National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for test evaluation partner

  1. Major Partner Test Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Major Test Partners Once a technology is ready to be tested at pilot or commercial scale, the cost of building a test facility becomes significant -- often beyond the funding...

  2. DOE and Partners Test Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE has embarked on a project with a number of partners to test Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technologies at a commercial geothermal power facility near Reno, Nevada. EGS...

  3. DOE and Partners Test Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologies...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    embarked on a project with a number of partners to test Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) technologies at a commercial geothermal power facility near Reno, Nevada. EGS technology...

  4. Department of Energy, Duke Energy and EPRI Partner to Test Advanced...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy, Duke Energy and EPRI Partner to Test Advanced Energy Technologies for Utilities Department of Energy, Duke Energy and EPRI Partner to Test Advanced Energy...

  5. Partnering Institution Name Partnering Institution Name Place...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Photovoltaics M M St Paul Minnesota http www nrel gov pv pv manufacturing html A O Smith A O Smith Milwaukee Wisconsin Test Evaluation Partner Electricity Resources Building...

  6. Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garetson, Thomas

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy?s (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations. Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing. Testing and evaluations were conducted in the following phases: ? Development of test procedures, which established testing procedures; ? Baseline performance testing, which established a performance baseline; ? Accelerated reliability testing, which determined vehicle reliability; ? Fleet testing, used to evaluate vehicle economics in fleet operation, and ? End of test performance evaluation. Test results are reported by two means and posted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to their website: quarterly progress reports, used to document work in progress; and final test reports. This final report documents work conducted for the entirety of the contract by the Clarity Group, Inc., doing business as ECOtality North America (ECOtality). The contract was performed from 1 October 2005 through 31 March 2013. There were 113 light-duty on-road (95), off-road (3) and low speed (15) vehicles tested.

  7. QCI Exam Test-Taking Tips from Community Housing Partners (CHP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains a list of tips for taking the Quality Control Inspector (QCI) Home Energy Professional Certification Exam, provided by Community Housing Partners (CHP).

  8. Testing of the structural evaluation test unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, D.J.; Bobbe, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    In the evaluation of the safety of radioactive material transportation it is important to consider the response of Type B packages to environments more severe than that prescribed by the hypothetical accident sequence in Title 10 Part 71 of the Code of Federal Regulations (NRC 1995). The impact event in this sequence is a 9-meter drop onto an essentially unyielding target, resulting in an impact velocity of 13.4 m/s. The behavior of 9 packages when subjected to impacts more severe than this is not well known. It is the purpose of this program to evaluate the structural response of a test package to these environments. Several types of structural response are considered. Of primary importance is the behavior of the package containment boundary, including the bolted closure and 0-rings. Other areas of concern are loss of shielding capability due to lead slump and the deceleration loading of package contents, that may cause damage to them. This type of information is essential for conducting accurate risk assessments on the transportation of radioactive materials. Currently very conservative estimates of the loss of package protection are used in these assessments. This paper will summarize the results of a regulatory impact test and three extra-regulatory impact tests on a sample package.

  9. An empirical test of partner choice mechanisms in a wild legumerhizobium interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Joel

    species exchange goods and services to their mutual benefit. Trade between partners with conflicting interests requires mechanisms to prevent exploitation. Partner choice theory proposes that individuals might. Our survey of wild-grown plants showed that larger nodules house more Bradyrhizobia, indicating

  10. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-11-10

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  11. Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex - NPTEC

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    The Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex, or NPTEC, is the world's largest facility for open air testing of hazardous toxic materials and biological simulants. NPTEC is used for testing, experimentation, and training for technologies that require the release of toxic chemicals or biological simulants into the environment.

  12. Innovative Partnering 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Emilie

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info Innovative partnering.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 5760 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Innovative partnering.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2O... | pg. 14 T he city of McKinney, Texas and Texas AgriLife Research and Extension Urban Solutions Center at Dallas are partnering on a six-year plan to educate and bring research-based innovations to McKinney residents. The goal is to help them...

  13. Major Partner Test Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousandReport)Price (Dollars per ThousandMajor New Mexico

  14. Vehicle Testing and Analysis Group: Center for Transportation Technologies and Systems (CTTS) (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-10-01

    Describes NREL's Vehicle Testing and Analysis Group's work in vehicle and fleet evaluations, testing, data, and analysis for government and industry partners.

  15. Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Conference Proceedings: Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft River and Boise, Idaho Abstract Evaluating the Raft River and...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Intertek at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about testing and evaluating advanced...

  17. Evaluation of a New Ramping Technique for Duct Leakage Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 LBNL-61743 Evaluation of a New Ramping Technique for Duct Leakage Testing Iain S. Walker ramping Technique for Duct Leakage Testing Table of contents Introduction

  18. Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar Interagency Field Test Evaluates Co-operation of Turbines and Radar May 1, 2012 - 2:56pm Addthis The Department...

  19. LOFT lead rod test results evaluation. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driskell, W.B.; Tolman, E.L.

    1980-07-30

    The purpose for evaluating the LOFT Lead Rod Test (simulations of large break, loss-of-coolant accidents) data was to determine; (a) if the centerline thermocouple and fuel rod elongation sensor data show indications of the collapsed fuel rod cladding, (b) the capability of the FRAP-T5 computer code to accurately predict cladding collapse, and (c) if cladding surface thermocouples enhance fuel rod cooling. With consideration to unresolved questions on data integrity, it was concluded that: the fuel rod centerline thermocouple and elongation sensor data do show indications of the fuel rod cladding collapse; the FRAP-T5 code conservatively predicts cladding collapse; and there is an indication that cladding surface thermocouples are enhancing fuel rod cooling.

  20. Interagency Field Test & Evaluation: Field Test 2 Public Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian Connor

    2013-03-30

    This fact sheet summarizes the second field tests of technologies intended to address wind turbine interference with land-based surveillance radar, which took place in Lubbock, TX.

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Advanced Vehicle Testing & Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Intertek at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about advanced vehicle testing and...

  2. STEP Partner Presentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    STEP Partner Presentation, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  3. Carroll P. Quade Deputy for Test and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carroll P. Quade Deputy for Test and Evaluation Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Research&E) for the Department of Navy. In this position, he acts as the senior advisor on all T&E matters to ASN RDA and the Chief of Navy Operations via the Director, Navy Test and Evaluation and Technology Requirements, OPNAV N

  4. Test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.F.; Allen, G.C.; Shipers, L.R.; Dobranich, D.; Ottinger, C.A.; Harmon, C.D.; Fan, W.C. ); Todosow, M. )

    1992-09-22

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and baseline performance of some of the major subsystems designed to support a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion fuel elements and engines being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. Some preliminary results of evaluating this facility for use in testing other NTP concepts are also summarized.

  5. Evaluation of Regressive Methods for Automated Generation of Test Trajectories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cukic, Bojan

    . In simple terms,a test trajectoiy is defined as a series of data points, with each (possiblymultidimensional of test generation and the percentage of "acceptable" trajectories, measured by the domain specificEvaluation of Regressive Methods for Automated Generation of Test Trajectories Brian J. Taylor

  6. Using a Mental Measurements Yearbook Review to Evaluate a Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    1 Using a Mental Measurements Yearbook Review to Evaluate a Test Anthony J. Nitko Professor, University of Arizona Introduction Once you have located a test, you will want to read its Mental Measurements Yearbook (MMY) review. You need to use the review to make judgments about the quality of the test

  7. Tests as Documentation: a First Attempt at Quality Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbiano, Lorenzo

    Tests as Documentation: a First Attempt at Quality Evaluation Maura Cerioli and Giovanni Lagorio--We present a novel method, and its associated sup- porting tool, for automatically singling out sloppy tests; that is, tests that run successfully on (some) incorrect implementations, that violate the property

  8. EVALUATING TEST METHODS USED TO CHARACTERIZE SOFTBALLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Lloyd V.

    impacts, and humidity. A dynamic compression test, where the ball impacts a rigidly mounted load cell). The COR is used to measure the energy of the ball that is lost during impact with a rigid wall (Cross allows a wide range of ball COR and compression values to be achieved. Balls are typically denoted as xx

  9. NREL: Transportation Research - Fleet Test and Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shines lightGeospatial ToolkitSMARTSWorking With Us NRELVehicleResearchFleet Test

  10. Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Spectroscopy-Based Portal Monitors Used for Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Spectroscopy- Based Portal Monitors Used for Homeland Security................................................................................1 4. Test and evaluation steps .........................................................................................1 5. Recording test results

  11. Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Handheld Radionuclide Identifiers for Use in Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Handheld Radionuclide Identifiers for Use in Homeland Security................................................................................1 4. Test and evaluation steps .........................................................................................1 5. Recording test results

  12. Leveraging enterprise architecture to enable integrated test and evaluation sustainability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheets, Arlan C. (Arlan Christopher)

    2011-01-01

    An analysis was performed to investigate how enterprise architecting methods can be applied to an integrate test and evaluation enterprise and make it a more sustainable enterprise to provide continuous value in the face ...

  13. Partnering with NREL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    An overview for industry and organizations about NREL's partnering opportunities including information about technology partnership agreements and technical area contacts.

  14. High Temperature Evaluation of Tantalum Capacitors - Test 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cieslewski, Grzegorz

    2014-09-28

    Tantalum capacitors can provide much higher capacitance at high-temperatures than the ceramic capacitors. This study evaluates selected tantalum capacitors at high temperatures to determine their suitability for you in geothermal field. This data set contains results of the first test where three different types of capacitors were evaluated at 260C.

  15. High Temperature Evaluation of Tantalum Capacitors - Test 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cieslewski, Grzegorz

    Tantalum capacitors can provide much higher capacitance at high-temperatures than the ceramic capacitors. This study evaluates selected tantalum capacitors at high temperatures to determine their suitability for you in geothermal field. This data set contains results of the first test where three different types of capacitors were evaluated at 260C.

  16. Office of Evaluation and Testing If the weather is bad...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Yi

    Office of Evaluation and Testing If the weather is bad... Don't risk it If the weather conditions or to make other arrangements For steps to schedule or reschedule your test click here>>. Check for weather related closings If inclement weather makes it necessary to close the College, announcements will be made

  17. Steam Trap Testing and Evaluation: An Actual Plant Case Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, A. L.

    1981-01-01

    With rising steam costs and a high failure rate on the Joliet Plants standard steam trap, a testing and evaluation program was begun to find a steam trap that would work at Olin-Joliet. The basis was to conduct the test on the actual process...

  18. 500-kW DCHX pilot-plant evaluation testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hlinak, A.; Lee, T.; Loback, J.; Nichols, K.; Olander, R.; Oshmyansky, S.; Roberts, G.; Werner, D.

    1981-10-01

    Field tests with the 500 kW Direct Contact Pilot Plant were conducted utilizing brine from well Mesa 6-2. The tests were intended to develop comprehensive performance data, design criteria, and economic factors for the direct contact power plant. The tests were conducted in two phases. The first test phase was to determine specific component performance of the DCHX, turbine, condensers and pumps, and to evaluate chemical mass balances of non-condensible gases in the IC/sub 4/ loop and IC/sub 4/ in the brine stream. The second test phase was to provide a longer term run at nearly fixed operating conditions in order to evaluate plant performance and identify operating cost data for the pilot plant. During these tests the total accumulated run time on major system components exceeded 1180 hours with 777 hours on the turbine prime mover. Direct contact heat exchanger performance exceeded the design prediction.

  19. Fenestration System Performance Research, Testing, and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jim Benney

    2009-11-30

    The US DOE was and is instrumental to NFRC's beginning and its continued success. The 2005 to 2009 funding enables NFRC to continue expanding and create new, improved ratings procedures. Research funded by the US DOE enables increased fenestration energy rating accuracy. International harmonization efforts supported by the US DOE allow the US to be the global leader in fenestration energy ratings. Many other governments are working with the NFRC to share its experience and knowledge toward development of their own national fenestration rating process similar to the NFRC's. The broad and diverse membership composition of NFRC allows anyone with a fenestration interest to come forward with an idea or improvement to the entire fenestration community for consideration. The NFRC looks forward to the next several years of growth while remaining the nation's resource for fair, accurate, and credible fenestration product energy ratings. NFRC continues to improve its rating system by considering new research, methodologies, and expanding to include new fenestration products. Currently, NFRC is working towards attachment energy ratings. Attachments are blinds, shades, awnings, and overhangs. Attachments may enable a building to achieve significant energy savings. An NFRC rating will enable fair competition, a basis for code references, and a new ENERGY STAR product category. NFRC also is developing rating methods to consider non specular glazing such as fritted glass. Commercial applications frequently use fritted glazing, but no rating method exists. NFRC is testing new software that may enable this new rating and contribute further to energy conservation. Around the world, many nations are seeking new energy conservation methods and NFRC is poised to harmonize its rating system assisting these nations to better manage and conserve energy in buildings by using NFRC rated and labeled fenestration products. As this report has shown, much more work needs to be done to continues research to improve existing ratings and develop new ones. NFRC needs to continue the work it has begun in several nations to implement the NFRC rating system that has been introduced. Many nations are eager to accept the expertise NFRC can offer to achieve energy conservation goals. NFRC looks forward to a continues partnership with the US Department of Energy to cooperatively achieve both.

  20. Evaluation and Comparison of Test Methods to Measure the Oxidation Stability of Neat Biodiesel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, S. R.

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of this project was to compare and evaluate several candidate test methods for evaluating oxidation stability of biodiesel.

  1. Test method Evaluating the influence of contacting fluids on polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    Test method Evaluating the influence of contacting fluids on polyethylene using acoustic emissions emissions Polyethylene Penetrant Toluene Aqueous detergent a b s t r a c t Identifying microstructural) on the structure of a semi-crystalline polymer (high density polyethylene, HDPE) over different periods of exposure

  2. Test and Evaluation Challenges of Embodied Artificial Intelligence and Robotics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacLennan, Bruce

    Test and Evaluation Challenges of Embodied Artificial Intelligence and Robotics Technical Report UT science, artificial intelligence (AI), and robotics promise a new generation of intelligent agents is an unedited draft of "Challenges of Embodied Artificial Intelligence and Robotics," an article invited

  3. Statistical Tests for Evaluating Earthquake Prediction Kurt S. Riedel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical Tests for Evaluating Earthquake Prediction Methods Kurt S. Riedel Courant Institute unlucky; 2) VAN predictions are anticorrrelated with earthquakes; 3) the MG hypothesis that earthquakes culprit, i.e., many of MG's earthquakes are probably aftershocks which VAN did not try to predict. Note

  4. Statistical Tests for Evaluating Earthquake Prediction Methods Kurt S. Riedel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statistical Tests for Evaluating Earthquake Prediction Methods Kurt S. Riedel Courant Institute are extremely unlucky; 2) VAN predictions are anticorrrelated with earthquakes; 3) the MG hypothesis the likely culprit, i.e., many of MG's earthquakes are probably aftershocks which VAN did not try to predict

  5. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE II TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Stone, M.; Miller, D.

    2014-09-03

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further research and development of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the CEF cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models; ? Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters in support of the melter flammability model development; o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed; o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species. After charging the CEF with cullet from Phase I CEF testing, the melter was slurry-fed with glycolic flowsheet based SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 25 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation parameters and off-gas chemistry. In order to generate off-gas data in support of the flammability model development for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet, vapor space steady state testing in the range of ~300-750°C was conducted under the following conditions, (i) 100% (nominal and excess antifoam levels) and 125% stoichiometry feed and (ii) with and without argon bubbling. Adjustments to feed rate, heater outputs and purge air flow were necessary in order to achieve vapor space temperatures in this range. Surge testing was also completed under nominal conditions for four days with argon bubbling and one day without argon bubbling.

  6. ALTERNATE REDUCTANT COLD CAP EVALUATION FURNACE PHASE I TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, F.; Miller, D.; Zamecnik, J.; Lambert, D.

    2014-04-22

    Savannah River Remediation (SRR) conducted a Systems Engineering Evaluation (SEE) to determine the optimum alternate reductant flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). Specifically, two proposed flowsheets (nitric–formic–glycolic and nitric–formic–sugar) were evaluated based upon results from preliminary testing. Comparison of the two flowsheets among evaluation criteria indicated a preference towards the nitric–formic–glycolic flowsheet. Further evaluation of this flowsheet eliminated the formic acid1, and as a result, the nitric–glycolic flowsheet was recommended for further testing. Based on the development of a roadmap for the nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet, Waste Solidification Engineering (WS-E) issued a Technical Task Request (TTR) to address flammability issues that may impact the implementation of this flowsheet. Melter testing was requested in order to define the DWPF flammability envelope for the nitric glycolic acid flowsheet. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF), a 1/12th scale DWPF melter, was selected by the SRR Alternate Reductant project team as the melter platform for this testing. The overall scope was divided into the following sub-tasks as discussed in the Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP): ? Phase I - A nitric–formic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled) to baseline the Cold Cap Evaluation Furnace (CEF) cold cap and vapor space data to the benchmark melter flammability models ? Phase II - A nitric–glycolic acid flowsheet melter test (unbubbled and bubbled) to: o Define new cold cap reactions and global kinetic parameters for the melter flammability models o Quantify off-gas surging potential of the feed o Characterize off-gas condensate for complete organic and inorganic carbon species Prior to startup, a number of improvements and modifications were made to the CEF, including addition of cameras, vessel support temperature measurement, and a heating element near the pour tube. After charging the CEF with cullet from a previous Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) run, the melter was slurry-fed with SB6-Frit 418 melter feed at 36% waste loading and was operated continuously for 6 days. Process data was collected throughout testing and included melter operation variables and off-gas chemistry. In order to satisfy the objective of Phase I testing, vapor space steady testing in the range of ~300°C-700°C was conducted without argon bubbling to baseline the melter data to the existing DWPF melter flammability model. Adjustments to heater outputs, air flows and feed rate were necessary in order to achieve the vapor space temperatures in this range. The results of the Phase I testing demonstrated that the CEF is capable of operating under the low vapor space temperatures A melter pressure of -5 inches of water was not sustained throughout the run, but the melter did remain slightly negative even with the maximum air flows required for the lowest temperature conditions were used. The auxiliary pour tube heater improved the pouring behavior at all test conditions, including reduced feed rates required for the low vapor space testing. Argon bubbling can be used to promote mixing and increase feed rate at multiple conditions. Improvements due to bubbling have been determined previously; however, the addition of the cameras to the CEF allows for visual observation during a range of bubbling configurations. The off-gas analysis system proved to be robust and capable of operating for long durations. The total operational hours on the melter vessel are approximately 385 hours. Dimensional measurements taken prior to Phase I testing and support block temperatures recorded during Phase I testing are available if an extension of service life beyond 1250 hours is desired in the future.

  7. SHEAR STRENGTH MEASURING EQUIPMENT EVALUATION AT THE COLD TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEACHAM JE

    2009-09-09

    Retrievals under current criteria require that approximately 2,000,000 gallons of double-shell tank (DST) waste storage space not be used to prevent creating new tanks that might be susceptible to buoyant displacement gas release events (BDGRE). New criteria are being evaluated, based on actual sludge properties, to potentially show that sludge wastes do not exhibit the same BDGRE risk. Implementation of the new criteria requires measurement of in situ waste shear strength. Cone penetrometers were judged the best equipment for measuring in situ shear strength and an A.P. van den berg Hyson 100 kN Light Weight Cone Penetrometer (CPT) was selected for evaluation. The CPT was procured and then evaluated at the Hanford Site Cold Test Facility. Evaluation demonstrated that the equipment with minor modification was suitable for use in Tank Farms.

  8. An evaluation of the whole effluent toxicity test method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osteen, D.V.

    1999-12-17

    Whole effluent toxicity (WET) testing has become increasingly more important to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the States in the permitting of wastewater discharges from industry and municipalities. The primary purpose of the WET test is to protect aquatic life by predicting the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream. However, there are both scientific and regulatory concerns that using WET tests to regulate industrial effluents may result in either false positives and/or false negatives. In order to realistically predict the effect of an effluent on the receiving stream, the test should be as representative as possible of the conditions in the receiving stream. Studies (Rand and Petrocelli 1985) suggested several criteria for an ideal aquatic toxicity test organism, one of which is that the organism be indigenous to, or representative of, the ecosystem receiving the effluent. The other component needed in the development of a predictive test is the use of the receiving stream water or similar synthetic water as the control and dilution water in the test method. Use of an indigenous species and receiving water in the test should help reduce the variability in the method and allow the test to predict the effect of the effluent on the receiving stream. The experience with toxicity testing at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has yielded inconclusive data because of the inconsistency and unreliability of the results. The SRS contention is that the WET method in its present form does not adequately mimic actual biological/chemical conditions of the receiving streams and is neither reasonable nor accurate. This paper discusses the rationale for such a position by SRS on toxicity testing in terms of historical permitting requirements, outfall effluent test results, standard test method evaluation, scientific review of alternate test species, and concerns over the test method expressed by other organizations. This paper presents the Savannah River Site position that the EPA test is neither reasonable nor accurate and thus cannot adequately establish the impact of NPDES outfall discharges on receiving streams.

  9. TaC Studios New Construction Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, T.; Curtis, O.; Kim, E.; Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

    2013-03-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with TaC Studios, an Atlanta based architecture firm specializing in residential and light commercial design, on the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA, in the mixed humid climate zone. This home will serve as a model home for the builder partner and addresses Building America energy savings targets through the planning and implementation of a design package will serve as a basis of design for the builder partner’s future homes. As a BA test house, this home will be evaluated to detail whole house energy use, end use loads, and HVAC and hot water efficiency.

  10. CoolCab Test and Evaluation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment ofof Energy Test and Evaluation

  11. Extra-regulatory impact tests and analyses of the structural evaluation test unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludwigsen, J.S.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1995-05-01

    The structural evaluation test unit is roughly equivalent to a 1/3 scale model of a high level waste rail cask. The test unit was designed to just meet the requirements of NRC Regulatory Guide 7.6 when subjected to a 9 m (30 ft) free drop resulting in an impact velocity of 13.4 m/s (30 mph) onto an unyielding target in the end-on orientation. The test unit was then subjected to impacts with higher velocities to determine the amount of built-in conservatism in this design approach. Test impacts of 13.4, 20.1 and 26.8 m/s (30, 45, and 60 mph) were performed. This paper will describe the design, testing, and comparison of measured strains and deformations to the equivalent analytical predictions.

  12. Annual Report New Partners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for industrial catalysis Simple and Safer Processes Skilled Scientists and Engineers Waste Prevention delighted to welcome Reliance Industries Limited and Solvay as our newest indus- try partners. We look

  13. Evaluation of Smart Irrigation Controllers: Initial Bench Testing Results 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swanson, Charles; Fipps, Guy

    2009-01-01

    stream_source_info TR-354 Inital Results-Smart Controller Report 7-16-09.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 20709 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name TR-354 Inital Results-Smart Controller Report 7-16-09.pdf....txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE AND LIFE SCIENCES TR-354 2009 Evaluation of Smart Irrigation Controllers: Initial Bench Testing Results July 2009 By Charles Swanson...

  14. Interim Test Procedures for Evaluating Electrical Performance and Grid Integration of Vehicle-to-Grid Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty, S.; Kramer, W.; Kroposki, B.; Martin, G.; McNutt, P.; Kuss, M.; Markel, T.; Hoke, A.

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a test plan for V2G testing. The test plan is designed to test and evaluate the vehicle's power electronics capability to provide power to the grid, and to evaluate the vehicle's ability to connect and disconnect from the utility according to a subset of the IEEE Std. 1547 tests.

  15. CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle...

  16. Test and Evaluation of the Piccolo Autopilot System on a One-Third Scale Yak-54

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jager, Rylan Walter

    2008-04-30

    dynamic models for a one-third scale Yak-54 are developed. A deliberate and methodical flight test program is developed to evaluate the Piccolo II flight control system. Parameter identification flight tests are performed to evaluate the three modeling...

  17. The use of the hypo-osmotic swelling test, water test, and supravital staining in the evaluation of drone sperm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The use of the hypo-osmotic swelling test, water test, and supravital staining in the evaluation was to investigate the suitability of the water test and hypo-osmotic swelling (HOS) test for analyzing honeybee, after a 60-min incubation. It was observed that subjecting honeybee spermatozoa to a hypo-osmotic

  18. Preliminary safety evaluation of the advanced burner test reactor.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunn, F. E.; Fanning, T. H.; Cahalan, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2006-09-15

    Results of a preliminary safety evaluation of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) pre-conceptual design are reported. The ABTR safety design approach is described. Traditional defense-in-depth design features are supplemented with passive safety performance characteristics that include natural circulation emergency decay heat removal and reactor power reduction by inherent reactivity feedbacks in accidents. ABTR safety performance in design-basis and beyond-design-basis accident sequences is estimated based on analyses. Modeling assumptions and input data for safety analyses are presented. Analysis results for simulation of simultaneous loss of coolant pumping power and normal heat rejection are presented and discussed, both for the case with reactor scram and the case without reactor scram. The analysis results indicate that the ABTR pre-conceptual design is capable of undergoing bounding design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents without fuel cladding failures. The first line of defense for protection of the public against release of radioactivity in accidents remains intact with significant margin. A comparison and evaluation of general safety design criteria for the ABTR conceptual design phase are presented in an appendix. A second appendix presents SASSYS-1 computer code capabilities and modeling enhancements implemented for ABTR analyses.

  19. Evaluating the FITTEST Automated Testing Tools in SOFTEAM: an Industrial Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Evaluating the FITTEST Automated Testing Tools in SOFTEAM: an Industrial Case Study Etienne Brosse shown the ability to automate testing within a real industry case. I. INTRODUCTION Software testing.089 3508 TB Utrecht The Netherlands #12;Evaluating the FITTEST Automated Testing Tools in SOFTEAM

  20. An Initial Industrial Evaluation of Interactive Search-Based Testing for Embedded Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldt, Robert

    An Initial Industrial Evaluation of Interactive Search-Based Testing for Embedded Software Bogdan-based software testing promises the ability to generate and evaluate large numbers of test cases at minimal cost increase in the time and effort required to do so. Search-based software testing, however, is a set

  1. Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Radiation Detection Portal Monitors for Use in Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Radiation Detection Portal Monitors for Use in Homeland..........................................................................................................3 #12;TEST AND EVALUATION PROTOCOL TEP NO. N42.35 PREPARED BY: DIV682 TITLE: Radiation Detection and Evaluation Protocol for Radiation Detection Portal Monitors for Use in Homeland Security 1. Scope

  2. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Maryland...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center Workplace Charging Challenge Partner:...

  3. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bosch Automotive Service...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bosch Automotive Service Solutions, Inc. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bosch Automotive Service Solutions, Inc. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Bosch Automotive...

  4. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa Barbara Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University of California, Santa...

  5. Evaluation of Test Methods for Permeability (Transport) and Development of Performance Guidelines for Durability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    control #12;Project ScopeProject Scope Phase I Literature Review of Concrete Permeability (Transport) Test Procedures and Models that Link Tests with Performance Phase II Evaluate Promising Concrete PermeabilityEvaluation of Test Methods for Permeability (Transport) and Development of Performance Guidelines

  6. Ground test facilities for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, G.C.; Beck, D.F.; Harmon, C.D.; Shipers, L.R.

    1992-08-01

    Interagency panels evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion development options have consistently recognized the need for constructing a major new ground test facility to support fuel element and engine testing. This paper summarizes the requirements, configuration, and design issues of a proposed ground test complex for evaluating nuclear thermal propulsion engines and fuel elements being developed for the Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) program. 2 refs.

  7. Partners | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O StreamsParticipantsParties agree to settlePartnering Middle

  8. Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Steve

    2014-07-29

    this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

  9. Laboratory Evaluation of EGS Shear Stimulation-Test 001

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bauer, Steve

    this is the results of an initial setup-shakedon test in order to develop the plumbing system for this test design. a cylinder of granite with offset holes was jacketed and subjected to confining pressure and low temperature (85C) and pore water pressure. flow through the sample was developed at different test stages.

  10. CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies...

  11. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    Standards for ~sting Solar Collectors and Thermal StorageLBL-6974 Rev. e. ' A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF+ 0.66 Fig. L r2 r2 Solar test collector flow chart. Type

  12. PRESSURE BAG MOLDING: MANUFACTURING, MECHANICAL TESTING, NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION, AND ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PRESSURE BAG MOLDING: MANUFACTURING, MECHANICAL TESTING, NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION, AND ANALYSIS..........................................................................................................4 Pressure Bag Molding-up ..............................................................................................................13 Resin Transfer Molding

  13. TaC Studios New Construction Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butler, T.; Curtis, O.; Kim, E.; Roberts, S.; Stephenson, R.

    2013-03-01

    As part of the NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Southface partnered with TaC Studios, an Atlanta based architecture firm specializing in residential and light commercial design, on the construction of a new test home in Atlanta, GA in the mixed humid climate zone. This home will serve as a model home for the builder partner and addresses Building America energy savings targets through the planning and implementation of a design package will serve as a basis of design for the builder partner's future homes. As a BA test house, this home will be evaluated to detail whole house energy use, end use loads, and HVAC and hot water efficiency.

  14. Evaluation of respirator fit training by quantitative fit testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chute, Daniel Otis

    1981-01-01

    that all respirator wearers be trained and f1t tested. In additiion, as part of a complete respiratory protection program, the effect1veness of resp1rator use training should be appraised at periodic 1ntervals. The purpose of this experiment... of trained individuals was able to significantly improve their measured protection factors when compared to the untrained control group. In addition, when fit tests were re- peated on the same day, the second test resulted in consistently higher scores...

  15. EVALUATION OF THE PEEP INDEX AND RECOMMENDED TOXICITY TESTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a Vancouver storm sewer. A flow-weighte~ composite sample from each site was tested for acute toxicity the mathematicalformula used to derive the index. A battery of bioassays is recommended for use in the FraserRiver Basin tliatthe SOS-Chromotest The test battery is identical to that used for the PEEP index, is replaced

  16. Evaluation of Hedge Effectiveness Tests Angelika C. Hailer, Siegfried M. Rump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rump, Siegfried M.

    framework defined in FAS 133 for US-GAAP (United States Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) and in IAS starts by defining measurable criteria for the evaluation of effec- tiveness tests. These criteriaEvaluation of Hedge Effectiveness Tests Angelika C. Hailer, Siegfried M. Rump Abstract. According

  17. AC 2007-2003: UNDERWATER LEGO ROBOTICS: TESTING, EVALUATION & Adam Carberry, Tufts University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AC 2007-2003: UNDERWATER LEGO ROBOTICS: TESTING, EVALUATION & REDESIGN Adam Carberry, Tufts;Underwater Lego Robotics: Testing, Evaluation & Redesign Abstract In this study, underwater robotics using of how underwater robotics can be used to integrate the engineering design process with related science

  18. Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Backpack-Based Radiation Detection Systems Used for Homeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Backpack- Based Radiation Detection Systems Used for Homeland Radiation Detection Systems Used for Homeland Security EFF. DATE 2013-05-30 REV. 2.00 PAGE 1 of 10 Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Backpack- Based Radiation Detection Systems Used for Homeland Security 1. Scope

  19. Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Alarming Personal Radiation Detectors for Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Requirements [R4] NIST Handbook 150-23, NVLAP Radiation Detection Instruments 3. Compliance Level InformationTesting and Evaluation Protocol for Alarming Personal Radiation Detectors for Homeland Security T Radiation Detectors for Homeland Security EFF. DATE 2013-05-17 REV. 3.00 PAGE 1 of 5 Testing and Evaluation

  20. Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater and Radionuclide Migration in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluating the Effects of Underground Nuclear Testing Below the Water Table on Groundwater, using FEHM, evaluate perturbed groundwater behavior associated with underground nuclear tests to an instantaneous pressurization event caused by a nuclear test when different permeability and porosity

  1. Flight test and evaluation of Omega navigation for general aviation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwoschinsky, Peter V.

    1975-01-01

    A seventy hour flight test program was accomplished to determine the suitability and accuracy of a low cost Omega navigation receiver in a general aviation aircraft. An analysis was made of signal availability in two widely ...

  2. Test evaluation of a laminated wood wind turbine blade concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faddoul, J.R.

    1981-05-01

    Because of the high stiffness and fatigue strength of wood (as compared to density) along with the low cost manufacturing techniques available, a laminated wood wind turbine blade application has been studied. This report presents the results of the testing performed on elements of the wood blade-to-hub transition section which uses steel studs cast into a laminated wood spar with a filled epoxy. Individual stud samples were tested for both ultimate load carrying capability and fatigue strength. A one-time pull-out load of 78,000 lb was achieved for a 15 in. long stud with a diameter of 1 in. Tension-tension fatigue indicated that peak loads on the order of 40% of ultimate could be maintained as an endurance limit (mean load = 20,000 lb, cyclic load = +-15,000 lb). Following the individual stud testing, a full-scale inboard blade section (20 ft in length) was tested.

  3. Testing and evaluation of damaged tubular jacket braces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moehlman, Scott Alan

    1990-01-01

    . In addition, crack growth at welded connections may also occur due to corrosion. Due to the high costs and dire consequences of catastrophic failure of an offshore platform, there exists the need to assess the structural integrity of platforms... will be presented. Experimental results of pure compression tests on undamaged, steel, tubular columns were reported by Bouwkamp (1975). Three fabricated electric-weld pipes and four seamless pipe were used for this study. The specimens were tested in pure...

  4. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels, NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-10-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility and its availability to biofuels' industry partners who want to operate, test, and develop biorefining technology and equipment.

  5. Partnering with the NCPV (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    Brochure that explains the basic partnering opportunities that exist within the National Center for Photovoltaics for industry and university groups: non-proprietary partnering opportunities, competitive solicitations, Technology Partnership Agreements, seed fund to develop Technology Partnership Agreements, Hands-On PV Experience Workshop, and NCPV Fellowship Program.

  6. Evaluation of cement kiln laboratories testing hazardous waste derived fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, R.E.

    1998-12-31

    Cement kiln operators wishing to burn hazardous waste derived fuels in their kilns must submit applications for Resource Conservation Recovery Act permits. One component of each permit application is a site-specific Waste Analysis Plan. These Plans describe the facilities` sampling and analysis procedures for hazardous waste derived fuels prior to receipt and burn. The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted on-site evaluations of several cement kiln facilities that were under consideration for Resource Conservation Recovery Act permits. The purpose of these evaluations was to determine if the on-site sampling and laboratory operations at each facility complied with their site-specific Waste Analysis Plans. These evaluations covered sampling, laboratory, and recordkeeping procedures. Although all the evaluated facilities were generally competent, the results of those evaluations revealed opportunities for improvement at each facility. Many findings were noted for more than one facility. This paper will discuss these findings, particularly those shared by several facilities (specific facilities will not be identified). Among the findings to be discussed are the ways that oxygen bombs were scrubbed and rinsed, the analytical quality control used, Burn Tank sampling, and the analysis of pH in hazardous waste derived fuels.

  7. A Virtual Environment for Protective Relaying Evaluation and Testing A. P. Sakis Meliopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Virtual Environment for Protective Relaying Evaluation and Testing A. P. Sakis Meliopoulos School modules and (d) interfaces to hardware so that testing of actual relaying equipment can be performed. We) design and implementation of multifunctional relays, (b) relay testing for specific disturbances, etc

  8. Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Mobile and Transportable Radiation Monitors Used for Homeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radiation Detection Instruments 3. Compliance Level Information Instrument under test might meet allTesting and Evaluation Protocol for Mobile and Transportable Radiation Monitors Used for Homeland and Transportable Radiation Monitors Used for Homeland Security EFF. DATE 2013-05-28 REV. 2.00 PAGE 1 of 5 Testing

  9. A Comparative Test of Web Accessibility Evaluation Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brajnik, Giorgio

    for usability evaluation methods is likely to re- peat for accessibility: that there is uncertainty about, teams involved in qual- ity assessment, developers) could: 1) optimize resources ex- pended in assessing different levels of qual- ity, require different levels of resources, and differ for their applicability

  10. Evaluation of Integrated High Temperature Component Testing Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafael Soto; David Duncan; Vincent Tonc

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a large-scale component test capability to support the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and their adaptation to commercial applications that advance U.S. energy economy, reliability, and security and reduce carbon emissions.

  11. Testing and evaluation of electrokinetic decontamination of concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePaoli, D.W.; Harris, M.T.; Ally, M.R.

    1996-10-01

    The goals and objectives of the technical task plan (TTP) are to (1) describe the nature and extent of concrete contamination within the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and emerging and commercial technologies applicable to these problems; (2) to match technologies to the concrete problems and recommend up to four demonstrations; (3) to initiate recommended demonstrations; and (4) to continue investigation and evaluation of the application of electrokinetic decontamination processes to concrete. This document presents findings of experimental and theoretical studies of the electrokinetic decontamination (EK) process and their implications for field demonstrations. This effort is an extension of the work performed under TTP 142005, ``Electroosmotic Concrete Decontamination. The goals of this task were to determine the applicability of EK for treating contaminated concrete and, if warranted, to evaluate EK as a potential technology for demonstration. 62 refs.

  12. National SCADA Test Bed Substation Automation Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Barnes; Briam Johnson

    2009-10-01

    Increased awareness of the potential for cyber attack has recently resulted in improved cyber security practices associated with the electrical power grid. However, the level of practical understanding and deployment of cyber security practices has not been evenly applied across all business sectors. Much of the focus has been centered on information technology business centers and control rooms. This report explores the current level of substation automation, communication, and cyber security protection deployed in electrical substations throughout existing utilities in the United States. This report documents the evaluation of substation automation implementation and associated vulnerabilities. This evaluation used research conducted by Newton-Evans Research Company for some of its observations and results. The Newton Evans Report aided in the determination of what is the state of substation automation in North American electric utilities. Idaho National Laboratory cyber security experts aided in the determination of what cyber vulnerabilities may pose a threat to electrical substations. This report includes cyber vulnerabilities as well as recommended mitigations. It also describes specific cyber issues found in typical substation automation configurations within the electric utility industry. The evaluation report was performed over a 5-month period starting in October 2008

  13. Letter report: Evaluation of dryer/calciner technologies for testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sevigny, G.

    1996-02-01

    This letter report describes some past experiences on the drying and calcination of radioactive materials or corresponding simulants; and the information needed from testing. The report also includes an assessment of informational needs including possible impacts to a full-scale plant. This includes reliability, maintenance, and overall size versus throughput. Much of the material was previously compiled and reported by Mike Elliott of PNL {open_quotes}Melter Performance Assessment{close_quotes} and Larry Eisenstatt of SEG on contract to WHC in a letter to Rod Powell. Also, an annotated bibliography was prepared by Reagan Seymour of WHC. Descriptions of the drying and calciner technologies, development status, advantages and disadvantages of using a WFE or calciner, and recommendations for future testing are discussed in this report.

  14. Final report : testing and evaluation for solar hot water reliability.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caudell, Thomas P.; He, Hongbo; Menicucci, David F.; Mammoli, Andrea A.; Burch, Jay

    2011-07-01

    Solar hot water (SHW) systems are being installed by the thousands. Tax credits and utility rebate programs are spurring this burgeoning market. However, the reliability of these systems is virtually unknown. Recent work by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has shown that few data exist to quantify the mean time to failure of these systems. However, there is keen interest in developing new techniques to measure SHW reliability, particularly among utilities that use ratepayer money to pay the rebates. This document reports on an effort to develop and test new, simplified techniques to directly measure the state of health of fielded SHW systems. One approach was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and is based on the idea that the performance of the solar storage tank can reliably indicate the operational status of the SHW systems. Another approach, developed by the University of New Mexico (UNM), uses adaptive resonance theory, a type of neural network, to detect and predict failures. This method uses the same sensors that are normally used to control the SHW system. The NREL method uses two additional temperature sensors on the solar tank. The theories, development, application, and testing of both methods are described in the report. Testing was performed on the SHW Reliability Testbed at UNM, a highly instrumented SHW system developed jointly by SNL and UNM. The two methods were tested against a number of simulated failures. The results show that both methods show promise for inclusion in conventional SHW controllers, giving them advanced capability in detecting and predicting component failures.

  15. Partnering for success: Industrial technologies program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2004-02-01

    Partnering for Success features the R&D and industrial energy management best practices and accomplishments of manufacturers who are partnering with DOE.

  16. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Purchase College, State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Purchase College, State University of New York Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Purchase College, State University of New York Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Purchase...

  17. Office of Test and Evaluation | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSEHowScientific andComplexOffice ofOffice| OfficeTest

  18. Transforming the DoD test and evaluation enterprise to enable unmanned autonomous systems of systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowart, Karl K., 1975-

    2011-01-01

    Many US Department of Defense (DoD) systems operate within a systems of systems construct, which present many challenges and will be ever increasing for test and evaluation of unmanned autonomous systems of systems. ...

  19. Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-01

    Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

  20. Test and Evaluation of a SoS using a Prescriptive and Adaptive Testing Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hess, John T.

    2010-06-22

    Testers need the ability to adapt test planning on the order of days and weeks. PATFrame will use its reasoning engine to prescribe the most effective strategies for the situation at hand. Strategies in this context include ...

  1. Development and evaluation of measurement devices used to support testing of radioactive material transportation packages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uncapher, W. L.; Ammerman, D. J.; Stenberg, D.R.; Bronowski, D. R.; Arviso, M.

    1992-01-01

    Radioactive material package designers use structural testing to verify and demonstrate package performance. A major part of evaluating structural response is the collection of instrumentation measurement data. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has an ongoing program to develop and evaluate measurement devices to support testing of radioactive material packages. Measurement devices developed in support of this activity include evaluation channels, ruggedly constructed linear variable differential transformers, and piezoresistive accelerometers with enhanced measurement capabilities. In addition to developing measurement devices, a method has been derived to evaluate accelerometers and strain gages for measurement repeatability, ruggedness, and manufacturers' calibration data under both laboratory and field conditions. The developed measurement devices and evaluation technique will be discussed and the results of the evaluation will be presented.

  2. Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Portable Radiation Detection Instrumentation for Homeland Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Portable Radiation Detection Instrumentation for Homeland and Evaluation Protocol for Portable Radiation Detection Instrumentation for Homeland Security 1. Scope with the following documents: [R1] ANSI N42.33, "American National Standard for Portable Radiation Detection

  3. Test method development for evaluating the freeze-thaw performance of segmental retaining wall blocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoelscher, Aaron Kindall

    2007-04-25

    for evaluating the freeze-thaw durability of SRW blocks has several drawbacks and does not accurately replicate environmental exposure field conditions. The objective of this research is to develop and assess a new standard test method for evaluating the freeze...

  4. The Mechanical Test Laboratory provides the highest standards in static and fatigue testing for composites and metals to generate material strength allowables and evaluate material properties.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Mechanical Test Laboratory provides the highest standards in static and fatigue testing for composites and metals to generate material strength allowables and evaluate material properties. MECHANICAL TEST LAB CAPABILITIES · Static and cyclic testing (ASTM and non-standard) · Impact drop testing · Slow

  5. Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Spectroscopic Personal Radiation Detectors (SPRDs) for Homeland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Procedures and General Requirements [R4] NIST Handbook 150-23, NVLAP Radiation Detection Instruments 3Testing and Evaluation Protocol for Spectroscopic Personal Radiation Detectors (SPRDs) for Homeland Radiation Detectors (SPRDs) for Homeland Security. EFF. DATE 2013-05-30 REV. 2.00 PAGE 1 of 5 Testing

  6. Low-Level waste phase 1 melter testing off gas and mass balance evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N.

    1996-06-28

    Commercially available melter technologies were tested during 1994-95 as part of a multiphase program to test candidate technologies for vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream to be derived from retrieval and pretreatment of Hanford Site tank wastes. Seven vendors were selected for Phase 1 testing to demonstrate vitrification of a high sodium content liquid LLW simulant. The tested melter technologies included four Joule-heated melters, a carbon electrode melter, a combustion melter, and a plasma melter. Various dry and slurry melter feed preparation processes were also tested. Various feed material samples, product glass samples, and process offgas streams were characterized to provide data for evaluation of process decontamination factors and material mass balances for each vitrification technology. This report describes the melter mass balance evaluations and results for six of the Phase 1 LLW melter vendor demonstration tests.

  7. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Northwest Evaluation Association

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'SEnergyof Energy JLANetApp Workplace

  8. Evaluation and Testing of the ADVANTG Code on SNM Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaver, Mark W.; Casella, Andrew M.; Wittman, Richard S.; Hayes, John W.

    2013-09-24

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been tasked with evaluating the effectiveness of ORNL’s new hybrid transport code, ADVANTG, on scenarios of interest to our NA-22 sponsor, specifically of detection of diversion of special nuclear material (SNM). PNNL staff have determined that acquisition and installation of ADVANTG was relatively straightforward for a code in its phase of development, but probably not yet sufficient for mass distribution to the general user. PNNL staff also determined that with little effort, ADVANTG generated weight windows that typically worked for the problems and generated results consistent with MCNP. With slightly greater effort of choosing a finer mesh around detectors or sample reaction tally regions, the figure of merit (FOM) could be further improved in most cases. This does take some limited knowledge of deterministic transport methods. The FOM could also be increased by limiting the energy range for a tally to the energy region of greatest interest. It was then found that an MCNP run with the full energy range for the tally showed improved statistics in the region used for the ADVANTG run. The specific case of interest chosen by the sponsor is the CIPN project from Las Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), which is an active interrogation, non-destructive assay (NDA) technique to quantify the fissile content in a spent fuel assembly and is also sensitive to cases of material diversion. Unfortunately, weight windows for the CIPN problem cannot currently be properly generated with ADVANTG due to inadequate accommodations for source definition. ADVANTG requires that a fixed neutron source be defined within the problem and cannot account for neutron multiplication. As such, it is rendered useless in active interrogation scenarios. It is also interesting to note that this is a difficult problem to solve and that the automated weight windows generator in MCNP actually slowed down the problem. Therefore, PNNL had determined that there is not an effective tool available for speeding up MCNP for problems such as the CIPN scenario. With regard to the Benchmark scenarios, ADVANTG performed very well for most of the difficult, long-running, standard radiation detection scenarios. Specifically, run time speedups were observed for spatially large scenarios, or those having significant shielding or scattering geometries. ADVANTG performed on par with existing codes for moderate sized scenarios, or those with little to moderate shielding, or multiple paths to the detectors. ADVANTG ran slower than MCNP for very simply, spatially small cases with little to no shielding that run very quickly anyway. Lastly, ADVANTG could not solve problems that did not consist of fixed source to detector geometries. For example, it could not solve scenarios with multiple detectors or secondary particles, such as active interrogation, neutron induced gamma, or fission neutrons.

  9. Report on the evaluation of the tritium producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the design and fabrication requirements for a tritium-producing burnable absorber rod lead test assembly and evaluates the safety issues associated with tritium-producing burnable absorber rod irradiation on the operation of a commercial light water reactor. The report provides an evaluation of the tritium-producing burnable absorber rod design and concludes that irradiation can be performed within U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations applicable to a commercial pressurized light water reactor.

  10. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A Type A Packaging. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-30

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 49, Part 178 (49 CFR 178). The program is currently administered by the DOE, Office of Facility Safety Analysis, DOE/EH-32, at DOE-Headquarters (DOE-HQ) in Germantown, Maryland. This document summarizes the evaluation and testing performed for all of the packagings successfully qualified in this program.

  11. HR Partners: Checklist, Forms & Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    HR Partners: Checklist, Forms & Reports VCU Human Resources September 17 & 18 #12;Agenda Opening the new 29 Hour Reporting Tool Share the "The Happenings" Clarify the purpose & execution of Separation;Our Session #12;Our Session 2. Outline how to document, report and adjust staff hours impacted

  12. Evaluation of the Start-Up Core Physics Tests at Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (Annular Core Loadings)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2010-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The Japanese government approved construction of the HTTR in the 1989 fiscal year budget; construction began at the Oarai Research and Development Center in March 1991 and was completed May 1996. Fuel loading began July 1, 1998, from the core periphery. The first criticality was attained with an annular core on November 10, 1998 at 14:18, followed by a series of start-up core physics tests until a fully-loaded core was developed on December 16, 1998. Criticality tests were carried out into January 1999. The first full power operation with an average core outlet temperature of 850ºC was completed on December 7, 2001, and operational licensing of the HTTR was approved on March 6, 2002. The HTTR attained high temperature operation at 950 ºC in April 19, 2004. After a series of safety demonstration tests, it will be used as the heat source in a hydrogen production system by 2015. Hot zero-power critical, rise-to-power, irradiation, and safety demonstration testing , have also been performed with the HTTR, representing additional means for computational validation efforts. Power tests were performed in steps from 0 to 30 MW, with various tests performed at each step to confirm core characteristics, thermal-hydraulic properties, and radiation shielding. The high-temperature test operation at 950 ºC represented the fifth and final phase of the rise-to-power tests. The safety tests demonstrated inherent safety features of the HTTR such as slow temperature response during abnormal events due to the large heat capacity of the core and the negative reactivity feedback. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for the annular core criticals from the initial six isothermal, annular and fully-loaded, core critical measurements performed at the HTTR. Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core is compiled elsewhere (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001).

  13. TEP Power Partners Project [Tucson Electric Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-19

    The Arizona Governor’s Office of Energy Policy, in partnership with Tucson Electric Power (TEP), Tendril, and Next Phase Energy (NPE), formed the TEP Power Partners pilot project to demonstrate how residential customers could access their energy usage data and third party applications using data obtained from an Automatic Meter Reading (AMR) network. The project applied for and was awarded a Smart Grid Data Access grant through the U.S. Department of Energy. The project participants’ goal for Phase I is to actively engage 1,700 residential customers to demonstrate sustained participation, reduction in energy usage (kWh) and cost ($), and measure related aspects of customer satisfaction. This Demonstration report presents a summary of the findings, effectiveness, and customer satisfaction with the 15-month TEP Power Partners pilot project. The objective of the program is to provide residential customers with energy consumption data from AMR metering and empower these participants to better manage their electricity use. The pilot recruitment goals included migrating 700 existing customers from the completed Power Partners Demand Response Load Control Project (DRLC), and enrolling 1,000 new participants. Upon conclusion of the project on November 19, 2013: ? 1,390 Home Area Networks (HANs) were registered. ? 797 new participants installed a HAN. ? Survey respondents’ are satisfied with the program and found value with a variety of specific program components. ? Survey respondents report feeling greater control over their energy usage and report taking energy savings actions in their homes after participating in the program. ? On average, 43 % of the participants returned to the web portal monthly and 15% returned weekly. ? An impact evaluation was completed by Opinion Dynamics and found average participant savings for the treatment period1 to be 2.3% of their household use during this period.2 In total, the program saved 163 MWh in the treatment period of 2013.

  14. Top partner probes of extended Higgs sectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearney, John

    Natural theories of the weak scale often include fermionic partners of the top quark. If the electroweak symmetry breaking sector contains scalars beyond a single Higgs doublet, then top partners can have sizable branching ...

  15. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Sierra Nevada Brewing Co...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Sierra Nevada Brewing Co. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Sierra Nevada...

  16. Long-term leaching test of incinerator bottom ash: Evaluation of Cu partition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Cheng-Fang Wu, Chung-Hsin; Liu, Yen-Chiun

    2007-07-01

    Two types of leaching tests were performed on the bottom ash from municipal solid waste incinerators. A short-term batch test specified by the America Nuclear Society (ANS) and long-term column tests with acetic acid (pH 5.2) as leaching solution were used to evaluate copper leachability. The Cu leaching after the 5-d ANS test is about 1% of the original Cu content of 5300 mg/kg. Upon addition of a stabilizing agent, the Cu leaching quantity is reduced; the extent of reduction depends on the type of chemical used (phosphate, carbonate and sulfide). The 1.6% Na{sub 2}S addition showed negligible Cu leaching, and Na{sub 2}S was, therefore, used in subsequent column tests. The 30-d column test indicates a steady increase of Cu leaching amount with time and reaches about 1.5% of the original Cu content after 30 d. A 180-d column test further increased the Cu leaching to about 5.1% of the original Cu content, whereas no appreciable Cu leaching was found with the addition of 1.6% Na{sub 2}S. A sequential extraction was conducted on the raw ash, ash with the addition of Na{sub 2}S and the residue ash after 30 d of operation to characterize Cu affinity for different solid fractions. The data were used to evaluate the fate of Cu through these interactions.

  17. Thesis: Modeling and Evaluation of the NIST Net Zero Energy Residential Test Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ;Motivation · The residential sector consumes over 20% of the total energy use in the U.S. · Net zero energy buildings reduce energy consumption and reduce dependence on non- renewable energy sources. · As interestThesis: Modeling and Evaluation of the NIST Net Zero Energy Residential Test Facility Liz Balke M

  18. Flight Test Evaluation of a Prototype Optical Instrument for Airborne Sense-and-Avoid Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hornsey, Richard

    Flight Test Evaluation of a Prototype Optical Instrument for Airborne Sense-and-Avoid Applications sense-and-avoid instrument was constructed from low-cost commercial off-the- shelf components 205 and the Bell 206 (intruder aircraft) were fully instrumented to record position and orientation

  19. CONE PENETRATION TESTING AND SITE EXPLORATION IN EVALUATING THE LIQUEFACTION RESISTANCE OF SANDS AND SILTY SANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONE PENETRATION TESTING AND SITE EXPLORATION IN EVALUATING THE LIQUEFACTION RESISTANCE OF SANDS the magnitude of earthquake- induced shear stresses in a natural soil deposit. These seismically-induced shear resistance for this purpose. The seismic shear stress ratio (SSR) is calculated as described by

  20. Second Line of Defense, Megaports Initiative, Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Jamie D.

    2012-05-30

    The purpose of the Operational Testing and Evaluation (OT&E) phases of the project is to prepare for turnover of the Megaports System supplied by U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA)—located at the Export Lanes of the Port of Lazaro Cardenas, Mexico—to the Government of Mexico (GOM).

  1. A Taxonomy of Buffer Overflows for Evaluating Static and Dynamic Software Testing Tools*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Taxonomy of Buffer Overflows for Evaluating Static and Dynamic Software Testing Tools* Kendra Phone: 7819812711 Email: LIPPMANN@LL.MIT.EDU ABSTRACT A taxonomy that uses 22 attributes detection tools. Attributes in the taxonomy include the buffer location (e.g. stack, heap, data

  2. Test and evaluation document for DOT Specification 7A type A packaging. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D L

    1997-08-04

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has been conducting, through several of its operating contractors, an evaluation and testing program to qualify Type A radioactive material packagings per US Department of Transportation (DOT) Specification 7A (DOT-7A) of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 49, Part 178 (49 CFR 178). This document summarizes the evaluation and testing performed for all of the packagings successfully qualified in this program. This document supersedes DOE Evaluation Document for DOT-7A Type A Packaging (Edling 1987), originally issued in 1987 by Monsanto Research Corporation Mound Laboratory (MLM), Miamisburg, Ohio, for the Department of Energy, Security Evaluation Program (I)P-4. Mound Laboratory issued four revisions to the document between November 1988 and December 1989. In September 1989, the program was transferred to Westinghouse Hanford Company (Westinghouse Hanford) in Richland, Washington. One additional revision was issued in March 1990 by Westinghouse Hanford. This revision reflects the earlier material and incorporates a number of changes. Evaluation and testing activities on 1208 three DOT-7A Program Dockets resulted in the qualification of three new packaging configurations, which are incorporated herein and summarized. This document presents approximately 300 different packagings that have been determined to meet the requirements for a DOT-7A, type A packaging per 49 CFR 178.350.

  3. Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact, Chapter 6 from the Clean Energy Finance Guide, Third Edition

  4. Letters of Outreach to Partner Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Letters of Outreach to Partner Communities, from the Tool Kit Framework: Small Town University Energy Program (STEP).

  5. Second generation sodium heat pipe receiver for a USAB V-160 Stirling engine: Evaluation of on-sun test results using the proposed IEA guidelines and analysis of heat pipe damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laing, D.; Traebing, C.

    1997-11-01

    Dish/Stirling technology has demonstrated the highest conversion efficiencies of all solar thermal conversion systems. At the DLR a second generation sodium heat pipe receiver for the Schlaich Bergermann und Partner (SBP) 9-kW{sub e} dish/Stirling system has been developed and constructed. Long-term operation occurred from Oct. 1992 until Aug. 1993 at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain, accumulating 950 operating hours. The performance of the SBP 9-kW{sub e} system with a sodium heat pipe receiver is evaluated according to the guidelines for dish/Stirling performance evaluation by Stine and Powel, as proposed to the International Energy Agency (IEA). Tests were stopped due to a leak in the receiver absorber surface. The analysis of this damage is reported.

  6. Evaluation of Fluid Conduction and Mixing within a Subassembly of the Actinide Burner Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cliff B. Davis

    2007-09-01

    The RELAP5-3D code is being considered as a thermal-hydraulic system code to support the development of the sodium-cooled Actinide Burner Test Reactor as part of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. An evaluation was performed to determine whether the control system could be used to simulate the effects of non-convective mechanisms of heat transport in the fluid, including axial and radial heat conduction and subchannel mixing, that are not currently represented with internal code models. The evaluation also determined the relative importance of axial and radial heat conduction and fluid mixing on peak cladding temperature for a wide range of steady conditions and during a representative loss-of-flow transient. The evaluation was performed using a RELAP5-3D model of a subassembly in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II, which was used as a surrogate for the Actinide Burner Test Reactor.

  7. Human perceptual deficits as factors in computer interface test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowser, S.E.

    1992-06-01

    Issues related to testing and evaluating human computer interfaces are usually based on the machine rather than on the human portion of the computer interface. Perceptual characteristics of the expected user are rarely investigated, and interface designers ignore known population perceptual limitations. For these reasons, environmental impacts on the equipment will more likely be defined than will user perceptual characteristics. The investigation of user population characteristics is most often directed toward intellectual abilities and anthropometry. This problem is compounded by the fact that some deficits capabilities tend to be found in higher-than-overall population distribution in some user groups. The test and evaluation community can address the issue from two primary aspects. First, assessing user characteristics should be extended to include tests of perceptual capability. Secondly, interface designs should use multimode information coding.

  8. Testing and evaluation of large-area heliostats for solar thermal applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strachan, J.W.; Houser, R.M.

    1993-02-01

    Two heliostats representing the state-of-the-art in glass-metal designs for central receiver (and photovoltaic tracking) applications were tested and evaluated at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico from 1986 to 1992. These heliostats have collection areas of 148 and 200 m{sup 2} and represent low-cost designs for heliostats that employ glass-metal mirrors. The evaluation encompassed the performance and operational characteristics of the heliostats, and examined heliostat beam quality, the effect of elevated winds on beam quality, heliostat drives and controls, mirror module reflectance and durability, and the overall operational and maintenance characteristics of the two heliostats. A comprehensive presentation of the results of these and other tests is presented. The results are prefaced by a review of the development (in the United States) of heliostat technology.

  9. Technology Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)ModelTalbottsInformation ResearchPartners Jump to:

  10. Development and Test Evaluations for Ni-DOBDC Metal Organic Framework (MOF) Engineered Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troy G. Garn; Mitchell Greenhalgh

    2013-07-01

    A joint effort to prepare engineered forms of a Ni-DOBDC metal organic framework (MOF) was completed with contributions from PNNL, SNL and the INL. Two independent methods were used at INL and SNL to prepare engineered form (EF) sorbents from Ni-DOBDC MOF powder developed and prepared at PNNL. Xe and Kr capacity test evaluations were performed at ambient temperature with the cryostat experimental setup at INL. The initial INL EF MOF test results indicated a Xe capacity of 1.6 mmol/kg sorbent and no Kr capacity. A large loss of surface area also occurred during minimal testing rendering the INL EF MOF unusable. Four capacity tests were completed using the SNL EF MOF at ambient temperature and resulted in Xe capacities of 1.4, 4.2, 5.0 and 3.8 mmol/kg sorbent with no Kr capacity observed in any ambient temperature tests. Two additional capacity tests were performed at 240 K to further evaluate SNL EF MOF performance. Xe capacities of 50.7 and 49.3 mmol/kg of sorbent and Kr capacities of 0.77 and 0.69 mmol/kg of sorbent were obtained, respectively. Following the adsorption evaluations, the SNL EF MOF material had lost about 40 % of the initial mass and 40 % of the initial surface area. In general, the Xe capacity results at ambient temperature for the INL and SNL EF Ni-DOBDC MOF’s were lower than 9.8 mmol Xe/kg sorbent test results reported by INL in FY-12 using PNNL’s inital EF supplied material.

  11. GSA's Green Proving Ground: Identifying, Testing and Evaluating Innovative Technologies; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Lowell, M.

    2012-05-01

    This paper will provide an overview of the GPG program and its objectives as well as a summary and status update of the 16 technologies selected for enhanced testing and evaluation in 2011. The federal government's General Services Administration's (GSA) Public Buildings Service (PBS) acquires space on behalf of the federal government through new construction and leasing, and acts as a caretaker for federal properties across the country. PBS owns or leases 9,624 assets and maintains an inventory of more than 370.2 million square feet of workspace, and as such has enormous potential for implementing energy efficient and renewable energy technologies to reduce energy and water use and associated emissions. The Green Proving Ground (GPG) program utilizes GSA's real estate portfolio to test and evaluate innovative and underutilized sustainable building technologies and practices. Findings are used to support the development of GSA performance specifications and inform decision making within GSA, other federal agencies, and the real estate industry. The program aims to drive innovation in environmental performance in federal buildings and help lead market transformation through deployment of new technologies. In 2011, the GPG program selected 16 technologies or practices for rigorous testing and evaluation. Evaluations are currently being performed in collaboration with the Department of Energy's National Laboratories, and a steady stream of results will be forthcoming throughout 2012. This paper will provide an overview of the GPG program and its objectives as well as a summary and status update of the 16 technologies selected for enhanced testing and evaluation in 2011. Lastly, it provides a general overview of the 2012 program.

  12. A utility evaluation of nondestructive testing devices used on asphalt concrete pavements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffels, Shelley Marie

    1986-01-01

    defined . Weighting factors are developed using the Churchman-Ackoff technique. The analysis is performed under uncertainty using a beta probability distribution. The calculations are performed using a computer program. The results are expressed... in terms of an expected value and a 95f confidence interval. Fifteen nondestructive testing devices are evaluated for use for both project-level design and network-level planning on asphalt concrete pavements. These devices are described in detail...

  13. GSA's Green Proving Ground: Identifying, Testing and Evaluating Innovative Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Lowell, M.

    2012-05-01

    GSA's Green Proving Ground (GPG) program utilizes GSA's real estate portfolio to test and evaluate innovative and underutilized sustainable building technologies and practices. Findings are used to support the development of GSA performance specifications and inform decision making within GSA, other federal agencies, and the real estate industry. The program aims to drive innovation in environmental performance in federal buildings and help lead market transformation through deployment of new technologies.

  14. CoolCab Test and Evaluation and CoolCalc HVAC Tool Development | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment ofof Energy Test and Evaluation and

  15. Grid Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New PagesInformation RegionalGreenvironmentNet Jump to:Partners

  16. Standard Test Method for Mechanical Hydrogen Embrittlement Evaluation of Plating/Coating Processes and Service Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes mechanical test methods and defines acceptance criteria for coating and plating processes that can cause hydrogen embrittlement in steels. Subsequent exposure to chemicals encountered in service environments, such as fluids, cleaning treatments or maintenance chemicals that come in contact with the plated/coated or bare surface of the steel, can also be evaluated. 1.2 This test method is not intended to measure the relative susceptibility of different steels. The relative susceptibility of different materials to hydrogen embrittlement may be determined in accordance with Test Method F1459 and Test Method F1624. 1.3 This test method specifies the use of air melted AISI E4340 steel per SAE AMS-S-5000 (formerly MIL-S-5000) heat treated to 260 – 280 ksi (pounds per square inch x 1000) as the baseline. This combination of alloy and heat treat level has been used for many years and a large database has been accumulated in the aerospace industry on its specific response to exposure...

  17. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part I. chemically generated precipitates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahn, C. B.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K.; Klein, P.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-12-01

    The purpose of the current program was to evaluate the properties of chemical precipitates proposed by industry that have been used in sump strainer head loss testing. Specific precipitates that were evaluated included aluminum oxyhydroxide (AlOOH) and sodium aluminum silicate (SAS) prepared according to the procedures in WCAP-16530-NP, along with precipitates formed from injecting chemicals into the test loop according to the procedure used by one sump strainer test vendor for U.S. pressurized water reactors. The settling rates of the surrogate precipitates are strongly dependent on their particle size and are reasonably consistent with those expected from Stokes Law or colloid aggregation models. Head loss tests showed that AlOOH and SAS surrogates are quite effective in increasing the head loss across a perforated pump inlet strainer that has an accumulated fibrous debris bed. The characteristics of aluminum hydroxide precipitate using sodium aluminate were dependent on whether it was formed in high-purity or ordinary tap water and whether excess silicate was present or not.

  18. Laboratory testing and modeling to evaluate perfluorocarbon compounds as tracers in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-21

    The thermal stability and adsorption characteristics of three perfluorinated hydrocarbon compounds were evaluated under geothermal conditions to determine the potential to use these compounds as conservative or thermally-degrading tracers in Engineered (or Enhanced) Geothermal Systems (EGS). The three compounds tested were perfluorodimethyl-cyclobutane (PDCB), perfluoromethylcyclohexane (PMCH), and perfluorotrimethylcyclohexane (PTCH), which are collectively referred to as perfluorinated tracers, or PFTs. Two sets of duplicate tests were conducted in batch mode in gold-bag reactors, with one pair of reactors charged with a synthetic geothermal brine containing the PFTs and a second pair was charged with the brine-PFT mixture plus a mineral assemblage chosen to be representative of activated fractures in an EGS reservoir. A fifth reactor was charged with deionized water containing the three PFTs. The experiments were conducted at {approx}100 bar, with temperatures ranging from 230 C to 300 C. Semi-analytical and numerical modeling was also conducted to show how the PFTs could be used in conjunction with other tracers to interrogate surface area to volume ratios and temperature profiles in EGS reservoirs. Both single-well and cross-hole tracer tests are simulated to illustrate how different suites of tracers could be used to accomplish these objectives. The single-well tests are especially attractive for EGS applications because they allow the effectiveness of a stimulation to be evaluated without drilling a second well.

  19. Final evaluation & test report for the standard waste box (docket 01-53-7A) type A packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY, D L

    2001-10-15

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A compliance test and evaluation results of the Standard Waste Box. Testing and evaluation activities documented herein are on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters, Office of Safety, Health and Security (EM-5), Germantown, Maryland. Duratek Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations performed an evaluation of the changes as documented herein under Docket 01-53-7A.

  20. Scaled Testing to Evaluate Pulse Jet Mixer Performance in Waste Treatment Plant Mixing Vessels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Bamberger, Judith A.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Scott, Paul A.; Minette, Michael J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

    2010-03-07

    The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford is being designed and built to pre-treat and vitrify the waste in Hanford’s 177 underground waste storage tanks. Numerous process vessels will hold waste at various stages in the WTP. These vessels have pulse jet mixer (PJM) systems. A test program was developed to evaluate the adequacy of mixing system designs in the solids-containing vessels in the WTP. The program focused mainly on non-cohesive solids behavior. Specifically, the program addressed the effectiveness of the mixing systems to suspend settled solids off the vessel bottom, and distribute the solids vertically. Experiments were conducted at three scales using various particulate simulants. A range of solids loadings and operational parameters were evaluated, including jet velocity, pulse volume, and duty cycle. In place of actual PJMs, the tests used direct injection from tubes with suction at the top of the tank fluid. This gave better control over the discharge duration and duty cycle and simplified the facility requirements. The mixing system configurations represented in testing varied from 4 to 12 PJMs with various jet nozzle sizes. In this way the results collected could be applied to the broad range of WTP vessels with varying geometrical configurations and planned operating conditions. Data for “just-suspended velocity”, solids cloud height, and solids concentration vertical profile were collected, analyzed, and correlated. The correlations were successfully benchmarked against previous large-scale test results, then applied to the WTP vessels using reasonable assumptions of anticipated waste properties to evaluate adequacy of the existing mixing system designs.

  1. New test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the residential building retrofit market.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the residential the Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), a method for diagnosing and correcting physics and utility bill calibration test cases, which soft- ware developers can use to compare

  2. An Evaluation of Differential Evolution in Software Test Data R. Landa Becerra, R. Sagarna and X. Yao, Fellow, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    tests are designed with the purpose of fulfilling particular adequacy criteria. For instance, branch results in a inherently high selection pressure. We build a test data generator which employs DE to solveAn Evaluation of Differential Evolution in Software Test Data Generation R. Landa Becerra, R

  3. Testing for Suspected Impairments and Dissociations in Single-Case Studies in Neuropsychology: Evaluation of Alternatives Using Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, John R.

    Testing for Suspected Impairments and Dissociations in Single-Case Studies in Neuropsychology: Evaluation of Alternatives Using Monte Carlo Simulations and Revised Tests for Dissociations John R. Crawford, a patient is compared with a small control sample. Methods of testing for a deficit on Task X

  4. BENCHMARK EVALUATION OF THE INITIAL ISOTHERMAL PHYSICS MEASUREMENTS AT THE FAST FLUX TEST FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Darrell Bess

    2010-05-01

    The benchmark evaluation of the initial isothermal physics tests performed at the Fast Flux Test Facility, in support of Fuel Cycle Research and Development and Generation-IV activities at the Idaho National Laboratory, has been completed. The evaluation was performed using MCNP5 with ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data libraries and according to guidelines provided for inclusion in the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project Handbook. Results provided include evaluation of the initial fully-loaded core critical, two neutron spectra measurements near the axial core center, 32 reactivity effects measurements (21 control rod worths, two control rod bank worths, six differential control rod worths, two shutdown margins, and one excess reactivity), isothermal temperature coefficient, and low-energy electron and gamma spectra measurements at the core center. All measurements were performed at 400 ºF. There was good agreement between the calculated and benchmark values for the fully-loaded core critical eigenvalue, reactivity effects measurements, and isothermal temperature coefficient. General agreement between benchmark experiment measurements and calculated spectra for neutrons and low-energy gammas at the core midplane exists, but calculations of the neutron spectra below the core and the low-energy gamma spectra at core midplane did not agree well. Homogenization of core components may have had a significant impact upon computational assessment of these effects. Future work includes development of a fully-heterogeneous model for comprehensive evaluation. The reactor physics measurement data can be used in nuclear data adjustment and validation of computational methods for advanced fuel cycle and nuclear reactor systems using Liquid Metal Fast Reactor technology.

  5. Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Peer Exchange Call Series: Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity, Call Slides and Summary, May 8, 2014. Call Slides and Summary More Documents &...

  6. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: Vermont Energy Investment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Information VEIC's Mission Workplace Charging News June 23, 2014 VEIC now an EV Everywhere Workplace Charging Challenge Partner The use of Electric Vehicles (EVs) is...

  7. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group Utility Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) utility partners are eager to work closely with Federal agencies to help achieve energy management goals.

  8. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) plutonium recycle test reactor graphite cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romano, T.

    1997-09-29

    This safety evaluation for packaging (SEP) provides the evaluation necessary to demonstrate that the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) Graphite Cask meets the requirements of WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping, for transfer of Type B, fissile, non-highway route controlled quantities of radioactive material within the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The scope of this SEP includes risk, shieldling, criticality, and.tiedown analyses to demonstrate that onsite transportation safety requirements are satisfied. This SEP also establishes operational and maintenance guidelines to ensure that transport of the PRTR Graphite Cask is performed safely in accordance with WHC-CM-2-14. This SEP is valid until October 1, 1999. After this date, an update or upgrade to this document is required.

  9. Development and test case application of a waste minimization project evaluation method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kjeldgaard, E.A. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Saloio, J.H.; Varnado, G.B. (ERC Environmental and Energy Services Co., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-08-01

    The authors have developed and applied a methodology to evaluate and prioritize proposed waste minimization activities affecting Department of Energy (DOE) programs. The approach provides a systematic and defensible method for selecting a set of waste minimization proposals that maximizes the benefits to DOE while maintaining costs within a specified budget. The report discusses the development of a structured set of evaluation criteria to characterize waste minimization issues; techniques for documenting the anticipated and potential costs, risks, and benefits of waste minimization proposals; and a method of translating disparate data into a figure of merit for each proposal. A test case demonstration of this prioritization approach was applied to proposals currently being considered at two DOE weapons production facilities. Recommendations are provided for combining this approach with the existing DOE proposal selection process. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors' designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550[degree]F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100[degree]F lower.

  11. Evaluation of cobalt mobility in soils from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papelis, C.

    1996-09-01

    Nuclear testing at and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) resulted in widespread contamination from transuranic and other radionuclides, as well as from other toxic inorganic and organic contaminants. The type of contamination, including spatial distribution and type of radionuclides present, depends on the type of testing performed. Remediation of the contaminated areas is currently under way. The optimum in situ or ex situ remediation technology depends on the degree of interaction between the particular radionuclide, or contaminant in general, and the soil matrix, among other factors. The objective of this project was to evaluate the sorption affinity of NTS soils for common non-transuranic radionuclides. The sorption of cobalt (Co) on soils from two different areas of the NTS, namely the Little Feller and Cabriolet event sites, was studied. Experiments were conducted as a function of pH, solid concentration, total Co concentration, ionic strength, and particle size fraction. Preliminary results indicate that both soils have a high sorption capacity for Co. The results suggest that Co uptake is controlled by sorption on either internal, permanent-charge, ion-exchange sites of clay minerals or on amphoteric, surface-hydroxyl sites of oxides. The results further indicate strong retardation of Co in these soils, under most conditions tested and expected to be found in the respective soil environments. These conclusions are applicable to transport of radionuclides which are expected to bind strongly on oxide surfaces (e.g., Co) but the results may not be representative of the behavior of weakly binding radionuclides. These studies clearly demonstrate the importance of evaluating the mobility of radionuclides and the degree of radionuclide-soil interaction before final selection of an in situ or ex situ remediation technology for a contaminated site.

  12. Odd Top Partners at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archana Anandakrishnan; Jack H. Collins; Marco Farina; Eric Kuflik; Maxim Perelstein

    2015-06-16

    LHC searches for fermionic top partners $T$ focus on three decay topologies: $T\\to bW$, $T\\to tZ$, and $T\\to th$. However, top partners may carry new conserved quantum numbers that forbid these decays. The simplest possibility is a conserved parity, under which the top partner is odd and all SM states are even. In this case, decays of top partners may involve new particle-odd scalars, leading to signal topologies more commonly associated with supersymmetry, either with or without R-parity conservation. We study a simplified model in which this possibility is realized, and estimate the bounds on the top partner mass in this model implied by LHC searches for supersymmetry. We find that the bounds can be significantly weaker than in the conventional top partner decay scenario. For example, if the new parity is exact, a 500 GeV top partner is allowed as long as the lightest parity-odd scalar mass is between 325 and 500 GeV. The lower allowed top partner mass reduces the need for fine-tuning in the Higgs mass parameter, compared to the conventional decay scenario. We also present an explicit model, the Oddest Little Higgs, which exhibits this phenomenology.

  13. TEST & EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE HEDGEHOG-II PACKAGING SYSTEMS DOT-7A TYPE A CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY, D.L.

    2003-12-29

    This report documents the US. Department of Transportation Specification 7A (DOT-7A) Type A compliance test and evaluation results for the Hedgehog-II packaging systems. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations provide primary and secondary containment. The approved packaging configurations described within this report are designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be in solid or liquid form. Liquids transported in the approved 1 L glass bottle assembly shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 1.6. Liquids transported in all other approved configurations shall have a specific gravity of less than or equal to 2.0. The solid contents, including packaging, are limited in weight to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles. The approved Hedgehog-II packaging configurations described in this report may be transported by air, and have been evaluated as meeting the applicable International Air Transport Association/International Civil Aviation Organization (IATA/ICAO) Dangerous Goods Regulations in addition to the DOT requirements.

  14. Evaluation of the adequacy of the 2000P test vehicle as a surrogate for light truck subclasses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Titus-Glover, Cyril James

    1996-01-01

    This study evaluated the adequacy of the 2000P test vehicle as a surrogate for light truck subclasses. The National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 350 recommended the use of a 3/4-ton (approximately 2000 kg) pickup...

  15. An evaluation of chemical screening test kits for lead in paint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oglesby, L.S.

    1996-04-01

    The Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act (Title X) requires abatement and management of lead-based paint. The purpose of this study was to evaluate three chemical screening test kits using materials and methods from one study and subjecting the results to the statistical analysis of another. The three kits were used to predict the presence of lead in paint at ten weight concentrations from 0.04 to 3.97%. Paint was applied to four wood boards yielding a sample size of 40. Four boards were painted with lead-free paint and used as blanks. All of the boards were tested with the three test kits by an untrained individual having no knowledge of the actual lead content. Sensitivity, specificity, and false positive and negative rates were calculated for the test kit results. The manufactures` detection limits, the observed sensitivity ranged from 1.00 to 0.80, specificity ranged from 1.00 to 0.42, false positive ranged from 0 to 58%, and false negatives ranged from 0 to 20%. At the 0.5% Federal threshold level, the observed sensitivity ranged from 1.00 to 0.94, specificity ranged from 1.00 to 0.5, false positives ranged from 0 to 11.1%, and false negatives ranged from 0 to 20%. The observed false positive and false negative rates for all three kits were found to be significantly lower than those reported in a previous study. These results indicate that the kits perform very well at the Federal threshold, with two of the kits having false negative rates below 12.5% and false positive rates of 3.13%. These results indicate that these two kits would probably be acceptable screening tests for lead in paint.

  16. Evaluation of technologies for volume reduction of plutonium-contaminated soils from the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papelis, C.; Jacobson, R.L.; Miller, F.L.; Shaulis, L.K.

    1996-06-01

    Nuclear testing at and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS) resulted in plutonium (Pu) contamination of the soil over an area of several thousands of acres. The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential of five different processes to reduce the volume of Pu-contaminated soil from three different areas, namely Areas 11, 13, and 52. Volume reduction was to be accomplished by concentrating the Pu into a small but highly contaminated soil fraction, thereby greatly reducing the volume of soil requiring disposal. The processes tested were proposed by Paramag Corp. (PARAMAG), Advanced Processing Technologies Inc. (APT), Lockheed Environmental Systems and Technologies (LESAT), Nuclear Remediation Technologies (NRT), and Scientific Ecology Group (SEG). Because of time and budgetary restraints, the NRT and SEG processes were tested with soil from Area 11 only. These processes typically included a preliminary soil conditioning step (e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), followed by a more advanced process designed to separate Pu from the soil, based on physiochemical properties of Pu compounds (e.g., magnetic susceptibility, specific gravity). Analysis of the soil indicates that a substantial fraction of the total Pu contamination is typically confined in a relatively narrow and small particle size range. Processes which were able to separate this highly contaminated soil fraction (using physical methods, e.g., attrition scrubbing, wet sieving), from the rest of the soil achieved volume (mass) reductions on the order of 70%. The advanced, more complex processes tested did not enhance volume reduction. The primary reason why processes that rely on the dependence of settling velocity on density differences failed was the very fine grain size of the Pu-rich particles.

  17. EVALUATION OF ARG-1 SAMPLES PREPARED BY CESIUM CARBONATE DISSOLUTION DURING THE ISOLOK SME ACCEPTABILITY TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, T.; Hera, K.; Coleman, C.

    2011-12-05

    Evaluation of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Process Cell (CPC) cycle time identified several opportunities to improve the CPC processing time. The Mechanical Systems & Custom Equipment Development (MS&CED) Section of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) recently completed the evaluation of one of these opportunities - the possibility of using an Isolok sampling valve as an alternative to the Hydragard valve for taking DWPF process samples at the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME). The use of an Isolok for SME sampling has the potential to improve operability, reduce maintenance time, and decrease CPC cycle time. The SME acceptability testing for the Isolok was requested in Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-DWPF-TTR-2010-0036 and was conducted as outlined in Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNLRP-2011-00145. RW-0333P QA requirements applied to the task, and the results from the investigation were documented in SRNL-STI-2011-00693. Measurement of the chemical composition of study samples was a critical component of the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. A sampling and analytical plan supported the investigation with the analytical plan directing that the study samples be prepared by a cesium carbonate (Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) fusion dissolution method and analyzed by Inductively Coupled Plasma - Optical Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The use of the cesium carbonate preparation method for the Isolok testing provided an opportunity for an additional assessment of this dissolution method, which is being investigated as a potential replacement for the two methods (i.e., sodium peroxide fusion and mixed acid dissolution) that have been used at the DWPF for the analysis of SME samples. Earlier testing of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method yielded promising results which led to a TTR from Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) to SRNL for additional support and an associated TTQAP to direct the SRNL efforts. A technical report resulting from this work was issued that recommended that the mixed acid method be replaced by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method for the measurement of magnesium (Mg), sodium (Na), and zirconium (Zr) with additional testing of the method by DWPF Laboratory being needed before further implementation of the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method at that laboratory. While the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok does not address any of the open issues remaining after the publication of the recommendation for the replacement of the mixed acid method by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method (since those issues are to be addressed by the DWPF Laboratory), the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} testing associated with the Isolok testing does provide additional insight into the performance of the method as conducted by SRNL. The performance is to be investigated by looking to the composition measurement data generated by the samples of a standard glass, the Analytical Reference Glass - 1 (ARG-1), that were prepared by the Cs{sub 2}CO{sub 3} method and included in the SME acceptability testing of the Isolok. The measurements of these samples were presented as part of the study results, but no statistical analysis of these measurements was conducted as part of those results. It is the purpose of this report to provide that analysis, which was supported using JMP Version 7.0.2.

  18. Field Validation of Toxicity Tests to Evaluate the Potential for Beneficial Use of Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Bidwell; Jonathan Fisher; Naomi Cooper

    2008-03-31

    This study investigated potential biological effects of produced water contamination derived from occasional surface overflow and possible subsurface intrusion at an oil production site along the shore of Skiatook Lake, Oklahoma. We monitored basic chemistry and acute toxicity to a suite of standard aquatic test species (fathead minnow-Pimephales promelas, Daphnia pulex, Daphnia magna, and Ceriodaphnia dubia) in produced water and in samples taken from shallow groundwater wells on the site. Toxicity identification evaluations and ion toxicity modeling were used to identify toxic constituents in the samples. Lake sediment at the oil production site and at a reference site were also analyzed for brine intrusion chemically and by testing sediment toxicity using the benthic invertebrates, Chironomus dilutus, and Hyallela azteca. Sediment quality was also assessed with in situ survival and growth studies with H. azteca and the Asian clam, Corbicula fluminea, and by benthic macroinvertebrate community sampling. The produced water was acutely toxic to the aquatic test organisms at concentrations ranging from 1% to 10% of the whole produced water sample. Toxicity identification evaluation and ion toxicity modeling indicated major ion salts and hydrocarbons were the primary mixture toxicants. The standardized test species used in the laboratory bioassays exhibited differences in sensitivity to these two general classes of contaminants, which underscores the importance of using multiple species when evaluating produced water toxicity. Toxicity of groundwater was greater in samples from wells near a produced water injection well and an evaporation pond. Principle component analyses (PCA) of chemical data derived from the groundwater wells indicated dilution by lake water and possible biogeochemical reactions as factors that ameliorated groundwater toxicity. Elevated concentrations of major ions were found in pore water from lake sediments, but toxicity from these ions was limited to sediment depths of 10 cm or greater, which is outside of the primary zone of biological activity. Further, exposure to site sediments did not have any effects on test organisms, and macroinvertebrate communities did not indicate impairment at the oil production site as compared to a reference site. In situ experiments with H. azteca and C. fluminea, indicated a sublethal site effect (on growth of both species), but these could not be definitively linked with produced water infiltration. Severe weather conditions (drought followed by flooding) negatively influenced the intensity of lake sampling aimed at delineating produced water infiltration. Due to the lack of clear evidence of produced water infiltration into the sub-littoral zone of the lake, it was not possible to assess whether the laboratory bioassays of produced water effectively indicate risk in the receiving system. However, the acutely toxic nature of the produced water and general lack of biological effects in the lake at the oil production site suggest minimal to no produced water infiltration into surficial lake sediments and the near-shore water column. This study was able to demonstrate the utility of ion toxicity modeling to support data from toxicity identification evaluations aimed at identifying key toxic constituents in produced water. This information could be used to prioritize options for treating produced water in order to reduce toxic constituents and enhance options for reuse. The study also demonstrated how geographic information systems, toxicity modeling, and toxicity assessment could be used to facilitate future site assessments.

  19. Review and evaluation of literature on testing of chemical additives for scale control in geothermal fluids. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

    1981-01-01

    A selected group of reported tests of chemical additives in actual geothermal fluids are reviewed and evaluated to summarize the status of chemical scale-control testing and identify information and testing needs. The task distinguishes between scale control in the cooling system of a flash plant and elsewhere in the utilization system due to the essentially different operating environments involved. Additives for non-cooling geothermal fluids are discussed by scale type: silica, carbonate, and sulfide.

  20. Testing, Evaluation, and Qualification of Bio-Oil for Heating Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaics »TanklessResearchEnergy TestTestingTesting, Evaluation,

  1. Final evaluation & test report for the standard waste box (docket 01-53-7A) type A packaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KELLY, D.L.

    2001-08-15

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance test and evaluation results of the Standard Waste Box (SWB). Testing and evaluation activities documented herein are on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters (DOE-HQ), Office of Safety, Health and Security (EM-5), Germantown, Maryland. Dwatek Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations (DFSNW) performed an evaluation of the changes as documented herein under Docket 01-53-7A.

  2. Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank 19 Test Results from Phase B: Mid-Scale Testing at PNNL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, M.R.; Combs, W.H.; Farmer, J.R.; Gladki, H.; Hatchell, B.K.; Johnson, M.A.; Poirier, M.R.; Rodwell, P.O.

    1999-03-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) performed mixer tests using 3-kW (4-hp) Flygt mixers in 1.8- and 5.7-m-diameter tanks at the 336 building facility in Richland, Washington to evaluate candidate scaling relationships for Flygt mixers used for sludge mobilization and particle suspension. These tests constituted the second phase of a three-phase test program involving representatives from ITT Flygt Corporation, the Savannah River Site (SRS), the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and PNNL. The results of the first phase of tests, which were conducted at ITT Flygt's facility in a 0.45-m-diameter tank, are documented in Powell et al. (1999). Although some of the Phase B tests were geometrically similar to selected Phase A tests (0.45-m tank), none of the Phase B tests were geometrically, cinematically, and/or dynamically similar to the planned Tank 19 mixing system. Therefore, the mixing observed during the Phase B tests is not directly indicative of the mixing expected in Tank 19 and some extrapolation of the data is required to make predictions for Tank 19 mixing. Of particular concern is the size of the mixer propellers used for the 5.7-m tank tests. These propellers were more than three times larger than required by geometric scaling of the Tank 19 mixers. The implications of the lack of geometric similarity, as well as other factors that complicate interpretation of the test results, are discussed in Section 5.4.

  3. Evaluation of melter technologies for vitrification of Hanford site low-level tank waste - phase 1 testing summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, C.N., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-06-27

    Following negotiation of the fourth amendment to the Tri- Party Agreement for Hanford Site cleanup, commercially available melter technologies were tested during 1994 and 1995 for vitrification of the low-level waste (LLW) stream to be derived from retrieval and pretreatment of the radioactive defense wastes stored in 177 underground tanks. Seven vendors were selected for Phase 1 testing to demonstrate vitrification of a high-sodium content liquid LLW simulant. The tested melter technologies included four Joule-heated melters, a carbon electrode melter, a combustion melter, and a plasma melter. Various dry and slurry melter feed preparation processes also were tested. The technologies and Phase 1 testing results were evaluated and a preliminary technology down-selection completed. This report describes the Phase 1 LLW melter vendor testing and the tested technologies, and summarizes the testing results and the preliminary technology recommendations.

  4. Partnering Policy for the Office of Environmental Management...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Policy for the Office of Environmental Management Partnering Policy for the Office of Environmental Management Partnering Policy for the Office of Environmental Management More...

  5. Energy Department and USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency in Rural Communities Energy Department and USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency in Rural Communities February 28, 2013 - 9:45am...

  6. San Antonio Better Buildings Partners Recognized for Advancing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    San Antonio Better Buildings Partners Recognized for Advancing Energy Efficiency San Antonio Better Buildings Partners Recognized for Advancing Energy Efficiency May 21, 2015 -...

  7. City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Challenge, Partners with Energy Department to Reduce Energy Waste and Boost Efficiency City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with Energy Department to...

  8. Pilot Aims to Partner Energy Department's National Laboratories...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pilot Aims to Partner Energy Department's National Laboratories with Clean Energy Small Businesses Pilot Aims to Partner Energy Department's National Laboratories with Clean Energy...

  9. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Workforce/Business Partners...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Neighborhood Program WorkforceBusiness Partners Peer Exchange Call: Working with Real Estate Home Inspectors, Exterminators, and other "Non-traditional" Partners Call Slides...

  10. Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to Develop Cyber Security Requirements for Advanced Metering Infrastructure Collaborative Utility Task Force Partners with DOE to...

  11. Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois Carbon Storage Partner Completes First Year of CO2 Injection Operations in Illinois November 19,...

  12. Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup Power Units at Eight Military Installations Departments of Energy, Defense Partner to Install Fuel Cell Backup...

  13. Energy Department Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy Managers and Reduce Energy Costs Energy Department Partners with Industry to Train Federal Energy Managers and Reduce Energy Costs...

  14. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University at Albany: State...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at Albany: State University of New York Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University at Albany: State University of New York Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: University at...

  15. Development of a bench scale test to evaluate lubricants for use with methanol-fueled engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, R.; Klaus, E.; Duda, J.L.

    1996-10-01

    In methanol-fueled diesel engines, the crankcase lubricant is used to lubricate both the engine and the fuel injector system. Crankcase lubricants including some designed for methanol-fueled engines are not completely compatible with the methanol fuel. In order to test the effect of methanol extraction on diesel engine lubricant performance, two extraction protocols were developed: one to simulate the fuel injector (1000 parts of methanol to one part of lubricant) and the other to simulate an extreme case of methanol contamination in the crank-case (one part of methanol to five parts of lubricant). The extracted samples of the lubricant were stripped to remove the methanol. The samples were then evaluated for changes in oxidative stability and lubricity. 12 refs., 3 figs., 8 tabs.

  16. Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.; Sekulic, B.; Barkaszi, S.; Yang, J.; Kahn, S.

    2014-06-01

    Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of interrow shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from interrow shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of interrow shading mismatch is at a maximum.

  17. Thermal lag test engines evaluated and compared to equivalent Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tailer, P.L.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal lag engines run both free piston and with pistons kinematically linked. Free piston, a thermal lag engine may be the simplest of all piston engines as it is valveless and has only one moving part, the piston. Horizontal and vertical thermal lag engines with substantially identical cooled pistons and cylinders are tested and evaluated, particularly as to power density. The horizontal engine has an elongated, small diameter heated chamber and the vertical engine has a large diameter flat heated chamber. Both heated chambers may be altered in volume to maximize engine power at optimum compression ratios. The power density of unpressurized thermal lag engines is compared to that of early commercial Stirling cycle unpressurized air engines. The comparison indicates the potential for applying well-known modern Stirling technology to thermal lag engines.

  18. Safety Evaluation for Packaging for onsite Transfer of plutonium recycle test reactor ion exchange columns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.J.

    1995-09-11

    The purpose of this Safety Evaluation for Packaging (SEP) is to authorize the use of three U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) 7A, Type A metal boxes (Capital Industries Part No. S 0600-0600-1080- 0104) to package 12 Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) ion exchange columns as low-level waste (LLW). The packages will be transferred from the 309 Building in the 300 Area to low level waste burial in the 200 West Area. Revision 1 of WHC-SD-TP-SEP-035 (per ECN No. 621467) documents that the boxes containing ion exchange columns and grout will maintain the payload under normal conditions of transport if transferred without the box lids

  19. Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank 19 Test Results from Phase A: Small-Scale Testing at ITT Flygt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, M.R.; Farmer, J.R.; Gladki, H.; Hatchell, B.K.; Poirier, M.R.; Rodwell, P.O.

    1999-03-30

    The key findings of the small-scale Flygt mixer tests are provided in this section. Some of these findings may not apply in larger tanks, so these data must be applied carefully when making predictions for large tanks. Flygt mixer testing in larger tanks at PNNL and in a full-scale tank at the SRS will be used to determine the applicability of these findings. The principal objectives of the small-scale Flygt mixer tests were to measure the critical fluid velocities required for sludge mobilization and particle suspension, to evaluate the applicability of the Gladki (1997) method for predicting required mixer thrust, and to provide small-scale test results for comparison with larger-scale tests to observe the effects of scale-up. The tank profile and mixer orientation (i.e., stationary, horizontal mixers) were in the same configuration as the prototype system, however, available resources did not allow geometric, kinematic, and dynamic similitude to be achieved. The results of these tests will be used in conjunction with the results from similar tests using larger tanks and mixers (tank diameters of 1.8 and 5.7 m [Powell et al. 1999]) to evaluate the effects of scaling and to aid in developing a methodology for predicting performance at full scale.

  20. Background Radiation Survey of the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colin Okada

    2010-09-16

    In preparation for operations at the Radiological/Nuclear Countermeasures Test and Evaluation Complex (Rad/NucCTEC), the Department of Homeland Security Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DHS/DNDO) requested that personnel from the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) conduct a survey of the present radiological conditions at the facility. The measurements consist of the exposure rate from a high-pressure ion chamber (HPIC), high-resolution spectra from a high-purity germanium (HPGe) system in an in situ configuration, and low-resolution spectra from a sodium iodide (NaI) detector in a radiation detection backpack. Measurements with these systems were collected at discrete locations within the facility. Measurements were also collected by carrying the VECTOR backpack throughout the complex to generate a map of the entire area. The area was also to be surveyed with the Kiwi (an array of eight-2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch NaI detectors) from the Aerial Measuring Systems; however, conflicts with test preparation activities at the site prevented this from being accomplished.

  1. Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session IA—Conversion Technologies I: Industrial Perspectives on Pathways to Advanced Biofuels Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels David C. Carroll, President and Chief Executive Officer, Gas Technology Institute

  2. New Partners for Smart Growth Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Partners for Smart Growth Conference is the nation's largest smart growth and sustainability conference. The three-day conference is themed, "Practical Tools and Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities."

  3. Home Energy Score FAQs for Partners

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in order to allow homes to be compared on an apples-to-apples basis, independent of occupant behavior. Can the Score be customized? DOE allows Partners some customization of...

  4. Robot Partners: Collaborative Perceptual Robotic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Little, Jim

    Robot Partners: Collaborative Perceptual Robotic Systems Working paper Cooperative Distributed robotic systems, including remote-brained soccer players, visually guided mobile robots, and visual been supported by the the Networks of Centres of Excellence Institute for Robotics and Intelligent

  5. Home Energy Score Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    25,000 BPI certified professionals in the U.S., several U.S. territories, Canada and Taiwan. As a Home Energy Score Partner, BPI expects to provide Home Energy Scores to...

  6. Partner with Us Work with NREL experts and take advantage of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and discharge cycles to evaluate performance and storage efficiency. Application Scenarios The Thermal Systems multiple charge and discharge cycles to evaluate heat exchanger performance and storage efficiencyPartner with Us Work with NREL experts and take advantage of the state-of-the-art capabilities

  7. Load tests on five large spread footings on sand and evaluation of prediction methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbens, Robert Melvin

    1995-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cross-Hole Wave Tests. Dilatometer Tests . . Borehole Shear Tests. . Step Blade Tests. 5 9 17 22 28 34 34 39 45 54 56 64 64 LOAD TEST SETUP 3. 1 3. 2 3. 3 3. 4 3. 5 3. 6 General Setup. Spread Footing Construction Reaction Shaft... INVOLVED Mr. Mike Adams Dr. Allan Lutenegger Dr. Don Degroot Buchanan/Soil Mechanics Dr. Derek Morris Mr. Tony Yen Mr. John Del hia PiezoCone Penetration Test Dilatometer Tests Dilatometer Test w/Thrust Measurements Pressuremeter Tests Step...

  8. TECHNICAL EVALUATION OF REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR PLUTONIUM-CONTAMINATED SOILS AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE (NTS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Hoeffner

    2003-12-31

    The Clemson Environmental Technologies Laboratory (CETL) was contracted by the National Energy Technology Center to evaluate technologies that might be used to reduce the volume of plutonium-contaminated soil at the Nevada Test Site. The project has been systematically approached. A thorough review and summary was completed for: (1) The NTS soil geological, geochemical and physical characteristics; (2) The characteristics and chemical form of the plutonium that is in these soils; (3) Previous volume reduction technologies that have been attempted on the NTS soils; (4) Vendors with technology that may be applicable; and (5) Related needs at other DOE sites. Soils from the Nevada Test Site were collected and delivered to the CETL. Soils were characterized for Pu-239/240, Am-241 and gross alpha. In addition, wet sieving and the subsequent characterization were performed on soils before and after attrition scrubbing to determine the particle size distribution and the distribution of Pu-239/240 and gross alpha as a function of particle size. Sequential extraction was performed on untreated soil to provide information about how tightly bound the plutonium was to the soil. Magnetic separation was performed to determine if this could be useful as part of a treatment approach. Using the information obtained from these reviews, three vendors were selected to demonstration their volume reduction technologies at the CETL. Two of the three technologies, bioremediation and soil washing, met the performance criteria. Both were able to significantly reduce the concentration plutonium in the soil from around 1100 pCi/g to 200 pCi/g or less with a volume reduction of around 95%, well over the target 70%. These results are especially encouraging because they indicate significant improvement over that obtained in these earlier pilot and field studies. Additional studies are recommended.

  9. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01

    Coating Applied to Collector Design, Proceedings North American Solarsolar test collector was designed for the testing of thermally absorbing coatingssolar test collector was designed so that certain collector parameters could be held constant or controlled and yet different coatings

  10. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01

    Standards for Testing Solar Collectors and Thermal Storagethe Performance of Flat-Rate Solar Collectors" University ofstandards for testing solar collectors. l Collectors are

  11. EVALUATION OF ZERO-POWER, ELEVATED-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS AT JAPAN’S HIGH TEMPERATURE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2011-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for two zero-power, warm-critical measurements with the fully-loaded HTTR core. Six isothermal temperature coefficients for the fully-loaded core from approximately 340 to 740 K have also been evaluated. These experiments were performed as part of the power-up tests (References 1 and 2). Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001) and annular start-up core loadings (HTTR-GCR-RESR-002) have been previously evaluated.

  12. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011, Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-01-30

    This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done to support several different programs that desire access to the ground surface above expended underground nuclear tests. The programs include: the Borehole Management Program, the Environmental Restoration Program, and the National Center for Nuclear Security Gas-Migration Experiment. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Evaluation of cavity collapse and crater formation is input into the safety decisions. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who participated in weapons testing activities perform these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. The evaluations do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011 was published on March 2, 2011. This report, considered Part 2 of work undertaken in calendar year 2011, compiles evaluations requested after the March report. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 6 LLNL test locations in Yucca Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Pahute Mesa. They include: Baneberry in U8d; Clearwater in U12q; Wineskin in U12r, Buteo in U20a and Duryea in nearby U20a1; and Barnwell in U20az.

  13. Seismic Data for Evaluation of Ground Motion Hazards in Las Vegas in Support of Test Site Readiness Ground Motion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, A

    2008-01-16

    In this report we describe the data sets used to evaluate ground motion hazards in Las Vegas from nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. This analysis is presented in Rodgers et al. (2005, 2006) and includes 13 nuclear explosions recorded at the John Blume and Associates network, the Little Skull Mountain earthquake and a temporary deployment of broadband station in Las Vegas. The data are available in SAC format on CD-ROM as an appendix to this report.

  14. Evaluation of Maxim Module-Integrated Electronics at the DOE Regional Test Centers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.; Sekulic, B.; Stein, J.; Barkaszi, S.; Yang, J.; Kahn, S.

    2014-07-01

    Module-embedded power electronics developed by Maxim Integrated are under evaluation through a partnership with the Department of Energy's Regional Test Center (RTC) program. Field deployments of both conventional modules and electronics-enhanced modules are designed to quantify the performance advantage of Maxim's products under different amounts of inter-row shading, and their ability to be deployed at a greater ground-coverage-ratio than conventional modules. Simulations in PVSYST have quantified the predicted performance difference between conventional modules and Maxim's modules from inter-row shading. Initial performance results have identified diffuse irradiance losses at tighter row spacing for both the Maxim and conventional modules. Comparisons with published models show good agreement with models predicting the greatest diffuse irradiance losses. At tighter row spacing, all of the strings equipped with embedded power electronics outperformed their conventional peers. An even greater performance advantage is predicted to occur in the winter months when the amount of inter-row shading mismatch is at a maximum.

  15. Demonstration, testing and evaluation of nonintrusive characterization technologies at operable Unit 2 of Rocky Flats Plant. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-09-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), high-resolution (HR) seismic reflection evaluation was conducted at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), near Golden, Colorado, to demonstrate the applicability of nonintrusive characterization techniques to detect buried objects, contamination, and geological/hydrological features at RFP. The evaluation was conducted as part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) request for demonstration, testing and evaluation (DT&E) of nonintrusive techniques, under DOE Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) No. DE-RA05-09OR22000.

  16. A Web-Based Common Framework to Support the Test and Evaluation Process Any Time, Anywhere, and Anyhow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schur, Anne ); Brown, James C. ); Eaton, Sharon L. ); Gibson, Alex G. ); Scott, Ryan T. ); Tanasse, Ted E. )

    2001-01-01

    Test and evaluation (T and E) is an enterprise. For any product, large or small, performance data is desired on many aspects to evaluate the product?s effectiveness for the intended users. Representing the many T and E facets without bewildering the user is challenging when there is a range of people, from the system developers to the manager of the organization, that want specific feedback. A web-based One-Stop Evaluation Center was created to meet these needs for a particular project. The evaluation center is usable at any time in the systems development lifecycle and streamlines the T and E enterprise. This paper discusses a common framework that unifies the T and E process with many stakeholders involved and is flexible to accommodate each stakeholders?specific evaluative processes and content. Our success has translated to many cost savings by enabling quick responses to change and a better line of communication between the users, developers, and managers.

  17. Evaluation of Flygt Mixers for Application in Savannah River Site Tank Summary of Test Results from Phase A, B, and C Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BK Hatchell; H Gladki; JR Farmer; MA Johnson; MR Poirier; MR Powell; PO Rodwell

    1999-10-21

    Staff from the Savannah River Site (SRS), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and ITT Flygt Corporation in Trumbull, Connecticut, are conducting a joint mixer testing program to evaluate the applicability of Flygt mixers to SRS Tank 19 waste retrieval and waste retrieval in other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tanks. This report provides the results of the Phase C Flygt mixer testing and summarizes the key findings from the Phase A and B tests. Phase C Flygt mixer testing used full-scale, Model 4680 Flygt mixers (37 kW, 51-cm propeller) installed in a fall-scale tank (25.9-m diameter) at SRS. Phase A testing used a 0.45-m tank and Flygt mixers with 7.8-cm diameter propellers. Phase B testing used Model 4640 Flygt mixers (3 kW, 37-cm propeller) installed in 1.8-m and 5.7-m tanks. Powell et al. (1999z4 1999b) provide detailed descriptions of the Phase A and B tests. In Phase C, stationary submerged jet mixers manufactured by ITT Flygt Corporation were tested in the 25.9-m diameter tank at the SRS TNX facility. The Model 4680 mixers used in Phase C have 37-kW (50-hp) electric motors that drive 51-cm (20-in.) diameter propellers at 860 rpm. Fluid velocity was measured at selected locations with as many as four Model 4680 mixers operating simultaneously in the 25.9-m tank, which was filled with water to selected levels. Phase C involved no solids suspension or sludge mobilization tests.

  18. Development and Commissioning of a Small/Mid-Size Wind Turbine Test Facility: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valyou, D.; Arsenault, T.; Janoyan, K.; Marzocca, P.; Post, N.; Grappasonni, G.; Arras, M.; Coppotelli, G.; Cardenas, D.; Elizalde, H.; Probst, O.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and commissioning tests of the new Clarkson University/Center for Evaluation of Clean Energy Technology Blade Test Facility. The facility is a result of the collaboration between the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and Intertek, and is supported by national and international partners. This paper discusses important aspects associated with blade testing and includes results associated with modal, static, and fatigue testing performed on the Sandia National Laboratories' Blade Systems Design Studies blade. An overview of the test capabilities of the Blade Test Facility are also provided.

  19. Evaluating preproduction prototypes of new energy-efficiency products in realistic test beds is an essential step before market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    ), a home built to code has a rating of 100 and a net zero energy home has a rating of 0. The ZEBRAlliance savings compared to a code built home. In addition, these homes could be net zero energy with solarEvaluating preproduction prototypes of new energy-efficiency products in realistic test beds

  20. CF Partners UK LLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County, California: Energy Resources JumpEmissionCapital PartnersCF Partners

  1. An evaluation of pocket-model, numerical readout breath alcohol testing instruments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Tassel, William Edward

    2004-11-15

    alcohol levels, the PMBTs ranged in price from $40-100 USD. The devices were first tested under laboratory conditions with alcohol solution simulators providing the alcoholic samples. They were then tested with human drinkers, under controlled field...

  2. Testing and evaluation of military systems in a high stakes environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moyer, Raphael (Raphael E.)

    2010-01-01

    Testing is a critical element of systems engineering, as it allows engineers to ensure that products meet specifications before they go into production. The testing literature, however, has been largely theoretical, and ...

  3. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, C.M.

    2011-01-01

    solar best collector was designed for the testing of thermally absorbing coatingssolar test collector was designed so that certain collector parameters could be held constant or controlled and yet different coatings

  4. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, Carl M.

    2011-01-01

    for Testing Solar Collectors and Thermal Storage Devices,SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR When analyzing a collector's performance and thermalThermal Capacitance Upon the Performance of Flat-Rate Solar Collectors"

  5. Field Test and Evaluation Report Five Photovoltaic Power Systems for the City of Tucson

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Members of the DOE solar energy Tiger Team tested five municipally owned, grid connected photovoltaic (PV) power systems for the City of Tucson on March 26 and 27, 2008. The five PV systems tested were Southeast Service Center, Clements Fitness Center, and Thonydale water treatment plant systems 1, 2, and 3. During all tests, skies were virtually cloudless with only occasional, high cirrus present, and none during array testing.

  6. Retail market test: An in-depth evaluation of a new product concept for lamb. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naylor, Robert Kenneth

    1967-01-01

    19 Objectives and Related Hypotheses 21 IV LITEPATSLRE REVIEW 24 Retail Market Tests 25 Matched-lot controlled experiments 25 Test store versus control store experiments. . 27 Latin-square experiments . . . , . ~ . , 28 Factorial experiments 28... Multiple covariance analysis Field Organization for the Market Test 50 50 VI THE RETAIL STORE TEST 52 General Consumer Awareness 52 General Sales Analysis Lamb sales analysis Summary Pork sales analysis Beef sales analysis 53 53 57 58 59...

  7. PMU Data Integrity Evaluation through Analytics on a Virtual Test-Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Shankar, Mallikarjun [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Power systems are rapidly becoming populated by phasor measurement units (PMUs) in ever increasing numbers. PMUs are critical components of today s energy management systems, designed to enable near real-time wide area monitoring and control of the electric power system. They are able to measure highly accurate bus voltage phasors as well as branch current phasors incident to the buses at which PMUs are equipped. Synchrophasor data is used for applications varying from state estimation, islanding control, identifying outages, voltage stability detection and correction, disturbance recording, and others. However, PMU-measured readings may suffer from errors due to meter biases or drifts, incorrect configurations, or even cyber-attacks. Furthermore, the testing of early PMUs showed a large disparity between the reported values from PMUs provided by different manufacturers, particularly when frequency was off-nominal, during dynamic events, and when harmonic/inter-harmonic content was present. Detection and identification of PMU gross measurement errors are thus crucial in maintaining highly accurate phasor readings throughout the system. In this paper, we present our work in conducting analytics to determine the trustworthiness and worth of the PMU readings collected across an electric network system. By implementing the IEEE 118 bus test case on a virtual test bed (VTB) , we are able to emulate PMU readings (bus voltage and branch current phasors in addition to bus frequencies) under normal and abnormal conditions using (virtual) PMU sensors deployed across major substations in the network. We emulate a variety of failures such as bus, line, transformer, generator, and/or load failures. Data analytics on the voltage phase angles and frequencies collected from the PMUs show that specious (or compromised) PMU device(s) can be identified through abnormal behaviour by comparing the trend of its frequency and phase angle reading with the ensemble of all other PMU readings in the network. If the reading trend of a particular PMU deviates from the weighted average of the reading trends of other PMUs at nearby substations, then it is likely that the PMU is malfunctioning. We assign a weight to each PMU denoting how electric-topology-wise close it is from where the PMU under consideration is located. The closer a PMU is, the higher the weight it has. To compute the closeness between two nodes in the power network, we employ a form of the resistance distance metric. It computes the electrical distance by taking into consideration the underlying topology as well as the physical laws that govern the electrical connections or flows between the network components. The detection accuracy of erroneous PMUs should be improved by employing this metric. We present results to validate the proposed approach. We also discuss the effectiveness of using an end-to-end VTB approach that allows us to investigate different types of failures and their responses as seen by the ensemble of PMUs. The collected data on certain types of events may be amenable to certain types of analysis (e.g., alerting for sudden changes can be done on a small window of data) and hence determine the data analytics architectures is required to evaluate the streaming PMU data.

  8. An Empirical Evaluation of the Impact ofAn Empirical Evaluation of the Impact ofAn Empirical Evaluation of the Impact ofAn Empirical Evaluation of the Impact of TestTestTestTest----Driven Development onDriven Development onDriven Development onDriven Deve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janzen, David

    XP Scale----Defined PracticesDefined PracticesDefined PracticesDefined Practices1111 pair programming test-driven development metaphor continuous integration on-site customer collective ownership acceptance testing planning-site customer collective ownership acceptance testing planning game short releases seconds minutes hours days

  9. Side-by-Side Testing of Water Heating Systems: Results from the 2009-2010 Evaluation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The performance of seven differing types of residential water heating systems was compared in a side-by-side test configuration over a full year period. The Hot Water System Laboratory (HWS Lab) test facility at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) in Cocoa, FL was used for the tests.

  10. A controlled in situ field evaluation of a new dynamic vacuum slug test method in unconfined aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauctes, B.A.; Schleyer, C.A.

    1995-09-01

    Most ground water site characterizations require initial estimates of the ground water flow velocity and potential downgradient extent of ground water contamination. The fundamental aquifer property, hydraulic conductivity, must be determined to make these essential estimates. Highly contaminated ground water often precludes conducting multi-well aquifer tests to evaluate hydraulic conductivity due to potential human health risks and ground water storage/treatment/disposal costs and logistics. Consequently, single-well slug tests are often sued, but the widely used pressure slug test method is not suitable for water table monitoring wells. As a result, a new slug test method was developed by GCL for unconfined aquifers. The new method was benchmarked against the widely used solid slug test method in a series of rising-head and falling-head slug tests. A statistical evaluation indicated no statistical difference (alpha = 0.05) between hydraulic conductivity values calculated from each method. The new dynamic vacuum method, designed specifically for use in water table monitoring wells, uses a continuous vacuum to draw air through the well screen exposed above the water table. The vacuum induces upwelling as air pressure inside the well casing drops below atmospheric pressure. Once upwelling equilibrates with the applied vacuum, the vacuum is released allowing the water to recover and the air pressure inside the casing to return to atmospheric pressure.

  11. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: • determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components • determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies • determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. • correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries • correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish • utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  12. Invited Chapter in Automation, Miniature Robotics and Sensors for Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation, Y. Bar-Cohen Editor, April 99

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    Invited Chapter in Automation, Miniature Robotics and Sensors for Non-Destructive Testing;Invited Chapter in Automation, Miniature Robotics and Sensors for Non-Destructive Testing and Evaluation

  13. Test method for auger electron spectroscopy(AES) evaluation of oxide layer of wetted surfaces of passivated 316L stainless steel components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semiconductor Equipement and Materials International. San José, CA

    2002-01-01

    Test method for auger electron spectroscopy(AES) evaluation of oxide layer of wetted surfaces of passivated 316L stainless steel components

  14. A Vital K-12 Partner Summer Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Mo

    earn college credits while in high school. Georgia Tech Promise Scholarship wwwA Vital K-12 Partner Summer Programs http://b.gatech.edu/LQgwjm Georgia Tech and Georgia Tech as available. Saturday Programs (K.I.D.S. Club) https://kidsclub-ceismc.gatech.edu Georgia Tech and Georgia

  15. Strategy Guideline: Partnering for High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, D.

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. In an environment where the builder is the only source of communication between trades and consultants and where relationships are, in general, adversarial as opposed to cooperative, the chances of any one building system to fail are greater. Furthermore, it is much harder for the builder to identify and capitalize on synergistic opportunities. Partnering can help bridge the cross-functional aspects of the systems approach and achieve performance-based criteria. Critical success factors for partnering include support from top management, mutual trust, effective and open communication, effective coordination around common goals, team building, appropriate use of an outside facilitator, a partnering charter progress toward common goals, an effective problem-solving process, long-term commitment, continuous improvement, and a positive experience for all involved.

  16. Test Loop Demonstration and Evaluation of Slurry Transfer Line Critical Velocity Measurement Instruments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Morgen, Gerald P.; Peters, Timothy J.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Baer, Ellen BK

    2010-07-31

    This report presents the results of the evaluation of three ultrasonic sensors for detecting critical velocity during slurry transfer between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

  17. Instrumented, Shielded Test Canister System for Evaluation of Spent Nuclear Fuel in Dry Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sindelar, R.L.

    1999-10-21

    This document describes the development of an instrumented, shielded test canister system to store and monitor aluminum-based spent nuclear duel under dry storage conditions.

  18. Performance evaluation of diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) as a booster material for insensitive high explosives using the onionskin test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, John S; Francois, Elizabeth G; Hooks, Daniel E; Hill, Larry G; Harry, Herbert H

    2010-11-09

    Initiation of insensitive high explosive (IHE) formulations requires the use of a booster explosive in the initiation train. Booster material selection is crucial, as the initiation must reliably function across some spectrum of physical parameters. The interest in DAAF for this application stems from the fact that it possesses many traits of an IHE but is shock sensitive enough to serve as an explosive booster. A hemispherical wave breakout test, termed the onionskin test, is one of the methods used to evaluate the performance of a booster material. The wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemisphericallHE charge is recorded and the relative uniformity of the breakout can be quantitatively compared between booster materials. A series of onionskin tests were performed to investigate breakout and propagation diaminoazoxyfurazan (DAAF) at low temperatures to evaluate ignition and detonation spreading in comparison to other explosives commonly used in booster applications. Some wave perturbation was observed with the DAAF booster in the onionskin tests presented. The results of these tests will be presented and discussed.

  19. Performance evaluation of booster materials in the plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 in a hemispherical wave breakout test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooks, Daniel E; Morris, John S; Hill, Larry G; Francois, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    An explosive booster is normally required to initiate detonation in an insensitive high explosive (lHE). Booster materials must be ignitable by a conventional detonator and deliver sufficient energy and favorable pulse shape to initiate the IHE charge. The explosive booster should be as insensitive as reasonably possible to maintain the overall safety margin of the explosive assembly. A hemispherical wave breakout test termed the on ionskin test is one of the methods of testing the performance of booster materials in an initiation train assembly. There are several variations of this basic test which are known by other names. In this test, the wave breakout time-position history at the surface of a hemispherical IHE acceptor charge is recorded, and the relative uniformity of breakout allows qualitative comparison between booster candidates and quantitative comparison of several metrics. The results of a series of onionskin experiments evaluating the performance of some new booster formulations in the triaminotrinitrobenzene (TA TB) -based plastic bonded explosive PBX 9502 will be presented. The boosters were tested in an onionskin arrangement in which the booster pellet was cylindrical, and the tests were performed at a temperature of-55{sup o}C to emphasize variations in spreading performance. The modification from the traditional hemispherical geometry facilitated efficient explosive fabrication and charge assembly, but the results indicate that this geometry was not ideal for several reasons. Despite the complications arising from geometry, promising performance was observed from booster formulations including 3,3' -diamino-4,4'azoxyfurazan.

  20. FY15 Report on Thermomechanical Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Francis D.; Buchholz, Stuart

    2015-08-01

    Sandia is participating in the third phase of a United States (US)-German Joint Project that compares constitutive models and simulation procedures on the basis of model calculations of the thermomechanical behavior and healing of rock salt (Salzer et al. 2015). The first goal of the project is to evaluate the ability of numerical modeling tools to correctly describe the relevant deformation phenomena in rock salt under various influences. Among the numerical modeling tools required to address this are constitutive models that are used in computer simulations for the description of the thermal, mechanical, and hydraulic behavior of the host rock under various influences and for the long-term prediction of this behavior. Achieving this goal will lead to increased confidence in the results of numerical simulations related to the secure disposal of radioactive wastes in rock salt. Results of the Joint Project may ultimately be used to make various assertions regarding stability analysis of an underground repository in salt during the operating phase as well as long-term integrity of the geological barrier in the post-operating phase A primary evaluation of constitutive model capabilities comes by way of predicting large-scale field tests. The Joint Project partners decided to model Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Rooms B & D which are full-scale rooms having the same dimensions. Room D deformed under natural, ambient conditions while Room B was thermally driven by an array of waste-simulating heaters (Munson et al. 1988; 1990). Existing laboratory test data for WIPP salt were carefully scrutinized and the partners decided that additional testing would be needed to help evaluate advanced features of the constitutive models. The German partners performed over 140 laboratory tests on WIPP salt at no charge to the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  1. DOE Partner Begins Carbon Storage Test | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergy HeadquartersFuel Cycle | Department of3.1-1 DOE M 483.1-1DOE OrderJanuary

  2. Workplace Charging Challenge Partner: CFV Solar Test Laboratory, Inc. |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'SEnergy Safely TearEnergy BiogenEnergy

  3. DOE and Partners Test Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technologies | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratory | DepartmentDOE Zero Energy ReadyHomeownersof

  4. United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling United States and Mexico to Partner in Fight Against Nuclear Smuggling April 16, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S....

  5. BETO Partners Win 20th Annual Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Partners Win 20th Annual Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards BETO Partners Win 20th Annual Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Awards July 23, 2015 - 3:21pm Addthis...

  6. RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT FOA RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT FOA September 29, 2015 - 10:43am Addthis...

  7. Evaluation of the Repeatability of the Delta Q Duct Leakage Testing Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of the Building Technologies Program and small commercial applications it uses the changes in blower door test results due to forced air system questions regarding the uncertainty due to changing weather during the test (particularly changes in wind

  8. NASA Partners License Nanotube Technology for Commercial Use...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    prnewswire.comnews-releasesnasa-partners-license-nanotube-technology-for-commercial-use-149724205.html Submitted: Monday, April 3...

  9. XG Sciences, ORNL partner on titanium-graphene composite materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    XG Sciences, ORNL partner on titaniumgraphene composite materials January 01, 2013 Titaniumgraphene composite specimens prepared for flash thermal diffusivity measurement....

  10. Partnering with Industry to Shape the Future (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pacheco, M. A.

    2013-02-01

    Keynote presentation given at the 2013 NTEA Green Truck Summit titled Partnering with Industry to Shape the Future.

  11. Proceedings of the Sudden Oak Death Third Science Symposium Evaluation of a Rapid Diagnostic Field Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , YO41 1LZ, UK. alan.inman@defra.gsi.gov.uk. #12;GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-214 380 Materials, considerable expertise and are not suited for plant health inspectors. Therefore, an extensive evaluation

  12. Evaluation of groundwater flow and transport at the Shoal underground nuclear test: An interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pohll, G.; Chapman, J.; Hassan, A.; Papelis, C.; Andricevic, R.; Shirley, C.

    1998-07-01

    Since 1962, all United States nuclear tests have been conducted underground. A consequence of this testing has been the deposition of large amounts of radioactive materials in the subsurface, sometimes in direct contact with groundwater. The majority of this testing occurred on the Nevada Test Site, but a limited number of experiments were conducted in other locations. One of these is the subject of this report, the Project Shoal Area (PSA), located about 50 km southeast of Fallon, Nevada. The Shoal test consisted of a 12-kiloton-yield nuclear detonation which occurred on October 26, 1963. Project Shoal was part of studies to enhance seismic detection of underground nuclear tests, in particular, in active earthquake areas. Characterization of groundwater contamination at the Project Shoal Area is being conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) with the State of Nevada Department of Environmental Protection and the US Department of Defense (DOD). This order prescribes a Corrective Action Strategy (Appendix VI), which, as applied to underground nuclear tests, involves preparing a Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP), Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD), Corrective Action Plan, and Closure Report. The scope of the CAIP is flow and transport modeling to establish contaminant boundaries that are protective of human health and the environment. This interim report describes the current status of the flow and transport modeling for the PSA.

  13. Evaluation of test methods for dynamic toughness characterization of duplex stainless steel forgings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natishan, M.E.; Tregoning, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    Ferralium is a dual-phase stainless steel which consists of roughly equal amounts of ferrite and austenite. Conventional Charpy V-notch impact tests were performed on specimens taken from several locations in three orientations from a forged Ferralium plate to quantify the materials dynamic fracture performance. The Charpy tests were compared with 2.54 cm thick (1T) single edge bend (SE(B)) specimens that were tested in a drop tower to measure dynamic fracture initiation toughness (K{sub Id}). SE(B) specimens were removed from three plate locations and tested in a single orientation. Charpy and K{sub Id} tests were performed over the entire fracture mode transition temperature range, but the bulk of testing was concentrated at a single temperature {minus}2 C to provide a statistically significant number of tests at a representative point in the ferritic fracture mode transition region. Charpy impact energy varied consistently with both orientation and location within the forged plate even though large scatter was present in the results. This large scatter precluded an accurate assessment of the materials fracture performance within the transition region. The scatter in the drop tower (SE(B)) results was much less and indicated that plate location had a minimal affect on performance. The reduced scatter in the SE(B) specimens is attributed to two factors. First, the microstructure of Ferralium, while macroscopically homogeneous, contains ferritic and austenitic phase sizes that approach the dimensions of the standard Charpy specimen. Second, the Charpy testing technique causes more variation than the standard SE(B) K{sub Id} tests within the transition region.

  14. Partnering efforts at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, C.B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Before individuals or agencies can effectively work together to solve common problems, they must first agree on exactly what those problems are and establish common goals and methods that will lead to mutually acceptable solutions. Then, they must make a conscientious effort to form a cohesive team that focuses on the established goals and deemphasize traditional roles, which may in some instances be considered adversarial. This kind of teamwork/partnering process can be more difficult, though not impossible, to achieve in cases where there are traditional (real or imagined) adversarial relationships between the parties, i.e. regulator vs. regulated. The US Department of Energy Site Office (DOE) at Paducah, Kentucky, the Kentucky Department of Environmental Protection (KDEP) and the US Environmental Protection Agency, Region IV (EPA) have made t strides toward teamwork and partnering at DOE`s Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. They have accomplished this in a number of ways, which will be discussed in greater detail but first and foremost, the agencies agreed up front that they had mutual goals and interests. These goals are to protect public health and the environment in a cost-effective and timely manner, taking care to make the wisest use of public resources (tax dollars); to evaluate and minimize risks, and to achieve ``Win-Win`` for all parties concerned.

  15. User's guide to closure evaluation system: CES beta-test version 1. 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.; McCready, J.

    1992-12-01

    The Closure Evaluation System (CES) is a decision support tool, developed by the U.S. EPA's Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory, to assist reviewers and preparers of Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit applications. CES is designed to serve as a checklist for identifying potential design problems in the vegetative cover, final cover, and leachate collection components of RCRA landfill closures as set forth in 40 CFR 264 and 40 CFR 265. It is not intended to be a complete automation of the evaluation process. The conclusions reached by the CES system (and it's modules) should serve either as a starting point for a more thorough investigation or as a final check applied after completion of a technical review. The CES system will, nevertheless, be useful in the directing the appropriate users attention to critical closure design issues and in applying design criteria that are supported by RCRA guidance. The CES system incorporates three modules that can assist in the evaluation of a proposed RCRA closure design: The Vegetative Cover Evaluation System (V-CES); The Final Cover Evaluation System (F-CES); and The Leachate Collection Evaluation System (L-CES). Since each module is a stand alone system, you can work with one module during a CES consultation or work with all three modules in any order.

  16. Laboratory and Modeling Evaluations in Support of Field Testing for Desiccation at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Ward, Anderson L.

    2011-02-23

    The Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau includes testing of the desiccation technology as a potential technology to be used in conjunction with surface infiltration control to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. Laboratory and modeling efforts were conducted to investigate technical uncertainties related to the desiccation process and its impact on contaminant transport. This information is intended to support planning, operation, and interpretation of a field test for desiccation in the Hanford Central Plateau.

  17. Cost and Risk Considerations for Test and Evaluation of Unmanned and Autonomous Systems of Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deonandan, Indira

    2010-06-22

    The evolutionary nature of Unmanned and Autonomous systems of systems (UASoS) acquisition needs to be matched by evolutionary test capabilities yet to be developed. As part of this effort we attempt to understand the cost ...

  18. MOWII Webinar: OCGen Prototype Testing: Evaluating Buoyancy Pod/Tension Leg Platforms for Tidal Energy Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) will present the results of the company's design, permitting, and testing of a mooring system for ocean energy devices in partnership with the U.S. Department...

  19. Experimental evaluation of a metal-mesh bearing damper in a high speed test rig 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zarzour, Mark Joseph

    1999-01-01

    Metal mesh is a commercially available material used in many applications including seals, heat shields, filters, gaskets, aircraft engine mounts, and vibration absorbers. This material has been tested in the Turbomachinery ...

  20. GPS/INS GENERALIZED EVALUATION TOOL (GIGET) FOR THE DESIGN AND TESTING OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    platforms to experimentally test and compare navigation performance. In side-by-side experiments, GIGET, or automotive grade inertial sen- sors with GPS. These results formulate a trade study to map previously

  1. Reservoir evaluation tests on RRGE 1 and RRGE 2, Raft River Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    response to the changes in the Earth's gravitational field caused by the passage of the sun and the moon. Overall, the results of the tests indicate that the geothermal reservoir...

  2. Evaluation of Ambient Particulate Matter (PM) Sampler Performance Through Wind Tunnel Testing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guha, Abhinav

    2010-07-14

    Particulate (TSP) pre-separators. The masses and particle size distributions (PSDs) obtained from the filters of tested samplers were compared to those of a collocated isokinetic sampler. Sampler performance was documented using two parameters: cut-point (d_50...

  3. Evaluation of Packaging Film Mechanical Integrity Using a Standardized Scratch Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hare, Brian

    2012-10-19

    Polymeric packaging films see widespread use in the food packaging industry, and their mechanical integrity is paramount to maintaining product appearance, freshness, and overall food safety. Current testing methods, such as tensile or puncture...

  4. Evaluation of a permeability-porosity relationship in a low permeability creeping material using a single transient test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghabezloo, Siavash; Saint-Marc, Jérémie; 10.1016/j.ijrmms.2008.10.003

    2008-01-01

    A method is presented for the evaluation of the permeability-porosity relationship in a low-permeability porous material using the results of a single transient test. This method accounts for both elastic and non-elastic deformations of the sample during the test and is applied to a hardened class G oil well cement paste. An initial hydrostatic undrained loading is applied to the sample. The generated excess pore pressure is then released at one end of the sample while monitoring the pore pressure at the other end and the radial strain in the middle of the sample during the dissipation of the pore pressure. These measurements are back analysed to evaluate the permeability and its evolution with porosity change. The effect of creep of the sample during the test on the measured pore pressure and volume change is taken into account in the analysis. This approach permits to calibrate a power law permeability-porosity relationship for the tested hardened cement paste. The porosity sensitivity exponent of the power...

  5. Development of a test facility for the experimental evaluation of liquid and gaseous automotive engine fuels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCanlies, John Michael

    1983-01-01

    Checkout 126 Uncertainty Analysis 131 APPENDIX F: DETAILED PROCEDURES AND ADDITIONAL BASELINE RESULTS 141 F. I F. 2 Test Procedures Additional Baseline Results 141 144 161 LIST OF TAGLES PAGE Table I: Variables to be Investigated in Original...quid methanol as a fuel for multi-cylinder automotive eng1nes. This investigation was conducted in two phases. During the first phase, the experimental test system was designed and constructed, and baseline engine performance with liquid methanol...

  6. Partners and Stakeholders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrder 422.1, CONDUCT P -Particle Receiver IntegratedPartners and

  7. EM Partnering Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof Energy LaboratoryApril 4,Partnering Initiative

  8. GNEP Partners and Observers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References: FARWashers | DepartmentGNEP Partners and

  9. Mass Properties Testing and Evaluation for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felicione, Frank S.

    2009-12-01

    Mass properties (MP) measurements were performed for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG), serial number (S/N) 0X730401, the power system designated for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. Measurements were made using new mounting fixtures at the mass properties testing station in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Space and Security Power Systems Facility (SSPSF). The objective of making mass properties measurements was to determine the generator’s flight configured mass and center of mass or center of gravity (CG). Using an extremely accurate platform scale, the mass of the as-tested generator was determined to be 100.117 ± 0.007 lb. Weight accuracy was determined by checking the platform scale with calibrated weights immediately prior to weighing the MMRTG.a CG measurement accuracy was assessed by surrogate testing using an inert mass standard for which the CG could be readily determined analytically. Repeated testing using the mass standard enabled the basic measurement precision of the system to be quantified in terms of a physical confidence interval about the measured CG position. However, repetitious testing with the MMRTG itself was not performed in deference to the gamma and neutron radiation dose to operators and the damage potential to the flight unit from extra handling operations. Since the mass standard had been specially designed to have a total weight and CG location that closely matched the MMRTG, the uncertainties determined from its testing were assigned to the MMRTG as well. On this basis, and at the 99% confidence level, a statistical analysis found the direct, as-measured MMRTG-MSL CG to be located at 10.816 ± 0.0011 in. measured perpendicular from the plane of the lower surface of the generator’s mounting lugs (Z direction), and offset from the generator’s long axis centerline in the X and Y directions by 0.0968 ± 0.0040 in. and 0.0276 ± 0.0026 in., respectively. These uncertainties are based simply on the statistical treatment of results from repetitive testing performed with the mass standard and included position variations that may have occurred during several mounting/dismounting operations of both the mass standard and mounting fixtures. Because of the limited data available, the computed uncertainty intervals reported are likely, although not assuredly, wider than the intervals that would have been found had more extensive data been available. However, these uncertainties do not account for other contributors to measurement uncertainty that might be applicable. These include potential weighing errors, possible tilt of the as-mounted test article, or translation of the measurement results from the MP instrument coordinates to those of the test article. Furthermore, when testing heat producing test articles such as the MMRTG, measurement degradation can occur from thermal expansion/contraction of the mounting fixtures as they heat up or cool and cause a subtle repositioning of the test article. Analyses for such impacts were made and additional uncertainty allowances were conservatively assigned to account for these. A full, detailed description is provided in this report.

  10. A new method for evaluating the plastic properties of materials through instrumented frictional sliding tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dao, Ming

    A new method for evaluating the plastic properties of materials through instrumented frictional-electro-mechanical systems. This paper describes a new method for estimating the plastic properties, i.e. the yield strength analysis) uses dimensionless functions derived from computational simulations to extract plastic properties

  11. Test rig and particulate deposit and cleaning evaluation processes using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schroder, Mark Stewart (Hendersonville, NC); Woodmansee, Donald Ernest (Schenectady, NY); Beadie, Douglas Frank (Greer, SC)

    2002-01-01

    A rig and test program for determining the amount, if any, of contamination that will collect in the passages of a fluid flow system, such as a power plant fluid delivery system to equipment assemblies or sub-assemblies, and for establishing methods and processes for removing contamination therefrom. In the presently proposed embodiment, the rig and test programs are adapted in particular to utilize a high-pressure, high-volume water flush to remove contamination from substantially the entire fluid delivery system, both the quantity of contamination and as disposed or deposited within the system.

  12. EVALUATION OF MECHANICAL RELIABILITY OF SILICON NITRIDE VANES AFTER FIELD TESTS IN AN INDUSTRIAL GAS TURBINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    GAS TURBINE H.-T. Lin and M. K. Ferber Metals and Ceramics Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak field tests in an industrial gas turbine. Two commercially available silicon nitride vanes (i.e., AS800- temperature structural components in advanced gas turbines [1-5]. These materials offer the advantages of (1

  13. Evaluation of Mechanical Reliability of Silicon Nitride Vanes After Field Tests in an Industrial Gas Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    Vanes Was Successfully Completed by Rolls-Royce Allison in 1999 Model 501K Turbine Exxon - Mobile, AL Dovetail Region Production Billets #12;200 hr Interval - Exxon - 6/29/99 Phase I Testing of Silicon Nitride-sprayed Oxide-based EBC (~ 150-200 µm) 4 µm8 µm #12;Ceramic Vane Turbine Demonstration Details · Exxon turbine

  14. Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilling, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Dilling@moffitt.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida (United States); Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca [Department of Statistics, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Forastiere, Arlene [Departments of Oncology, Radiation Oncology, and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Kian Ang, K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Methods and Materials: Patients from RTOG studies 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered vs. non-partnered), race (white vs. non-white), and sex (female vs. male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p values. Results: A total of 1,736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS rates compared to partnered females (adjusted HR = 1.22, 95% CI, 1.09-1.36), partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.28), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.20, 95% CI, 1.09-1.32). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC compared to partnered males (adjusted HR = 1.26, 95% CI, 1.09-1.46) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR = 1.30, 95% CI, 1.05-1.62). White females had LRC superior to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC compared to non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC compared to partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC compared to unpartnered non-whites. Conclusions: Race, gender, and partner status had impacts on both OS and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination.

  15. Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis for Decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. B. Culp

    2006-10-01

    Preparation of this Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis is consistent with the joint U.S. Department of Energy and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Policy on Decommissioning of Department of Energy Facilities Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act, which establishes the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act non-time-critical removal action (NTCRA) process as an approach for decommissioning.

  16. HYBRID LAMINAR FLOW TECHNOLOGY Partner: EADS Airbus (D) (Coordinator), Apparatebau Gauting (D), EADS Airbus (F), Aerospace Systems and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlin,Technische Universität

    HYBRID LAMINAR FLOW TECHNOLOGY (HYLTEC) Partner: EADS Airbus (D) (Coordinator), Apparatebau Gauting Task1 Operational flight tests, lab tests, manufacturing issues Task2 Laminar flow retrofit studies high drag HLFC via suction causes laminar flow therefore lower drag HYLTEC topics: Consequences

  17. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, February 1987--July 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Hall, D.; Harrison, S.; Liggett, W.; Linzer, M.; Ricker, R.; Ruspi, J.; Shull, R.

    1988-05-01

    The waste package is a proposed engineering barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Technical discussions are given for the corrosion of metals proposed for the canister, particularly carbon steels, stainless steels, and copper. The current level of understanding of several canister materials is questioned for the candidate repository in tuff. Three issues are addressed, the possibility of the stress-induced failure of Zircaloy, the possible corrosion of copper and copper alloys, and the lack of site-specific characterization data. Discussions are given on problems concerning localized corrosion and environmentally assisted cracking of AISI 1020 steel at elevated temperatures (150{degree}C). For the proposed salt site, the importance of the duration of corrosion tests and some of the conditions that may preclude prompt initiation of needed long-term testing are two issues that are discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  18. Examination of a Standardized Test for Evaluating the Degree of Cure of EVA Encapsulation: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D. C.; Gu, X.; Haldenman, S.; Hidalgo, M.; Malguth, E.; Reid, C. G.; Shioda, T.; Schulze, S. H.; Wang, Z. Y.; Wohlgemuth, J. H.

    2013-11-01

    The curing of cross-linkable encapsulation is a critical consideration for photovoltaic (PV) modules manufactured using a lamination process. Concerns related to ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA) include the quality (e.g., expiration and uniformity) of the films or completion (duration) of the cross-linking of the EVA within a laminator. Because these issues are important to both EVA and module manufacturers, an international standard has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the degree of cure for EVA encapsulation. The present draft of the standard calls for the use of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) as the rapid, enabling secondary (test) method. Both the residual enthalpy- and melt/freeze-DSC methods are identified. The DSC methods are calibrated against the gel content test, the primary (reference) method. Aspects of other established methods, including indentation and rotor cure metering, were considered by the group. Key details of the test procedure will be described.

  19. Association of macroscopic laboratory testing and micromechanics modelling for the evaluation of the poroelastic parameters of a hardened cement paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghabezloo, Siavash

    2010-01-01

    The results of a macro-scale experimental study performed on a hardened class G cement paste [Ghabezloo et al. (2008) Cem. Con. Res. (38) 1424-1437] are used in association with the micromechanics modelling and homogenization technique for evaluation of the complete set of poroelastic parameters of the material. The experimental study consisted in drained, undrained and unjacketed isotropic compression tests. Analysis of the experimental results revealed that the active porosity of the studied cement paste is smaller than its total porosity. A multi-scale homogenization model, calibrated on the experimental results, is used to extrapolate the poroelastic parameters to cement pastes prepared with different water-to-cement ratio. The notion of cement paste active porosity is discussed and the poroelastic parameters of hardened cement paste for an ideal, perfectly drained condition are evaluated using the homogenization model.

  20. Association of macroscopic laboratory testing and micromechanics modelling for the evaluation of the poroelastic parameters of a hardened cement paste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siavash Ghabezloo

    2010-06-25

    The results of a macro-scale experimental study performed on a hardened class G cement paste [Ghabezloo et al. (2008) Cem. Con. Res. (38) 1424-1437] are used in association with the micromechanics modelling and homogenization technique for evaluation of the complete set of poroelastic parameters of the material. The experimental study consisted in drained, undrained and unjacketed isotropic compression tests. Analysis of the experimental results revealed that the active porosity of the studied cement paste is smaller than its total porosity. A multi-scale homogenization model, calibrated on the experimental results, is used to extrapolate the poroelastic parameters to cement pastes prepared with different water-to-cement ratio. The notion of cement paste active porosity is discussed and the poroelastic parameters of hardened cement paste for an ideal, perfectly drained condition are evaluated using the homogenization model.

  1. Second Line of Defense, Port of Buenos Aires and Exolgan Container Terminal Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Bryan W.

    2012-08-23

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Megaports project team for Argentina will conduct operational testing and evaluation (OT&E) at Exolgan Container Terminal at the Port of Dock Sud from July 16-20, 2012; and at the Port of Buenos Aires from September 3-7, 2012. SLD is installing radiation detection equipment to screen export, import, and transshipment containers at these locations. The purpose of OT&E is to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the SLD mission and to ensure the system continues to perform as expected in an operational environment with Argentina Customs effectively adjudicating alarms.

  2. Test report : Milspray Scorpion energy storage device.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors have supplied their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and a subset of these systems were selected for performance evaluation at the BCIL. The technologies tested were electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. MILSPRAY Military Technologies has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lead acid batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited assessment of the Milspray Scorpion Energy Storage Device.

  3. Chiral Partners in a Chirally Broken World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Leupold; Markus Wagner

    2008-07-15

    The isovector--vector and the isovector--axial-vector current are related by a chiral transformation. These currents can be called chiral partners at the fundamental level. In a world where chiral symmetry was not broken, the corresponding current-current correlators would show the same spectral information. In the real world chiral symmetry is spontaneously broken. A prominent peak -- the rho-meson -- shows up in the vector spectrum (measured in (e^+ e^-)-collisions and tau-decays). On the other hand, in the axial-vector spectrum a broad bump appears -- the a_1-meson (also accessible in tau-decays). It is tempting to call rho and a_1 chiral partners at the hadronic level. Strong indications are brought forward that these ``chiral partners'' do not only differ in mass but even in their nature: The rho-meson appears dominantly as a quark-antiquark state with small modifications from an attractive pion-pion interaction. The a_1-meson, on the other hand, can be understood as a meson-molecule state mainly formed by the attractive interaction between pion and rho-meson. A key issue here is that the meson-meson interactions are fixed by chiral symmetry breaking. It is demonstrated that one can understand the vector and the axial-vector spectrum very well within this interpretation. It is also shown that the opposite cases, namely rho as a pion-pion molecule or a_1 as a quark-antiquark state lead to less satisfying results. Finally speculations on possible in-medium changes of hadron properties are presented.

  4. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 1 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  5. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 5 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  6. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 6 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  7. A Historical Evaluation of the U12t Tunnel, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Volume 2 of 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harold Drollinger; Robert C. Jones; and Thomas F. Bullard; Desert Research Institute, Laurence J. Ashbaugh, Southern Nevada Courier Service and Wayne R. Griffin, Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2009-02-01

    This report presents a historical evaluation of the U12t Tunnel on the Nevada Test Site in southern Nevada. The work was conducted by the Desert Research Institute at the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office and the U.S. Department of Defense, Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA). The U12t Tunnel is one of a series of tunnels used for underground nuclear weapons effects tests on the east side of Rainier and Aqueduct Mesas. Six nuclear weapons effects tests, Mint Leaf, Diamond Sculls, Husky Pup, Midas Myth/Milagro, Mighty Oak, and Mission Ghost, and one high explosive test, SPLAT, were conducted within the U12t Tunnel from 1970 to 1987. All six of the nuclear weapons effects tests and the high explosive test were sponsored by DTRA. Two conventional weapons experiments, Dipole Knight and Divine Eagle, were conducted in the tunnel portal area in 1997 and 1998. These experiments were sponsored by the Defense Special Weapons Agency. The U12t Tunnel complex is composed of the Portal and Mesa Areas and includes an underground tunnel with a main access drift and nine primary drifts, a substantial tailings pile fronting the tunnel portal, a series of discharge ponds downslope of the tailings pile, and two instrumentation trailer parks and 16 drill holes on top of Aqueduct Mesa. A total of 89 cultural features were recorded: 54 at the portal and 35 on the mesa. In the Portal Area, cultural features are mostly concrete pads and building foundations; other features include the portal, rail lines, the camel back, ventilation and cooling system components, communication equipment, and electrical equipment. On the mesa are drill holes, a few concrete pads, a loading ramp, and electrical equipment.

  8. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results. Topical report, Task 7.30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors` designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550{degree}F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100{degree}F lower.

  9. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatiblemore »with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-? turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.« less

  10. Evaluation of Cooling Conditions for a High Heat Flux Testing Facility Based on Plasma-Arc Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charry, Carlos H.; Abdel-khalik, Said I.; Yoda, Minami; Sabau, Adrian S.; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2015-07-31

    The new Irradiated Material Target Station (IMTS) facility for fusion materials at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) uses an infrared plasma-arc lamp (PAL) to deliver incident heat fluxes as high as 27 MW/m2. The facility is being used to test irradiated plasma-facing component materials as part of the joint US-Japan PHENIX program. The irradiated samples are to be mounted on molybdenum sample holders attached to a water-cooled copper rod. Depending on the size and geometry of samples, several sample holders and copper rod configurations have been fabricated and tested. As a part of the effort to design sample holders compatible with the high heat flux (HHF) testing to be conducted at the IMTS facility, numerical simulations have been performed for two different water-cooled sample holder designs using the ANSYS FLUENT 14.0 commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package. The primary objective of this work is to evaluate the cooling capability of different sample holder designs, i.e. to estimate their maximum allowable incident heat flux values. 2D axisymmetric numerical simulations are performed using the realizable k-? turbulence model and the RPI nucleate boiling model within ANSYS FLUENT 14.0. The results of the numerical model were compared against the experimental data for two sample holder designs tested in the IMTS facility. The model has been used to parametrically evaluate the effect of various operational parameters on the predicted temperature distributions. The results were used to identify the limiting parameter for safe operation of the two sample holders and the associated peak heat flux limits. The results of this investigation will help guide the development of new sample holder designs.

  11. Sustainable Power Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model forTechnologies Ltd Jump to:Power Partners Jump to:

  12. Jane Capital Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8,OpenKentucky: EnergyFacility |Jane Capital Partners Jump

  13. New Hope Partners LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures LtdNeville, Ohio: EnergyHaven County, Connecticut:Partners LLC Jump

  14. New Hope Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI Ventures LtdNeville, Ohio: EnergyHaven County, Connecticut:Partners LLC

  15. Ambata Capital Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name:Ambata Capital Partners Jump to:

  16. M 1 Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lyon-Lincoln Electric Coop IncPartners Jump

  17. North America Power Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon: EnergyNongqishi Electric PowerHandelsPower Partners

  18. Property:Partner | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report Url Jump to: navigation,News/LinkUtilityPartOf Jump to:Partner

  19. Arch Venture Partners (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to:AngolaEnergyAquaAratuaOklahoma: EnergyPartners

  20. ARCH Venture Partners (Texas) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgramInformation ALLETE,ARCH Venture Partners (Texas)

  1. Category:CLEAN Partner | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,Cammack Village,8199089°,Analytical Modeling JumpCLEAN Partner Jump to:

  2. Bluefield Partners LLP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformationBio-GasIllinois: EnergyHills,Bluefield Partners LLP Jump to:

  3. China Export Partners | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR JumpMaine:WestTexas: EnergyExport Partners Jump to: navigation,

  4. NGEN Partners LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsourceEnergyTexas:NGEN Partners LLC (SouthernNGEN

  5. PartneringFuture | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O StreamsParticipantsParties agree to settlePartnering With

  6. Partners of the MFRC | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEYI/O StreamsParticipantsParties agree to settlePartnering

  7. Testing three health impact assessment tools in planning: A process evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schively Slotterback, Carissa; Forsyth, Ann; Krizek, Kevin J.; Johnson, Amanda; Pennucci, Aly

    2011-03-15

    There is increasing interest in Health Impact Assessment in planning. This paper describes the results of different approaches to health impact assessment (HIA) conducted in 10 municipalities and one county in Minnesota. The paper outlines the HIA processes, outputs, and short-term outcomes concluding that it is important to engage a diverse group of stakeholders. Overall, HIA is potentially an important new tool in the planning toolkit. Strategic use of HIA to evaluate draft plans and inform plan updates and project redesigns can help raise awareness about health issues and focus planning on important human problems.

  8. EVALUATION OF AP-FARM SIMULANT COMPOSITION FOR ROTARY MICROFILTER TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HUBER HJ

    2011-09-19

    This document identifies the feed composition of a Hanford AP tank farm simulant for rotary microfiltration testing. The composition is based on an Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) model run in combination with Tank Waste Information Network (TWINS) data and mineralogical studies of actual waste solids. The feed simulant is intended to be used in test runs at SRNL. The simulant will be prepared in two parts: (1) A supernate, composed of water-soluble salts and (2) The undissolved (actually, undissolvable) solids. Test slurries with distinct solids concentrations (e.g., 0.5, 5 and 10 wt%) are then prepared as needed. The base for the composition of supernate and solids is the modeled feed sequence for a deployment scenario of the Supplemental Pretreatment units within AP-farm. These units comprise a filtration part, the RMF, and a Cesium-removal part, a Small Column Ion Exchange. The primary use of this simulant is for filtration testing - however, in case that it is also used for ion-exchange tests, the amount of Cs-137 that would need to be added is available in Table 1 and Attachment 3. A modified model run (MMR-049) of the Hanford Tank Waste Operations Simulator (HTWOS) system plan 6 case 3 was performed to identify the feed sequence. Case 3 assumed supplemental treatment besides the low activity waste (LAW) melter with supplemental pretreatment supporting the pretreatment facility. The MMR did not cap the duration of supplemental pretreatment to 15 months, but rather used it throughout the entire treatment mission as an add-on option to the pretreatment facility at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Tank 241-AP-105 (AP-105) was chosen as the feed tank to the filtration unit. Other parameters included a fixed minimum of 0.5 wt% solids in the feed and a maximum Na-concentration of 5M in the supernate. The solids rejection from the filtration unit was set to 99.99% and the maximum allowed amount of solids within tank AP-105 was set to 10 wt%. A comprehensive description of the run and the full suite of results were issued as SVF-2364-00. The list of individual feed events including the amounts of liquid and solids transferred for the first five years is added as Attachment 2; the chemical composition of the supernate feed comprises Attachment 3. For the simulant composition, only the first five years of proposed feed delivery were taken into account. The main outcome of MMR-049 was that for the first five years, the feed would come mostly from AP-farms. Multiple delivery campaigns to AP-105 are included in this average feed, while minimizing the amount of contributing tanks to the solids in the feed mix.

  9. Degree project 30hp, (20 weeks) at Q-linea AB, Uppsala. The project is aimed to test and evaluate image analysis algorithms for analysis of images obtained

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uppsala Universitet

    Degree project 30hp, (20 weeks) at Q-linea AB, Uppsala. The project is aimed to test and evaluate-lineas sepsis project. Based on a novel and proprietary molecular platform, Q-linea develops fully automated

  10. An evaluation of the enzyme labeled antibody test for the diagnosis of bovine brucellosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, John W

    1977-01-01

    was of lower molecular weight (7S), heat stable, and insensitive to mercapto- ethanol reduction. Within the IgG class there existed two subclasses, IgG1 and IgG2. IgG1 was most common in serum and lacteal secretions. IgN was found to be a very efficient...? Table 1. ELA test results from reaction of anti ? IgG, anti-lgM, and a anti-gamma globulin conjugates with dilutions of bovine IgG mg bovine lgG/well anti-IgG anti-IgM anti-gamma globulin 6. 25 x 10 -3 3. 13 x 10 1 56 x 10 -3 7 8 x 10 3. 9 x 10 -4...

  11. Evaluation of Demo 1C composite flywheel rotor burst test and containment design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kass, M.D.; McKeever, J.W.; Akerman, M.A.; Goranson, P.L.; Litherland, P.S.; O`Kain, D.U.

    1998-07-01

    Laboratory-Directed funds were provided in FY 1995 for research to develop flywheel containment specifications and to consider concepts that could satisfy these specifications and produce a prototype small, lightweight, inexpensive, mobile flywheel containment. Research activities have included an analytical and pictorial review of the Demo 1C flywheel failure test, which provided significant insight about radial and axial failure modes; calculations of the thickness of ultra-conservative pressure vessel containment; entertainment of advanced containment concepts using lightweight materials and armor literature; consideration of fabrication assembly procedures; and participation in a Flywheel Energy Storage Workshop during which additional flywheel failure experiences were discussed. Based on these activities, calculations, and results, a list of conclusions concerning flywheel containment and its relation to the flywheel are presented followed by recommendations for further research.

  12. Evaluation of ELISA screening test for detecting aflatoxin in biogenic dust samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, J.T.

    1996-05-01

    Aflatoxin is a carcinogenic chemical that is sometimes produced when agricultural commodities are infested by the fungi Aspergillus flavus and A. Parasiticus. Aflatoxin has been found to be present in air samples taken around persons handling materials likely to be contaminated. The purpose of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of using an Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) test kit that was developed to screen for aflatoxin in bulk agricultural commodities, to an air sample. Samples were taken from two environments likely to be contaminated with aflatoxin, a dairy farm feed mixing operation and a peanut bagging operation. The dust collected from these environments was considered to be biogenic, in that it originated primarily from biological materials.

  13. Frontside-micromachined planar piezoresistive vibration sensor: Evaluating performance in the low frequency test range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lan; Lu, Jian, E-mail: jian-lu@aist.go.jp; Takagi, Hideki; Maeda, Ryutaro [Research Center for Ubiquitous MEMS and Micro Engineering (UMEMSME), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8564 (Japan)] [Research Center for Ubiquitous MEMS and Micro Engineering (UMEMSME), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8564 (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    Using a surface piezoresistor diffusion method and front-side only micromachining process, a planar piezoresistive vibration sensor was successfully developed with a simple structure, lower processing cost and fewer packaging difficulties. The vibration sensor had a large sector proof mass attached to a narrow flexure. Optimization of the boron diffusion piezoresistor placed on the edge of the narrow flexure greatly improved the sensitivity. Planar vibration sensors were fabricated and measured in order to analyze the effects of the sensor dimensions on performance, including the values of flexure width and the included angle of the sector. Sensitivities of fabricated planar sensors of 0.09–0.46 mV/V/g were measured up to a test frequency of 60 Hz. The sensor functioned at low voltages (<3 V) and currents (<1 mA) with a high sensitivity and low drift. At low background noise levels, the sensor had performance comparable to a commercial device.

  14. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels and Bioproducts (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility, a biochemical pilot plant and partnership facility containing equipment and lab space for pretreatement, enzymatic hydrolysis, fermentation, compositional analysis, and downstream processing. For more than 30 years, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been at the leading edge of research and technology advancements to develop renewable fuels and bioproducts. NREL works to develop cost-competitive alternatives to conventional transportation fuels and value-added biobased chemicals that can be used to manufacture clothing, plastics, lubricants, and other products. NREL is developing technologies and processes to produce a range of sustainable, energy-dense advanced biofuels that are compatible with our existing transportation fuel infrastructure. As part of that effort, NREL's National Bioenergy Center has entered into more than 90 collaborations in the past five years with companies ranging in size from start-ups to those that appear on Fortune magazine's Fortune 100 list. The new Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (IBRF) showcases NREL's commitment to collaboration and to meeting the nation's biofuels and bioproducts development and deployment goals. Designed to speed the growth of the biofuels and bioproducts industries, the IBRF is a unique $33.5 million pilot facility capable of supporting a variety of projects. The IBRF is available to industry partners who work with NREL through cooperative research and development, technical, and analytical service agreements. With 27,000 ft2 of high bay space, the IBRF provides industry partners with the opportunity to operate, test, and develop their own biorefining technology and equipment.

  15. TAP Webinar: Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP), this webinar will cover the Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education Partners are demonstrating how clean energy initiatives can be achievable...

  16. Utility Partnership Program Agency Partners | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    agencies are partners in the Utility Partnership Program or have engaged in a utility energy service contract project. Agricultural Research Service Bureau of Prisons Bureau of...

  17. Energy Department Partners with State, City and Industry Stakeholders...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State, City and Industry Stakeholders to Help Hoboken Region Improve Its Electric Grid in the Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy Energy Department Partners with State, City and Industry...

  18. New Better Buildings Challenge Partners Commit 70 Million Square...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Moniz. "Joining hundreds of other organizations, these new partners are taking action to save money by saving energy, while also cutting carbon pollution and creating jobs."...

  19. Energy Smart Federal Partnership: Program Partners and Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation covers program partners and resources for the Energy Smart Partnership and is given at the Spring 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting.

  20. City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge, Partners with Energy Department to Reduce Energy Waste and Boost Efficiency City of Houston Joins Better Buildings Challenge,...

  1. Obama Administration Announces 14 Initial Partners in the Better...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buildings Challenge Obama Administration Announces 14 Initial Partners in the Better Buildings Challenge June 30, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. - Secretary of Energy...

  2. Performance Evaluation of Advanced Retrofit Roof Technologies Using Field-Test Data Phase Three Final Report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Childs, Phillip W.; Atchley, Jerald Allen

    2015-01-01

    This article presents some miscellaneous data from two low-slope and two steep-slope experimental roofs. The low-slope roofs were designed to compare the performance of various roof coatings exposed to natural weatherization. The steep-slope roofs contained different combinations of phase change material, rigid insulation, low emittance surface and above-sheathing ventilation, with standing-seam metal panels on top. The steep-slope roofs were constructed on a series of adjacent attics separated at the gables using thick foam insulation. This article describes phase three (3) of a study that began in 2009 to evaluate the energy benefits of a sustainable re-roofing technology utilizing standing-seam metal roofing panels combined with energy efficient features like above-sheathing-ventilation (ASV), phase change material (PCM) and rigid insulation board. The data from phases 1 and 2 have been previously published and reported [Kosny et al., 2011; Biswas et al., 2011; Biswas and Childs, 2012; Kosny et al., 2012]. Based on previous data analyses and discussions within the research group, additional test roofs were installed in May 2012, to test new configurations and further investigate different components of the dynamic insulation systems. Some experimental data from phase 3 testing from May 2012 to December 2013 and some EnergyPlus modeling results have been reported in volumes 1 and 3, respectively, of the final report [Biswas et al., 2014; Biswas and Bhandari, 2014].

  3. Methodology, Methods, and Metrics for Testing and Evaluating Augmented Cognition Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2008-09-15

    The augmented cognition research community seeks cognitive neuroscience-based solutions to improve warfighter performance by applying and managing mitigation strategies to reduce workload and improve the throughput and quality of decisions. The focus of augmented cognition mitigation research is to define, demonstrate, and exploit neuroscience and behavioral measures that support inferences about the warfighter’s cognitive state that prescribe the nature and timing of mitigation. A research challenge is to develop valid evaluation methodologies, metrics and measures to assess the impact of augmented cognition mitigations. Two considerations are external validity, which is the extent to which the results apply to operational contexts; and internal validity, which reflects the reliability of performance measures and the conclusions based on analysis of results. The scientific rigor of the research methodology employed in conducting empirical investigations largely affects the validity of the findings. External validity requirements also compel us to demonstrate operational significance of mitigations. Thus it is important to demonstrate effectiveness of mitigations under specific conditions. This chapter reviews some cognitive science and methodological considerations in designing augmented cognition research studies and associated human performance metrics and analysis methods to assess the impact of augmented cognition mitigations.

  4. Evaluation of Advanced New Construction Packages in Test Homes. Lake Elsinore, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.

    2013-08-01

    This report presents the long-term evaluation results from a hot-dry climate project that examines the room-to-room temperature conditions that exist in a high performance envelope, the performance of a simplified air distribution system, and a comparison of modeled energy performance with measured energy use. The project, a prototype house built by K. Hovnanian Homes’ Ontario Group, is located in Lake Elsinore, Riverside County, California, and achieves a 50% level of whole house source energy savings with respect to the Building America (BA) Benchmark Definition 2009 (Hendron and Engebrecht 2010). Temperature measurements in three rooms indicate that the temperature difference between the measured locations and the thermostat were within recommendations 90.3% of the time in heating mode and 99.3% of the time in cooling mode. The air distribution system is operating efficiently with average delivered temperatures adequate to facilitate proper heating and cooling and only minor average temperature differences observed between the system’s plenum and farthest register. Monitored energy use results for the house indicate that it is using less energy than predicted from modeling. A breakdown of energy use according to end use determined little agreement between comparable values.

  5. Evaluation and compilation of DOE waste package test data: Biannual report, August 1987--January 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Ondik, H.; Plante, E.; Ricker, R.; Ruspi, J.

    1988-08-01

    This report summarizes results of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) evaluations on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW). The waste package is a proposed engineered barrier that is part of a permanent repository for HLW. Metal alloys are the principal barriers within the engineered system. Since enactment of the Budget Reconciliation Act for Fiscal Year 1988, the Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site (in which tuff is the geologic medium) is the only site that will be characterized for use as high-level nuclear waste repository. During the reporting period of August 1987 to January 1988, five reviews were completed for tuff, and these were grouped into the categories: ferrous alloys, copper, groundwater chemistry, and glass. Two issues are identified for the Yucca Mountain site: the approach used to calculate corrosion rates for ferrous alloys, and crevice corrosion was observed in a copper-nickel alloy. Plutonium can form pseudo-colloids that may facilitate transport. NBS work related to the vitrification of HLW borosilicate glass at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) and the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and activities of the DOE Materials Characterization Center (MCC) for the 6-month reporting period are also included. 27 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Evaluation of Dynamic Behavior of Pile Foundations for Interim Storage Facilities Through Geotechnical Centrifuge Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shizuo Tsurumaki; Hiroyuki Watanabe; Akira Tateishi; Kenichi Horikoshi; Shunichi Suzuki

    2002-07-01

    In Japan, there is a possibility that interim storage facilities for recycled nuclear fuel resources may be constructed on quaternary layers, rather than on hard rock. In such a case, the storage facilities need to be supported by pile foundations or spread foundations to meet the required safety level. The authors have conducted a series of experimental studies on the dynamic behavior of storage facilities supported by pile foundations. A centrifuge modeling technique was used to satisfy the required similitude between the reduced size model and the prototype. The centrifuge allows a high confining stress level equivalent to prototype deep soils to be generated (which is considered necessary for examining complex pile-soil interactions) as the soil strength and the deformation are highly dependent on the confining stress. The soil conditions were set at as experimental variables, and the results are compared. Since 2000, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) has been conducting these research tests under the auspices on the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry of Japan. (authors)

  7. Strategy Guideline. Partnering for High Performance Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prahl, Duncan

    2013-01-01

    High performance houses require a high degree of coordination and have significant interdependencies between various systems in order to perform properly, meet customer expectations, and minimize risks for the builder. Responsibility for the key performance attributes is shared across the project team and can be well coordinated through advanced partnering strategies. For high performance homes, traditional partnerships need to be matured to the next level and be expanded to all members of the project team including trades, suppliers, manufacturers, HERS raters, designers, architects, and building officials as appropriate. This guide is intended for use by all parties associated in the design and construction of high performance homes. It serves as a starting point and features initial tools and resources for teams to collaborate to continually improve the energy efficiency and durability of new houses.

  8. Pond Management 1 Gilchrist 4-H Partners with Local 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    Pond Management 1 Gilchrist 4-H Partners with Local 1 SWAT Clubs Optimizing Peanut Harvest 2 On My Faculty 7 Resignation 7 OCTOBER 2010 Table of Contents Pond Management 1 Gilchrist 4-H Partners with Local and Waterways Management Reeling Em' In!! 7 New Faculty 7 Resignation 7 Pond Management In Northeast Florida

  9. Evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic response and fuel rod thermal and mechanical deformation behavior during the power burst facility test LOC-3. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yackle, T.R.; MacDonald, P.E.; Broughton, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    An evaluation of the results from the LOC-3 nuclear blowdown test conducted in the Power Burst Facility is presented. The test objective was to examine fuel and cladding behavior during a postulated cold leg break accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Separate effects of rod internal pressure and the degree of irradiation were investigated in the four-rod test. Extensive cladding deformation (ballooning) and failure occurred during blowdown. The deformation of the low and high pressure rods was similar; however, the previously irradiated test rod deformed to a greater extent than a similar fresh rod exposed to identical system conditions.

  10. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant designed for the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials for the development of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The FFTF was fueled with plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) and reflected by Inconel-600. Westinghouse Hanford Company operated the FFTF as part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the U.S. Department of Energy on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although the FFTF was a testing facility not specifically designed to breed fuel or produce electricity, it did provide valuable information for LMFBR projects and base technology programs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, prototype testing, and site construction. The major objectives of the FFTF were to provide a strong, disciplined engineering base for the LMFBR program, provide fast flux testing for other U.S. programs, and contribute to the development of a viable self-sustaining competitive U.S. LMFBR industry. During its ten years of operation, the FFTF acted as a national research facility to test advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, systems, nuclear power plant operating and maintenance procedures, and active and passive reactor safety technologies; it also produced a large number of isotopes for medical and industrial users, generated tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and participated in cooperative, international research work. Prior to the implementation of the reactor characterization program, a series of isothermal physics measurements were performed; this acceptance testing program consisted of a series of control rod worths, critical rod positions, subcriticality measurements, maximum reactivity addition rates, shutdown margins, excess reactivity, and isothermal temperature coefficient reactivity. The results of these experiments were of particular importance because they provide extensive information which can be directly applied to the design of large LMFBR’s. It should be recognized that the data presented in the initial report were evaluated only to the extent necessary to ensure that adequate data were obtained. Later reports provided further interpretation and detailed comparisons with prediction techniques. The conclusion of the isothermal physics measurements was that the FFTF nuclear characteristics were essentially as designed and all safety requirements were satisfied. From a nuclear point of view, the FFTF was qualified to proceed into power operation mode. The FFTF was completed in 1978 and first achieved criticality on February 9, 1980. Upon completion of the isothermal physics and reactor characterization programs, the FFTF operated for ten years from April 1982 to April 1992. Reactor operations of the FFTF were terminated and the reactor facility was then defueled, deactivated, and placed into cold standby condition. Deactivation of the reactor was put on hold from 1996 to 2000 while the U.S. Department of Energy examined alternative uses for the FFTF but then announced the permanent deactivation of the FFTF in December 2001. Its core support basket was later drilled in May 2005, so as to remove all remaining sodium coolant. On April 17, 2006, the American Nuclear Society designated the FFTF as a “National Nuclear Historic Landmark”.

  11. test and evaluation

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2Anational lab |buisness8/%2A5/%2A en

  12. BETTER BUILDINGS PARTNER SUMMARIES | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Camden, New Jersey Summary Chicago, Illinois Summary Evaluation Cincinnati, Ohio Summary Connecticut Summary Eagle County, Colorado Summary Fayette County, Pennsylvania Summary...

  13. Field test evaluation of conservation retrofits of low-income, single-family buildings in Wisconsin: Audit field test implementation and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCold, L.N.; Schlegel, J.A.; O'Leary, L.; Hewitt, D.C.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes the field test of a retrofit audit. The field test was performed during the winter of 1985-86 in four south central Wisconsin counties. The purpose of the field test was to measure the energy savings and cost effectiveness of the audit-directed retrofit program for optimizing the program's benefit-to-cost ratio. The audit-directed retrofit program is described briefly in this report and in more detail by another report in this series (ORNL/CON-228/P3). The purpose of this report is to describe the methods and results of the field test. 3 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  14. RTAP evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cupps, K.; Elko, S.; Folta, P.

    1995-01-23

    An in-depth analysis of the RTAP product was undertaken within the CNC associate program to determine the feasibility of utilizing it to replace the current Supervisory Control System that supports the AVLIS program. This document contains the results of that evaluation. With some fundamental redesign the current Supervisory Control system could meet the needs described above. The redesign would require a large amount of software rewriting and would be very time consuming. The higher level functionality (alarming, automation, etc.) would have to wait until its completion. Our current understanding and preliminary testing indicate that using commercial software is the best way to get these new features at the minimum cost to the program. Additional savings will be obtained by moving the maintenance costs of the basic control system from in-house to commercial industry and allowing our developers to concentrate on the unique control areas that require customization. Our current operating system, VMS, has become a hindrance. The UNIX operating system has become the choice for most scientific and engineering systems and we should follow suit. As a result of the commercial system survey referenced above we selected RTAP, a SCADA product developed by Hewlett Packard (HP), as the most favorable product to replace the current supervisory system in AVLIS. It is an extremely open system, with a large, well defined Application Programming Interface (API). This will allow the seamless integration of unique front end devices in the laser area (e.g. Optical Device Controller). RTAP also possesses various functionality that is lacking in our current system: integrated alarming, real-time configurable database, system scalability, and a Sequence Control Language (SQL developed by CPU, an RTAP Channel Partner) that will facilitate the automation necessary to bring the AVLIS process to plant-line operation. It runs on HP-9000, DEC-Alpha, IBM-RS6000 and Sun Workstations.

  15. FY 1994 program summary: Office of Technology Development, Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management, formerly the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), was established in November 1989 as the first step toward correcting contamination problems resulting from nearly 50 years of nuclear weapons production and fuel processing activities. EM consolidates several DOE organizations previously responsible for the handling, treatment, and disposition of radioactive and hazardous waste. Within EM, the Office of Technology Development (OTD/EM-50) is responsible for developing technologies to meet DOE`s goal for environmental restoration. OTD manages an aggressive national program of applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation (RDDT and E) for environmental cleanup, waste management, and related technologies. The program is designed to resolve major technical issues, to rapidly advanced beyond current technologies for environmental restoration and waste management operations, and to expedite compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations. This report summarizes Fiscal Year 1994 (FY94) programmatic information, accomplishments, and planned activities relevant to the individual activities within OTD`s RDDT and E.

  16. Evaluating preproduction prototypes of new energy-efficiency products in realistic test beds is an essential step before market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    (ground- source) integrated heat pump. · The first test buildings will be installed on the new light

  17. The Financial Impact of Domestic Partner Benefits in New Hampshire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badgett, M.V. Lee

    2006-01-01

    Management Unit, State of New Hampshire. 2006. Self- FundedConcord: State of New Hampshire. December 2006 Hadley, JackPartner Benefits in New Hampshire Dec. 20, 2006). Ragins,

  18. TAP Webinar: Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This webinar, held on Jan. 21, 2015, covered the Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education Partners are demonstrating how clean energy initiatives can be achievable and effective in reducing energy costs and climate impact.

  19. Fact #857 January 26, 2015 Number of Partner Workplaces Offering...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    these partners in August 2014 showed that the availability of workplace electric vehicle (EV) charging increased to about 275 workplaces in 2014, a 345% growth from 2011. Of those...

  20. Better Buildings Partners Gather to Plan for the Future | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and enhance their business models to ensure that their efforts thrive well into the future. "We wanted to help our partners prepare for the future, even while they are still...

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Partner Central | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Central DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Partner Central The DOE Zero Energy Ready Home label is the symbol of excellence for new homes. Join the ranks of leading edge builders who...

  2. Three New Partners Join the Better Buildings Challenge | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    February 21, 2013 - 11:59am Addthis Johnson Controls, one of the three new Better Buildings Challenge partners, will reduce its energy use by 25 percent in 71 of its U.S....

  3. Teaming Partner List Available for the Innovative Composites...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    on low-cost, energy efficient manufacturing and recycling of advanced fiber-reinforced polymer composites. See the FOA for instructions on how to be added to the Teaming Partner...

  4. Test report : Raytheon / KTech RK30 energy storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Raytheon/KTech has developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Raytheon/KTech Zinc-Bromide Energy Storage System.

  5. Test Report : GS battery, EPC power HES RESCU.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-10-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprising of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. GS Battery and EPC Power have developed an energy storage system that utilizes zinc-bromide flow batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the GS Battery, EPC Power HES RESCU.

  6. Test report : Princeton power systems prototype energy storage system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors will be sending their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and then to the BCIL for performance evaluation. The technologies that will be tested are electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. Princeton Power Systems has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lithium ion phosphate batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited analysis of performance of the Princeton Power Systems Prototype Energy Storage System.

  7. U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And Mission Support Alliance, LLC Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and the Mission Support Alliance, LLC (MSA) are committed to continuous improvement and will partner together to enchance teaming...

  8. Airborne measurements of total sulfur gases during NASA global tropospheric experiment/chemical instrumentation test and evaluation 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farwell, S.O.; MacTaggart, D.L.; Chatham, W.H.

    1995-04-20

    A metal foil collection/flash desorption/flame photometric detection (MFC/FD/FPD) technique was used by investigators from the University of Idaho (UI) to measure ambient total sulfur gas concentrations from an aircraft platform during the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment/Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation 3 (GTE/CITE 3) program. The MFC/FD/FPD technique allowed rapid quantitation of tropospheric background air masses using sample integration times of 1-3 min with little or no gap between measurements. The rapid and continual sampling nature of this technique yielded data covering approximately 75% of the entire CITE 3 program`s air track. Ambient air measurement data obtained during northern hemisphere (NH) flights often exhibited relatively high total sulfur gas values (up to 19 ppb) and an extremely high degree of sample heterogeneity, especially in coastal locations. Data from southern hemisphere (SH) flights typically exhibited relatively low total sulfur gas concentrations and a low degree of sample heterogeneity. A bimodal interhemispheric total sulfur gas gradient was observed using data obtained during transit flights between the two CITE 3 program ground bases. Comparisons were made of UI total sulfur gas measurements with composite sulfur gas values generated using speciated sulfur gas measurements from other CITE 3 participants. Only a relatively small number of overlap periods for comparison were obtained from all the available CITE 3 data because of large differences in measurement integration times and lack of synchronization of sample start/stop times for the various investigators. These effects were compounded with extreme sample heterogeneity in the NH and the speed at which the aircraft traversed the air masses being sampled. Comparison of NH UI total with composite sulfur gas values showed excellent correlation and linear curve fit, indicating substantial qualitative agreement. 20 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. Unmanned airborne vehicle (UAV): Flight testing and evaluation of two-channel E-field very low frequency (VLF) instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    Using VLF frequencies, transmitted by the Navy`s network, for airborne remote sensing of the earth`s electrical, magnetic characteristics was first considered by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) around the mid 1970s. The first VLF system was designed and developed by the USGS for installation and operation on a single engine, fixed wing aircraft used by the Branch of Geophysics for geophysical surveying. The system consisted of five channels. Two E-field channels with sensors consisting of a fixed vertical loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on top of the fuselage and a gyro stabilized horizontal loaded dipole antenna with pre-amp mounted on a tail boom. The three channel magnetic sensor consisted of three orthogonal coils mounted on the same gyro stabilized platform as the horizontal E-field antenna. The main features of the VLF receiver were: narrow band-width frequency selection using crystal filters, phase shifters for zeroing out system phase variances, phase-lock loops for generating real and quadrature gates, and synchronous detectors for generating real and quadrature outputs. In the mid 1990s the Branch of Geophysics designed and developed a two-channel E-field ground portable VLF system. The system was built using state-of-the-art circuit components and new concepts in circuit architecture. Small size, light weight, low power, durability, and reliability were key considerations in the design of the instrument. The primary purpose of the instrument was for collecting VLF data during ground surveys over small grid areas. Later the system was modified for installation on a Unmanned Airborne Vehicle (UAV). A series of three field trips were made to Easton, Maryland for testing and evaluating the system performance.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of mechanical properties of rock using an automated triaxial compression test with a constant mean stress criterion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mellegard, K.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

    1999-07-01

    A computerized, servohydraulic test system has been used in the laboratory to perform axisymmetric, triaxial compression tests on natural rock salt using a load path that maintains constant mean stress. The constant mean stress test protocol illustrates that modern test systems allow a nonstandard load path which can focus on a particular aspect of rock characterization; namely, the onset of dilation. Included are discussions of how the constant mean stress test could be used to investigate material anisotropy and determine elastic moduli. The results from the constant mean stress tests are compared to test results from a traditional test method. The paper also addresses system calibration concerns and the effects of pressure changes on the direct-contact extensometers used to measure strain.

  11. Fault modeling, delay evaluation and path selection for delay test under process variation in nano-scale VLSI circuits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Xiang

    2006-04-12

    Delay test in nano-scale VLSI circuits becomes more difficult with shrinking technology feature sizes and rising clock frequencies. In this dissertation, we study three challenging issues in delay test: fault modeling, ...

  12. The evaluation of micro-surfacing mixture design procedures and the effects of material variation on the test responses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Edward Mensah

    1994-01-01

    This study examines statistically the repeatability of the International Slurry Surfacing Association (ISSA) mixture design tests by estimating the h and k consistency statistics for the test results obtained. An idea of ...

  13. Evaluation of select heat and pressure measurement gauges for potential use in the NRC/OECD High Energy Arc Fault (HEAF) test program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Carlos; Wente, William Baker; Figueroa, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the current state of the art in fire probabilistic risk assessment methodology, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Regulatory Research, contracted Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to conduct a series of scoping tests to identify thermal and mechanical probes that could be used to characterize the zone of influence (ZOI) during high energy arc fault (HEAF) testing. For the thermal evaluation, passive and active probes were exposed to HEAF-like heat fluxes for a period of 2 seconds at the SNLs National Solar Thermal Test Facility to determine their ability to survive and measure such an extreme environment. Thermal probes tested included temperature lacquers (passive), NANMAC thermocouples, directional flame thermometers, modified plate thermometers, infrared temperature sensors, and a Gardon heat flux gauge. Similarly, passive and active pressure probes were evaluated by exposing them to pressures resulting from various high-explosive detonations at the Sandia Terminal Ballistic Facility. Pressure probes included bikini pressure gauges (passive) and pressure transducers. Results from these tests provided good insight to determine which probes should be considered for use during future HEAF testing.

  14. Evaluation of the European PMP Methodologies Using Chassis Dynamometer and On-road Testing of Heavy-duty Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Critical evaluation of new protocol for measurement of heavy-duty diesel engine particulate matter emissions proposed for potential use in California.

  15. Clean Technology Evaluation & Workforce Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Glaza

    2012-12-01

    The overall objective of the Clean Technology Evaluation portion of the award was to design a process to speed up the identification of new clean energy technologies and match organizations to testing and early adoption partners. The project was successful in identifying new technologies targeted to utilities and utility technology integrators, in developing a process to review and rank the new technologies, and in facilitating new partnerships for technology testing and adoption. The purpose of the Workforce Development portion of the award was to create an education outreach program for middle & high-school students focused on clean technology science and engineering. While originally targeting San Diego, California and Cambridge, Massachusetts, the scope of the program was expanded to include a major clean technology speaking series and expo as part of the USA Science & Engineering Festival on the National Mall in Washington, D.C.

  16. Design Optimization and Performance Evaluation of the Relaying Algorithms, Relays and Protective Systems Using Advanced Testing Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Systems Using Advanced Testing Tools Mladen Kezunovic Bogdan Kasztenny Fellow, IEEE Senior Member, IEEE tools. Nowadays, optimization from the vendor perspective is usually performed using heuristic methods

  17. Correlation of Simulation Examination to Written Test Scores for Advanced Cardiac Life Support Testing: Prospective Cohort Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    simulation evaluation. Mean+SD Multiple choice test Cardiacrhythm test Clinicalmanagement test Mean of three written tests Simulation test

  18. Evaluation of the Non-Transient Hydrologic Source Term from the CAMBRIC Underground Nuclear Test in Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tompson, A B; Maxwell, R M; Carle, S F; Zavarin, M; Pawloski, G A; Shumaker, D E

    2005-08-05

    Hydrologic Source Term (HST) calculations completed in 1998 at the CAMBRIC underground nuclear test site were LLNL's first attempt to simulate a hydrologic source term at the NTS by linking groundwater flow and transport modeling with geochemical modeling (Tompson et al., 1999). Significant effort was applied to develop a framework that modeled in detail the flow regime and captured all appropriate chemical processes that occurred over time. However, portions of the calculations were simplified because of data limitations and a perceived need for generalization of the results. For example: (1) Transient effects arising from a 16 years of pumping at the site for a radionuclide migration study were not incorporated. (2) Radionuclide fluxes across the water table, as derived from infiltration from a ditch to which pumping effluent was discharged, were not addressed. (3) Hydrothermal effects arising from residual heat of the test were not considered. (4) Background data on the ambient groundwater flow direction were uncertain and not represented. (5) Unclassified information on the Radiologic Source Term (RST) inventory, as tabulated recently by Bowen et al. (2001), was unavailable; instead, only a limited set of derived data were available (see Tompson et al., 1999). (6) Only a small number of radionuclides and geochemical reactions were incorporated in the work. (7) Data and interpretation of the RNM-2S multiple well aquifer test (MWAT) were not available. As a result, the current Transient CAMBRIC Hydrologic Source Term project was initiated as part of a broader Phase 2 Frenchman Flat CAU flow and transport modeling effort. The source term will be calculated under two scenarios: (1) A more specific representation of the transient flow and radionuclide release behavior at the site, reflecting the influence of the background hydraulic gradient, residual test heat, pumping experiment, and ditch recharge, and taking into account improved data sources and modeling approaches acquired or developed since the previous work (as in Pawloski et al., 2001, at the CHESHIRE site). This will be referred to as the transient CAMBRIC source term. (2) A generic release model made under steady-state flow conditions, in the absence of any transient effect, at the same site with the same RST for use in the development of simple release models at the other nine underground test sites in the Frenchman Flat CAU. This will be referred to as the steady state (non-transient) source term. The purpose of this report is to summarize the results of our steady state source term simulations. Additional details pertaining to these results, the transient model results, and the overall strategy, rationale, and assumptions used in the models will be documented in a separate report.

  19. Radiological survey and evaluation of the fallout area from the Trinity test: Chupadera Mesa and White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, W.R.; Rodgers, J.C.

    1985-06-01

    Current radiological conditions were evaluated for the site of the first nuclear weapons test, the Trinity test, and the associated fallout zone. The test, located on White Sands Missile Range, was conducted as part of the research with nuclear materials for the World War II Manhattan Engineer District atomic bomb project. Some residual radioactivity attributable to the test was found in the soils of Ground Zero on White Sands Missile Range and the areas that received fallout from the test. The study considered relevant information including historical records, environmental data extending back to the 1940s, and new data acquired by field sampling and measurements. Potential exposures to radiation were evaluated for current land uses. Maximum estimated doses on Chupadera Mesa and other uncontrolled areas are less than 3% of the DOE Radiation Protection Standards (RPSs). Radiation exposures during visits to the US Army-controlled Ground Zero area are less than 1 mrem per annual visit or less than 0.2% of the RPS for a member of the public. Detailed data and interpretations are provided in appendixes. 14 figs., 45 tabs.

  20. A Cultural Resources Inventory and Historical Evaluation of the Smoky Atmospheric Nuclear Test, Areas 8, 9, and 10, Nevada National Security Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Robert C.; King, Maureen L.; Beck, Colleen M.; Falvey, Lauren W.; Menocal, Tatianna M.

    2014-09-01

    This report presents the results of a National Historic Preservation Act Section 106 cultural resources inventory and historical evaluation of the 1957 Smoky atmospheric test location on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The Desert Research Institute (DRI) was tasked to conduct a cultural resources study of the Smoky test area as a result of a proposed undertaking by the Department of Energy Environmental Management. This undertaking involves investigating Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 550 for potential contaminants of concern as delineated in a Corrective Action Investigation Plan. CAU 550 is an area that spatially overlaps portions of the Smoky test location. Smoky, T-2c, was a 44 kt atmospheric nuclear test detonated at 5:30 am on August 31, 1957, on top of a 213.4 m (700 ft) 200 ton tower (T-2c) in Area 8 of the NNSS. Smoky was a weapons related test of the Plumbbob series (number 19) and part of the Department of Defense Exercise Desert Rock VII and VIII. The cultural resources effort involved the development of a historic context based on archival documents and engineering records, the inventory of the cultural resources in the Smoky test area and an associated military trench location in Areas 9 and 10, and an evaluation of the National Register eligibility of the cultural resources. The inventory of the Smoky test area resulted in the identification of structures, features, and artifacts related to the physical development of the test location and the post-test remains. The Smoky test area was designated historic district D104 and coincides with a historic archaeological site recorded as 26NY14794 and the military trenches designed for troop observation, site 26NY14795. Sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795 are spatially discrete with the trenches located 4.3 km (2.7 mi) southeast of the Smoky ground zero. As a result, historic district D104 is discontiguous and in total it covers 151.4 hectares (374 acres). The Smoky test location, recorded as historic district D104 and historic sites 26NY14794 and 26NY14795, is the best preserved post-shot atmospheric nuclear tower test at the NNSS and possibly in the world. It is of local, national, and international importance due to nuclear testing’s pivotal role in the Cold War between the United States and the former Soviet Union. The district and sites are linked to the historic theme of atmospheric nuclear testing. D104 retains aspects of the engineering plan and design for the Smoky tower, instrument stations used to measure test effects, German and French personnel shelters, and military trenches. A total of 33 structures contribute to the significance of D104. Artifacts and features provide significant post-test information. Historic district D104 (discontiguous) and historic site 26NY14794 (the Smoky test area) are eligible for listing on the NRHP under Criteria A, B, C, and D. The historic site 26NY14795 (the Smoky military trenches) is eligible for listing under Criteria A, C, and D. Several items have been identified for removal by the CAU 550 investigation. However, none of them is associated with the Smoky atmospheric test, but with later activities in the area. The military trenches are not part of CAU 550 and no actions are planned there. A proposed closure of the Smoky test area with restrictions will limit access and contribute to the preservation of the cultural resources. It is recommended that the Smoky historic district and sites be included in the NNSS cultural resources monitoring program.

  1. Commercial Building Partners Catalyze High Performance Buildings Across the Nation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baechler, Michael C.; Dillon, Heather E.; Bartlett, Rosemarie

    2012-08-01

    In 2008 the US Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Commercial Buildings Partnership (CBP) project to accelerate market adoption of commercially available energy saving technologies into the design process for new and upgraded commercial buildings. The CBP represents a unique collaboration between industry leaders and DOE to develop high performance buildings as a model for future construction and renovation. CBP was implemented in two stages. This paper focuses on lessons learned at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the first stage and discusses some partner insights from the second stage. In the first stage, PNNL and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory recruited CBP partners that own large portfolios of buildings. The labs provide assistance to the partners' design teams and make a business case for energy investments.

  2. Evaluation of plasma melter technology for verification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes: Demonstration test No. 4 preliminary test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Gass, W.R.; Dighe, S.V.; D`Amico, N.; Swensrud, R.L.; Darr, M.F.

    1995-01-10

    This document provides a preliminary report of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. Phase I test conduct included 26 hours (24 hours steady state) of melting of simulated high-sodium low-level radioactive liquid waste. Average processing rate was 4.9 kg/min (peak rate 6.2 kg/min), producing 7330 kg glass product. Free-flowing glass pour point was 1250 C, and power input averaged 1530 kW(e), for a total energy consumption of 19,800 kJ/kg glass. Restart capability was demonstrated following a 40-min outage involving the scrubber liquor heat exchanger, and glass production was continued for another 2 hours. Some volatility losses were apparent, probably in the form of sodium borates. Roughly 275 samples were collected and forwarded for analysis. Sufficient process data were collected for heat/material balances. Recommendations for future work include lower boron contents and improved tuyere design/operation.

  3. Property:Geothermal/Partner5Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,Property EditMimeTypeGeofluidTempPartner2WebsitePartner5Website

  4. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN TASKS: Energy 1) Testing experiment: Energy, spring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Torgny

    lab partner(s), choose the best design. Indicate the criteria that you used to decide which designEXPERIMENTAL DESIGN TASKS: Energy 1) Testing experiment: Energy, spring Design an experiment you can predict based on this relationship. Write brief outlines for each design. Working with your

  5. National Fuel Cell Bus Program: Accelerated Testing Evaluation Report #2, Alameda-Contra Costa Transit District (AC Transit) and Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eudy, L.; Chandler, K.

    2010-06-01

    This is an evaluation of hydrogen fuel cell transit buses operating at AC Transit in revenue service since March 20, 2006, comparing similar diesel buses operating from the same depot. It covers November 2007 through February 2010. Results include implementation experience, fueling station operation, evaluation results at AC Transit (bus usage, availability, fuel economy, maintenance costs, and road calls), and a summary of achievements and challenges encountered during the demonstration.

  6. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF A SUSTAINABLE AND ENERGY EFFICIENT RE-ROOFING TECHNOLOGY USING FIELD-TEST DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Miller, William A; Childs, Phillip W; Kosny, Jan; Kriner, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Three test attics were constructed to evaluate a new sustainable method of re-roofing utilizing photo-voltaic (PV) laminates, metal roofing panels, and PCM heat sink in the Envelope Systems Research Apparatus (ESRA) facility in the ORNL campus. Figure 1 is a picture of the three attic roofs located adjacent to each other. The leftmost roof is the conventional shingle roof, followed by the metal panel roof incorporating the cool-roof coating, and third from left is the roof with the PCM. On the PCM roof, the PV panels are seen as well; they're labelled from left-to-right as panels 5, 6 and 7. The metal panel roof consists of three metal panels with the cool-roof coating; in further discussion this is referred to as the infrared reflective (IRR) metal roof. The IRR metal panels reflect the incoming solar radiation and then quickly re-emit the remaining absorbed portion, thereby reducing the solar heat gain of the attic. Surface reflectance of the panels were measured using a Solar Spectrum Reflectometer. In the 0.35-2.0 {mu}m wavelength interval, which accounts for more than 94% of the solar energy, the IRR panels have an average reflectance of 0.303. In the infrared portion of the spectrum, the IRR panel reflectance is 0.633. The PCM roof consists of a layer of macro-encapsulated bio-based PCM at the bottom, followed by a 2-cm thick layer of dense fiberglass insulation with a reflective surface on top, and metal panels with pre-installed PV laminates on top. The PCM has a melting point of 29 C (84.2 F) and total enthalpy between 180 and 190 J/g. The PCM was macro-packaged in between two layers of heavy-duty plastic foil forming arrays of PCM cells. Two air cavities, between PCM cells and above the fiberglass insulation, helped the over-the-deck natural air ventilation. It is anticipated that during summer, this extra ventilation will help in reducing the attic-generated cooling loads. The extra ventilation, in conjunction with the PCM heat sink, are used to minimize thermal stresses due to the PV laminates on sunny days. In PV laminates sunlight is converted into electricity and heat simultaneous. In case of building integrated applications, a relatively high solar absorption of amorphous silicon laminates can be utilized during the winter for solar heating purposes with PCM providing necessary heat storage capacity. However, PV laminates may also generate increased building cooling loads during the summer months. Therefore, in this project, the PCM heat sink was to minimize summer heat gains as well. The PCM-fibreglass-PV assembly and the IRR metal panels are capable of being installed directly on top of existing shingle roofs during re-roofing, precluding the need for recycling or disposal of waste materials. The PV laminates installed on the PCM attic are PVL-144 models from Uni-Solar. Each laminate contains 22 triple junction amorphous silicon solar cells connected in series. The silicon cells are of dimensions 356 mm x 239 mm (14-in. x 9.4-in.). The PVL-144 laminate is encapsulated in durable ETFE (poly-ethylene-co-tetrafluoroethylene) high light-transmissive polymer. Table 1 lists the power, voltage and current ratings of the PVL-144 panel.

  7. Evaluating preproduction prototypes of new energy-efficiency products in realistic test beds is an essential step before market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    pump water heater and ClimateMaster TrilogyTM 40 Q-ModeTM geothermal (ground- source) integrated heat pump. · The first test buildings will be installed on the new light commercial building flexible

  8. Geochemical and Isotopic Evaluation of Groundwater Movement in Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene

    2006-02-01

    This report describes the results of a comprehensive geochemical evaluation of the groundwater flow system in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). The main objectives of this study are to identify probable pathways for groundwater flow within the study area and to develop constraints on groundwater transit times between selected data collection sites. This work provides an independent means of testing and verifying predictive flow models being developed for this CAU using finite element methods. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU constitutes the largest of six underground test areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) specified for remedial action in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. A total of 747 underground nuclear detonations were conducted in this CAU. Approximately 23 percent of these detonations were conducted below or near the water table, resulting in groundwater contamination in the vicinity and possibly downgradient of these underground test locations. Therefore, a rigorous evaluation of the groundwater flow system in this CAU is necessary to assess potential long-term risks to the public water supply at downgradient locations.

  9. Test Plan for Evaluating Hammer and Fixed Cutter Grinders Using Multiple Varieties and Moistures of Biomass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not listed

    2007-07-01

    Biomass preprocessing is a critical operation in the preparation of feedstock for the front-end of a cellulosic ethanol biorefinery. Its purpose is to chop, grind, or otherwise format the biomass material into a suitable feedstock for optimum conversion to ethanol and other bioproducts. Without this operation, the natural size, bulk density, and flowability characteristics of harvested biomass would decrease the capacities and efficiencies of feedstock assembly unit operations and biorefinery conversion processes to the degree that programmatic cost targets could not be met. The preprocessing unit operation produces a bulk flowable material that 1) improves handling and conveying efficiencies throughout the feedstock assembly system and biorefinery 2) increases biomass surface areas for improved pretreatment efficiencies, 3) reduces particle sizes for improved feedstock uniformity and density, and 4) fractionates structural components for improved compositional quality. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with defining the overall efficiency/effectiveness of current commercial hammer and fixed cutter grinding systems and other connecting systems such as harvest and collection, storage, transportation, and handling for a wide variety of feedstock types used in bioethanol or syngas production. This test plan details tasks and activities for two separate full-scale grinding tests: Material Characterization Test and Machine Characterization Test. For the Material Characterization Test, a small amount (~5-7 tons each) of several feedstock varieties will be ground. This test will define the fractionation characteristics of the grinder that affect the bulk density, particle size distribution, and quality of the size reduced biomass resulting from different separation screen sizes. A specific screen size will be selected based on the characteristics of the ground material. The Machine Characterization Test will then use this selected screen to grind several 30-ton batches of different feedstock varieties and moistures. This test will focus on identifying the performance parameters of the grinding system specific to the feed, fractionation, and screen separation components and their affect on machine capacity and efficiency.

  10. Evaluation of Simplified Methods for Estimating Shear Capacity Using JNES/NUPEC Low-Rise Concrete Shear Wall Cyclic Test Data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nie,J.; Braverman, J.; Hofmayer, C.; Ali, S.

    2008-06-01

    The simplified methods in current codes for determining the shear capacity of reinforced concrete shear walls had mostly been validated using the test results of single-element shear walls. Recently available JNES/NUPEC test data of reinforced concrete shear walls under multi-directional cyclic loadings provided a unique opportunity to investigate the adequacy of the simplified methods for use in situations with strong interaction effects. A total of 11 test specimens with aspect ratios between 0.47 and 0.87 have been used in the assessment. Two simplified methods from the ACI 349-01 standard [1] and one from the ASCE 43-05 standard [2] have been evaluated. This paper also presents the development of an adjustment factor to consider the aspect ratio and the development of two approaches to consider interaction effects for one of the simplified methods. It concludes with the insights on the applicability of the code methods when interaction effects exist.

  11. Operation Greenhouse. Scientific Director's report of atomic weapon tests at Eniwetok, 1951. Annex 6. 6. Evaluation of filter material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engquist, E,H.

    1985-04-01

    Four types of standard and developmental filter materials used in individual and collective-protective devices and one type of developmental filter material used for sampling of air for particulate matter were evaluated against the contamination produced by the detonation of an atomic bomb and present in the resulting radioactive cloud. These filter materials were evaluated in multilayer pads at the standard flow-rate conditions used by the Chemical Corps in evaluation studies of filter materials. This permitted correlation of results of laboratory data. Analysis of the materials was made by counting the gross beta activity collected on successive layers of the same filter material and the efficiency of the materials was calculated from the data obtained.

  12. TRD -Your Partner for Technical R&D Crystalline Solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    TRD - Your Partner for Technical R&D Crystalline Solids Wei-Qin (Tony) Tong, Ph.D. Novartis-States Organic Molecular Solid Amorphous Crystalline Polymorphs Solvates/Hydrates Monotropic Enantiotropic is between amorphous and crystalline materials · Solubility ratios of polymorphs are typically independent

  13. Molecular Plant RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT Rhizosphere Microbes as Essential Partners for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirt, Heribert

    Molecular Plant RESEARCH HIGHLIGHT Rhizosphere Microbes as Essential Partners for Plant Stress appears to depend on their association with certain microbes, raising a number of ques- tions: What distinguishes the microbes and plants that can adapt to extreme environmental conditions? Can all plants improve

  14. EM Sees Growth Across Complex in Partnering Agreements with Contractors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    AIKEN, S.C. – DOE Savannah River Operations Office Manager Dave Moody views the partnering relationship between his office and liquid waste contractor Savannah River Remediation (SRR) as an opportunity to view cleanup work from each other’s point of view.

  15. Knowledge protection and partner selection in R&D alliances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Dan

    2006-10-30

    This dissertation investigates three sets of research questions. First, how can partner selection be used as a mechanism to minimize R&D alliance participants� concerns about knowledge leakage? And what is the nature of the relationship among...

  16. QER- Comment of Clean Line Energy Partners LLC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Clean Line Energy Partners would like to submit the attached written comments to the QER task force, in conjunction with the verbal comments Jimmy Glotfelty provided today in Newark. Thank you for your consideration, and please let us know if you would like any additional information. Sincerely, Diana Rivera

  17. Evaluation and compilation of DOE [Department of Energy] waste package test data; Biannual report, February 1988--July 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Interrante, C.; Escalante, E.; Fraker, A.; Plante, E.

    1989-10-01

    This report summarizes evaluations by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) of Department of Energy (DOE) activities on waste packages designed for containment of radioactive high-level nuclear waste (HLW) for the six month period February 1988 through July 1988. Activities for the DOE Materials Characterization Center are reviewed for the period January 1988 through June 1988. A summary is given of the Yucca Mountain, Nevada disposal site activities. Short discussions relating to the reviewed publications are given and complete reviews and evaluations are included. 20 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Benchmark Evaluation of Start-Up and Zero-Power Measurements at the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bess, John D.; Fujimoto, Nozomu

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate six cold-critical and two warm-critical, zero-power measurements of the HTTR. Additional measurements of a fully-loaded subcritical configuration, core excess reactivity, shutdown margins, six isothermal temperature coefficients, and axial reaction-rate distributions were also evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments. Insufficient information is publicly available to develop finely-detailed models of the HTTR as much of the design information is still proprietary. However, the uncertainties in the benchmark models are judged to be of sufficient magnitude to encompass any biases and bias uncertainties incurred through the simplification process used to develop the benchmark models. Dominant uncertainties in the experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the impurity content of the various graphite blocks that comprise the HTTR. Monte Carlo calculations of keff are between approximately 0.9 % and 2.7 % greater than the benchmark values. Reevaluation of the HTTR models as additional information becomes available could improve the quality of this benchmark and possibly reduce the computational biases. High-quality characterization of graphite impurities would significantly improve the quality of the HTTR benchmark assessment. Simulation of the other reactor physics measurements are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.

  19. Benchmark Evaluation of Start-Up and Zero-Power Measurements at the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bess, John D.; Fujimoto, Nozomu

    2014-10-09

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate six cold-critical and two warm-critical, zero-power measurements of the HTTR. Additional measurements of a fully-loaded subcritical configuration, core excess reactivity, shutdown margins, six isothermal temperature coefficients, and axial reaction-rate distributions were also evaluated as acceptable benchmark experiments. Insufficient information is publicly available to develop finely-detailed models of the HTTR as much of the design information is still proprietary. However, the uncertainties in the benchmark models are judged to be of sufficient magnitude to encompass any biases and bias uncertainties incurred through the simplification process used to develop the benchmark models. Dominant uncertainties in themore »experimental keff for all core configurations come from uncertainties in the impurity content of the various graphite blocks that comprise the HTTR. Monte Carlo calculations of keff are between approximately 0.9 % and 2.7 % greater than the benchmark values. Reevaluation of the HTTR models as additional information becomes available could improve the quality of this benchmark and possibly reduce the computational biases. High-quality characterization of graphite impurities would significantly improve the quality of the HTTR benchmark assessment. Simulation of the other reactor physics measurements are in good agreement with the benchmark experiment values. The complete benchmark evaluation details are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments.« less

  20. Complete Phase I Tests As Described in the Multi-lab Test Plan for the Evaluation of CH3I Adsorption on AgZ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruffey, S. H.; Jubin, R. T.

    2014-09-30

    Silver-exchanged mordenite (AgZ) has been identified as a potential sorbent for iodine present in the off-gas streams of a used nuclear fuel reprocessing facility. In such a facility, both elemental and organic forms of iodine are released from the dissolver in gaseous form. These species of iodine must be captured with high efficiency for a facility to avoid radioactive iodine release above regulatory limits in the gaseous effluent of the plant. Studies completed at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) examined the adsorption of organic iodine in the form of CH3I by AgZ. Upon breakthrough of the feed gas through the sorbent bed, elemental iodine was observed in the effluent stream, despite the fact that the only source of iodine in the system was the CH3I in the feed gas.1 This behavior does not appear to have been reported previously nor has it been independently confirmed. Thus, as a result of these prior studies, multiple knowledge gaps relating to the adsorption of CH3I by AgZ were identified, and a multi-lab test plan, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), INL, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Sandia National Laboratories, was formulated to address each in a systematic way.2 For this report, the scope of work for ORNL was further narrowed to three thin-bed experiments that would characterize CH3I adsorption onto AgZ in the presence of water, NO, and NO2. Completion of these three-thin bed experiments demonstrated that organic iodine in the form of CH3I was adsorbed by reduced silver mordenite (Ag0Z) to a 50% higher loading than that of I2 when adsorbed from a dry air stream. Adsorption curves suggest different adsorption mechanisms for I2 and CH3I. In the presence of NO and NO2 gas, the loading of CH3I onto Ag0Z is suppressed and may be reversible. Further, the presence of NO and NO2 gas appears to oxidize CH3I to I2; this is indicated by an adsorption curve similar to that of I2 on Ag0Z. Finally, the loss of organic iodine loading capacity by Ag0Z in the presence of NOx is unaffected by the addition of water vapor to the gas stream; no marked additional loss in capacity or retention was observed.

  1. The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012: America's Partner in Power...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012: America's Partner in Power The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012: America's Partner in Power This report, compiled by Fuel Cells 2000 with...

  2. Narcissism and Type of Violent Relationships for Perpetrators of Intimate Partner Violence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rinker, Lee

    2010-01-16

    . The study of a cross-section of men in a Batterer Intervention Program included measures on self-perception, views of partner, and history of violent, aggressive, controlling, and psychologically abusive interactions with their partner. Structural Equation...

  3. California Registered Domestic Partner Supplemental Information 01/2013 Name: ___________________________________________________ ID: __________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    California Registered Domestic Partner Supplemental Information 01/2013 Name: ___________________________________________________ ID: __________________________ California Registered Domestic Partner Supplemental Information Avenue Tel: (707) 664-2389 Rohnert Park, CA 94928 Fax: (707) 664-4242 Office Use Only: Supplemental

  4. Argentina: An Important All-of-the-Above Energy Partner | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Argentina: An Important All-of-the-Above Energy Partner Argentina: An Important All-of-the-Above Energy Partner June 16, 2014 - 5:03pm Addthis Deputy Energy Secretary Daniel...

  5. FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal Energy Costs FEMP and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal Energy Costs March 26, 2015 -...

  6. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for the concrete-shielded RH TRU drum for the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.J.

    1998-03-31

    This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per HNF-PRO-154, Responsibilities and Procedures for all Hazardous Material Shipments. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to a solid waste storage facility on the Hanford Site.

  7. Safety evaluation for packaging (onsite) for concrete-shielded RHTRU waste drum for the 327 postirradiation testing laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.

    1996-10-29

    This safety evaluation for packaging authorizes onsite transport of Type B quantities of radioactive material in the Concrete- Shielded Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste (RH TRU) Drum per WHC-CM-2-14, Hazardous Material Packaging and Shipping. The drum will be used for transport of 327 Building legacy waste from the 300 Area to the Transuranic Waste Storage and Assay Facility in the 200 West Area and on to a Solid Waste Storage Facility, also in the 200 Area.

  8. Radiative cooling test facility and performance evaluation of 4-MIL aluminized polyvinyl fluoride and white-paint surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruskopf, M.S.; Berdahl, P.; Martin, M.; Sakkal, F.; Sobolewski, M.

    1980-11-01

    A test facility designed to measure the amount of radiative cooling a specific material or assembly of materials will produce when exposed to the sky is described. Emphasis is placed upon assemblies which are specifically designed to produce radiative cooling and which therefore offer promise for the reduction of temperatures and/or humidities in occupied spaces. The hardware and software used to operate the facility are documented and the results of the first comprehensive experiments are presented. A microcomputer-based control/data acquisition system was employed to study the performance of two prototype radiator surfaces: 4-mil aluminized polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and white painted surfaces set below polyethylene windscreens. The cooling rates for materials tested were determined and can be approximated by an equation (given). A computer model developed to simulate the cooling process is presented. (MCW)

  9. Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators to Sustain and Grow Your Energy Efficiency Initiatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation contains information on Partnering with Utilities and Other Program Administrators to Sustain and Grow Your Energy Efficiency Initiatives.

  10. Borehole SASW testing to evaluate log(G{sub max}) - log({sigma}{prime}) relationships in situ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalinski, M.E.; Stokoe, K.H. II; Young, Y.L.; Roesset, J.M.

    1999-07-01

    A new method is being developed for the in-situ measurement of shear wave velocity, V{sub s}, in the soil surrounding a borehole. The method involves the measurement of axially propagating surface waves inside an uncased borehole using the Spectral-Analysis-of-Surface-Waves (SASW) approach. Testing if performed with instrumentation housed inside an inflatable tool. Inflation pressures applied by the tool are used to vary radial stresses in the soil surrounding the borehole. Surface wave velocities over a range of frequencies are measured at each inflation pressure. These measurements are then theoretically modeled so that the variation in V{sub s} (an hence small-strain shear module, G{sub max}) with distance behind the borehole wall is determined at each pressure. The results of field tests with the borehole SASW tool at two sites composed of unsaturated clayey soil are presented. These results are compared with independent field seismic measurements and with laboratory tests on intact specimens using the torsional resonant column to assess the validity of the new field method.

  11. Spent-Fuel Test - Climax: An evaluation of the technical feasibility of geologic storage of spent nuclear fuel in granite: Executive summary of final results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C.

    1986-09-02

    This summary volume outlines results that are covered in more detail in the final report of the Spent-Fuel Test - Climate project. The project was conducted between 1978 and 1983 in the granitic Climax stock at the Nevada Test Site. Results indicate that spent fuel can be safely stored for periods of years in this host medium and that nuclear waste so emplaced can be safely retrieved. We also evaluated the effects of heat and radiation (alone and in combination) on emplacement canisters and the surrounding rock mass. Storage of the spent-fuel affected the surrounding rock mass in measurable ways, but did not threaten the stability or safety of the facility at any time.

  12. Split green fluorescent protein as a modular binding partner for protein crystallization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Hau B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS D454, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Yeates, Todd O. [University of California, PO Box 951569, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov; Waldo, Geoffrey S., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    A strategy using a new split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a modular binding partner to form stable protein complexes with a target protein is presented. The modular split GFP may open the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants. A modular strategy for protein crystallization using split green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a crystallization partner is demonstrated. Insertion of a hairpin containing GFP ?-strands 10 and 11 into a surface loop of a target protein provides two chain crossings between the target and the reconstituted GFP compared with the single connection afforded by terminal GFP fusions. This strategy was tested by inserting this hairpin into a loop of another fluorescent protein, sfCherry. The crystal structure of the sfCherry-GFP(10–11) hairpin in complex with GFP(1–9) was determined at a resolution of 2.6 Å. Analysis of the complex shows that the reconstituted GFP is attached to the target protein (sfCherry) in a structurally ordered way. This work opens the way to rapidly creating crystallization variants by reconstituting a target protein bearing the GFP(10–11) hairpin with a variety of GFP(1–9) mutants engineered for favorable crystallization.

  13. Test, Evaluation, and Demonstration of Practical Devices/Systems to Reduce Aerodynamic Drag of Tractor/Semitrailer Combination Unit Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Smith; Karla Younessi; Matt Markstaller; Dan Schlesinger; Bhaskar Bhatnagar; Donald Smith; Bruno Banceu; Ron Schoon; V.K. Sharma; Mark Kachmarsky; Srikant Ghantae; Michael Sorrels; Conal Deedy; Justin Clark; Skip Yeakel; Michael D. Laughlin; Charlotte Seigler; Sidney Diamond

    2007-04-30

    Class 8 heavy-duty trucks account for over three-quarters of the total diesel fuel used by commercial trucks (trucks with GVWRs more than 10,000 pounds) in the United States each year. At the highway speeds at which these trucks travel (i.e., 60 mph or greater), aerodynamic drag is a major part of total horsepower needed to move the truck down the highway, Reductions in aerodynamic drag can yield measurable benefits in fuel economy through the use of relatively inexpensive and simple devices. The goal of this project was to examine a number of aerodynamic drag reduction devices and systems and determine their effectiveness in reducing aerodynamic drag of Class 8 tractor/semitrailer combination-units, thus contributing to DOE's goal of reducing transportation petroleum use. The project team included major heavy truck manufacturers in the United States, along with the management and industry expertise of the Truck Manufacturers Association as the lead investigative organization. The Truck Manufacturers Association (TMA) is the national trade association representing the major North American manufacturers of Class 6-8 trucks (GVWRs over 19,500 lbs). Four major truck manufacturers participated in this project with TMA: Freightliner LLC; International Truck and Engine Corporation; Mack Trucks Inc.; and Volvo Trucks North America, Inc. Together, these manufacturers represent over three-quarters of total Class 8 truck sales in the United States. These four manufacturers pursued complementary research efforts as part of this project. The project work was separated into two phases conducted over a two-year period. In Phase I, candidate aerodynamic devices and systems were screened to focus research and development attention on devices that offered the most potential. This was accomplished using full-size vehicle tests, scale model tests, and computational fluid dynamics analyses. In Phase II, the most promising devices were installed on full-size trucks and their effect on fuel economy was determined, either through on-road testing or full-size wind tunnel testing. All of the manufacturers worked with devices and systems that offer practical solutions to reduce aerodynamic drag, accounting for functionality, durability, cost effectiveness, reliability, and maintainability. The project team members and their roles and responsibilities are shown in Figure 2-1. Figure 2-2 shows the Phase I and II project schedules for all four projects and associated management activities.

  14. Property:Geothermal/Partner9Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,PropertyPartner7Website Jump to: navigation,

  15. Partner With DOE and Residential Buildings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyAprilEnergy EEREPlateauFolsomProgressPaducahPageParkingPartner

  16. Evaluation of precipitates used in strainer head loss testing : Part II. precipitates by in-situ aluminum alloy corrosion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bahn, C.; Kasza, K. E.; Shack, W. J.; Natesan, K. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-05-01

    Vertical loop head loss tests were performed with 6061 and 1100 aluminum (Al) alloy plates immersed in borated solution at pH = 9.3 at room temperature and 60 C. The results suggest that the potential for corrosion of an Al alloy to result in increased head loss across a glass fiber bed may depend on its microstructure, i.e., the size distribution and number density of intermetallic particles that are present in Al matrix and FeSiAl ternary compounds, as well as its Al release rate. Per unit mass of Al removed from solution, the WCAP-16530 aluminum hydroxide (Al(OH){sub 3}) surrogate was more effective in increasing head loss than the Al(OH)3 precipitates formed in situ by corrosion of Al alloy. However, in choosing a representative amount of surrogate for plant specific testing, consideration should be given to the potential for additional head losses due to intermetallic particles and the apparent reduction in the effective solubility of Al(OH){sub 3} when intermetallic particles are present.

  17. Instruments of RT-2 Experiment onboard CORONASPHOTON and their test and evaluation II: RT-2/CZT payload

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotoch, Tilak B; Debnath, D; Malkar, J P; Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Madhav, Vaibhav P; Sreekumar, S; Chakrabarti, Sandip K; 10.1007/s10686-010-9189-y

    2010-01-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors are high sensitivity and high resolution devices for hard X-ray imaging and spectroscopic studies. The new series of CZT detector modules (OMS40G256) manufactured by Orbotech Medical Solutions (OMS), Israel, are used in the RT-2/CZT payload onboard the CORONAS-PHOTON satellite. The CZT detectors, sensitive in the energy range of 20 keV to 150 keV, are used to image solar flares in hard X-rays. Since these modules are essentially manufactured for commercial applications, we have carried out a series of comprehensive tests on these modules so that they can be confidently used in space-borne systems. These tests lead us to select the best three pieces of the 'Gold' modules for the RT-2/CZT payload. This paper presents the characterization of CZT modules and the criteria followed for selecting the ones for the RT-2/CZT payload. The RT-2/CZT payload carries, along with three CZT modules, a high spatial resolution CMOS detector for high resolution imaging of transient X-ray ev...

  18. EVALUATION OF CORE PHYSICS ANALYSIS METHODS FOR CONVERSION OF THE INL ADVANCED TEST REACTOR TO LOW-ENRICHMENT FUEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark DeHart; Gray S. Chang

    2012-04-01

    Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR.

  19. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  20. EVALUATING THE EFFECTS OF FLY ASH EXPOSURE ON FISH EARLY LIFE STAGES: FATHEAD MINNOW EMBRYO-LARVAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeley Jr, Mark Stephen; Elmore, Logan R; McCracken, Kitty

    2012-05-01

    On December 22, 2008, a dike containing fly ash and bottom ash in an 84-acre complex of the Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA) Kingston Steam Plant in East Tennessee failed and released a large quantity of ash into the adjacent Emory River. Ash deposits extended as far as 4 miles upstream (Emory River mile 6) of the Plant, and some ash was carried as far downstream as Tennessee River mile 564 ({approx}4 miles downstream of the Tennessee River confluence with the Clinch River). A byproduct of coal burning power plants, fly ash contains a variety of metals and other elements which, at sufficient concentrations and in specific forms, can be toxic to biological systems. The effects of fly ash contamination on exposed fish populations depend on the magnitude and duration of exposure, with the most significant risk considered to be the effects of specific ash constituents, especially selenium, on fish early life stages. Uptake by adult female fish of fly ash constituents through the food chain and subsequent maternal transfer of contaminants to the developing eggs is thought to be the primary route of selenium exposure to larval fish (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Lemly 1999, Moscatello and others 2006), but direct contact of the fertilized eggs and developing embryos to ash constituents in river water and sediments is also a potential risk factor (Woock and others 1987, Coyle and others 1993, Jezierska and others 2009). To address the risk of fly ash from the Kingston spill to the reproductive health of downstream fish populations, ORNL has undertaken a series of studies in collaboration with TVA including: (1) a field study of the bioaccumulation of fly ash constituents in fish ovaries and the reproductive condition of sentinel fish species in reaches of the Emory and Clinch Rivers affected by the fly ash spill; (2) laboratory tests of the potential toxicity of fly ash from the spill area on fish embryonic and larval development (reported in the current technical manuscript); (3) additional laboratory experimentation focused on the potential effects of long-term exposures to fly ash on fish survival and reproductive competence; and (4) a combined field and laboratory study examining the in vitro developmental success of embryos and larvae obtained from fish exposed in vivo for over two years to fly ash in the Emory and Clinch Rivers. These fish reproduction and early life-stage studies are being conducted in conjunction with a broader biological monitoring program administered by TVA that includes a field study of the condition of larval fish in the Emory and Clinch Rivers along with assessments of water quality, sediment composition, ecotoxicological studies, terrestrial wildlife studies, and human and ecological risk assessment. Information and data generated from these studies will provide direct input into risk assessment efforts and will also complement and help support other phases of the overall biomonitoring program. Fish eggs, in general, are known to be capable of concentrating heavy metals and other environmental contaminants from water-borne exposures during embryonic development (Jezierska and others 2009), and fathead minnow embryos in particular have been shown to concentrate methylmercury (Devlin 2006) as well as other chemical toxicants. This technical report focuses on the responses of fathead minnow embryos to simple contact exposures to fly ash in laboratory toxicity tests adapted from a standard fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) 7-d embryo-larval survival and teratogenicity test (method 1001.0 in EPA 2002) with mortality, hatching success, and the incidences of developmental abnormalities as measured endpoints.

  1. Long-Term Results from Evaluation of Advanced New Construction Packages in Test Homes: Lake Elsinore, Californi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.

    2013-08-01

    This report presents the long-term evaluation results from a hot-dry climate project that examines the room-to-room temperature conditions that exist in a high performance envelope, the performance of a simplified air distribution system, and a comparison of modeled energy performance with measured energy use. The project, a prototype house built by K. Hovnanian Homes’ Ontario Group, is located in Lake Elsinore, Riverside County, California, and achieves a 50% level of whole house source energy savings with respect to the Building America (BA) Benchmark Definition 2009 (Hendron and Engebrecht 2010). Temperature measurements in three rooms indicate that the temperature difference between the measured locations and the thermostat were within recommendations 90.3% of the time in heating mode and 99.3% of the time in cooling mode. The air distribution system is operating efficiently with average delivered temperatures adequate to facilitate proper heating and cooling and only minor average temperature differences observed between the system’s plenum and farthest register. Monitored energy use results for the house indicate that it is using less energy than predicted from modeling. A breakdown of energy use according to end use determined little agreement between comparable values.

  2. Long-Term Results from Evaluation of Advanced New Construction Packages in Test Homes: Lake Elsinore, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stecher, D.; Brozyna, K.

    2013-08-01

    This report presents the long-term evaluation results from a hot-dry climate project that examines the room-to-room temperature conditions that exist in a high performance envelope, the performance of a simplified air distribution system, and a comparison of modeled energy performance with measured energy use. The project, a prototype house built by K. Hovnanian Homes' Ontario Group, is located in Lake Elsinore, Riverside County, California, and achieves a 50% level of whole house source energy savings with respect to the Building America (BA) Benchmark Definition 2009 (Hendron and Engebrecht 2010). Temperature measurements in three rooms indicate that the temperature difference between the measured locations and the thermostat were within recommendations 90.3% of the time in heating mode and 99.3% of the time in cooling mode. The air distribution system is operating efficiently with average delivered temperatures adequate to facilitate proper heating and cooling and only minor average temperature differences observed between the system's plenum and farthest register. Monitored energy use results for the house indicate that it is using less energy than predicted from modeling. A breakdown of energy use according to end use determined little agreement between comparable values.

  3. Developing Fatigue Pre-crack Procedure to Evaluate Fracture Toughness of Pipeline Steels Using Spiral Notch Torsion Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Tan, Ting; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Wei; Feng, Zhili

    2012-10-01

    The spiral notch torsion test (SNTT) has been utilized to investigate the crack growth behavior of X52 steel base and welded materials used for hydrogen infrastructures. The X52 steel materials are received from a welded pipe using friction stir welding techniques. Finite element models were established to study the crack growth behavior of steel SNTT steel samples, which were assumed to be isotropic material. A series SNTT models were set up to cover various crack penetration cases, of which the ratios between crack depth to diameter (a/D ratio) ranging from 0.10 to 0.45. The evolution of compliance and energy release rates in the SNTT method have been investigated with different cases, including different geometries and materials. Indices of characteristic compliance and energy release rates have been proposed. Good agreement has been achieved between predictions from different cases in the same trend. These work shed lights on a successful protocol for SNTT application in wide range of structural materials. The further effort needed for compliance function development is to extend the current developed compliance function to the deep crack penetration arena, in the range of 0.55 to 0.85 to effectively determine fracture toughness for extremely tough materials.

  4. Biomass Fuel Characterization : Testing and Evaluating the Combustion Characteristics of Selected Biomass Fuels : Final Report May 1, 1988-July, 1989.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushnell, Dwight J.; Haluzok, Charles; Dadkhah-Nikoo, Abbas

    1990-04-01

    Results show that two very important measures of combustion efficiency (gas temperature and carbon dioxide based efficiency) varied by only 5.2 and 5.4 percent respectively. This indicates that all nine different wood fuel pellet types behave very similarly under the prescribed range of operating parameters. The overall mean efficiency for all tests was 82.1 percent and the overall mean temperature was 1420 1{degree}F. Particulate (fly ash) ad combustible (in fly ash) data should the greatest variability. There was evidence of a relationship between maximum values for both particulate and combustible and the percentages of ash and chlorine in the pellet fuel. The greater the percentage of ash and chlorine (salt), the greater was the fly ash problem, also, combustion efficiency was decreased by combustible losses (unburned hydrocarbons) in the fly ash. Carbon monoxide and Oxides of Nitrogen showed the next greatest variability, but neither had data values greater than 215.0 parts per million (215.0 ppm is a very small quantity, i.e. 1 ppm = .001 grams/liter = 6.2E-5 1bm/ft{sup 3}). Visual evidence indicates that pellets fuels produced from salt laden material are corrosive, produce the largest quantities of ash, and form the only slag or clinker formations of all nine fuels. The corrosion is directly attributable to salt content (or more specifically, chloride ions and compounds formed during combustion). 45 refs., 23 figs., 19 tabs.

  5. Alternative Evaluation Study: Methods to Mitigate/Accommodate Subsidence for the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County Nevada, with Special Focus on Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, L.

    1997-09-01

    An Alternative Evaluation Study is a type of systematic approach to problem identification and solution. An Alternative Evaluation Study was convened August 12-15, 1997, for the purpose of making recommendations concerning closure of Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl and other disposal cells and mitigation/accommodation of waste subsidence at the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site. This report includes results of the Alternative Evaluation Study and specific recommendations.

  6. REAL ESTATE FOUNDATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PARTNERING FUND GRANT The intent of the Real Estate Foundation of British Columbia Partnering Fund, generated by an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    REAL ESTATE FOUNDATION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PARTNERING FUND GRANT GUIDELINES The intent of the Real Estate Foundation of British Columbia Partnering Fund, generated by an endowment to UNBC by the Real below. MISSION UNBC and the Real Estate Foundation of British Columbia share a mutual interest

  7. A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. J. Shott, V. Yucel, L. Desotell

    2008-04-01

    In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milliSievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191.

  8. A Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations Part 191 Evaluation of Buried Transuranic Waste at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shott, G.J.; Yucel, V.; Desotell, L. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Pyles, G.; Carilli, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In 1986, 21 m{sup 3} of transuranic (TRU) waste was inadvertently buried in a shallow land burial trench at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is considered five options for management of the buried TRU waste. One option is to leave the waste in-place if the disposal can meet the requirements of Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 'Environmental Radiation Protection Standard for Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level, and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'. This paper describes analyses that assess the likelihood that TRU waste in shallow land burial can meet the 40 CFR 191 standards for a geologic repository. The simulated probability of the cumulative release exceeding 1 and 10 times the 40 CFR 191.13 containment requirements is estimated to be 0.009 and less than 0.0001, respectively. The cumulative release is most sensitive to the number of groundwater withdrawal wells drilled through the disposal trench. The mean total effective dose equivalent for a member of the public is estimated to reach a maximum of 0.014 milli-Sievert (mSv) at 10,000 years, or approximately 10 percent of the 0.15 mSv 40 CFR 191.15 individual protection requirement. The dose is predominantly from inhalation of short-lived Rn-222 progeny in air produced by low-level waste disposed in the same trench. The transuranic radionuclide released in greatest amounts, Pu-239, contributes only 0.4 percent of the dose. The member of public dose is most sensitive to the U-234 inventory and the radon emanation coefficient. Reasonable assurance of compliance with the Subpart C groundwater protection standard is provided by site characterization data and hydrologic processes modeling which support a conclusion of no groundwater pathway within 10,000 years. Limited quantities of transuranic waste in a shallow land burial trench at the NTS can meet the requirements of 40 CFR 191. (authors)

  9. Partners for Profit... Coastal Bermudagrass, Fertilizer, and Management. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pratt, J. Neal; Lovell, Ashley C.

    1979-01-01

    is expressed to the Tennessee Valley Authority for providing partial funds for printing. J S 111'1 I c.;l~ I 8 -/:);).3 (l a. '"A I JvJ(Y PARTNERS FOR PROFIT ... COASTAL BERMUDAGRASS, FERTILIZER AND MANAGEMENT J. Neal Pratt and Ashley C. Lovell* Coastal... in improved animal performances. L-771 Crop Fertilization on East Texas Soils L-772 L-983 Crop Fertilization on Coast Prairie and Coastal 8end Soils Crop Fertilization on Rolling Plains, Central Prairies and Cross Timber Soils L-1411 Field and Forage...

  10. Searches for 3rd generation partners in ATLAS and CMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripiana, Martin; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    Naturalness arguments for weak-scale supersymmetry favour supersymmetric partners of the third generation quarks with masses not too far from those of their Standard Model counterparts. Top or bottom squarks with masses of a few hundred GeV can also give rise to large direct pair production rates at the LHC. The talk presents recent ATLAS and CMS results from searches for direct stop and sbottom pair production, using 20/fb of 8 TeV pp collision data, and prospects for 13 TeV Run-2 data are also included.

  11. EA-318-A AEP Energy Partners, Inc. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to export electricSilverhill Ltd toAEP Energy Partners,

  12. EA-340-A Saracen Energy Partners, LP | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to export electricSilverhillSaracen Energy Partners, LP

  13. CMI Education Partner: Iowa State University | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6Materials InstitutePartner: Iowa State

  14. CMI Education Partner: Purdue University | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6Materials InstitutePartner: Iowa

  15. CMI Education Partner: Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News PublicationsAudits &Bradbury Science Museum6Materials InstitutePartner:

  16. Property:NrelPartnerType | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE Inc dEA EIS Report JumpNrelPartnerType Jump

  17. Property:NrelPartnerYear | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLCALLETE Inc dEA EIS Report JumpNrelPartnerType

  18. Property:Geothermal/Partner2Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,Property EditMimeTypeGeofluidTempPartner2Website Jump to:

  19. Property:Geothermal/Partner3Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,Property EditMimeTypeGeofluidTempPartner2Website Jump

  20. Property:Geothermal/Partner4Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,Property EditMimeTypeGeofluidTempPartner2Website

  1. Property:Geothermal/Partner7Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,PropertyPartner7Website Jump to: navigation, search Property

  2. Property:Geothermal/Partner8Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation,PropertyPartner7Website Jump to: navigation, search

  3. Global Renewable Energy Partners AS GREP AS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlantMagma Energy Group JumpEnergy Partners AS GREP

  4. CMI Education Partners Offer Courses | Critical Materials Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory of raregovAboutRecovery ActToolsForNorth CarolinaCCI - CommunityAboutPartners

  5. NGEN Partners LLC (Southern California) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsourceEnergyTexas:NGEN Partners LLC (Southern

  6. CE2 Capital Partners LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County, California: Energy Resources JumpEmissionCapital Partners LLC Jump

  7. Property:EnergyAccessPartner | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to: navigation, search PropertyIsoOther JumpEndDate Jump to:EnergyAccessPartner

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Partner Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department8, 2015 GATEWAY Takes 9.New TownHome Serenbe,DepartmentPartner

  9. Workplace Charging Challenge Partners: EV Connect | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematics And Statistics » USAJobs SearchAMERICA'SEnergyofThe HartfordUnumXcel EnergyPartners: EV

  10. Bear Creek Wind Partners LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDateSAEngineering LLCBarnerBayshorePartners

  11. Durability Evaluation of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoyu Zhang; James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Gregory K. Housley

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus for single cell and small stack tests has been developed for this purpose. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  12. Preliminary evaluation of the use of the greater confinement disposal concept for the disposal of Fernald 11e(2) byproduct material at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R.; Brown, T.J.; Stockman, H.W.; Gallegos, D.P.; Conrad, S.H.; Price, L.L.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents a preliminary evaluation of the ability of the greater confinement disposal boreholes at the Nevada Test Site to provide long-term isolation of radionuclides from the disposal of vitrified byproduct material. The byproduct material is essentially concentrated residue from processing uranium ore that contains a complex mixture of radionuclides, many of which are long-lived and present in concentrations greater than 100,000 picoCuries per gram. This material has been stored in three silos at the fernald Environmental Management Project since the early 1950s and will be vitrified into 6,000 yd{sup 3} (4,580 m{sup 3}) of glass gems prior to disposal. This report documents Sandia National Laboratories` preliminary evaluation for disposal of the byproduct material and includes: the selection of quantitative performance objectives; a conceptual model of the disposal system and the waste; results of the modeling; identified issues, and activities necessary to complete a full performance assessment.

  13. Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W. L., LLNL

    1997-11-01

    Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

  14. Fourier-Mukai partners of a K3 surface and the cusps of its Kahler moduli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shouhei Ma

    2008-08-22

    Using lattice theory, we establish a one-to-one correspondence between the set of Fourier-Mukai partners of a projective $K3$ surface and the set of 0-dimensional standard cusps of its Kahler moduli. We also study the relation between twisted Fourier-Mukai partners and general 0-dimensional cusps, and the relation between Fourier-Mukai partners with elliptic fibrations and certain 1-dimensional cusps.

  15. Nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martz, H.E.

    1997-02-01

    Research reported in the thrust area of nondestructive evaluation includes: advanced 3-D imaging technologies; new techniques in laser ultrasonic testing; infrared computed tomography for thermal NDE of materials, structures, sources, and processes; automated defect detection for large laser optics; multistatic micropower impulse radar imaging for nondestructive evaluation; and multi-modal NDE for AVLIS pod shielding components.

  16. Food Landscapes Community Partners: The Neighborhood Resource Center (NRC); Transition Day Support Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    of Internal Medicine; School of Allied Health Professions, Department of Health Administration; VCU Health, School of Allied Health Professions VCU Partners: School of Allied Health Professions, Department

  17. Sandia Energy - Sandia and Partners Complete Phase I of a Vertical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Partners Complete Phase I of a Vertical-Axis Deep-Water Offshore Turbine Study Home Renewable Energy Energy News Wind Energy News & Events Computational Modeling & Simulation...

  18. BRIDGE Frderung von Grndungen aus Hochschulen Unternehmensgrndung mit einem starken Partner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diekmann, Martin

    BRIDGE ­ Förderung von Gründungen aus Hochschulen Unternehmensgründung mit einem starken Partner:00 Uhr Cartesium, Rotunde, Enrique-Schmidt-Str. 5 Anmeldung und weitere Informationen: www.bridge

  19. RFI Released to Compile Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT FOA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) is compiling a Teaming Partner List to facilitate the formation of new project teams for the anticipated Buildings Energy Efficiency Frontiers &...

  20. Reconstructing singly produced top partners in decays to $\\mathbf{Wb}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas Gutierrez Ortiz; James Ferrando; Deepak Kar; Michael Spannowsky

    2014-10-09

    Fermionic top partners are a feature of many models of physics beyond the Standard Model. We propose a search strategy for single production of top partners focussing specifically on the dominant decay to $Wb$. The enormous background can be reduced by requiring a forward jet and exploiting jet substructure to suppress top-pair production. This simple strategy is shown to produce a sensitive search for single top-partner production, in the context of composite Higgs models, that has competitive mass reach with existing experimental searches for top-partner-pair production at the 8TeV LHC.

  1. Vestibular function test program evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Glenn Frederic

    1990-01-01

    . conjugate or disconjugate eye movements 3. eye movement plane 4. fast and slow phase direction 5. amplitude 6. beat frequency 7. fast and slow phase velocity 8. change in direction or amplitude 9. head position or changes of head position influences... OALOULATE EIH HAI'10 ~ H TEE EAHO PEEP E HAO ~ ILEHAVEE OUTPUT H ~ AOE E HALO UL AT ~ ~ T ~ Eu HH ~ Fig. 4. continued. 7. maximum eye deviation (input by the user in degrees) to the left, held for 3 seconds 8. return to midline (0 degrees), held...

  2. Sandia Energy - Test and Evaluation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)GeothermalFuel Magnetization andStochastic

  3. Evaluating the national HIV counseling and testing (CT) program of St. Lucia: a study to determine coverage, utilization, successes, and gaps in service delivery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asrat, Anjabebu S.

    2010-01-01

    The Program Evaluation Standards 2nd Edition. How to assessProgram evaluation: Alternative approaches and practical guidelines 2nd edition.

  4. AVTA: Transit Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity transit projects follow a rigorous data collection and analysis protocol. Refer to "General Evaluation Plan: Fleet Test and Evaluation Projects" for...

  5. Search Strategies for Top Partners in Composite Higgs models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gripaios, Ben; Müller, Thibaut; Parker, M. A.; Sutherland, David

    2014-08-29

    invariably contains several high pT objects, including several b-jets, as well as a reasonable branching fraction to leptons. 3.2 Doublet model The next model contains a top partner carrying the (1, 2) irrep of SU(2)2. Unlike the singlet model, this cannot... overloading the reader’s RAM, and at the risk of incurring kernel panic, we use tR to represent both the Weyl fermion and the vector that gives its embedding in the 5 rep of Sp(2): tR = (0, 0, 0, 0, tR) T . 5As in [29], the bR is absent from our discussion. 6...

  6. Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.; Boyle, K.L.; Zhang, K.

    2010-05-01

    As part of the effort to investigate the technical feasibility of gas production from hydrate deposits, a long-term field test (lasting 18-24 months) is under consideration in a project led by the U.S. Department of Energy. We evaluate a candidate deposit involving the C-Unit in the vicinity of the PBU-L106 site in North Slope, Alaska. This deposit is stratigraphically bounded by impermeable shale top and bottom boundaries (Class 3), and is characterized by high intrinsic permeabilities, high porosity, high hydrate saturation, and a hydrostatic pressure distribution. The C-unit deposit is composed of two hydrate-bearing strata separated by a 30-ft-thick shale interlayer, and its temperatrure across its boundaries ranges between 5 and 6.5 C. We investigate by means of numerical simulation involving very fine grids the production potential of these two deposits using both vertical and horizontal wells. We also explore the sensitivity of production to key parameters such as the hydrate saturation, the formation permeability, and the permeability of the bounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production performance of the C-Unit at the PBU-L106 site to that of the D-Unit accumulation at the Mount Elbert site, a thinner, single-layer Class 3 deposit on the North Slope of Alaska that is shallower, less-pressurized and colder (2.3-2.6 C). The results indicate that production from horizontal wells may be orders of magnitude larger than that from vertical ones. Additionally, production increases with the formation permeability, and with a decreasing permeability of the boundaries. The effect of the hydrate saturation on production is complex and depends on the time frame of production. Because of higher production, the PBU-L106 deposit appears to have an advantage as a candidate for the long-term test.

  7. Evaluation of the Repeatability of the Delta Q Duct Leakage Testing Technique Including Investigation of Robust Analysis Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2008-01-01

    Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertaintythe uncertainty due to changing weather during the test (the DeltaQ test are influenced by weather induced pressures.

  8. Energy Evaluation of a New Construction Pilot Community: Fresno, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.; Poerschke, A.; Rapport, A.; Wayne, M.

    2014-06-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes (WCHH) based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the House Simulation Protocols (Hendron, Robert; Engebrecht, Cheryn (2010). Building America House Simulation Protocols. Golden, CO: National Renewable Energy Laboratory). Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package (SIMP) from a single test house into multiple houses. Although a technical solution already may have been evaluated and validated in an individual test house, the potential exists for constructability failures at the community scale. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a SIMP and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this community-scale research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. Verification with measured data is an important component in predictive energy modeling. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  9. Compendium of NASA Data Base for the Global Tropospheric Experiment`s Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation No. 3 (CITE-3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, G.L.; Scott, A.D. Jr.

    1996-03-01

    This compendium describes aircraft data that are available from NASA`s Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation - 3 (CITE-3) conducted over the north and tropical Atlantic Ocean during August/September 1989. CITE-3 objectives were to intercompare instrumentation for aircraft measurements of SO2, DMS (dimethyl sulfide), COS (carbonyl sulfide), C2S, and H2S and to determine for the marine environment, the abundance and distribution of these sulfur species. Sampling was conducted aboard the NASA Wallops Electra aircraft in ambient air over the North Atlantic Ocean east of Wallops Island, Virginia, and the tropical Atlantic east of Natal, Brazil. Intercomparison measurements included 5 techniques for SO2; 6 for DMS; and 3 each for COS, CS2, and H2S. Ancillary data important to ozone photochemistry and sulfur partitioning chemistry were also measured. This document provides a representation of NASA Electra data that are available from NASA Langley`s Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The DAAC data bases include other data such as meteorological data/products, results from surface studies, satellite observations, and data from sonde releases.

  10. Office of Technology Development FY 1993 program summary: Office of Research and Development, Office of Demonstration, Testing and Evaluation. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    This report summarizes significant FY93 programmatic information and accomplishments relevant to the individual activities within the Office of Technology Development Program for Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation (RDDT&E). A brief discussion of the mission of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Technology Development is presented. An overview is presented of the major problem areas confronting DOE. These problem areas include: groundwater and soils cleanup; waste retrieval and processing; and pollution prevention. The organizational elements within EM are highlighted. An EM-50 Funding Summary for FY92 and FY93 is also provided. RDDT&E programs are discussed and their key problem areas are summarized. Three salient program-formulating concepts are explained. They are: Integrated Demonstrations, Integrated Programs, and the technology window of opportunity. Detailed information for each of the programs within RDDT&E is presented and includes a fact sheet, a list of technical task plans and an accomplishments and objectives section.

  11. Single-Pass Flow-Through Test Elucidation of Weathering Behavior and Evaluation of Contaminant Release Models for Hanford Tank Residual Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita; Geiszler, Keith N.

    2013-01-01

    Contaminant release models are required to evaluate and predict long-term environmental impacts of even residual amounts of high-level radioactive waste after cleanup and closure of radioactively contaminated sites such as the DOE’s Hanford Site. More realistic and representative models have been developed for release of uranium, technetium, and chromium from Hanford Site tanks C-202, C-203, and C-103 residual wastes using data collected with a single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) method. These revised models indicate that contaminant release concentrations from these residual wastes will be considerably lower than previous estimates based on batch experiments. For uranium, a thermodynamic solubility model provides an effective description of uranium release, which can account for differences in pore fluid chemistry contacting the waste that could occur through time and as a result of different closure scenarios. Under certain circumstances in the SPFT experiments various calcium rich precipitates (calcium phosphates and calcite) form on the surfaces of the waste particles, inhibiting dissolution of the underlying uranium phases in the waste. This behavior was not observed in previous batch experiments. For both technetium and chromium, empirical release models were developed. In the case of technetium, release from all three wastes was modeled using an equilibrium Kd model. For chromium release, a constant concentration model was applied for all three wastes.

  12. Energy Department and AHAM Partner to Streamline ENERGY STAR Testing for Washers, Dryers, Refrigerators

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Under a new policy, the Energy Department will work closely with the Association of Home Appliance Manufactures to verify the ENERGY STAR performance of products participating in AHAM’s verification program.

  13. An empirical test of partner choice mechanisms in a wild legume-rhizobium interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01

    Denison, R. F. 2003 Host sanctions and the legume-rhizobiumDenison, R. F. 2000 Legume sanctions and the evolution of2003 Plant biology - Mutual sanctions. Nature 422, 672-674.

  14. Department of Energy, Duke Energy and EPRI Partner to Test Advanced Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratoryof Energy ElevenLGJuly 2013 CyberTechnologies for

  15. Company Name: Boston Partners Financial Group, LLC Web Site: bostonpartnersfinancialgroup.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    .com Industry: Financial Planning Brief Company Overview: Boston Partners Financial Group is a great placeCompany Name: Boston Partners Financial Group, LLC Web Site: bostonpartnersfinancialgroup to ensure that they and those they care about are protected now, and in the future. Majors they typically

  16. Termination of Domestic Partnership Signature of faculty/staff/student domestic partner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    Termination of Domestic Partnership Signature of faculty/staff/student domestic partner Printed as of ________________________. I certify I have mailed a copy of this Termination to my above named former domestic partner. We the domestic partnership is terminated. In the event more than one such Termination of Domestic Partnership

  17. UMBC Training Centers Partners with EC-Council, to Deliver Online Cybersecurity Training Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

    UMBC Training Centers Partners with EC-Council, to Deliver Online Cybersecurity Training Programs "iClasses offer Students the option of live, instructor lead online security training virtually anywhere with access to the internet." March 21, 2011 - UMBC Training Centers, long time partner of the EC

  18. Medium and Heavy Duty Vehicle Field Evaluations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walkowicz, K.

    2014-06-01

    This presentation discusses field evaluations of medium- and heavy-duty vehicles performed by NREL. The project provides medium-duty (MD) and heavy-duty (HD) test results, aggregated data, and detailed analysis, including 3rd party unbiased data (data that would not normally be shared by industry in an aggregated and detailed manner). Over 5.6 million miles of advanced technology MD and HD truck data have been collected, documented, and analyzed on over 240 different vehicles since 2002. Data, analysis, and reports are shared within DOE, national laboratory partners, and industry for R&D planning and strategy. The results help guide R&D for new technology development, help define intelligent usage of newly developed technology, and help fleets/users understand all aspects of advanced technology.

  19. Final Report: Mobile Surveillance and Wireless Communication Systems Field Operational Test Volume 3: Appendices A-J Containing Evaluation Data Gathered During the Anaheim Special Event and I-5 Tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Lawrence

    1999-01-01

    and Wireless Communications Systems Field Operational Testand Wireless Communication Systems Field Operational Testand Wireless Communications Systems Field Operational Test

  20. High-Throughput, High-Precision Hot Testing Tool for High-Brightness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Diode Testing Lead Performer: KLA-Tencor Corporation - Milpitas, CA Partners: Ocean Optics - Dunedin, FL DOE Total Funding: 3,994,729 Cost Share: 4,626,422 Project Term: 815...

  1. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Salut Underground Nuclear Test in U20ak, Nevada National Security Site, and the Impact of Stability of the Ground Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-04-25

    At the request of Jerry Sweeney, the LLNL Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Salut underground nuclear test in U20ak to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. Review of the Salut site is complicated because the test experienced a subsurface, rather than surface, collapse. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Salut detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeologogy due to the nuclear detonation. Sweeney's proposal requires physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Test Site (NNSS, formerly the Nevada Test Site), and focuses on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow, and deep geophysical surveys.

  2. Fact #857 January 26, 2015 Number of Partner Workplaces Offering Electric Vehicle Charging More Than Tripled Since 2011 – Dataset

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Excel file with dataset for Number of Partner Workplaces Offering Electric Vehicle Charging More Than Tripled Since 2011

  3. Test plan for evaluation of plasma melter technology for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlin, D.F.; Lahoda, E.J.; Gass, W.R.; D`Amico, N.

    1994-10-20

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of plasma arc vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Low-Level Waste (LLW) Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it [one of seven selected for glass melter testing under Purchase Order MMI-SVV-384212] is the Westinghouse Science and Technology Center (WSTC) in Pittsburgh, PA. WSTC authors of the test plan are D. F. McLaughlin, E. J. Lahoda, W. R. Gass, and N. D`Amico. The WSTC Program Manager for this test is D. F. McLaughlin. This test plan is for Phase I activities described in the above Purchase Order. Test conduct includes melting of glass frit with Hanford LLW Double-Shell Slurry Feed waste simulant in a plasma arc fired furnace.

  4. Evaluation of the Thermophysical Properties of Poly(MethylMethacrylate): A Reference Material for the Development of a flammability Test for Micro-Gravity Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhaus, Thomas

    1999-01-01

    A study has been conducted using PMMA (Poly(methyl methacrylate)) as a reference material in the development process of the Forced Flow and flame Spread Test (FIST). This test attempts to establish different criteria for ...

  5. Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners, a DIP subset

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Graeber, Thomas G.; Eisenberg, David

    The Database of Ligand-Receptor Partners (DLRP) is a subset of DIP (Database of Interacting Proteins). The DLRP is a database of protein ligand and protein receptor pairs that are known to interact with each other. By interact we mean that the ligand and receptor are members of a ligand-receptor complex and, unless otherwise noted, transduce a signal. In some instances the ligand and/or receptor may form a heterocomplex with other ligands/receptors in order to be functional. We have entered the majority of interactions in DLRP as full DIP entries, with links to references and additional information (see the DIP User's Guide). DLRP is a web supplement for: Thomas G. Graeber and David Eisenberg. Bioinformatic identification of potential autocrine signaling loops in cancers from gene expression profiles. Nature Genetics, 29(3):295-300 (November 2001). [Quoted from the DLRP homepage at http://dip.doe-mbi.ucla.edu/dip/DLRP.cgi] Also available from this page is the DLRP chemokine subset.

  6. Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Nondestructive Evaluation and Monitoring Projects NASA White Sands Test Facility (WSTF)...

  7. Evaluation of Sorbent Injection for Mercury Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharon Sjostrom

    2008-06-30

    ADA-ES, Inc., with support from DOE/NETL, EPRI, and industry partners, studied mercury control options at six coal-fired power plants. The overall objective of the this test program was to evaluate the capabilities of activated carbon injection at six plants: Sunflower Electric's Holcomb Station Unit 1, AmerenUE's Meramec Station Unit 2, Missouri Basin Power Project's Laramie River Station Unit 3, Detroit Edison's Monroe Power Plant Unit 4, American Electric Power's Conesville Station Unit 6, and Labadie Power Plant Unit 2. These plants have configurations that together represent 78% of the existing coal-fired generation plants. The financial goals for the program established by DOE/NETL were to reduce the uncontrolled mercury emissions by 50 to 70% at a cost 25 to 50% lower than the target established by DOE of $60,000 per pound of mercury removed. Results from testing at Holcomb, Laramie, Meramec, Labadie, and Monroe indicate the DOE goal was successfully achieved. However, further improvements for plants with conditions similar to Conesville are recommended that would improve both mercury removal performance and economics.

  8. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation at the Norbo Underground Nuclear Test in U8c, Nevada Nuclear Security Site, and the Impact on Stability of the Ground Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawloski, G A

    2012-06-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Containment Program performed a review of nuclear test-related data for the Norbo underground nuclear test in U8c to assist in evaluating this legacy site as a test bed for application technologies for use in On-Site Inspections (OSI) under the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. This request is similar to one made for the Salut site in U8c (Pawloski, 2012b). Review of the Norbo site is complicated because the test first exhibited subsurface collapse, which was not unusual, but it then collapsed to the surface over one year later, which was unusual. Of particular interest is the stability of the ground surface above the Norbo detonation point. Proposed methods for on-site verification include radiological signatures, artifacts from nuclear testing activities, and imaging to identify alteration to the subsurface hydrogeology due to the nuclear detonation. Aviva Sussman from the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has also proposed work at this site. Both proposals require physical access at or near the ground surface of specific underground nuclear test locations at the Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and focus on possible activities such as visual observation, multispectral measurements, and shallow and deep geophysical surveys.

  9. WVCP | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information About Partnership with NREL Partnership with NREL Yes Partnership Type Test & Evaluation Partner Partnering Center within NREL Electricity Resources & Building...

  10. Spent Fuel Test-Climax: An evaluation of the technical feasibility of geologic storage of spent nuclear fuel in granite: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick, W.C.

    1986-03-30

    In the Climax stock granite on the Nevada Test Site, eleven canisters of spent nuclear reactor fuel were emplaced, and six electrical simulators were energized. When test data indicated that the test objectives were met during the 3-year storage phase, the spent-fuel canisters were retrieved and the thermal sources were de-energized. The project demonstrated the feasibility of packaging, transporting, storing, and retrieving highly radioactive fuel assemblies in a safe and reliable manner. In addition to emplacement and retrieval operations, three exchanges of spent-fuel assemblies between the SFT-C and a surface storage facility, conducted during the storage phase, furthered this demonstration. The test led to development of a technical measurements program. To meet these objectives, nearly 1000 instruments and a computer-based data acquisition system were deployed. Geotechnical, seismological, and test status data were recorded on a continuing basis for the three-year storage phase and six-month monitored cool-down of the test. This report summarizes the engineering and scientific endeavors which led to successful design and execution of the test. The design, fabrication, and construction of all facilities and handling systems are discussed, in the context of test objectives and a safety assessment. The discussion progresses from site characterization and experiment design through data acquisition and analysis of test data in the context of design calculations. 117 refs., 52 figs., 81 tabs.

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home? LENDER PARTNER...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    U.S. Department of Energy Zero Energy Ready Home(tm) LENDER PARTNER AGREEMENT This agreement is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in support of DOE Zero Energy...

  12. DOE CHALLENGE HOME and PHIUS PARTNER TO MAKE IT EASIER TO REACH

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CHALLENGE HOME and PHIUS PARTNER TO MAKE IT EASIER TO REACH NEW LEVELS OF ZERO NET-ENERGY READY This partnership between DOE and PHIUS enhances coordination between voluntary peak...

  13. Dancing cheek to cheek : haptic communication between partner dancers and swing as a finite state machine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentry, Sommer Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    To see two expert partners, one leading and the other following, swing dance together is to watch a remarkable two-agent communication and control system in action. Even blindfolded, the follower can decode the leader's ...

  14. U.S. DOE TAP Webinar: Better Buildings Challenge K-12 Education Partners

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Challenge (BBC) K-12 Education Partners are demonstrating how clean energy initiatives can be achievable and effective in reducing energy costs and climate impact. With K-12...

  15. Energy Department and USDA Partner to Support Energy Efficiency in Rural Communities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partnering with USDA, the Energy Department has created the State Energy Extension Partnership to equip America’s farm families and rural small businesses with the efficiency tools, resources and training needed to reduce energy costs.

  16. Single assembly robot in search of human partner: Versatile grounded language generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knepper, Ross Alan

    We describe an approach for enabling robots to recover from failures by asking for help from a human partner. For example, if a robot fails to grasp a needed part during a furniture assembly task, it might ask a human ...

  17. U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and FEMP Partner to Drive Down Federal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of Engineers Partner to Drive Down Federal Energy Costs A view of the biomass-fired cogeneration facility at the Savannah River Site. EM is Leader in Use of Performance-Based...

  18. For Immediate Release --Friday, July 11, 2014 Potato Growers of Alberta and industry partners to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Joy

    of Alberta and industry partners to create research Chair at University of Lethbridge Research capacity in Alberta's potato industry will be significantly enhanced due years from the Potato Growers of Alberta (PGA), McCain Foods, ConAgra Lamb

  19. Real Estate Foundation of British Columbia Partnering Fund Award Results for 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Real Estate Foundation of British Columbia Partnering Fund Award Results for 2006 page 1 of 2 mountain communities and the mining industry in benefiting from amenity migration. #12;Real Estate

  20. Real Estate Foundation of British Columbia Partnering Fund Award Results for 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northern British Columbia, University of

    Real Estate Foundation of British Columbia Partnering Fund Award Results for 2008 page 1 of 2 and recommends improvements for future projects. 1 graduate student #12;Real Estate Foundation of British

  1. Airline alliance revenue management : improving joint revenues through partner sharing of flight leg opportunity costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Alyona

    2012-01-01

    Airlines participating in alliances offer code share itineraries (with flight segments operated by different partners) to expand the range of origin-destination combinations offered to passengers, thus increasing market ...

  2. Austin's Home Performance with Energy Star Program: Making a Compelling Offer to a Financial Institution Partner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimring, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Making a Compelling Offer to a Financial Institution PartnerEnergy recently ran the ‘Best Offer Ever’ promotion in whichwith more details on the ‘Best Offer Ever’ is forthcoming.  

  3. Unmarried partners: a comparison of Anglos, Asians, Blacks, Hispanics, and Native Americans using assimilation theory 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walther, Carol Sue

    2001-01-01

    increased to what is now a prevalently studied household formation. In this thesis, I apply Milton Gordon's assimilation perspective to heterosexual, gay and lesbian unmarried partners. In the assimilation perspective, Gordon (1964) asserts that minority...

  4. Same-Sex Spouses and Unmarried Partners in the American Community Survey, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gates, Gary

    2009-01-01

    in California were likely same- sex couples. For moreL. The Measurement of Same-Sex Unmarried Partner Couples inGeographic Trends Among Same-Sex Couples in the U.S. Census

  5. Unequal Taxes on Equal Benefits: The Taxation of Domestic Partner Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badgett, M.V. Lee

    2007-01-01

    as a dependent of a taxpayer, a domestic partner would haveto live all year in the taxpayer’s household, receive moreher support from the taxpayer, and meet the IRS citizenship/

  6. Test of Little Higgs Mechanism at Future Colliders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeki Matsumoto

    2012-02-25

    In the little higgs scenario, several coupling constants are related to each other to guarantee the stability of the higgs boson mass at one-loop level. This relation is called the little higgs mechanism. We discuss how accurately the relation can be tested at future $e^+e^-$ colliders, with especially focusing on the top sector of the scenario using a method of effective lagrangian. In order to test the mechanism, it is important to measure the Yukawa coupling of the top partner. Higgs associated and threshold productions of the top partner are found to be the best processes for this purpose.

  7. Evaluation of the Repeatability of the Delta Q Duct Leakage Testing TechniqueIncluding Investigation of Robust Analysis Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickerhoff, Darryl; Walker, Iain

    2008-08-01

    The DeltaQ test is a method of estimating the air leakage from forced air duct systems. Developed primarily for residential and small commercial applications it uses the changes in blower door test results due to forced air system operation. Previous studies established the principles behind DeltaQ testing, but raised issues of precision of the test, particularly for leaky homes on windy days. Details of the measurement technique are available in an ASTM Standard (ASTM E1554-2007). In order to ease adoption of the test method, this study answers questions regarding the uncertainty due to changing weather during the test (particularly changes in wind speed) and the applicability to low leakage systems. The first question arises because the building envelope air flows and pressures used in the DeltaQ test are influenced by weather induced pressures. Variability in wind induced pressures rather than temperature difference induced pressures dominates this effect because the wind pressures change rapidly over the time period of a test. The second question needs to answered so that DeltaQ testing can be used in programs requiring or giving credit for tight ducts (e.g., California's Building Energy Code (CEC 2005)). DeltaQ modeling biases have been previously investigated in laboratory studies where there was no weather induced changes in envelope flows and pressures. Laboratory work by Andrews (2002) and Walker et al. (2004) found biases of about 0.5% of forced air system blower flow and individual test uncertainty of about 2% of forced air system blower flow. The laboratory tests were repeated by Walker and Dickerhoff (2006 and 2008) using a new ramping technique that continuously varied envelope pressures and air flows rather than taking data at pre-selected pressure stations (as used in ASTM E1554-2003 and other previous studies). The biases and individual test uncertainties for ramping were found to be very close (less than 0.5% of air handler flow) to those found in for the pressure station approach. Walker and Dickerhoff also included estimates of DeltaQ test repeatability based on the results of field tests where two houses were tested multiple times. The two houses were quite leaky (20-25 Air Changes per Hour at 50Pa (0.2 in. water) (ACH50)) and were located in the San Francisco Bay area. One house was tested on a calm day and the other on a very windy day. Results were also presented for two additional houses that were tested by other researchers in Minneapolis, MN and Madison, WI, that had very tight envelopes (1.8 and 2.5 ACH50). These tight houses had internal duct systems and were tested without operating the central blower--sometimes referred to as control tests. The standard deviations between the multiple tests for all four houses were found to be about 1% of the envelope air flow at 50 Pa (0.2 in. water) (Q50) that led to the suggestion of this as a rule of thumb for estimating DeltaQ uncertainty. Because DeltaQ is based on measuring envelope air flows it makes sense for uncertainty to scale with envelope leakage. However, these tests were on a limited data set and one of the objectives of the current study is to increase the number of tested houses. This study focuses on answering two questions: (1) What is the uncertainty associated with changes in weather (primarily wind) conditions during DeltaQ testing? (2) How can these uncertainties be reduced? The first question is addressing issues of repeatability. To study this five houses were tested as many times as possible over a day. Weather data was recorded on-site--including the local windspeed. The result from these five houses were combined with the two Bay Area homes from the previous studies. The variability of the tests (represented by the standard deviation) is the repeatability of the test method for that house under the prevailing weather conditions. Because the testing was performed over a day a wide range of wind speeds was achieved following typical diurnal variations of low wind in the early morning and greatest winds in the late afternoon/early

  8. Evaluation of the Repeatability of the Delta Q Duct Leakage Testing Technique Including Investigation of Robust Analysis Techniques and Estimates of Weather Induced Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickerhoff, Darryl

    2008-01-01

    Deve lop m ent of a New Duct Leakage Test: Delta Q.    than a few cfm for tight duct systems as long as at leastHowever houses with leakier duct systems seem to have less

  9. Chlamydia testing and treatment in community pharmacies: findings and lessons learned from setting out to evaluate an unexpectedly short lived service in Lothian, Scotland 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kapadia, Mufiza Zia

    2013-07-06

    Genital chlamydia is the most commonly diagnosed sexually transmitted infection. In August 2008, the Scottish government directed its health boards to involve community pharmacies in providing chlamydia testing and ...

  10. An evaluation of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Horizontal Gaze Nystagmus test at a .08 blood alcohol concentration for the State of Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platt, Lance Arthur

    2004-09-30

    to maintain proficiency in the SFST battery and curriculum. Third, the current SFST practitioner curriculum should focus more on the administration and scoring of the SFSTs including the HGN test to maximize the learning of the competencies of the correct...

  11. Evaluation of a single cell and candidate materials with high water content hydrogen in a generic solid oxide fuel cell stack test fixture, Part II: materials and interface characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, Y. S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-01-01

    A generic solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) test fixture was developed to evaluate candidate materials under realistic conditions. A commerical 50 mm x 50 mm NiO-YSZ anode supported thin YSZ electrolyte cell with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathode was tested to evaluate the stability of candidate materials. The cell was tested in two stages at 800oC: stage I of low (~3% H2O) humidity and stage II of high (~30% H2O) humidity hydrogen fuel at constant voltage or constant current mode. Part I of the work was published earlier with information of the generic test fixture design, materials, cell performance, and optical post-mortem analysis. In part II, detailed microstructure and interfacial characterizations are reported regarding the SOFC candidate materials: (Mn,Co)-spinel conductive coating, alumina coating for sealing area, ferritic stainless steel interconnect, refractory sealing glass, and their interactions with each other. Overall, the (Mn,Co)-spinel coating was very effective in minimizing Cr migration. No Cr was identified in the cathode after 1720h at 800oC. Aluminization of metallic interconnect also proved to be chemically compatible with alkaline-earth silicate sealing glass. The details of interfacial reaction and microstructure development are discussed.

  12. Evaluation of impact limiter performance during end-on and slapdown drop tests of a one-third scale model storage/transport cask system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Bronowski, D.R.; Uncapher, W.L.; Attaway, S.W.; Bateman, V.I.; Carne, T.G.; Gregory, D.L. ); Huerta, M. )

    1990-12-01

    This report describes drop testing of a one-third scale model shipping cask system. Two casks were designed and fabricated by Transnuclear, Inc., to ship spent fuel from the former Nuclear Fuel Services West Valley reprocessing facility in New York to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for a long-term spent fuel dry storage demonstration project. As part of the NRC's regulatory certification process, one-third scale model tests were performed to obtain experimental data on impact limiter performance during impact testing. The objectives of the testing program were to (1) obtain deceleration and displacement information for the cask and impact limiter system, (2) obtain dynamic force-displacement data for the impact limiters, (3) verify the integrity of the impact limiter retention system, and (4) examine the crush behavior of the limiters. Two 30-ft (9-m) drop tests were conducted on a mass model of the cask body and scaled balsa and redwood-filled impact limiters. This report describes the results of both tests in terms of measured decelerations, posttest deformation measurements, and the general structural response of the system. 3 refs., 32 figs.

  13. Shared Experimental Facilities Your Partner for Materials Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Energy Facility to evaluate solar cells. Radio Microwave Terahertz Infrared Ultraviolet X-ray Nuclear tools for characterizing the structural properties of a wide range of materials. Microwave reactors/Raman Spectrometer probes chemical bonds and structure in molecular materials. Solar Energy is simulated

  14. A Comparative Evaluation of Three Situational Judgment Test Response Formats: Additional Assessment of Construct-related Validity, Subgroup Differences, Susceptibility to Response Distortion, Test-taker Reactions, and Internal Psychometric Properties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Craig Douglas

    2014-01-13

    on Situational Judgment Test Response Formats (Glaze, Jarrett, Arthur, Schurig, & Taylor, 2011)……….................................5 Mean Data………………………….……………...……………………6 Construct-related Validity……………………………..……..…………6 Subgroup Differences... …………….…………………………....….....…8 Response Distortion………………………………………………..….10 Present Study……….………………………………………………...………….11 Construct-related Validity: Alternative Explanation of Glaze et al.’s (2011) Results………………………………………...………12 Hypothesis 1...

  15. York County Energy Partners CFB Cogeneration Project. Annual report, [September 30, 1992--September 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    The Department of Energy, under the Clean Coal Technology program, proposes to provide cost-shared financial assistance for the construction of a utility-scale circulating fluidized bed technology cogeneration facility by York County Energy Partners, L.P (YCEP). YCEP, a project company of ir Products and Chemicals, Inc., would design, construct and operate a 250 megawatt (gross) coal-fired cogeneration facility on a 38-acre parcel in North Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania. The facility would be located adjacent to the P. H. Glatfelter Company paper mill, the proposed steam host. Electricity would be delivered to Metropolitan Edison Company. The facility would demonstrate new technology designed to greatly increase energy efficiency and reduce air pollutant emissions over current generally available commercial technology which utilizes coal fuel. The facility would include a single train circulating fluidized bed boiler, a pollution control train consisting of limestone injection for reducing emissions of sulfur dioxide by greater than 92 percent, selective non-catalytic reduction for reducing emissions of nitrogen oxides, and a fabric filter (baghouse) for reducing emissions of particulates. Section II of this report provides a general description of the facility. Section III describes the site specifics associated with the facility when it was proposed to be located in West Manchester Township. After the Cooperative Agreement was signed, YCEP decided to move the proposed site to North Codorus Township. The reasons for the move and the site specifics of that site are detailed in Section IV. This section of the report also provides detailed descriptions of several key pieces of equipment. The circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFB), its design scale-up and testing is given particular emphasis.

  16. The use of pre- and post-stimulation well test analysis in the evaluation of stimulation effectiveness in the Devonian Shales of the Appalachian Basin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lancaster, David Earl

    1988-01-01

    gas wells throughout the Appalachian Basin. The analysis of pre-stimulation well tests from four wells in Pike County, KY illustrates the practical difficulties in obtaining analyzable data from Devonian Shale wells. Fig. 1 shows the location... and requires that the flow periods prior to shut-in be even longer. The Martin 1 well located in Martin County, KY illustrates the problem of an insufficient flow period in a more typical Devonian Shale well test. The Martin 1 well was studied as part...

  17. Test and evaluation report for Westinghouse Hanford Company`s 1-L liquid shipper, docket 95-41-7A, Type A container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D.L.

    1996-03-13

    This report incorporates the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Facility Safety Analysis (DOE/EH-32) approval letter for packaging use. This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance test results of the 1-L Liquid Shipper packaging. The approved packaging system is designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be liquid or solid form. Liquid contents must have a specific gravity {lt}2. Solid materials are limited in weight, to include packaging, to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles.

  18. Residential Air Conditioner Direct Load Control "Energy Partners Program" 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    ) approach in which both demand- side and supply side resources are evaluated. HL&P also recognizes the contribution demand-side programs make to the company's long-term ability to provide reliable and reasonably priced electric service for its... effected, according to EPRI. Numerous large investor-owned electric utilities are presently offering residential load control programs with great success. Arkansas Power & Light, Duke Power Company, Florida Power Corporation, Florida Power t Light...

  19. Energy Evaluation of a New Construction Pilot Community: Fresno, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.; Poerschke, A.; Rapport, A.; Wayne, M.

    2014-06-01

    A new construction pilot community was constructed by builder-partner Wathen-Castanos Hybrid Homes based on a single occupied test house that was designed to achieve greater than 30% energy savings with respect to the Building America House Simulation Protocols developed by NREL. Builders face several key problems when implementing a whole-house systems integrated measures package from a single test house into multiple houses. This report addresses factors of implementation and scalability at the community scale and proposes methodologies by which community-scale energy evaluations can be performed based on results at the occupied test house level. Research focused on the builder and trade implementation of a measures package and the actual utility usage in the houses at the community scale of production. Five occupants participated in this research by providing utility bills and information on occupancy and miscellaneous gas and electric appliance use for their houses. IBACOS used these utility data and background information to analyze the actual energy performance of the houses. The actual utility bill readings were compared to projected energy consumption using BEopt with actual weather and thermostat set points for normalization.

  20. Evaluation of light microscopy and rapid diagnostic test for the detection of malaria under operational field conditions: a household survey in Ethiopia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endeshaw, Tekola; Gebre, Teshome; Ngondi, Jeremiah; Graves, Patricia M.; Shargie, Estifanos B.; Ejigsemahu, Yeshewamebrat; Ayele, Berhan; Yohannes, Gedeon; Teferi, Tesfaye; Messele, Ayenew; Zerihun, Mulat; Genet, Asrat; Mosher, Aryc W.; Emerson, Paul M.; Richards, Frank O. Jr

    2008-07-03

    of whom 11,504 (82%) were included in the analysis. Overall slide positivity rate was 4.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 3.4–5.0%) while ParaScreen RDT was positive in 3.3% (95% CI 2.6–4.1%) of those tested. Considering microscopy as the gold standard...

  1. FRC Performance Comparison: Direct Tensile Test, FRC Performance Comparison: Direct Tensile Test, BeamBeamType Bending Test, and Round Panel TestType Bending Test, and Round Panel Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Shih-Ho

    FRC Performance Comparison: Direct Tensile Test, FRC Performance Comparison: Direct Tensile Test, BeamBeamType Bending Test, and Round Panel TestType Bending Test, and Round Panel Test ShihShihHo ChaoTo compare the performance of FRC materials when evaluated by three major types of material tests (Unia ial

  2. Austin's Home Performance with Energy Star Program: Making a Compelling Offer to a Financial Institution Partner

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimring, Mark

    2011-03-18

    Launched in 2006, over 8,700 residential energy upgrades have been completed through Austin Energy's Home Performance with Energy Star (HPwES) program. The program's lending partner, Velocity Credit Union (VCU) has originated almost 1,800 loans, totaling approximately $12.5 million. Residential energy efficiency loans are typically small, and expensive to originate and service relative to larger financing products. National lenders have been hesitant to deliver attractive loan products to this small, but growing, residential market. In response, energy efficiency programs have found ways to partner with local and regional banks, credit unions, community development finance institutions (CDFIs) and co-ops to deliver energy efficiency financing to homeowners. VCU's experience with the Austin Energy HPwES program highlights the potential benefits of energy efficiency programs to a lending partner.

  3. Initial Teaming Partner List for Upcoming BENEFIT FOA Released | Department

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLAN FOR0987P Uncertainty inInhibitingSciTechof Energy

  4. Voluntary Initiative: Partnering to Enhance Program Capacity | Department

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-Sessions | Department ofVPV-SiteTestingOfficeU.S. Department of10 20of

  5. Evaluation of Cesium, Strontium, and Lead Sorption, Desorption, and Diffusion in Volcanic Tuffs from Frenchman Flat, Nevada Test Site: Macroscopic and Spectroscopic Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charalambos Papelis; Wooyong Um

    2003-03-01

    The interaction of radionuclides and other contaminants with minerals and other aquifer materials controls the rate of migration of these contaminants in groundwater. The stronger these interactions, the more a radionuclide will be retarded. Processes such as sorption and diffusion often control the migration of inorganic compounds in aquifers. In addition, these processes are often controlled by the nature of ions of interest, the nature of the aquifer materials, and the specific geochemical conditions. Parameters describing sorption and diffusion of radionuclides and other inorganic ions on aquifer materials are used in transport codes to predict the potential for migration of these contaminants into the accessible environment. Sorption and diffusion studies can help reduce the uncertainty of radionuclide transport modeling on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and other nuclear testing areas. For example, reliable sorption equilibrium constants, obtained under a variety of conditions, can be used to suggest a plausible sorption mechanism and to provide retardation parameters that can be used in transport models. In addition, these experiments, performed under a variety of conditions, can lead to models that can accommodate changing geochemical conditions. Desorption studies can probe the reversibility of reactions and test whether the reversibility assumed by equilibrium models is justified. Kinetic studies can be used to probe the time-dependent limitations of reactions and suggest whether an equilibrium or kinetic model may be more appropriate. Finally, spectroscopic studies can be used to distinguish between different sorption mechanisms, and provide further guidance with respect to model selection.

  6. Testing to evaluate the suitability of waste forms developed for electrometallurgically treated spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel for disposal in the Yucca Mountain reporsitory.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, W. E.

    2006-01-31

    The results of laboratory testing and modeling activities conducted to support the development of waste forms to immobilize wastes generated during the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel and their qualification for disposal in the federal high-level radioactive waste repository are summarized in this report. Tests and analyses were conducted to address issues related to the chemical, physical, and radiological properties of the waste forms relevant to qualification. These include the effects of composition and thermal treatments on the phase stability, radiation effects, and methods for monitoring product consistency. Other tests were conducted to characterize the degradation and radionuclide release behaviors of the ceramic waste form (CWF) used to immobilize waste salt and the metallic waste form (MWF) used to immobilize metallic wastes and to develop models for calculating the release of radionuclides over long times under repository-relevant conditions. Most radionuclides are contained in the binder glass phase of the CWF and in the intermetallic phase of the MWF. The release of radionuclides from the CWF is controlled by the dissolution rate of the binder glass, which can be tracked using the same degradation model that is used for high-level radioactive waste (HLW) glass. Model parameters measured for the aqueous dissolution of the binder glass are used to model the release of radionuclides from a CWF under all water-contact conditions. The release of radionuclides from the MWF is element-specific, but the release of U occurs the fastest under most test conditions. The fastest released constituent was used to represent all radionuclides in model development. An empirical aqueous degradation model was developed to describe the dependence of the radionuclide release rate from a MWF on time, pH, temperature, and the Cl{sup -} concentration. The models for radionuclide release from the CWF and MWF are both bounded by the HLW glass degradation model developed for use in repository licensing, and HLW glass can be used as a surrogate for both CWF and MWF in performance assessment calculations. Test results indicate that the radionuclide release from CWF and MWF is adequately described by other relevant performance assessment models, such as the models for the solution chemistries in breached waste packages, dissolved concentration limits, and the formation of radionuclide-bearing colloids.

  7. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system being evaluated. This can be the system manufacturer, a system user, or a third party organization such as a government agency. b. The term Vendor (or Vendor’s) System replaces the name of the specific SCADA/EMS being tested.

  8. Test and evaluation report for Westinghouse Hanford Company`s 1-L Liquid Shipper, Docket 95-41-7A, Type A container

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance test results of the 1-L Liquid Shipper packaging. The 1-L Liquid Shipper consists of the 3M SafeSend polyethylene canister base and cap with integral sorbent material, a quad ring gasket, a plastic bag, and six foam inserts. A 1-L narrow-mouth, Teflon bottle with Tefzel lid holds contents. The inner bottle is placed inside the SafeSend container. The inner bottle content weight cannot exceed 2000 g (4.4 lb). Total bottle weight, including contents cannot exceed 2167.5 g (4.78 lb). The nominal gross weight of the assembled packaging is to be no more that 3830.5 g (8.4 lb). The approved packaging system is designed to ship Type A quantities of radioactive materials, normal form. Contents may be liquid or solid form. Liquid contents may have a specific gravity less than or equal to (<2). Solid materials are limited in weight, to include packaging, to the gross weight of the as-tested liquids and bottles.

  9. College of Engineering Partner Schools Australia Melbourne University, Melbourne GE3*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    College of Engineering Partner Schools Australia Melbourne University, Melbourne ­ GE3* University of New South Wales, New South Wales ­ GE3* Austria Technical University of Vienna, Vienna - GE3* Chile Universidad del Bio Bio, Concepcion China Xiamen University, Xiamen ­ GE3* Denmark Aalborg University, Aalborg

  10. On the partner particles for moving mirror radiation and black hole evaporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Hotta; R. Schützhold; W. G. Unruh

    2015-04-21

    The partner mode with respect to a vacuum state for a given mode (like that corresponding to one of the thermal particles emitted by a black hole) is defined and calculated. The partner modes are explicitly calculated for a number of cases, in particular for the modes corresponding to a particle detector being excited by turn-on/turn-off transients, or with the thermal particles emitted by the accelerated mirror model for black hole evaporation. One of the key results is that the partner mode in general is just a vacuum fluctuation, and one can have the partner mode be located in a region where the state cannot be distinguished from the vacuum state by any series of local measurements, including the energy density. I.e., "information" (the correlations with the thermal emissions) need not be associated with any energy transport. The idea that black holes emit huge amounts of energy in their last stages because of all the information which must be emitted under the assumption of black-hole unitarity is found not necessarily to be the case.

  11. Partnering: An Engine for Innovation, Continuum Magazine, Fall 2014 / Issue 7; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-10-01

    This issue of Continuum highlights the many ways NREL partners with private industry and other research institutions. You will find references to many of the partnerships and examples of the scope of our engagement with industry leaders, government organizations, and startups.

  12. DOE Partner Begins Injecting 50,000 Tons of CO2 in Michigan Basin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building on an initial injection project of 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide into a Michigan geologic formation, a U.S. Department of Energy team of regional partners has begun injecting 50,000 additional tons into the formation, which is believed capable of storing hundreds of years worth of CO2, a greenhouse gas that contributes to climate change.

  13. Sharing Policies for Multi-Partner Asset Management in Smart Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preece, Alun

    Sharing Policies for Multi-Partner Asset Management in Smart Environments Christos Parizas, Diego from our social and economic ecosystems. The management of smart environment assets in multi embed IT assets into physical world's objects and hold promise for improving the services we receive

  14. Enhancing Today for Tomorrow Proprietary and Confidential Information-Zada Partners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    as the price increases (by switching to more fuel-efficient cars, mass transit, consolidating trips, carpooling. That doesn't include all the deferred maintenance on city and county roadways. State Gasoline (¢/g) Diesel and Confidential Information- Zada Partners 4 Issues with Fuel Based Taxation · Current Issues ­ Demand for fuel

  15. The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012 America's Partner in Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012 America's Partner in Power #12;The Business Case for Fuel Cells 2012 Fuel Cells 2000 | Page i Authors and Acknowledgements This report was written and compiled by Sandra Curtin, Jennifer Gangi, and Ryan Skukowski of Fuel Cells 2000, an activity of Breakthrough

  16. Center of Excellence in Piezoelectric Materials and Devices Ben Franklin Technology PArtners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dePamphilis, Claude

    materials and the applications that utilize them. Among the products for which piezoelectrics play a pivotal Applications · New Piezoelectric Materials Development · Piezoelectrics for Resonators and Sensors PlannedCenter of Excellence in Piezoelectric Materials and Devices Ben Franklin Technology PArtners Center

  17. EIS-0221: Proposed York County Energy Partners Cogeneration Facility, York County, PA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy prepared this environmental impact statement to assess the environmental and human health impacts associated with construction and operation of the York County Energy Partners, L.P. Cogeneration Facility on a 38- acre parcel in North Codorus Township, York County, Pennsylvania.

  18. Compiled by the Alliance for Research in Chicagoland Communities (ARCC) Connecting with Partners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    Compiled by the Alliance for Research in Chicagoland Communities (ARCC) Connecting with Partners community research projects. Find out who's been doing work on your topic of interest. Build alliances input? As research team members? On a Community Advisory Board? #12;Compiled by the Alliance

  19. Cooperation and Assortativity with Endogenous Partner Selection1 JING WANG, New York University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiat, Amos

    Cooperation and Assortativity with Endogenous Partner Selection1 JING WANG, New York University York University, 44 West 4th Street, New York, NY 10012, USA; S. Suri and D. J. Watts, Yahoo! Research, 111 West 40th Street, 17th Floor, New York, NY 10018, U.S.A. Copyright is held by the author

  20. Partner with Us Work with NREL experts and take advantage of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are interested in working with NREL's Energy Systems Fabrication Laboratory, please contact: ESIF Manager Carolyn that is performed in adjacent laboratories. The laboratory enables NREL to manufacture fuel cells in-house usingPartner with Us Work with NREL experts and take advantage of the state-of-the-art capabilities