghouse four loop pressurized water reactor (PWR). The facility consists of pressure vessel, two symmetric loops, a pressurizer and a full emergency core cooling system (ECCS) system. The transient was run on the CRAY-YMP supercomputer at Texas A&M university. Core boiling and primary pressurization followed the initiation of the transient. The time to core boiling was overpredicted. Almost all Primary parameters were predicted well until the occurrence of the loop seal clearing (LSC) at 2400 seconds. The secondary side temperatures were in good agreement with the experimental data until the LSC. Following the LSC, the steam condensation in the tubes was not calculated. This resulted in the overprediction of primary pressures after the LSC. Also, the temperatures in the hot and the cold legs were overpredicted. Because there was no significant condensation in the U-tubes, the core remained uncovered. Moreover, the LSC did not recover. Consequently, secondary side temperatures were underpredicted after the LSC. This indicated the deficiency of the condensation model. The core temperature excursion at the time of the LSC was not predicted, though there was good agreement between the experimental and calculated data for the rest of the transient. Severe oscillations were calculated throughout the course of the transient. Overall, there was reasonable qualitative agreement between the measured and the calculated data.

Banerjee, Sibashis Sanatkumar

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

TRIO experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TRIO experiment is a test of in-situ tritium recovery and heat transfer performance of a miniaturized solid breeder blanket assembly. The assembly (capsule) was monitored for temperature and neutron flux profiles during irradiation and a sweep gas flowed through the capsule to an anaytical train wherein the amounts of tritium in its various chemical forms were determined. The capsule was designed to operate at different temperatures and sweep gas conditions. At the end of the experiment the amount of tritium retained in the solid was at a concentration of less than 0.1 wppM. More than 99.9% of tritium generated during the experiment was successfully recovered. The results of the experiment showed that the tritium inventories at the beginning and at the end of the experiment follow a relationship which appears to be characteristic of intragranular diffusion.

Clemmer, R.G.; Finn, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Misra, B.; Billone, M.C.; Bowers, D.L.; Fischer, A.K.; Greenwood, L.R.; Mattas, R.F.; Tam, S.W.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect

A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85{degrees} to 95{degrees}C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern. This document is a Treatability Study Work Plan for the demonstration program. The document contains a description of the proposed treatability study, background of the EM heating process, description of the field equipment, and demonstration test design.

Sresty, G.C.

1994-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx): Goals, platforms, and field operations  

SciTech Connect

The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-REx) was an international field program designed to make observations of poorly understood but critical components of the coupled climate system of the southeast Pacific. This region is characterized by strong coastal upwelling, the coolest SSTs in the tropical belt, and is home to the largest subtropical stratocumulus deck on Earth. The field intensive phase of VOCALS-REx took place during October and November 2008 and constitutes a critical part of a broader CLIVAR program (VOCALS) designed to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding, model simulations, and predictions of the southeastern Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system, on diurnal to interannual timescales. The other major components of VOCALS are a modeling program with a model hierarchy ranging from the local to global scales, and a suite of extended observations from regular research cruises, instrumented moorings, and satellites. The two central themes of VOCALS-REx focus upon (a) links between aerosols, clouds and precipitation and their impacts on marine stratocumulus radiative properties, and (b) physical and chemical couplings between the upper ocean and the lower atmosphere, including the role that mesoscale ocean eddies play. A set of hypotheses designed to be tested with the combined field, monitoring and modeling work in VOCALS is presented here. A further goal of VOCALS-REx is to provide datasets for the evaluation and improvement of large-scale numerical models. VOCALS-REx involved five research aircraft, two ships and two surface sites in northern Chile. We describe the instrument payloads and key mission strategies for these platforms and give a summary of the missions conducted.

Wood, R.; Springston, S.; Mechoso, C. R.; Bretherton, C. S.; A.Weller, R.; Huebert, B.; Straneo, F.; Albrecht, B. A.; Coe, H.; Allen, G.; Vaughan, G.; Daum, P.; Fairall, C.; Chand, D.; Klenner, L. G.; Garreaud, R.; Grados, C.; Covert, D. S.; Bates, T. S.; Krejci, R.; Russell, L. M.; Szoeke, S. d.; Brewer, A.; Yuter, S. E.; Chaigneau, A.; Toniazzo, T.; Minnis, P.; Palikonda, R.; Abel, S. J.; Brown, W. O. J.; Williams, S.; Fochesatto, J.; Brioude, J.; Bower, K. N

2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

247

Beyond the Usability Lab: Conducting Large-scale Online User Experience Studies, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Online usability testing allows usability practitioners to get simultaneous feedback about their web and software applications from 1,000s of participants in countless market segments. Companies want quantifiable user feedback early in their development ...

William Albert; Thomas Tullis; Donna Tedesco

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

AN EXPERIMENT TO STUDY PEBBLE BED LIQUID-FLUORIDE-SALT HEAT TRANSFER  

SciTech Connect

A forced-convection liquid-fluoride-salt loop is being constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This loop was designed as a versatile experimental facility capable of supporting general thermal/fluid/corrosion testing of liquid fluoride salts. The initial test configuration is designed to support the Pebble Bed Advanced High-Temperature Reactor and incorporates a test section designed to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK salt in a heated pebble bed. The loop is constructed of Inconel 600 and is capable of operating at up to 700oC. It contains a total of 72 kg of FLiNaK salt and uses an overhung impeller centrifugal sump pump that can provide FLiNaK flow at 4.5 kg/s with a head of 0.125 MPa. The test section is made of silicon carbide (SiC) and contains approximately 600 graphite spheres, 3 cm in diameter. The pebble bed is heated using a unique inductive technique. A forced induction air cooler removes the heat added to the pebble bed. The salt level within the loop is maintained by controlling an argon cover gas pressure. Salt purification is performed in batch mode by transferring the salt from the loop into a specially made nickel crucible system designed to remove oxygen, moisture and other salt impurities. Materials selection for the loop and test section material was informed by 3 months of Inconel 600 and SiC corrosion testing as well as tests examining subcomponent performance in the salt. Several SiC-to-Inconel 600 mechanical joint designs were considered before final salt and gas seals were chosen. Structural calculations of the SiC test section were performed to arrive at a satisfactory test section configuration. Several pump vendors provided potential loop pump designs; however, because of cost, the pump was designed and fabricated in-house. The pump includes a commercial rotating dry gas shaft seal to maintain loop cover gas inventory. The primary instrumentation on the loop includes temperature, pressure, and loop flow rate measurement. Although techniques for all these measurements have improved, no commercial instrumentation was available for flow and pressure measurement that had been tested under these conditions. Instrumentation was tested and modified to meet both corrosion and temperature requirements. This paper discusses the issues encountered during the design and construction of the ORNL Liquid Salt Loop and should prove useful to those contemplating construction of similar high-temperature liquid-fluoride-salt facilities.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; McCarthy, Mike [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Pilot study risk assessment for selected problems at the Nevada Test Site (NTS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located in southwestern Nevada, about 105 km (65 mi) northwest of the city of Las Vegas. A series of tests was conducted in the late 1950s and early 1960s at or near the NTS to study issues involving plutonium-bearing devices. These tests resulted in the dispersal of about 5 TBq of {sup 239,24O}Pu on the surficial soils at the test locations. Additionally, underground tests of nuclear weapons devices have been conducted at the NTS since late 1962; ground water beneath the NTS has been contaminated with radionuclides produced by these tests. These two important problems have been selected for assessment. Regarding the plutonium contamination, because the residual {sup 239}Pu decays slowly (half-life of 24,110 y), these sites could represent a long-term hazard if they are not remediated and if institutional controls are lost. To investigate the magnitude of the potential health risks for this no-remediation case, three basic exposure scenarios were defined that could bring individuals in contact with {sup 239,24O}Pu at the sites: (1) a resident living in a subdivision, (2) a resident farmer, and (3) a worker at a commercial facility -- all located at a test site. The predicted cancer risks for the resident farmer were more than a factor of three times higher than the suburban resident at the median risk level, and about a factor of ten greater than the reference worker at a commercial facility. At 100 y from the present, the 5, 50, and 95th percentile risks for the resident farmer at the most contaminated site were 4 x 10{sup {minus}6}, 6 x 10{sup {minus}5}, and 5 x 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. For the assessment of Pu in surface soil, the principal sources of uncertainty in the estimated risks were population mobility, the relationship between indoor and outdoor contaminant levels, and the dose and risk factors for bone, liver, and lung.

Daniels, J.I. [ed.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Bogen, K.T.; Daniels, J.I.; Layton, D.W.; Straume, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Andricevic, R.; Jacobson, R.L. [Nevada Univ., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center; Meinhold, A.F.; Holtzman, S.; Morris, S.C.; Hamilton, L.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Study and testing of direct contact heat exchangers for geothermal brines. Phase II, August 1976--June 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The analytical and experimental studies completed under this project have explored several aspects of geothermal binary power cycles and column type direct contact heat exchangers between geothermal brine and isobutane. A major improvement of the heat exchanger was developed by the combination of the preheater and boiler into a single continuous column. At East Mesa, this new direct contact heat exchanger was tested on geothermal brine in order to correlate the experimental heat transfer data with the theoretical model for use in designing larger plants. Experiments also involved a small radial inflow turbine to produce electricity which marked the first generation of electricity from geothermal brine using a binary cycle. In analytical studies, a comparison of the relationship between column diameter and droplet size was made for both Minard--Johnson and Sakiadis--Johnson model. The Letan--Kehat model for relating column height and temperature profile was analyzed and compared with experimental data. It appears that the experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical models. A detailed design of a 250 Kw pilot plant incorporating the direct contact heat exchanger was completed. This design with estimated costs for it and a 500 Kw pilot plant is incorporated.

Suratt, W.B.; Lee, C.O.

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM's). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM's under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM's to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

EA-0813; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Decontamination and Decommissioning Project and The Tokamak Physics Experiment at the PPPL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

13; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) The Tokamak Fusion 13; Environmental Assessment and (FONSI) The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Decontamination and Decommissioning Project and The Tokamak Physics Experiment at the PPPL Table of Contents EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ACRONYMS Glossary of Radiological Terms SCIENTIFIC NOTATION 1.0 PURPOSE AND NEED FOR THE PROPOSED ACTIONS 1.1 TFTR D&D Project 1.2 TPX Project 1.3 Scope of Document 1.4 Local Community Relations Program 1.5 References 2.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE PROPOSED ACTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES 2.1 TFTR D&D Project 2.2 TPX Project 2.3 Environmental Monitoring 2.4 References 3.0 DESCRIPTION OF THE AFFECTED ENVIRONMENT 3.1 PPPL Proposed Site 3.2 ORR Alternative Site 3.3 References 4.0 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE PROPOSED ACTIONS AND ALTERNATIVES 4.1 TFTR D&D Project 4.1.1 Impacts of Normal D&D Operations

256

A Measurement of the muon neutrino charged current quasielastic interaction and a test of Lorentz violation with the MiniBooNE experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Mini-Booster neutrino experiment (MiniBooNE) at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab) is designed to search for {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} {nu}{sub e} appearance neutrino oscillations. Muon neutrino charged-current quasi-elastic (CCQE) interactions ({nu}{sub {mu}} + n {yields} {mu} + p) make up roughly 40% of our data sample, and it is used to constrain the background and cross sections for the oscillation analysis. Using high-statistics MiniBooNE CCQE data, the muon-neutrino CCQE cross section is measured. The nuclear model is tuned precisely using the MiniBooNE data. The measured total cross section is {sigma} = (1.058 {+-} 0.003 (stat) {+-} 0.111 (syst)) x 10{sup -38} cm{sup 2} at the MiniBooNE muon neutrino beam energy (700-800 MeV). {nu}{sub e} appearance candidate data is also used to search for Lorentz violation. Lorentz symmetry is one of the most fundamental symmetries in modern physics. Neutrino oscillations offer a new method to test it. We found that the MiniBooNE result is not well-described using Lorentz violation, however further investigation is required for a more conclusive result.

Katori, Teppei; /Indiana U.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Studies of ionic liquids in lithium-ion battery test systems  

SciTech Connect

In this work, thermal and electrochemical properties of neat and mixed ionic liquid - lithium salt systems have been studied. The presence of a lithium salt causes both thermal and phase-behavior changes. Differential scanning calorimeter DSC and thermal gravimetric analysis TGA were used for thermal analysis for several imidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, trifluoromethansulfonate, BF{sub 4}, and PF{sub 6} systems. Conductivities and diffusion coefficient have been measured for some selected systems. Chemical reactions in electrode - ionic liquid electrolyte interfaces were studied by interfacial impedance measurements. Lithium-lithium and lithium-carbon cells were studied at open circuit and a charged system. The ionic liquids studied include various imidazolium systems that are already known to be electrochemically unstable in the presence of lithium metal. In this work the development of interfacial resistance is shown in a Li|BMIMBF{sub 4} + LiBF{sub 4}|Li cell as well as results from some cycling experiments. As the ionic liquid reacts with the lithium electrode the interfacial resistance increases. The results show the magnitude of reactivity due to reduction of the ionic liquid electrolyte that eventually has a detrimental effect on battery performance.

Salminen, Justin; Prausnitz, John M.; Newman, John

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Study of the Ds+ to K+K-e+ nu Decay Channel with the BaBar Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Charm semileptonic decays allow a validation of lattice QCD calculations through the measurement of the hadronic form factors, which characterize the effect of strong interaction in these reactions. The accuracy of such calculations is crucial for the improvement of the test of the standard model in flavor physics. This thesis presents a study of the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} channel using 214 fb{sup -1} recorded by de BAbar experiment. For events with a K{sup +}K{sup -} mass in the range between 1.01 GeV/c{sup 2} and 1.03 Gev/c{sup 2}, the {phi} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} is the dominant component. Using the simple pole model to parameterize the q{sup 2} dependence of the form factors -V(q{sup 2}), A{sub 1}(q{sup 2}) and A{sub 2}(q{sup 2})- the following ratios are measured at q{sup 2} = 0; {tau}{sub V} = V(0)/A{sub 1}(0) = 1.868 {+-} 0.061 {+-} 0.079, r{sub 2} = A{sub 2}(0)/A{sub 1}(0) = 0.763 {+-} 0.072 {+-} 0.062. The mass pole of the axial-vector form factor is also obtained: m{sub A} = (2.30{sub -0.18}{sup +0.42} {+-} 0.21) GeV/c{sup 2}. In the same mass range, the semileptonic branching fraction, relative to the D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}{pi}{sup +} channel, is measured, and the absolute normalization of the axial-vector form factor is extracted: A{sub 1}(q{sup 2} = 0) and = 0.605 {+-} 0.012 {+-} 0.018 {+-} 0.018. The stated errors refer to the statistical, systematic and errors from external inputs, respectively. An S wave component in the K{sup +}K{sup -} system, possibly originating from a f{sub 0}, is also studied through its interference with the {phi}. An S wave component is observed for the first time in this decay channel with a 5{sigma} significance.

Serrano, Justine; /Orsay, IPN /SLAC

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

259

Studies of participants in nuclear tests. Final report, 1 September 1978-31 October 1984  

SciTech Connect

A study of mortality, by cause of death, was done on a cohort of 46,186 participants in one or more of five test series. The series studied were UPSHOT-KNOTHOLE (1953) and PLUMBBOB (1957) at the Nevada Test Site, and GREENHOUSE (1951), CASTLE (1954), and REDWING (1956) which were conducted at the Pacific Proving Ground at Enewetak and Bikini. The participants were traced individually by the use of Veterans Administration records. For the participants in each series, the number of deaths attributed to particular causes was compared with the number expected to occur at US cause- and age-specific mortality rates. A total of 5113 deaths from all causes was ascertained; this was 11.1% of the number of participants. The number was, however, only 83.5% of the number expected at US mortality rates. Mortality from leukemia among the 3554 participants at SMOKY - 10 deaths below age 85 - were 2.5 times the expected number. When the leukemia deaths are compared to other deaths in all six data sets, the differences among the series are not significant. No cancer other than leukemia was ascertained to have occurred in significant excess among SMOKY participants and the number of deaths from other cancers (67) was less than the number expected at population rates (83.8). The total body of evidence cannot convincingly either affirm or deny that the higher than statistically expected incidence of leukemia among SMOKY participants (or of prostate cancer among REDWING participants) is the result of radiation exposure incident to the tests. 19 refs., 27 tabs.

Robinette, C.D.; Jablon, S.; Preston, T.L.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Topological Test Spaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A test space is the set of outcome-sets associated with a collection of experiments. This notion provides a simple mathematical framework for the study of probabilistic theories -- notably, quantum mechanics -- in which one is faced with incommensurable random quantities. In the case of quantum mechanics, the relevant test space, the set of orthonormal bases of a Hilbert space, carries significant topological structure. This paper inaugurates a general study of topological test spaces. Among other things, we show that any topological test space with a compact space of outcomes is of finite rank. We also generalize results of Meyer and Clifton-Kent by showing that, under very weak assumptions, any second-countable topological test space contains a dense semi-classical test space.

Alexander Wilce

2004-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Kilauea Iki lava lake experiment plans  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twelve experimental studies are proposed to complete field laboratory work at Kilauea Iki lava lake. Of these twelve experiments, eleven do not require the presence of melt. Some studies are designed to use proven techniques in order to expand our existing knowledge, while others are designed to test new concepts. Experiments are grouped into three main categories: geophysics, energy extraction, and drilling technology. Each experiment is described in terms of its location, purpose, background, configuration, operation, and feasibility.

Dunn, J.C.; Hills, R.G.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Demonstration testing and evaluation of in situ soil heating. Treatability study work plan, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A Treatability Study planned for the demonstration of the in situ electromagnetic (EM) heating process to remove organic solvents is described in this Work Plan. The treatability study will be conducted by heating subsurface vadose-zone soils in an organic plume adjacent to the Classified Burial Ground K-1070-D located at K-25 Site, Oak Ridge. The test is scheduled to start during the fourth quarter of FY94 and will be completed during the first quarter of FY95. The EM heating process for soil decontamination is based on volumetric heating technologies developed during the `70s for the recovery of fuels from shale and tar sands by IIT Research Institute (IITRI) under a co-operative program with the US Department of Energy (DOE). Additional modifications of the technology developed during the mid `80s are currently used for the production of heavy oil and waste treatment. Over the last nine years, a number of Government agencies (EPA, Army, AF, and DOE) and industries sponsored further development and testing of the in situ heating and soil decontamination process for the remediation of soils containing hazardous organic contaminants. In this process the soil is heated in situ using electrical energy. The contaminants are removed from the soil due to enhanced vaporization, steam distillation and stripping. IITRI will demonstrate the EM Process for in situ soil decontamination at K-25 Site under the proposed treatability study. Most of the contaminants of concern are volatile organics which can be removed by heating the soil to a temperature range of 85 to 95 C. The efficiency of the treatment will be determined by comparing the concentration of contaminants in soil samples. Samples will be obtained before and after the demonstration for a measurement of the concentration of contaminants of concern.

Sresty, G.C.

1994-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm PoolInternational Cloud Experiment data  

SciTech Connect

Cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single column version of NCAR CAM3. For comparisons, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations were compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Pool- International Cloud Experiment by US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within the mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) content is similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and extends 2 km further downward, which are closer to observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction in total condensate on temperature from the new scheme is also closer to available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is in general larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the TOA OLR in addition to cloud water path. The deep convection process affects both TOA OLR and surface downward longwave radiation. The over-frequently-triggered deep convention process in the model is not the only mechanism for the excess middle and high level clouds. Further evaluation especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data is needed.

Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; McFarlane, Sally A.

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

264

Measured versus predicted performance of the SERI test house: a validation study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For the past several years the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Passive and Hybrid Solar Division has sponsored work to improve the reliability of computerized building energy analysis simulations. Under the auspices of what has come to be called the Class A Monitoring and Validation program, the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) has engaged in several areas of research that includes: (1) developing a validation methodology; (2) developing a performance monitoring methodology designed to meet the specific data needs for validating analysis/design tools; (3) constructing and monitoring a 1000-ft/sup 2/, multizone, skin-load-dominated test building; (4) constructing and monitoring a two-zone test cell; and (5) making sample validation studies using the DOE-2.1, BLAST-3.0, and SERIRES-1.0 computer programs. This paper reports the results obtained in comparing the measured thermal performance of the building to the performance calculated by the building energy analysis simulations. It also describes the validation methodology and the class A data acquisition capabilities at SERI.

Judkoff, R.; Wortman, D.; Burch, J.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Blade system design studies volume II : preliminary blade designs and recommended test matrix.  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts, LLC is performing a Blade System Design Study (BSDS) concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The BSDS Volume I project report addresses issues and constraints identified to scaling conventional blade designs to the megawatt size range, and evaluated candidate materials, manufacturing and design innovations for overcoming and improving large blade economics. The current report (Volume II), presents additional discussion of materials and manufacturing issues for large blades, including a summary of current trends in commercial blade manufacturing. Specifications are then developed to guide the preliminary design of MW-scale blades. Using preliminary design calculations for a 3.0 MW blade, parametric analyses are performed to quantify the potential benefits in stiffness and decreased gravity loading by replacement of a baseline fiberglass spar with carbon-fiberglass hybrid material. Complete preliminary designs are then presented for 3.0 MW and 5.0 MW blades that incorporate fiberglass-to-carbon transitions at mid-span. Based on analysis of these designs, technical issues are identified and discussed. Finally, recommendations are made for composites testing under Part I1 of the BSDS, and the initial planned test matrix for that program is presented.

Griffin, Dayton A. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC, Kirkland, WA)

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Generator loss of field; Experience and studies for AEP's Rockport Plant  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the performance of American Electric Power (AEP) Company's remotely-located 2600 MW Rockport Plant after loss of field (LOF) disturbances to one of its 1300 MW cross-compound units. Loss of field conditions occur rarely, but the resultant high currents and pulsating torques can damage a turbine-generator, and the electrical system near the disturbance will be impacted by abnormal levels or cyclic swings of power, VArs, and voltages. Rockport LOF computer simulations were conducted with recently developed detailed models; the level of detail was suggested by analyses of recent LOF experience at AEP and by recent developments in generator and excitation system modeling. Simulation results are presented to illustrate the torques, current levels, voltages, speeds, and potential relay actions following loss of field.

Rana, R.D.; Schulz, R.P. (Bulk Transmission Planning Div., American Electric Power Service Corp., Columbus, OH (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Selection of the most advantageous gas turbine air filtration system: Comparative study of actual operating experience  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses relative merits of three types of air filtration systems used by Sui Northern Gas Pipelines Ltd. (Pakistan), on its gas turbine compressor packages. These Filtration systems are: (i) Two stage inertial plus auto oil bath type multi-duty filters by AAF used on Saturn Mark-1 packages manufactured by Solar Turbines Inc. (ii) Three stage high efficiency barrier filters by AAF used on Centaur packages by Solar. (iii) Single stage pulse-jet self-cleaning filter by Donaldson again used on a Centaur package. The selection is primarily based in package performance data collected over a 15 month period analyzing power loss due to fouling effects and related operation and maintenance costs for the three systems. The Company's operating experience indicates that on new installations the pulse clean system offers the best advantage both in terms of filtration costs as well as availability of additional horse power when operating under moderate to severe environmental conditions.

Gilani, S.I.; Mehr, M.Z.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Initial confinement studies of ohmically heated plasmas in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Initial operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has concentrated upon confinement studies of ohmically heated hydrogen and deuterium plasmas. Total energy confinement times (tau/sub E/) are 0.1 to 0.2 s for a line-average density range (anti n/sub e/) of 1 to 2.5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/ with electron temperatures of T/sub e/(o) approx. 1.2 to 2.2 keV, ion temperatures of T/sub i/(o) approx. 0.9 to 1.5 keV, and Z/sub eff/ approx. 3. A comparison of PLT, PDX, and TFTR plasma confinement supports a dimension-cubed scaling law.

Efthimion, P.C.; Bell, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Bretz, N.; Cecchi, J.L.; Coonrod, J.; Davis, S.; Dylla, H.F.; Fonck, R.; Furth, H.P.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Design and testing a solar cooling system employing liquid desiccants: Dehumidifier experiments in Colorado State University Solar House II: Final report, 1986--1987  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A nominal 3-ton (10.5-kW) lithium bromide, open-cycle desiccant cooling system has been designed, installed, and operated. This experimental system dehumidifies ambient air in a packed bed utilizing an aqueous solution of lithium bromide. The absorbent solution is distributed by spray nozzles and flows countercurrent to the air. The dilute solution exiting the dehumidifier is concentrated in a packed bed regenerator by solar heated air. The strong solution is cooled by two heat exchangers before reentering the dehumidifier. Provisions to simulate conditions of high ambient humidity and temperature have been made. Experiments on the dehumidifier operating in a decoupled mode (without countercurrent regenerator operation) have been carried out. Cooling capacities in the range of 1.0--4.0 refrigeration tons have been achieved, depending upon the operating conditions. The effect of different independent variables on the capacity of the dehumidifier has been studied. An empirical equation correlating the variables have been obtained by statistical analysis of the data. The equation obtained indicates that the capacity of the dehumidifier depends strongly on the solution concentration, solution flow rate, air inlet temperature and the air humidity. Two other variables studied, the solution inlet temperature and the air flow rate, did not affect the cooling capacity greatly. The dependence of condensation rate on each of the variables is analyzed. 22 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Lenz, T.G.; Loef, G.O.G.; Patnaik, S.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Particle Physics Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What Is A Particle Physics Experiment? The word "experiment" often makes people envision a scientist in white lab coat and goggles walking into the lab, pouring some test tubes...

272

A study of how lighting can affect a guest's dining experience.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The goal of this thesis is to provide a case study to the design community that will offer data in regards to incorporating a specific (more)

Ciani, Amy Elizabeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Original article: Bootstrap tests for fractional integration and cointegration: A comparison study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are few methods in the literature to test for integration and cointegration in the traditional framework, i.e. using the I(0)-I(1) paradigm. In the first case, the most known are the Dickey-Fuller (DF), the Augmented Dickey-Fuller (ADF) and the ... Keywords: ARFIMA model, Bootstrap, Classical unit root tests, EG and Johansen tests, Semiparametric estimator

G. C. Franco; V. A. Reisen; F. A. Alves

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Study of Elevator Safety Performance Test System Based on LabVIEW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upgrading of China's coal mine detection equipment and technical means are very backward, mainly distributed instruments and devices, low efficiency, poor accuracy, detection and testing of the limitations of the data, testing methods, data-processing ... Keywords: Elevator, LabVIEW, test system

Bingsheng Wu; Chaozhi Cai

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Measurements of aerosol properties from aircraft, satellite and ground-based remote sensing: a case-study from the Dust and Biomass-burning Experiment (DABEX)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Measurements of aerosol properties from aircraft, satellite and ground-based remote sensing: A case study from the Dust and Biomass burning Experiment (DABEX)

Johnson, B. T.; Christopher, S.; Haywood, J.; Osborne, S. R.; McFarlane, Sally; Hsu, C.; Salustro, C.; Kahn, Ralph

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

A simulation study using EFA and CFA programs based the impact of missing data on test dimensionality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the impact of missing rates and data imputation methods on test dimensionality. We consider how missing rate levels (10%, 20%, 30%, and 50%) and the six missed data imputation methods (Listwise, Serial Mean, Linear Interpolation, ... Keywords: Confirmatory factor analysis, Data imputation, Exploratory factor analysis, Statistics package for social science, Test dimensionality

Shin-Feng Chen; Shuyi Wang; Chen-Yuan Chen

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ris-M-2874 Neutron Diffraction Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;1. Introduction The nuclear spin systems in metals provide ideal models to test theoretical ideas by experiments Roskilde, Denmark August 1990 #12;Abstract Nuclear spins in silver constitute an ideal antiferromagnetic study the feasibility of neutron diffraction experiments on nuclear magnetic order in silver

278

Integration experiments and performance studies of a COTS parallel archive system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current and future Archive Storage Systems have been asked to (a) scale to very high bandwidths, (b) scale in metadata performance, (c) support policy-based hierarchical storage management capability, (d) scale in supporting changing needs of very large data sets, (e) support standard interface, and (f) utilize commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) hardware. Parallel file systems have been asked to do the same thing but at one or more orders of magnitude faster in performance. Archive systems continue to move closer to file systems in their design due to the need for speed and bandwidth, especially metadata searching speeds such as more caching and less robust semantics. Currently the number of extreme highly scalable parallel archive solutions is very small especially those that will move a single large striped parallel disk file onto many tapes in parallel. We believe that a hybrid storage approach of using COTS components and innovative software technology can bring new capabilities into a production environment for the HPC community much faster than the approach of creating and maintaining a complete end-to-end unique parallel archive software solution. In this paper, we relay our experience of integrating a global parallel file system and a standard backup/archive product with a very small amount of additional code to provide a scalable, parallel archive. Our solution has a high degree of overlap with current parallel archive products including (a) doing parallel movement to/from tape for a single large parallel file, (b) hierarchical storage management, (c) ILM features, (d) high volume (non-single parallel file) archives for backup/archive/content management, and (e) leveraging all free file movement tools in Linux such as copy, move, Is, tar, etc. We have successfully applied our working COTS Parallel Archive System to the current world's first petafiop/s computing system, LANL's Roadrunner machine, and demonstrated its capability to address requirements of future archival storage systems.

Chen, Hsing-bang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scott, Cody [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Grider, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torres, Aaron [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turley, Milton [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sanchez, Kathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bremer, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

A Study on Experiment and Numerical Analysis for Disclosing Shell Wall Thinning of a Feedwater Heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feedwater heaters of many nuclear power plants have recently experienced severe wall thinning damage, which will increase as operating time progresses. Several nuclear power plants in Korea have experienced wall thinning damage in the area around the impingement baffle - installed downstream of the high pressure turbine extraction steam line - inside number 5A and 5B feedwater heaters. At that point, the extracted steam from the high pressure turbine is two phase fluid at high temperature, high pressure, and high speed. Since it flows in reverse direction after impinging the impingement baffle, the shell wall of the number 5 high pressure feedwater heater may be affected by flow-accelerated corrosion. This paper describes the comparisons between the numerical analysis results using the FLUENT code and the down scale experimental data in an effort to determine root causes of the shell wall thinning of the high pressure feedwater heaters. The numerical analysis and experimental data were also confirmed by actual wall thickness measured by an ultrasonic test. (authors)

Kyeong Mo, Hwang; Tae Eun, Jin [Korea Power Engineering Company, 360-9, Mabuk-dong, Kusong-Eup, Yongin-Shi (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Woo [Daeji Metal Co., LTD., 994-57, Dongchun-Dong, Yeunsu-Gu, Incheon Shi (Korea, Republic of); Kyung Hoon, Kim [Kyunghee University, 1, Seocheon-Ri, Gihung-Eup, Yongin-Shi (Korea, Republic of)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study -- 2006 Annual Report  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the U.S. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2s. Because of these operating parameters, and the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U-235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U 235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent Keff between the HEU core and a LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U 235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in Keff and heat profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 125 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The Monte-Carlo coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) depletion methodology was used to calculate Keff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the Keff versus EFPDs plot is similar in shape to the reference ATR HEU case. The LEU core conversion feasibility study can also be used to optimize the U-235 content of each fuel plate, so that the relative radial fission heat flux profile is bounded by the reference ATR HEU case. The detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profiles of the HEU and optimized LEU cases have been investigated. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the UFSAR safety requirements, additional studies will be necessary to evaluate and compare safety parameters such as void reactivity and Doppler coefficients, control components worth (OSCC, safety rods and regulating rod), and shutdown margins between the HEU and LEU cores.

G. S. Chang; R. G. Ambrosek

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion Feasibility Study (2006 Annual Report)  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth with a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2s. Because of these operating parameters, and the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff between the HEU core and the LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U-235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized for operation at 125 EFPD with a total core power of 115 MW. The depletion methodology, Monte-Carlo coupled with ORIGEN2 (MCWO), was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU case demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar in shape to the reference ATR HEU case. The LEU core conversion feasibility study can also be used to optimize the U-235 content of each fuel plate, so that the relative radial fission heat flux profile is bounded by the reference ATR HEU case. The detailed radial, axial, and azimuthal heat flux profiles of the HEU and optimized LEU cases have been investigated. However, to demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the UFSAR safety requirements, additional studies will be necessary to evaluate and compare safety parameters such as void reactivity and Doppler coefficients, control components worth (outer shim control cylinders (OSCCs), safety rods and regulating rod), and shutdown margins between the HEU and LEU cores.

Gray S. Chang; Richard G. Ambrosek; Misti A. Lillo

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in aModular Classroom Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms.

Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Fisk,William J.; Lai, Chi-Ming; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Reusing a JML Specification Dedicated to Verification for Testing, and Vice-Versa: Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing and verification are two activities which have the same objective: to ensure software dependability. In the Java context, the Java Modelling Language (JML) has been proposed as specification language. It can be used both for verification and ... Keywords: JML, Java, Software dependability, Testing, Verification

Lydie Du Bousquet; Yves Ledru; Olivier Maury; Catherine Oriat; Jean-Louis Lanet

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

285

The CMS forward calorimeter prototype design studies and Omega(c)0 search at E781 experiment at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

In the fit part, the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) forward calorimeter design studies are presented. The forward calorimeter consists of quartz fibers embedded in a steel absorber. Radiation damage studies of the quartz fiber and the absorber as well as the results of the first pre-production prototype PPP-I are presented. In the second part, the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}search studies at the SELEX (E781) experiment at FermiLab are presented. 107 {+-} 22 {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} events are observed in three decay modes. The relative branching ratio ({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) is measured as 2.00 {+-} 0.45(stat) {+-} 0.32(sys).

Ayan, Ahmet Sedat; /Iowa U.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Operating Experience and Economic Assessment of Commercial and Industrial Cool Storage Systems - TVA Case Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal storage systems offer utilities a means to change the energy use patterns of both residential and commercial and industrial (C&I) customers by moving water-heating and space-conditioning loads from peak to offpeak periods. Benefits from investments in these systems include reduced capital investment in new generating capacity, reduced operating costs, and reduced risk associated with load growth projections and future environmental legislation. This paper presents the results of a study undertaken to evaluate the performance of and quantify the potential economic benefits of C&I cool storage systems. The paper is organized into three major sections. Section one discusses the empirical data gathered from TVA's C&I Cool Storage Demonstration conducted during the summer of 1984. Section two discusses TVA's methodology For quantifying the potential economic benefits of these systems. Finally, the results are summarized with regard to future program activities.

Sieber, R. E.; Dahmus, A. B.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Systematic Study of High-pT Direct Photon Production with the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When studying the initial state and evolution of the matter created in relativistic heavy ion collisions, high-pT direct photons are a powerful probe. They are created in initial hard processes and in parton fragmentation, and possibly in interactions of partons with the hot and dense medium. We present systematic measurements of high-pT direct photon production in \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200 GeV p+p and Au+Au collisions. The nuclear modification factor of direct photons is shown for 5 < pT < 18 GeV/c, and at very high transverse momenta it seems to be below unity in the most central Au+Au collisions.

Tadaaki Isobe

2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

288

Subsurface Bio-Immobilization of Plutonium: Experiment and Model Validation Study  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to conduct a concurrent experimental and modeling study centered on the interactions of Shewanella algae BrY with plutonium and uranium species and phases. The most important objective of this research is to investigate the long-term stability of bioprecipitated immobilized actinide phases under changing redox conditions in biologically active systems. The long-term stability of bio-immobilized actinides (e.g. by bio-reduction) is a key criteria that defines the utility and effectiveness of a remediation/containment strategy for subsurface actinide contaminants. Plutonium, which is the focus of this project, is the key contaminant of concern at several DOE sites.

Reed, Donald; Rittmann, Bruce

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Study of inelastic contribution in the 7Be + p scattering experiment at CRIB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 7Be(p,{gamma})8B reaction is undoubtfully important to the understanding of the solar model. As a step in the direction of improving the accuracy of the S17 astrophysical factor, a study of the 7Be + p scattering was performed with the thick target method at the CRIB facility. In addition to its astrophysical significance, this reaction is also useful to clarify the nuclear structure of 8B. A primary beam of 7Li and a hydrogen gas target were used to produce a 7Be secondary beam at 7.69 MeV/u. This was the first time in which {gamma}-rays were measured in coincidence with protons, and we have successfully measured the inelastic contribution to the scattering cross section.

Amadio, G.; Yamaguchi, H.; He, J. J.; Saito, A.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Fujikawa, H.; Kubono, S.; Khiem, L. H.; Kwon, Y. K. [CNS, University of Tokyo, Japan, Saitama, Wako, Hirosawa, 2-1, Zip Code 351-0198 (Japan); Teranishi, T. [Kyushu University (Japan); Nishimura, S.; Togano, Y. [RIKEN (Japan); Niikura, M. [Kyoto University (Japan); Iwasa, N.; Inafuku, S. [Tohoku University (Japan)

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

290

Monte Carlo Study of the abBA Experiment: Detector Response and Physics Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The abBA collaboration proposes to conduct a comprehensive program of precise measurements of neutron $\\beta$-decay coefficients $a$ (the correlation between the neutrino momentum and the decay electron momentum), $b$ (the electron energy spectral distortion term), $A$ (the correlation between the neutron spin and the decay electron momentum), and $B$ (the correlation between the neutron spin and the decay neutrino momentum) at a cold neutron beam facility. We have used a GEANT4-based code to simulate the propagation of decay electrons and protons in the electromagnetic spectrometer and study the energy and timing response of a pair of Silicon detectors. We used these results to examine systematic effects and find the uncertainties with which the physics parameters $a$, $b$, $A$, and $B$ can be extracted from an over-determined experimental data set.

E. Frlez

2004-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

291

Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 4 - Case Study on aComputer-testing Center (No. 21)  

SciTech Connect

The data center in this study had a total floor area of 8,580 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 440 racks, and was located in a 208,240 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally, it was served by a single electrical supply with no provision for backup power. The data center operated on a 24 hour per day, year-round cycle, and users had all hour full access to the data center facility. The study found that data center computer load accounted for 23% of the overall building electrical load, while the total power consumption attributable to the data center including allocated cooling load and lighting was 30% of the total facility load. The density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the data center was 63 W/ft{sup 2}. Power consumption density for all data center allocated load (including cooling and lighting) was 84 W/ft{sup 2}, approximately 12 times the average overall power density in rest of the building (non-data center portion). For the data center, 75% of the overall electric power was the rack critical loads, 11% of the power was consumed by chillers, 9% by CRAH units, 1% by lighting system, and about 4% of the power was consumed by pumps. The ratio of HVAC to IT power demand in the data center in this study was approximately 0.32. General recommendations for improving overall data center energy efficiency include improving the lighting control, airflow optimization, and control of mechanical systems serving the data center in actual operation. This includes chilled water system, airflow management and control in data centers. Additional specific recommendations or considerations to improve energy efficiency are provided in this report.

Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Studies of mechanisms of hydrogen recycle using a plasma-wall interaction experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is shown that for type 304L stainless steel at room temperature and ion energies of 100 eV a large part of the recycling occurs with hydrogen residence times in the wall of about 100 ms. The use of wall temperatures from 80 to 500 K permits differentiation between thermally activated processes and ion bombardment-induced phenomena. For low energy ions (100 eV) onto 300 K stainless steel walls recycling increases to more than 90% in a few tenths of a second at 3 x 10/sup 16/ ions cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/. For ions up to 300 eV at this flux there is little energy dependence. Both thermally and ion induced processes can be important at room temperature, but under the conditions of this study thermal processes greatly enhance the recycle rates at 300 and 500 K. Preliminary results indicate that recombination of atomic hydrogen to molecular hydrogen can be rate controlling in some practical regimes.

Clausing, R.E.; Emerson, L.C.; Heatherly, L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Study of the Decays of Charm Mesons With the BaBar Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Presented hadronic form factor measurements of D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} and D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e} with - dramatically reduced measurement error and first q{sup 2}-dependent study of D{sub s}{sup +} {yields} {phi}e{sup +}{nu}{sub e}. First observation at > 6.5{sigma} level of doubly-Cabibbo suppressed D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay mode - BF(D{sup +} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}) = (2.52 {+-} 0.47(stat) {+-} 0.25(syst) {+-} 0.08(ref)) x 10{sup -4}. Improved measurements of Cabibbo-suppressed to Cabibbo-favored branching ratios for D{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and D{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}K{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} decay modes.

Bondioli, Mario; /UC, Irvine

2011-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

294

Computational modeling study of the radial line slot antenna microwave plasma source with comparisons to experiments  

SciTech Connect

The radial line slot antenna plasma source is a high-density microwave plasma source comprising a high electron temperature source region within the plasma skin depth from a coupling window and low electron temperature diffusion region far from the window. The plasma is typically comprised of inert gases like argon and mixtures of halogen or fluorocarbon gases for etching. Following the experimental study of Tian et al.[J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 24, 1421 (2006)], a two-dimensional computational model is used to describe the essential features of the source. A high density argon plasma is described using the quasi-neutral approximation and coupled to a frequency-domain electromagnetic wave solver to describe the plasma-microwave interactions in the source. The plasma is described using a multispecies plasma chemistry mechanism developed specifically for microwave excitation conditions. The plasma is nonlocal by nature with locations of peak power deposition and peak plasma density being very different. The spatial distribution of microwave power coupling depends on whether the plasma is under- or over-dense and is described well by the model. The model predicts the experimentally observed low-order diffusion mode radial plasma profiles. The trends of spatial profiles of electron density and electron temperature over a wide range of power and pressure conditions compare well with experimental results.

Raja, Laxminarayan L. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Mahadevan, Shankar [Esgee Technologies Inc., 1301 S. Capital of Texas Hwy. Suite B-122, Austin, Texas 78746 (United States); Ventzek, Peter L. G.; Yoshikawa, Jun [Tokyo Electron Ltd., Akasaka Biz Tower, 3-1 Akasaka 5-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 107-6325 (Japan)

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

A thermal active restrained shrinkage ring test to study the early age concrete behaviour of massive structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In massive concrete structures, cracking may occur during hardening, especially if autogenous and thermal strains are restrained. The concrete permeability due to this cracking may rise significantly and thus increase leakage (in tank, nuclear containment...) and reduce the durability. The restrained shrinkage ring test is used to study the early age concrete behaviour (delayed strains evolution and cracking). This test shows, at 20 {sup o}C and without drying, for a concrete mix which is representative of a French nuclear power plant containment vessel (w/c ratio equal to 0.57), that the amplitude of autogenous shrinkage (about 40 {mu}m/m for the studied concrete mix) is not high enough to cause cracking. Indeed, in this configuration, thermal shrinkage is not significant, whereas this is a major concern for massive structures. Therefore, an active test has been developed to study cracking due to restrained thermal shrinkage. This test is an evolution of the classical restrained shrinkage ring test. It allows to take into account both autogenous and thermal shrinkages. Its principle is to create the thermal strain effects by increasing the temperature of the brass ring (by a fluid circulation) in order to expand it. With this test, the early age cracking due to restrained shrinkage, the influence of reinforcement and construction joints have been experimentally studied. It shows that, as expected, reinforcement leads to an increase of the number of cracks but a decrease of crack widths. Moreover, cracking occurs preferentially at the construction joint.

Briffaut, M. [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Benboudjema, F. [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Torrenti, J.M., E-mail: jean-michel.torrenti@lcpc.f [Universite Paris Est, Laboratoire central des ponts et chaussees, Paris (France); Nahas, G. [LMT/ENS Cachan/CNRS UMR8535/UPMC/PRES UniverSud Paris, Cachan (France); Institut de radioprotection et de surete nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Levitated Dipole Experiment (LDX) will be the first experiment able to study high-beta plasma confined by a magnetic dipole with near classi-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-coil. In addition, we summarize our plan to test the operation of the superconducting magnets and our procedure/Science Technology Center (St. Petersburg, Russia), and manufacturing of its cyrostat has begun. Finally, the HTc! #12;LDX Superconducting Coil Manufacturing Status: Floating Coil (714 turns, Nb3Sn, 5T, 1.3 MA turns

297

Experience Report for WOPR  

SciTech Connect

One of the purposes of the SQA effort at LLNL is to attempt to determine the 'goodness' of the research codes used for various scientific applications. Typically these are two and three dimensional multi-physics simulation and modeling codes. These legacy research codes are used for applciations such as atmospheric dispersion modeling and analysis and prediction of the performance of engineered systems. These codes are continually subjected to automated regression test suites consisting of verified and validated expected results. Code is managed in repositories. Experience level of developers is high in the knowledge domain, platforms, and languages used. Code size of the multi-physics code used in this study was 578,242 lines excluding comment and blank lines or 5538.7 function points. Languages were 70% C++, 20% C, and 10% Fortran. The code has 130 users and a development team of 14 and an embedded SQE. The code has achieved 100% prime feature test coverage, 73.6% functional test coverage, and 71.5% statement test coverage. The average cyclomatic complexity of the code was 6.25. The codes have evolved over 10 years. Research codes are challenging because there is a desire to balance agility with discipline as well as compliance with DOE standards. Agility is important to allow experimentation with new algorithms and addition of the latest physics features. Discipline is important to increase the quality of the codes. Automation of processes and defect prevention/detection are deployed throughout the software development process. Since resarch codes are a small segment of the software industry, not much information exists in terms of reliability studies on these types of codes. This paper describes attempts to determine the goodness of these research codes. Goodness defined as both correctness of the codes and their fault densities. Correctness is determined by user interviews, peer review; feature based automated testing, and coverage measurement. This paper focuses on the fault density aspect of goodness and reliability of the codes in particular. The approach taken was to use multiple fault density prediction methods and compare results to actual experimentation and other industry studies on fault density. As a result of the predictions and experiments our confidence in the prediction methods was increased and our confidence in the goodness of the code from a fault density perspective was given more context. A large unintended benefit of these experiments was to find defects hidden for years in the codes when using the Monte Carlo reliability testing results to develop heuristic based bug driven tests.

Pope, G

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

A study of residual Cesium 137 contamination in southwestern Utah soil following the nuclear weapons tests at the Nevada Test Site in the 1950's and 1960's.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Nevada Test Site (NTS) was the location for at least 100 above ground Nuclear Weapons tests during the 1950's and early 1960's. Radioactive fallout (more)

[No author

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Data Center Energy Benchmarking: Part 3 - Case Study on an ITEquipment-testing Center (No. 20)  

SciTech Connect

The data center in this study had a total floor area of 3,024 square feet (ft{sup 2}) with one-foot raised-floors. It was a rack lab with 147 racks, and was located in a 96,000 ft{sup 2} multi-story office building in San Jose, California. Since the data center was used only for testing equipment, it was not configured as a critical facility in terms of electrical and cooling supply. It did not have a dedicated chiller system but was served by the main building chiller plant and make-up air system. Additionally it was served by only a single electrical supply with no provision for backup power in the event of a power outage. The Data Center operated on a 24 hour per day, year-round cycle, and users had full-hour access to the data center facility. The study found that data center computer load accounted for 15% of the overall building electrical load, while the total power consumption attributable to the data center including allocated cooling load and lighting was 22% of the total facility load. The density of installed computer loads (rack load) in the data center was 61 W/ft{sup 2}. Power consumption density for all data center allocated load (including cooling and lighting) was 88 W/ft{sup 2}, approximately eight times the average overall power density in rest of the building (non-data center portion). The building and its data center cooling system was provided with various energy optimizing systems that included the following: (1) Varying chilled water flow rate through variable speed drives on the primary pumps. (2) No energy losses due to nonexistence of UPS or standby generators. (3) Minimized under-floor obstruction that affects the delivery efficiency of supply air. (4) Elimination of dehumidification/humidification within the CRAH units. For the data center, 70% of the overall electric power was the rack critical loads, 14% of the power was consumed by chillers, 12% by CRAH units, 2% by lighting system, and about 2% of the power was consumed by chilled water pumps. General recommendations for improving overall data center energy efficiency include improving the lighting control, airflow optimization, control of mechanical systems serving the data center in actual operation.. This includes chilled water system, airflow management and control in the data center. Additional specific recommendations or considerations to improve energy efficiency are provided in this report.

Xu, Tengfang; Greenberg, Steve

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

TREATABILITY STUDIES USED TO TEST FOR EXOTHERMIC REACTIONS OF PLUTONIUM DECONTAMINATION CHEMICALS  

SciTech Connect

Fluor Hanford is decommissioning the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) at the Hanford site in Eastern Washington. Aggressive chemicals are commonly used to remove transuranic contaminants from process equipment to allow disposal as low level waste. Chemicals being considered for decontamination of gloveboxes in PFP include cerium(IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial solutions that include acids, degreasers, and sequestering agents. Fluor's decontamination procedure involves application of chemical solutions as a spray on the contaminated surfaces, followed by a wipe-down with rags. This process effectively transfers the transuranic materials to the decontamination liquids, which are then absorbed by rags and packaged for disposal as TRU waste. Concerns regarding the safety of this procedure developed following a fire at Rocky Flats in 2003. The fire occurred in a glovebox that had been treated with cerium nitrate, which is one of the decontamination chemicals that Fluor Hanford has proposed to use. The investigation of the event was hampered by the copious use of chemicals and water to extinguish the fire, and was not conclusive regarding the cause. However, the reviewers noted that rags were found in the glovebox, suggesting that the combination of rags and chemicals may have contributed to the fire. With that uncertainty, Fluor began an investigation into the potential for fire when using the chemicals and materials in the decontamination process. The focus of this work has been to develop a disposal strategy that will provide a chemically stable waste form at expected Hanford waste storage temperatures. Treatability tests under CERCLA were used to assess the use of certain chemicals and wipes during the decontamination process. Chemicals being considered for decontamination of gloveboxes at PFP include cerium (IV) nitrate in a nitric acid solution, and proprietary commercial solutions as RadPro{trademark} that include acids, degreasers, and sequestering agents. As part of the treatability study, Fluor and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) personnel have evaluated the potential for self-heating and exothermic reactions in the residual decontamination materials. Exothermic reactions that release significant heat and off-gas have been discovered for both the cerium nitrate, as seen in a fire at Rocky Flats, and proprietary solutions developed for decontamination purposes. From the treatability studies, certain limiting conditions have been defined that will aid in assuring safe operations and waste packaging during the decommissioning process.

EWALT, J.R.

2005-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Study of the test method for prediction of air conditioning equipment seasonal performance  

SciTech Connect

The test procedure, Method of Testing, Rating and Estimating the Seasonal Performance of Central Air-Conditioners and Heat Pumps Operating in the Cooling Mode, has been analyzed. The analysis of the test procedure incorporated two main functions: (1) to determine the validity of the test procedure; and (2) to determine if there are other alternate methods of obtaining the same results with less testing burden. Data were collected from industry and analyzed for any significant trends. Certain conclusions are drawn about the energy efficiency ratios, degradation coefficients and seasonal energy efficiency ratios. An error analysis was performed on the test procedure to determine the approximate amount of error when using this procedure. A semi-empirical model assuming a first order system response was developed to determine the factors that affect the part-load and cooling-load factors. The corresponding transient characteristics are then determined in terms of a single time constant. A thermostat demand cycle is used to determine the relationship between on-time and cycle-time. Recommendations are made regarding an alternate method being used to determine the seasonal energy efficiency ratio.

Thomas, S.B.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC: Improving and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory StudyHVAC: Improving and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory StudyHVAC: Improving and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory Study

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Critical evaluation of the pulsed laser method for single event effects testing and fundamental studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the authors present an evaluation of the pulsed laser as a technique for single events effects (SEE) testing. They explore in detail the important optical effects, such as laser beam propagation, surface reflection, and linear and nonlinear absorption, which determine the nature of laser-generated charge tracks in semiconductor materials. While there are differences in the structure of laser- and ion-generated charge tracks, they show that in many cases the pulsed laser remains an invaluable tool for SEE testing. Indeed, for several SEE applications, they show that the pulsed laser method represents a more practical approach than conventional accelerator-based methods.

Melinger, J.S.; Buchner, S.; McMorrow, D.; Stapor, W.J.; Weatherford, T.R.; Campbell, A.B. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Eisen, H. [Army Research Lab., Adelphi, MD (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A comparative study of STCP and SCDAP simulation of PBF SFD Test 1-1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a detailed comparison of the Source Term Code Package (STCP) and the SCDAP computer codes for simulation of the Power Burst Facility (PBF) Severe Fuel Damage (SFD) test 1-1. The SCDAP code is mechanistic, and has been benchmarked against a wide range of severe accident data. The SFD 1-1 test was designed to simulate the heatup and resulting fuel damage in the upper half of a 3000-Mw(t) PWR core approximately 2 to 3 hours after initiation of a small break accident, when the core is approximately 75% uncovered. 6 refs., 1 fig.

Yang, J.W.; Khatib-Rahbar, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: in-vivo measurements, pilot study report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a project to evaluate the in-vivo counting performance criteria of draft ANSI Standard N13.30, Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay. The draft ANSI Standard provides guidance to in-vivo counting facilities regarding the precision and accuracy of measurements for certain categories of commonly assayed radionuclides and critical regions of the body. The draft ANSI Standard was evaluated by conducting an intercomparison test involving a number of whole-body counting facilities. The testing involved three types of measurements: chest counting for detection of radioactive materials in the lung, whole-body counting for detection of uniformly distributed activity, and neck counting for detection of radioactive material concentrated in the thyroid. Results of the first-round intercomparison test are presented in this report. The appropriateness of the draft Standard performance criteria was judged by the measurement results reported by participating in-vivo counting facilities. The intercomparison testing showed that some laboratories had difficulty meeting the performance criteria specified in the draft ANSI Standard N13.30.

Robinson, A.V.; Fisher, D.R.; Reece, W.D.; MacLellan, J.A.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Towards an empirical method of efficiency testing of system parts: A methodological study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current usability evaluation methods are essentially holistic in nature. However, engineers that apply a component-based software engineering approach might also be interested in understanding the usability of individual parts of an interactive system. ... Keywords: Efficiency, Empirical method, HCI methodology, Log file analysis, Usability evaluation method, Usability testing

Willem-Paul Brinkman; Reinder Haakma; Don G. Bouwhuis

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Study on the Photogrammetric Application to the Fuel Cell Engine Vibration Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owing to its energy-saving and environment-friendly features, the fuel cell car has become the future trend of vehicle development. To prolong the engines life span, the suspension of fuel cell engine needs to be appropriately designed, which ... Keywords: fuel cell engine, vibration testing, close-up photogrammetry, image processing

Chuqi Su; Xiang Lin

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Gyrokinetic studies of the effect of {beta} on drift-wave stability in the National Compact Stellarator Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gyrokinetic turbulence code GS2 was used to investigate the effects of plasma {beta} on linear, collisionless ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes and trapped electron modes (TEM) in National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) geometry. Plasma {beta} affects stability in two ways: through the equilibrium and through magnetic fluctuations. The first was studied here by comparing ITG and TEM stability in two NCSX equilibria of differing {beta} values, revealing that the high {beta} equilibrium was marginally more stable than the low {beta} equilibrium in the adiabatic-electron ITG mode case. However, the high {beta} case had a lower kinetic-electron ITG mode critical gradient. Electrostatic and electromagnetic ITG and TEM mode growth rate dependencies on temperature gradient and density gradient were qualitatively similar. The second {beta} effect is demonstrated via electromagnetic ITG growth rates' dependency on GS2's {beta} input parameter. A linear benchmark with gyrokinetic codes GENE and GKV-X is also presented.

Baumgaertel, J. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Hammett, G. W.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Nunami, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Xanthopoulos, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Methods to study event-by-event fluctuations in the NA61/SHINE experiment at the CERN SPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical calculations locate the critical point (CP) of strongly interacting matter at energies accessible at the CERN SPS. Event-by-event transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuations are considered as one of the most important tools to search for the CP. Pilot studies of the energy dependence and the system size dependence of both p{sub T} and multiplicity fluctuations were performed by the NA49 experiment. The NA61/SHINE ion program is a continuation of these efforts. After briefly recalling the essential NA49 results on fluctuations we will discuss the technical methods (removing Non-Target interactions) which we plan to apply for future transverse momentum and multiplicity fluctuation analyses.

Cetner, T., E-mail: Tomasz.Cetner@cern.ch; Grebieszkow, K., E-mail: kperl@if.pw.edu.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Physics (Poland)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in a Modular Classroom Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Saving Energy (IVSE) Laboratory Study Glossary SpecificEnergy (IVSE) Laboratory Study Table of Contents Table of Contents i Glossary.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Experience in the Testing and Application of the EPRI DfD Process: Decontamination for Decommissioning of Reactor Coolant Systems and Plant Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a vendor's perspective on the application of the EPRI DfD (Decontamination for Decommissioning) process. It includes a summary of in-house testing and initial field applications of the process, focusing on lessons learned and the application methodology.

1999-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Interface or AirSea Flux Component of the TOGA Coupled OceanAtmosphere Response Experiment and Its Impact on Subsequent AirSea Interaction Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interface or airsea flux component of the Coupled OceanAtmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) research program and its subsequent impact on studies of airsea interaction are described. The ...

Robert A. Weller; Frank Bradley; Roger Lukas

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The sizes and powers of some stochastic dominance tests: A Monte Carlo study for correlated and heteroskedastic distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Testing for stochastic dominance among distributions is an important issue in the study of asset management, income inequality, and market efficiency. This paper conducts Monte Carlo simulations to examine the sizes and powers of several commonly used ... Keywords: C12, Correlated distributions, D31, G11, Grid points, Heteroskedasticity, Stochastic dominance

Hooi-Hooi Lean; Wing-Keung Wong; Xibin Zhang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Development testing of the two-watt RTG heat source and Hastelloy-S/T-111 alloy compatibility studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two-watt radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source capsules were tested to determine their survivability under extreme environmental conditions: high external pressure, high impact, and high internal pressure. Test results showed that the capsules could withstand external pressures of 1,000 bars and impacts at velocities near 150 meters per second. However, the results of the internal pressure tests (stress-rupture) were not so favorable, possibly because of copper contamination, leading to a recommendation for additional testing. A material compatibility study examined the use of Hastelloy-S as a material to clad the tantalum strength member of the two-watt radioisotopic heat source. Test capsules were subjected to high temperatures for various lengths of time, then cross sectioned and examined with a scanning electron microscope. Results of the study indicate that Hastelloy-S would be compatible with the underlying alloy, not only at the normal operating temperatures of the heat source, but also when exposed to the much higher temperatures of a credible accident scenario.

Howell, E.I.; Teaney, P.E.

1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

315

Identification of Integral Benchmarks for Nuclear Data Testing Using DICE (Database for the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments)  

SciTech Connect

Typical users of the International Criticality Safety Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook have specific criteria to which they desire to find matching experiments. Depending on the application, those criteria may consist of any combination of physical or chemical characteristics and/or various neutronic parameters. The ICSBEP Handbook contains a structured format helping the user narrow the search for experiments of interest. However, with nearly 4300 different experimental configurations and the ever increasing addition of experimental data, the necessity to perform multiple criteria searches have rendered these features insufficient. As a result, a relational database was created with information extracted from the ICSBEP Handbook. A users interface was designed by OECD and DOE to allow the interrogation of this database. The database and the corresponding users interface are referred to as DICE. DICE currently offers the capability to perform multiple criteria searches that go beyond simple fuel, physical form and spectra and includes expanded general information, fuel form, moderator/coolant, neutron-absorbing material, cladding, reflector, separator, geometry, benchmark results, spectra, and neutron balance parameters. DICE also includes the capability to display graphical representations of neutron spectra, detailed neutron balance, sensitivity coefficients for capture, fission, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, nu-bar and mu-bar, as well as several other features.

J. Blair Briggs; A. Nichole Ellis; Yolanda Rugama; Nicolas Soppera; Manuel Bossant

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Development and Testing of a Frozen Soil Parameterization for Cold Region Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper simulation of soil freezing and thawing processes is an important issue in cold region climate studies. This paper reports on a frozen soil parameterization scheme for cold region studies that includes water flow and heat transfer in soil ...

Xia Zhang; Shu Fen Sun; Yongkang Xue

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Design and Test of a Nb3Sn Subscale Dipole Magnet for Training Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subscale Dipole Magnet for Training Studies Helene Felice,lateral and axial preload on training. On the other hand, ithas been developed to study training in Nb 3 Sn coils under

Caspi, Shlomo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

AQUIFER TESTING AND REBOUND STUDY IN SUPPORT OF THE 100-H DEEP CHROMIUM INVESTIGATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU) second Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) 5-year review (DOEIRL-2006-20, The Second CERCLA Five-Year Review Report for the Hanford Site) set a milestone to conduct an investigation of deep hexavalent chromium contamination in the sediments of the Ringold upper mud (RUM) unit, which underlies the unconfined aquifer in the 100-H Area. The 5-year review noted that groundwater samples from one deep well extending below the aquitard (i.e., RUM) exceeded both the groundwater standard of 48 parts per billion (ppb) (Ecology Publication 94-06, Model Toxics Control Act Cleanup Statute and Regulation) and the federal drinking water standard of 100 {mu}g/L for hexavalent chromium. The extent of hexavalent chromium contamination in this zone is not well understood. Action 12-1 from the 5-year review is to perform additional characterization of the aquifer below the initial aquitard. Field characterization and aquifer testing were performed in the Hanford Site's 100-H Area to address this milestone. The aquifer tests were conducted to gather data to answer several fundamental questions regarding the presence of the hexavalent chromium in the deep sediments of the RUM and to determine the extent and magnitude of deeper contamination. The pumping tests were performed in accordance with the Description of Work for Aquifer Testing in Support of the 100-H Deep Chromium Investigation (SGW-41302). The specific objectives for the series of tests were as follows: (1) Evaluate the sustainable production of the subject wells using step-drawdown and constant-rate pumping tests. (2) Collect water-level data to evaluate the degree of hydraulic connection between the RUM and the unconfined (upper) aquifer (natural or induced along the well casing). (3) Evaluate the hydraulic properties of a confined permeable layer within the RUM.; (4) Collect time-series groundwater samples during testing to evaluate the extent and persistence of hexavalent chromium in the deeper zones. Use data collected to refine the current conceptual model for the 100-H Area unconfined aquifer and the RUM in this area. (5) Evaluate the concentration 'rebound' in the unconfined aquifer of hexavalent chromium and the contaminants of concern during shutdown of the extraction wells. Measure co-contaminants at the beginning, middle, and end of each pumping test. The RUM is generally considered an aquitard in the 100-HR-3 OU; however, several water-bearing sand layers are present that are confined within the RUM. The current hydrogeologic model for the 100-H Area aquifer system portrays the RUM as an aquitard layer that underlies the unconfined aquifer, which may contain permeable zones, stringers, or layers. These permeable zones may provide pathways for chromium to migrate deeper into the RUM under certain hydrogeologic conditions. One condition may be the discharge of large volumes of cooling water that occurred near the former H Reactor, which caused a mound of groundwater to form 4.9 to 10.1 m (16 to 33 ft) above the natural water table. The cooling water reportedly contained 1 to 2 mglL of hexavalent chromium for corrosion prevention. Three alternate hypotheses for the introduction of hexavalent chromium into the RUM are as follows: (1) Local groundwater with higher concentrations of hexavalent chromium originating from reactor operations at H Reactor was driven by high heads from groundwater mounding in the unconfined aquifer into the RUM via permeable pathways in the upper surface of the RUM. (2) Local groundwater with hexavalent chromium was introduced from the unconfined aquifer via well boreholes, either during drilling or as a result of poor well construction, allowing hydraulic communication between the unconfined aquifer and the RUM. (3) Hexavalent chromium migrated across the Hom area within the more permeable zones of the RUM. The three wells used for the aquifer pumping tests (199-H3-2C, 199-H4-12C, and 199-H4-15CS) exhibit hexavalent chromium contamination in confined aqu

SMOOT JL

2010-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

319

Author manuscript, published in "13th International Conference on Quality Software (QSIC 2013), Nanjing: China (2013)" An Empirical Study of Adoption of Software Testing in Open Source Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AbstractTesting is an indispensable part of software development efforts. It helps to improve the quality of software systems by finding bugs and errors during development and deployment. Huge amount of resources are spent on testing efforts. However, to what extent are they used in practice? In this study, we investigate the adoption of testing in open source projects. We study more than 20,000 non-trivial software projects and explore the correlation of test cases with various project development characteristics including: project size, development team size, number of bugs, number of bug reporters, and the programming languages of these projects. Keywords-Empirical study, Software testing, Adequacy, Test cases

Pavneet Singh Kochhar; Tegawend F. Bissy; David Lo; Lingxiao Jiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Tensile testing and stabilization/carbonization studies of polyacrylonitrile/carbon nanotube composite fibers .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study focuses on the processing, structure and properties of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)/ carbon nanotube (CNT) composite carbon fibers. Small diameter PAN/CNT based carbon fibers have (more)

Lyons, Kevin Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) took place in spring 2007 and is the third in the series of Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) experiments. The HATS experiments have been instrumental in testing and developing subfilterscale (...

Edward G. Patton; Thomas W. Horst; Peter P. Sullivan; Donald H. Lenschow; Steven P. Oncley; William O. J. Brown; Sean P. Burns; Alex B. Guenther; Andreas Held; Thomas Karl; Shane D. Mayor; Luciana V. Rizzo; Scott M. Spuler; Jielun Sun; Andrew A. Turnipseed; Eugene J. Allwine; Steven L. Edburg; Brian K. Lamb; Roni Avissar; Ronald J. Calhoun; Jan Kleissl; William J. Massman; Kyaw Tha Paw U; Jeffrey C. Weil

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Optimal designs for conjoint experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conjoint experiments, each respondent receives a set of profiles to rate. Sometimes, the profiles are expensive prototypes that respondents have to test before rating them. Designing these experiments involves determining how many and which profiles ... Keywords: Conjoint experiments, D-optimality, Optimal block design, Optimal block sizes, Prototype testing

Roselinde Kessels; Peter Goos; Martina Vandebroek

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Recovery Act-Funded Study Assesses Contamination at Former Test Site in California  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CANOGA PARK, Calif. - Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery CANOGA PARK, Calif. - Workers in a study funded by $38 million from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act to assess radiological contamination have collected more than 600 soil samples and surveyed 120 acres of land for gamma radiation. Under an interagency agreement with DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is conduct- ing the study at Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) Area IV and the Northern Undeveloped Land. DOE's Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) is located in Area IV. Results of the study will guide cleanup decisions for this portion of SSFL, which was once used for a broad range of energy related research and development. The EPA is collecting soil samples to determine the nature and extent of radiological contamina-

324

SUMMARY PLAN FOR BENCH-SCALE REFORMER AND PRODUCT TESTING TREATABILITY STUDIES USING HANFORD TANK WASTE  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the sample selection, sample preparation, environmental, and regulatory considerations for shipment of Hanford radioactive waste samples for treatability studies of the FBSR process at the Savannah River National Laboratory and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

ROBBINS RA

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

I Recognise You but I Can't Place You: An Investigation of Familiar-Only Experiences during Tests of Voice and Face Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we examine in detail the situation in which a subject finds that a face or voice is familiar but is unable to retrieve any biographical information about the person concerned. In two experiments, subjects were asked to identify a set of 40 celebrities either from hearing their voice or from seeing their face. Although many more celebrities were identified and named in response to their face than their voice, the results showed that there was a very large number of occasions when a celebrity's voice was felt to be familiar but the subject was unable to retrieve any biographical information about the person. This situation occurred less frequently in response to seeing a celebrity' s face; when a face was found familiar, the subject was much more likely to be able to recall the celebrity's occupation. The possibility that these results might have come about because subjects were using different criteria to determine familiarity in the face and voice conditions was investigated and discounted. An additional finding was that when subjects found a face to be familiar-only, they were able to recall significantly more additional information about the person when they were cued by the person's voice than when they simply saw the face again. These results are discussed in relation to the models of person recognition put forward by Bruce and Young (1986) and Burton, Bruce, and Johnston (1990)

J. Richard Hanley; S. Tanya Smith; Jenny Hadfield

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Hybrid Tower Study: Volume 3: Phase 3 -- Scale Model Development and Full-Scale Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hybrid towers maximize the power transmission efficiency of the available space whenever there is the need to have both ac and dc lines in the same corridor. This study developed calculation techniques and design rules for the placement of conductors energized with HVAC and HVDC circuits on the same towers. Significantly, the study did not identify any hybrid interactions that would prevent the successful operation of a hybrid corridor or hybrid tower transmission line.

1994-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Heap leach studies on the removal of uranium from soil. Report of laboratory-scale test results  

SciTech Connect

This report details the initial results of laboratory-scale testing of heap leach that is being developed as a method for removing uranium from uranium-contaminated soil. The soil used was obtained from the site of the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) near the village of Fernald in Ohio. The testing is being conducted on a laboratory scale, but it is intended that this methodology will eventually be enlarged to field scale where, millions of cubic meters of uranium-contaminated soil can be remediated. The laboratory scale experiments show that, using carbonate/bicarbonate solutions, uranium can be effectively removed from the soil from initial values of around 600 ppM down to 100 ppM or less. The goal of this research is to selectively remove uranium from the contaminated soil, without causing serious changes in the characteristics of the soil. It is also hoped that the new technologies developed for soil remediation at FEMP will be transferred to other sites that also have uranium-contaminated soil.

Turney, W.R.J.R.; York, D.A.; Mason, C.F.V.; Chisholm-Brause, C.J.; Dander, D.C.; Longmire, P.A.; Morris, D.E.; Strait, R.K.; Brewer, J.S.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Numerical Simulation and Test Study on Non-uniform Area Of Round-ended CFST Tubular Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of Poisson ratio of core concrete on the bearing capacity of round-ended CFST tubular tower and non-uniform area were analyzed with test study and the sub-model technology, the most disadvantaged stress state of the structure under the triaxial ... Keywords: round-ended concrete-filled steel(CFST), triaxial compression, Poisson's ratio(), sub-model method, Micro-expansive

Jian-xiong Xie; Zhe-an Lu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Admittance Test and Conceptual Study of a CW Positron Source for CEBAF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conceptual study of a Continuous Wave (CW) positron production is presented in this paper. The Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) at Jefferson Lab (JLAB) operates with a CW electron beam with a well-defined emittance, time structure and energy spread. Positrons created via bremsstrahlung photons in a high-Z target emerge with a large emittance compared to incoming electron beam. An admittance study has been performed at CEBAF to estimate the maximum beam phase space area that can be transported in the LINAC and in the Arcs. A positron source is described utilizing the CEBAF injector electron beam, and directly injecting the positrons into the CEBAF LINAC.

Golge, Serkan [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk VA 23529 (United States); Hyde, Charles E. [Department of Physics, Old Dominion University, Norfolk VA 23529 (United States); Universite Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand (France); Freyberger, Arne [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

330

Testing Visual Information Retrieval Methodologies Case Study: Comparative Analysis of Textual, Icon, Graphical,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on segmentation of the underlying full-text into topics, where grayscale rectangular areas show the relative, not to implement all the bells and whistles of the full systems. In our case study we have chosen to include text. At the same time, our ability to read the documents returned from our searches to the Web or the bibliographic

Brooks, Stephen

331

Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar energy information is made available to students through classroom instruction by way of the Solar Energy Education teaching manuals. In this manual solar energy, as well as other energy sources like wind power, is introduced by performing school activities in the area of social studies. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Final Technical Report: Supporting Wind Turbine Research and Testing - Gearbox Durability Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The combination of premature failure of wind turbine gearboxes and the downtime caused by those failures leads to an increase in the cost of electricity produced by the wind. There is a need for guidance to asset managers regarding how to maximize the longevity of their gearboxes in order to help keep the cost of wind energy as low as possible. A low cost of energy supports the US Department of Energy's goal of achieving 20% of the electricity in the United States produced by wind by the year 2030. DNV KEMA has leveraged our unique position in the industry as an independent third party engineering organization to study the problem of gearbox health management and develop guidance to project operators. This report describes the study. The study was conducted in four tasks. In Task 1, data that may be related to gearbox health and are normally available to wind project operators were collected for analysis. Task 2 took a more in-depth look at a small number of gearboxes to gain insight in to relevant failure modes. Task 3 brought together the previous tasks by evaluating the available data in an effort to identify data that could provide early indications of impending gearbox failure. Last, the observations from the work were collected to develop recommendations regarding gearbox health management.

Matthew Malkin

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Electron microscopic evaluation and fission product identification of irradiated TRISO coated particles from the AGR-1 experiment: A preliminary Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Post-irradiation examination of coated particle fuel from the AGR-1 experiment is in progress at Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. In this presentation a brief summary of results from characterization of microstructures in the coating layers of selected irradiated fuel particles with burnup of 11.3% and 19.3% FIMA will be given. The main objective of the characterization were to study irradiation effects, fuel kernel porosity, layer debonding, layer degradation or corrosion, fission-product precipitation, grain sizes, and transport of fission products from the kernels across the TRISO layers. Characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy were used. A new approach to microscopic quantification of fission-product precipitates is also briefly demonstrated. The characterization emphasized fission-product precipitates in the SiC-IPyC interface, SiC layer and the fuel-buffer interlayer, and provided significant new insights into mechanisms of fission-product transport. Although Pd-rich precipitates were identified at the SiC-IPyC interlayer, no significant SiC-layer thinning was observed for the particles investigated. Characterization of these precipitates highlighted the difficulty of measuring low concentration Ag in precipitates with significantly higher concentrations of contain Pd and U. Different approaches to resolving this problem are discussed. Possible microstructural differences between particles with high and low releases of Ag particles are also briefly discussed, and an initial hypothesis is provided to explain fission-product precipitate compositions and locations. No SiC phase transformations or debonding of the SiC-IPyC interlayer as a result of irradiation were observed. Lessons learned from the post-irradiation examination are described and future actions are recommended.

I J van Rooyen; D E Janney; B D Miller; J L Riesterer; P A Demkowicz

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

BNL | Accelerator Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerator Test Facility Accelerator Test Facility Home Core Capabilities Photoinjector S-Band Linac Laser Systems CO2 Laser Nd:Yag Laser Beamlines Beamline Simulation Data Beamline Parameters Beam Diagnostics Detectors Beam Schedule Operations Resources Fact Sheet (.pdf) Image Library Upgrade Proposal (.pdf) Publications ES&H Experiment Start-up ATF Handbook Laser Safety Collider-Accelerator Dept. C-AD ES&H Resources Staff Users' Place Apply for Access ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo ATF photo A user facility for advanced accelerator research The Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) is a proposal driven, steering committee reviewed facility that provides users with high-brightness electron- and laser-beams. The ATF pioneered the concept of a user facility for studying complex properties of modern accelerators and

335

Curriculum Implementation: a Study of the Effect of a Specialized Curriculum on Sixth Grade Mathematics Summative Test Scores in a Rural Middle School.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to examine curriculum implementation in sixth grade mathematics as it related to standardized testing in a rural district. The (more)

Bicknell, Libby Plath

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

1994 Baseline biological studies for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report describes environmental work performed at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) in 1994 by the Basic Environmental Monitoring and Compliance Program (BECAMP). The DAF is located near the Mojave-Great Basin desert transition zone 27 km north of Mercury. The area immediately around the DAF building complex is a gentle slope cut by 1 to 3 m deep arroyos, and occupied by transitional vegetation. In 1994, construction activities were largely limited to work inside the perimeter fence. The DAF was still in a preoperational mode in 1994, and no nuclear materials were present. The DAF facilities were being occupied so there was water in the sewage settling pond, and the roads and lights were in use. Sampling activities in 1994 represent the first year in the proposed monitoring scheme. The proposed biological monitoring plan gives detailed experimental protocols. Plant, lizard, tortoise, small mammal, and bird surveys were performed in 1994. The authors briefly outline procedures employed in 1994. Studies performed on each taxon are reviewed separately then summarized in a concluding section.

Townsend, Y.E. [ed.; Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Progress Letter Report on Bending Fatigue Test System Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel Vibration Integrity Study (Out-of-cell fatigue testing development - Task 2.4)  

SciTech Connect

Vibration integrity of high burn-up spent nuclear fuel in transportation remains to be a critical component of US nuclear waste management system. The structural evaluation of package for spent fuel transportation eventually will need to see if the content or spent fuel is in a subcritical condition. However, a system for testing and characterizing such spent fuel is still lacking mainly due to the complication involved with dealing radioactive specimens in a hot cell environment. Apparently, the current state-of-the-art in spent fuel research and development is quite far away from the delivery of reliable mechanical property data for the assessment of spent fuels in the transport package evaluation. Under the sponsorship of US NRC, ORNL has taken the challenge in developing a robust testing system for spent fuel in hot cell. An extensive literature survey was carried out and unique requirements of such testing system were identified. The U-frame setup has come to the top among various designs examined for reverse bending fatigue test of spent fuel rod. The U-frame has many features that deserve mentioned here: Easy to install spent fuel rod in test; Less linkages than in conventional bending test setup such as three-point or four-point bending; Target the failure mode relevant to the fracture of spent fuel rod in transportation by focusing on pure bending; The continuous calibrations and modifications resulted in the third generation (3G) U-frame testing setup. Rigid arms are split along the LBB axis at rod sample ends. For each arm, this results in a large arm body and an end piece. Mating halves of bushings were modified into two V-shaped surfaces on which linear roller bearings (LRB) are embedded. The rod specimen is installed into the test fixture through opening and closing slide end-pieces. The 3G apparently has addressed major issues of setup identified in the previous stage and been proven to be eligible to be further pursued in this project. On the other hand, the purchase of universal testing machine or Bose dual LM2 TB was completed and the testing system was delivered to ORNL in August 2012. The preliminary confirmation of the system and on-site training were given by Bose field engineer and regional manager on 8/1-8/2/2012. The calibration of Bose testing system has been performed by ORNL because the integration of ORNL setup into the Bose TestBench occurred after the installation. Major challenge with this process arose from two aspects: 1) the load control involves two load cells, and 2) U-frame setup itself is a non-standard specimen. ORNL has been able to implement the load control through Cycle Indirect along with pinning the U-frame setup. Two meetings with ORNL hot-cell group (November 2012 and January 2013) were held to discuss the potential issues with both epoxy mounting of rigid sleeve and U-frame setup. Many suggestions were provided to make the procedure friendlier to the manipulator in hot cell. Addressing of these suggestions resulted in another cycle of modifications of both vise mold and setup. The initial meeting with ORNL I&C group occurred in November 2012 with regard to the Bose cable modification and design of central panel to integrate the cables and wires. The first round of cable modification and central panel fabrication was completed in February 2012. The testing with the modified cables exhibited substantial noises and the testing system was not shown to be stable. It was believed the cross talk was responsible to the noise, and a central panel with a better grounding and shielding was highly recommended. The central panel has been re-designed and fabricated in March 2013. In the subsequent period, the ORNL made substantial effort to debug the noises with the load cell channel, and to resolve the noises and nonlinearity with RDP LVDTs related to the integration of RDP LVDTs to Bose system. At the same time, ORNL has completed the verification tests of Bose test system, including cycle tests under reversal bending in load control, bending tests under monotonic load, and cycle test

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Cox, Thomas S [ORNL; Baldwin, Charles A [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

The Underground Test Area Project of the Nevada Test Site: Building Confidence in Groundwater Flow and Transport Models at Pahute Mesa Through Focused Characterization Studies  

SciTech Connect

Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site contains about 8.0E+07 curies of radioactivity caused by underground nuclear testing. The Underground Test Area Subproject has entered Phase II of data acquisition, analysis, and modeling to determine the risk to receptors from radioactivity in the groundwater, establish a groundwater monitoring network, and provide regulatory closure. Evaluation of radionuclide contamination at Pahute Mesa is particularly difficult due to the complex stratigraphy and structure caused by multiple calderas in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field and overprinting of Basin and Range faulting. Included in overall Phase II goals is the need to reduce the uncertainty and improve confidence in modeling results. New characterization efforts are underway, and results from the first year of a three-year well drilling plan are presented.

Pawloski, G A; Wurtz, J; Drellack, S L

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

339

A study of the ultrahigh-energy cosmic ray mass composition with the MACRO and EAS-TOP experiments  

SciTech Connect

Two components of cosmic-ray-induced air showers are measured simultaneously at the Gran Sasso Laboratory: the electromagnetic shower at the ground surface by the EAS-TOP extensive air shower array, and the deep-underground muons by the MACRO experiment. The two independent data sets collected during 96.3 days of simultaneous running are combined, and underground muon multiplicity distributions are obtained for anticoincident events (no surface trigger) and high-energy, coincident events. These categories correspond to ranges in primary energy from about 2 x 10{sup 3} GeV to a few times 10{sup 5} GeV, and from 1.5 x 10{sup 5} GeV to about 10{sup 7} GeV, respectively. The experimental shower size and muon multiplicity distributions, as well as the distribution of mean muon multiplicity as a function of shower size (N{sub mu} - log(N{sub mu}) relation), are compared to the ones obtained with Monte Carlo calculations using various trial compositions as input. This is done in an effort to discriminate between these models of primary cosmic-ray mass composition at and above the `kneel` in the all-particle spectrum, where contradictory experimental evidence exists and where a knowledge of the composition would bear upon possible mechanisms for cosmic-ray acceleration and propagation. Detailed studies of simulated anticoincident event rates uncover problems with generator used, with between 25 and 40% too few high-energy muons created. This, combined with the dependence of absolute event rates on the assumed differential primary energy spectra, hampers the interpretation in terms of composition of underground muon or surface air shower data taken separately. However, the N{sub mu} - log(N{sub e}) relation is independent of the spectra or overall Monte Carlo normalization problems. The simulated N{sub mu} - log (N{sub e}) relation for coincident events is found to be inconsistent with the possibility that the cosmic ray flux becomes proton-dominated at and above the knee.

Coutu, S.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

340

FELIX: construction and testing of a facility to study electromagnetic effects for first wall, blanket, and shield systems  

SciTech Connect

An experimental test facility for the study of electromagnetic effects in the FWBS systems of fusion reactors has been constructed over the past 1-1/2 years at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). In a test volume of 0.76 m/sup 3/ a vertical pulsed 0.5 T dipole field (B < 50 T/s) is perpendicular to a 1 T solenoid field. Power supplies of 2.75 MW and 5.5 MW and a solid state switch rated 13 kV, 13.1 kA (170 MW) control the pulsed magnetic fields. The total stored energy in the coils is 2.13 MJ. The coils are designed for a future upgrade to 4 T or the solenoid and 1 T for the dipole field (a total of 23.7 MJ). This paper describes the design and construction features of the facility. These include the power supplies, the solid state switches, winding and impregnation of large dipole saddle coils, control of the magnetic forces, computer control of FELIX and of experimental data acquisition and analysis, and an initial experimental test setup to analyze the eddy current distribution in a flat disk.

Praeg, W.F.; Turner, L.R.; Biggs, J.A.; Knott, M.J.; Lari, R.J.; McGhee, D.G.; Wehrle, R.B.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Experimental Study of First Wall Cooling with Gas Loop in the Development of a Korean Test Blanket Module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Blanket Design and Experiments / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

Jun Soo Lee; Dong Won Lee; Goon Cherl Park

342

Tests of an Ensemble Kalman Filter for Mesoscale and Regional-Scale Data Assimilation. Part III: Comparison with 3DVAR in a Real-Data Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) for mesoscale and regional-scale data assimilation has been demonstrated in the authors recent studies via observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs) both under a perfect-model ...

Zhiyong Meng; Fuqing Zhang

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Customer reponse to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ahead Wholesale Market Electricity Prices: Case Study of RTPahead Wholesale Market Electricity Prices: Case Study of RTPElectricity Prices

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

BNL | Active ATF Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spokesperson: A. Murokh, Radiabeam (2013) AE57 - Corrugated Plate De-Chirper (feasibility study). Spokesperson: A. Murokh (2013) AE58 - ERL BPM Test (feasibility study)....

345

TEST VERSION Mathematics by Experiment: Plausible ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jonathan M. Borwein Centre for Experimental and Constructive Mathematics Department of Mathematics Simon Fraser University David H. Bailey Lawrence...

346

The 1981 ocean tomography experiment: Preliminary results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary results from a 1981 test ocean acoustic tomography experiment are presented. The system deployed in the southern North Atlantic

The Ocean Tomography Group; R. C. Spindel

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to ~42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5% as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: ~50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies (@ ~40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches ~40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

Khericha, Soli T

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Experiment Safety Assurance Package for the 40- to 50-GWd/MT Burnup Phase of Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in Small I-Hole Positions in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

This experiment safety assurance package (ESAP) is a revision of the last MOX ESAP issued in February 2001(Khericha 2001). The purpose of this revision is to identify the changes in the loading pattern and to provide a basis to continue irradiation up to {approx}42 GWd/MT burnup (+ 2.5%) as predicted by MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) transport code before the preliminary postirradiation examination (PIE) results for 40 GWd/MT burnup are available. Note that the safety analysis performed for the last ESAP is still applicable and no additional analysis is required (Khericha 2001). In July 2001, it was decided to reconfigure the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 3, at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, as the loading pattern for Phase IV, Parts 2 and 3. Three capsule assemblies will be irradiated until the highest burnup capsule assembly accumulates: {approx}50 GWd/MT burnup, based on the MCNP code predictions. The last ESAP suggests that at the end of Phase IV, Part 1, we remove the two highest burnup capsule assemblies ({at} {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup) and send them to ORNL for PIE. Then, irradiate the test assembly using the loading pattern for Phase IV, Part 2, until the highest burnup capsule reaches {approx}40 GWd/MT burnup per MCNP-predicted values.

Khericha, S.T.

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

349

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 16 March 1991--15 March 1992  

SciTech Connect

Research by the US Department of Energy (DOE) has shown that cloud radiative feedback is the single most important effect determining the magnitude of possible climatic responses to human activity. However, these effects are still not known at the levels needed for climate prediction. Consequently, DOE has launched a major initiative-- the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program -- directed at improving the parameterization of the physics governing cloud and radiative processes in general circulation models (GCM`s). One specific goal of ARM is to improve the treatment of radiative transfer in GCM`s under clear-sky, general overcast and broken cloud conditions. Our approach to developing the radiation model will be to test existing models in an iterative, predictive fashion. We will supply the Clouds and Radiative Testbed (CART) with a set of models to be compared with operationally observed data. The differences we find will lead to the development of new models to be tested with new data. Similarly, our GCM studies will use existing GCM`s to study the radiation sensitivity problem. We anticipate that the outcome of this approach will provide both a better longwave radiative forcing algorithm and a better understanding of how longwave radiative forcing influences the equilibrium climate of the atmosphere.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Design and Analysis of Salmonid Tagging Studies in the Columbia Basin : Volume II: Experiment Salmonid Survival with Combined PIT-CWT Tagging.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiment designs to estimate the effect of transportation on survival and return rates of Columbia River system salmonids are discussed along with statistical modeling techniques. Besides transportation, river flow and dam spill are necessary components in the design and analysis otherwise questions as to the effects of reservoir drawdowns and increased dam spill may never be satisfactorily answered. Four criteria for comparing different experiment designs are: (1) feasibility, (2) clarity of results, (3) scope of inference, and (4) time to learn. In this report, alternative designs for conducting experimental manipulations of smolt tagging studies to study effects of river operations such as flow levels, spill fractions, and transporting outmigrating salmonids around dams in the Columbia River system are presented. The principles of study design discussed in this report have broad implications for the many studies proposed to investigate both smolt and adult survival relationships. The concepts are illustrated for the case of the design and analysis of smolt transportation experiments. The merits of proposed transportation studies should be measured relative to these principles of proper statistical design and analysis.

Newman, Ken

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Experience, Plans, and a Mixed Flow Expander  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The experience referred to is mostly that of Hydrothermal Power Company beginning in 1971 when the investigation and development was started on the geothermal expander which is described here. The discussion includes results of testing in Mexico at Cerro Prieto where they enjoyed the hospitality of the Department of Geothermal Studies. The discussion will lead through the subsequent testing at the East Mesa Test Facility, courtesy of the US Bureau of Reclamation, and on Sinclair 4 near Niland, courtesy of Southern California Edison Company and Phillips Petroleum Company. They then discuss some of the plans which are contained in an evaluation project funded by ERDA.

McKay, Richard A.; Sprankle, Roger S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

The design, construction, and testing of a nuclear fuel rod thermal simulation system to study gallium/Zircaloy interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The presence of gallium in weapons grade plutonium has raised many questions concerning its use in light water reactor (LWR) fuel rods. The biggest concern is that the gallium will migrate down the thermal gradient in the fuel rod and deposit on the inner surface of the clad, which could cause it to fail. In order to study these effects, a fuel rod thermal simulation system (FRTSS) has been developed to recreate the shape and magnitude of the temperature profile in pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel rods. The system uses electrically heated simulated fuel rods inside of a large, natural convection heat exchanger that uses lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) (45 <% Pb, 55 <% Bi) as the working fluid. The simulated rods consist of small diameter electric heaters, annular pellets of depleted uranium/cerium oxide doped with approximately 10 ppm of gallium, a small helium filled gap, and generic Zircaloy IV cladding. The system is controlled through a computer-based data acquisition system that is used to record temperature data and operate the various pieces of equipment. A simple mathematical model was used to design the heat exchanger and predict the temperature profile within the simulated rods. Results from system tests indicated that the mathematical model was capable of predicting heater surface temperatures within 6.15% +/- 1.82% and clad outer surface temperatures within 1.91% +/- 4.46%. In addition, the tests also revealed that the system could accurately simulate the temperature profiles of operating PWR fuel rods. Consequently, the FRTSS provides a safe and effective means for studying gallium migration in the fuel pellets and its subsequent interactions with Zircaloy IV.

Allison, Christopher Curtis

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Flatback airfoil wind tunnel experiment.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computational fluid dynamics study of thick wind turbine section shapes in the test section of the UC Davis wind tunnel at a chord Reynolds number of one million is presented. The goals of this study are to validate standard wind tunnel wall corrections for high solid blockage conditions and to reaffirm the favorable effect of a blunt trailing edge or flatback on the performance characteristics of a representative thick airfoil shape prior to building the wind tunnel models and conducting the experiment. The numerical simulations prove the standard wind tunnel corrections to be largely valid for the proposed test of 40% maximum thickness to chord ratio airfoils at a solid blockage ratio of 10%. Comparison of the computed lift characteristics of a sharp trailing edge baseline airfoil and derived flatback airfoils reaffirms the earlier observed trend of reduced sensitivity to surface contamination with increasing trailing edge thickness.

Mayda, Edward A. (University of California, Davis, CA); van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Chao, David D. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Experiment Study of the Propagation of Radio Waves in a Scaled Model of Long-Wall Coal Mining Tunnels  

SciTech Connect

A long-wall coal mining tunnel is the most important working area in a coal mine. It has long been realized that radio communications can improve both productivity and safety in this dangerous area. Hence, many attempts to use radio communications in such an environment have been made. Unfortunately, no radio system has satisfactorily provided communication services there, which, we believe, is partially due to poor understanding of the propagation characteristics of radio waves in the long-wall mining tunnel. To have deeper physical insight into the propagation problem, a scaled model of the long-wall mining tunnel was built, and the propagation characteristics of UHF radio waves were measured. The experiment and the measured results are presented and discussed.

Han, G.R.; Zhang, W.M.; Zhang, Y.P. [Shanxi University, Taiyuan (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Recent radon transient experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radon transient analysis is being developed as a method complementary to pressure transient analysis for evaluation of geothermal reservoirs. The method is based on the observations of Stoker and Kruger (1975) that radon concentration in produced geothermal fluids is related to geothermal reservoir type, production flow rates, and time. Stoker and Kruger showed that radon concentrations were markedly different in vapor-dominated and liquid-dominated systems, and varied not only among wells of different flow rate in an individual reservoir, but also varied timewise in individual wells. The potential uses of radon as an internal tracer for geothermal reservoir engineering were reviewed by Kruger, Stoker, and Umana (1977). Also included were results of the first transient test performed with rapid flow rate change in a vapor-dominated field. The results of the next four radon-flow rate transient experiments were summarized by Kruger (1978) in which effects of well interference and startup production in a new well were demonstrated. Four of these first five radon transient experiments have been carried out in vapor-dominated reservoirs at The Geysers in California and Serrazzano in Italy. The systematics of the transients of radon concentration following abrupt changes in flow rate is being evaluated by Warren and Kruger (1978). The fifth test was at the HGP-A well in Hawaii, the first transient test in a liquid-dominated reservoir. Three additional radon transient tests have been carried out, each in a different type of geothermal resource. The first test was in a petrothermal resource, the reservoir created by hydraulic fracturing by LASL in the hot, dry rock experiment in New Mexico. The results of this first 75-day production test of continuous forced circulation, during January-April, 1978, are given by Tester, et al (1978). The results of the radon concentration measurements made during this test are summarized by Kruger, Cederberg, and Semprini (1978). The second test was a second transient test at the HGP-A well in the liquid-dominated reservoir at Pohoiki, Hawaii, and the third test was a second transient test at the Grottitana well in the Serrazzano field at Larderello, Italy. The general observations of these tests are listed in Table 1. A summary of each of these three tests follows. During the LASL hot dry rock flow test, five samples of recirculating production fluid were obtained by wellhead sampling. Two samples were obtained during the following shutin and venting periods of the test, and one sample of makeup water was analyzed during the test.

Kruger, P.; Semprini, L.; Cederberg, G.; Macias, L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

LOFT facility and test program  

SciTech Connect

The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) test facility, program objectives, and the experiments planned are described. The LOFT facility is related to the smaller Semiscale facility and the larger commercial pressurized water reactors. The fact that LOFT is a computer model assessment tool rather than a demonstration test is emphasized. Various types of reactor safety experiments planned through 1983 are presented.

McPherson, G.D.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TEST BED PROGRAM FOR NOVEL DETECTORS AND DETECTOR MATERIALS AT SRS H-CANYON SEPARATIONS FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have proposed that a test bed for advanced detectors be established at the H-Canyon separations facility located on the DOE Savannah River Site. The purpose of the proposed test bed will be to demonstrate the capabilities of emerging technologies for national and international safeguards applications in an operational environment, and to assess the ability of proven technologies to fill any existing gaps. The need for such a test bed has been expressed in the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) program plan and would serve as a means to facilitate transfer of safeguards technologies from the laboratory to an operational environment. New detectors and detector materials open the possibility of operating in a more efficient and cost effective manner, thereby strengthening national and international safeguards objectives. In particular, such detectors could serve the DOE and IAEA in improving timeliness of detection, minimizing uncertainty and improving confidence in results. SRNL's concept for the H Canyon test bed program would eventually open the facility to other DOE National Laboratories and establish a program for testing national and international safeguards related equipment. The initial phase of the test bed program is to conduct a comprehensive feasibility study to determine the benefits and challenges associated with establishing such a test bed. The feasibility study will address issues related to the planning, execution, and operation of the test bed program. Results from the feasibility study will be summarized and discussed in this paper.

Sexton, L.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Hanks, D.

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Study of the (e,e'p) quasi-elastic reaction in complex nuclei: theory and experiment  

SciTech Connect

Experimental coincidence cross section and transverse-longitudinal asymmetry A{sub TL} have been obtained for the quasielastic (e,e'p) reaction in {sup 16}O, {sup 12}C, and {sup 208}Pb in constant q-? kinematics in the missing momentum range -350 < p{sub miss} < 350 MeV/c. In these experiments, performed in experimental Hall A of the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLAB), the beam energy and the momentum and angle of the scattered electrons were kept fixed, while the angle between the proton momentum and the momentum transfer q was varied in order to map out the missing momentum distribution. The experimental cross section and A{sub TL} asymmetry have been compared with Monte Carlo simulations based on Distorted Wave Impulse Approximation (DWIA) calculations with both relativistic and non-relativistic spinor structure. The spectroscopic factors obtained for both models are in agreement with previous experimental values, while A{sub TL} measurements favor the relativistic DWIA calculation. This thesis describes the details of the experimental setup, the calibration of the spectrometers, the techniques used in the data analysis to derive the final cross sections and the A{sub TL}, the ingredients of the theoretical calculations employed and the comparison of the results with the simulations based on these theoretical models.

Joaquin Lopez Herraiz

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Spheromak Formation and Sustainment Studies at the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment Using High-Speed Imaging and Magnetic Diagnostics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-speed imaging system with shutter speeds as fast as 2 ns and double frame capability has been used to directly image the formation and evolution of the Sustained Spheromak Physics Experiment (SSPX). Reproducible plasma features have been identified with this diagnostic and divided in three groups, according to the stage in the discharge at which they occur: (1) breakdown and ejection, (2) sustainment, and (3) decay. During the first stage, plasma descends into the flux conserver shortly after breakdown and a transient plasma column is formed. The column then rapidly bends and simultaneously becomes too dim to photograph a few microseconds after formation. We conjecture that this rapid bending precedes the transfer of toroidal to poloidal flux. During sustainment, a stable plasma column different from the transient one is observed. It has been possible to measure the column diameter and compare it to CORSICA, an MHD equilibrium reconstruction code which showed good agreement with the measurements. Elongation and velocity measurements were made of cathode patterns also seen during this stage, possibly caused by pressure gradients or E x B drifts. The patterns elongate in a toroidal-only direction which depends on the magnetic field polarity. During the decay stage the column diameter expands as the current ramps down, until it eventually dissolves into filaments. With the use of magnetic probes inserted in the gun region, a X-point which moved axially depending on current level and toroidal mode number, was observed in all the stages of the SSPX plasma discharge.

Romero-Talamas, C A; Holcomb, C; Bellan, P M; Hill, D N

2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Experiences from near-real-time satellite-based volcano monitoring in Central America: case studies at Fuego, Guatemala  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past decade, remote sensing has been used increasingly in the study of active volcanoes and their associated hazards. Ground-based remote sensing techniques, such as those aimed at the analysis of volcanic gases or fumarole temperatures, are ...

P. W. Webley; M. J. Wooster; W. Strauch; J. A. Saballos; K. Dill; P. Stephenson; J. Stephenson; R. Escobar Wolf; O. Matias

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Customer reponse to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March. Neenan, B. (1992) Electricity A La Carte ElectricPrice Responsive? The Electricity Journal 15(3): 52-59.ahead Wholesale Market Electricity Prices: Case Study of RTP

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

A Numerical Study of Stratospheric Gravity Waves Triggered by Squall Lines Observed during the TOGA COARE and COPT-81 Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3D mesoscale model is used to study the structure and intensity of stratospheric gravity waves generated by tropical convection. Two prototypical cases are examined: a squall line observed during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled ...

C. Piani; D. R. Durran

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Approved Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cycle 31OCT97 Exp Spokesperson Experiment Title Days 666 Clark Magnetic Rotation in 104Sn 5 667 Janssens Unsafe COULEX of the 240Pu Nucleus 3 670 Smith Exotic Structures in very...

365

Background Experiment  

Gas and liquid samples analyzed Resin with known oxygen exposure irradiated for comparison Irradiated resin used in K d tests for comparison Co-60 ...

366

HAPEXMOBLIHY: A Hydrologic Atmospheric Experiment for the Study of Water Budget and Evaporation Flux at the Climatic Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The HAPEX-MOBILHY program is aimed at studying the hydrological budget and evaporation flux at the scale of a GCM (general circulation model) grid square, i.e., 104 km2. Different surface and subsurface networks will be operated during the year ...

Jean-Claude Andr; Jean-Paul Goutorbe; Alain Perrier

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Studying information seeking on the non-English Web: An experiment on a Spanish business Web portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Internet is estimated to grow significantly as access to Web content in some non-English languages continues to increase. However, prior research in human-computer interaction (HCI) has implicitly assumed the primary language used on the Web to be ... Keywords: Browsing, Cross-regional search capability, Information quality, Internet, Non-English Web content, Searching, Spanish, User satisfaction, User study, Web, Web portal

Wingyan Chung

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Analysis of the Impurity Flow Reversal Experiment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments performed on the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-A) tokamak have shown that poloidally asymmetric injection of hydrogen gas can alter the inward transport of injected impurity atoms. We have compared the observed transport times and the magnitude of the flow reversal effect with a model based on the neoclassical theory of impurity transport and find that the observations are consistent with the theory. However, uncertainities in the radial profiles and the atomic rate coefficients do not permit a truly definitive test of the theory.

Burrell, K.H.; Wong, S.K.; Amano, T.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

High-silicon {sup 238}PuO{sub 2} fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of [sup 238]Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. The modular GPHS design was developed to address both survivability during launch abort and return from orbit. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment- impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and Earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

Reimus, M.A.H.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

A study of the physics and chemistry of knock in modern SI engines and their relationship to the octane tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avoiding knock is the major design constraint for spark ignition engines because of the unacceptable noise and engine damage associated with it. Hence, the Research and Motor Octane Number (RON and MON) tests were established ...

Mittal, Vikram

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Studies of strong-field gravity : testing the black hole hypothesis and investigating spin-curvature coupling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations of gravitational systems agree well with the predictions of general relativity (GR); however, to date we have only tested gravity in the weak-field limit. In the next few years, observational advances may make ...

Vigeland, Sarah Jane

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Customer response to day-ahead wholesale market electricity prices: Case study of RTP program experience in New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is growing interest in policies, programs and tariffs that encourage customer loads to provide demand response (DR) to help discipline wholesale electricity markets. Proposals at the retail level range from eliminating fixed rate tariffs as the default service for some or all customer groups to reinstituting utility-sponsored load management programs with market-based inducements to curtail. Alternative rate designs include time-of-use (TOU), day-ahead real-time pricing (RTP), critical peak pricing, and even pricing usage at real-time market balancing prices. Some Independent System Operators (ISOs) have implemented their own DR programs whereby load curtailment capabilities are treated as a system resource and are paid an equivalent value. The resulting load reductions from these tariffs and programs provide a variety of benefits, including limiting the ability of suppliers to increase spot and long-term market-clearing prices above competitive levels (Neenan et al., 2002; Boren stein, 2002; Ruff, 2002). Unfortunately, there is little information in the public domain to characterize and quantify how customers actually respond to these alternative dynamic pricing schemes. A few empirical studies of large customer RTP response have shown modest results for most customers, with a few very price-responsive customers providing most of the aggregate response (Herriges et al., 1993; Schwarz et al., 2002). However, these studies examined response to voluntary, two-part RTP programs implemented by utilities in states without retail competition.1 Furthermore, the researchers had limited information on customer characteristics so they were unable to identify the drivers to price response. In the absence of a compelling characterization of why customers join RTP programs and how they respond to prices, many initiatives to modernize retail electricity rates seem to be stymied.

Goldman, C.; Hopper, N.; Sezgen, O.; Moezzi, M.; Bharvirkar, R.; Neenan, B.; Boisvert, R.; Cappers, P.; Pratt, D.

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Low Energy Antiproton Experiments - A Review  

SciTech Connect

Low energy antiprotons offer excellent opportunities to study properties of fundamental forces and symmetries in nature. Experiments with them can contribute substantially to deepen our fundamental knowledge in atomic, nuclear and particle physics. Searches for new interactions can be carried out by studying discrete symmetries. Known interactions can be tested precisely and fundamental constants can be extracted from accurate measurements on free antiprotons (p-bar's) and bound two- and three-body systems such as antihydrogen (H-bar = p-bare-), the antprotonic helium ion (He++p-bar)+ and the antiprotonic atomcule (He++p-bare-) . The trapping of a single p-bar in a Penning trap, the formation and precise studies of antiprotonic helium ions and atoms and recently the production of H-bar have been among the pioneering experiments. They have led already to precise values for p-bar parameters, accurate tests of bound two- and three-body Quantum Electrodynamics (QED), tests of the CPT theorem and a better understanding of atom formation from their constituents. Future experiments promise more precise tests of the standard theory and have a robust potential to discover new physics. Precision experiments with low energy p-bar's share the need for intense particle sources and the need for time to develop novel instrumentation with all other experiments, which aim for high precision in exotic fundamental systems. The experimental programs - carried out in the past mostly at the former LEAR facility and at present at the AD facility at CERN - would benefit from intense future sources of low energy p-bar's. The highest possible p-bar fluxes should be aimed for at new facilities such as the planned FLAIR facility at GSI in order to maximize the potential of delicate precision experiments to influence model building. Examples of key p-bar experiments are discussed here and compared with other experiments in the field. Among the central issues is their potential to obtain important information on basic symmetries such as CPT and to gain insights into antiparticle gravitation as well as the possibilities to learn about nuclear neutron distributions.

Jungmann, Klaus P. [Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747AA Groningen (Netherlands)

2005-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

374

The FIFE Data Publication Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The First ISLSCP Field Experiment (FIFE) provided an opportunity to test the concept of data publication for long-term access to valuable scientific data. In analogy with the procedures used in research publication, the FIFE Information System ...

Donald E. Strebel; David R. Landis; K. Fred Huemmrich; Jeffrey A. Newcomer; Blanche W. Meeson

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Essays in macroeconomics and experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation consists of four chapters on empirical and experimental macroeconomics and other experimental topics. Chapter 1 uses a laboratory experiment to test the predictions of a dynamic global game designed to ...

Shurchkov, Olga

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

STUDIES OF METAL-WATER REACTIONS AT HIGH TEMPERATURES: I. THE CONDENSER DISCHARGE EXPERIMENT: PRELIMINARY RESULTS WITH ZIRCONIUM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The condenser-discharge method of conducting molten metal- water reactions at high temperatures was refined. Two methods to measure energy input to specimen wires and, therefore, to compute initial metal temperatures were developed. Calculated metal temperatures were estimated to be accurate to within 100 deg C. Two reaction cells were designed, one for operation at atmospheric pressure with water at room temperature, and the other for operation at high pressure and with water at elevated temperature. Means were developed to determine the surface area of metal exposed to reaction and to determine the total extent of reaction. Pressure transducers were used to record the rate of reactions. The zirconium- water reaction was studied with initial metal temperatures from 1100 to 4000 deg C with 30 and 60-mil wires in room-temperature water. Initial pressures in these runs were the vapor pressures of water at room temperature (20-30 mm). Runs were made with 60-mil wires in water heated to 200 deg C (225 psi). Results in room-temperature water indicated that the reaction became explosive at an initial metal temperature of 2600 deg C. Below this temperature, 20% or less reaction occurred. At higher water temperatures, reaction ranged from 40 to 70%. Runs in heated water showed markedly greater reaction, reaching 50% for fully melted metal at the melting point (1840 deg C). Results suggested that the rates of both solid-state processes and the diffusion of water vapor through the hydrogen blanket surrounding reacting particles must be considered. (auth)

Baker, L. Jr.; Warchal, R.L.; Vogel, R.C.; Kilpatrick, M.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. High-siliocon fuel characterization study: Half module impact tests 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Because any space mission could experience a launch abort or return from orbit, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive credible accident environments. Previous testing conducted in support of the Galileo and Ulysses missions documented the response of GPHSs to a variety of fragment-impact, aging, atmospheric reentry, and earth-impact conditions. The evaluations documented in this report are part of an ongoing program to determine the effect of fuel impurities on the response of the heat source to conditions baselined during the Galileo/Ulysses test program. In the first two tests in this series, encapsulated GPHS fuel pellets containing high levels of silicon were aged, loaded into GPHS module halves, and impacted against steel plates. The results show no significant differences between the response of these capsules and the behavior of relatively low-silicon fuel pellets tested previously.

Reimus, M.A.H.; George, T.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

Experimental Study of W Z Intermediate Bosons Associated Production with the CDF Experiment at the Tevatron Collider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studying WZ associated production at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider is of great importance for two main reasons. On the one hand, this process would be sensitive to anomalies in the triple gauge couplings such that any deviation from the value predicted by the Standard Model would be indicative of new physics. In addition, by choosing to focus on the final state where the Z boson decays to b{bar b} pairs, the event topology would be the same as expected for associated production of a W and a Standard Model light Higgs boson (m{sub H} {approx}< 135 GeV) which decays into b{bar b} pairs most of times. The process WH {yields} W b{bar b} has an expected {sigma} {center_dot} B about five times lower than WZ {yields} Wb{bar b} for m{sub H} {approx_equal} 120 GeV. Therefore, observing this process would be a benchmark for an even more difficult search aiming at discovering the light Higgs in the WH {yields} Wb{bar b} process. After so many years of Tevatron operation only a weak WZ signal was recently observed in the full leptonic decay channel, which suffers from much less competition from background. Searching for the Z in the b{bar b} decay channel in this process is clearly a very challenging endeavour. In the work described in this thesis, WZ production is searched for in a final state where the W decays leptonically to an electron-neutrino pair or a muon-neutrino pair, with associated production of a jet pair consistent with Z decays. A set of candidate events is obtained by applying appropriate cuts to the parameters of events collected by wide acceptance leptonic triggers. To improve the signal fraction of the selected events, an algorithm was used to tag b-flavored jets by means of their content of long lived b-hadrons and corrections were developed to the jet algorithm to improve the b-jet energy resolution for a better reconstruction of the Z mass. In order to sense the presence of a signal one needs to estimate the amount of background. The relative content of heavy flavor jets in the dominant W+multijet background is assumed as predicted by theory. This technique was originally developed in CDF to measure the t{bar t} production cross section in the final state with W + 3 or more jets. This thesis was conceived as the first attempt within CDF to apply a customized version of it to look for evidence of diboson production in the final state with aW and two jets. Extracting the signal in this channel is very hard since with such a small number of jets the background is two orders of magnitude greater than the signal. Moreover, since the signal to background ratio is very small, the expected sensitivity depends critically on the theoretical uncertainties on the amount of background. While work is in progress to understand this background more reliably, this analysis provides an estimate of the achievable upper limit on the WZ production cross section.

Pozzobon, Nicola; /Pisa U.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

On test suite composition and cost-effective regression testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regression testing is an expensive testing process used to re-validate software as it evolves. Various methodologies for improving regression testing processes have been explored, but the cost-effectiveness of these methodologies has been shown to vary with characteristics of regression test suites. One such characteristic involves the way in which test inputs are composed into test cases within a test suite. This article reports the results of controlled experiments examining the effects of two factors in test suite composition test suite granularity and test input grouping on the costs and benefits of several regression-testing-related methodologies: retest-all, regression test selection, test suite reduction, and test case prioritization. These experiments consider the application of several specific techniques, from each of these methodologies, across ten releases each of two substantial software systems, using seven levels of test suite granularity and two types of test input grouping. The effects of granularity, technique, and grouping on the cost and fault-detection effectiveness of regression testing under the given methodologies are analyzed. This analysis shows that test suite granularity significantly affects several cost-benefit factors for the methodologies considered, while test input grouping has limited effects. Further, the results expose essential tradeoffs affecting the relationship between test suite design and regression testing cost-effectiveness, with several implications for practice. 1

Gregg Rothermel; Sebastian Elbaum; Alexey Malishevsky; Praveen Kallakuri

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test experience studies" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

NIST Test Bed for Explosives Trace Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Test material stability studies. Field research also allows testing of different storage methods to establish test material shelf life. ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

382

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A FAST NEUTRON TEST CONCEPT FOR THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1967, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has provided state-of-the-art experimental irradiation testing capability. A unique design is investigated herein for the purpose of providing a fast neutron flux test capability in the ATR. This new test capability could be brought on line in approximately 5 or 6 years, much sooner than a new test reactor could be built, to provide an interim fast-flux test capability in the timeframe before a fast-flux research reactor could be built. The proposed cost for this system is approximately $63M, much less than the cost of a new fast-flux test reactor. A concept has been developed to filter out a large portion of the thermal flux component by using a thermally conductive neutron absorber block. The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility of this experiment cooling concept.

Donna Post Guillen

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

PLANS FOR WARM DENSE MATTER EXPERIMENTS AND IFE TARGET EXPERIMENTS ON NDCX-II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Heavy Ion Fusion Science Virtual National Laboratory (HIFS-VNL) is currently developing design concepts for NDCX-II, the second phase of the Neutralized Drift Compression Experiment, which will use ion beams to explore Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) target hydrodynamics. The ion induction accelerator will consist of a new short pulse injector and induction cells from the decommissioned Advanced Test Accelerator (ATA) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). To fit within an existing building and to meet the energy and temporal requirements of various target experiments, an aggressive beam compression and acceleration schedule is planned. WDM physics and ion-driven direct drive hydrodynamics will initially be explored with 30 nC of lithium ions in experiments involving ion deposition, ablation, acceleration and stability of planar targets. Other ion sources which may deliver higher charge per bunch will be explored. A test stand has been built at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to test refurbished ATA induction cells and pulsed power hardware for voltage holding and ability to produce various compression and acceleration waveforms. Another test stand is being used to develop and characterize lithium-doped aluminosilicate ion sources. The first experiments will include heating metallic targets to 10,000 K and hydrodynamics studies with cryogenic hydrogen targets.

Waldron, W.L.; Barnard, J.J.; Bieniosek, F.M.; Friedman, A.; Henestroza, E.; Leitner, M.; Logan, B.G.; Ni, P.A.; Roy, P.K.; Seidl, P.A.; Sharp, W.M.

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

SANE experiment  

SciTech Connect

The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) is a measurement of parallel and near-perpendicular double spin asymmetries in an inclusive electron scattering. The main goal of the experiment was to measure A{sub {parallel}} and A{sub 80} and extract the spin asymmetries of the proton A{sub 1}{sup p}, A{sub 2}{sup p} and spin structure functions g{sub 1}{sup p} and g{sub 2}{sup p}. Using the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility's polarized electron beam and the University of Virginia's polarized frozen ammonia ({sup 14}NH{sub 3}) target in Hall C, the experiment ran in 2009, collecting data in a Q{sup 2} region from 2.5 to 6.5 GeV{sup 2} and between Bjorken x of 0.3 to 0.8. Particle detection was accomplished using the Big Electron Telescope Array (BETA), a novel non-magnetic detector. This talk will address the progress of the analysis designed to extract the proton spin asymmetries and structure functions. Preliminary results will be presented.

H. Baghdasaryan, SANE Collaboration

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Systematic study related to the role of initial impurities and irradiation rates in the formation and evolution of complex defects in silicon for detectors in HEP experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of oxygen and carbon impurities on the concentrations of defects in silicon for detector uses, in complex fields of radiation, characteristic to high energy physics experiments, is investigated in the frame of the quantitative phenomenological model developed previously by the authors and extended in the present paper. Continuous irradiation conditions are considered, simulating realistically the environments for these experiments. The generation rate of primary defects is calculated starting from the projectile - silicon interaction and from the recoil energy redistribution in the lattice. The mechanisms of formation of complex defects are explicitly analysed. Vacancy-interstitial annihilation, interstitial and vacancy migration to sinks, divacancy, vacancy- and interstitial-impurity complex formation and decomposition are considered. Oxygen and carbon impurities present in silicon could monitor the concentration of all stable defects, due to their interaction with vacancies and interstitials. Their role in the mechanisms of formation and decomposition of the following stable defects: V_2, VO, V_2O, C_i, C_iO_i, C_iC_s and VP, is studied. The model predictions cover a generation primary rate of defects between 10^2 pairs/cm3/s and 10^{11} pairs/cm3/s, and could be a useful clue in obtaining harder materials for detectors for space missions, at the new generation of accelerators, as, e.g. LHC, Super-LHC and Eloisatron, or for industrial applications.

Sorina Lazanu; Ionel Lazanu

2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

386

Reactor Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Precisely measuring $\\theta_{13}$ is one of the highest priority in neutrino oscillation study. Reactor experiments can cleanly determine $\\theta_{13}$. Past reactor neutrino experiments are reviewed and status of next precision $\\theta_{13}$ experiments are presented. Daya Bay is designed to measure $\\sin^22\\theta_{13}$ to better than 0.01 and Double Chooz and RENO are designed to measure it to 0.02-0.03. All are heading to full operation in 2010. Recent improvements in neutrino moment measurement are also briefed.

Jun Cao

2007-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

387

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 We perform experiments simulating reactor core melt phenomena in which molten core debris ("corium") erodes the concrete floor of a containment building. This occurred during the Fukushima nuclear power plant accident though the extent of concrete damage is yet unknown. This video shows the top view of a churning molten pool of uranium oxide at 2000°C (3600°F) seen during an experiment at Argonne. Corium behaves much like lava.

388

Experiment Hazard Class 11 - Hydrogen  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 - Hydrogen 1 - Hydrogen Applicability This hazard classification applies to all experiments and processes involving the use of gaseous hydrogen. This class includes work performed in the Experiment Hall Beamline Stations and any preparatory/setup/testing work performed in the LOM laboratories. Other hazard controls such as fire protection and life safety regulations may apply to experiments of this hazard class. A summary of controls for hydrogen use is available in the hydrogen summary document. Experiment Category Experiments involving previously reviewed hazard controls qualify for categorized as medium risk. Experiments involving new equipment or modified hazard control schemes are categorized as high risk. Experiment Hazard Control Verification Statements Engineered Controls - Applicable controls for storage and use of

389

Kolmogorov-Smirnov test as a tool to study the distribution of ultra-high energy cosmic ray sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze in detail the two-dimensional Kolmogorov-Smirnov test as a tool to learn about the distribution of the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays. We confront in particular models based on AGN observed in X rays, on galaxies observed in HI and isotropic distributions, discussing how this method can be used not only to reject isotropy but also to support or reject specific source models, extending results obtained recently in the literature.

Diego Harari; Silvia Mollerach; Esteban Roulet

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

390

Study and testing of direct contact heat exchangers for geothermal brines. Final report, June 1975--July 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The object of the work reported herein was to assess the technical and economic feasibility of preheating and evaporating a secondary fluid via direct contact with hot geothermal brine. The work covered a period of 12 months and included the design, construction, and testing of a unit which heats and vaporizes 10 gpm of isobutane by direct contact with 325/sup 0/F brine. The analytical and experimental efforts explored design and economic characteristics, including anticipated problem areas such as working fluid loss in the brine, production of a stable dispersion of the working fluid in brine, fluids separation, axial mixing and carry-over of water vapor with the working fluid. Isobutane was selected as the working fluid for tests primarily because of the favorable amount of net work produced per pound of geothermal brine and the low amount and cost of working fluid lost in the heat exchange process. The Elgin Spray Tower concept was selected for the preheater and boiler. The test apparatus includes a separate boiler and a separate preheater, each 6'' diameter by 6' high. Brine enters the top of each vessel and leaves the bottom. Isobutane enters the bottom of the preheater through a distributor plate to produce 0.15 inch diameter drops. The experimental unit operated with no major problems and demonstrated its hydraulic and thermal capabilities. Volumetric heat transfer coefficients obtained ranged up to 4000 BTU/hr /sup 0/F ft/sup 3/. Boiling heat transfer coefficients of as high as 17,000 BTU/hr /sup 0/F ft/sup 3/ were obtained with a design value of 10,000 BTU/hr /sup 0/F ft/sup 3/. Amount of isobutane in a 21 percent NaCl solution leaving the preheater was less than 40 ppM. A conceptual design and cost estimate was prepared for a direct contact heat exchange system sized for a 50 MW power plant.

Suratt, W.B.; Hart, G.K.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Laboratory tests to evaluate and study formation damage with low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) for horizontal well completions in low pressure and depleted reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing number of open hole horizontal well completions in low-pressure and depleted reservoirs requires the use of non-damaging low-density drill-in fluids (LDDIF) to avoid formation damage and realize optimum well productivity. To address this need we have formulated new LDDIFS with specific density lower than 1.0 sg (8.34 ppg) specifically to drill and complete low pressure and depleted reservoirs with minimum formation damage and maximum production. These materials exhibit typical drilling fluid characteristics, allowing the well to be safely drilled (0 required well depth but also perform as completion fluids, lessening formation damage to a greater extent than fluids with greater density and higher wellbore pressures. The new LDDIF incorporates low-density hollow glass spheres (HGS) to allow near-balanced drilling in low pressure and depleted reservoirs. The LDDIF uses potassium chloride (KCI) brine as the base fluid because of its low density and inhibition of clay hydration and employs low concentrations of the HGS so that fluid rheology is not altered. We have conducted extensive laboratory testing to compare performance of the HGS LDDIF with that of conventional horizontal well DIFs. Experiments consisted of permeability regain tests on unconsolidated sands with sand control screens. Test variables included temperature, concentration of drill solids cleanup technique and HGS concentration. Test results have shown that the new fluids are up to 50% easier to remove from the wellbore formation faces and provide higher productivity than higher density fluids. Such results indicate that higher well productivity from wells with less impairment would offset any added costs of HGS additives in the fluids.

Chen, Guoqiang

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Chesapeake Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Send E-Mail to NVLAP at: NVLAP@nist.gov. Personal Body Armor Testing. ... 7 Ballistic Resistance of Body Armor, Section 7, Ballistic Test Methods. ...

2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Structural Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Structural testing at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) offers many benefits to wind turbine companies. NWTC includes a new high bay large enough to test any blade expected during the next 5 years. (There are four test bays.) In 1995, NWTC developed a saphisticated data acquisition system, known as the Blade Structural Testing Real-time Acquisition Interface Network (BSTRAIN), to monitor structural testing through 24-hour continuous video surveillance. NWTC recommends ultimate static-strength and fatigue testing, with nondestructive testing in some cases (vibrational testing is covered in a separate information sheet).

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study  

SciTech Connect

Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced RISMC toolkit that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fermilab at Work | Experiments and Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Working Group U.S. Long-Baseline Neutrino Experiment Study U.S. Lattice QCD Very Large Hadron Collider WFIRST Accelerator Experiments FermilabNICADD Photoinjector Laboratory...

396

An Engineering Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

A relatively inexpensive reactor for the specific purpose of testing a sub-critical portion of another reactor under conditions that would exist during actual operation is discussed. It is concluded that an engineering tool for reactor development work that bridges the present gap between exponential and criticality experiments and the actual full scale operating reactor is feasible. An example of such a test reactor which would not entail development effort to ut into operation is depicted.

Fahrner, T.; Stoker, R.L.; Thomson, A.S.

1951-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

The New Zealand Southern Alps Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southern Alps Experiment is being mounted to study the influence of New Zealand's Southern Alps on local weather and climate. This paper describes these alpine influences and outlines proposed field and modeling experiments. Experiment goals ...

D. S. Wratt; R. N. Ridley; M. R. Sinclair; H. Larsen; S. M. Thompson; R. Henderson; G. L. Austin; S. G. Bradley; A. Auer; A. P. Sturman; I. Owens; B. Fitzharris; B. F. Ryan; J-F. Gayet

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

A study of longwave radiation codes for climate studies: Validation with ARM observations and tests in general circulation models. Technical report, 15 September 1990--25 April 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the activities of our group to meet our stated objectives. The report is divided into sections entitled: Radiation Model Testing Activities, General Circulation Model Testing Activities, Science Team Activities, and Publications, Presentations and Meetings. The section on Science Team Activities summarizes our participation with the science team to further advance the observation and modeling programs. Appendix A lists graduate students supported, and post-doctoral appointments during the project. Reports on the activities during each of the first two years are included as Appendix B. Significant progress has been made in: determining the ability of line-by-line radiation models to calculate the downward longwave flux at the surface; determining the uncertainties in calculated the downwelling radiance and flux at the surface associated with the use of different proposed profiling techniques; intercomparing clear-sky radiance and flux observations with calculations from radiation codes from different climate models; determining the uncertainties associated with estimating N* from surface longwave flux observations; and determining the sensitivity of model calculations to different formulations of the effects of finite sized clouds.

Ellingson, R.G.; Baer, F.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

ALEGRA -- code validation: Experiments and simulations  

SciTech Connect

In this study, the authors are providing an experimental test bed for validating features of the ALEGRA code over a broad range of strain rates with overlapping diagnostics that encompass the multiple responses. A unique feature of the Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian Grid for Research Applications (ALEGRA) code is that it allows simultaneous computational treatment, within one code, of a wide range of strain-rates varying from hydrodynamic to structural conditions. This range encompasses strain rates characteristic of shock-wave propagation (10{sup 7}/s) and those characteristic of structural response (10{sup 2}/s). Most previous code validation experimental studies, however, have been restricted to simulating or investigating a single strain-rate regime. What is new and different in this investigation is that the authors have performed well-instrumented experiments which capture features relevant to both hydrodynamic and structural response in a single experiment. Aluminum was chosen for use in this study because it is a well characterized material--its EOS and constitutive material properties are well defined over a wide range of loading rates. The current experiments span strain rate regimes of over 10{sup 7}/s to less than 10{sup 2}/s in a single experiment. The input conditions are extremely well defined. Velocity interferometers are used to record the high strain-rate response, while low strain rate data were collected using strain gauges.

Chhabildas, L.C.; Konrad, C.H.; Mosher, D.A.; Reinhart, W.D; Duggins, B.D.; Rodeman, R.; Trucano, T.G.; Summers, R.M.; Peery, J.S.

1998-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Test Diversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a novel method for measuring the degree to which a set of test cases executes a given program in diverse ways with respect to the two fundamental programming concepts: control and data. Test Diversity is a method for measuring the variety of software control flow and data flow, comprising of four new measures: conditional diversity, data diversity, standard deviation of diversity, and test orthogonality. These closely-related measures could be used to evaluate the test effectiveness and the test-effort distribution of a test suite. The Diversity Analyzer is a novel industrial-strength testing tool that can currently perform diversity analysis on software written in C/C++/C#/VB in Windows and.NET environments. The Diversity Analyzer is used to evaluate the fault-detection effectiveness of Test Diversity on various types of industrial projects. Key Words: testing tools, verification, theory, experimentation, conditional diversity, data diversity, standard deviation,

Borislav Nikolik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Crystal-Face Archive of Images: Images from the Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Cirrus Regional Study of Tropical Anvils and Cirrus Layers - Florida Area Cirrus Experiment (CRYSTAL-FACE) took place in the summer of 2002 over Key West, Florida. It was a measurement campaign that investigated the physical properties and formation processes of tropical cirrus clouds. Six aircraft with various instruments flew missions, gathering data that were compared with ground-based instrument data and that would be used in the modeling of the Earths climate. DOE was only one of several federal agencies involved, along with various universities and science institutes. The Crystal-Face numeric data sets are available in DOEs ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/armlogin/login.jsp and in NASAs ARCS archive at http://espoarchive.nasa.gov/archive/arcs/crystalf/images/npol_1/. Various sets of data are also available at some of the participating universities. The official home page for Crystal-Face is http://www.espo.nasa.gov/crystalface/index.html. See the 52 science posters at http://www.espo.nasa.gov/crystalface/posters.html

403

Ganges valley aerosol experiment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In June 2011, the Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX) began in the Ganges Valley region of India. The objective of this field campaign is to obtain measurements of clouds, precipitation, and complex aerosols to study their impact on cloud formation and monsoon activity in the region.

Kotamarthi, V.R.; Satheesh, S.K. (Environmental Science Division); (Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India)

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Animal Testing Medical Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Animal Testing In Medical Research Past, present and future. Marte Thomassen Ellen Trolid Tonje Arondsen Marit Gystøl #12;ZO-8091 Forsøksdyrlære Animal experiments in medical research NTNU ­ Norges ................................................................................................................................................ 9 7. THE FUTURE OF ANIMALS IN MEDICAL RESEARCH.21

Bech, Claus

405

Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

ISOTHERMAL AIR INGRESS VALIDATION EXPERIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

Idaho National Laboratory carried out air ingress experiments as part of validating computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations. An isothermal test loop was designed and set to understand the stratified-flow phenomenon, which is important as the initial air flow into the lower plenum of the very high temperature gas cooled reactor (VHTR) when a large break loss-of-coolant accident occurs. The unique flow characteristics were focused on the VHTR air-ingress accident, in particular, the flow visualization of the stratified flow in the inlet pipe to the vessel lower plenum of the General Atomics Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR). Brine and sucrose were used as heavy fluids, and water was used to represent a light fluid, which mimics a counter current flow due to the density difference between the stimulant fluids. The density ratios were changed between 0.87 and 0.98. This experiment clearly showed that a stratified flow between simulant fluids was established even for very small density differences. The CFD calculations were compared with experimental data. A grid sensitivity study on CFD models was also performed using the Richardson extrapolation and the grid convergence index method for the numerical accuracy of CFD calculations . As a result, the calculated current speed showed very good agreement with the experimental data, indicating that the current CFD methods are suitable for predicting density gradient stratified flow phenomena in the air-ingress accident.

Chang H Oh; Eung S Kim

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z