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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

S-PRIME/TI-SNPS program activities in FY94 critical components testing  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design for a 40-kWe thermionic space nuclear power system (TI-SNPS) known as the S-PRIME system is being developed by Rockwell and its subcontractors for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), United States Air Force (USAF), and Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) under the TI-SNPS Program. Phase 1 of this program includes developing a conceptual design of a 5- to 40-kWe range TI-SNPS and validating key technologies that support the design. All key technologies for the S-PRIME design have been identified along with six critical component demonstrations, which will be used to validate the S-PRIME design features. {copyright}American Institute of Physics 1995

Brown, C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy Space Reactor Power Systems Division, 19901 Germantown Road, Germantown, Maryland 20874 (United States); Dale Rogers, R.; Determan, W.R. [Rockwell International Corporation, Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, California 91303-7922 (United States); Van Hagan, T. [General Atomics, Post Office Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-9784 (United States)

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

2

Status of the Boeing Dish Engine Critical Component project  

SciTech Connect

The Boeing Company's Dish Engine Critical Component (DECC) project started in April of 1998. It is a continuation of a solar energy program started by McDonnel Douglas (now Boeing) and United Stirling of Sweden in the mid 1980s. The overall objectives, schedule, and status of this project are presented in this paper. The hardware test configuration, hardware background, operation, and test plans are also discussed. A summary is given of the test data, which includes the daily power performance, generated energy, working-gas usage, mirror reflectivity, solar insolation, on-sun track time. Generating time, and system availability. The system performance based upon the present test data is compared to test data from the 1984/88 McDonnel Douglas/United Stirling AB/Southern California Edison test program. The test data shows that the present power, energy, and mirror performance is comparable to when the hardware was first manufactured 14 years ago.

Stone, K.W.; Nelving, H.; Braun, H.W.; Clark, T.B.; Diver, R.B.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

systems performance studies - HIL components testing Battery systems performance studies - HIL components testing 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

4

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, Robert E. (West Mifflin, PA); Doman, Marvin J. (McKeesport, PA); Wilson, Edward C. (West Mifflin, PA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

NGNP Component Test Capability Design Code of Record  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project is conducting a trade study to select a preferred approach for establishing a capability whereby NGNP technology development testing—through large-scale, integrated tests—can be performed for critical HTGR structures, systems, and components (SSCs). The mission of this capability includes enabling the validation of interfaces, interactions, and performance for critical systems and components prior to installation in the NGNP prototype.

S.L. Austad; D.S. Ferguson; L.E. Guillen; C.W. McKnight; P.J. Petersen

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS APPENDICES.................................................................................... 5 B.2. DR Automation Server User Guide

7

Model-based software component testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] Software component testing (SCT) is a proven software engineering approach to evaluating, improving and demonstrating component reliability and quality for producing trusted software… (more)

Zheng, Weiqun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Component evaluation testing and analysis algorithms.  

SciTech Connect

The Ground-Based Monitoring R&E Component Evaluation project performs testing on the hardware components that make up Seismic and Infrasound monitoring systems. The majority of the testing is focused on the Digital Waveform Recorder (DWR), Seismic Sensor, and Infrasound Sensor. In order to guarantee consistency, traceability, and visibility into the results of the testing process, it is necessary to document the test and analysis procedures that are in place. Other reports document the testing procedures that are in place (Kromer, 2007). This document serves to provide a comprehensive overview of the analysis and the algorithms that are applied to the Component Evaluation testing. A brief summary of each test is included to provide the context for the analysis that is to be performed.

Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion John

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...

10

DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells This document describes test protocols...

11

AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AUTOMATED CRITICAL PEAK PRICING FIELD TESTS: 2006 PROGRAM DESCRIPTION AND RESULTS) for development of the DR Automation Server System This project could not have been completed without extensive: Greg Watson and Mark Lott · C&C Building Automation: Mark Johnson and John Fiegel · Chabot Space

12

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough System and Component Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

System and Component Testing System and Component Testing Here you'll find information about parabolic trough system and components testing, as well facilities and laboratories used for testing. Tests include those for: Concentrator thermal efficiency Receiver thermal performance Mirror contour and collector alignment Mirror reflectivity and durability Some of the following documents are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader. Concentrator Thermal Efficiency Testing Researchers and industry use the following facilities for testing parabolic trough collectors. AZTRAK Rotating Platform At Sandia National Laboratories' National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF), the AZTRAK rotating platform has been used to test several parabolic trough modules and receivers. Initially, researchers tested a

13

NNSA Completes its Critical Radar Arming and Fuzing Test for...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

its Critical Radar Arming and Fuzing Test for the W88 ALT 370 | National Nuclear Security Administration People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

14

DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) March 2007 Fuel cells, especially for...

15

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) Revised May...

16

Testing Subgroup Workshop on Critical Property Needs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Objectives: Develop an action plan that details the necessary tests to measure and compare the physical properties of metallic materials relevant to high pressure hydrogen service

17

Critical components for novel direct cardiac compression device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.................................................. 35 9.1 Methods and Design Progression of Welds ....................... 38 9.2 Chamber Shape Progression............................................... 42 9.3 Inflation Points............................................. 6 3 Schematic of DCCD framework ............................................................. 9 4 Picture taken of testing apparatus............................................................ 13 5 Comparison of .032? diameter spring steel...

Harrison, Jr., Lewis D.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Ultra Accelerated Testing of PV Module Components  

SciTech Connect

Using concentrated natural sunlight at the NREL High Flux Solar Furnace, we have exposed several materials to acceleration factors of up to 400 times the normal outdoor UV exposure dose. This accelerated rate allows the exposure of materials such that a year of outdoor exposure can be simulated in about 5 hours. We have studied the solarization of cerium containing glass, the degradation of ethylene vinyl acetate laminated between borosilicate glass, and the yellowing of standard polystyrene test coupons. The first two candidates are of interest to the photovoltaics (PV) program, and the last candidate material is a widely used dosimeter for ultra violet (UV) exposure in accelerated weathering chambers

Pitts, J. R.; King, D. E.; Bingham, C.; Czanderna, A. W.

1998-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

19

Self-Assembly in Chains, Rings, and Branches: A Single Component System with Two Critical Points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-Assembly in Chains, Rings, and Branches: A Single Component System with Two Critical Points October 2013) We study the interplay between phase separation and self-assembly in chains, rings. The emergence of the lower critical point is caused by the self-assembly of rings taking place in the vapor

Sciortino, Francesco

20

Test of QED at critical field strength  

SciTech Connect

In a new experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam at SLAC, a low-emittance 46.6 GeV electron beam is brought into collisions with terawatt pulses of 1054 nm or 527 nm wavelength from a Nd:glass laser. Peak laser intensities of 10{sup 18} W/cm{sup 2} have been achieved corresponding to a value of 0.6 for the parameter {eta} = e{epsilon}/m{omega}{sub 0}c. In this case, an electron that crosses the center of the laser pulse has near-unit interaction probability. Results are presented for multiphoton Compton scattering in which an electron interacts with up to four laser photons, in agreement with theoretical calculations.

Bula, C. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

LM tests of spatial dependence based on bootstrap critical values  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract To test the existence of spatial dependence in an econometric model, a convenient test is the Lagrange Multiplier (LM) test. However, evidence shows that, in finite samples, the LM test referring to asymptotic critical values may suffer from the problems of size distortion and low power, which become worse with a denser spatial weight matrix. In this paper, residual-based bootstrap methods are introduced for asymptotically refined approximations to the finite sample critical values of the LM statistics. Conditions for their validity are clearly laid out and formal justifications are given in general, and in detail under several popular spatial LM tests using Edgeworth expansions. Monte Carlo results show that when the conditions are not fully met, bootstrap may lead to unstable critical values that change significantly with the alternative, whereas when all conditions are met, bootstrap critical values are very stable, approximate much better the finite sample critical values than those based on asymptotics, and lead to significantly improved size and power. The methods are further demonstrated using more general spatial LM tests, in connection with local misspecification and unknown heteroskedasticity.

Zhenlin Yang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL |  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components at LBNL Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Use of heavy-ion accelerators for testing microelectronic components for

23

Free?piston stirling component test power converter test results of the initial test phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)—Lewis Research Center (LeRC) has the responsibility to develop power technologies that have the potential of satisfying anticipated future space mission power requirements. The Free?Piston Stirling Power Converter (FPSC) is one of the many power technologies being evaluated and developed by NASA. FPSPCs have the potential to provide high reliability long life efficient operation; and they can be coupled with all potential heat sources nuclear radioisotope and solar various heat input heat rejection systems and various power management and distribution systems. FPSPCs can complete favorably with alternative power conversion systems over a range of hundreds of watts to hundreds of kilowatts and to megawatts. Mechanical Technology Incorporated (MTI) is developed FPSPC technology under contract to NASA?LeRC and will demonstrate this technology in two full?scale power converters. The first of these the Component Test Power Converter (CTPC) initiated testing in Spring 1991 to evaluate mechanical operation at space operating temperatures. This paper reviews the testing of the CTPC at MTI and the companion testing of the earlier technology engine the Space Power Research Engine (SPRE) at NASA?LeRC.

George R. Dochat; James E. Dudenhoefer

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Evaluation of component integrity by non-destructive testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-destructive methods achieve an ever-increasing role in the inspection of structural components. However, restricting NDT to its classical domain, the detection of flaws, one takes only limited advantage of its possibilities. Non-destructive testing pro- vides the ability to differentiate different structures of materials or to measure internal and induced stresses, thus providing data for the calculation of reliability and potential lifetime. To reach this goal, NDT data must be combined with results of destructive testing. Here, a closer monitoring of fast processes like crack propagation, especially under an impact load, may provide a better understanding of materials behaviour. Again, inertia-free NDT methods with high time-resolution are especially suited to the task. The potentials of NDT are further increased by the development of automatic data acquisition and processing. Computerization provides highly discriminative evaluation methods, as cross-correlation or cluster analysis. To demonstrate the potentials of NDT, a variety of examples will be presented, including fast sensitive tests which allow a more accurate localization and appropriate description of flaws, structures and stresses by different optical, electromagnetic, radiographic and acoustic methods.

H.-A. Crostack; W. Reimers

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Moving Bed, Granular Bed Filter Development Program: Option 1, Component Test Facility. Task 3, Test plan  

SciTech Connect

In the base contract, Combustion Power Co. developed commercial designs for a moving granular-bed filter (GBF). The proposed filter is similar to previous designs in terms of its shape and method of filtration. The commercial designs have scaled the filter from a 5 ft diameter to as large as a 20 ft diameter filter. In Task 2 of the Moving Bed-Granular Filter Development Program, all technical concerns related to the further development of the filter are identified. These issues are discussed in a Topical Report which has been issued as part of Task 2. Nineteen issues are identified in this report. Along with a discussion of these issues are the planned approaches for resolving each of these issues. These issues will be resolved in either a cold flow component test facility or in pilot scale testing at DOE`s Power System Development Facility (PSDF) located at Southem Company Services` Wilsonville facility. Task 3 presents a test plan for resolving those issues which can be addressed in component test facilities. The issues identified in Task 2 which will be addressed in the component test facilities are: GBF scale-up; effect of filter cone angle and sidewall materials on medium flow and ash segregation; maximum gas filtration rate; lift pipe wear; GBF media issues; mechanical design of the gas inlet duct; and filter pressure drop. This document describes a test program to address these issues, with testing to be performed at Combustion Power Company`s facility in Belmont, California.

Haas, J.C.; Purdhomme, J.W.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM USCAR FUEL CELL TECH TEAM CELL COMPONENT ACCELERATED STRESS TEST PROTOCOLS FOR PEM FUEL CELLS (Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies) Revised May 26, 2010 Fuel cells, especially for automotive propulsion, must operate over a wide range of operating and cyclic conditions. The desired operating range encompasses temperatures from below the freezing point to well above the boiling point of water, humidity from ambient to saturated, and half-cell potentials from 0 to >1.5 volts. Furthermore, the anode side of the cell may be exposed to hydrogen and air during different parts of the driving and startup/shutdown cycles. The severity in operating conditions is greatly exacerbated by the transient and cyclic nature of

27

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced components test facility Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of components for the new de- signs being tested underground at the Nevada Test Site. Small- scale recycling... Alam- os. Finally there was a modest capability to design,...

28

DOE Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document describes test protocols to assess the performance and durability of fuel cell components intended for automotive applications.

29

Cell Component Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Accelerated Stress Test Protocols for PEM Fuel Cells, Electrocatalysts, Supports, Membranes, and Membrane Electrode Assemblies

30

Criticality experiments with fast flux test facility fuel pins  

SciTech Connect

A United States Department of Energy program was initiated during the early seventies at the Hanford Critical Mass Laboratory to obtain experimental criticality data in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program. The criticality experiments program was to provide basic physics data for clean well defined conditions expected to be encountered in the handling of plutonium-uranium fuel mixtures outside reactors. One task of this criticality experiments program was concerned with obtaining data on PuO{sub 2}-UO{sub 2} fuel rods containing 20--30 wt % plutonium. To obtain this data a series of experiments were performed over a period of about twelve years. The experimental data obtained during this time are summarized and the associated experimental assemblies are described. 8 refs., 7 figs.

Bierman, S.R.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced test reactor critical facility...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced test reactor critical facility Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Engineers at Western are...

32

Heavy-ion Accelerators for Testing Microelectronic Components...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

damages the component or the system of which it is part. These can be simulated with beams from heavy-ion accelerators such as tandems or cyclotrons. At the 88-Inch Cyclotron...

33

Isotropic and Nonisotropic Components of Earthquakes and Nuclear Explosions on the Lop Nor Test Site, China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isotropic and Nonisotropic Components of Earthquakes and Nuclear Explosions on the Lop Nor Test and 1996 following events (seven nuclear explosions, three earthquakes) that occurred on the Lop Nor test Abstract Ð We test the hypothesis that the existence of an observable non-zero isotropic component

Ritzwolle, Mike

34

COTS FPGA/SRAM Irradiations Using a Dedicated Testing Infrastructure for Characterization of Large Component Batches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new testing platform for irradiation of large batches of COTS FPGA and SRAMs. The main objective is measurement of component radiation response and assessment of component-to-component variability within one batch. The first validation and test results using the testing platform are presented for 150nm TFT SRAM (Renesas) and different sizes of the 130nm ProASIC3 FPGA (Microsemi).

Slawosz, Uznanski; Johannes, Walter; Andrea, Vilar-Villanueva

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

CMI Unique Facility: Filtration Test Facility | Critical Materials...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and it addresses the grand challenge of developing technologies for separating the rare earth elements. For more information, and to explore using the filtration test facility,...

36

Analysis of components from drip tests with ATM-10 glass  

SciTech Connect

Waste package assemblies consisting of actinide-doped West Valley ATM-10 reference glass and sensitized 304L stainless steel have been reacted with simulated repository groundwater using the Unsaturated Test Method. Analyses of surface corrosion and reaction products resulting from tests that were terminated at scheduled intervals between 13 and 52 weeks are reported. Analyses reveal complex interactions between the groundwater, the sensitized stainless steel waste form holder, and the glass. Alteration phases form that consist mainly of smectite clay, brockite, and an amorphous thorium iron titanium silicate, the latter two incorporating thorium, uranium, and possibly transuranics. The results from the terminated tests, combined with data from tests that are still ongoing, will help determine the suitability of glass waste forms in the proposed high-level repository at the Yucca Mountain Site.

Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A test section for evaluating cooling tower components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be- ing, used i'or the evaluation of various t;, . pss of cooling tower packing. The mater measuring and heating equipnent hsvs been used in ths testing of two small cmneroial cooling tcsrers. 37 C~WP18FR STATIC PREDStlRE -/g. g~g 1 fry v t t... be- ing, used i'or the evaluation of various t;, . pss of cooling tower packing. The mater measuring and heating equipnent hsvs been used in ths testing of two small cmneroial cooling tcsrers. 37 C~WP18FR STATIC PREDStlRE -/g. g~g 1 fry v t t...

Alter, Alan Brian

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Testing Components of New Community Isopycnal Ocean Circulation Model  

SciTech Connect

The ocean and atmosphere are both governed by the same physical laws and models of the two media have many similarities. However, there are critical differences that call for special methods to provide the best simulation. One of the most important difference is that the ocean is nearly opaque to radiation in the visible and infra-red part of the spectrum. For this reason water mass properties in the ocean are conserved along trajectories for long distances and for long periods of time. For this reason isopycnal coordinate models would seem to have a distinct advantage in simulating ocean circulation. In such a model the coordinate surfaces are aligned with the natural paths of near adiabatic, density conserving flow in the main thermocline. The difficulty with this approach is at the upper and lower boundaries of the ocean, which in general do not coincide with density surfaces. For this reason hybrid coordinate models were proposed by Bleck and Boudra (1981) in which Cartesian coordinates were used near the ocean surface and isopycnal coordinates were used in the main thermocline. This feature is now part of the HICOM model (Bleck, 2002).

Bryan, Kirk

2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

39

eCrash: a Framework for Performing Evolutionary Testing on Third-Party Java Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

eCrash: a Framework for Performing Evolutionary Testing on Third-Party Java Components José Carlos fcofdez@unex.es Abstract The focus of this paper is on presenting a tool for generating test data of the instrumented test object. The main objective of this approach is that of evolving a set of test cases

Fernandez, Thomas

40

EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los 35: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico EA-1035: Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to relocate the Weapons Component Testing Facility from Building 450 to Building 207, both within Technical Area 16, at the U.S. Department of Energy's Los Alamos National Laboratory. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Finding of No Significant Impact Relocation of the Weapons Component Testing Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico February 10, 1995 EA-1035: Final Environmental Assessment

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

THE COMPONENT TEST FACILITY – A NATIONAL USER FACILITY FOR TESTING OF HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTOR (HTGR) COMPONENTS AND SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and other High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) Projects require research, development, design, construction, and operation of a nuclear plant intended for both high-efficiency electricity production and high-temperature industrial applications, including hydrogen production. During the life cycle stages of an HTGR, plant systems, structures and components (SSCs) will be developed to support this reactor technology. To mitigate technical, schedule, and project risk associated with development of these SSCs, a large-scale test facility is required to support design verification and qualification prior to operational implementation. As a full-scale helium test facility, the Component Test facility (CTF) will provide prototype testing and qualification of heat transfer system components (e.g., Intermediate Heat Exchanger, valves, hot gas ducts), reactor internals, and hydrogen generation processing. It will perform confirmation tests for large-scale effects, validate component performance requirements, perform transient effects tests, and provide production demonstration of hydrogen and other high-temperature applications. Sponsored wholly or in part by the U.S. Department of Energy, the CTF will support NGNP and will also act as a National User Facility to support worldwide development of High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor technologies.

David S. Duncan; Vondell J. Balls; Stephanie L. Austad

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Design and testing of components for a low cost laser cutter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main goal of this thesis is to document the design and testing of various components for use in a low cost laser cutting mechanism for hobbyists and recreational designers. Different electronics were used to assess the ...

Ramos, Joshua D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced components test Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: advanced components test Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 David S. Rosenblum Technical Report 97-34 Summary:...

44

Testing and examination of TMI-2 electrical components and discrete devices  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the approach and results of the in situ test conducted on TMI-2 reactor building electrical components and discrete devices. Also included are the necessary presumptions and assumptions to correlate observed anomalies to the accident.

Soberano, F.T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Testing of Safety-Critical Software Embedded in an Artificial Heart  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing of Safety-Critical Software Embedded in an Artificial Heart Sungdeok Cha1 , Sehun Jeong1 frequently to control medical devices such as artificial heart or robotic surgery system. While much (KAOC). It is a state-of-the-art artificial heart which completed animal testing phase. We per- formed

46

Pipeline Safety Our goal is to provide standard test methods and critical data to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pipeline Safety METALS Our goal is to provide standard test methods and critical data to the pipeline industry to improve safety and reliability. Of particular interest is the testing of high-strength pipeline steels, which could enable higher volume gas transport and reduce energy costs. However

47

Pipeline Safety Our goal is to provide standard test methods and critical data to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pipeline Safety METALS Our goal is to provide standard test methods and critical data to the pipeline industry to improve safety and reliability. Of particular interest is the testing of high strength pipeline steels, which could enable higher volume gas transport and reduce energy costs. However

48

Intact and Degraded Component Criticality Calculations of N Reactors Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this calculation is to perform intact and degraded mode criticality evaluations of the Department of Energy's (DOE) N Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel codisposed in a 2-Defense High-Level Waste (2-DHLW)/2-Multi-Canister Overpack (MCO) Waste Package (WP) and emplaced in a monitored geologic repository (MGR) (see Attachment I). The scope of this calculation is limited to the determination of the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for both intact and degraded mode internal configurations of the codisposal waste package. This calculation will support the analysis that will be performed to demonstrate the technical viability for disposing of U-metal (N Reactor) spent nuclear fuel in the potential MGR.

L. Angers

2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Durability testing of medium speed diesel engine components designed for operating on coal/water slurry fuel  

SciTech Connect

Over 200 operating cylinder hours were run on critical wearing engine parts. The main components tested included cylinder liners, piston rings, and fuel injector nozzles for coal/water slurry fueled operation. The liners had no visible indication of scoring nor major wear steps found on their tungsten carbide coating. While the tungsten carbide coating on the rings showed good wear resistance, some visual evidence suggests adhesive wear mode was present. Tungsten carbide coated rings running against tungsten carbide coated liners in GE 7FDL engines exhibit wear rates which suggest an approximate 500 to 750 hour life. Injector nozzle orifice materials evaluated were diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, and thermally stabilized diamond. Based upon a total of 500 cylinder hours of engine operation (including single-cylinder combustion tests), diamond compact was determined to be the preferred orifice material.

McDowell, R.E.; Giammarise, A.W.; Johnson, R.N.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Pilot plant assessment of blend properties and their impact on critical power plant components  

SciTech Connect

A series of tests were performed to determine the effects of blending eastern bituminous coals with western subbituminous coals on utility boiler operation. Relative to the baseline bituminous coal, the testing reported here indicated that there were significant impacts to boiler performance due to the blending of the eastern and western coals. Results indicated that fuel blending can be used to adequately control flue gas emissions of both SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} at the expense of reduced milling efficiency, increased sootblowing in the high-temperature and low-temperature regions of the boiler and, to a lesser extent, decreased collection efficiency for an electrostatic precipitator. The higher reactivity of the subbituminous coal increased the overall combustion efficiency, which may tend to decrease the impact of milling efficiency losses. The extent of these impacts was directly related to the percentage of subbituminous coal in the blends. At the lowest blend ratios of subbituminous coal, the impacts were greatly reduced.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Testing Measurement Invariance Using MIMIC: Likelihood Ratio Test and Modification Indices with a Critical Value Adjustment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiple-indicators multiple-causes (MIMIC) modeling is often employed for measurement invariance testing under the structural equation modeling framework. This Monte Carlo study explored the behaviors of MIMIC as a measurement invariance testing...

Kim, Eun Sook

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

52

Extensive remote handling and conservative plasma conditions to enable fusion nuclear science R&D using a component testing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

nuclear science R&D using a component testing facility Y.K.M. Peng 1), T.W. Burgess 1), A.J. Carroll 1), C. This use aims to test components in an integrated fusion nuclear environment, for the first time@ornl.gov Abstract. The use of a fusion component testing facility to study and establish, during the ITER era

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

53

B3.11 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components-  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- 1 SWCX for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Outdoor Tests, Experiments on Materials and Equipment Components Introduction .A .. s defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office Integrated Management System Procedure, NEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same n

54

Making Automated Testing of Cloud Applications an Integral Component of PaaS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Making Automated Testing of Cloud Applications an Integral Component of PaaS Stefan Bucur Johannes application software stacks. While the platform-as-a-service (PaaS) model has streamlined ap- plication difficult. We argue that a modern PaaS offering should include a facility to thoroughly and automatically

Candea, George

55

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON MATERIALS AND COMPONENTS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR OUTDOOR TESTS ON MATERIALS AND COMPONENTS, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed AetioD: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct outdoor tests and experiments on materials and equipment components under controlled conditions. No source, special nuclear, or byproduct materials would be involved, but encapsulated radioactive sources manufactured to applicable standards or other radiological materials could be used in activities under this categorical exclusion (eX). LoeatioD of Action: The locations would include DOE property at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and other offsite outdoor locations. Description of the Proposed Action:

56

Large Cryogenic Infrastructure for LHC Superconducting Magnet and Cryogenic Component Tests: Layout, Commissioning and Operational Experience  

SciTech Connect

The largest cryogenic test facility at CERN, located at Zone 18, is used to validate and to test all main components working at cryogenic temperature in the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) before final installation in the machine tunnel. In total about 1300 main dipoles, 400 main quadrupoles, 5 RF-modules, eight 1.8 K refrigeration units will be tested in the coming years.The test facility has been improved and upgraded over the last few years and the first 18 kW refrigerator for the LHC machine has been added to boost the cryogenic capacity for the area via a 25,000 liter liquid helium dewar. The existing 6 kW refrigerator, used for the LHC Test String experiments, will also be employed to commission LHC cryogenic components.We report on the design and layout of the test facility as well as the commissioning and the first 10,000 hours operational experience of the test facility and the 18 kW LHC refrigerator.

Calzas, C.; Chanat, D.; Knoops, S.; Sanmarti, M.; Serio, L. [Accelerator Technology Division, CERN, 1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

57

Field Testing of Nano-PCM-Enhanced Building Envelope Components in a Warm-Humid Climate  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program s goal of developing high-performance, energy-efficient buildings will require more cost-effective, durable, energy-efficient building envelopes. Forty-eight percent of the residential enduse energy consumption is spent on space heating and air conditioning. Reducing envelope-generated heating and cooling loads through application of phase-change material (PCM) enhanced envelope components can facilitate maximizing the energy efficiency of buildings. Field testing of prototype envelope components is an important step in estimating their energy benefits. An innovative PCM (nano-PCM) was developed with PCM encapsulated with expanded graphite (interconnected) nanosheets, which is highly conducive for enhanced thermal storage and energy distribution, and is shape-stable for convenient incorporation into lightweight building components. During 2012, two test walls with cellulose cavity insulation and prototype PCM-enhanced interior wallboards were installed in a natural exposure test (NET) facility in Charleston, SC. The first test wall was divided into four sections separated by wood studs and thin layers of foam insulation. Two sections contained nano-PCMenhanced wallboards: one was a three-layer structure in which nano-PCM was sandwiched between two gypsum boards, and the other one had PCM dispersed homogeneously throughout graphite nanosheet-enhanced gypsum board. The second test wall also contained two sections with interior PCM wallboards; one contained nano-PCM dispersed homogeneously in gypsum and the other was gypsum board containing a commercial microencapsulated PCM (MEPCM) for comparison. Each test wall contained a section covered with gypsum board on the interior side that served as control or a baseline for evaluation of the PCM wallboards. The walls were instrumented with arrays of thermocouples and heat flux transducers. This paper presents the measured performance and analysis to evaluate the energy-saving potential of the nano-PCM-enhanced building components.

Biswas, Kaushik [ORNL; LuPh.D., Jue [Technova Corporation; Soroushian, Parviz [Technova Corporation

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Methods for nondestructive testing of austenitic high-temperature gas-cooled reactor components  

SciTech Connect

Safety-relevant components of high-temperature gas-cooled reactor components are mostly fabricated in nickel-based alloys and austenitic materials like Inconel-617, Hastelloy-X, Nimonic-86, or Incoloy-800H. Compared to ferritic steels, these austenitic materials can have a coarse-grained microstructure, especially in weldments and castings. Coarse-grained or elastic anisotropic materials are difficult to inspect with ultrasonics due to strong attenuation, high noise level (scattering, ''grass'' indications), and sound beam distortions (skewing, splitting, and mode conversion). Only few results dealing with the nondestructive testing of nickel-based alloys are known. The problem area, solutions, and first experiences are reported.

Gobbels, K.; Kapitza, H.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Criticality Model  

SciTech Connect

The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

A. Alsaed

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

60

Fusion Nuclear Schience Facility-AT: A Material And Component Testing Device  

SciTech Connect

A Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a necessary complement to ITER, especially in the area of materials and components testing, needed for DEMO design development. FNSF-AT, which takes advantage of advanced tokamak (AT) physics should have neutron wall loading of 1-2 MW/m2, continuous operation for periods of up to two weeks, a duty factor goal of 0.3 per year and an accumulated fluence of 3-6 MW-yr/m2 (~30-60 dpa) in ten years to enable the qualification of structural, blanket and functional materials, components and corresponding ancillary equipment necessary for the design and licensing of a DEMO. Base blankets with a ferritic steel structure and selected tritium blanket materials will be tested and used for the demonstration of tritium sufficiency. Additional test ports at the outboard mid-plane will be reserved for test blankets with advanced designs or exotic materials, and electricity production for integrated high fluence testing in a DT fusion spectrum. FNSF-AT will be designed using conservative implementations of all elements of AT physics to produce 150-300 MW fusion power with modest energy gain (Q<7) in a modest sized normal conducting coil device. It will demonstrate and help to select the DEMO plasma facing, structural, tritium breeding, functional materials and ancillary equipment including diagnostics. It will also demonstrate the necessary tritium fuel cycle, design and cooling of the first wall chamber and divertor components. It will contribute to the knowledge on material qualification, licensing, operational safety and remote maintenance necessary for DEMO design

Wong, C. P.; Chan, V. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Stambaugh, Ron; Sawan, M.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Merrill, Brad

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Developing standard performance testing procedures for material control and accounting components at a site  

SciTech Connect

The condition of a nuclear material control and accountability system (MC&A) and its individual components, as with any system combining technical elements and documentation, may be characterized through an aggregate of values for the various parameters that determine the system's ability to perform. The MC&A system's status may be functioning effectively, marginally or not functioning based on a summary of the values of the individual parameters. This work included a review of the following subsystems, MC&A and Detecting Material Losses, and their respective elements for the material control and accountability system: (a) Elements of the MC&A Subsystem - Information subsystem (Accountancy/Inventory), Measurement subsystem, Nuclear Material Access subsystem, including tamper-indicating device (TID) program, and Automated Information-gathering subsystem; (b) Elements for Detecting Nuclear Material Loses Subsystem - Inventory Differences, Shipper/receiver Differences, Confirmatory Measurements and differences with accounting data, and TID or Seal Violations. In order to detect the absence or loss of nuclear material there must be appropriate interactions among the elements and their respective subsystems from the list above. Additionally this work includes a review of regulatory requirements for the MC&A system component characteristics and criteria that support the evaluation of the performance of the listed components. The listed components had performance testing algorithms and procedures developed that took into consideration the regulatory criteria. The developed MC&A performance-testing procedures were the basis for a Guide for MC&A Performance Testing at the material balance areas (MBAs) of State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation - Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (SSC RF-IPPE).

Scherer, Carolynn P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bushlya, Anatoly V [ROSATOM, RUSSIA; Efimenko, Vladimir F [IPPE, RUSSIA; Ilyanstev, Anatoly [IPPE, RUSSIA; Regoushevsky, Victor I [IPPE, RUSSIA

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity

Colorado at Boulder, University of

63

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.3 Check Upload Integrity

Colorado at Boulder, University of

64

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing

Colorado at Boulder, University of

65

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1a Watchdog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1a Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0049 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

66

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Watchdog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0019 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

67

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.2 Download Data Timing

Colorado at Boulder, University of

68

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1b Watchdog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1b Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0018 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

69

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1a Watchdog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1a Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0017 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

70

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1b Watchdog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.1b Watchdog Date: February 13, 2001 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0050 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

71

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Program Description and Results APPENDICES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Program Description and Results APPENDICES Mary Ann Piette David Watson Naoya Motegi Sila Kiliccote Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS90R3111 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 August 30, 2007 This work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, under Work for Others Contract No. 150-99-003, Am #1 and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL Report Number 62218 2 Table of Contents List of Tables ......................................................................................................................................3

72

ACCELERATED TESTING OF NEUTRON-ABSORBING ALLOYS FOR NUCLEAR CRITICALITY CONTROL  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy requires nuclear criticality control materials be used for storage of highly enriched spent nuclear fuel used in government programs and the storage of commercial spent nuclear fuel at the proposed High-Level Nuclear Waste Geological Repository located at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Two different metallic alloys (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd and borated stainless steel) have been chosen for this service. An accelerated corrosion test program to validate these materials for this application is described and a performance comparison is made.

Ronald E. Mizia

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Development of the Neutron Diffraction Technique for the Determination of Near Surface Residual Stresses in Critical Gas Turbine Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Near surface residual stresses contribute significantly to the life of structural engineering components. A method of producing compressive residual stresses in the surface region of components to give improve...

A. N. Ezeilo; P. S. Webster; G. A. Webster…

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

The large-area hybrid-optics CLAS12 RICH detector: Tests of innovative components  

SciTech Connect

A large area ring-imaging Cherenkov detector has been designed to provide clean hadron identification capability in the momentum range from 3 GeV/c to 8 GeV/c for the CLAS12 experiments at the upgraded 12 GeV continuous electron beam accelerator facility of Jefferson Lab to study the 3D nucleon structure in the yet poorly explored valence region by deep-inelastic scattering, and to perform precision measurements in hadronization and hadron spectroscopy. The adopted solution foresees a novel hybrid optics design based on an aerogel radiator, composite mirrors and densely packed and highly segmented photon detectors. Cherenkov light will either be imaged directly (forward tracks) or after two mirror reflections (large angle tracks). The preliminary results of individual detector component tests and of the prototype performance at test-beams are reported here.

Contalbrigo, M.; Baltzell, N.; Benmokhtar, F.; Barion, L.; Cisbani, E.; El Alaoui, A.; Hafidi, K.; Hoek, M.; Kubarovsky, V.; Lagamba, L.; Lucherini, V.; Malaguti, R.; Mirazita, M.; Montgomery, R.; Movsisyan, A.; Musico, P.; Orecchini, D.; Orlandi, A.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Pereira, S.; Perrino, R.; Phillips, J.; Pisano, S.; Rossi, P.; Squerzanti, S.; Tomassini, S.; Turisini, M.; Viticchiè, A.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Screening tests of representative nuclear power plant components exposed to secondary environments created by fires  

SciTech Connect

This report presents results of screening tests to determine component survivability in secondary environments created by fires, specifically increased temperatures, increased humidity, and the presence of particulates and corrosive vapors. Additionally, chloride concentrations were measured in the exhaust from several of the tests used to provide fire environments. Results show actual failure or some indication of failure for strip chart recorders, electronic counters, an oscilloscope amplifier, and switches and relays. The chart recorder failures resulted from accumulation of particulates on the pen slider mechanisms. The electronic counter experienced leakage current failures on circuit boards after the fire exposure and exposure to high humidity. The oscillosocpe amplifier experienced thermal-related drift as high as 20% before thermal protective circuitry shut the unit down. In some cases, switches and relays experienced high contact resistances with the low voltages levels used for the mesurements. Finally, relays tested to thermal failure experienced various failures, all at temperatures ranging from 150/sup 0/C to above 350/sup 0/C. The chloride measurements show that most of the hydrogen chloride generated in the test fires is combined with particulate by the time it reaches the exhaust duct, indicating that hydrogen chloride condensation may be less likely than small scale data implies. 13 refs., 36 figs.

Jacobus, M.J.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results Mary Ann Piette David Watson Naoya Motegi Sila Kiliccote Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS90R3111 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 June 19, 2007 LBNL Report Number 62218 ii Acknowledgements The work described in this report was funded by the Emerging Technologies Program at Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Additional funding was provided by the Demand Response Research Center which is funded by the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission), Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program, under Work for Others Contract No.500-03-026, Am #1 and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are grateful for the extensive

77

R t f N l C t T ti Di i GReport of Nuclear Component Testing Discussion Group National Spherical Torus ProgramNational Spherical Torus Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Office of Science R t f N l C t T ti Di i GReport of Nuclear Component Testing Discussion Group nuclear technology, SG1 leader UCLA DOE contact: Eckstrand, Steve, OFES #12;Nuclear Component Testing (NCT) aims to complement ITER mission and fill many DEMO R&D gaps · Mission of the Nuclear Component Testing

78

Test Loop Demonstration and Evaluation of Slurry Transfer Line Critical Velocity Measurement Instruments  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the evaluation of three ultrasonic sensors for detecting critical velocity during slurry transfer between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Morgen, Gerald P.; Peters, Timothy J.; Wilcox, Wayne A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Schonewill, Philip P.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Baer, Ellen BK

2010-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method to Compare Armor Materials or Components (Residual Mass Ballistic Testing Method)  

SciTech Connect

A statistics based ballistic test method is presented for use when comparing multiple groups of test articles of unknown relative ballistic perforation resistance. The method is intended to be more efficient than many traditional methods for research and development testing. To establish the validity of the method, it is employed in this study to compare test groups of known relative ballistic performance. Multiple groups of test articles were perforated using consistent projectiles and impact conditions. Test groups were made of rolled homogeneous armor (RHA) plates and differed in thickness. After perforation, each residual projectile was captured behind the target and its mass was measured. The residual masses measured for each test group were analyzed to provide ballistic performance rankings with associated confidence levels. When compared to traditional V50 methods, the residual mass (RM) method was found to require fewer test events and be more tolerant of variations in impact conditions.

Benjamin Langhorst; Thomas M Lillo; Henry S Chu

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

225-kW Dynamometer for Testing Small Wind Turbine Components (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the capabilities, operating envelope, loads and components of the 225-kW dynamometer at the NWTC.

Not Available

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Critical Subcriticals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technology magazine Latest Issue:August 2014 All Issues submit Critical Subcriticals Nuclear weapons testing with real plutonium and real experiments-but no yield April 1,...

82

IGT Stack No. 6 (SDG{ampersand}E-1) Test Plan and Component Specification Document: Topical report, March 1996  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of Stack-6 (SDG{ampersand}E-1) is to scale up and demonstrate the long term performance and endurance characteristics of the IMHEX stack design and the Generation No. 2 cell components (improved pore matching electrodes) in a 20 cell subscale stack test.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

Concentrating Solar Power Ã?¢Ã?Â?Ã?Â? Central Receiver Panel Component Fabrication and Testing FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to complete a design of an advanced concentrated solar panel and demonstrate the manufacturability of key components. Then confirm the operation of the key components under prototypic solar flux conditions. This work is an important step in reducing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) from a central receiver solar power plant. The key technical risk to building larger power towers is building the larger receiver systems. Therefore, this proposed technology project includes the design of an advanced molten salt prototypic sub-scale receiver panel that can be utilized into a large receiver system. Then complete the fabrication and testing of key components of the receive design that will be used to validate the design. This project shall have a significant impact on solar thermal power plant design. Receiver panels of suitable size for utility scale plants are a key element to a solar power tower plant. Many subtle and complex manufacturing processes are involved in producing a reliable, robust receiver panel. Given the substantial size difference between receiver panels manufactured in the past and those needed for large plant designs, the manufacture and demonstration on prototype receiver panel components with representative features of a full-sized panel will be important to improving the build process for commercial success. Given the thermal flux limitations of the test facility, the panel components cannot be rendered full size. Significance changes occurred in the projects technical strategies from project initiation to the accomplishments described herein. The initial strategy was to define cost improvements for the receiver, design and build a scale prototype receiver and test, on sun, with a molten salt heat transport system. DOE had committed to constructing a molten salt heat transport loop to support receiver testing at the top of the NSTTF tower. Because of funding constraints this did not happen. A subsequent plan to test scale prototype receiver, off sun but at temperature, at a molten salt loop at ground level adjacent to the tower also had to be abandoned. Thus, no test facility existed for a molten salt receiver test. As a result, PWR completed the prototype receiver design and then fabricated key components for testing instead of fabricating the complete prototype receiver. A number of innovative design ideas have been developed. Key features of the receiver panel have been identified. This evaluation includes input from Solar 2, personal experience of people working on these programs and meetings with Sandia. Key components of the receiver design and key processes used to fabricate a receiver have been selected for further evaluation. The Test Plan, Concentrated Solar Power Receiver In Cooperation with the Department of Energy and Sandia National Laboratory was written to define the scope of the testing to be completed as well as to provide details related to the hardware, instrumentation, and data acquisition. The document contains a list of test objectives, a test matrix, and an associated test box showing the operating points to be tested. Test Objectives: 1. Demonstrate low-cost manufacturability 2. Demonstrate robustness of two different tube base materials 3. Collect temperature data during on sun operation 4. Demonstrate long term repeated daily operation of heat shields 5. Complete pinhole tube weld repairs 6. Anchor thermal models This report discusses the tests performed, the results, and implications for design improvements and LCOE reduction.

McDowell, Michael W [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne; Miner, Kris [Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne

2013-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

84

A Principal Components Analysis of Executive Processes: Exploring the Structure of Executive Functions using Neuropsychological Tests   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

”, “Dual-Tasking” and “Planning”) and their relationship to “Intelligence”. The separability of these executive functions was explored. Ten neuropsychological tests were administered to young and healthy participants (N =103). Correlations between tests...

Maner, Safir

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

Facility for high heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps  

SciTech Connect

A new high-heat flux testing facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon Plasma Arc Lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can handle irradiated plasma facing component materials and mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at ORNL can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW/m2 over a heated area of 9x12 and 1x10 cm2, respectively, which are fusion-prototypical steady state heat flux conditions. The facility will be described and the main differences between the photon-based high-heat flux testing facilities, such as PALs, and the e-beam and particle beam facilities more commonly used for fusion HHF testing are discussed. The components of the test chamber were designed to accommodate radiation safety and materials compatibility requirements posed by high-temperature exposure of low levels irradiated tungsten articles. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing are presented and discussed.

Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL] [ORNL; Ohriner, Evan Keith [ORNL] [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL] [ORNL; Harper, David C [ORNL] [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL] [ORNL; Schaich, Charles Ross [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Reliability Testing Beyond Qualification as a Key Component in Photovoltaic's Progress Toward Grid Parity: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses why it is necessary for new lower cost PV modules to be tested using a reliability test sequence that goes beyond the Qualification test sequence now utilized for modules. Today most PV modules are warranted for 25 years, but the Qualification Test Sequence does not test for 25-year life. There is no accepted test protocol to validate a 25-year lifetime. This paper recommends the use of long term accelerated testing to compare now designs directly with older designs that have achieved long lifetimes in outdoor exposure. If the new designs do as well or better than the older ones, then it is likely that they will survive an equivalent length of time in the field.

Wohlgemuth, J. H.; Kurtz, S.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Facility for high-heat flux testing of irradiated fusion materials and components using infrared plasma arc lamps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new high-heat flux testing (HHFT) facility using water-wall stabilized high-power high-pressure argon plasma arc lamps (PALs) has been developed for fusion applications. It can accommodate irradiated plasma facing component materials and sub-size mock-up divertor components. Two PALs currently available at Oak Ridge National Laboratory can provide maximum incident heat fluxes of 4.2 and 27 MW m?2, which are prototypic of fusion steady state heat flux conditions, over a heated area of 9 ? 12 and 1 ? 10 cm2, respectively. The use of PAL permits the heat source to be environmentally separated from the components of the test chamber, simplifying the design to accommodate safe testing of low-level irradiated articles and materials under high-heat flux. Issues related to the operation and temperature measurements during testing of tungsten samples are presented and discussed. The relative advantages and disadvantages of this photon-based HHFT facility are compared to existing e-beam and particle beam facilities used for similar purposes.

Adrian S Sabau; Evan K Ohriner; Jim Kiggans; David C Harper; Lance L Snead; Charles R Schaich

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Effects of a GIS Course on Three Components of Spatial Literacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tests (spatial habits of mind inventory, spatial concepts and skills test, critical spatial thinking oral test) to measure students' performance on these three elements. Furthermore, this research investigated the relationship among the components. Pre...

Kim, Minsung

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

89

Field testing of component-level model-based fault detection methods for mixing boxes and VAV fan systems  

SciTech Connect

An automated fault detection and diagnosis tool for HVAC systems is being developed, based on an integrated, life-cycle, approach to commissioning and performance monitoring. The tool uses component-level HVAC equipment models implemented in the SPARK equation-based simulation environment. The models are configured using design information and component manufacturers' data and then fine-tuned to match the actual performance of the equipment by using data measured during functional tests of the sort using in commissioning. This paper presents the results of field tests of mixing box and VAV fan system models in an experimental facility and a commercial office building. The models were found to be capable of representing the performance of correctly operating mixing box and VAV fan systems and detecting several types of incorrect operation.

Xu, Peng; Haves, Philip

2002-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

90

Application of standard SSC test methods for evaluating metallic components of non-bonded flexible pipe  

SciTech Connect

Floating production platforms for oil and gas commonly utilize flexible risers. These multi-layered pipes contain carbon steel wires to provide both hoop strength and axial strength. Aggressive production environments containing hydrogen sulfide necessitate the selection of steels that meet the requirements of MR0175. The wires have been tested for use in sour gas environments in accordance with NACE and API requirements. Modifications to the sour service testing methods which were made to meet the requirements of API 17J, Draft Specification for Unbonded Flexible Pipe, are discussed and the results are summarized.

Ethridge, A.D. [Wellstream, Inc., Panama City, FL (United States); Cayard, M.S. [CLI International, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

High Temperature Steam Electrolysis Materials Degradation: Preliminary Results of Corrosion Tests on Ceramatec Electrolysis Cell Components  

SciTech Connect

Corrosion tests were performed on stainless steel and nickel alloy coupons in H2O/H2 mixtures and dry air to simulate conditions experienced in high temperature steam electrolysis systems. The stainless steel coupons were tested bare and with one of three different proprietary coatings applied. Specimens were corroded at 850°C for 500 h with weight gain data recorded at periodic intervals. Post-test characterization of the samples included surface and cross-section scanning electron microscopy, grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, and area-specific resistance measurements. The uncoated nickel alloy outperformed the ferritic stainless steel under all test conditions based on weight gain data. Parabolic rate constants for corrosion of these two uncoated alloys were consistent with values presented in the literature under similar conditions. The steel coatings reduced corrosion rates in H2O/H2 mixtures by as much as 50% compared to the untreated steel, but in most cases showed negligible corrosion improvement in air. The use of a rare-earth-based coating on stainless steel did not result in a significantly different area specific resistance values after corrosion compared to the untreated alloy. Characterization of the samples is still in progress and the findings will be revised when the complete data set is available.

Paul Demkowicz; Prateek Sachdev; Kevin DeWall; Pavel Medvedev

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error-Detecting Command Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error-Detecting Command Format. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error

Colorado at Boulder, University of

93

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Code in PROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0045 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

94

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload Data Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload

Colorado at Boulder, University of

95

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5c Code in PROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5c Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0047 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

96

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory Monitor Commanding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory Monitor Commanding. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

97

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory Monitors in Housekeeping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory Monitors. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

98

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5c Code in PROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5c Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0015 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

99

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory Download Commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory Download Commands. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

100

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable/Enable Watchdog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes for Command Opcode and Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes for Command Opcode. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes

Colorado at Boulder, University of

102

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory Download Commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory Download Commands. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.2.1 Process Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

103

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC Background Checking on Memory Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC Background Checking on Memory. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC

Colorado at Boulder, University of

104

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory Copy Commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory Copy Commands Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

105

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC Checking on Upload  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5

Colorado at Boulder, University of

106

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.1Housekeeping Response Within One Second  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.1Housekeeping Response Within One. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5

Colorado at Boulder, University of

107

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Performs Requisite Initializations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Performs Requisite. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5a Performs

Colorado at Boulder, University of

108

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload Data Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.2 Capability to Upload

Colorado at Boulder, University of

109

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory Monitors in Housekeeping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory Monitors. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.1 HST Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

110

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error-Detecting Command Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error-Detecting Command Format. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.1.1 Error

Colorado at Boulder, University of

111

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability to Log Diagnostics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability to Log Diagnostics. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability

Colorado at Boulder, University of

112

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Command to Disable/Enable Watchdog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Command to Disable. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2a Command

Colorado at Boulder, University of

113

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5d Code in PROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5d Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0016 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

114

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5d Code in PROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5d Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0048 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

115

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5b Code in PROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5b Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-0046 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

116

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory Copy Commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory Copy Commands Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.1 Process Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

117

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory Monitor Commanding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory Monitor Commanding. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.4.2 HST Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

118

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.2 Distinguish between Power-Up and Watchdog Resets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.2 Distinguish between Power. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5

Colorado at Boulder, University of

119

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.1 Housekeeping Response Within One Second  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.1 Housekeeping Response Within One. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5

Colorado at Boulder, University of

120

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC Checking on Upload  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.1.4 Command to Disable/Enable CRC. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC Background Checking on Memory Regions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC Background Checking on Memory. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.5.3.1 CRC

Colorado at Boulder, University of

122

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory Initialization on Power-Up Only  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory Initialization on Power. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

123

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable/Enable Watchdog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command to Disable. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.2b Command

Colorado at Boulder, University of

124

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.5a HST Error Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.5a HST Error Format Date: February for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement-03-0054 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW

Colorado at Boulder, University of

125

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5b Code in PROM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.5b Code in PROM Date: February 13 for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement-0014 February 13, 2001 Center for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1

Colorado at Boulder, University of

126

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.2 Distinguish Between Power-up and Watchdog Resets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.2 Distinguish Between Power. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 for Astrophysics & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5

Colorado at Boulder, University of

127

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability to Log Diagnostics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability to Log Diagnostics. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.2.3 Capability

Colorado at Boulder, University of

128

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory Initialization on Power-Up Only  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory Initialization on Power. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.4 Memory

Colorado at Boulder, University of

129

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes for Command Opcode and Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes for Command Opcode. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 & Space Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.2 Echoes

Colorado at Boulder, University of

130

Characterization of fast neutron spectrum in the TRIGA for hardness testing of electronic components  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory-West, operated by the University of Chicago, is located near Idaho Falls, ID, on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Site. ANL-West performs work in support of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor Program (LMFBR) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy. The NRAD reactor is located at the Argonne Site within the Hot Fuel Examination Facility/North, a large hot cell facility where both non-destructive and destructive examinations are performed on highly irradiated reactor fuels and materials in support of the LMFBR program. The NRAD facility utilizes a 250-kW TRIGA reactor and is completely dedicated to neutron radiography and the development of radiography techniques. Criticality was first achieved at the NRAD reactor in October of 1977. Since that time, a number of modifications have been implemented to improve operational efficiency and radiography production. This paper describes the modifications and changes that significantly improved operational efficiency and reliability of the reactor and the essential auxiliary reactor systems. (author)

Nelson, George W. [Department of Nuclear and Energy Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Cesium reservoir and interconnective components. Final test report: TFE Verification Program  

SciTech Connect

The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE (thermionic fuel element) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW range. A thermionic converter must be supplied with cesium vapor for two reasons. Cesium atoms adsorbed on the surface of the emitter cause a reduction of the emitter work function to permit high current densities without excessive heating of the emitter. The second purpose of the cesium vapor is to provide space-charge neutralization in the emitter-collector gap so that the high current densities may flow across the gap unattenuated. The function of the cesium reservoir is to provide a source of cesium atoms, and to provide a reserve in the event that cesium is lost from the plasma by any mechanism. This can be done with a liquid cesium metal reservoir in which case it is heated to the desired temperature with auxiliary heaters. In a TFE, however, it is desirable to have the reservoir passively heated by the nuclear fuel. In this case, the reservoir must operate at a temperature intermediate between the emitter and the collector, ruling out the use of liquid reservoirs. Integral reservoirs contained within the TFE will produce cesium vapor pressures in the desired range at typical electrode temperatures. The reservoir material that appears to be the best able to meet requirements is graphite. Cesium intercalates easily into graphite, and the cesium pressure is insensitive to loading for a given intercalation stage. The goals of the cesium reservoir test program were to verify the performance of Cs-graphite reservoirs in the temperature-pressure range of interest to TFE operation, and to test the operation of these reservoirs after exposure to a fast neutron fluence corresponding to seven year mission lifetime. In addition, other materials were evaluated for possible use in the integral reservoir.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A technique for testing analog and mixed-signal linear cir-cuit components based on their impulse response (IR) sig-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract A technique for testing analog and mixed-signal linear cir- cuit components based benchmark circuit is used as the Device-Under-Test as a means of validating this technique. The detection. The detection results are compared and shown to be superior to a typical specification based test. 1

Patel, Chintan

133

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate: One Per Second  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate: One Per Second. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate

Colorado at Boulder, University of

134

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1c Initialize to Boot State After Reset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1c Initialize to Boot State After. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1c Initialize to Boot State After Reset Size Code Indent No

Colorado at Boulder, University of

135

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1a Initialize to Boot State After Reset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1a Initialize to Boot State After. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1a Initialize to Boot State After Reset Size Code Indent No

Colorado at Boulder, University of

136

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump Anywhere in Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump Anywhere in Code. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump

Colorado at Boulder, University of

137

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump Anywhere in Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump Anywhere in Code. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.4.1 Command to Jump

Colorado at Boulder, University of

138

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1d Initialize to Boot State After Reset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1d Initialize to Boot State After. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1d Initialize to Boot State After Reset Size Code Indent No

Colorado at Boulder, University of

139

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate: One Per Second  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate: One Per Second. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Astronomy Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.2.1a Command Rate

Colorado at Boulder, University of

140

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counters for All Commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counters for All Commands Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counters for All

Colorado at Boulder, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1b Initialize to Boot State After Reset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1b Initialize to Boot State After. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.1b Initialize to Boot State After Reset Size Code Indent No

Colorado at Boulder, University of

142

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Reboot DCE FSW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Reboot DCE FSW Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.13 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Reboot DCE

Colorado at Boulder, University of

143

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Re-boot DCE FSW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Re-boot DCE FSW Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.1.1.3 Commands to Re-boot DCE FSW Size Code Indent No. Document No. Rev

Colorado at Boulder, University of

144

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counter for All Commands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counter for All Commands Date. Brownsberger 2-13-01 The Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy Reviewed: Approved: COS DCE BOOT FSW v1 Initial Release COS DCE BOOT FSW v1.09 Component Test Results Requirement 5.2.3.3a Counter for All

Colorado at Boulder, University of

145

Analysis of removal alternatives for the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor at the Savannah River Site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This engineering study evaluates different alternatives for decontamination and decommissioning of the Heavy Water Components Test Reactor (HWCTR). Cooled and moderated with pressurized heavy water, this uranium-fueled nuclear reactor was designed to test fuel assemblies for heavy water power reactors. It was operated for this purpose from march of 1962 until December of 1964. Four alternatives studied in detail include: (1) dismantlement, in which all radioactive and hazardous contaminants would be removed, the containment dome dismantled and the property restored to a condition similar to its original preconstruction state; (2) partial dismantlement and interim safe storage, where radioactive equipment except for the reactor vessel and steam generators would be removed, along with hazardous materials, and the building sealed with remote monitoring equipment in place to permit limited inspections at five-year intervals; (3) conversion for beneficial reuse, in which most radioactive equipment and hazardous materials would be removed and the containment building converted to another use such as a storage facility for radioactive materials, and (4) entombment, which involves removing hazardous materials, filling the below-ground structure with concrete, removing the containment dome and pouring a concrete cap on the tomb. Also considered was safe storage, but this approach, which has, in effect, been followed for the past 30 years, did not warrant detailed evaluation. The four other alternatives were evaluate, taking into account factors such as potential effects on the environment, risks, effectiveness, ease of implementation and cost. The preferred alternative was determined to be dismantlement. This approach is recommended because it ranks highest in the comparative analysis, would serve as the best prototype for the site reactor decommissioning program and would be most compatible with site property reuse plans for the future.

Owen, M.B.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Quantum critical benchmark for density functional theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two electrons at the threshold of ionization represent a severe test case for electronic structure theory. A pseudospectral method yields a very accurate density of the two-electron ion with nuclear charge close to the critical value. Highly accurate energy components and potentials of Kohn-Sham density functional theory are given, as well as a useful parametrization of the critical density. The challenges for density functional approximations and the strength of correlation are also discussed.

Paul E. Grabowski; Kieron Burke

2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

147

Commissioning of the Korean High Heat Flux Test Facility by Using Electron Beam System for Plasma Facing Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Divertor and High-Heat-Flux Components / Proceedings of the Twentieth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE-2012) (Part 1), Nashville, Tennessee, August 27-31, 2012

Suk-Kwon Kim; Eo Hwak Lee; Jae-Sung Yoon; Dong Won Lee; Duck-Hoi Kim; Seungyon Cho

148

Precision Cleaning Titanium Components  

SciTech Connect

Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

149

ENDF/B-VII.1 Neutron Cross Section Data Testing with Critical Assembly Benchmarks and Reactor Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The ENDF/B-VII.1 library is the latest revision to the United States' Evaluated Nuclear Data File (ENDF). The ENDF library is currently in its seventh generation, with ENDF/B-VII.0 being released in 2006. This revision expands upon that library, including the addition of new evaluated files (was 393 neutron files previously, now 418 including replacement of elemental vanadium and zinc evaluations with isotopic evaluations) and extension or updating of many existing neutron data files. Complete details are provided in the companion paper [1]. This paper focuses on how accurately application libraries may be expected to perform in criticality calculations with these data. Continuous energy cross section libraries, suitable for use with the MCNP Monte Carlo transport code, have been generated and applied to a suite of nearly one thousand critical benchmark assemblies defined in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project's International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments. This suite covers uranium and plutonium fuel systems in a variety of forms such as metallic, oxide or solution, and under a variety of spectral conditions, including unmoderated (i.e., bare), metal reflected and water or other light element reflected. Assembly eigenvalues that were accurately predicted with ENDF/B-VII.0 cross sections such as unmoderated and uranium reflected 235U and 239Pu assemblies, HEU solution systems and LEU oxide lattice systems that mimic commercial PWR configurations continue to be accurately calculated with ENDF/B-VII.1 cross sections, and deficiencies in predicted eigenvalues for assemblies containing selected materials, including titanium, manganese, cadmium and tungsten are greatly reduced. Improvements are also confirmed for selected actinide reaction rates such as 236U capture. Other deficiencies, such as the overprediction of Pu solution system critical eigenvalues and a decreasing trend in calculated eigenvalue for 233U fueled systems as a function of Above-Thermal Fission Fraction remain. The comprehensive nature of this critical benchmark suite and the generally accurate calculated eigenvalues obtained with ENDF/B-VII.1 neutron cross sections support the conclusion that this is the most accurate general purpose ENDF/B cross section library yet released to the technical community.

G. Palmiotti

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584  

SciTech Connect

The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of =14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS' System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP. (authors)

Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy W.J.; Hopkins, Derek F. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States); Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A. [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

System Performance Testing of the Pulse-Echo Ultrasonic Instrument for Critical Velocity Determination during Hanford Tank Waste Transfer Operations - 13584  

SciTech Connect

The delivery of Hanford double-shell tank waste to the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) is governed by specific Waste Acceptance Criteria that are identified in ICD 19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed. Waste must be certified as acceptable before it can be delivered to the WTP. The fluid transfer velocity at which solid particulate deposition occurs in waste slurry transport piping (critical velocity) is a key waste acceptance parameter that must be accurately characterized to determine if the waste is acceptable for transfer to the WTP. Washington River Protection Solutions and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory have been evaluating the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument since 2010 for its ability to detect particle settling and determine critical velocity in a horizontal slurry transport pipeline for slurries containing particles with a mean particle diameter of ?14 micrometers (?m). In 2012 the PulseEcho instrument was further evaluated under WRPS’ System Performance test campaign to identify critical velocities for slurries that are expected to be encountered during Hanford tank waste retrieval operations or bounding for tank waste feed. This three-year evaluation has demonstrated the ability of the ultrasonic PulseEcho instrument to detect the onset of critical velocity for a broad range of physical and rheological slurry properties that are likely encountered during the waste feed transfer operations between the Hanford tank farms and the WTP.

Denslow, Kayte M.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.; Adkins, Harold E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Hopkins, Derek F.; Thien, Michael G.; Kelly, Steven E.; Wooley, Theodore A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

A Test Facility for the International Linear Collider at SLAC End Station A, for Prototypes of Beam Delivery and IR Components  

SciTech Connect

The SLAC Linac can deliver damped bunches with ILC parameters for bunch charge and bunch length to End Station A. A 10Hz beam at 28.5 GeV energy can be delivered there, parasitic with PEP-II operation. We plan to use this facility to test prototype components of the Beam Delivery System and Interaction Region. We discuss our plans for this ILC Test Facility and preparations for carrying out experiments related to collimator wakefields and energy spectrometers. We also plan an interaction region mockup to investigate effects from backgrounds and beam-induced electromagnetic interference.

Woods, M.; Erickson, R.; Frisch, J.; Hast, C.; Jobe, R.K.; Keller, L.; Markiewicz, T.; Maruyama, T.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nelson, T.; Phinney, N.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Seryi, A.; Smith, S.; Szalata, Z.; Tenenbaum, P.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Beard, C.; /Daresbury /CERN /DESY /KEK, Tsukuba /LLNL, Livermore /Lancaster U.

2005-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

153

Rocky Flats CAAS System Recalibrated, Retested, and Analyzed to Install in the Criticality Experiments Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Neutron detectors and control panels transferred from the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) were recalibrated and retested for redeployment to the CEF. Testing and calibration were successful with no failure to any equipment. Detector sensitivity was tested at a TRIGA reactor, and the response to thermal neutron flux was satisfactory. MCNP calculated minimum fission yield ({approx} 2 x 10{sup 15} fissions) was applied to determine the thermal flux at selected detector positions at the CEF. Thermal flux levels were greater than 6.39 x 10{sup 6} (n/cm{sup 2}-sec), which was about four orders of magnitude greater than the minimum alarm flux. Calculations of detector survivable distances indicate that, to be out of lethal area, a detector needs to be placed greater than 15 ft away from a maximum credible source. MCNP calculated flux/dose results were independently verified by COG. CAAS calibration and the testing confirmed that the RFP CAAS system is performing its functions as expected. New criteria for the CAAS detector placement and 12-rad zone boundaries at the CEF are established. All of the CAAS related documents and hardware have been transferred from LLNL to NSTec for installation at the CEF high bay areas.

Kim, S; Heinrichs, D; Biswas, D; Huang, S; Dulik, G; Scorby, J; Boussoufi, M; Liu, B; Wilson, R

2009-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability  

SciTech Connect

Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Technical Letter Report, An Evaluation of Ultrasonic Phased Array Testing for Reactor Piping System Components Containing Dissimilar Metal Welds, JCN N6398, Task 2A  

SciTech Connect

Research is being conducted for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the effectiveness and reliability of advanced nondestructive examination (NDE) methods for the inspection of light-water reactor components. The scope of this research encom¬passes primary system pressure boundary materials including dissimilar metal welds (DMWs), cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS), piping with corrosion-resistant cladding, weld overlays, inlays and onlays, and far-side examinations of austenitic piping welds. A primary objective of this work is to evaluate various NDE methods to assess their ability to detect, localize, and size cracks in steel components that challenge standard and/or conventional inspection methodologies. This interim technical letter report provides a summary of a technical evaluation aimed at assessing the capabilities of phased-array (PA) ultrasonic testing (UT) methods as applied to the inspection of small-bore DMW components that exist in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience and events such as the circumferential cracking in the reactor vessel nozzle-to-RCS hot leg pipe at V.C. Summer nuclear power station, identified in 2000, show that in PWRs where primary coolant water (or steam) are present under normal operation, Alloy 82/182 materials are susceptible to pressurized water stress corrosion cracking. The extent and number of occurrences of DMW cracking in nuclear power plants (domestically and internationally) indicate the necessity for reliable and effective inspection techniques. The work described herein was performed to provide insights for evaluating the utility of advanced NDE approaches for the inspection of DMW components such as a pressurizer surge nozzle DMW, a shutdown cooling pipe DMW, and a ferritic (low-alloy carbon steel)-to-CASS pipe DMW configuration.

Diaz, Aaron A.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Anderson, Michael T.

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

NETL: News Release - First Test Passes Muster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 29, 2003 September 29, 2003 First Test Passes Muster A recent study conducted by Conversion Gas Imports (CGI), L.L.C. and Ebara International tested the largest LNG production pump ever made. The first of three critical component tests, this trial was performed at discharge pressures exceeding 2,000 pounds per square inch (psi). The successful assessment laid the foundation for a pump design that would operate at large volumes and at pressures that exceed 2,400 psi. The National Technology Energy Lab recently awarded a project to CGI to field test the critical components of a novel LNG process known as the "Bishop Process." High-pressure, high volume LNG pumps are a critical component of the Bishop Process salt cavern-based LNG receiving terminals. These pumps allow ships to be unloaded quickly and directly into salt storage caverns.

157

Standard Test Method for Application of Ionization Chambers to Assess the Low Energy Gamma Component of Cobalt-60 Irradiators Used in Radiation-Hardness Testing of Silicon Electronic Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 Low energy components in the photon energy spectrum of Co-60 irradiators lead to absorbed dose enhancement effects in the radiation-hardness testing of silicon electronic devices. These low energy components may lead to errors in determining the absorbed dose in a specific device under test. This method covers procedures for the use of a specialized ionization chamber to determine a figure of merit for the relative importance of such effects. It also gives the design and instructions for assembling this chamber. 1.2 This method is applicable to measurements in Co-60 radiation fields where the range of exposure rates is 7 × 10 ?6 to 3 × 10?2 C kg ?1 s?1 (approximately 100 R/h to 100 R/s). For guidance in applying this method to radiation fields where the exposure rate is >100 R/s, see Appendix X1. Note 1—See Terminology E170 for definition of exposure and its units. 1.3 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information onl...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Crack growth rates and metallographic examinations of Alloy 600 and Alloy 82/182 from field components and laboratory materials tested in PWR environments.  

SciTech Connect

In light water reactors, components made of nickel-base alloys are susceptible to environmentally assisted cracking. This report summarizes the crack growth rate results and related metallography for field and laboratory-procured Alloy 600 and its weld alloys tested in pressurized water reactor (PWR) environments. The report also presents crack growth rate (CGR) results for a shielded-metal-arc weld of Alloy 182 in a simulated PWR environment as a function of temperature between 290 C and 350 C. These data were used to determine the activation energy for crack growth in Alloy 182 welds. The tests were performed by measuring the changes in the stress corrosion CGR as the temperatures were varied during the test. The difference in electrochemical potential between the specimen and the Ni/NiO line was maintained constant at each temperature by adjusting the hydrogen overpressure on the water supply tank. The CGR data as a function of temperature yielded activation energies of 252 kJ/mol for a double-J weld and 189 kJ/mol for a deep-groove weld. These values are in good agreement with the data reported in the literature. The data reported here and those in the literature suggest that the average activation energy for Alloy 182 welds is on the order of 220-230 kJ/mol, higher than the 130 kJ/mol commonly used for Alloy 600. The consequences of using a larger value of activation energy for SCC CGR data analysis are discussed.

Alexandreanu, B.; Chopra, O. K.; Shack, W. J.

2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Evaluation of critical pathways, radionuclides, and remedial measures for reducing the radiological dose to returning populations at a former nuclear test site  

SciTech Connect

Bikini Island, the major residence island at Bikini Atoll, was contaminated with radioactive fallout as a result of the BRAVO test conducted on March 1, 1954. We have identified the critical radionuclides and supplied radiological data needed to develop dose estimates for all possible exposure pathways. These estimates show that the major dose to returning populations would result from ingestion of cesium-137 (137 Cs) in locally grown terrestrial foods where the predicted population average effective dose exceeds current federal guidelines. Consequently, we designed several long-term field experiments to develop and evaluate methods to reduce the 137 Cs content in locally grown foods.This paper gives a general outline of the remediation experiments with a more detailed description of a preferred combined option. Our comparative evaluation on various remedial methods show that the combined option--potassium treatment of the entire islands with limited excavation of soil in village an d housing areas--will be effective in reducing the dose to about 10% of pretreatment levels, and offers very significant benefits with respect to adverse environmental impacts as well as savings in overall costs, time, and required expert resources.

Robison, W. L., LLNL

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Critical Materials:  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

lighting. 14 (bottom) Criticality ratings of shortlisted raw 76 materials. 15 77 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 78 This section reviews the major trends within...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Use of system code to estimate equilibrium tritium inventory in fusion DT machines, such as ARIES-AT and components testing facilities  

SciTech Connect

ITER is under construction and will begin operation in 2020. This is the first 500 MWfusion class DT device, and since it is not going to breed tritium, it will consume most of the limited supply of tritium resources in the world. Yet, in parallel, DT fusion nuclear component testing machines will be needed to provide technical data for the design of DEMO. It becomes necessary to estimate the tritium burn-up fraction and corresponding initial tritium inventory and the doubling time of these machines for the planning of future supply and utilization of tritium. With the use of a system code, tritium burn-up fraction and initial tritium inventory for steady state DT machines can be estimated. Estimated tritium burn-up fractions of FNSF-AT, CFETR-R and ARIES-AT are in the range of 1–2.8%. Corresponding total equilibrium tritium inventories of the plasma flow and tritium processing system, and with the DCLL blanket option are 7.6 kg, 6.1 kg, and 5.2 kg for ARIES-AT, CFETR-R and FNSF-AT, respectively.

C.P.C. Wong; B. Merrill

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Stack Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stack Components Stack Components Nancy L. Garland Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Fuel Cell Team FORS 5G-086 (202) 586-5673 nancy.garland@ee.doe.gov Stack Components F u e l P r o c e s s o r Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 e - H+ Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate Cathode + Anode - Electrolyte H+ H+ H+ H+ HYDROGEN OXYGEN Example shown is for acidic electrolytes Bipolar Plate Bipolar Plate e - e - e - e - O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 O 2 e - e - H+ H+ Power Stack Component Barriers $10 Other Bipolar Plates Membranes Electrodes $25 $5 $5 Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW BARRIERS * Stack material cost/manufacturing * Durability * Electrode performance * Thermal and water management Stack Component Targets

163

Infrastructure, Components and System Level Testing and Analysis of Electric Vehicles: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-09-353  

SciTech Connect

Battery technology is critical for the development of innovative electric vehicle networks, which can enhance transportation sustainability and reduce dependence on petroleum. This cooperative research proposed by Better Place and NREL will focus on predicting the life-cycle economics of batteries, characterizing battery technologies under various operating and usage conditions, and designing optimal usage profiles for battery recharging and use.

Neubauer, J.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Superallowed 0(+)-> 0(+) nuclear beta decays: A critical survey with tests of the conserved vector current hypothesis and the standard model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complete and critical survey is presented of all half-life, decay-energy, and branching-ratio measurements related to 20 superallowed 0(+)-> 0(+) decays...no measurements are ignored, although some are rejected for cause and others updated. A new calculation of the statistical rate function f is described and experimental ft values determined. The associated theoretical corrections needed to convert...

Hardy, John C.; Towner, IS.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Critical Materials Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentations during the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 overviewing critical materials strategies

166

Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components  

SciTech Connect

Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

167

Sandia National Laboratories: provide critical performance data...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provide critical performance data on photovoltaic systems Launch of Solar Testing Site in Vermont On November 27, 2013, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership,...

168

Identification of Integral Benchmarks for Nuclear Data Testing Using DICE (Database for the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments)  

SciTech Connect

Typical users of the International Criticality Safety Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) Handbook have specific criteria to which they desire to find matching experiments. Depending on the application, those criteria may consist of any combination of physical or chemical characteristics and/or various neutronic parameters. The ICSBEP Handbook contains a structured format helping the user narrow the search for experiments of interest. However, with nearly 4300 different experimental configurations and the ever increasing addition of experimental data, the necessity to perform multiple criteria searches have rendered these features insufficient. As a result, a relational database was created with information extracted from the ICSBEP Handbook. A users’ interface was designed by OECD and DOE to allow the interrogation of this database. The database and the corresponding users’ interface are referred to as DICE. DICE currently offers the capability to perform multiple criteria searches that go beyond simple fuel, physical form and spectra and includes expanded general information, fuel form, moderator/coolant, neutron-absorbing material, cladding, reflector, separator, geometry, benchmark results, spectra, and neutron balance parameters. DICE also includes the capability to display graphical representations of neutron spectra, detailed neutron balance, sensitivity coefficients for capture, fission, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering, nu-bar and mu-bar, as well as several other features.

J. Blair Briggs; A. Nichole Ellis; Yolanda Rugama; Nicolas Soppera; Manuel Bossant

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Development and validation of a real-time SAFT-UT (synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing) system for the inspection of light water reactor components: Annual report, October 1985-September 1986  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is working to design, fabricate, and evaluate a real-time flaw detection and characterization system based on the synthetic aperture focusing technique for ultrasonic testing (SAFT-UT). The system is designed to perform inservice inspection of light-water reactor components. Included objectives of this program for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission are to develop procedures for system calibration and field operation, to validate the system through laboratory and field inspections, and to generate an engineering data base to support ASME Code acceptance of the technology. This progress report covers the programmatic work from October 1985 through September 1986. 45 figs., 8 tabs.

Doctor, S.R.; Hall, T.E.; Reid, L.D.; Mart, G.A.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DARHT Facility: A critical component of stockpile stewardship DARHT Facility: A critical component of stockpile stewardship A new research frontier awaits! Our door is open and we thrive on mutually beneficial partnerships, collaborations that drive innovations and new technologies. April 12, 2012 Dominic Tafoya and Dave Honaberger prepare a refurbished DARHT (Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility) 2nd axis accelerator cell for magnetic axis alignment measurements. Contact Group Leader Terry Priestley (505) 665-1330 Email Deputy Group Leader Tim Ferris (505) 665-2179 Email Hydrotests are critical in assessing nuclear weapons in nation's stockpile Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility 4:17 How DARHT Works The weapons programs at Los Alamos have one principal mission: ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of nuclear weapons in our nation's

171

Critical Materials Institute  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Ames Laboratory Director Alex King talks about the goals of the Critical Materials Institute in diversifying the supply of critical materials, developing substitute materials, developing tools and techniques for recycling critical materials, and forecasting materials needs to avoid future shortages.

Alex King

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects |...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Projects for Utility-Scale and Distributed Wind Energy.pdf More Documents & Publications Offshore Wind Projects Environmental Wind Projects Workforce Development Wind Projects...

173

Sandia National Laboratories: Reactor Component Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Doppler Velocimeter EC Top Publications A Comparison of Platform Options for Deep-water Floating Offshore Vertical Axis Wind Turbines: An Initial Study Nonlinear Time-Domain...

174

DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT: Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility DARHT, supports a critical component of LANL's primary mission: to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of nuclear weapons in our nation's stockpile. Los Alamos scientists built DARHT, the world's most powerful x-ray machine, to analyze mockups of nuclear weapons. At the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility, or DARHT, supports a critical component of LANL's primary mission: to ensure the safety, security, and effectiveness of nuclear weapons in our nation's stockpile. Los Alamos scientists built DARHT, the world's most powerful x-ray machine, to analyze mockups of nuclear weapons.

175

Instrumentation of Current Technology Testing and Replicating Harsh Environments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 2 Project Team o Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) o Jarlath McEntee o Monty Worthington o University of Alaska Anchorage (UAA) o Faculty o Thomas Ravens o Todd Petersen o Muhammad Ali o Research Assistants o Tim Kirk o Jacob Clark o Angus Bromaghin 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 3 ORPC Technology o TideGen Power System (TGU) o Designed to generate electricity at water depths of 50 to 100 feet 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 4 ORPC Technology 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 5 TGU Performance Test Results o ORPC field testing on TGU prototype in 2008 showed significant wear on bearings and seals. 10/17/2012 University of Alaska Anchorage 6

176

Nuclear criticality safety guide  

SciTech Connect

This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing with JUnit Testing with JUnit Running a test case: 1 Get the component to a known state (set up). 2 Cause some event (the test case). 3 Check the behaviour. · Record pass/fail · Track statistics · Typically we want to do a lot of test cases so it makes sense to automate. · Test cases

Peters, Dennis

178

TESTING OF TMR SAND MANTIS FINAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Screening tests of Sand Mantis candidate materials selected for erosion resistance have been completed. The results of this testing identified that over a relatively short period of operation (<1 hour), measurable erosion will occur in each of the candidate zoom tube materials given equal operating exposure. Additionally, this testing has shown that erosion of the rubber discharge hose directly downstream of the vehicle could be expected to limit the service life of the discharge hose. On the basis of these test results, SRNL recommends the following; {lg_bullet} redesign of critical system components (e.g., zoom tube, discharge hose) should be conducted to improve system characteristics relative to erosion and capitalize on the results of this testing, {lg_bullet} continued efforts to deploy the Sand Mantis should include testing to better define and optimize operating parameters, and gain an understanding of system dynamics, {lg_bullet} discontinue wear testing with the selected materials pending redesign of critical system components (1st recommendation) and inclusion of other candidate materials. The final selection of additional candidate materials should be made following design changes, but might include a Stellite alloy or zirconia.

Krementz, D; William Daugherty, W

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

179

Derivation of criticality safety benchmarks from ZPR fast critical assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Scores of critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9, and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. Most of the assemblies were mockups of various liquid-metal fast breeder reactor designs. These tended to be complex, containing, for example, mockups of control rods and control rod positions. Some assemblies, however, were `physics benchmarks`. These relatively `clean` assemblies had uniform compositions and simple geometry and were designed to test fast reactor physics data and methods. Assemblies in this last category are well suited to form the basis for new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of some of these benchmark candidates and to describe the strategy being used to create the benchmarks.

Schaefer, R.W.; McKnight, R.D.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Prototype and Component...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DC systems such as commercial microgrids Long-duration reliability and safety tests of battery and energy storage system components Thermal energy storage materials testing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CRITICALITY SAFETY (CS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OBJECTIVE CS.1 The LANL criticality safety program provides the required technical guidance and oversight capabilities to ensure a comprehensive criticality safety program for the storage of nuclear materials in SSTs. (Core Requirements 3, 4, 8) Criteria * The Criticality Safety Program is an administrative TSR and meets the General and * Specific Requirements of DOE O 420.1A, Section 4.3 Nuclear Criticality Safety. * All processes and operations involving significant quantities of fissile materials are * described in current procedures approved by line management. * Procedures contain approved criticality controls and limits, based on HSR-6 evaluations and recommendations. * Supervisors, operations personnel, and criticality safety officers have received

182

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) DOE has set expectations for implementing criticality safety controls that are selected to provide preventive and/or mitigative functions for specific potential accident scenarios. There are additional expectations for criticality safety controls that are also designated as Specific Administrative Controls (SACs) (see HSS CRAD 64-32). Also, in instances when the review addresses functionality and operability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of nuclear facilities specifically required

183

Critical Materials Workshop  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

AMO hosted a public workshop on Tuesday, April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA to provide background information on critical materials assessment, the current research within DOE related to critical materials, and the foundational aspects of Energy Innovation Hubs. Additionally, the workshop solicited input from the critical materials community on R&D gaps that could be addressed by DOE.

184

CRITICALITY SAFETY (CS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective CS.1 - A criticality safety program is established, sufficient numbers of qualified personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure criticality safety support services are adequate for safe operations. (Core Requirements 1, 2, and 6) Criteria * Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented. * Operations support personnel for the criticality safety area are adequately staffed and trained. Approach Record Review: Review the documentation that establishes the Criticality Safety Requirements (CSRs) for appropriateness and completeness. Review for adequacy and completion the criticality safety personnel training records that indicate training on facility procedures and systems under

185

Critical in PROJECT TITLE COMMENTS BPA NPCC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PROJECT NUMBER (BiOp Critical in Italics) PROJECT TITLE COMMENTS BPA NPCC 35019 Develop and Implement a Pilot Status and Trend Monitoring Program BPA reduced budget by $250,000 to reflect duplicate NPCC tier 2. NPCC budget reflects an assumption of a capital determination for some components; BPA has

186

R&D ERL: G5 test and commissioning plan  

SciTech Connect

Gun-to-5-cell cavity (G5) setup (Fig 1-2) can be considered as the first stage of the final BNL ERL design. The goal of the G5 setup is to test critical ERL components with the beam and characterize the beam produced by the gun. Also, this test will be used to assess effectiveness of the zigzag merger, which will be installed later in the ERL setup. The major components under the test will include the SRF gun, the five-cell SRF cavity, vacuum components, parts of the control and diagnostic systems. G5 is designed to measure the following beam parameters: (1) projected bunch emittance (?) and Twiss parameters ({alpha}, {beta}); (2) slice emittance; (3) bunch length; and (4) longitudinal and transverse halo.

Kayran, D.; Pozdeyev, E.

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

Identification and selection of interaction test scenarios for integration testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Integration testing checks for compatibility and interoperability between the components in the system. Integration test models are, typically, generated independently from the other testing level models. In our research, we aim at a model-based framework ... Keywords: components, integration, interactions, model based testing, testing

Mohamed Mussa; Ferhat Khendek

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Timelines | Critical Materials Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of interest to rare earths and critical materials, organized by those specific to rare earth elements, general chemistry and uses. Timelines of rare earth discovery: Discovery and...

189

ORNL partners on critical materials hub | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL partners on critical materials hub ORNL partners on critical materials hub January 01, 2013 The Critical Materials Institute builds on the Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy report, which addresses the use of rare earths and other critical materials in clean energy components, products, and processes. December 2011. Credit: U.S. DOE. ORNL wins big as part of a team led by Ames Labora-tory, which was selected for an Energy Innovation Hub to address shortages of critical materials, including rare earth metals. The award of up to $120 million over five years for the Critical Materials Institute involves four national labs, academia, and industrial partners. ORNL will play a key role in conducting the CMI's mis-sion to eliminate materials criticality as an impediment to the commercialization of clean

190

Further testing and development of an 11-watt Stirling converter  

SciTech Connect

Three previous IECEC papers describe the development of an 11-watt Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) intended for remote power applications. This paper describes more recent testing and development activities. Testing of the engineering model (EM) was performed to determine the effect of heat rejection temperature, thermal input and initial charge pressure on thermal efficiency. Shock testing of the generator included a drop test and 3 hours of testing in a random vibration environment where g{sup 2}/Hz = 0.04. Endurance testing of a complete Stirling converter continues, with over 15,000 maintenance-free operating hours. Endurance testing of critical subsystems and components has achieved 14,000 to 26,000 hours of operation without failure. Minor changes to the RSG prototype design, based on the development of the EM, are described.

Ross, B.A.; Montgomery, W.L. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this calculation report, Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality of Commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel, is to validate the computational method used to perform postclosure criticality calculations. The validation process applies the criticality analysis methodology approach documented in Section 3.5 of the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report. The application systems for this validation consist of waste packages containing transport, aging, and disposal canisters (TAD) loaded with commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) of varying assembly types, initial enrichments, and burnup values that are expected from the waste stream and of varying degree of internal component degradation that may occur over the 10,000-year regulatory time period. The criticality computational tool being evaluated is the general-purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) transport code. The nuclear cross-section data distributed with MCNP 5.1.40 and used to model the various physical processes are based primarily on the Evaluated Nuclear Data File/B Version VI (ENDF/B-VI) library. Criticality calculation bias and bias uncertainty and lower bound tolerance limit (LBTL) functions for CSNF waste packages are determined based on the guidance in ANSI/ANS 8.1-1998 (Ref. 4) and ANSI/ANS 8.17-2004 (Ref. 5), as described in Section 3.5.3 of Ref. 1. The development of this report is consistent with Test Plan for: Range of Applicability and Bias Determination for Postclosure Criticality. This calculation report has been developed in support of licensing activities for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, and the results of the calculation may be used in the criticality evaluation for CSNF waste packages based on a conceptual TAD canister.

Radulescu, Georgeta [ORNL; Mueller, Don [ORNL; Goluoglu, Sedat [ORNL; Hollenbach, Daniel F [ORNL; Fox, Patricia B [ORNL

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q97.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q97.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Safety-Oriented Design of Component Assemblies using Safety Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FACS 2006 Safety-Oriented Design of Component Assemblies using Safety Interfaces Jonas Elmqvist¨oping, Sweden Abstract This paper promotes compositional reasoning in the context of safety-critical systems, and demonstrates a safety-oriented component model using an application from the automotive industry: an Adaptive

197

Test Automation Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

Mousavi, Mohammad

198

Critical wavelength for river meandering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A fully nonlinear modal analysis identifies a critical centerline wave number qc for river meandering that separates long-wavelength bends, which grow to cutoff, from short-wavelength bends, which decay. Exact, numerical, and approximate analytical results for qc rely on the Ikeda, Parker, and Sawai [J. Fluid Mech. 112, 363 (1981)] model, supplemented by dynamical equations that govern the river migration and length. Predictions also include upvalley bend migration at long times and a peak in lateral migration rates at intermediate times. Experimental tests are suggested.

Boyd F. Edwards and Duane H. Smith

2001-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

199

Electronic Component Obsolescence  

SciTech Connect

Electronic component obsolescence occurs when parts are no longer available to support the manufacture and/or repair of equipment still in service. Future instrumentation containing complex components WILL face obsolescence issues as technology advances. This paper describes hardware and software obsolescence as well as factors to consider when designing new instrumentation.

Sohns, Carl William [ORNL; Ward, Christina D [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Critical Materials Hub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Critical materials, including some rare earth elements that possess unique magnetic, catalytic, and luminescent properties, are key resources needed to manufacture products for the clean energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010 and 2011 Critical Materials Strategy reported that supply challenges for five rare earth metals—dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium, and yttrium—could affect clean energy technology deployment in the coming years.1, 2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Component Evaluation Tool from the Vehicle System Perspective  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testbed) is a Modular Hybrid Test Environment for Component Evaluation Emulated electric traction system: *Battery pack simulated *Motor-inverter emulated *Physical motor...

202

Building and Connecting Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While equations are an essential part of model development, it quickly becomes tedious to write out all the equations for the components in a system. In this chapter, we show how to reuse constitutive equation...

Michael Tiller Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Integrating Program Component Executables  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integrating Integrating Program Component Executables on Distributed Memory Architectures via MPH Chris Ding and Yun He Computational Research Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA chqding@lbl.gov, yhe@lbl.gov Abstract A growing trend in developing large and complex ap- plications on today's Teraflop computers is to integrate stand-alone and/or semi-independent program components into a comprehensive simulation package. One example is the climate system model which consists of atmosphere, ocean, land-surface and sea-ice. Each component is semi- independent and has been developed at different institu- tions. We study how this multi-component multi-executable application can run effectively on distributed memory archi- tectures. We identify five effective execution modes and de- velop the MPH library to support

204

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

205

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

Unknown

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Technology Readiness Testing  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q98. The most significant accomplishments are listed in the report.

NONE

1998-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project  

SciTech Connect

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the U.S. Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Kazakhstan, Spain, and Israel are now participating. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled "International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments" (ICSBEP Handbook). The 2002 edition of the ICSBEP Handbook contains benchmark model specifications for 2881 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for validating computer codes that calculate effective neutron multiplication and for testing basic nuclear data.

J. Blair Briggs

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

News Releases | Critical Materials Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Releases CMI hosts EU, Japan to discuss global critical materials strategy, September 10, 2014 Five Critical Materials Institute researchers named Most Influential Scientific Minds...

211

NREL: Learning - Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Advanced Vehicle Systems and Components Photo of a man checking out an advanced battery using testing equipment that includes a long metal tube on a table top. NREL's researchers test new batteries developed for hybrid electric vehicles. Credit: Warren Gretz Researchers and engineers at the NREL work closely with those in the automotive industry to develop new technologies, such as advanced batteries, for storing energy in cars, trucks, and buses. They also help to develop and test new technologies for using that energy more efficiently. And they work on finding new, energy-efficient ways to reduce the amount of fuel needed to heat and cool the interiors, or cabins, of vehicles. To help develop these new technologies, NREL's researchers are improving the efficiency of vehicle systems and components like these:

212

Utility Advanced Turbine System (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration phase 3. Quarterly progress report, October 1--December 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Utility Advanced Turbine System (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration -- Phase 3. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This report summarizes work accomplished during the period 2Q96.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

High heat flux testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

High heat flux testing for the United States fusion power program is the primary mission of the Plasma Materials Test Facility (PMTF) located at Sandia National Laboratories - New Mexico. This facility, which is owned by the United States Department of Energy, has been in operation for over 17 years and has provided much of the high heat flux data used in the design and evaluation of plasma facing components for many of the world`s magnetic fusion, tokamak experiments. In addition to domestic tokamaks such as Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton and the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics, components for international experiments like TEXTOR, Tore-Supra, and JET also have been tested at the PMTF. High heat flux testing spans a wide spectrum including thermal shock tests on passively cooled materials, thermal response and thermal fatigue tests on actively cooled components, critical heat flux-burnout tests, braze reliability tests and safety related tests. The objective of this article is to provide a brief overview of the high heat flux testing capabilities at the PMTF and describe a few of the experiments performed over the last year.

Youchison, D.L.; McDonald, J.M.; Wold, L.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Only critical information was scanned  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Only critical information was scanned. Entire document is available upon request - Click here to email a...

216

Structure of the Triplet Distribution Function near the Critical Point  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asymptotic long-range properties of the triplet distribution function of a fluid near its critical point are inferred from known properties of the pair distribution function and the second equation in the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy. The inverse correlation range ? and the critical exponent ? are related to coefficients in this asymptotic form. This structural information can be used, in some cases, to test whether a proposed functional relationship between the distribution functions is consistent with realistic critical behavior.

Gerald L. Jones

1983-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Inhomogeneous critical Ising model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The spectrum of the transfer matrix of a semi-infinite two-dimensional Isin model with marginally inhomogeneous couplings has been determined exactly in the finite-size-scaling limit at the bulk critical point. Depending on the local temperature at the boundary the surface phase transition of this system is either of first order or of second order with nonuniversal critical exponents. For a second-order transition, the excitation energies of the transfer matrix are inversely proportional to the linear size (N) of the system, but the levels are not equidistantly spaced. On the other hand, for a first-order transition the lowest gap vanishes algegraically, but faster than 1/N.

Ferenc Iglói

1990-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Applicability of ZPR critical experiment data to criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

More than a hundred zero power reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. To be sure, the original reason for performing these critical experiments was to support fast reactor development. Nevertheless, data from some of the assemblies are well suited to form the basis for valuable, new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to describe the ZPR data that would be of benefit to the criticality safety community and to explain how these data could be developed into practical criticality safety benchmarks.

Schaefer, R.W.; Aumeier, S.E.; McFarlane, H.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

BNL CRCR LEAF Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, A detailed description of the LEAF facility is given in Rev. Sci. Inst. 75, 4359-4366 (2004), which can be found by following this link. Accelerator System Components The LEAF facility layout indicates the locations of the laser system, the RF components, the electron gun and the beam lines. RF System The modulator cabinet and S-band (2.856 GHz) klystron are located in the laser room. A copper waveguide carries the 15 MW RF pulse from the klystron to the electron gun in the accelerator vault. (A klystron is a high-power RF amplifier. You can visit the ALS MicroWorlds site for more information on klystrons and the principles of RF particle acceleration.) Electron Gun Accelerator and Beam Line 5 psec beam line The electron gun (link to picture) is located in the southwest corner of

220

Noise and structural dynamics test facilities at Boeing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The noise and structural dynamics laboratories at Boeing provide a wide range of test and measurement services to the Boeing Company. Test data from these laboratories support all phases of the product life cycle across a diverse line of products and applications. The noise laboratory facilities include a low?speed free?jet acoustic wind tunnel several anechoic and reverberation test chambers a critical listening facility and a materials test center. These facilities are supported with a network of data systems for in?lab testing and a variety of transportable data systems for field? and airplane?based testing. Structural dynamics laboratory facilities include large strongbacks and structural floors for component vibration testing sonic fatigue test facilities and vibration test facilities. These facilities are supported by a network of dedicated data systems for a wide range of modal shock vibration and fatigue testing. Field tests are supported by a wide range of portable data systems and instrumentation trailers capable of large channel count measurements. This work will provide an overview of the test facilities and measurement capabilities of these laboratories.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Injection molded component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intermediate component includes a first wall member, a leachable material layer, and a precursor wall member. The first wall member has an outer surface and first connecting structure. The leachable material layer is provided on the first wall member outer surface. The precursor wall member is formed adjacent to the leachable material layer from a metal powder mixed with a binder material, and includes second connecting structure.

James, Allister W; Arrell, Douglas J

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

V-004: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2012 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2012 4: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2012 V-004: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2012 October 17, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2012 PLATFORM: Oracle All Applicable Version(s) ABSTRACT: October 2012 Critical Patch Update, security vulnerability fixes for proprietary components of Oracle Linux will be announced in Oracle Critical Patch Updates. REFERENCE LINKS: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A Critical Patch Update is a collection of patches for multiple security vulnerabilities. Critical Patch Update patches are usually cumulative but each advisory describes only the security fixes added since the previous Critical Patch Update advisory. IMPACT:

223

Vibrational measurement for commissioning SRF Accelerator Test Facility at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The commissioning of two cryomodule components is underway at Fermilab's Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) Accelerator Test Facility. The research at this facility supports the next generation high intensity linear accelerators such as the International Linear Collider (ILC), a new high intensity injector (Project X) and other future machines. These components, Cryomodule No.1 (CM1) and Capture Cavity II (CC2), which contain 1.3 GHz cavities are connected in series in the beamline and through cryogenic plumbing. Studies regarding characterization of ground motion, technical and cultural noise continue. Mechanical transfer functions between the foundation and critical beamline components have been measured and overall system displacement characterized. Baseline motion measurements given initial operation of cryogenic, vacuum systems and other utilities are considered.

McGee, M.W.; Leibfritz, J.; Martinez, A.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Schappert, W.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Design of thermal control systems for testing of electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the electronic component manufacturing industry, most components are subjected to a full functional test before they are sold. Depending on the type of components, these functional tests may be performed at room ...

Sweetland, Matthew, 1970-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Beam dynamics simulations and measurements at the Project X Test Facility  

SciTech Connect

Project X, under study at Fermilab, is a multitask high-power superconducting RF proton beam facility, aiming to provide high intensity protons for rare processes experiments and nuclear physics at low energy, and simultaneously for the production of neutrinos, as well as muon beams in the long term. A beam test facility - former known as High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) - is under commissioning for testing critical components of the project, e.g. dynamics and diagnostics at low beam energies, broadband beam chopping, RF power generation and distribution. In this paper we describe the layout of the test facility and present beam dynamics simulations and measurements.

Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Scarpine, V.E.; Webber, R.C.; /Fermilab

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Feature selection by higher criticism thresholding achieves the optimal phase diagram  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...higher criticism test statistic is . HC seems insensitive...figure-1 b shows a probability-probability (PP...2005 Higher criticism statistic: detecting and identifying...mathematical sciences I: Probability and statistics, Platinum Jubilee...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes the purpose, lab specifications, applications scenarios, and information on how to partner with NREL's Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at the Energy Systems Integration Facility. The purpose of the Energy Systems High Pressure Test Laboratory at NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF) is to provide space where high pressure hydrogen components can be safely tested. High pressure hydrogen storage is an integral part of energy storage technology for use in fuel cell and in other distributed energy scenarios designed to effectively utilize the variability inherent with renewable energy sources. The high pressure storage laboratory is co-located with energy storage activities such as ultra-capacitors, super conducting magnetic flywheel and mechanical energy storage systems laboratories for an integrated approach to system development and demonstration. Hazards associated with hydrogen storage at pressures up to 10,000 psi include oxygen displacement, combustion, explosion, and pressurization of room air due to fast release and physical hazards associated with burst failure modes. A critical understanding of component failure modes is essential in developing reliable, robust designs that will minimize failure risk beyond the end of service life. Development of test protocol for accelerated life testing to accurately scale to real world operating conditions is essential for developing regulations, codes and standards required for safe operation. NREL works closely with industry partners in providing support of advanced hydrogen technologies. Innovative approaches to product design will accelerate commercialization into new markets. NREL works with all phases of the product design life cycle from early prototype development to final certification testing. High pressure tests are performed on hydrogen components, primarily for the validation of developing new codes and standards for high pressure hydrogen applications. The following types of tests can be performed: Performance, Component and system level efficiency, Strength of materials and hydrogen compatibility, Safety demonstration, Model validation, and Life cycle reliability.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

An evaluation of the critical mechanical properties of filled elastomers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN EVALUATION OF THE CRITICAL MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF FILLED ELASTOMERS A Thesis By PATRICK ARTHUR GIBSON Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... possible. ABSTRACT An Evaluation of the Critical Mechanical Properties of Filled Elastomers Patrick A. Gibson, B. S. , Texas ASM University Directed by: Dr. William B. Ledbetter A test procedure is developed for the uniaxial tensile testing...

Gibson, Patrick Arthur

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

229

Critical Skills Master's Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skills Master's Program Skills Master's Program (CSMP): The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP) provides exceptional bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Master's of Science degree. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully complete the GRE as required by the universities of interest. * Complete a master's degree within:

230

Critical exponent for viscosity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have measured the critical exponent y characterizing the divergence of the viscosity ???T-Tc?-y for carbon dioxide and xenon. The values of y for both fluids fall within the range y=0.041±0.001 and are consistent with the range y=0.042±0.002 spanned by our earlier data for four binary liquid mixtures. This agreement is the strongest evidence that pure fluids and binary liquids are in the same dynamic universality class; however, the results for y are inconsistent with the recent theoretical value of 0.032.

Robert F. Berg and Michael R. Moldover

1990-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

231

Power System Equipment Module Test Project  

SciTech Connect

The technology of electric power generation when applying the binary process to hydrothermal resources had not yet been demonstrated in the United States. Accordingly, on November 10, 1977, the Electric Power Research Institute and the Department of Energy, acting through the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, agreed to cofund the Power System Equipment Module Test Project. The Power System Equipment Module Test Project consisted of a field test program to accomplish the objectives listed below while heating hydrocarbon fluids to above their critical points, expanding these fluids, and subsequently, condensing them below their critical points: (1) Verify the performance of state-of-the-art heat exchangers in geothermal service; (2) Verify the heat exchangers' performance heating either selected pure light hydrocarbons or selected mixtures of light hydrocarbons in the vicinity of their respective critical pressures and temperatures; (3) Establish overall heat transfer coefficients that might be used for design of commercial-size geothermal power plants using the same geothermal brine and light hydrocarbon working fluids; (4) Perform and investigate the above under representative fluid operating conditions during which the production wells would be pumped. The project was accomplished by diverting approximately 200 gpm of the flow from one of Magma Power Company's geothermal wells in the East Mesa Geothermal Field. After the heat was removed from the geothermal brine flow, the cooled flow was returned to Magma Power Company and recombined with the main brine stream for disposal by reinjection. Approximately five thermal megawatts was transferred from geothermal brine to hydrocarbon working fluids in a closed system. This heat was removed from the working fluids in a condenser and subsequently rejected to the environment by a wet cooling tower. The thermodynamic performance of both the working fluids and the system components was measured during the test program to achieve the project's objectives.

Schilling, J.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

An assessment of criticality safety at the Department of Energy Rocky Flats Plant, Golden, Colorado, July--September 1989  

SciTech Connect

This is a report on the 1989 independent Criticality Safety Assessment of the Rocky Flats Plant, primarily in response to public concerns that nuclear criticality accidents involving plutonium may have occurred at this nuclear weapon component fabrication and processing plant. The report evaluates environmental issues, fissile material storage practices, ventilation system problem areas, and criticality safety practices. While no evidence of a criticality accident was found, several recommendations are made for criticality safety improvements. 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Criticality Safety The Nuclear Engineering Division (NE) of Argonne National Laboratory is experienced in performing criticality safety and shielding evaluations for nuclear, and neutron spectra. The NE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) capabilities are based on a staff with decades

Kemner, Ken

234

Component failure data handbook  

SciTech Connect

This report presents generic component failure rates that are used in reliability and risk studies of commercial nuclear power plants. The rates are computed using plant-specific data from published probabilistic risk assessments supplemented by selected other sources. Each data source is described. For rates with four or more separate estimates among the sources, plots show the data that are combined. The method for combining data from different sources is presented. The resulting aggregated rates are listed with upper bounds that reflect the variability observed in each rate across the nuclear power plant industry. Thus, the rates are generic. Both per hour and per demand rates are included. They may be used for screening in risk assessments or for forming distributions to be updated with plant-specific data.

Gentillon, C.D.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Sprayed skin turbine component  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fabricating a turbine component (50) by casting a core structure (30), forming an array of pits (24) in an outer surface (32) of the core structure, depositing a transient liquid phase (TLP) material (40) on the outer surface of the core structure, the TLP containing a melting-point depressant, depositing a skin (42) on the outer surface of the core structure over the TLP material, and heating the assembly, thus forming both a diffusion bond and a mechanical interlock between the skin and the core structure. The heating diffuses the melting-point depressant away from the interface. Subsurface cooling channels (35) may be formed by forming grooves (34) in the outer surface of the core structure, filling the grooves with a fugitive filler (36), depositing and bonding the skin (42), then removing the fugitive material.

Allen, David B

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

236

Damping Specification of Automotive Structural Components via Modal Projection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the cost of increased mass which negatively impacts production costs and vehicle performance on a substructuring approach, the tool allows the engineer to identify the critical vehicle components to be damped-frequency vibroacoustic noise in the vehicle compartment. It is a fairly straightforward procedure to compute

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

237

EVALUATION OF COMPONENT MODE SYNTHESIS METHODS FOR THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF COMPONENT MODE SYNTHESIS METHODS FOR THE DETECTION OF MODAL INTERACTION THROUGH ROTOR 2009 Abstract The study of interactions through direct contact between blade-tips and outer casings where friction is accounted for. This method offers energy momentum conserving which is a critical point

Boyer, Edmond

238

U-019: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2011 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

19: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2011 19: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2011 U-019: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2011 October 25, 2011 - 8:46am Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - October 2011 . PLATFORM: Oracle All Applicable Version(s) ABSTRACT: October 2011 Critical Patch Update, security vulnerability fixes for proprietary components of Oracle Linux will be announced in Oracle Critical Patch Updates. Reference LINKS: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory Oracle Risk Matrix JC3-CIRC Tech Bulletin U-014 Oracle Patch Table IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A Critical Patch Update is a collection of patches for multiple security vulnerabilities. Critical Patch Update patches are usually cumulative but each advisory describes only the security fixes added since the previous

239

Development of a structural health monitoring system for the life assessment of critical transportation infrastructure.  

SciTech Connect

Recent structural failures such as the I-35W Mississippi River Bridge in Minnesota have underscored the urgent need for improved methods and procedures for evaluating our aging transportation infrastructure. This research seeks to develop a basis for a Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system to provide quantitative information related to the structural integrity of metallic structures to make appropriate management decisions and ensuring public safety. This research employs advanced structural analysis and nondestructive testing (NDT) methods for an accurate fatigue analysis. Metal railroad bridges in New Mexico will be the focus since many of these structures are over 100 years old and classified as fracture-critical. The term fracture-critical indicates that failure of a single component may result in complete collapse of the structure such as the one experienced by the I-35W Bridge. Failure may originate from sources such as loss of section due to corrosion or cracking caused by fatigue loading. Because standard inspection practice is primarily visual, these types of defects can go undetected due to oversight, lack of access to critical areas, or, in riveted members, hidden defects that are beneath fasteners or connection angles. Another issue is that it is difficult to determine the fatigue damage that a structure has experienced and the rate at which damage is accumulating due to uncertain history and load distribution in supporting members. A SHM system has several advantages that can overcome these limitations. SHM allows critical areas of the structure to be monitored more quantitatively under actual loading. The research needed to apply SHM to metallic structures was performed and a case study was carried out to show the potential of SHM-driven fatigue evaluation to assess the condition of critical transportation infrastructure and to guide inspectors to potential problem areas. This project combines the expertise in transportation infrastructure at New Mexico State University with the expertise at Sandia National Laboratories in the emerging field of SHM.

Roach, Dennis Patrick; Jauregui, David Villegas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM); Daumueller, Andrew Nicholas (New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders  

SciTech Connect

This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know …).

INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

Valerie L. Putman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Los Alamos and NNSS team to resume critical experiments at new...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear safety test runs on planet device Los Alamos and NNSS team to resume critical experiments at new location This experiment demonstrated the restoration of a national...

243

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

Unknown

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90{degree} shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45{degree} angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Evaluation of Sialon internal combustion engine components and fabrication of several ceramic components for automotive applications  

SciTech Connect

Fabrication development work was carried out on a push-rod tip having a stepped OD design and a 90[degree] shoulder in the transition area. Spray-dried Sialon premix was used in dry press tooling, and components were densified to about 98% of theoretical density using pressureless sintering conditions. Upon evaluation of the sintered components, it was found that afl components showed defects in the transition area. Modifications of the pressing parameters, incorporation of a 45[degree] angle in the shoulder area, and the use of tailored premix did not lead to the fabrication of defect-free parts. From these observations, it was concluded that the original part design could not easily be adapted to high-volume ceramic manufacturing methods. Subsequently, a modification to the desip was implemented. An SiC material with improved toughness (Hexoloy SX) was used for fabricating several test components with a closely machined, straight OD design. Pressureless-sintered and post-hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) Hexoloy SX components were supplied to The American Ceramic Engine Company (ACE) for assembly and testing. Fuel pump push-rod assemblies with Hemoloy SX tips were prepared by ACE, but no testing has been carried out to date.

McMurtry, C.H.; Ten Eyck, M.O.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components Prodip K. DasWater management in PEM fuel cells is critical for optimumof droplet dynamics in PEM fuel-cell gas flow channels has

Das, Prodip K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Inversion of Waveforms For Extreme Source Models With an Application to the Isotropic Moment Tensor Component  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......component) in the source. Synthetic tests were used to examine the effect...structure of Silent Canyon caldera, Nevada Test Site, Bull. seism. Soc. Am., 77...structure of Silent Canyon caldera, Nevada Test Site, Bull. sebm. SOC. Am., 77......

D. W. Vasco; L. R. Johnson

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

FAQS Reference Guide – Criticality Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the April 2009 edition of DOE-STD-1173-2009, Criticality Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

249

Electric Motors and Critical Materials  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EV, materials, and motor designers is missing * Achieving high volume July 24, 2012 Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout Session 2 - Discussion of Breakthroughs and...

250

Future Applications Monitor Critical Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future Applications · Monitor Critical Structures ­ Bridges, dams, pipelines, power integrity for rescue efforts ­ Expendable for unstable conditions ­ Power system repair ­ Firefighting

Huston, Dryver R.

251

Criticality Safety | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

at Department of Energy Non Reactor Nuclear Facilities DOE-STD-1135-99, Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification Contact Garrett Smith...

252

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

None

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NREL: Wind Research - Structural Testing Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Structural Testing Laboratory Structural Testing Laboratory Photo of NREL's Wind Research User Facility. Shown in front are several test bays that protect proprietary information while companies disassemble turbines to analyze, test, and modify individual components. NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory includes office space for industry researchers, houses experimental laboratories, computer facilities, space for assembling turbines, components, and blades for testing. Credit: Patrick Corkery. NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provides office space for industry researchers, experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, and space for assembling components and turbines for atmospheric testing. The facility also houses two blade stands equipped with overhead cranes and

254

Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms Assessment of Initial Test Conditions for Experiments to Assess Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms Irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking is a key materials degradation issue in today's nuclear power reactor fleet and affects critical structural components within the reactor core. The effects of increased exposure to irradiation, stress, and/or coolant can substantially increase susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking of austenitic steels in high-temperature water environments. Despite 30 years of experience, the underlying mechanisms of Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) are unknown. Extended service conditions will increase the exposure

255

Cold Test Facility - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects & Facilities > Cold Test Facility Projects & Facilities 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory 222-S Laboratory 224-B Facility 224-T...

256

UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

Unknown

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Track B - Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes Presentations from Track B, Critical Guidance for Peak Performance Homes of the U.S. Department of Energy Building America program's 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting are provided below as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. These presentations for this track covered the following topics: Ventilation Strategies in High Performance Homes; Combustion Safety in Tight Houses; Implementation Program Case Studies; Field Testing from Start to Finish; and Humidity Control and Analysis. why_we_ventilate.pdf formaldehyde_new_homes.pdf whole_bldg_ventilation.pdf combustion_safety_codes.pdf combustion_diagnostics.pdf test_protocols_results.pdf utility_incentive_programs.pdf

258

Critical Infrastructure and Internal Controls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critical refers to infrastructure that provides an essential support for economic and social well-being, for public safety and for the functioning of key government responsibilities. According to Resolution of the National Security Strategy of the Republic ... Keywords: Risk management,Process control,Government,Standards,Security,Uncertainty,internal controls,critical infrastructure,risk,risk management

Iztok Podbregar; Mojca Ferjancic Podbregar

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Compositional simulation of primary depletion for near critical reservoirs using the VIP simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization factor. 13 Critical temperature, critical pressure, and ascentric factor of each component in a mixture are required by most cubic equations of state. Lee-Kesler" (1975) and Kesler- Lee" (1977) developed a set of correlations for T?p, and w...

Ordonez, Roberto E

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: Program Description and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conversations with Siemens, Honeywell, Syserco, Yamas andmet with Siemens and Honeywell to discuss the site selectiondetails of the CPP tariff. Honeywell did not nominate any

Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David; Motegi, Naoya; Kiliccote, Sila; Xu, Peng

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Durability of ACERT Engine Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

strength data from with FE model "load factors" and stress field to estimate fast fracture strength and fatigue resistance of design component Determination of FE model "load...

262

Magnetic Critical Solutions in Holography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AdS/CFT correspondence is a realization of the holographic principle in the context of string theory. It is a map between a quantum field theory and a string theory living in one or more extra dimensions. Holography provides new tools to the study of strongly coupled systems. It has important applications in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and condensed matter (CM) systems, which are usually complicated and strongly coupled. Quantum critical CM theories have scaling symmetries and can be connected to higher-dimensional scale invariant space-times. The Effective Holographic Theory paradigm may be used to describe the low-energy (IR) holographic dynamics of quantum critical systems at the two-derivative level by the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton (EMD) theory. We find the magnetic critical scaling solutions of an EMD theory containing an extra parity-odd term $F\\wedge F$. Previous studies in the absence of magnetic fields have shown the existence of quantum critical lines separated by quantum critical points. We find this is also true in the presence of a magnetic field. The critical solutions are characterized by the triplet of critical exponents ($\\theta,z,\\zeta$), the first two describing the geometry, while the latter describes the charge density.

N. Angelinos

2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

263

Tank farm nuclear criticality review  

SciTech Connect

The technical basis for the nuclear criticality safety of stored wastes at the Hanford Site Tank Farm Complex was reviewed by a team of senior technical personnel whose expertise covered all appropriate aspects of fissile materials chemistry and physics. The team concluded that the detailed and documented nucleonics-related studies underlying the waste tanks criticality safety basis were sound. The team concluded that, under current plutonium inventories and operating conditions, a nuclear criticality accident is incredible in any of the Hanford single-shell tanks (SST), double-shell tanks (DST), or double-contained receiver tanks (DCRTS) on the Hanford Site.

Bratzel, D.R., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Critical Materials Research Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOVEMBER 2012 NOVEMBER 2012 The Critical Materials Research Alliance About the Critical Materials Research Alliance The recent surge of interest in critical materials, including rare earth elements (REEs), stems from supply shortages and escalating prices of some REEs. In 2010, the United States' sole REE supplier was China-previously responsible for 97% of global REE production-but the Chinese government curtailed their export. Because REEs and other critical elements are used in renewable energy resources, energy storage, energy efficiency technologies, and national defense, a shortage in their supply impedes development of energy technologies and hinders U.S. defense industries. To address the challenges faced in revitalizing the rare earth industry, the National Energy Technology

265

Bible Criticism and Social Science  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper I will deal with the crucial role played by the Bible critics of the 17th century in providing some of the framework in which modern social science developed. Besides providing some of the method...

Richard Popkin

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Autoclave nuclear criticality safety analysis  

SciTech Connect

Steam-heated autoclaves are used in gaseous diffusion uranium enrichment plants to heat large cylinders of UF{sub 6}. Nuclear criticality safety for these autoclaves is evaluated. To enhance criticality safety, systems are incorporated into the design of autoclaves to limit the amount of water present. These safety systems also increase the likelihood that any UF{sub 6} inadvertently released from a cylinder into an autoclave is not released to the environment. Up to 140 pounds of water can be held up in large autoclaves. This mass of water is sufficient to support a nuclear criticality when optimally combined with 125 pounds of UF{sub 6} enriched to 5 percent U{sup 235}. However, water in autoclaves is widely dispersed as condensed droplets and vapor, and is extremely unlikely to form a critical configuration with released UF{sub 6}.

D`Aquila, D.M. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Piketon, OH (United States); Tayloe, R.W. Jr. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

267

Critical State of Superconducting Solenoids  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The critical state is a term introduced by Bean [1] to describe the magnetic properties of a bulk type II superconductor. In this state every region of the superconducting material carries the maximum induced cri...

M. S. Lubell

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Deconfined criticality in bilayer graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose that bilayer graphene can provide an experimental realization of deconfined criticality. Current experiments indicate the presence of Néel order in the presence of a moderate magnetic field. The Néel order can be destabilized by application of a transverse electric field. The resulting electric field induced state is likely to have valence bond solid order, and the transition can acquire the emergent fractionalized and gauge excitations of deconfined criticality.

Junhyun Lee and Subir Sachdev

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

Low Frequency-SAFT Inspection Methodology for Coarse-Grained Steel Rail Components (Manganese Steel Frogs)  

SciTech Connect

In the rail industry, sections of high strength Manganese steel are employed at critical locations in railroad networks. Ultrasonic inspections of Manganese steel microstructures are difficult to inspect with conventional means, as the propagation medium is highly attenuative, coarse-grained, anisotropic and nonhomogeneous in nature. Current in-service inspection methods are ineffective while pre-service X-ray methods (used for full-volumetric examinations of components prior to shipment) are time-consuming, costly, require special facilities and highly trained personnel for safe operations, and preclude manufacturers from inspecting statistically meaningful numbers of frogs for effective quality assurance. In-service examinations consist of visual inspections only and by the time a defect or flaw is visually detected, the structural integrity of the component may already be compromised, and immediate repair or replacement is required. A novel ultrasonic inspection technique utilizing low frequency ultrasound (100 to 500 kHz) combined with a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) for effective reduction of signal clutter and noise, and extraction of important features in the data, has proven to be effective for these coarse grained steel components. Results from proof-of-principal tests in the laboratory demonstrate an effective means to detect and localize reflectors introduced as a function of size and depth from the top of the frog rail. Using non-optimal, commercially available transducers coupled with the low-frequency/SAFT approach, preliminary evaluations were conducted to study the effects of the material microstructure on ultrasonic propagation, sensitivity and resolution in thick section frog components with machined side-drilled holes. Results from this study will be presented and discussed.

Diaz, Aaron A.; Andersen, Eric S.; Samuel, Todd J.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Full-field characterization of thermal diffusivity in continuous- fiber ceramic composite materials and components  

SciTech Connect

Continuous-fiber ceramic matrix composites (CFCCs) are currently being developed for various high-temperature applications, including use in advanced heat engines. Among the material classes of interest for such applications are silicon carbide (SiC)-fiber-reinforced SiC (SiC{sub (f)}/SiC), SiC-fiber-reinforced silicon nitride (SiC {sub (f)}/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3})-fiber-reinforced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sub (f)}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and others. In such composites, the condition of the interfaces (between the fibers and matrix) are critical to the mechanical and thermal behavior of the component (as are conventional mechanical defects such as cracks, porosity, etc.). For example, oxidation of this interface (especially on carbon coated fibers) can seriously degrade both mechanical and thermal properties. Furthermore, thermal shock damage can degrade the matrix through extensive crack generation. A nondestructive evaluation method that could be used to assess interface condition, thermal shock damage, and to detect other ``defects`` would thus be very beneficial, especially if applicable to full-scale components. One method under development uses infrared thermal imaging to provide ``single-shot`` full-field assessment of the distribution of thermal properties in large components by measuring thermal diffusivity. By applying digital image filtering, interpolation, and least-squares-estimation techniques for noise reduction, we can achieve acquisition and analysis times of minutes or less with submillimeter spatial resolution. The system developed at Argonne has been used to examine the effects of thermal shock, oxidation treatment, density variations, and variations in oxidation resistant coatings in a full array of test specimens. Subscale CFCC components with nonplanar geometries have also been studied for manufacturing-induced variations in thermal properties.

Steckenrider, J.S.; Ellingson, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rothermel, S.A. [South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Standards for PV Modules and Components -- Recent Developments and Challenges: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

International standards play an important role in the Photovoltaic industry. Since PV is such a global industry it is critical that PV products be measured and qualified the same way everywhere in the world. IEC TC82 has developed and published a number of module and component measurement and qualification standards. These are continually being updated to take advantage of new techniques and equipment as well as better understanding of test requirements. Standards presently being updated include the third edition of IEC 61215, Crystalline Silicon Qualification and the second edition of IEC 61730, PV Module Safety Requirements. New standards under development include qualification of junction boxes, connectors, PV cables, and module integrated electronics as well as for testing the packaging used during transport of modules. After many years of effort, a draft standard on Module Energy Rating should be circulated for review soon. New activities have been undertaken to develop standards for the materials within a module and to develop tests that evaluate modules for wear-out in the field (International PV Module QA Task Force). This paper will discuss these efforts and indicate how the audience can participate in development of international standards.

Wohlgemuth, J. H.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Probabilistic assessment of critically flawed LMFBR PHTS piping elbows  

SciTech Connect

One of the important functions of the Primary Heat Transport System (PHTS) of a large Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) plant is to contain the circulating radioactive sodium in components and piping routed through inerted areas within the containment building. A significant possible failure mode of this vital system is the development of cracks in the piping components. This paper presents results from the probabilistic assessment of postulated flaws in the most-critical piping elbow of each piping leg. The criticality of calculated maximum sized flaws is assessed against an estimated material fracture toughness to determine safety factors and failure probability estimates using stress-strength interference theory. Subsequently, a different approach is also employed in which the randomness of the initial flaw size and loading are more-rigorously taken into account. This latter approach yields much smaller probability of failure values when compared to the stress-strength interference analysis results.

Balkey, K.R.; Wallace, I.T.; Vaurio, J.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

MSTC - Microsystems Science, Technology, and Components - Trusted  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Trusted Microsystems Trusted Microsystems Microsystems Home Custom Microsystems Solutions Microsystems R&D Services Capabilities and Technologies Facilities Trusted Microsystems General Info About Us Awards Contacts Doing Business with Us Fact Sheets MESA News Trusted Microsystems for National Security Customers Trusted R&D Trusted Design Trusted Fabrication Trusted BEOL Trusted Custom Electronic Components Trusted Microsystems "Trusted Microsystems" encompasses the entire product development cycle. Sandia's Microsystems Center affords access to trusted people and facilities for research and development, design, layout, fabrication, characterization, packaging, and test. Trusted Design Secure design facility with disciplined and trusted design flow and methodologies Trusted Structured ASIC

274

Cleanroom Work Support Component Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Satisfactory cleanroom operations require adequate support components. The same care in design required for the cleanroom proper must also be used in layout ... and activities that are carried out in the cleanroom

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 4Q97.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

Integrating agile practices into critical software development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating agile practices into critical software development Katarzyna Lukasiewicz, Janusz Górski. In this text we describe our research towards introducing agile practices into critical software development processes Keywords-- safety-critical software; agile practices; software development; process improvement

Boyer, Edmond

277

Magnetic Critical Solutions in Holography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AdS/CFT correspondence is a realization of the holographic principle in the context of string theory. It is a map between a quantum field theory and a string theory living in one or more extra dimensions. Holography provides new tools to the study of strongly coupled systems. It has important applications in quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and condensed matter (CM) systems, which are usually complicated and strongly coupled. Quantum critical CM theories have scaling symmetries and can be connected to higher-dimensional scale invariant space-times. The Effective Holographic Theory paradigm may be used to describe the low-energy (IR) holographic dynamics of quantum critical systems at the two-derivative level by the Einstein-Maxwell-Dilaton (EMD) theory. We find the magnetic critical scaling solutions of an EMD theory containing an extra parity-odd term $F\\wedge F$. Previous studies in the absence of magnetic fields have shown the existence of quantum critical lines separated by quantum critical points. We fin...

Angelinos, N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

New Developments in Planning Accelerated Life Tests.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Accelerated life tests (ALTs) are often used to make timely assessments of the life time distribution of materials and components. The goal of many ALTs… (more)

Ma, Haiming

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Analysis of Fundamental NIST Sphere Experiments Related to Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect

A series of neutron transport experiments was performed in 1989 and 1990 at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology) using a spherical stainless steel container and fission chambers. These experiments were performed to help understand errors observed in criticality calculations for arrays of individually subcritical components, particularly solution arrays [1-3]. They were supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Environment and Health, Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project. The intent was to evaluate the possibility that the criticality prediction errors stem from errors in the calculation of neutron leakage from individual components of the array. Thus, the explicit product of the experiments was the measurement of the leakage flux, as characterized by various Cd-shielded and unshielded fission rates. Because the various fission rates have different neutron-energy sensitivities, collectively they give an indication of the energy dependence of the leakage flux. Leakage and moderation were varied systematically through the use of different diameter spheres, with and without water. Some of these experiments with bare fission chambers have been evaluated by the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)[4].

Kim, Soon S.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Introduction Aerial surveys from aircraft are a critical component of many environmental research,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For localized surveys, small Unmanned Air Vehicles (UAVs) equipped with color and near infrared cameras accuracy assessment and improvement of detection probabilities. Autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) for Ecological Research Franklin Percival1 , Leonard Pearlstine2 , Bon Dewitt3 , Scot Smith3 , Adam Watts1

Mazzotti, Frank

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fluid-phase behavior of binary mixtures in which one component can have two critical points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and SAFT models8­12 to compute mixture phase diagrams see, e.g., Refs. 13­18 . The result- ing taxonomy

282

Physical Components, Coordinate Components, and the Speed of Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For generalized coordinate systems, the numerical values of vector and tensor components do not generally equal the physical values, i.e., the values one would measure with standard physical instruments. Hence, calculating physical components from coordinate components is important for comparing experiment with theory. Surprisingly, however, this calculational method is not widely known among physicists, and is rarely taught in relativity courses, though it is commonly employed in at least one other field (applied mechanics.) Different derivations of this method, ranging from elementary to advanced level, are presented. The result is then applied to clarify the oftentimes confusing issue of whether or not the speed of light in non-inertial frames is equal to c.

Robert D. Klauber

2001-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Nuclear Criticality Safety | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Criticality Safety SHARE Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety ORNL is the lead national laboratory responsible for supporting the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in managing the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. NCSP is chartered to maintain the technical infrastructure (integral experiments, computational tools, training, data, etc.) needed to support safe, efficient fissionable material operations. ORNL has extensive expertise in the area of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) based upon years of experience in the following areas: Operations Support: providing fissionable material operations support for enrichment, fabrication, production, and research; Critical Experiments: performing experiments at the Y-12 Critical Experiment Facility;

284

CRITICALITY SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Criticality Safety Qualification Standard Reference Guide APRIL 2011 This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ...................................................................................................................................... iii PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1 PREFACE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ......................................................................................................... 2

285

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) Criticality Safety Controls...

286

PRECLOSURE CRITICALITY ANALYSIS PROCESS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a process for performing preclosure criticality analyses for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These analyses will be performed from the time of receipt of fissile material until permanent closure of the repository (preclosure period). The process describes how criticality safety analyses will be performed for various configurations of waste in or out of waste packages that could occur during preclosure as a result of normal operations or event sequences. The criticality safety analysis considers those event sequences resulting in unanticipated moderation, loss of neutron absorber, geometric changes, or administrative errors in waste form placement (loading) of the waste package. The report proposes a criticality analyses process for preclosure to allow a consistent transition from preclosure to postclosure, thereby possibly reducing potential cost increases and delays in licensing of Yucca Mountain. The proposed approach provides the advantage of using a parallel regulatory framework for evaluation of preclosure and postclosure performance and is consistent with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approach of supporting risk-informed, performance-based regulation for fuel cycle facilities, ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'', and 10 CFR Part 63. The criticality-related criteria for ensuring subcriticality are also described as well as which guidance documents will be utilized. Preclosure operations and facilities have significant similarities to existing facilities and operations currently regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; therefore, the design approach for preclosure criticality safety will be dictated by existing regulatory requirements while using a risk-informed approach with burnup credit for in-package operations.

A.E. Danise

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

287

Dynamic characterization of satellite components through non-invasive methods  

SciTech Connect

The rapid deployment of satellites is hindered by the need to flight-qualify their components and the resulting mechanical assembly. Conventional methods for qualification testing of satellite components are costly and time consuming. Furthermore, full-scale vehicles must be subjected to launch loads during testing. The harsh testing environment increases the risk of component damage during qualification. The focus of this research effort was to assess the performance of Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) techniques as replacement for traditional vibration testing. SHM techniques were applied on a small-scale structure representative of a responsive satellite. The test structure consisted of an extruded aluminum space-frame covered with aluminum shear plates, which was assembled using bolted joints. Multiple piezoelectric patches were bonded to the test structure and acted as combined actuators and sensors. Various methods of SHM were explored including impedance-based health monitoring, wave propagation, and conventional frequency response functions. Using these methods in conjunction with finite element modeling, the dynamic properties of the test structure were established and areas of potential damage were identified and localized. The adequacy of the results from each SHM method was validated by comparison to results from conventional vibration testing.

Mullens, Joshua G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wiest, Heather K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mascarenas, David D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyuhae [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

288

1 - Gas turbines: operating conditions, components and material requirements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter provides a summary of the operating cycle of an industrial gas turbine and associated plant. The characteristics of the materials and integrated materials systems used in a gas turbine are considered. The conditions under which industrial gas turbines operate, and the impact these operating conditions have on materials behavior, are described. The materials selection criteria for individual components and component sections are discussed. The key material properties for designing critical components and the approach for conducting a life assessment are considered. The major limitations to the performance of current superalloys, coatings and steels and the challenges facing the introduction of new materials are discussed. An overview is given of current trends in materials development and future materials technologies.

A.W. James; S. Rajagopalan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Automated cleaning of electronic components  

SciTech Connect

Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Managing Critical Management Improvement Initiatives  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Provides requirements and responsibilities for planning, executing and assessing critical management improvement initiatives within DOE. DOE N 251.59, dated 9/27/2004, extends this Notice until 10/01/2005. Archived 11-8-10. Does not cancel other directives.

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Critical Infrastructure and Cyber Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indicators vis-a-vis one another, which is especially important in the midst of the current budgetary uncertainty in Washington. In this study, we present our definitions of the three indicators; an overview of the eighteen sectors of critical infrastructure...

Doll, Abby; Pirrong, Renee; Jennings, Matthew; Stasny, George; Giblin, Andy; Shaffer, Steph; Anderson, Aimee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Surgical Critical Care Service Orientation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Improved inter-service communication · Reduction in SCC practice variance · Reduction in resource · Amanda Martin, CRNP · Continuity · Clinical · Compliance · Communication #12;SCCS Surgical Critical Care Service: Rhoads 5 · Geographic Coverage · Green Team ­ Rooms 5001-5012 ­ Rapid Response · Gold Team

Bushman, Frederic

293

T-672: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - July 2011 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

672: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - July 2011 672: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - July 2011 T-672: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - July 2011 July 20, 2011 - 1:34pm Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - July 2011 PLATFORM: Affected Products and Components ABSTRACT: Due to the threat posed by a successful attack, Oracle strongly recommends that customers apply CPU fixes as soon as possible. This Critical Patch Update contains 78 new security fixes across all product families. Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts Security Alerts reference LINKS: Oracle Fusion Middleware Risk Matrix Oracle Database Server Risk Matrix Oracle Enterprise Manager Grid Control Risk Matrix Oracle E-Business Suite Risk Matrix Oracle PeopleSoft Products Risk Matrix Oracle Sun Products Suite Risk Matrix

294

Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods  

SciTech Connect

Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

Wang, Jy-An John [ORNL; Wang, Hong [ORNL; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom [ORNL; Howard, Rob L [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Near-critical Ising model Christophe Garban  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Near-critical Ising model Christophe Garban ENS Lyon and CNRS 8th World Congress in Probability and Statistics Istanbul, July 2012 C. Garban (ENS Lyon and CNRS) Near-critical Ising model 1 / 19 #12;Plan 1 Near-critical Ising model 2 / 19 #12;Plan 1 Near-critical behavior, case of percolation Notion of correlation length L

Garban, Christophe

296

Primary Components of Binomial Ideals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for primary components of special binomial ideals. A feature of this work is that our results are independent of the characteristic of the field. First of all, we analyze the primary decomposition of a special class of binomial ideals, lattice ideals...

Eser, Zekiye

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

297

Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information from readers and from personnel who took course 00INL189. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that fissionable material handlers and criticality safety officers must understand. The reorganization is based on and consistent with changes made to course 00INL189 due to a review of course exam results and to discussions with personnel who conduct area-specific training.

V. L. Putman

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" 2 Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.2;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

299

,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" Relative Standard Errors for Table 7.1;" " Unit: Percents." ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Selected Wood and Other Biomass Components" ,,,,,,"Coal Components",,,"Coke",,,"Electricity Components",,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Natural Gas Components",,,"Steam Components" " "," ",,,,,,,,,,,,,"Total",,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,"Wood Residues",,,," " " "," "," ",,,,,"Bituminous",,,,,,"Electricity","Diesel Fuel",,,,,,"Motor",,,,,,,"Natural Gas",,,"Steam",,,," ",,,"and","Wood-Related","All"

300

Rapid electrochemical screening of engine coolants. Correlation of electrochemical potentiometric measurements with ASTM D 1384 glassware corrosion test  

SciTech Connect

Engine coolants are typically subjected to comprehensive performance evaluations that involve multiple laboratory and field tests. These tests can take several weeks to conduct and can be expensive. The tests can involve everything from preliminary chemical screening to long term fleet tests. An important test conducted at the beginning of coolant formula development to screen the corrosion performance of engine coolants is described in ASTM D 1384. If the coolant formula passes the test, it is then subjected to more rigorous testing. Conducting the test described in ASTM D 1384 takes two weeks, and determining the coolant corrosion performance under several test parameters can takes resources and time that users seldom have. Therefore, it is very desirable to have tests that can be used for rapid screening and quality assurance of coolants. The purpose of this study was to conduct electrochemical tests that can ultimately be used for quick initial screening of engine coolants. The specific intent of the electrochemical tests is to use ASTM D 1384 as a model and to attempt to duplicate its results. Implementation of the electrochemical tests could accelerate the process of selecting promising coolant formulas and reduce coolant evaluation time and cost. Various electrochemical tests were conducted to determine the corrosion performance of several engine coolant formulas. The test results were compared to those obtained from the ASTM D 1384 test. These tests were conducted on the same metal specimens and under similar conditions as those used in the ASTM D 1384 test. The electrochemical tests included the determination of open circuit potential (OCP) for the various metal specimens, anodic and cathodic polarization curves for the various metal specimens, corrosion rate for metal specimens involved in a galvanic triad, and critical pitting potential (CPP) for aluminum (pitting of aluminum engine components and cooling systems is a cause for concern). The details for the methods and the correlation of the results to ASTM D 1384 tests results will be presented.

Doucet, G.P. [Shell Chemical Co., Houston, TX (United States); Jackson, J.M.; Kriegel, O.A.; Passwater, D.K. [Shell Oil Products Co., Houston, TX (United States); Prieto, N.E. [Petroferm Inc., Fernandina Beach, FL (United States)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiential Component Approval Form Concentration in Nanotechnology Return completed form to ENG Plan to complete the experiential component as a requirement for the concentration in Nanotechnology to complete the experiential component for the Nanotechnology Concentration by: Research Experience in Lab

Goldberg, Bennett

302

Nuclear criticality safety: 300 Area  

SciTech Connect

This Standard applies to the receipt, processing, storage, and shipment of fissionable material in the 300 Area and in any other facility under the control of the Reactor Materials Project Management Team (PMT). The objective is to establish practices and process conditions for the storage and handling of fissionable material that prevent the accidental assembly of a critical mass and that comply with DOE Orders as well as accepted industry practice.

Not Available

1991-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

Quantum Critical Scaling in Graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We show that the emergent relativistic symmetry of electrons in graphene near its quantum critical point (QCP) implies a crucial importance of the Coulomb interaction. We derive scaling laws, valid near the QCP, that dictate the nontrivial magnetic and charge response of interacting graphene. Our analysis yields numerous predictions for how the Coulomb interaction will be manifested in experimental observables such as the diamagnetic response and electronic compressibility.

Daniel E. Sheehy and Jörg Schmalian

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

304

Shear viscosity measurements in the binary mixture butyl cellosolve-water near its upper and lower critical consolute points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

has been measured for a two-component critical liquid system, butyl cellosolve-water, in the region to report measurements of the shear viscosity of critical binary mixture butyl cello- solve (2-n353 Shear viscosity measurements in the binary mixture butyl cellosolve-water near its upper

Boyer, Edmond

305

Tank farms criticality safety manual  

SciTech Connect

This document defines the Tank Farms Contractor (TFC) criticality safety program, as required by Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Subpart 830.204(b)(6), ''Documented Safety Analysis'' (10 CFR 830.204 (b)(6)), and US Department of Energy (DOE) 0 420.1A, Facility Safety, Section 4.3, ''Criticality Safety.'' In addition, this document contains certain best management practices, adopted by TFC management based on successful Hanford Site facility practices. Requirements in this manual are based on the contractor requirements document (CRD) found in Attachment 2 of DOE 0 420.1A, Section 4.3, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety,'' and the cited revisions of applicable standards published jointly by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) and the American Nuclear Society (ANS) as listed in Appendix A. As an informational device, requirements directly imposed by the CRD or ANSI/ANS Standards are shown in boldface. Requirements developed as best management practices through experience and maintained consistent with Hanford Site practice are shown in italics. Recommendations and explanatory material are provided in plain type.

FORT, L.A.

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

306

Laser ultrasonic multi-component imaging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Techniques for ultrasonic determination of the interfacial relationship of multi-component systems are discussed. In implementations, a laser energy source may be used to excite a multi-component system including a first component and a second component at least in partial contact with the first component. Vibrations resulting from the excitation may be detected for correlation with a resonance pattern indicating if discontinuity exists at the interface of the first and second components.

Williams, Thomas K. (Federal Way, WA); Telschow, Kenneth (Des Moines, WA)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

307

Processing of Activated Core Components  

SciTech Connect

Used activated components from the core of a NPP like control elements, water channels from a BWR, and others like in-core measurement devices need to be processed into waste forms suitable for interim storage, and for the final waste repository. Processing of the activated materials can be undertaken by underwater cutting and packaging or by cutting and high-pressure compaction in a hot cell. A hot cell is available in Germany as a joint investment between GNS and the Karlsruhe Research Center at the latter's site. Special transport equipment is available to transport the components ''as-is'' to the hot cell. Newly designed underwater processing equipment has been designed, constructed, and operated for the special application of NPP decommissioning. This equipment integrates an underwater cutting device with an 80 ton force underwater in-drum compactor.

Friske, A.; Gestermann, G.; Finkbeiner, R.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

308

Nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear component horizontal seismic restraint. Small gaps limit horizontal displacement of components during a seismic occurrence and therefore reduce dynamic loadings on the free lower end. The reactor vessel and reactor guard vessel use thicker section roll-forged rings welded between the vessel straight shell sections and the bottom hemispherical head sections. The inside of the reactor guard vessel ring forging contains local vertical dovetail slots and upper ledge pockets to mount and retain field fitted and installed blocks. As an option, the horizontal displacement of the reactor vessel core support cone can be limited by including shop fitted/installed local blocks in opposing alignment with the reactor vessel forged ring. Beams embedded in the wall of the reactor building protrude into apertures in the thermal insulation shell adjacent the reactor guard vessel ring and have motion limit blocks attached thereto to provide to a predetermined clearance between the blocks and reactor guard vessel ring.

Snyder, Glenn J. (Lynchburg, VA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Chapter 9 - Brake Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter describes and explains the role and methods of experimental testing in the design and verification of brakes and their components. It starts by discussing the increasing capability of computer-based predictive techniques, which can simulate many aspects of brake operation and save time and cost compared with previous methods of experimental evaluation. Preparation, procedures, instrumentation, data acquisition and results analysis, interpretation and reporting for experimental testing ranging from whole vehicle braking performance on a test track to component performance and material thermophysical properties in the laboratory, are explained and discussed. By the end of the chapter the design and operation of test rigs including inertia dynamometers for full-size brakes, scale rigs for small-sample friction and wear measurement, machines for cyclic loading and material property measurement, etc. are described. The importance of careful preparation of the friction pair (‘bedding-in’ and ‘burnishing’) for brake performance testing and the evaluation of variability by repeat testing is emphasised.

Andrew Day

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Perceptual-components architecture for digital video  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A perceptual-components architecture for digital video partitions the image stream into signal components in a manner analogous to that used in the human visual system. These...

Watson, Andrew B

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) HIGH INTEGRITY MAGNESIUM AUTOMOTIVE COMPONENTS (HIMAC) 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual...

312

Fusion-component lifetime analysis  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional computer code has been developed to examine the lifetime of first-wall and impurity-control components. The code incorporates the operating and design parameters, the material characteristics, and the appropriate failure criteria for the individual components. The major emphasis of the modeling effort has been to calculate the temperature-stress-strain-radiation effects history of a component so that the synergystic effects between sputtering erosion, swelling, creep, fatigue, and crack growth can be examined. The general forms of the property equations are the same for all materials in order to provide the greatest flexibility for materials selection in the code. The individual coefficients within the equations are different for each material. The code is capable of determining the behavior of a plate, composed of either a single or dual material structure, that is either totally constrained or constrained from bending but not from expansion. The code has been utilized to analyze the first walls for FED/INTOR and DEMO and to analyze the limiter for FED/INTOR.

Mattas, R.F.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

6 - Enterprise Web Application Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A robust software testing strategy is essential for bulletproofing an enterprise application and for a quality delivery within the planned cost and quality. We have seen some testing strategies specific to scalability, availability, and performance in previous chapters. This chapter complements those testing methodologies by elaborating on testing best practices and testing methodologies that can be adopted for testing enterprise web applications. Creating a rock-solid testing strategy is a creative and multi-dimensional effort requiring intricate knowledge of the domain, technology, and scenario in which the end user operates. With the emergence of various enterprise web technologies, traditional testing methods fall short of meeting various end-user expectations. This chapter focuses on the challenges with testing in general and web testing methods in particular. The chapter then lays out the critical success factors for a sound testing strategy in enterprise application testing. It provides novel end-to-end software testing methodologies, starting from the testing estimation model, up through postproduction for enterprise web applications. The key pillars of the testing strategy proposed in this chapter are based on user-centric, complete validation, automation, proactive problem detection and prevention and performance focus (the UCAPP model). The chapter provides sample testing metrics, testing processes, for implementation of proposed testing strategy. The chapter also provides detailed insights from comprehensive analysis of successfully implemented enterprise web applications, software testing trends, and best practices implemented successfully in large-scale enterprise projects to achieve high availability in enterprise applications. The chapter provides enterprise testing principles with a special focus on enterprise web scenarios. In previous chapters, we saw the testing processes, best practices, and techniques applicable for each of the quality attributes—scalability, availability, and performance. This chapter extends those concepts and covers the remaining aspects of testing such as testing principles, process, and techniques applicable to generic projects and enterprise web projects.

Shailesh Kumar Shivakumar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Guidelines for preparing criticality safety evaluations at Department of Energy non-reactor nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

This Department of Energy (DOE) is approved for use by all components of DOE. It contains guidelines that should be followed when preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations that will be used to demonstrate the safety of operations performed at DOE Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities. Adherence with these guidelines will provide consistency and uniformity in Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSEs) across the complex and will document compliance with DOE Order 5480.24 requirements as they pertain to CSEs.

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Tritium Removal from Carbon Plasma Facing Components  

SciTech Connect

Tritium removal is a major unsolved development task for next-step devices with carbon plasma-facing components. The 2-3 order of magnitude increase in duty cycle and associated tritium accumulation rate in a next-step tokamak will place unprecedented demands on tritium removal technology. The associated technical risk can be mitigated only if suitable removal techniques are demonstrated on tokamaks before the construction of a next-step device. This article reviews the history of codeposition, the tritium experience of TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) and JET (Joint European Torus) and the tritium removal rate required to support ITER's planned operational schedule. The merits and shortcomings of various tritium removal techniques are discussed with particular emphasis on oxidation and laser surface heating.

C.H. Skinner; J.P. Coad; G. Federici

2003-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

316

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) HVAC System Component Index  

SciTech Connect

This document lists safety class (SC) and safety significant (SS) components for the Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning (HVAC) and specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items (CGI), as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-18 19. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item. The Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) HVAC System includes sub-systems 25A through 25K. Specific system boundaries and justifications are contained in HNF-SD-CP-SDD-005, ''Definition and Means of Maintaining the Ventilation System Confinement Portion of the PFP Safety Envelope.'' The procurement requirements associated with the system necessitates procurement of some system equipment as Commercial Grade Items in accordance with HNF-PRO-268, ''Control of Purchased Items and Services.''

DIAZ, E.N.

2000-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

317

Vibration Durability Testing and Design Validation Based on Narrow Frequency Band.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Existing vibration durability testing methods for a component is conservative in verifying the fatigue strength of a component. They more of typify the damaging potential… (more)

Berhanu, Gudeta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Random Testing versus Partition Testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The difference between Partition Testing and Random Testing has been thoroughlyinvestigated theoretically. In this thesis we present a practical study ofthe differences between random… (more)

Oftedal, Kristian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Accelerated Testing Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Validation Testing Validation Rangachary Mukundan (PI), Rodney Borup, John Davey, Roger Lujan Los Alamos National Laboratory Adam Z. Weber Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Greg James Ballard Power Systems, Inc Mike Brady Oak Ridge National Laboratory Steve Grot Ion Power, Inc This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information Objective/Barrier/Target The objectives of this project are 3-fold 1. Correlation of the component lifetimes measured in an AST to real-world behavior of that component. 2. Validation of existing ASTs for Catalyst layers and Membranes 3. Development of new ASTs for GDLs, bipolar plates and interfaces Technical Barrier Addressed: A. Durability * Durability of fuel cell systems operating over automotive drive cycles has not

320

Magnetohydrodynamic projects at the CDIF (Component Development and Integration Facility)  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly technical progress report presents the tasks accomplished at the Component Development and Integration Facility during the fourth quarter of FY90. Areas of technical progress this quarter included: coal system development; seed system development; test bay modification; channel power dissipation and distribution system development; oxygen system storage upgrade; iron core magnet thermal protection system oxygen checkout; TRW slag rejector/CDIF slag removal project; stack gas/environmental compliance upgrade; coal-fired combustor support; 1A channels fabrication and assembly; support of Mississippi State University diagnostic testing; test operations and results; data enhancement; data analysis and modeling; technical papers; and projected activities. 2 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to guarantee that the system's behavior is preserved across a component replacement. If automated logical

Liskov, Barbara

322

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. ... Keywords: Reconfiguration, model checking, stateful components

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

A component-based collaboration infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-through in building reusable sys- tems. The popularity of di?erent component models in industry has demonstrated the attractions and power of CBD. Further more, modern object-oriented languages 18 such as Java and .Net provide direct support on component... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 B. Shared Component Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1. Modeling Shared Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2. Java Embodiment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 a. Shared Component . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 b...

Yang, Yi

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermal neutron flux contours from criticality event  

SciTech Connect

The generation of thermal neutron flux contours from a criticality event is demonstrated for an idealized building with a criticality event in one of the rooms. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code is used to calculate the thermal neutron flux.

Carter, L.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Computing Criticality of Lines in Power Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Criticality of Lines in Power Systems Ali P?narto identify critical lines, failure of which can causecriticality measure for all lines at a time, as opposed to

Pinar, Ali; Reichert, Adam; Lesieutre, Bernard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Interlaboratory Comparisons of NbTi Critical Current Measurements  

SciTech Connect

We report on a multi-institute comparison of critical current data measured on a modern NbTi wire for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which has shown a standard deviation below 1% in critical current density spread in more than 1500 measurements. Interlaboratory comparisons on Nb{sub 3}Sn wires have shown ambiguities that could be attributable to strain related differences in critical current density, originating from differences in sample handling, reaction, and mounting techniques, or also to differences in the magnetic field and current calibrations between the institutes. A round robin test of a well characterized NbTi wire provides a baseline variance in critical current results that is presumed to be attributable only to differences in the characterization systems. Systematic differences on the order of 3.5% are found in the comparison. The most likely cause for the observed differences is a small diameter holder that brings the wire into a strain regime in which strain effects can no longer be ignored. A NbTi round robin test, when performed properly, will separate system differences from sample specific differences and provide laboratories with an opportunity to calibrate equipment against a standard measurement.

Godeke, A.; Turrioni, D.; Boutboul, T.; Cheggour, N.; Goodrich, L.F.; Ghosh, A.; Den Ouden, A.; Meinesz, M.

2009-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fusion algebra of critical percolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an explicit conjecture for the chiral fusion algebra of critical percolation considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The representations we take to generate fusion are countably infinite in number. The ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of these representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of these representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure. They involve representations which we call Kac representations of which some are reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fusion algebra is a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the recent results of Eberle-Flohr and Read-Saleur. Notably, in agreement with Eberle-Flohr, we find the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. Our fusion rules are supported by extensive numerical studies of an integrable lattice model of critical percolation. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere.

Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

CRITICALITY SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 Page 1 of 47 9, 2010 Page 1 of 47 Criticality Safety Qualification Standard Reference Guide 2010 For use with DOE-STD 1173-2009, CRITICALITY SAFETY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD September 9, 2010 Page 2 of 47 PURPOSE....................................................................................................................... 5 SCOPE............................................................................................................................ 5 1. Criticality safety personnel must demonstrate a working-level knowledge of the fission process. .......................................................................................................... 6 2. Criticality safety personnel must demonstrate a working-level knowledge of the

329

Critical Materials Workshop Final Participant List  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

List of participants who attended the Critical Materials Workshop held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, VA

330

Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

331

Critical Feature Analysis of a Radiotherapy Machine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

@iba.be Abstract The software implementation of the emergency shutdown feature in a major radiotherapy system. Introduction A key difficulty in the analysis of large software systems is the isolation and evalu- ation of critical source code. Ideally, safety critical requirements would be imple- mented by safety critical

Jackson, Daniel

332

Certification of alternative aviation fuels and blend components  

SciTech Connect

Aviation turbine engine fuel specifications are governed by ASTM International, formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) International, and the British Ministry of Defence (MOD). ASTM D1655 Standard Specification for Aviation Turbine Fuels and MOD Defence Standard 91-91 are the guiding specifications for this fuel throughout most of the world. Both of these documents rely heavily on the vast amount of experience in production and use of turbine engine fuels from conventional sources, such as crude oil, natural gas condensates, heavy oil, shale oil, and oil sands. Turbine engine fuel derived from these resources and meeting the above specifications has properties that are generally considered acceptable for fuels to be used in turbine engines. Alternative and synthetic fuel components are approved for use to blend with conventional turbine engine fuels after considerable testing. ASTM has established a specification for fuels containing synthesized hydrocarbons under D7566, and the MOD has included additional requirements for fuels containing synthetic components under Annex D of DS91-91. New turbine engine fuel additives and blend components need to be evaluated using ASTM D4054, Standard Practice for Qualification and Approval of New Aviation Turbine Fuels and Fuel Additives. This paper discusses these specifications and testing requirements in light of recent literature claiming that some biomass-derived blend components, which have been used to blend in conventional aviation fuel, meet the requirements for aviation turbine fuels as specified by ASTM and the MOD. The 'Table 1' requirements listed in both D1655 and DS91-91 are predicated on the assumption that the feedstocks used to make fuels meeting these requirements are from approved sources. Recent papers have implied that commercial jet fuel can be blended with renewable components that are not hydrocarbons (such as fatty acid methyl esters). These are not allowed blend components for turbine engine fuels as discussed in this paper.

Wilson III, George R. (Southwest Research Institute, 6220 Culebra Road, San Antonio, Texas 78238 (United States)); Edwards, Tim; Corporan, Edwin (United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)); Freerks, Robert L. (Rentech, Incorporated, 1331 17th Street, Denver, Colorado 80202 (United States))

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Energy asset owners are facing a monumental challenge as they address compliance with the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards (CIP-002 through CIP-009). The increased use of wireless technologies and their introduction into control center networks and field devices compound this challenge, as ambiguity exists regarding the applicability of the CIP requirements to wireless networking technologies. Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards More Documents & Publications

334

CRITICALITY SAFETY TRAINING AT FLUOR HANFORD (FH)  

SciTech Connect

The Fluor Hanford Criticality Safety engineers are extensively trained. The objectives and requirements for training are derived from Department of Energy (DOE) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society Standards (ANSI/ANS), and are captured in the Hanford Criticality Safety Program manual, HNF-7098. Qualification cards have been established for the general Criticality Safety Engineer (CSE) analyst, CSEs who support specific facilities, and for the facility Criticality Safety Representatives (CSRs). Refresher training and continuous education in the discipline are emphasized. Weekly Brown Bag Sessions keep the criticality safety engineers informed of the latest developments and historic perspectives.

TOFFER, H.

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

335

Mobile Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobile apps are everywhere. Some apps entertain and others enable business transactions. Apps increasingly interact with complex IT landscapes. For example, a banking app on a mobile device acts as a front end that invokes services on a back-end server ... Keywords: mobile apps, mobile devices, software quality management, software testing, test automation, test strategy

Klaus Haller

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Utility advanced turbine system (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration -- Phase 3. Quarterly report, July 1--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detailed design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. This initial report summarizes work accomplished during the third quarter of 1995. The most significant accomplishments reported include the following. Overall design continued, progressing from preliminary and conceptual design activities to detailed design activities. The aerodynamic design of six out of eight 9H turbine airfoils was completed. The 9H compressor design concept was finalized including rotor configuration, aerodynamic design of compressor, and compressor structure. Conceptual on-base and external piping layout was begun. The ATS Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement was negotiated and signed.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. As ITER serves as a fusion testing facility for magnetic fusion energy (MFE) nuclear technology componentIFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation

Abdou, Mohamed

338

Simulation of Watts Bar Unit 1 Initial Startup Tests with Continuous Energy Monte Carlo Methods  

SciTech Connect

The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors* is developing a collection of methods and software products known as VERA, the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications. One component of the testing and validation plan for VERA is comparison of neutronics results to a set of continuous energy Monte Carlo solutions for a range of pressurized water reactor geometries using the SCALE component KENO-VI developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Recent improvements in data, methods, and parallelism have enabled KENO, previously utilized predominately as a criticality safety code, to demonstrate excellent capability and performance for reactor physics applications. The highly detailed and rigorous KENO solutions provide a reliable nu-meric reference for VERAneutronics and also demonstrate the most accurate predictions achievable by modeling and simulations tools for comparison to operating plant data. This paper demonstrates the performance of KENO-VI for the Watts Bar Unit 1 Cycle 1 zero power physics tests, including reactor criticality, control rod worths, and isothermal temperature coefficients.

Godfrey, Andrew T [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Bekar, Kursat B [ORNL; Celik, Cihangir [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Building State-of-the-Art Wind Technology Testing Facilities (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The new Wind Technology Test Center is the only facility in the nation capable of testing wind turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. A critical factor to wind turbine design and development is the ability to test new designs, components, and materials. In addition, wind turbine blade manufacturers are required to test their blades as part of the turbine certification process. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC) to design, construct, and operate the Wind Technology Center (WTTC) in Boston, Massachusetts. The WTTC offers a full suite of certification tests for turbine blades up to 90 meters in length. NREL worked closely with MTS Systems Corporation to develop the novel large-scale test systems needed to conduct the static and fatigue tests required for certification. Static tests pull wind turbine blades horizontally and vertically to measure blade deflection and strains. Fatigue tests cycle the blades millions of times to simulate what a blade goes through in its lifetime on a wind turbine. For static testing, the WTTC is equipped with servo-hydraulic winches and cylinders that are connected to the blade through cables to apply up to an 84-mega Newton meter maximum static bending moment. For fatigue testing, MTS developed a commercial version of NREL's patented resonant excitation system with hydraulic cylinders that actuate linear moving masses on the blade at one or more locations. This system applies up to a 21-meter tip-to-tip fatigue test tip displacement to generate 20-plus years of cyclic field loads in a matter of months. NREL also developed and supplied the WTTC with an advanced data acquisition system capable of measuring and recording hundreds of data channels at very fast sampling rates while communicating with test control systems.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaluation of aging degradation of structural components  

SciTech Connect

Irradiation embrittlement of the neutron shield tank (NST) A212 Grade B steel from the Shippingport reactor, as well as thermal embrittlement of CF-8 cast stainless steel components from the Shippingport and KRB reactors, has been characterized. Increases in Charpy transition temperature (CTT), yield stress, and hardness of the NST material in the low-temperature low-flux environment are consistent with the test reactor data for irradiations at < 232{degrees}C. The shift in CTT is not as severe as that observed in surveillance samples from the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR): however, it shows very good agreement with the results for HFIR A212-B steel irradiated in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The results indicate that fluence rate has not effect on radiation embrittlement at rates as low as 2 {times} 10{sup 8} n/cm{sup 2}{center dot}s at the low operating temperature of the Shippingport NST, i.e., 55{degrees}C. This suggest that radiation damage in Shippingport NST and HFIR surveillance samples may be different because of the neutron spectra and/or Cu and Ni content of the two materials. Cast stainless steel components show relatively modest decreases in fracture toughness and Charpy-impact properties and a small increase in tensile strength. Correlations for estimating mechanical properties of cast stainless steels predict accurate or slightly conservative values for Charpy-impact energy, tensile flow stress, fracture toughness J-R curve, and J{sub IC} of the materials. The kinetics of thermal embrittlement and degree of embrittlement at saturation, i.e., the minimum impact energy achieved after long-term aging, were established from materials that were aged further in the laboratory. The results were consistent with the estimates. The correlations successfully predict the mechanical properties of the Ringhals 2 reactor hot- and crossover-leg elbows (CF-8M steel) after service of {approx}15 y.

Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Magnesium Powertrain Cast Components Project (AMD 304)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 28, 2008 Task 3 Research Address MPCC-identified critical gaps in fundamental science of Mg for powertrain applications and initiate research in these areas *...

343

Building Component Library | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Component Library Building Component Library Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Building Component Library Agency/Company /Organization: NREL Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings Phase: Create a Vision, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan Topics: Resource assessment, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Dataset Website: bcl.nrel.gov Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): buildings, nrel, data, component Language: English Building Component Library Screenshot References: Buildings Component Library[1] The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The Building Component Library is a repository of building data used to create building energy models. The data are broken down into separate

344

Predicting problems caused by component upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a new, automatic technique to assess whether replacing a component of a software system by a purportedly compatible component may change the behavior of the system. The technique operates before ...

McCamant, Stephen

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEA Task 27 BUILDING ENVELOPE COMPONENTS Performance, durability and sustainability of advanced windows and solar components for building envelopes Energy Performance Assessment Methodology Starting................................................................................................................................................. 3 2 Concepts of Energy Performance Assessment of Building Envelopes

346

Advanced filters and components for power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to improve the high frequency performance of components and filters by better compensating the parasitic effects of practical components. The main application for this improvement is in ...

Neugebauer, Timothy Carl, 1975-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Integrated Geothermal Well Testing: Test Objectives and Facilities  

SciTech Connect

A new and highly integrated geothermal well test program was designed for three geothermal operators in the US (MCR, RGI and Mapco Geothermal). This program required the design, construction and operation of new well test facilities. The main objectives of the test program and facilities are to investigate the critical potential and worst problems associated with the well and produced fluids in a period of approximately 30 days. Field and laboratory investigations are required to determine and quantify the problems of fluid production, utilization and reinjection. The facilities are designed to handle a flow rate from a geothermal well of one million pounds per hour at a wellhead temperature of approximately 268 C (515 F). The facilities will handle an entire spectrum of temperature and rate conditions up to these limits. All pertinent conditions for future fluid exploitations can be duplicated with these facilities, thus providing critical information at the very early stages of field development. The new well test facilities have been used to test high temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal wells in the Imperial Valley of California. The test facilities still have some problems which should be solvable. The accomplishments of this new and highly integrated geothermal well test program are described in this paper.

Nicholson, R. W.; Vetter, O. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Sandia National Laboratories: Materials & Components Compatibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Test Facility Central Receiver Test Facility Power Towers for Utilities Solar Furnace Dish Test Facility Optics Lab Parabolic Dishes Work For Others (WFO) User...

349

Tools to Implement MPDV Component Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents work on photonic Doppler velocimetry multiplexing techniques, particularly as regards measurements on components.

Pena, M; Daykin, E; Emmit, R; Garza, A; Gibo, M; Hutchins, M; Perez, C; Teel, M

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

350

Predicting Problems Caused by Component Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. If automated logical comparison indicates that the new component does not make all the guarantees that the old

Liskov, Barbara

351

Tensor Principal Component Analysis via Convex Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 11, 2012 ... Keywords: Tensor; Principal Component Analysis; Low Rank; Nuclear Norm; Semidefinite Programming Relaxation. Category 1: Convex and ...

Bo Jiang

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

352

Molecular Components of Catalytic Selectivity  

SciTech Connect

Selectivity, that is, to produce one molecule out of many other thermodynamically feasible product molecules, is the key concept to develop 'clean manufacturing' processes that do not produce byproducts (green chemistry). Small differences in potential energy barriers for elementary reaction steps control which reaction channel is more likely to yield the desired product molecule (selectivity), instead of the overall activation energy for the reaction that controls turnover rates (activity). Recent studies have demonstrated the atomic- or molecular-level tailoring of parameters such as the surface structures of active sites that give rise to nanoparticle size and shape dependence of turnover rates and reaction selectivities. Here, we highlight seven molecular components that influence reaction selectivities. These include: surface structure, adsorbate-induced restructuring, adsorbate mobility, reaction intermediates, surface composition, charge transport, and oxidation states for model metal single crystal and colloid nanoparticle catalysts. We show examples of their functioning and describe in-situ instruments that permit us to investigate their roles in surface reactions.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Park, Jeong Y.

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

353

Lower-Energy Energy Storage System (LEESS) Component Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Alternate hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) energy storage systems (ESS) such as lithium-ion capacitors (LICs) and electrochemical double-layer capacitor (EDLC) modules have the potential for improved life, superior cold temperature performance, and lower long-term cost projections relative to traditional battery storage systems. If such lower-energy ESS (LEESS) devices can also be shown to maintain high HEV fuel savings, future HEVs designed with these devices could have an increased value proposition relative to conventional vehicles. NREL's vehicle test platform is helping validate the in-vehicle performance capability of alternative LEESS devices and identify unforeseen issues. NREL created the Ford Fusion Hybrid test platform for in-vehicle evaluation of such alternative LEESS devices, bench testing of the initial LIC pack, integration and testing of the LIC pack in the test vehicle, and bench testing and installation of an EDLC module pack. EDLC pack testing will continue in FY15. The in-vehicle LIC testing results suggest technical viability of LEESS devices to support HEV operation. Several LIC configurations tested demonstrated equivalent fuel economy and acceleration performance as the production nickel-metal-hydride ESS configuration across all tests conducted. The lowest energy LIC scenario demonstrated equivalent performance over several tests, although slightly higher fuel consumption on the US06 cycle and slightly slower acceleration performance. More extensive vehicle-level calibration may be able to reduce or eliminate these performance differences. The overall results indicate that as long as critical attributes such as engine start under worst case conditions can be retained, considerable ESS downsizing may minimally impact HEV fuel savings.

Gonder, J.; Cosgrove, J.; Shi, Y.; Saxon, A.; Pesaran, A.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

CRITICALITY SAFETY CONTROLS AND THE SAFETY BASIS AT PFP  

SciTech Connect

With the implementation of DOE Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, and DOE-STD-3007-2007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities', a new requirement was imposed that all criticality safety controls be evaluated for inclusion in the facility Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) and that the evaluation process be documented in the site Criticality Safety Program Description Document (CSPDD). At the Hanford site in Washington State the CSPDD, HNF-31695, 'General Description of the FH Criticality Safety Program', requires each facility develop a linking document called a Criticality Control Review (CCR) to document performance of these evaluations. Chapter 5, Appendix 5B of HNF-7098, Criticality Safety Program, provided an example of a format for a CCR that could be used in lieu of each facility developing its own CCR. Since the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) is presently undergoing Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D), new procedures are being developed for cleanout of equipment and systems that have not been operated in years. Existing Criticality Safety Evaluations (CSE) are revised, or new ones written, to develop the controls required to support D&D activities. Other Hanford facilities, including PFP, had difficulty using the basic CCR out of HNF-7098 when first implemented. Interpretation of the new guidelines indicated that many of the controls needed to be elevated to TSR level controls. Criterion 2 of the standard, requiring that the consequence of a criticality be examined for establishing the classification of a control, was not addressed. Upon in-depth review by PFP Criticality Safety staff, it was not clear that the programmatic interpretation of criterion 8C could be applied at PFP. Therefore, the PFP Criticality Safety staff decided to write their own CCR. The PFP CCR provides additional guidance for the evaluation team to use by clarifying the evaluation criteria in DOE-STD-3007-2007. In reviewing documents used in classifying controls for Nuclear Safety, it was noted that DOE-HDBK-1188, 'Glossary of Environment, Health, and Safety Terms', defines an Administrative Control (AC) in terms that are different than typically used in Criticality Safety. As part of this CCR, a new term, Criticality Administrative Control (CAC) was defined to clarify the difference between an AC used for criticality safety and an AC used for nuclear safety. In Nuclear Safety terms, an AC is a provision relating to organization and management, procedures, recordkeeping, assessment, and reporting necessary to ensure safe operation of a facility. A CAC was defined as an administrative control derived in a criticality safety analysis that is implemented to ensure double contingency. According to criterion 2 of Section IV, 'Linkage to the Documented Safety Analysis', of DOESTD-3007-2007, the consequence of a criticality should be examined for the purposes of classifying the significance of a control or component. HNF-PRO-700, 'Safety Basis Development', provides control selection criteria based on consequence and risk that may be used in the development of a Criticality Safety Evaluation (CSE) to establish the classification of a component as a design feature, as safety class or safety significant, i.e., an Engineered Safety Feature (ESF), or as equipment important to safety; or merely provides defense-in-depth. Similar logic is applied to the CACs. Criterion 8C of DOE-STD-3007-2007, as written, added to the confusion of using the basic CCR from HNF-7098. The PFP CCR attempts to clarify this criterion by revising it to say 'Programmatic commitments or general references to control philosophy (e.g., mass control or spacing control or concentration control as an overall control strategy for the process without specific quantification of individual limits) is included in the PFP DSA'. Table 1 shows the PFP methodology for evaluating CACs. This evaluation process has been in use since February of 2008 and has proven to be simple and effective. Each control identified i

Kessler, S

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Safety implementation of adaptive embedded control components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper deals with dynamic reconfigurations of component-based adaptive embedded control systems to be automatically handled at run-time by intelligent agents. We define a Control Component as a software unit supporting control tasks of the system ... Keywords: adaptive embedded control system, dynamic reconfiguration, intelligent agent, semaphore, software control component

Atef Gharbi; Mohamed Khalgui; Samir Ben Ahmed

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 LIRMM UM II Component based Software Architecture of Robot Controllers R. Passama, D. Andreu, C component approaches and robot control architectures. This methodology defines a process that guides architecture, useful for analysis and integration, and a dedicated component-based language, focusing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

357

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM The purpose of this Quality Assurance for Capital Project Critical Decision...

358

CRAD, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation - May 31, 2013...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation - May 31, 2013 CRAD, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation - May 31, 2013 May 31, 2013 Criticality Safety Controls Implementation...

359

Analysis of Fission Products on the AGR-1 Capsule Components  

SciTech Connect

The components of the AGR-1 irradiation capsules were analyzed to determine the retained inventory of fission products in order to determine the extent of in-pile fission product release from the fuel compacts. This includes analysis of (i) the metal capsule components, (ii) the graphite fuel holders, (iii) the graphite spacers, and (iv) the gas exit lines. The fission products most prevalent in the components were Ag-110m, Cs 134, Cs 137, Eu-154, and Sr 90, and the most common location was the metal capsule components and the graphite fuel holders. Gamma scanning of the graphite fuel holders was also performed to determine spatial distribution of Ag-110m and radiocesium. Silver was released from the fuel components in significant fractions. The total Ag-110m inventory found in the capsules ranged from 1.2×10 2 (Capsule 3) to 3.8×10 1 (Capsule 6). Ag-110m was not distributed evenly in the graphite fuel holders, but tended to concentrate at the axial ends of the graphite holders in Capsules 1 and 6 (located at the top and bottom of the test train) and near the axial center in Capsules 2, 3, and 5 (in the center of the test train). The Ag-110m further tended to be concentrated around fuel stacks 1 and 3, the two stacks facing the ATR reactor core and location of higher burnup, neutron fluence, and temperatures compared with Stack 2. Detailed correlation of silver release with fuel type and irradiation temperatures is problematic at the capsule level due to the large range of temperatures experienced by individual fuel compacts in each capsule. A comprehensive Ag 110m mass balance for the capsules was performed using measured inventories of individual compacts and the inventory on the capsule components. For most capsules, the mass balance was within 11% of the predicted inventory. The Ag-110m release from individual compacts often exhibited a very large range within a particular capsule.

Paul A. Demkowicz; Jason M. Harp; Philip L. Winston; Scott A. Ploger

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

9 - Laser remanufacturing to improve the erosion and corrosion resistance of metal components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter looks at laser remanufacturing processes and their application to typical failed components. The failure of four typical components is analyzed and then laser solutions are described, including special material design, technique optimization, field testing and application. The results show that laser remanufacturing is an effective method for hardening and repairing failed components which can be reused with high corrosion and erosion resistance.

J.H. Yao; Q.L. Zhang; F.Z. Kong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The Casimir effect: from quantum to critical fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Casimir effect in quantum electrodynamics (QED) is perhaps the best-known example of fluctuation-induced long-ranged force acting on objects (conducting plates) immersed in a fluctuating medium (quantum electromagnetic field in vacuum). A similar effect emerges in statistical physics, where the force acting, e.g., on colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture is affected by the classical thermal fluctuations occurring in the surrounding medium. The resulting Casimir-like force acquires universal features upon approaching a critical point of the medium and becomes long-ranged at criticality. In turn, this universality allows one to investigate theoretically the temperature dependence of the force via representative models and to stringently test the corresponding predictions in experiments. In contrast to QED, the Casimir force resulting from critical fluctuations can be easily tuned with respect to strength and sign by surface treatments and temperature control. We present some recent advances in the theoretical study of the universal properties of the critical Casimir force arising in thin films. The corresponding predictions compare very well with the experimental results obtained for wetting layers of various fluids. We discuss how the Casimir force between a colloidal particle and a planar wall immersed in a binary liquid mixture has been measured with femto-Newton accuracy, comparing these experimental results with the corresponding theoretical predictions.

Andrea Gambassi

2008-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

362

Development of glass vitrification at SRL as a waste treatment technique for nuclear weapon components  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the development of vitrification for the waste treatment of nuclear weapons components at the Savannah River Site. Preliminary testing of surrogate nuclear weapon electronic waste shows that glass vitrification is a viable, robust treatment method.

Coleman, J.T.; Bickford, D.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Fine and coarse components in surface sediments from Bikini Lagoon  

SciTech Connect

In 1979, 21 years after the moratorium on nuclear testing in the Marshall Islands, surface sediment samples (to depths of 2 and 4 cm) were collected from 87 locations in the lagoon of Bikini Atoll, one of the two sites in the Marshall Islands used by the United States to test nuclear devices from 1946 through 1958. The main purpose for the collections was to map the distribution of long-lived man-made radionuclides associated with the bottom material. In addition the samples were processed to estimate the fraction of fine and coarse components to show, by comparison, what modifications occurred in the composition since the sediments were first described in samples collected before testing in 1946. Nuclear testing produced more finely divided material that is now found in the surface sediment layer over large areas of the lagoon and especially in regions of the lagoon and reef adjacent to test sites. The 5 cratering events alone at Bikini Atoll redistributed sufficient material to account for the higher inventory of fine material found over the surface 4 cm of the sediment of the lagoon. Although the fraction of fine material in the bottom sediments was altered by the nuclear events, the combined processes of formation, transport and deposition were not sufficiently dynamic to greatly change the general geographical features of the major sedimentary components over most of the lagoon floor.

Noshkin, V. E., LLNL

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Oak Ridge Critical Experiment Facility (Building 9213)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9213) Joe Lenhard, retired Department of Energy official, had responsibility for the Oak Ridge Critical Experi- ment Facility. Joe has continued to hold up this facility as...

365

Critical Materials Hub | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

energy economy. These materials are so critical to the technologies that enable wind turbines, solar panels, electric vehicles, and energy-efficient lighting that DOE's 2010...

366

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards (CIP-002 through CIP-009). The increased use of wireless technologies and...

367

Critical function and success path summary display  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The content of and hierarchical access to three levels of display pages containing information on critical function monitoring and success path monitoring.

Scarola, Kenneth (Windsor, CT); Jamison, David S. (Windsor, CT); Manazir, Richard M. (North Canton, CT); Rescorl, Robert L. (Vernon, CT); Harmon, Daryl L. (Enfield, CT)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and controlled. Criticality experiments, where a nuclear chain reaction becomes self-sustaining, were also conducted. In addition, 209-E was a research facility where methods of...

369

CMI Affiliate Members | Critical Materials Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mineral exploration and development company focused on critical metals including Rare Earth Elements (REE's) and tungsten (W) in Scandinavia. Tasman is listed on the TSX Venture...

370

Critical Mission Support Through Energy Security  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the critical mission support through energy security and is given at the Spring 2010 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting in Rapid City, South Dakota.

371

Toward Developing Genetic Algorithms to Aid in Critical Infrastructure Modeling  

SciTech Connect

Today’s society relies upon an array of complex national and international infrastructure networks such as transportation, telecommunication, financial and energy. Understanding these interdependencies is necessary in order to protect our critical infrastructure. The Critical Infrastructure Modeling System, CIMS©, examines the interrelationships between infrastructure networks. CIMS© development is sponsored by the National Security Division at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in its ongoing mission for providing critical infrastructure protection and preparedness. A genetic algorithm (GA) is an optimization technique based on Darwin’s theory of evolution. A GA can be coupled with CIMS© to search for optimum ways to protect infrastructure assets. This includes identifying optimum assets to enforce or protect, testing the addition of or change to infrastructure before implementation, or finding the optimum response to an emergency for response planning. This paper describes the addition of a GA to infrastructure modeling for infrastructure planning. It first introduces the CIMS© infrastructure modeling software used as the modeling engine to support the GA. Next, the GA techniques and parameters are defined. Then a test scenario illustrates the integration with CIMS© and the preliminary results.

Not Available

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Iterative acceleration methods for Monte Carlo and deterministic criticality calculations  

SciTech Connect

If you have ever given up on a nuclear criticality calculation and terminated it because it took so long to converge, you might find this thesis of interest. The author develops three methods for improving the fission source convergence in nuclear criticality calculations for physical systems with high dominance ratios for which convergence is slow. The Fission Matrix Acceleration Method and the Fission Diffusion Synthetic Acceleration (FDSA) Method are acceleration methods that speed fission source convergence for both Monte Carlo and deterministic methods. The third method is a hybrid Monte Carlo method that also converges for difficult problems where the unaccelerated Monte Carlo method fails. The author tested the feasibility of all three methods in a test bed consisting of idealized problems. He has successfully accelerated fission source convergence in both deterministic and Monte Carlo criticality calculations. By filtering statistical noise, he has incorporated deterministic attributes into the Monte Carlo calculations in order to speed their source convergence. He has used both the fission matrix and a diffusion approximation to perform unbiased accelerations. The Fission Matrix Acceleration method has been implemented in the production code MCNP and successfully applied to a real problem. When the unaccelerated calculations are unable to converge to the correct solution, they cannot be accelerated in an unbiased fashion. A Hybrid Monte Carlo method weds Monte Carlo and a modified diffusion calculation to overcome these deficiencies. The Hybrid method additionally possesses reduced statistical errors.

Urbatsch, T.J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

SILENE Benchmark Critical Experiments for Criticality Accident Alarm Systems  

SciTech Connect

In October 2010 a series of benchmark experiments was conducted at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE [1] facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). This presentation will discuss the geometric configuration of these experiments and the quantities that were measured and will present some preliminary comparisons between the measured data and calculations. This series consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. During the first experiment the reactor was bare (unshielded), but during the second and third experiments it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. During each experiment several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor, and some of these detectors were themselves shielded from the reactor by high-density magnetite and barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond. All the concrete was provided by CEA Saclay, and the BoroBond was provided by Y-12 National Security Complex. Figure 1 is a picture of the SILENE reactor cell configured for pulse 1. Also included in these experiments were measurements of the neutron and photon spectra with two BICRON BC-501A liquid scintillators. These two detectors were provided and operated by CEA Valduc. They were set up just outside the SILENE reactor cell with additional lead shielding to prevent the detectors from being saturated. The final detectors involved in the experiments were two different types of CAAS detectors. The Babcock International Group provided three CIDAS CAAS detectors, which measured photon dose and dose rate with a Geiger-Mueller tube. CIDAS detectors are currently in use at Y-12 in the newly constructed Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility. The second CAAS detector used a {sup 6}LiF TLD to absorb neutrons and a silicon detector to count the charge particles released by these absorption events. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided four of these detectors, which had formerly been used at the Rocky Flats facility in the United States.

Miller, Thomas Martin [ORNL] [ORNL; Reynolds, Kevin H. [Y-12 National Security Complex] [Y-12 National Security Complex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Recent progress and tests of radiation resistant impregnation materials for Nb{sub 3}Sn coils  

SciTech Connect

Fermilab is collaborating with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) (US-LARP collaboration) to develop a large-aperture Nb{sub 3}Sn superconducting quadrupole for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) luminosity upgrade. An important component of this work is the development of materials that are sufficiently radiation resistant for use in critical areas of the upgrade. This paper describes recent progress in characterization of materials, including the baseline CTD101K epoxy, cyanate ester blends, and Matrimid 5292, a bismaleimide-based system. Structural properties of “ten stacks” of cable impregnated with these materials are tested at room and cryogenic temperatures and compared to the baseline CT-101K. Experience with potting 1 and 2 meter long coils with Matrimid 5292 are described. Test results of a single 1-m coil impregnated with Matrimid 5292 are reported and compared to similar coils impregnated with the traditional epoxy.

Bossert, R.; Krave, S.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Chlachidze, G.; Nobrega, A.; Novitski, I.; Yu, M.; Zlobin, A. V. [Technical Division, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

375

Expandable Metal Liner For Downhole Components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liner for an annular downhole component is comprised of an expandable metal tube having indentations along its surface. The indentations are formed in the wall of the tube either by drawing the tube through a die, by hydroforming, by stamping, or roll forming and may extend axially, radially, or spirally along its wall. The indentations accommodate radial and axial expansion of the tube within the downhole component. The tube is inserted into the annular component and deformed to match an inside surface of the component. The tube may be expanded using a hydroforming process or by drawing a mandrel through the tube. The tube may be expanded in such a manner so as to place it in compression against the inside wall of the component. The tube is useful for improving component hydraulics, shielding components from contamination, inhibiting corrosion, and preventing wear to the downhole component during use. It may also be useful for positioning conduit and insulated conductors within the component. An insulating material may be disposed between the tube and the component in order to prevent galvanic corrosion of the downhole component.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe R. (Provo, UT)

2004-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nuclear criticality safety experiments, calculations, and analyses: 1958 to 1982. Volume 1. Lookup tables  

SciTech Connect

This compilation contains 688 complete summaries of papers on nuclear criticality safety as presented at meetings of the American Nuclear Society (ANS). The selected papers contain criticality parameters for fissile materials derived from experiments and calculations, as well as criticality safety analyses for fissile material processing, transport, and storage. The compilation was developed as a component of the Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) now under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The compilation is presented in two volumes: Volume 1 contains a directory to the ANS Transaction volume and page number where each summary was originally published, the author concordance, and the subject concordance derived from the keyphrases in titles. Volume 2 contains - in chronological order - the full-text summaries, reproduced here by permission of the American Nuclear Society from their Transactions, volumes 1-41.

Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Development and Test Laboratory may include: * Fuel cell and fuel cell component manufacturers * Certification laboratories * Government agencies * Universities * Other...

378

Impacts of criticality safety on hot fuel examination facility operations  

SciTech Connect

The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) complex comprises four large hot cells. These cells are used to support the nation's nuclear energy program, especially the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor, by providing nondestructive and destructive testing of irradiated reactor fuels and furnishing the hot cell services required for operation of Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II). Because it is a research rather than a production facility, HFEF assignments are varied and change from time to time to meet the requirements of our experimenters. Such a variety of operations presents many challenges, especially for nuclear criticality safety. The following operations are reviewed to assure that accidental criticality is not possible, and that all rules and regulations are met: transportation, temporary storage, examinations, and disposition.

Garcia, A.S.; Courtney, J.C.; Bacca, J.P.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Critical current and instability threshold measurement of Nb3Sn cables for high field accelerator magnets  

SciTech Connect

Rutherford-type cables made of high critical current Nb{sub 3}Sn strands are being used in several laboratories for developing new generation superconducting magnets for present and future accelerators and upgrades. Testing of cable short samples is an important part of these R&D programs and the instability problem found in some short model magnets at Fermilab made these tests even more significant. Fermilab in collaboration with BNL, CERN and LBNL has developed sample holders and sample preparation infrastructure and procedures for testing Nb{sub 3}Sn cable short samples at BNL and CERN test facilities. This paper describes the sample holders, sample preparation and instrumentation, and test results. Several samples made of MJR or PIT strands 1 mm in diameter have been tested. Some samples were unstable (i.e. quenched at low transport currents) at low fields and reached the critical surface at higher fields.

Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; /Fermilab; Bartlett, S.E.; /LBL, Berkeley; Barzi, E.; /Fermilab; Denarie, C.-H.; /CERN; Dietderich, D.; /LBL, Berkeley; Ghosh, A.K.; /Brookhaven; Verweij, A.P.; /CERN; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources 2007 #12;ii #12;Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources Prepared for: Colorado Cattleman's Agricultural Land Trust 8833 Ralston Road Arvada, CO 80002 Great Outdoors Colorado 1600 Broadway, Suite 1650 Denver, CO 80202 Colorado

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications September 2011 Resnick Institute Report C in the generation, storage, transmission, conversion and conservation of energy. + Institute Leadership Harry://resnick.caltech.edu Pasadena, CA. USA + #12;Critical Materials For Sustainable Energy Applications California Institute

382

Critical aspects of hierarchical protein folding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We argue that the first order folding transitions of proteins observed at physiological chemical conditions end in a critical point for a given temperature and chemical potential of the surrounding water. We investigate this critical point using a hierarchical Hamiltonian and determine its universality class. This class differs qualitatively from those of other known models.

Alex Hansen; Mogens H. Jensen; Kim Sneppen; Giovanni Zocchi

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation`s defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE`s capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Critical technologies research: Opportunities for DOE  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies have identified a number of critical technologies that are essential to the nation's defense, economic competitiveness, energy independence, and betterment of public health. The National Critical Technologies Panel (NCTP) has identified the following critical technology areas: Aeronautics and Surface Transportation; Biotechnology and Life Sciences; Energy and Environment; Information and Communications; Manufacturing; and Materials. Sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER), the Critical Technologies Research Workshop was held in May 1992. Approximately 100 scientists, engineers, and managers from the national laboratories, industry, academia, and govemment participated. The objective of the Berkeley Workshop was to advance the role of the DOE multiprogram energy laboratories in critical technologies research by describing, defining, and illustrating research areas, opportunities, resources, and key decisions necessary to achieve national research goals. An agenda was developed that looked at DOE's capabilities and options for research in critical technologies and provided a forum for industry, academia, govemment, and the national laboratories to address: Critical technology research needs; existing research activities and resources; capabilities of the national laboratories; and opportunities for national laboratories, industries, and universities. The Workshop included plenary sessions in which presentations by technology and policy leaders set the context for further inquiry into critical technology issues and research opportunities. Separate sessions then focused on each of the following major areas of technology: Advanced materials; biotechnology and life sciences; energy and environment; information and communication; and manufacturing and transportation.

Not Available

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Nuclear waste plans enter critical phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... London. Britain's newly privatized nuclear power industry is facing a critical few months as it contemplates how to dispose of ... as it contemplates how to dispose of up to 300,000 cubic metres of radioactive waste by early next century á" and answer critics who claim that its plans are ...

Ehsan Masood

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Samurai: protecting critical data in unsafe languages  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Programs written in type-unsafe languages such as C and C++ incur costly memory errors that result in corrupted data structures, program crashes, and incorrect results. We present a data-centric solution to memory corruption called critical memory, a ... Keywords: critical memory, error recovery, memory safety

Karthik Pattabiraman; Vinod Grover; Benjamin G. Zorn

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

2011 Critical Materials Strategy | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Critical Materials Strategy 1 Critical Materials Strategy 2011 Critical Materials Strategy This report examines the role that rare earth metals and other key materials play in clean energy technologies such as wind turbines, electric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting. The report found that several clean energy technologies use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term, with risks generally decreasing in the medium and long terms. Supply challenges for five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium) may affect clean energy technology deployment in the years ahead. DOE_CMS2011_FINAL_Full.pdf DOE_CMS_2011_Summary.pdf More Documents & Publications 2010 Critical Materials Strategy ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials

388

Critical insulation thickness for maximum entropy generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critical insulation thickness is known to refer to the insulation thickness that maximises the rate of heat transfer in cylindrical and spherical systems. The same analogy is extended to the rate of entropy generation in the present study. The possible critical insulation thickness that yields a maximum rate of entropy generation is investigated. Entropy generation is related to heat transfer through and temperature distribution within the insulation material. It is found that there exists a critical insulation thickness for maximising the rate of entropy generation that is a function of the Bi number and the surface to ambient temperature ratio. The solution of such critical thickness is formulated analytically for both cylindrical and spherical geometries. It is also found that the critical insulation thickness for the rate of entropy generation does not coincide with that for the rate of heat transfer.

Ahmet Z. Sahin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

WITTEKIND WD

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

390

Empirical scaling formulas for critical current and critical field for commercial NbTi  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of an analysis of both published and unpublished critical current data given as a function of both field and temperature. Simple formulas have been obtained for (1) the critical temperature as a function of field that is needed to obtain an estimate of the current sharing temperature and hence temperature margin, (2) the critical current density for constant temperature as a function of field, and (3) the critical current density for constant field as a function of temperature.

Lubell, M.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Test Comparability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Effect of strain on the critical parameters of V/sub 2/(Hf, Zr) Laves phase composite superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Strain effects on the critical parameters of composite-processed V/sub 2/(Hf, Zr) Laves phase superconductors have been examined. The critical temperature is found to be insensitive to the strain induced by the thermal differential contraction between the composite components. Critical current versus uniaxial strain curves obtained are completely flat at magnetic fields up to 19 T. It also turns out that the bulk upper critical field shows essentially no sensitivity to uniaxial strain. These results, which are quite different from those reported for A15 compound superconductors, are discussed in terms of the structural insensitivity of the Laves phase superconductor. Fractography suggests that the mechanical properties of V/sub 2/(Hf, Zr) composite conductors may be improved by the grain refinement of component alloys.

Wada, H.; Inoue, K.; Tachikawa, K.; Ekin, J.W.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To control diesel-engine toxicity, a computation method is proposed for the concentration of toxic components in diesel exhaust fumes, on the basis of external engine...

A. F. Dorokhov; E. V. Klimova

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Successfully Dismantled March 20, 2007 Uranium Weapons Components Successfully Dismantled Oak Ridge, TN Continuing its efforts to reduce the size of the U.S. nuclear weapons...

396

NDE DEVELOPMENT FOR ACERT ENGINE COMPONENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Barrier Coating (TBC) 12 PM024 TBCs applied on engine exhaust components reduce heat loss so improve efficiency; they also replace the use of expensive high-temperature...

397

Component and System Qualification Workshop Proceedings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Proceedings from the U.S. DOE Hydrogen Component and System Qualification Workshop, held at Sandia National Laboratory in Livermore, CA, on November 4, 2010.

398

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing Language Processing Components with GATE (a User Guide) For GATE version 3 beta 1 (July.3 Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 3.4 [D] Get Started

Maynard, Diana

399

QualityAssurance&Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Testing and Testing Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science & Technology Center provides customers with manufacturing quality requirements, testing standards and specifica- tions for new product designs, including the implementation of these requirements into final product acceptance complete with documenta- tion. Technical support and procedures are fur- nished for Interagency Product Acceptance. Capabilities * Will inspect printed circuit (PC) boards, wire wrap boards, boxes, chassis, cables, racks, systems, etc. * Work from sketches or formal drawings * Review drawings and requirements * Visual inspections for layout, markings, solder joints, components, mechanical assembly, general workmanship, safety * Point-to-point continuity checks

400

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

Mousavi, Mohammad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Software Testing and Maintenance 1 Regression Testing Introduction Test Selection Test Minimization Test Prioritization Summary Software Testing and Maintenance 2 What is it? Regression testing refers to the portion of the test cycle in which a program is tested to ensure that changes do not affect

Lei, Jeff Yu

402

Reliability and component importance analysis of substation automation systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims to present a comprehensive technique to quantitatively assess the reliability of substation automation systems. The technique is based on the tie-sets methodology. In order to demonstrate the application of the proposed technique, a variety of substation automation architectures is first introduced. The associated reliability block diagrams as well as the exact system reliability are then given. The impacts and the degree of importance of various components on the reliability of substation automation systems are presented. Two suitable measures of importance are selected. The first is the Birnbaum’s measure used to determine the bottleneck of the system reliability. The second measure uses criticality importance to diagnose failures and generating repair or inspection checklists.

Hamze Hajian-Hoseinabadi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Magnetohydrodynamic projects at the CDIF (Component Development and Integration Facility)  

SciTech Connect

This quarterly technical progress report presents the tasks accomplished at the Component Development and Integration Facility during the third quarter of FY90. Areas of technical progress this quarter included: coal system development; seed system development; test bay modification; channel power dissipation and distribution system development; integrated topping cycle/proof-of-concept current controls project; oxygen system storage upgrade; iron core magnet thermal protection system checkout; TRW slag rejector/CDIF slag removal project; stack gas/environmental compliance upgrade; coal-fired combustor support; 1A channels fabrication and assembly; support of Mississippi State University diagnostic testing; test operations and results; data enhancement; data analysis and modeling; technical papers; and projected activities. 2 tabs.

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Criticality safety aspects of decontamination and decommissioning at defense nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect

Defense nuclear facilities have operated for forty years with a well-defined mission to produce weapons components for the nation. With the end of the cold war, the facilities` missions have changed to one of decontamination and decommissioning. Off-normal operations and use of new procedures, such as will exist during these activities, have often been among the causal factors in previous criticality accidents at process facilities. This paper explores the similarities in causal factors in previous criticality accidents to the conditions existing in current defense nuclear facilities undergoing the transition to decontamination and decommissioning. Practices to reduce the risk to workers, the public, and the environment are recommended.

Croucher, D.W.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Critical Mission Support Through Energy Secuirty  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Mission Support Critical Mission Support Through Energy Security Development of an Army Energy Security Assessment Model FUPWG Mr. Chuck Tremel, CTC 21 October 2010 2 2 Purpose * Provide an overview of the Army Energy Security Assessment (ESA) methodology - Being developed by Concurrent Technologies Corporation - Monitored by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Engineering Research and Development-Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC-CERL) * Engage Utility and Government Stakeholders 3 3 Overall Program Objectives * Develop/enhance the draft ESA methodology demonstrated under the Army Power and Energy Initiative (APEI) - Leverage existing processes (e.g., Anti-terrorism/Force Protection) - Critical Mission focused * Validate the methodology at an Army installation

406

Critical configurations of planar robot arms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is known that a closed polygon P is a critical point of the oriented area function if and only if P is a cyclic polygon, that is, $P$ can be inscribed in a circle. Moreover, there is a short formula for the Morse index. Going further in this direction, we extend these results to the case of open polygonal chains, or robot arms. We introduce the notion of the oriented area for an open polygonal chain, prove that critical points are exactly the cyclic configurations with antipodal endpoints and derive a formula for the Morse index of a critical configuration.

Khimshiashvili, G; Siersma, D; Zhukova, A

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

test | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

test test test test More Documents & Publications 2009 ECR FINAL REPORT 2010 Final ECR 2008 Report Environmental Conflict Resolution...

408

Hybrid solar lighting systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates each component.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

409

Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

410

IReliability Failure Mode, Effects and Criticality Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the system FMECA for the PSE included in A TM 501 B. The component level FMEA is given in a Teledyne ~ocument

Rathbun, Julie A.

411

LBNL Windows & Daylighting Software -- THERM Components  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Components Components THERM has three basic components: Graphic User Interface: a graphic user interface that allows you to draw a cross section of the product or component for which you are performing thermal calculations. Heat Transfer Analysis: a heat-transfer analysis component that includes: an automatic mesh generator to create the elements for the finite-element analysis, a finite-element solver, an optional error estimator and adaptive mesh generator, and an optional view-factor radiation model. Results: a results displayer. Graphic User Interface THERM has standard graphic capabilities associated with the Microsoft Windows™ operating system. For example, THERM allows you to use: Both mouse and cursor operations; Standard editing features, such as Cut, Copy, Paste, Select All, and Delete;

412

Hot gas path component cooling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cooling system for a hot gas path component is disclosed. The cooling system may include a component layer and a cover layer. The component layer may include a first inner surface and a second outer surface. The second outer surface may define a plurality of channels. The component layer may further define a plurality of passages extending generally between the first inner surface and the second outer surface. Each of the plurality of channels may be fluidly connected to at least one of the plurality of passages. The cover layer may be situated adjacent the second outer surface of the component layer. The plurality of passages may be configured to flow a cooling medium to the plurality of channels and provide impingement cooling to the cover layer. The plurality of channels may be configured to flow cooling medium therethrough, cooling the cover layer.

Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Bunker, Ronald Scott; Itzel, Gary Michael

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

413

Correct Execution of Reconfiguration for Stateful Components  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In component-based software engineering, reconfiguration describes structural changes to the architecture of a component system. For stateful components, not only structural but also behavioural aspects have to be taken into account in reconfiguration. We present a procedure to conduct reconfiguration in systems of concurrent, stateful components that interferes as little as possible with unchanged subsystems. Reconfiguration is described by a plan for adding, deleting and reconnecting components. A plan is executed by a sequence of simple, local steps, which are suitable for implementation in a programming language. We prove that plan execution is indistinguishable from atomic reconfiguration and use this fact for state-space reduction for verifying properties by model checking.

Moritz Hammer; Alexander Knapp

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Verification Any activity should be verified. #12;Verification Testing Test Driven Development Testing with JUnit Approaches to verification 1 Testing 2 Static Analysis · Peer review · Insepction/Walk-through/Structured review · Formal

Peters, Dennis

415

NREL: Performance and Reliability R&D - Accelerated Testing of Modules and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerated Testing of Modules and Components for Photovoltaic Reliability Accelerated Testing of Modules and Components for Photovoltaic Reliability To conduct accelerated testing of modules and components, NREL subjects photovoltaic (PV) components and materials to stressors such as thermal cycling, heat, moisture, and ultraviolet light to provide early indication of potential failure modes. New accelerated test and diagnostic techniques are developed to meet specific needs, especially those associated with understanding new devices and materials. NREL capabilities for accelerated testing for photovoltaic reliability involve two types of testing: Accelerated Testing of Modules Accelerated Testing of Components. Accelerated Testing of Modules To conduct tests on accelerated testing, NREL maintains and operates a collection of environmental chambers for application of humidity, heat,

416

Critical behavior of hierarchical Ising models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the critical behavior of two-dimensional layered Ising models where the exchange couplings between neighboring layers follow hierarchical sequences. The perturbation caused by the nonperiodicity could be irrelevant, relevant, or marginal. For marginal sequences we have performed a detailed study, which involved analytical and numerical calculations of different surface and bulk critical quantities in the two-dimensional classical as well as in the one-dimensional quantum version of the model. The critical exponents are found to vary continuously with the strength of the modulation, while close to the critical point the system is essentially anisotropic: the correlation length is diverging with different exponents along and perpendicular to the layers.

Ferenc Iglói; Péter Lajkó; Ferenc Szalma

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Southeastern Colorado Survey of Critical Biological Resources: Landowner's Guide to Livestock and Biodiversity Prepared By: Paul Holsinger, Project Assistant and Chris West, Executive Director Colorado Colorado Landowner's Guide to Livestock and Biodiversity Introduction Southeastern Colorado Survey

418

Critical eigenvalue in LMFBRs: a physics assessment  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes recent work to put the analysis of past critical eigenvalue measurements from the US critical experiments program on a consistent basis. The integral data base includes 53 configurations built in 11 ZPPR assemblies which simulate mixed oxide LMFBRs. Both conventional and heterogeneous designs representing 350, 700, and 900 MWe sizes and with and without simulated control rods and/or control rod positions have been studied. The review of the integral data base includes quantitative assessment of experimental uncertainties in the measured excess reactivity. Analyses have been done with design level and higher-order methods using ENDF/B-IV data. Comparisons of these analyses with the experiments are used to generate recommended bias factors for criticality predictions. Recommended methods for analysis of LMFBR fast critical assemblies and LMFBR design calculations are presented. Unresolved issues and areas which require additional experimental or analytical study are identified.

McKnight, R.D.; Collins, P.J.; Olsen, D.N.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Bed management in a Critical Care Unit  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......can also be approach using a stochastic...150 BED MANAGEMENT IN A CRITICAL...of Decision Sciences and Information Management, Catholic University...bed-occupancy management and planning...Improving the Sipp approach for staffing......

J. D. Griffiths; V. Knight; I. Komenda

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Iowa lab gets critical materials research center  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

hub is set to be the largest R&D effort toward alleviating the global shortage of rare earth metals. T he newly created Critical Materials Institute at the Ames Laboratory has the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CMI Industry Survey | Critical Materials Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in professional development or continuing education courses in these areas: Yes No Rare earth elements Yes No Other critical materials Yes No Converting rare earth ore to metal Yes...

422

CMI Grand Challenge Problems | Critical Materials Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

are among the most difficult elements to process, and the hardest to do without. Rare earth elements rank at the top of all lists of critical materials today, and the difficulty...

423

Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

424

When agents communicate hypotheses in critical situations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses the problem of efficient propagation of uncertain information in dynamic environments and critical situations. When a number of (distributed) agents have only partial access to information, the explanation(s) and conclusion(s) ...

Gauvain Bourgne; Nicolas Maudet; Suzanne Pinson

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

A critical programmer searches for professionalism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phrase "critical programmer" in this article's title is meant to be thought of as the programmer who carefully, respectfully, questions conventional wisdom. The particular conventional wisdom under consideration here (held mainly by those who do ...

Robert Schaefer

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

SAE J2579 Validation Testing Program: Powertech Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Safety Working Group at the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has developed a new 'systems-level' document for hydrogen vehicles. This document, SAE TIR J2579, is a new approach to certification standards for components. The document eliminates the need for dozens of test samples, tested in isolation from each other. SAE TIR J2579 describes the components which create the 'high-pressure envelope', the components whose primary function is the containment of the high-pressure hydrogen on-board the vehicle, and has created a sequential test based on those specific components.

McDougall, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Testing Challenges in Web-based Applications with respect to Interoperability and Integration.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Testing is one of the critical processes in software development life cycle. It plays key role in the success of software product by improving its… (more)

Farooq, Umar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

ORSPHERE: CRITICAL, BARE, HEU(93.2)-METAL SPHERE  

SciTech Connect

In the early 1970’s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) in an attempt to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950’s (HEU-MET-FAST-001). The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. “The very accurate description of this sphere, as assembled, establishes it as an ideal benchmark for calculational methods and cross-section data files.” (Reference 1) While performing the ORSphere experiments care was taken to accurately document component dimensions (±0. 0001 in. for non-spherical parts), masses (±0.01 g), and material data The experiment was also set up to minimize the amount of structural material in the sphere proximity. A three part sphere was initially assembled with an average radius of 3.4665 in. and was then machined down to an average radius of 3.4420 in. (3.4425 in. nominal). These two spherical configurations were evaluated and judged to be acceptable benchmark experiments; however, the two experiments are highly correlated.

Margaret A. Marshall

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

General Critical Properties of the Dynamics of Scientific Discovery  

SciTech Connect

Scientific fields are difficult to define and compare, yet there is a general sense that they undergo similar stages of development. From this point of view it becomes important to determine if these superficial similarities can be translated into a general framework that would quantify the general advent and subsequent dynamics of scientific ideas. Such a framework would have important practical applications of allowing us to compare fields that superficially may appear different, in terms of their subject matter, research techniques, typical collaboration size, etc. Particularh' important in a field's history is the moment at which conceptual and technical unification allows widespread exchange of ideas and collaboration, at which point networks of collaboration show the analog of a percolation phenomenon, developing a giant connected component containing most authors. Here we investigate the generality of this topological transition in the collaboration structure of scientific fields as they grow and become denser. We develop a general theoretical framework in which each scientific field is an instantiation of the same large-scale topological critical phenomenon. We consider whether the evidence from a variety of specific fields is consistent with this picture, and estimate critical exponents associated with the transition. We then discuss the generality of the phenomenon and to what extent we may expect other scientific fields — including very large ones — to follow the same dynamics.

Bettencourt, L. M. A. (LANL); Kaiser, D. I. (MIT)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

430

NETL: News Release - Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 12, 2006 September 12, 2006 Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins: Midwest Partnership Looks at Appalachian Basin for Safe Storage Sites Seismic Surveys to Determine Viability of Rock Formations for CO2 Storage WASHINGTON, DC - Tapping into rock formations at sites thousands of feet deep, a government-industry team is using seismic testing to help determine whether those sites can serve as reservoirs to safely store carbon dioxide (CO2), a major greenhouse gas. MORE INFO WATCH: NETL Project Manager Charlie Byrer discuss this important project Learn more about DOE's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership web site The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is sponsoring the tests in a program to develop carbon sequestration

431

Crustal interpretation of three-component seismic data from southwestern New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) standardizing all seismic data to a seismometer response of 1. 0 Hz with 70% of critical damping; and (3) reorienting the seismic data such that the three components were approximately parallel to the average P, SV, and SH wave polarizations. Raytracing... trace format. . Page . . . 22 2. Interpreted arrival times for the Tyrone and Santa Rita reduced-time sections . . . . 44 3. The interpreted crustal model. . 51 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Previous seismic studies in the area . Page 12 2. Map...

Riehle, Michael George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

National Wind Tecnology Center Provides Dual Axis Resonant Blade Testing  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NREL's Structural Testing Laboratory at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) provides experimental laboratories, computer facilities for analytical work, space for assembling components and turbines for atmospheric testing as well as office space for industry researchers. Fort Felker, center director at the NWTC, discusses NREL's state-of-the-art structural testing capabilities and shows a flapwise and edgewise blade test in progress.

Felker, Fort

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

433

Automatic generation of built-in contract test drivers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automatic generation of platform-independent and -dependent built-in contract test drivers that check pairwise interactions between client and server components is presented, focusing on the built-in contract testing (BIT) method and the model-driven ... Keywords: Built-in contract testing, MDA, Model-driven testing

Everton L. Alves, Patricia D. Machado, Franklin Ramalho

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

FARVAT: a family-based rare variant association test  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......family-based rare variant association test Sungkyoung Choi 1 Sungyoung Lee 1 Sven...FAmily-based Rare Variant Association Test (FARVAT). FARVAT is based on the quasi-likelihood...working matrix, our method could be a burden test or a variance component test, and could......

Sungkyoung Choi; Sungyoung Lee; Sven Cichon; Markus M. Nöthen; Christoph Lange; Taesung Park; Sungho Won

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses -HOL/TestGen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen An Experiment in Test and Proof Thomas Malcher January 20, 2014 1 / 20 #12;Verifying Test Hypotheses - HOL/TestGen HOL/TestGen Outline Introduction Test Hypotheses HOL/TestGen - Demo Verifying Test Hypotheses Conclusion 2 / 20 #12

436

Automated Test Coverage Measurement for Reactor Protection System Software  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Test Coverage Measurement for Reactor Protection System Software Implemented in Function- ing a case study using test cases prepared by domain experts for reactor protection system software) are widely used to implement safety- critical systems such as nuclear reactor protection systems, testing

437

Property:Component Integration | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Component Integration Component Integration Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. The allowed values for this property are: Customer Assembled Factory Integrated Pages using the property "Component Integration" Showing 22 pages using this property. D Distributed Generation Study/10 West 66th Street Corp + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/615 kW Waukesha Packaged System + Factory Integrated + Distributed Generation Study/Aisin Seiki G60 at Hooligans Bar and Grille + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Arrow Linen + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Dakota Station (Minnegasco) + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Elgin Community College + Customer Assembled + Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm + Factory Integrated +

438

Criticality Benchmark Analysis of the HTTR Annular Startup Core Configurations  

SciTech Connect

One of the high priority benchmarking activities for corroborating the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Program is evaluation of Japan's existing High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is a 30 MWt engineering test reactor utilizing graphite moderation, helium coolant, and prismatic TRISO fuel. A large amount of critical reactor physics data is available for validation efforts of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). Previous international reactor physics benchmarking activities provided a collation of mixed results that inaccurately predicted actual experimental performance.1 Reevaluations were performed by the Japanese to reduce the discrepancy between actual and computationally-determined critical configurations.2-3 Current efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involve development of reactor physics benchmark models in conjunction with the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) for use with verification and validation methods in the VHTR Program. Annular cores demonstrate inherent safety characteristics that are of interest in developing future HTGRs.

John D. Bess

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Critical Issues in NPH Categorization and Limit State Selection of SSCs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Issues in NPH Categorization and Critical Issues in NPH Categorization and Limit State Selection of Structures, Systems, and Components Quazi Hossain Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory DOE Natural Phenomena Hazards Workshop October 25-26, 2011 Steps of an ideal Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPHs) design process The design of structures, systems, and Components (SSCs) in the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities for major Natural Phenomena Hazards (NPHs) is performed, in an ideal case, following these steps: * Step 1: Systematic safety and hazard evaluation using STD-3009 & STD-1189 to determine the unmitgated dose consequences of failure of the SSCs on collocated workers and the public. This step also includes defining what constitutes failure (e.g., for seismic design,

440

A Mix Testing Process Integrating Two Manual Testing Approaches: Exploratory Testing and Test Case Based Testing.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Software testing is a key phase in software development lifecycle. Testing objectives corresponds to the discovery and detection of faults, which can be attained by… (more)

Shah, Syed

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Investigating Binary Black Hole Mergers with Principal Component Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite recent progress in numerical simulations of the coalescence of binary black hole systems, highly asymmetric spinning systems and the construction of accurate physical templates remain challenging and computationally expensive. We explore the feasibility of a prompt and robust test of whether the signals exhibit evidence for generic features that can educate new simulations. We form catalogs of numerical relativity waveforms with distinct physical effects and compute the relative probability that a gravitational wave signal belongs to each catalog. We introduce an algorithm designed to perform this task for coalescence signals using principal component analysis of waveform catalogs and Bayesian model selection and demonstrate its effectiveness.

James Clark; Laura Cadonati; James Healy; Ik Siong Heng; Josh Logue; Nicholas Mangini; Lionel London; Larne Pekowsky; Deirdre Shoemaker

2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

442

A fuel for sub-critical fast reactor  

SciTech Connect

Along with the problem of the nuclear waste transmutation, the problem of minimization of waste production is of current interest. It is not possible to eliminate production of waste at a nuclear power plant, but, as is shown in this report, it is in principle possible to arrange a fuel composition with no net production of transuranic elements. The idea is to find the transuranic elements composition to which the depleted uranium is continuously supplied during frequent reprocessing, and amount of each other transuranic fuel component remains unchanged in time. For each transuranic component, the balance is achieved by equating burnup and production rates. The production is due to neutron capture by the neighboring lighter isotope and subsequent beta-decay. The burnup includes fission, neutron capture and decays. For the calculations a simplified burnup model which accounts for 9 isotopes of uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium is used. The calculated fuel composition consists mainly of uranium with minority of plutonium isotopes. Such a fuel, after usage in a sub-critical fast reactor, should be reprocessed. The fission product content increases during burnup, representing a net production of waste, while the transuranic elements and {sup 238}U should be recycled into a new fuel. For such a fuel cycle, the net consumption is only for 238U, and the net waste production is just fission products.

Moiseenko, V. E.; Chernitskiy, S. V.; Agren, O.; Noack, K. [Institute of Plasma Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Science Center 'Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology', Akademichna St. 1, 61108 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Uppsala University, Angstroem Laboratory, Division of Electricity, Box 534, SE-75121 Uppsala (Sweden)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

443

Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Testing and Analysis Modeling, Testing and Analysis The Vehicle Technologies Office's robust portfolio is supported by modeling, testing, and analysis. This work complements the research on batteries, power electronics, and materials, helping researchers integrate these components and ensure the whole vehicle meets consumer and commercial needs. Modeling allows researchers to build "virtual vehicles" that simulate fuel economy, emissions and performance of a potential vehicle. The Office has supported the development of several software-based analytic tools that researchers can use or license. Integration and Validation allows researchers to test physical component and subsystem prototypes as if they are in a real vehicle. Laboratory and Fleet Testing provides data on PEVs through both dynamometer and on-the-road testing. Researchers use the data to benchmark current vehicles, as well as validate the accuracy of software models.

444

Cold vacuum drying proof of performance (first article testing) test results  

SciTech Connect

This report presents and details the test results of the first of a kind process referred to as Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD). The test results are compiled from several months of testing of the first process equipment skid and ancillary components to de-water and dry Multi-Canister Overpacks (MCO) filled with Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF). The tests results provide design verifications, equipment validations, model validation data, and establish process parameters.

MCCRACKEN, K.J.

1999-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

445

Residual stress measurement on ductile cast iron using critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using ultrasonics was approached. Residual stresses in castings are developed for various reasons. The presence of these stresses, coupled with applied stresses in service, sometimes results in the yield of material and subsequent failure of component.... Present work was focussed on development of an ultrasonic technique using critically refracted longitudinal (L g waves for evaluating residual stresses in ductile cast iron. An L probe suitable to work with ductile cast iron was designed and fabricated...

Chundu, Srinivasulu Naidu

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

446

ARM - Evaluation Product - Organic Aerosol Component VAP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP ProductsOrganic Aerosol Component VAP Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Organic Aerosol Component VAP 2011.01.08 - 2012.03.24 Site(s) SGP General Description Organic aerosol (OA, i.e., the organic fraction of particles) accounts for 10-90% of the fine aerosol mass globally and is a key determinant of aerosol radiative forcing. But atmospheric OA is poorly characterized and its life cycle insufficiently represented in models. As a result, current models are unable to simulate OA concentrations and properties. This deficiency represents a large source of uncertainty in the quantification of aerosol direct and indirect effects and the prediction of future climate change. The Organic Aerosol Component (OACOMP) value-added product (VAP) uses

447

Structural Automotive Components from Composite Materials | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. lm08kia.pdf More Documents & Publications Structural Automotive Components from Composite...

448

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge Portals: Components, Functionalities, and Deployment Challenges Claudia Loebbecke University of Cologne Kevin Crowston Syracuse University School of Information Studies Abstract Knowledge Portals (KPs) are highly integrative Knowledge Management Systems (KMS) that promise to synthesize widely

Crowston, Kevin

449

Artificial Vision A vital component of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Artificial Vision A vital component of transhumanism #12;Machinehead · Merger of human and machine. · Transhumanism ­ Our design is flawed. · Blind spot · Blinking #12;Beyond the blind spot · Eventually plug

La Rosa, Andres H.

450

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

Thresholding Multivariate Regression and Generalized Principal Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the high-dimensional data matrices have been extensively researched for uncorrelated and independent situations, they are much less so for the transposable data matrices. A generalization of principal component analysis and the related weighted least...

Sun, Ranye

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

452

commentary and analysis: The Insignificance of Significance Testing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Null hypothesis significance testing (NHST) is commonplace in atmospheric research, despite the many criticisms that have been leveled against its use in other fields of research. NHST is used, in papers in almost every issue of the Society's ...

Neville Nicholls

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Critical points and transitions in an electric power transmission model for cascading failure blackouts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cascading failures in large-scale electric power transmission systems are an important cause of blackouts. Analysis of North American blackout data has revealed power law (algebraic) tails in the blackout size probability distribution which suggests a dynamical origin. With this observation as motivation we examine cascading failure in a simplified transmission system model as load power demand is increased. The model represents generators loads the transmission line network and the operating limits on these components. Two types of critical points are identified and are characterized by transmission line flow limits and generator capability limits respectively. Results are obtained for tree networks of a regular form and a more realistic 118-node network. It is found that operation near critical points can produce power law tails in the blackout size probability distribution similar to those observed. The complex nature of the solution space due to the interaction of the two critical points is examined.

B. A. Carreras; V. E. Lynch; I. Dobson; D. E. Newman

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Indigestible fiber components as possible internal markers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INZERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas AQf University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... 1975 Major Subject: Animal Nutrition INDIGESTIBLE FIBER COMPONENTS AS POSSIBLE INTERNAL MARKERS A Thesis by BERNARD FREDERICK JACOBS Approved as to style and content by: !, /, (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Depar ent) (Member) (Member...

Jacobs, Bernard Frederick

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Component of variance estimation based on synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Component of Variance Estimation based on. Synthesis. (August lg (2) Jocelyn Anthea Tommerup, B. Sc. , B. Econ. , University of Queenslsnd Directed. by: Dr. H. 0. Hartley Analysis of variance, widely used in the study of statistical variation.... Essentially the problem is to find these coefficients so that, estimstes of the components may be computed. Hartley [1967] hss proposed a method which gives these coef'ficients directly for sry design, balanced of' unbalanced. It is the objective...

Tommerup, Jocelyn Anthea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

456

RDCDS Meteorologoical Component Quick Installation Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide provides step-by-step instructions for the deployment of one of the Rapidly Deployable Chemical Defense System (RDCDS) weather stations and central control system. Instructions for the deployment and operation of the Atmospheric Systems Corporation miniSODAR™ (SOnic Detection and Ranging) can be found in accompanying manuals developed by Atmospheric Systems Corporation. A detailed description of the system and its components can be found in the manual entitled Description of the RDCDS Meteorological Component.

Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.

2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

457

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components.

Dickens, Larry M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Haynes, Howard D. (Knoxville, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Clinton, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Method and apparatus for monitoring aircraft components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Operability of aircraft mechanical components is monitored by analyzing the voltage output of an electrical generator of the aircraft. Alternative generators, for a turbine-driven rotor aircraft, include the gas producer turbine tachometer generator, the power turbine tachometer generator, and the aircraft systems power producing starter/generator. Changes in the peak amplitudes of the fundamental frequency and its harmonics are correlated to changes in condition of the mechanical components. 14 figs.

Dickens, L.M.; Haynes, H.D.; Ayers, C.W.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

459

An analysis of multiple component mooring lines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN ANALYSIS OF MULTIPLE COMPONENT MOORING LINES A Thesis by THOMAS ROBERT NALTERS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major...'595 ABSTRACT An Analysis Of Multiple Component Mooring Lines (December 1977) Thomas Robert Walters, B. E. , Vanderbilt University Co-Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Ts ung- Chow Su Co- Chai rman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard Domi nguez...

Walters, Thomas Robert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

460

An Accelerated Aging Analysis Method Based on Local Data for Components and Materials in Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In nuclear power plants, accelerated aging of certain components can lead to reduction of their service life, which has potential impact on the safety and economics of the whole plant. In order to effectively manage the accelerated aging of critical ... Keywords: accelerated aging, life estimation, accelerating factor, performance degradation data

Zeng Yuyun; Liu Jingquan; Huang Weigang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Non-Destructive Testing of Subsurface Infrastructure using Induced Polarization and Electrical Resistivity Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

critical component of the assessment. While this issue is not new, current techniques are typically invasive or costly. This research explores the feasibility and effectiveness of induced polarization (IP) and electrical resistivity imaging (ERI), near...

Tucker, Stacey Elizabeth

2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

462

Condition Based Monitoring of Gas Turbine Combustion Components  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to develop sensors that allow condition based monitoring of critical combustion parts of gas turbines. Siemens teamed with innovative, small companies that were developing sensor concepts that could monitor wearing and cracking of hot turbine parts. A magnetic crack monitoring sensor concept developed by JENTEK Sensors, Inc. was evaluated in laboratory tests. Designs for engine application were evaluated. The inability to develop a robust lead wire to transmit the signal long distances resulted in a discontinuation of this concept. An optical wear sensor concept proposed by K Sciences GP, LLC was tested in proof-of concept testing. The sensor concept depended, however, on optical fiber tips wearing with the loaded part. The fiber tip wear resulted in too much optical input variability; the sensor could not provide adequate stability for measurement. Siemens developed an alternative optical wear sensor approach that used a commercial PHILTEC, Inc. optical gap sensor with an optical spacer to remove fibers from the wearing surface. The gap sensor measured the length of the wearing spacer to follow loaded part wear. This optical wear sensor was developed to a Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 5. It was validated in lab tests and installed on a floating transition seal in an F-Class gas turbine. Laboratory tests indicate that the concept can measure wear on loaded parts at temperatures up to 800{degrees}C with uncertainty of < 0.3 mm. Testing in an F-Class engine installation showed that the optical spacer wore with the wearing part. The electro-optics box located outside the engine enclosure survived the engine enclosure environment. The fiber optic cable and the optical spacer, however, both degraded after about 100 operating hours, impacting the signal analysis.

Ulerich, Nancy; Kidane, Getnet; Spiegelberg, Christine; Tevs, Nikolai

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

The Activities of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP)  

SciTech Connect

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) was initiated in 1992 by the United States Department of Energy. The ICSBEP became an official activity of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) – Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) in 1995. Representatives from the United States, United Kingdom, France, Japan, the Russian Federation, Hungary, Republic of Korea, Slovenia, Yugoslavia, Kazakhstan, Spain, and Israel are now participating. The purpose of the ICSBEP is to identify, evaluate, verify, and formally document a comprehensive and internationally peer-reviewed set of criticality safety benchmark data. The work of the ICSBEP is published as an OECD handbook entitled “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments”. The 2001 Edition of the Handbook contains benchmark specifications for 2642 critical or subcritical configurations that are intended for use in validation efforts and for testing basic nuclear data.

Briggs, Joseph Blair

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

U-083:Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - January 2012 |...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3:Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - January 2012 U-083:Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - January 2012 January 18, 2012 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle Critical Patch...

465

Critical shear stresses in cohesive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to thank the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Texas, for permitting me to use their scour apparatus for this study, and to acknowledge the guidance in the use of that apparatus provided by l 9 Dr. F. D. Masch of the University of Texas... Dimensions of the Test Apparatus. 12 12 Testing Procedure 15 Sample Preparation Performing the Scour Tests Summary of Scour Test Procedures. . . . . . . . . . Vane Shear Test Void Ratio and Per Cent Moisture Determinations 15 16 19 20 21 RESULTS...

Rektorik, Robert James

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

466

Fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model for critical facilities in combating the terrorism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Critical facility vulnerability assessment is a highly complex strategic activity in combating the terrorism and necessitates a structured quantified methodology to support the decision-making process in defense planning. In the system perspective, the critical facility, such as airport, dam, governmental facility, harbor, nuclear power plant, oil plant etc., can be defined as a system that relies on a group of different interdependent logical and physical entities as system functions and system components. The aim of this paper is to present a realistic approach to determine the vulnerability of such a system defended against the terrorist attack under multiple criteria which can be both qualitative and quantitative by considering these interdependencies. The proposed approach, called fuzzy integrated vulnerability assessment model (FIVAM), is based on fuzzy set theory, Simple Multi-Attribute Rating Technique (SMART) and Fuzzy Cognitive Maps (FCM) methodology in a group decision-making environment. The FIVAM approach is presented step-by-step and applied to a simple case study on airport vulnerability assessment. The results of the application are compared to those observed through a classical vulnerability assessment model to illustrate the effectiveness of the FIVAM. Furthermore, FIVAM provides a framework to identify the hidden vulnerabilities caused by the functional interdependencies within the system. The results also show that FIVAM quantifies the vulnerability of the system, system functions and system components, and determines the most critical functions and components by simulating the system behavior.

Ilker Akgun; Ahmet Kandakoglu; Ahmet Fahri Ozok

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Significant backlogs existed in each of the three types of tests Surveillance Testing conducted in the Surveillance Testing Program---laboratory tests, flight tests, and component tests---as of September 30? 2005. Laboratory tests are conducted on weapons' non-nuclear systems to detect defects due to handling, aging, manufacturing, or design. Flight tests involve dropping or launching a weapon, with its nuclear components removed, to assess performance and reliability. Component tests involve the destructive analysis of the five primary weapon components: pits, secondaries, detonators, cable assemblies, and the gas transfer valves systems

468

Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Follow-up Audit on Stockpile Surveillance Testing, IG-0744 Significant backlogs existed in each of the three types of tests Surveillance Testing conducted in the Surveillance Testing Program---laboratory tests, flight tests, and component tests---as of September 30? 2005. Laboratory tests are conducted on weapons' non-nuclear systems to detect defects due to handling, aging, manufacturing, or design. Flight tests involve dropping or launching a weapon, with its nuclear components removed, to assess performance and reliability. Component tests involve the destructive analysis of the five primary weapon components: pits, secondaries, detonators, cable assemblies, and the gas transfer valves systems

469

COMPONENT DEVELOPMENT NEEDS FOR THE HYBRID SULFUR ELECTROLYZER  

SciTech Connect

Fiscal year 2008 studies in electrolyzer component development have focused on the characterization of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) after performance tests in the single cell electrolyzer, evaluation of electrocatalysts and membranes using a small scale electrolyzer and evaluating the contribution of individual cell components to the overall electrochemical performance. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) studies of samples taken from MEAs testing in the SRNL single cell electrolyzer test station indicates a sulfur-rich layer forms between the cathode catalyst layer and the membrane. Based on a review of operating conditions for each of the MEAs evaluated, we conclude that the formation of the layer results from the reduction of sulfur dioxide as it passes through the MEA and reaches the catalyst layer at the cathode-membrane interface. Formation of the sulfur rich layer results in partial delamination of the cathode catalyst layer leading to diminished performance. Furthermore we believe that operating the electrolyzer at elevated pressure significantly increases the rate of formation due to increased adsorption of hydrogen on the internal catalyst surface. Thus, identification of a membrane that exhibits much lower transport of sulfur dioxide is needed to reduce the quantity of sulfur dioxide that reaches the cathode catalyst and is reduced to produce the sulfur-rich layer. Three candidate membranes are currently being evaluated that have shown promise from preliminary studies, (1) modified Nafion{reg_sign}, (2) polybenzimidazole (PBI), and (3) sulfonated Diels Alder polyphenylene (SDAPP). Testing examined the activity for the sulfur dioxide oxidation of platinum (Pt) and platinum-alloy catalysts in 30 wt% sulfuric acid solution. Linear sweep voltammetry showed an increase in activity when catalysts in which Pt is alloyed with non-noble transition metals such as cobalt and chromium. However when Pt is alloyed with noble metals, such as iridium or ruthenium, the kinetic activity decreases. We recommend further testing to determine if these binary alloys will provide the increased reaction kinetic needed to meet the targets. We also plan to test the performance of these catalyst materials for both proton and sulfur dioxide reduction. The latter may provide another parameter by which we can control the reduction of sulfur dioxide upon transport to the cathode catalyst surface. A small scale electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2}) has been fabricated and successfully installed as an additional tool to evaluate the effect of different operating conditions on electrolyzer and MEA performance. Currently this electrolyzer is limited to testing at temperatures up to 80 C and at atmospheric pressure. Selected electrochemical performance data from the single cell sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer were analyzed with the aid of an empirical equation which takes into account the overpotential of each of the components. By using the empirical equation, the performance data was broken down into its components and a comparison of the potential losses was made. The results indicated that for the testing conditions of 80 C and 30 wt% sulfuric acid, the major overpotential contribution ({approx}70 % of all losses) arise from the slow reaction rate of oxidation of sulfur dioxide. The results indicate that in order to meet the target of hydrogen production at 0.5 A/cm{sup 2} at 0.6 V and 50 wt% sulfuric acid, identification of a better catalyst for sulfur dioxide oxidation will provide the largest gain in electrolyzer performance.

Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H; Mark Elvington, M

2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

NDE Development for ACERT Engine Components  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- NDE inspection for TBC samples after fatiguebench test at Caterpillar and ORNL in near term, and for engine-tested samples when available pmp18 7 NDE Methods for Advanced...

471

The Effect of Applied Pressure During Feeding of Critical Cast Aluminum Alloy Components With Particular Reference to Fatigue Resistance  

SciTech Connect

the medium to long freezing range alloys of aluminum such as A356, A357, A206, 319 for example are known to exhibit dispersed porosity, which is recognized as a factor affecting ductility, fracture toughness, and fatigue resistance of light alloy castings. The local thermal environment, for example, temperature gradient and freezing from velocity, affect the mode of solidification which, along with alloy composition, heat treatment, oxide film occlusion, hydrogen content, and the extent to which the alloy contracts on solidification, combine to exert strong effects on the porosity formation in such alloys. In addition to such factors, the availability of liquid metal and its ability to flow through the partially solidified casting, which will be affect by the pressure in the liquid metal, must also be considered. The supply of molten metal will thus be controlled by the volume of the riser available for feeding the particular casting location, its solidification time, and its location together with any external pressure that might be applied at the riser.

J.T. Berry; R. Luck; B. Zhang; R.P. Taylor

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

472

Use of a web-based delphi for identifying critical components of a professional science master's program in biotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

science master?s program be focused on local, regional or national workforce needs? 5. What entry-level positions would be appropriate for a recent graduate of a professional science master?s program in biotechnology? 6. What roles are appropriate... specialized, but the integrity of the Ph.D. as a research degree should not be diluted. 11 ? Provide better career information and guidance, including establishing a national database to collect information on time to degree, financial aid...

Kantz, Jeannine Wells

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

473

Civil and environmental engineers are a critical component in supporting the global economy, securing the health and welfare of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, securing the health and welfare of diverse communities, improving the quality of life, and maintaining and supply chain solutions; Wind, wave and tidal energy; Solar power using hydrodynamics; Microbial fuel. ENVIRONMENT & HEALTH Water quality and treatment; Wastewater reclamation and reuse; Health effects of air

Jacobs, Laurence J.

474

Agricultural by-products provide critical habitat components for cold-climate populations of an oviparous snake (Natrix natrix)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The optimal temperature for embryonic development in the laboratory is in the range ... 27–29 °C, which closely matches the temperatures recorded inside manure heaps (Löwenborg et al...2010). Below and above thes...

Kristin Löwenborg; Simon Kärvemo; Alma Tiwe…

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

y12 performance test final012604.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protective Force Performance Test Improprieties DOE/IG-0636 January 2004 PROTECTIVE FORCE PERFORMANCE TEST IMPROPRIETIES TABLE OF CONTENTS OVERVIEW Introduction and Objectives 1 Observations and Conclusions 3 DETAILS OF FINDINGS June 26, 2003, Performance Test 4 Performance Testing 5 Performance Measurement 8 RECOMMENDATIONS 9 MANAGEMENT COMMENTS 9 INSPECTOR COMMENTS 9 APPENDICES A. Scope and Methodology 10 B. Management Comments 11 Overview Page 1 Protective Force Performance Test Improprieties INTRODUCTION The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Y-12 National Security AND OBJECTIVES Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, which is a component of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), is an integral

476

Development and Testing of Insulated Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

This project has comprised design, analysis, laboratory testing, and field testing of insulated drill pipe (IDP). This paper will briefly describe the earlier work, but will focus on results from the recently-completed field test in a geothermal well. Field test results are consistent with earlier analyses and laboratory tests, all of which support the conclusion that insulated drill pipe can have a very significant effect on circulating fluid temperatures. This will enable the use of downhole motors and steering tools in hot wells, and will reduce corrosion, deterioration of drilling fluids, and heat-induced failures in other downhole components.

Champness, T.; Finger, J.; Jacobson, R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

477

Performance Engineering Technology for Scientific Component Software  

SciTech Connect

Large-scale, complex scientific applications are beginning to benefit from the use of component software design methodology and technology for software development. Integral to the success of component-based applications is the ability to achieve high-performing code solutions through the use of performance engineering tools for both intra-component and inter-component analysis and optimization. Our work on this project aimed to develop performance engineering technology for scientific component software in association with the DOE CCTTSS SciDAC project (active during the contract period) and the broader Common Component Architecture (CCA) community. Our specific implementation objectives were to extend the TAU performance system and Program Database Toolkit (PDT) to support performance instrumentation, measurement, and analysis of CCA components and frameworks, and to develop performance measurement and monitoring infrastructure that could be integrated in CCA applications. These objectives have been met in the completion of all project milestones and in the transfer of the technology into the continuing CCA activities as part of the DOE TASCS SciDAC2 effort. In addition to these achievements, over the past three years, we have been an active member of the CCA Forum, attending all meetings and serving in several working groups, such as the CCA Toolkit working group, the CQoS working group, and the Tutorial working group. We have contributed significantly to CCA tutorials since SC'04, hosted two CCA meetings, participated in the annual ACTS workshops, and were co-authors on the recent CCA journal paper [24]. There are four main areas where our project has delivered results: component performance instrumentation and measurement, component performance modeling and optimization, performance database and data mining, and online performance monitoring. This final report outlines the achievements in these areas for the entire project period. The submitted progress reports for the first two years describe those year's achievements in detail. We discuss progress in the last project period in this document. Deployment of our work in CCA components, frameworks, and applications is an important metric of success. We also summarize the project's accomplishments in this regard at the end of the report. A list of project publications is also given.

Malony, Allen D.

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

478

Vaccine refrigerator testing. Final report  

SciTech Connect

For the Central American Health Clinic Project initiated in 1986, Sandia National Laboratories and the Florida Solar Energy Center recognized the need for a test and evaluation program for vaccine refrigeration systems. At the Florida Solar Energy Center, side-by-side testing of three photovoltaic powered vaccine refrigerators began in 1987. The testing was expanded in 1988 to include a kerosene absorption refrigerator. This report presents observations, conclusions, and recommendations derived from testing the four vaccine refrigeration systems. Information is presented pertaining to the refrigerators, photovoltaic arrays, battery subsystems, charge controllers, and user requirements. This report should be of interest to designers, manufacturers, installers, and users of photovoltaic-powered vaccine refrigeration systems and components.

Ventre, G.G. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States); Kilfoyle, D.; Marion, B. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Definition: Critical Peak Pricing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pricing Pricing Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Critical Peak Pricing When utilities observe or anticipate high wholesale market prices or power system emergency conditions, they may call critical events during a specified time period (e.g., 3 p.m.-6 p.m. on a hot summer weekday), the price for electricity during these time periods is substantially raised. Two variants of this type of rate design exist: one where the time and duration of the price increase are predetermined when events are called and another where the time and duration of the price increase may vary based on the electric grid's need to have loads reduced;[1] Related Terms electricity generation References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/critical_peak_pricing Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike

480

Definition: Critical Peak Rebates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebates Rebates Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Critical Peak Rebates When utilities observe or anticipate high wholesale market prices or power system emergency conditions, they may call critical events during pre-specified time periods (e.g., 3 p.m.-6 p.m. summer weekday afternoons), the price for electricity during these time periods remains the same but the customer is refunded at a single, predetermined value for any reduction in consumption relative to what the utility deemed the customer was expected to consume.[1] Related Terms electricity generation References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/critical_peak_rebates [[C LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ategory: Smart Grid Definitions|Template:BASEPAGENAME]]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test critical components" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry  

SciTech Connect

High Mach number flight requires that the scramjet propulsion system operate at a relatively low static inlet pressure and a high inlet temperature. These two constraints can lead to extremely high temperatures in the combustor, yielding high densities of radical species and correspondingly poor chemical combustion efficiency. As the temperature drops in the nozzle expansion, recombination of these excess radicals can produce more product species, higher heat yield, and potentially more thrust. The extent to which the chemical efficiency can be enhanced in the nozzle expansion depends directly on the rate of the radical recombination reactions. A comprehensive assessment of the important chemical processes and an experimental validation of the critical rate parameters is therefore required if accurate predictions of scramjet performance are to be obtained. This report covers the identification of critical reactions, and the critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Oldenborg, R.C.; Harradine, D.M.; Loge, G.W.; Lyman, J.L.; Schott, G.L.; Winn, K.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Critical point anomalies include expansion shock waves  

SciTech Connect

From first-principle fluid dynamics, complemented by a rigorous state equation accounting for critical anomalies, we discovered that expansion shock waves may occur in the vicinity of the liquid-vapor critical point in the two-phase region. Due to universality of near-critical thermodynamics, the result is valid for any common pure fluid in which molecular interactions are only short-range, namely, for so-called 3-dimensional Ising-like systems, and under the assumption of thermodynamic equilibrium. In addition to rarefaction shock waves, diverse non-classical effects are admissible, including composite compressive shock-fan-shock waves, due to the change of sign of the fundamental derivative of gasdynamics.

Nannan, N. R., E-mail: ryan.nannan@uvs.edu [Mechanical Engineering Discipline, Anton de Kom University of Suriname, Leysweg 86, PO Box 9212, Paramaribo, Suriname and Process and Energy Department, Delft University of Technology, Leeghwaterstraat 44, 2628 CA Delft (Netherlands); Guardone, A., E-mail: alberto.guardone@polimi.it [Department of Aerospace Science and Technology, Politecnico di Milano, Via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Colonna, P., E-mail: p.colonna@tudelft.nl [Propulsion and Power, Delft University of Technology, Kluyverweg 1, 2629 HS Delft (Netherlands)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

483

Surveillance Guide - NSS 18.1 Criticality Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICALITY SAFETY CRITICALITY SAFETY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that effective programs have been developed and implemented to protect the public and DOE's workers from unplanned criticality. The programs should minimize the potential for inadvertent criticality, provide appropriate training for personnel on criticality hazards and procedures for preventing inadvertent criticality, and provide appropriate systems to detect such criticalities and warn workers. The surveillance activities provide a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of policies, programs, and procedures and for reviewing compliance with specific DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.24, Nuclear Criticality Safety

484

Critical Materials Research in DOE Video (Text Version)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a text version of the "Critical Materials Research in DOE" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

485

Critical Update - Renewable Guidance Update | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Update - Renewable Guidance Update Critical Update - Renewable Guidance Update Presentation covers the FUPWG Meeting, held on May 1-2, 2007 in Cape Canaveral, Florida....

486

Electric Motors and Critical Materials | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Motors and Critical Materials Electric Motors and Critical Materials Presentation given at the EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Electric Drive (Power Electronics and Electric...

487

EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout Group Report EV Everywhere Workshop: Electric Motors and Critical Materials Breakout Group Report Presentation given at the EV...

488

CHP: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure for Critical Facilities...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

CHP: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure for Critical Facilities - Report, March 2013 CHP: Enabling Resilient Energy Infrastructure for Critical Facilities - Report, March...

489

National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment Video (Text Version)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a text version of the "National Academies Criticality Methodology and Assessment" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

490

Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy Video (Text Version)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a text version of the "Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy" video presented at the Critical Materials Workshop, held on April 3, 2012 in Arlington, Virginia.

491

Ideas for Transatlantic Cooperation on Critical Materials,Chairs...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

nCriticalMaterials.pptx More Documents & Publications Trans-Atlantic Workshop on Rare Earth Elements and Other Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future Renzo Tomellini, EC...

492

Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and Credentialing - 2014 BTO Peer Review Advanced Critical Advanced Energy Retrofit Education and Training and...

493

Anne de Guibert, SAFT, Critical Materials and Alternatives for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Anne de Guibert, SAFT, Critical Materials and Alternatives for Storage Batteries Anne de Guibert, SAFT, Critical Materials and Alternatives for Storage Batteries...

494

A data flow-based structural testing technique for FBD programs Eunkyoung Jee a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Nuclear Regulatory Commission) [3] mandates that software unit testing for safety-critical systemsA data flow-based structural testing technique for FBD programs Eunkyoung Jee a , Junbeom Yoo b Available online 10 March 2009 Keywords: Software testing Structural testing Test coverage criteria

495

Critical dynamics of nonperiodic Ising chains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The critical dynamics of the nonperiodic ferromagnetic Ising chains with two different coupling constants (J1>J2>0) arranged in nonperiodic sequences are studied by trace map method. For Glauber dynamics, it is found that the dynamical critical exponent z=1+J1/J2 for the Fibonacci, general Fibonacci (e.g., silver-mean, copper-mean), and period-doubling ferromagnetic Ising chains. The applicability of the trace map method and the origin of the nonuniversality are briefly discussed.

Peiqing Tong

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Helicopter final assembly critical path analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Helicopter final assembly involves the installation of hundreds of components into the aircraft and takes thousands of man-hours. Meeting production targets such as total build days and total aircraft man-hours can be ...

Daigh, Sara L. (Sarah Louise), 1981-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

CARSON DM

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Improved Criteria for Acceptable Yield Point Elongation in Surface Critical Steels  

SciTech Connect

Yield point elongation (YPE) is considered undesirable in surface critical applications where steel is formed since "strain lines" or Luders bands are created during forming. This project will examine in detail the formation of luders bands in industrially relevant strain states including the influence of substrate properties and coatings on Luders appearance. Mechanical testing and surface profilometry were the primary methods of investigation.

Dr. David Matlock; Dr. John Speer

2007-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

499