Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Metrics for the National SCADA Test Bed Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (DOE-OE) National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) Program is providing valuable inputs into the electric industry by performing topical research and development (R&D) to secure next generation and legacy control systems. In addition, the program conducts vulnerability and risk analysis, develops tools, and performs industry liaison, outreach and awareness activities. These activities will enhance the secure and reliable delivery of energy for the United States. This report will describe metrics that could be utilized to provide feedback to help enhance the effectiveness of the NSTB Program.

Craig, Philip A.; Mortensen, J.; Dagle, Jeffery E.

2008-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

2

DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan This document presents the National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan, a coherent strategy for improving the cyber security of control systems in the energy sector. The NSTB Program is conducted within DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE), which leads national efforts to modernize the electric grid, enhance the security and reliability of the energy infrastructure, and facilitate recovery from disruptions to the energy supply. The Plan covers the planning period of fiscal year 2008 to 2013. DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan More Documents & Publications DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan

3

Atmospheric fluidized bed combustion of municipal solid waste: test program results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Air classified municipal solid waste (MSW) was fired in an atmospheric fluidized bed combustor at low excess air to simulate boiler conditions. The 7 ft/sup 2/ combustor at Combustion Power Company's energy laboratory in Menlo Park, CA, incorporates water tubes for heat extraction and recycles elutriated particles to the bed. System operation was stable while firing processed MSW for the duration of a 300-h test. Low excess air, low exhaust gas emissions, and constant bed temperature demonstrated feasibility of steam generation from fluidized bed combustion of MSW. During the 300-h test, combustion efficiency averaged 99%. Excess air was typically 44% while an average bed temperature of 1400/sup 0/F and an average superficial gas velocity of 4.6 fps were maintained. Typical exhaust emission levels were 30 ppM SO/sub 2/, 160 ppM NO/sub x/, 200 ppM CO, and 25 ppM hydrocarbons. No agglomeration of bed material or detrimental change in fluidization properties was experienced. A conceptual design study of a full scale plant to be located at Stanford University was based on process conditions from the 300-h test. The plant would produce 250,000 lb/hr steam at the maximum firing rate of 1000 tons per day (TPD) processed MSW. The average 800 TPD firing rate would utilize approximately 1200 TPD raw MSW from surrounding communities. The Stanford Solid Waste energy Program was aimed at development of a MSW-fired fluidized bed boiler and cogeneration plant to supply most of the energy needs of Stanford University.

Preuit, L C; Wilson, K B

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagram of CERTS Microgrid Test Bed Figure 3. Tecogen PrimeCERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed. (California EnergyFigure 1. CERTS Microgrid Test Bed at American Electric

ETO, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Bed expansion crucible tests  

SciTech Connect

The Am/Cm program will vitrify the americium and curium currently stored in F-canyon. A batch flowsheet has been developed (with non-radioactive surrogate feed in place of the F-canyon solution) and tested full-scale in the 5-inch Cylindrical Induction Melter (CIM) facility at TNX. During a normal process run, a small bed expansion occurs when oxygen released from reduction of cerium (IV) oxide to cerium (III) oxide is trapped in highly viscous glass. The bed expansion is characterized by a foamy layer of glass that slowly expands as the oxygen is trapped and then dissipates when the viscosity of the foam becomes low enough to allow the oxygen to escape. Severe bed expansions were noted in the 5-inch CIM when re-heating after an interlock during the calcination phase of the heat cycle, escaping the confines of the melter vessel. In order to better understand the cause of the larger than normal bed expansion and to develop mitigating techniques, a series of three crucible tests were conducted.

Stone, M.E.

2000-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

6

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagram of CERTS Microgrid Test Bed Figure 3. Tecogen Prime2009 CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed J. ETO, Lawrenceof the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the

Eto, Joe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Line Diagram of CERTS Microgrid Test Bed Figure 3. TecogenCALGARY 2009 CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed J. ETO,The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to

Eto, Joe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed Title CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2010 Authors Lasseter, Robert H., Joseph H. Eto, Ben...

9

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Line Diagram of CERTS Microgrid Test Bed Figure 3. TecogenRoy, N. Lewis. 2008. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed. (Energy Resources: The MicroGrid Concept. (Lawrence Berkeley

ETO, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed R. H. Lasseter, Fellow,play functionality. The tests demonstrated stable behaviorin an autonomous manner. All tests performed as expected and

Lasseter, R. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Transportation Safeguards & Security Test Bed (TSSTB) | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Safeguards and Security Test Bed May 30, 2013 The Transportation Safeguards and Security Test Bed consists of a test-bed vehicle and a monitoringlaboratorytraining...

12

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TEST BED PROGRAM FOR NOVEL DETECTORS AND DETECTOR MATERIALS AT SRS H-CANYON SEPARATIONS FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have proposed that a test bed for advanced detectors be established at the H-Canyon separations facility located on the DOE Savannah River Site. The purpose of the proposed test bed will be to demonstrate the capabilities of emerging technologies for national and international safeguards applications in an operational environment, and to assess the ability of proven technologies to fill any existing gaps. The need for such a test bed has been expressed in the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) program plan and would serve as a means to facilitate transfer of safeguards technologies from the laboratory to an operational environment. New detectors and detector materials open the possibility of operating in a more efficient and cost effective manner, thereby strengthening national and international safeguards objectives. In particular, such detectors could serve the DOE and IAEA in improving timeliness of detection, minimizing uncertainty and improving confidence in results. SRNL's concept for the H Canyon test bed program would eventually open the facility to other DOE National Laboratories and establish a program for testing national and international safeguards related equipment. The initial phase of the test bed program is to conduct a comprehensive feasibility study to determine the benefits and challenges associated with establishing such a test bed. The feasibility study will address issues related to the planning, execution, and operation of the test bed program. Results from the feasibility study will be summarized and discussed in this paper.

Sexton, L.; Mendez-Torres, A.; Hanks, D.

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

National SCADA Test Bed | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services Cybersecurity Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity National SCADA Test Bed National SCADA Test Bed Electricity Advisory Committee Transmission Planning...

14

High-temperature-staged fluidized-bed combustion (HITS), bench scale experimental test program conducted during 1980. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental program was conducted to evaluate the process feasibility of the first stage of the HITS two-stage coal combustion system. Tests were run in a small (12-in. ID) fluidized bed facility at the Energy Engineering Laboratory, Aerojet Energy Conversion Company, Sacramento, California. The first stage reactor was run with low (0.70%) and high (4.06%) sulfur coals with ash fusion temperatures of 2450/sup 0/ and 2220/sup 0/F, respectively. Limestone was used to scavenge the sulfur. The produced low-Btu gas was burned in a combustor. Bed temperature and inlet gas percent oxygen were varied in the course of testing. Key results are summarized as follows: the process was stable and readily controllable, and generated a free-flowing char product using coals with low (2220/sup 0/F) and high (2450/sup 0/F) ash fusion temperatures at bed temperatures of at least 1700/sup 0/ and 1800/sup 0/F, respectively; the gaseous product was found to have a total heating value of about 120 Btu/SCF at 1350/sup 0/F, and the practicality of cleaning the hot product gas and delivering it to the combustor was demonstrated; sulfur capture efficiencies above 80% were demonstrated for both low and high sulfur coals with a calcium/sulfur mole ratio of approximately two; gasification rates of about 5,000 SCF/ft/sup 2/-hr were obtained for coal input rates ranging from 40 to 135 lbm/hr, as required to maintain the desired bed temperatures; and the gaseous product yielded combustion temperatures in excess of 3000/sup 0/F when burned with preheated (900/sup 0/F) air. The above test results support the promise of the HITS system to provide a practical means of converting high sulfur coal to a clean gas for industrial applications. Sulfur capture, gas heating value, and gas production rate are all in the range required for an effective system. Planning is underway for additional testing of the system in the 12-in. fluid bed facility, including demonstration of the second stage char burnup reactor.

Anderson, R E; Jassowski, D M; Newton, R A; Rudnicki, M L

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Test Bed at American Electric Power Figure 2. One-LineH. VOLKOMMER, American Electric Power, USA E. LINTON AND H.and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully

ETO, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. CERTS Microgrid Test Bed at American Electric Power PhotoCredit: American Electric Power Figure 2. One-Line DiagramVOLKOMMER, American Electric Power, USA E. LINTON AND HECTOR

Eto, Joe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on Power Delivery CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed R. H.and J. Roy Abstract--. CERTS Microgrid concept captures theas a subsystem or a microgrid. The sources can operate in

Lasseter, R. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

National SCADA Test Bed | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home National SCADA Test Bed National SCADA Test Bed Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems...

19

Moving Granular Bed Filter Development Program  

SciTech Connect

The granular bed filter was developed through low pressure, high temperature (1600{degrees}F) testing in the late 1970`s and early 1980`s`. Collection efficiencies over 99% were obtained. In 1988, high pressure, high temperature testing was completed at New York University, Westbury, N.Y., utilizing a coal-fired pressurized, fluidized bed combustor. High particulate removal efficiencies were confirmed as it was shown that both New Source Performance Standards and turbine tolerance limits could be met. The early scale-up work of the granular bed filter indicated potential limitations due to size, cost, and mechanical complexity. These limitations were addressed in the present program by utilizing the information gained from the filter development up through the NYU test program to reassess the commercial approach. Two studies were chosen for developing conceptual designs and cost estimates of the commercial sized filters. One is the economic study of the 250 MWe, second generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plant defined by Foster Wheeler. This plant originally included cross-flow filters for hot gas cleanup. The other plant under study is a 100 MWe, airblown KRW gasifier. A cross-flow inter was utilized for gas stream cleanup in this study also. Granular bed and ceramic candle filters were substituted for the cross-flow filters in both these plants, and the resulting cost of electricity (COE) is compared.

Wilson, K.B.; Haas, J.C.; Eshelman, M.B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Moving Granular Bed Filter Development Program  

SciTech Connect

The granular bed filter was developed through low pressure, high temperature (1600[degrees]F) testing in the late 1970's and early 1980's'. Collection efficiencies over 99% were obtained. In 1988, high pressure, high temperature testing was completed at New York University, Westbury, N.Y., utilizing a coal-fired pressurized, fluidized bed combustor. High particulate removal efficiencies were confirmed as it was shown that both New Source Performance Standards and turbine tolerance limits could be met. The early scale-up work of the granular bed filter indicated potential limitations due to size, cost, and mechanical complexity. These limitations were addressed in the present program by utilizing the information gained from the filter development up through the NYU test program to reassess the commercial approach. Two studies were chosen for developing conceptual designs and cost estimates of the commercial sized filters. One is the economic study of the 250 MWe, second generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plant defined by Foster Wheeler. This plant originally included cross-flow filters for hot gas cleanup. The other plant under study is a 100 MWe, airblown KRW gasifier. A cross-flow inter was utilized for gas stream cleanup in this study also. Granular bed and ceramic candle filters were substituted for the cross-flow filters in both these plants, and the resulting cost of electricity (COE) is compared.

Wilson, K.B.; Haas, J.C.; Eshelman, M.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Next Generation Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3 machine rooms (safety, security, power, & A/C). Supports COOP ... ii. Developing methods and technologies for next generation biometric testing. ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Moving granular-bed filter development program, Option III: Development of moving granular-bed filter technology for multi-contaminant control. Task 14: Test plan; Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental test plan has been prepared for DOE/METC review and approval to develop a filter media suitable for multi-contaminant control in granular-bed filter (GBF) applications. The plan includes identification, development, and demonstration of methods for enhanced media morphology, chemical reactivity, and mechanical strength. The test plan includes media preparation methods, physical and chemical characterization methods for fresh and reacted media, media evaluation criteria, details of test and analytical equipment, and test matrix of the proposed media testing. A filter media composed of agglomerated limestone and clay was determined to be the best candidate for multi-contaminate control in GBF operation. The combined limestone/clay agglomerate has the potential to remove sulfur and alkali species, in addition to particulate, and possibly halogens and trace heavy metals from coal process streams.

Haas, J.C.; Olivo, C.A.; Wilson, K.B.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Dynometer test bed (fact sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) Dynamometer Test Bed is one of a kind. It offers wind industry engineers a unique opportunity to conduct lifetime endurance tests on a wide range of wind turbine drivetrains and gearboxes at various speeds, using low or high torque. By testing full-scale wind turbines, engineers from NREL and industry hope to understand the impact of various wind conditions with the goal of improving hardware design.

O' Dell, K.

2000-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

24

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed Title CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-3553E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Lasseter, Robert H., Joseph H. Eto, Ben Schenkman, John Stevens, Harry T. Volkommer, David Klapp, Ed Linton, Hector Hurtado, and Joyashree Roy Journal IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery Volume 26 Start Page 325 Issue 1 Date Published 01/2011 Keywords distributed energy resources (der) Abstract CERTS Microgrid concept captures the emerging potential of distributed generation using a system approach. CERTS views generation and associated loads as a subsystem or a "microgrid". The sources can operate in parallel to the grid or can operate in island, providing UPS services. The system can disconnect from the utility during large events (i.e. faults, voltage collapses), but may also intentionally disconnect when the quality of power from the grid falls below certain standards. CERTS Microgrid concepts were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resynchronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. Keywords: CHP, UPS, distributed generation, intentional islanding, inverters, microgrid, CERTS, power vs. frequency droop, voltage droop.

25

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of generating sources less than 100kW. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation, islanding the microgrid's load from a disturbance, thereby maintaining a higher level of service, without impacting the integrity of the utility's electrical power grid; 2) an approach to electrical protection within a limited source microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications between sources. These techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations,and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protection system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust under all conditions, including difficult motor starts and high impedance faults. The results from these tests are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or more of the CERTS Microgrid concepts. Future planned microgrid work involves unattended continuous operation of the microgrid for 30 to 60 days to determine how utility faults impact the operation of the microgrid and to gage the power quality and reliability improvements offered by microgrids.

Eto, Joe; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Stevens, John; Klapp, Dave; Volkommer, Harry; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

26

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Submitted to IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery Submitted to IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery Abstract--. CERTS Microgrid concept captures the emerging potential of distributed generation using a system approach. CERTS views generation and associated loads as a subsystem or a "microgrid". The sources can operate in parallel to the grid or can operate in island, providing UPS services. The system can disconnect from the utility during large events (i.e. faults, voltage collapses), but may also intentionally disconnect when the quality of power from the grid falls below certain standards. CERTS Microgrid concepts were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations,

27

Enhanced durability of high-temperature desulfurization sorbents for moving-bed applications. Option 2 Program: Development and testing of zinc titanate sorbents  

SciTech Connect

One of the most advantageous configurations of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system is coupling it with a hot gas cleanup for the more efficient production of electric power in an environmentally acceptable manner. In conventional gasification cleanup systems, closely heat exchangers are necessary to cool down the fuel gases for cleaning, sometimes as low as 200--300{degree}F, and to reheat the gases prior to injection into the turbine. The result is significant losses in efficiency for the overall power cycle. High-temperature coal gas cleanup in the IGCC system can be operated near 1000{degree}F or higher, i.e., at conditions compatible with the gasifier and turbine components, resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for IGCC power systems in which mixed-metal oxides are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. The objective of this contract is to identify and test fabrication methods and sorbent chemical compositions that enhance the long-term chemical reactivity and mechanical durability of zinc ferrite and other novel sorbents for moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization of coal-derived gases. Zinc ferrite was studied under the base program of this contract. In the next phase of this program novel sorbents, particularly zinc titanate-based sorbents, are being studied under the remaining optional programs. This topical report summarizes only the work performed under the Option 2 program. In the course of carrying out the program, more than 25 zinc titanate formulations have been prepared and characterized to identify formulations exhibiting enhanced properties over the baseline zinc titanate formulation selected by the US Department of Energy.

Ayala, R.E.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Moving granular-bed filter development program. Topical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced, coal-based, power plants, such as IGCC and Advanced-PFBC, are currently nearing commercial demonstration. These power plant technologies require hot gas filtration as part of their gas cleaning trains. Ceramic barrier filters are the major filter candidates being developed for these hot gas cleaning applications. While ceramic barrier filters achieve high levels of particle removal, concerns exist for their reliability and operability in these applications. An alternative hot gas filtration technology is the moving granular bed filter. An advanced, moving granular bed filter has been conceived, and early development activities performed by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science and Technology Center. This document reports on the Base Contract tasks performed to resolve the barrier technical issues for this technology. The concept, the Standleg Moving Granular Bed Filter (SMGBF) has a concurrent downward, gas and bed media flow configuration that results in simplified features and improved scaleup feasibility compared to alternative designs. Two modes of bed media operation were assessed in the program: once-through using pelletized power plant waste as bed media, and recycle of bed media via standleg and pneumatic transport techniques. Cold Model testing; high-temperature, high-pressure testing; and pelletization testing using advanced power plant wastes, have been conducted in the program. A commercial, economic assessment of the SMGBF technology was performed for IGCC and Advanced-PFBC applications. The evaluation shows that the barrier technical issues can be resolved, and that the technology is potentially competitive with ceramic barrier filters.

Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

DOD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project DOD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project Presentation covers the DOD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project, given at the May, 23 2012 Federal Technology...

30

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Programmatic Background and Design of the Cloud and Radiation Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, is a major new program of atmospheric measurement and modeling. The program is intended to improve the understanding of processes that affect ...

Gerald M. Stokes; Stephen E. Schwartz

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

National SCADA Test Bed Consequence Modeling Tool | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National SCADA Test Bed Consequence Modeling Tool National SCADA Test Bed Consequence Modeling Tool This document presents a consequence modeling tool that provides, for asset...

32

National SCADA Test Bed Enhancing control systems security in...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCADA Test Bed Enhancing control systems security in the energy sector National SCADA Test Bed Enhancing control systems security in the energy sector Improving the security of...

33

DoD ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project EW-201016 "High Efficiency - Reduced Emissions Boiler Controls" 23 May 2012 Dr. Jim Galvin ESTCP Program Manager for Energy & Water ESTCP Energy Test Bed Project Location 2 3 Boiler Efficiency Improvement Demo Oxygen Sensor Servo Controls * 90% of boilers lack automated controls * State of the art automated controls sense only oxygen * Demonstrated prototype sensed oxygen and carbon monoxide Prototype CO Sensor Key Findings Boiler Before Demo 4 * Size: 25 MMBtu * Age: 30 years * Fuel: Natural Gas or Oil * Demo performed by United Technologies Research Center * Technology demonstrated: Fireye PPC4000 (Oxygen trim control) * Upgraded PPC4000 tested as a prototype 5 Three Phased TestTest Phase 1: Existing Legacy System (baseline)

34

National SCADA Test Bed | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cybersecurity » Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity Cybersecurity » Energy Delivery Systems Cybersecurity » National SCADA Test Bed National SCADA Test Bed Created in 2003, the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) is a one-of-a-kind national resource that draws on the integrated expertise and capabilities of the Argonne, Idaho, Lawrence Berkeley, Los Alamos, Oak Ridge, Pacific Northwest, and Sandia National Laboratories to address the cybersecurity challenges of energy delivery systems. Core and Frontier Research The NSTB core capabilities combine a network of the national labs' state-of-the-art operational system testing facilities with expert research, development, analysis, and training to discover and address critical security vulnerabilities and threats the energy sector faces. NSTB offers testing and research facilities, encompassing field-scale control

35

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

projects, and currently performs design and testing of power converters and direct-drive permanent magnet generator technology for wind power products. Jean Roy has a Masters...

36

Post Combustion Test Bed Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assessment methodology and slip-stream testing platform enables the comprehensive early-stage evaluation of carbon capture solvents and sorbents utilizing a breadth of laboratory experimental capability as well as a testing platform at a nearby 600 MW pulverized coal-fired power plant.

Cabe, James E.; King, Dale A.; Freeman, Charles J.

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

Joint NOAA, Navy, NASA Hurricane Test Bed Terms of Reference  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(JHT) to advance the transfer of new research and technology into operational hurricane prediction. The JHT will routinely serve as a conduit between the operational, academic, and research communities. This facility will be located at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) in Miami, FL. Whereas the operational center and associated personnel could be the NHC, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC, Navy), or the Central Pacific Hurricane Center (CPHC), and NHC will be specified in this document, both for brevity and to acknowledge the current focus of the JHT on that organization. Use of other facilities is possible depending on requirements, workload, and opportunity. II. Mission Statement The mission of the Joint (NOAA, Navy, and NASA) Hurricane Test Bed is to transfer more rapidly and smoothly new technology, research results, and observational advances of the USWRP, its sponsoring agencies, the academic community and other groups into improved tropical cyclone analysis and prediction at operational centers. III. Concept of Operations The JHT is the initial test bed activity funded by the USWRP and is established to accelerate the technology infusion focused on hurricane analysis and prediction. Until all test beds are organized under a national test bed activity, the USWRP Interagency Program Office (IPO) provides coordination and oversight. The USWRP/IPO will facilitate outreach, the proposal process, and interaction with the oversight board, funding, and other tasks common to the test beds. The JHT will work with the USWRP/IPO to accomplish those tasks appropriate for administration of the hurricane test bed. The JHT mission will be accomplished by the following: assessing scientific breakthroughs and new techniques to identify advanced, realtime, data-analysis techniques, forecast models, and observational systems that have potential for significantly improving the forecast guidance provided to hurricane forecasters; completing tests of the codes, products, and observations in a quasi-operational information technology (IT) environment subject to metrics that mandate good scientific performance while meeting ease-of use criteria and time constraints;

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Fluidized Bed Asbestos Sampler Design and Testing  

SciTech Connect

A large number of samples are required to characterize a site contaminated with asbestos from previous mine or other industrial operations. Current methods, such as EPA Region 10s glovebox method, or the Berman Elutriator method are time consuming and costly primarily because the equipment is difficult to decontaminate between samples. EPA desires a shorter and less costly method for characterizing soil samples for asbestos. The objective of this was to design and test a qualitative asbestos sampler that operates as a fluidized bed. The proposed sampler employs a conical spouted bed to vigorously mix the soil and separate fine particulate including asbestos fibers on filters. The filters are then analyzed using transmission electron microscopy for presence of asbestos. During initial testing of a glass prototype using ASTM 20/30 sand and clay fines as asbestos surrogates, fine particulate adhered to the sides of the glass vessel and the tubing to the collection filter presumably due to static charge on the fine particulate. This limited the fines recovery to ~5% of the amount added to the sand surrogate. A second prototype was constructed of stainless steel, which improved fines recovery to about 10%. Fines recovery was increased to 15% by either humidifying the inlet air or introducing a voltage probe in the air space above the sample. Since this was not a substantial improvement, testing using the steel prototype proceeded without using these techniques. Final testing of the second prototype using asbestos suggests that the fluidized bed is considerably more sensitive than the Berman elutriator method. Using a sand/tremolite mixture with 0.005% tremolite, the Berman elutriator did not segregate any asbestos structures while the fluidized bed segregated an average of 11.7. The fluidized bed was also able to segregate structures in samples containing asbestos at a 0.0001% concentration, while the Berman elutriator method did not detect any fibers at this concentration. Opportunities for improvement with the fluidized bed include improving reproducibility among replicates, increasing mass recovery, improving the lid gasket seal.

Karen E. Wright; Barry H. O'Brien

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Real-Time Building Energy Simulation Using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed. Proceedings of 12 thand the Building Controls Test Bed Xiufeng Pang, PrajeshBUILDING CONTROLS VIRTUAL TEST BED Xiufeng Pang 1 , Prajesh

Pang, Xiufeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

HALOGEN COLLECTOR TEST PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Efficiency tests of removal of radioactive iodine from an air stream were performed on the following halogen collectors: a silver-plated copper-ribbon bed: activatedcharcoal beds, 0.5 and l.0 in. deep: a molecular-sieve bed; and a sodium thiosulfate bed. The tests were conducted at 70 and 160 deg F and at 70 and 95% relative humidity. Only the activated-charcoal collectors achieved a high iodineremoval efficiency over a sustained period at the various operating conditions. (C.J.G.)

1960-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Status of granular bed filter development program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to design and develop moving bed granular filters and ceramic candle filters for particulate control from combined cycle systems. Results are described.

Wilson, K.B.; Haas, J.C.; Prudhomme, J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory Test Bed. California Energy Commission, PublicCERTS Microgrid, California Energy Commission R&D Forum, 4CERTS Microgrid, California Energy Commission R&D Forum, 4

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

An Experimental Test Bed for Small Unmanned Helicopters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a custom experimental test bed for the evaluation of autonomous flight controllers for unmanned helicopters. The development of controllers for unmanned helicopters is a difficult procedure which involves testing through simulation ... Keywords: Aerial robotics, Experimental test bed, Flight control, Fuzzy control, Unmanned helicopters

Nikos I. Vitzilaios; Nikos C. Tsourveloudis

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 C (900-1000 F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.'s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 C (650-1000 F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost assessment and a market plan for large-scale fabrication of sorbents were developed. As an optional task, long-term bench-scale tests of the best moving-bed sorbents were conducted. Starting from thermodynamic calculations, several metal oxides were identified for potential use as hot gas cleanup sorbents using constructed phase stability diagrams and laboratory screening of various mixed-metal oxide formulations. Modified zinc titanates and other proprietary metal oxide formulations were evaluated at the bench scale and many of them found to be acceptable for operation in the target desulfurization temperature range of 370 C (700 F) to 538 C (1000 F) and regeneration temperatures up to 760 C (1400 F). Further work is still needed to reduce the batch-to-batch repeatability in the fabrication of modified zinc titanates for larger scale applications. The information presented in this Volume 1 report contains the results of moving-bed sorbent development at General Electric's Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD). A separate Volume 2 report contains the results of the subcontract on fluidized-bed sorbent development at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT).

R.E Ayala; V.S. Venkataramani; Javad Abbasian; Rachid B. Slimane; Brett E. Williams; Minoo K. Zarnegar; James R. Wangerow; Andy H. Hill

2000-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

45

ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM; DEVELOPMENT OF SORBENTS FOR MOVING-BED AND FLUIDIZED-BED APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power system using high-temperature coal gas cleanup is one of the most promising advanced technologies for the production of electric power from coal in an environmentally acceptable manner. Unlike conventional low-temperature cleanup systems that require costly heat exchangers, high-temperature coal gas cleanup systems can be operated near 482-538 C (900-1000F) or higher, conditions that are a closer match with the gasifier and turbine components in the IGCC system, thus resulting is a more efficient overall system. GE is developing a moving-bed, high-temperature desulfurization system for the IGCC power cycle in which zinc-based regenerable sorbents are currently being used as desulfurization sorbents. Zinc titanate and other proprietary zinc-based oxides are being considered as sorbents for use in the Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program at Tampa Electric Co.?s (TECo) Polk Power Station. Under cold startup conditions at TECo, desulfurization and regeneration may be carried out at temperatures as low as 343 C (650 F), hence a versatile sorbent is desirable to perform over this wide temperature range. A key to success in the development of high-temperature desulfurization systems is the matching of sorbent properties for the selected process operating conditions, namely, sustainable desulfurization kinetics, high sulfur capacity, and mechanical durability over multiple cycles. Additionally, the sulfur species produced during regeneration of the sorbent must be in a form compatible with sulfur recovery systems, such as sulfuric acid or elemental sulfur processes. The overall objective of this program is to develop regenerable sorbents for hydrogen sulfide removal from coal-derived fuel gases in the temperature range 343-538 C (650-1000 F). Two categories of reactor configurations are being considered: moving-bed reactors and fluidized-bed (bubbling and circulating) reactors. In addition, a cost assessment and a market plan for large-scale fabrication of sorbents were developed. As an optional task, long-term bench-scale tests of the best moving-bed sorbents were conducted. Starting from thermodynamic calculations, several metal oxides were identified for potential use as hot gas cleanup sorbents using constructed phase stability diagrams and laboratory screening of various mixed-metal oxide formulations. Modified zinc titanates and other proprietary metal oxide formulations were evaluated at the bench scale and many of them found to be acceptable for operation in the target desulfurization temperature range of 370 C (700 F) to 538 C (1000 F) and regeneration tempera-tures up to 760 C (1400 F). Further work is still needed to reduce the batch-to-batch repeatability in the fabrication of modified zinc titanates for larger scale applications. The information presented in this Volume 1 report contains the results of moving-bed sorbent develop-ment at General Electric?s Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD). A separate Volume 2 report contains the results of the subcontract on fluidized-bed sorbent development at the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT).

R.E. AYALA; V.S. VENKATARAMANI

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

USGv6 Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... their own list of tested products accessible ... items arising include soliciting test laboratories and ... participate in the USGv6 testing program, soliciting ...

2013-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

47

New Zero Net-Energy Facility: A Test Bed for Home Efficiency | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Zero Net-Energy Facility: A Test Bed for Home Efficiency Zero Net-Energy Facility: A Test Bed for Home Efficiency New Zero Net-Energy Facility: A Test Bed for Home Efficiency September 17, 2012 - 2:34pm Addthis Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Kathleen Hogan joined representatives from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and state and local elected officials to celebrate the opening of the new zero net-energy residential test laboratory. | Photo courtesy of NIST. Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency Kathleen Hogan joined representatives from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and state and local elected officials to celebrate the opening of the new zero net-energy residential test laboratory. | Photo courtesy of NIST. David Lee Residential Program Supervisor, Building Technologies Program

48

Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS provides a Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP). Formerly the Smalley Check Sample Program LPP is a collaborative proficiency testing service for oil and fat related commodities, oilseeds, oilseed meals, and edible fats. Laboratory Proficiency Testing

49

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - New Test Bed Probes the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Test Bed Probes the Origin of Pulses at LCLS By Glenn Roberts Jr. July 23, 2013 It all comes down to one tiny spot on a diamond-cut, highly pure copper plate. That's where...

50

Hydrogen storage-bed design for tritium systems test assembly  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed the design of a hydrogen storage bed for the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA). Our objective is to store hydrogen isotopes as uranium hydrides and recover them by dehydriding. The specific use of the storage bed is to store DT gas as U(D,T)/sub 3/ when it is required for the TSTA. The hydrogen storage bed consists of a primary container in which uranium powder is stored and a secondary container for a second level of safety in gas confinement. The primary container, inlet and outlet gas lines, cartridge heaters, and instrumentation are assembled in the secondary container. The design of the hydrogen storage bed is presented, along with the modeling and analysis of the bed behavior during hydriding-dehydriding cycles.

Cullingford, H.S.; Wheeler, M.G.; McMullen, J.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

NIST Test Bed for Explosives Trace Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Test material stability studies. Field research also allows testing of different storage methods to establish test material shelf life. ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

52

Design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation test bed  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the design requirements for the supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) test bed that will be located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The test bed will process a maximum of 50 gph of waste plus the required volume of cooling water. The test bed will evaluate the performance of a number of SCWO reactor designs. The goal of the project is to select a reactor that can be scaled up for use in a full-size waste treatment facility to process US Department of Energy mixed wastes. EG&G Idaho, Inc. will design and construct the SCWO test bed at the Water Reactor Research Test Facility (WRRTF), located in the northern region of the INEL. Private industry partners will develop and provide SCWO reactors to interface with the test bed. A number of reactor designs will be tested, including a transpiring wall, tube, and vessel-type reactor. The initial SCWO reactor evaluated will be a transpiring wall design. This design requirements report identifies parameters needed to proceed with preliminary and final design work for the SCWO test bed. A flow sheet and Process and Instrumentation Diagrams define the overall process and conditions of service and delineate equipment, piping, and instrumentation sizes and configuration Codes and standards that govern the safe engineering and design of systems and guidance that locates and interfaces test bed hardware are provided. Detailed technical requirements are addressed for design of piping, valves, instrumentation and control, vessels, tanks, pumps, electrical systems, and structural steel. The approach for conducting the preliminary and final designs and environmental and quality issues influencing the design are provided.

Svoboda, J.M.; Valentich, D.J.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump System Performance Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An extensive independent evaluation recently was completed of the Multi-Source Hydronic Heat Pump (MSHHP) system, a proprietary heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) system developed by Meckler Systems Group. The MSHHP tests were conducted on a unique test bed designed and constructed by National Technical Systems (NTS) through a research and development grant program funded by Southern California Edison Company. This paper outlines testing methods and results, including evaluations of peak power and energy savings allowed by the innovative system. The main difference between the MSHHP and a conventional HVAC system is use of a chilled water "diversity" cooling loop interconnecting air to water coils (located at each water source heat pump unit) with a central chilled water storage tank. The MSHHP system uses significantly less energy than a conventional HVAC system, and lowers peak demand by shifting required electrical energy consumption to lower-cost, off-peak and mid-peak rates. Lower heat pump capacities are a main feature of the MSHHP. This is accomplished by pre-cooling return air from the zone space, a process that also allows the heat pump to operate at a higher Coefficient of Performance (COP), thereby contributing to further energy savings.

Meckler, M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The Emergence of Weather-Related Test Beds Linking Research and Forecasting Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Test beds have emerged as a critical mechanism linking weather research with forecasting operations. The U.S. Weather Research Program (USWRP) was formed in the 1990s to help identify key gaps in research related to major weather prediction problems and ...

F. Martin Ralph; Janet Intrieri; David Andra Jr.; Robert Atlas; Sid Boukabara; David Bright; Paula Davidson; Bruce Entwistle; John Gaynor; Steve Goodman; Jiann-Gwo Jiing; Amy Harless; Jin Huang; Gary Jedlovec; John Kain; Steven Koch; Bill Kuo; Jason Levit; Shirley Murillo; Lars Peter Riishojgaard; Timothy Schneider; Russell Schneider; Travis Smith; Steven Weiss

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Test plan for the 34 meter vertical axis wind turbine test bed located at Bushland, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A plan is presented for the testing and evaluation of a new 500 kw vertical axis wind turbine test bed. The plan starts with the initial measurements made during construction, proceeds through evaluation of the design, the development of control methods, and finally to the test bed phase where new concepts are evaluated and in-depth studies are performed.

Stephenson, W.A.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Westinghouse standleg moving granular bed filter development program  

SciTech Connect

Advanced, coal-based, power plants, such as IGCC and Advanced-PFBC, are currently nearing commercial demonstration. These power plant technologies require hot gas filtration as part of their gas cleaning trains. Ceramic barrier filters are the major filter candidates being developed for these hot gas cleaning applications. While ceramic barrier filters achieve high levels of particle removal, there are concerns for their reliability and operability. An alternative hot gas filtration technology is the moving granular bed filter. These systems are at a lower state of development than ceramic barrier filters, and their effectiveness as filters is still in question. Their apparent attributes, result from their much less severe mechanical design and materials constraints, and the potential for more reliable, failure-free particle removal operation. The standleg moving granular-bed filter (SMGBF) system, is a compact unit that uses cocurrent gas-pellet contacting in an arrangement that greatly simplifies and enhances the distribution of dirty, process gas to the moving bed and allows effective disengagement of clean gas from the moving bed. This paper describes the equipment and process test results.

Newby, R.A.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Deep Bed Iodine Sorbent Testing FY 2011 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products (FPs) and activation products that increasingly interfere with the fission process as their concentrations increase. Some of these fission and activation products tend to evolve in gaseous species during used nuclear fuel reprocessing. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Deep-bed iodine sorption testing has been done to evaluate the performance of solid sorbents for capturing iodine in off-gas streams from nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The objectives of the FY 2011 deep bed iodine sorbent testing are: (1) Evaluate sorbents for iodine capture under various conditions of gas compositions and operating temperature (determine sorption efficiencies, capacities, and mass transfer zone depths); and (2) Generate data for dynamic iodine sorption modeling. Three tests performed this fiscal year on silver zeolite light phase (AgZ-LP) sorbent are reported here. Additional tests are still in progress and can be reported in a revision of this report or a future report. Testing was somewhat delayed and limited this year due to initial activities to address some questions of prior testing, and due to a period of maintenance for the on-line GC. Each test consisted of (a) flowing a synthetic blend of gases designed to be similar to an aqueous dissolver off-gas stream over the sorbent contained in three separate bed segments in series, (b) measuring each bed inlet and outlet gas concentrations of iodine and methyl iodide (the two surrogates of iodine gas species considered most representative of iodine species expected in dissolver off-gas), (c) operating for a long enough time to achieve breakthrough of the iodine species from at least one (preferably the first two) bed segments, and (d) post-test purging with pure N2 to drive loosely or physisorbed iodine species off of the sorbent. Post-test calculations determine the control efficiencies for each bed, iodine loadings on the sorbent, and mass transfer zone depths. Portions of the iodine-laden sorbent from the first bed of two of the tests have been shipped to SNL for waste form studies. Over the past three years, we have explored a full range of inlet iodine and methyl iodide concentrations ranging from {approx}100 ppb to {approx}100 ppm levels, and shown adequate control efficiencies within a bed depth as shallow as 2 inches for lower concentrations and 4 inches for higher concentrations, for the AgZ-type sorbents. We are now performing a limited number of tests in the NC-77 sorbent from SNL. Then we plan to continue to (a) fill in data gaps needed for isotherms and dynamic sorbent modeling, and (b) test the performance of additional sorbents under development.

Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan DOEOE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan This document is designed to help guide and strengthen the DOEOE...

59

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Smart Grid Security Educational Training with ThunderCloud: A Virtual Security Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we describe a cloud based virtual smart grid test bed: ThunderCloud, which can be used for domain-specific security educational training applicable to the smart grid environment. The test bed consists of virtual machines connected using ... Keywords: Domain-Specific Security Training, Smart Grid, Virtual Test Bed

Joseph Stites, Ambareen Siraj, Eric L. Brown

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Electrostatic granular bed filter development program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The application of the electrostatically enhanced granular bed filter (EGB) in a pressurized fluidized bed (PFB) combined cycle power plant is explored in this study. In a PFB combustor power plant, dust particles entrained in the combustion gases must be removed at high temperature (1700/sup 0/F) and pressure (10 atm) in order to protect a gas turbine from erosion. The EFB filter provides a unique design adapted to avoid filter front face plugging which has been the limiting factor in the successful development of granular bed filters for this application. Under the present study, laboratory experiments and analyses were performed to provide the engineering data necessary to design a test module in the actual PFB environment. An analytical model for predicting the performance of an EGB was also developed. The test data and the model were then utilized to establish preferred geometries and operating parameters of the EGB filter system applied in a 663 MWe PFB power plant. Preliminary conceptual designs were established and an economic evaluations performed. The results of the system analysis and economic studies were analyzed to assess the applicability of the EGB filter to utility scale PFB power plants. New power plants must also meet New Source Performance Standards (.03 lb/10/sup 6/ Btu) which necessitates removal of dust in the respirable size range which would otherwise be harmless to the gas turbine. A key technical issue in the PFB application is whether the hot gas cleanup equipment can satisfy the NSPS. The potential of the EGB for achieving NSPS ahead of the gas turbine is demonstrated, and the conceptual design and economics of this application are presented. (LCL)

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Multilayer coatings for the EUVL front-end test bed  

SciTech Connect

Good illumination uniformity at the mask and wafer planes, and high wafer thoroughput in the EUVL front-end test bed facility at LLNL require graded period multilayer (ML) coatings on several of the optics. The ML deposition was accomplished using a newly developed deposition technique which avoids the use of {open_quotes}uniformity masks{close_quotes} to define the spatial dependence of the ML period variation. The capabilities of the process in providing the specified ML coatings are discussed for both EUVL condenser and imaging systems.

Vernon, S.P.; Carey, M.J.; Gaines, D.P.; Weber, F.J.

1995-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

63

Tests of candidate materials for particle bed reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rhenium metal hot frits and zirconium carbide-coated fuel particles appear suitable for use in flowing hydrogen to at least 2000 K, based on previous tests. Recent tests on alternate candidate cooled particle and frit materials are described. Silicon carbide-coated particles began to react with rhenium frit material at 1600 K, forming a molten silicide at 2000 K. Silicon carbide was extensively attacked by hydrogen at 2066 K for 30 minutes, losing 3.25% of its weight. Vitrous carbon was also rapidly attacked by hydrogen at 2123 K, losing 10% of its weight in two minutes. Long term material tests on candidate materials for closed cycle helium cooled particle bed fuel elements are also described. Surface imperfections were found on the surface of pyrocarbon-coated fuel particles after ninety days exposure to flowing (approx.500 ppM) impure helium at 1143 K. The imperfections were superficial and did not affect particle strength.

Horn, F.L.; Powell, J.R.; Wales, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Heat pipe testing program test plan  

SciTech Connect

A test plan is given which describes the tests to be conducted on several typical solar receiver heat pipes. The hardware to be used, test fixtures and rationale of the test program are discussed. The program objective is to perform life testing under simulated receiver conditions, and to conduct performance tests with selected heat pipes to further map their performance, particularly with regard to their transient behavior. Performance requirements are defined. Test fixtures designed for the program are described in detail, and their capabilities for simulating the receiver conditions and their limitations are discussed. The heat pipe design is given. (LEW)

Bienert, W.B.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

65

CEBAF UPGRADE CRYOMODULE COMPONENT TESTING IN THE HORIZONTAL TEST BED (HTB)*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEBAF UPGRADE CRYOMODULE COMPONENT TESTING IN THE HORIZONTAL TEST BED (HTB)* I. E. Campisi , B The planned upgrade of the CEBAF electron accelerator includes the development of an improved cryomodule. Several components differ substantially from the original CEBAF cryomodule; these include: the new 7-cell

66

Cottonseed Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab proficiency testing for Cottonseed. Determinations include Free Fatty Acids, Foreign Matter, Moisture,Nitrogen,Oil. Cottonseed Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab

67

Fumonisin Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for B1, B2, B3,and total Fumonisin in corn meal samples. Fumonisin Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laboratories Laboratory methods

68

Aflatoxin Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing for Aflatoxin. Samples include Peanut Butter, Peanut Paste, Cottonseed Meal, Corn Meal, Milk, Pistachio and Almond, Aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 Aflatoxin Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP)

69

Cholesterol Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing for Cholesterol. Samples Dried Meats, Dried Egg, and Cheese Powder. Method AOAC 994.10 Cholesterol Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laborato

70

Peanut Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Peanuts to determine Free Fatty Acids, Foreign Matter, Moisture, Oil, Nitrogen. Peanut Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laborat

71

Soybeans Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for determining Free Fatty Acids, Moisture, Nitrogen, Oil, and Crude Fiber in Soybeans. Soybeans Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab la

72

Nuclear waste repository transparency technology test bed demonstrations at WIPP  

SciTech Connect

Secretary of Energy, Bill Richardson, has stated that one of the nuclear waste legacy issues is ``The challenge of managing the fuel cycle's back end and assuring the safe use of nuclear power.'' Waste management (i.e., the back end) is a domestic and international issue that must be addressed. A key tool in gaining acceptance of nuclear waste repository technologies is transparency. Transparency provides information to outside parties for independent assessment of safety, security, and legitimate use of materials. Transparency is a combination of technologies and processes that apply to all elements of the development, operation, and closure of a repository system. A test bed for nuclear repository transparency technologies has been proposed to develop a broad-based set of concepts and strategies for transparency monitoring of nuclear materials at the back end of the fuel/weapons cycle. WIPP is the world's first complete geologic repository system for nuclear materials at the back end of the cycle. While it is understood that WIPP does not currently require this type of transparency, this repository has been proposed as realistic demonstration site to generate and test ideas, methods, and technologies about what transparency may entail at the back end of the nuclear materials cycle, and which could be applicable to other international repository developments. An integrated set of transparency demonstrations was developed and deployed during the summer, and fall of 1999 as a proof-of-concept of the repository transparency technology concept. These demonstrations also provided valuable experience and insight into the implementation of future transparency technology development and application. These demonstrations included: Container Monitoring Rocky Flats to WIPP; Underground Container Monitoring; Real-Time Radiation and Environmental Monitoring; Integrated level of confidence in the system and information provided. As the world's only operating deep geologic repository, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) offers a unique opportunity to serve as an international cooperative test bed for developing and demonstrating technologies and processes in a fully operational repository system setting. To address the substantial national security implications for the US resulting from the lack of integrated, transparent management and disposition of nuclear materials at the back-end of the nuclear fuel and weapons cycles, it is proposed that WIPP be used as a test bed to develop and demonstrate technologies that will enable the transparent and proliferation-resistant geologic isolation of nuclear materials. The objectives of this initiative are to: (1) enhance public confidence in safe, secure geologic isolation of nuclear materials; (2) develop, test, and demonstrate transparency measures and technologies for the back-end of nuclear fuel cycle; and (3) foster international collaborations leading to workable, effective, globally-accepted standards for the transparent monitoring of geological repositories for nuclear materials. Test-bed activities include: development and testing of monitoring measures and technologies; international demonstration experiments; transparency workshops; visiting scientist exchanges; and educational outreach. These activities are proposed to be managed by the Department of Energy/Carlsbad Area Office (DOE/CAO) as part of The Center for Applied Repository and Underground Studies (CARUS).

BETSILL,J. DAVID; ELKINS,NED Z.; WU,CHUAN-FU; MEWHINNEY,JAMES D.; AAMODT,PAUL

2000-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Joint Hurricane Test Bed: Its First Decade of Tropical Cyclone Research-To-Operations Activities Reviewed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Joint Hurricane Testbed (JHT) is reviewed at the completion of its first decade. Views of the program by hurricane forecasters at the National Hurricane Center, the test bed's impact on forecast accuracy, and highlights of the top-rated projects are ...

Edward N. Rappaport; Jiann-Gwo Jiing; Christopher W. Landsea; Shirley T. Murillo; James L. Franklin

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Results from the NREL Variable-Speed Test bed  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NREL Variable-Speed Test bed turbine has been used to examine the performance and controllability of a variable-speed, variable-pitch turbine. Control strategies that eliminate drive-train torque fluctuations in high winds have been published before and example data are given here. The energy capture of a variable-speed wind turbine depends in part on its ability to successfully operate at the peak of the C{sub p}-{lambda} curve. The losses associated with the inability of the rotor to stay exactly on top of the curve at all have been found and quantified. New control strategies for improving energy capture in moderate winds are also proposed. The potential exists to improve overall energy capture by 5% or more.

Fingersh, L.J.; Carlin, P.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). National Wind Technology Center

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER (FBSR) WASTE FORMS  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium aqueous radioactive wastes. The addition of clay and a catalyst as co-reactants converts high sodium aqueous low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford and Idaho DOE sites to a granular ''mineralized'' waste form that may be made into a monolith form if necessary. Simulant Hanford and Idaho high sodium wastes were processed in a pilot scale FBSR at Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium-bearing waste (SBW). The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The durability of the FBSR waste form products was tested in order to compare the measured durability to previous FBSR waste form testing on Hanford Envelope C waste forms that were made by THOR Treatment Technologies (TTT) and to compare the FBSR durability to vitreous LAW waste forms, specifically the Hanford low activity waste (LAW) glass known as the Low-activity Reference Material (LRM). The durability of the FBSR waste form is comparable to that of the LRM glass for the test responses studied.

Jantzen, C

2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

76

Deep Bed Adsorption Testing using Silver-Functionalized Aerogel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing and evolve in gaseous species into the reprocessing facility off-gas systems. Analyses have shown that I129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Two Aerogel sorption tests that have been performed this fiscal year. The maximum iodine decontamination factor (DF) was measured to be over 10,000, above the 1,000-10,000 target DF range. The mass transfer zone may be as short as 0.5 inches under the sorption conditions of the first test. Only a small fraction of the iodine sorbed on Bed 1 was desorbed during the purge periods. The silver-functionalized Aerogel appears to have potential to be a very effective and efficient iodine sorbent.

Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Iodine Sorbent Performance in FY 2012 Deep Bed Tests  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear fission results in the production of fission products and activation products, some of which tend to be volatile during used fuel reprocessing and evolve in gaseous species into the reprocessing facility off-gas systems. Analyses have shown that I-129, due to its radioactivity, high potential mobility in the environment, and high longevity (half life of 15.7 million years), can require control efficiencies of up to 1,000x or higher to meet regulatory emission limits. Iodine capture is an important aspect of the Separations and Waste Forms Campaign Off-gas Sigma Team (Jubin 2011, Pantano 2011). Deep-bed iodine sorption tests for both silver-functionalized Aerogel and silver zeolite sorbents were performed during Fiscal Year 2012. These tests showed that: Decontamination factors were achieved that exceed reasonably conservative estimates for DFs needed for used fuel reprocessing facilities in the U.S. to meet regulatory requirements for I-129 capture. Silver utilizations approached or exceeded 100% for high inlet gas iodine concentrations, but test durations were not long enough to approach 100% silver utilization for lower iodine concentrations. The depth of the mass transfer zone was determined for both low iodine concentrations (under 10 ppmv) and for higher iodine concentrations (between 10-50 ppmv); the depth increases over time as iodine is sorbed. These sorbents capture iodine by chemisorption, where the sorbed iodine reacts with the silver to form very non-volatile AgI. Any sorbed iodine that is physisorbed but not chemically reacted with silver to form AgI might not be tightly held by the sorbent. The portion of sorbed iodine that tends to desorb because it is not chemisorbed (reacted to form AgI) is small, under 1%, for the AgZ tests, and even smaller, under 0.01%, for the silver-functionalized Aerogel.

Nick Soelberg; Tony Watson

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Moving granular-bed filter development program topical report  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Science Technology Center has proposed a novel moving granular-bed filter concept, the Standleg Moving Granular-Bed Filter (S-MGBF) system, that overcomes the inherent deficiencies of the current state-of-the-art moving granular-bed filter technology. The S-MGBF system combines two unique features that make it highly effective for use in advanced coal-fueled power plants. First, the S-MGBF system applies pelletization technology to generate filter pellets from the power plant solid waste materials, and uses these pellets as a once-through'' filtering media to eliminate the need for costly, complex, and large filter media recycling equipment. This pelletizing step also generates a more environmentally acceptable solid waste product and provides the potential to incorporate gas-phase contaminant sorbents into the filtering media. Secondly, the S-MGBF system passes these pellets and the flyash laden power plant gas through a highly compact S-MGBF that uses cocurrent gas-pellet contacting in an arrangement that greatly simplifies and enhances the distribution of dirty gas to the moving bed and the disengagement of clean gas from the moving bed.

Newby, R.A.; Dilmore, W.J.; Fellers, A.W.; Gasparovic, A.C.; Kittle, W.F.; Lippert, T.E.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Yang, W.C.

1991-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

79

Petrology and geochemistry of samples from bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5, U12g-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the detailed geologic characterization of samples of bed-contact zones and surrounding nonwelded bedded tuffs, both within Tunnel Bed 5, that are exposed in the G-Tunnel complex beneath Rainier Mesa on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Original planning studies treated the bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5 as simple planar surfaces of relatively high permeability. Detailed characterization, however, indicates that these zones have a finite thickness, are depositional in origin, vary considerably over short vertical and horizontal distances, and are internally complex. Fluid flow in a sequence of nonwelded zeolitized ash-flow or bedded tuffs and thin intervening reworked zones appears to be a porous-medium phenomenon, regardless of the presence of layering. There are no consistent differences in either bulk composition or detailed mineralogy between bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones in Tunnel Bed 5. Although the original bulk composition of Tunnel Bed 5 was probably peralkaline, extensive zeolitization has resulted in a present peraluminous bulk composition of both bedded tuffs and bed-contact zones. The major zeolite present, clinoptilolite, is intermediate (Ca:K:Na = 26:35:39) and effectively uniform in composition. This composition is similar to that of clinoptilolite from the tuffaceous beds of Calico Hills above the static water level in hole USW G-1, but somewhat different from that reported for zeolites from below the static water level in USW G-2. Tunnel Bed 5 also contains abundant hydrous manganese oxides. The similarity in composition of the clinoptilolites from Tunnel Bed 5 and those above the static water level at Yucca Mountain indicates that many of the results of nuclide-migration experiments in Tunnel Bed 5 would be transferrable to zeolitized nonwelded tuffs above the static water level at Yucca Mountain.

Connolly, J.R.; Keil, K.; Mansker, W.L.; Allen, C.C.; Husler, J.; Lowy, R.; Fortney, D.R.; Lappin, A.R.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

LOFT facility and test program  

SciTech Connect

The Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) test facility, program objectives, and the experiments planned are described. The LOFT facility is related to the smaller Semiscale facility and the larger commercial pressurized water reactors. The fact that LOFT is a computer model assessment tool rather than a demonstration test is emphasized. Various types of reactor safety experiments planned through 1983 are presented.

McPherson, G.D.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Co-Simulation of Building Energy and Control Systems with the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the implementation of the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB). The BCVTB is a software environment that allows connecting different simulation programs to exchange data during the time integration, and that allows conducting hardware in the loop simulation. The software architecture is a modular design based on Ptolemy II, a software environment for design and analysis of heterogeneous systems. Ptolemy II provides a graphical model building environment, synchronizes the exchanged data and visualizes the system evolution during run-time. The BCVTB provides additions to Ptolemy II that allow the run-time coupling of different simulation programs for data exchange, including EnergyPlus, MATLAB, Simulink and the Modelica modelling and simulation environment Dymola. The additions also allow executing system commands, such as a script that executes a Radiance simulation. In this article, the software architecture is presented and the mathematical model used to implement the co-simulation is discussed. The simulation program interface that the BCVTB provides is explained. The article concludes by presenting applications in which different state of the art simulation programs are linked for run-time data exchange. This link allows the use of the simulation program that is best suited for the particular problem to model building heat transfer, HVAC system dynamics and control algorithms, and to compute a solution to the coupled problem using co-simulation.

Wetter, Michael

2010-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

82

Nevada Test Site closure program  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the history, design and development, procurement, fabrication, installation and operation of the closures used as containment devices on underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site. It also addresses the closure program mothball and start-up procedures. The Closure Program Document Index and equipment inventories, included as appendices, serve as location directories for future document reference and equipment use.

Shenk, D.P.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Irradiation test program for FFTF  

SciTech Connect

Four unique deisgn features are described which make the Fast Flux Test Facility eminently suitable for irradiation test programs. These features are a fast flux level of 7 x 10/sup 15/ neutrons/cm/sup 2//sec, a 36-inch reference (breeder reactor) core height, test volumes suitable for testing of statistical quantities of materials, and the capability for direct (contact) or indirect (proximity) instrumentation of active core experiments.

Corrigan, D.C.; Last, G.A.

1978-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fixed bed testing of durable, steam resistant zinc oxide containing sorbents  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy is currently developing Integrated Gasification combined Cycle (IGCC) systems for electrical power generation. It has been predicted that IGCC plants with hot gas cleanup will be superior to conventional pulverized coal-fired power plants in overall plant efficiency and environmental performance. Development of a suitable regenerable sorbent is a major barrier issue in the hot gas cleanup program for IGCC systems. This has been a challenging problem during the last 20 years, since many of the sorbents developed in the program could not retain their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated cycles of sulfidation and regeneration reactions. Two promising sorbents and (METC6), which were capable of sustaining their reactivity and physical integrity during repeated sulfidation/regeneration cycles, have been developed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) during the past year. These sorbents were tested (sulfided) both in low-pressure (260 kPa/37.7 psia) and high-pressure (1034 kPa/150 psia) fixed-bed reactors at 538{degrees}C (1000{degrees}F) with simulated KRW coal gas. High-pressure testing was continued for 20 cycles with steam regeneration. There were no appreciable changes in sulfidation capacity of the sorbents during the 20-cycle testing. The crush strength of the sorbent actually improved after 20 cycles and there were no indications of spalling or any other physical deterioration of the sorbents. In testing to date, these sorbents exhibit better overall sulfur capture performance than the conventional sorbents.

Siriwardane, R.V.; Grimm, U.; Poston, J. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Monaco, S.J. [EG& G dTechnical Services of West Virginia, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

U.S. DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Supports | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

U.S. DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Supports U.S. DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Supports U.S. DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Supports To help advance the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National SCADA Test Bed's (NSTB) efforts to enhance control system security in the energy sector, DOE's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE) recently awarded a total of nearly $8 million to fund five industry-led projects: Hallmark Project. (PDF 789 KB) Will commercialize the Secure SCADA Communications Protocol (SSCP), which marks SCADA messages with a unique identifier that must be authenticated before the function is carried out, ensuring message integrity. (Lead: Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories; Partners: Pacific Northwest National Laboratories, CenterPoint Energy) Detection and Analysis of Threats to the Energy Sector (DATES) (PDF

86

National SCADA Test Bed Enhancing control systems security in the energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SCADA Test Bed Enhancing control systems security in the SCADA Test Bed Enhancing control systems security in the energy sector National SCADA Test Bed Enhancing control systems security in the energy sector Improving the security of energy control systems has become a national priority. Since the mid-1990's, security experts have become increasingly concerned about the threat of malicious cyber attacks on the vital supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) and distributed control systems (DCS) used to monitor and manage our energy infrastructure. Many of the systems still in use today were designed to operate in closed, proprietary networks. National SCADA Test Bed Enhancing control systems security in the energy sector More Documents & Publications NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas Transmission and Distribution World March 2007: DOE Focuses on Cyber

87

RESOURCE ASSESSMENT & PRODUCTION TESTING FOR COAL BED METHANE IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN  

SciTech Connect

The geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky have completed the initial geologic assessment of their respective parts of the Illinois Basin. Cumulative thickness maps have been generated and target areas for drilling have been selected. The first well in the Illinois area of the Illinois Basin coal bed methane project was drilled in White County, Illinois in October 2003. This well was cored in the major coal interval from the Danville to the Davis Coals and provided a broad spectrum of samples for further analyses. Sixteen coal samples and three black shale samples were taken from these cores for canister desorption tests and were the subject of analyses that were completed over the following months, including desorbed gas volume, gas chemical and isotope composition, coal proximate, calorific content and sulfur analyses. Drilling programs in Indiana and Kentucky are expected to begin shortly.

Cortland Eble; James Drahovzal; David Morse; Ilham Demir; John Rupp; Maria Mastalerz; Wilfrido Solano

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program Area Lead ENERGY SYSTEMS INTEGRATION Mike GravelyResearch Energy Systems Integration Environmentallyto PIERs Energy Systems Integration Program. For more

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

New Accreditation Program for Body Armor Testing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Accreditation Program for Body Armor Testing Laboratories. From NIST Tech Beat: December 12, 2007. ...

2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

90

DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Frequently Asked Questions for: DOE's Round Robin Test Program May 2011 i Table of Contents Introduction ......

91

2012 SG Peer Review - LANL Smart Grid Technology Test Bed - Scott Backhaus, LANL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Test Bed Technology Test Bed Scott Backhaus Los Alamos National Laboratory June 8, 2012 December 2008 Smart Grid Technology Test Bed Objectives Life-cycle Funding ($K) Technical Scope - Create and demonstrate a replicable DER control system-focus on small electrical utilities and co-operatives - Integration of renewables - Planning of DER portfolios - Assess economic DER value - Development/characterization of DER - Commercial HVAC - Run-of-river hydro  Model predictive control (MPC) of diverse portfolios of distributed resources  Optimal/controllable modification of the statistics of PV variability  Data-driven models for control of HVAC in large commercial buildings  Models/control of run-of-river hydro-river impacts 2 FY10-11 FY12 FY13 Request FY14 Request 350 300 400 400

92

2012 SG Peer Review - CERTS Microgrid Test Bed - Joe Eto, LBNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Peer Peer Review Meeting Peer Review Meeting The CERTS Microgrid Test Bed g Joe Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 7 June 2012 The CERTS Microgrid Test Bed Objective To lower the cost and improve the performance of clusters of smaller distributed energy resources and loads when operated in an integrated manner when operated in an integrated manner, i.e., as microgrids Life-cycle Funding Summary ($K) Prior to FY12, FY13, Out-year(s) Technical Scope The CERTS Microgrid Test Bed is being expanded through the addition of new hardware elements: 1) a CERTS- compatible conventional synchronous generator ; 2) an FY 12 , authorized , requested y ( ) 2500K 1000K 1000K 2500K energy management system relying on software as a service (SaaS) for dispatch; 3) a commercially available, stand-alone

93

Post-quasistatic approximation as a test bed for numerical relativity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown that observers in the standard ADM 3+1 treatment of matter are the same as the observers used in the matter treatment of Bondi: they are comoving and local Minkowskian. Bondi's observers are the basis of the post-quasistatic approximation (PQSA) to study a contracting distribution of matter. This correspondence suggests the possibility of using the PQSA as a test bed for numerical relativity. The treatment of matter by the PQSA and its connection with the ADM 3+1 treatment are presented, for its practical use as a calibration tool and as a test bed for numerical relativistic hydrodynamic codes.

Barreto, W. [Centro de Fisica Fundamental, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Edible Fat Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing for Edible Fat to test OSI,FFA, AOCS Color, Capillary Melting Point, Iodine Value, Lovibond Color, Mettler Dropping Point, a;-Monoglycerides, SFC Edible Fat Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP

95

Fish Meal Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Fish Meal to test Acid Value, Crude Protein, Moisture, Oil, Ash, Pepsin Digestibility, Ammonia Nitrogen. Fish Meal Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified

96

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Utility Connected .. 92 CONCLUSION.. 99 II ListUtility Connected mode for Test 10.4.17 .. 215 XV Listutility grid. .. 25 II List

Eto, Joseph H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

IN SITU DECOMMISSIONING SENSOR NETWORK, MESO-SCALE TEST BED - PHASE 3 FLUID INJECTION TEST SUMMARY REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Office of Environmental management (DOE EM) faces the challenge of decommissioning thousands of excess nuclear facilities, many of which are highly contaminated. A number of these excess facilities are massive and robust concrete structures that are suitable for isolating the contained contamination for hundreds of years, and a permanent decommissioning end state option for these facilities is in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD option is feasible for a limited, but meaningfull number of DOE contaminated facilities for which there is substantial incremental environmental, safety, and cost benefits versus alternate actions to demolish and excavate the entire facility and transport the rubble to a radioactive waste landfill. A general description of an ISD project encompasses an entombed facility; in some cases limited to the blow-grade portion of a facility. However, monitoring of the ISD structures is needed to demonstrate that the building retains its structural integrity and the contaminants remain entombed within the grout stabilization matrix. The DOE EM Office of Deactivation and Decommissioning and Facility Engineering (EM-13) Program Goal is to develop a monitoring system to demonstrate long-term performance of closed nuclear facilities using the ISD approach. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has designed and implemented the In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) to address the feasibility of deploying a long-term monitoring system into an ISD closed nuclear facility. The ISDSN-MSTB goal is to demonstrate the feasibility of installing and operating a remote sensor network to assess cementitious material durability, moisture-fluid flow through the cementitious material, and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility in a decommissioned closed nuclear facility. The original ISDSN-MSTB installation and remote sensor network operation was demonstrated in FY 2011-12 at the ISDSN-MSTB test cube located at the Florida International University Applied Research Center, Miami, FL (FIU-ARC). A follow-on fluid injection test was developed to detect fluid and ion migration in a cementitious material/grouted test cube using a limited number of existing embedded sensor systems. This In Situ Decommissioning Sensor Network, Meso-Scale Test Bed (ISDSN-MSTB) - Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test Summary Report summarizes the test implementation, acquired and processed data, and results from the activated embedded sensor systems used during the fluid injection test. The ISDSN-MSTB Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test was conducted from August 27 through September 6, 2013 at the FIU-ARC ISDSN-MSTB test cube. The fluid injection test activated a portion of the existing embedded sensor systems in the ISDSN-MSTB test cube: Electrical Resistivity Tomography-Thermocouple Sensor Arrays, Advance Tensiometer Sensors, and Fiber Loop Ringdown Optical Sensors. These embedded sensor systems were activated 15 months after initial placement. All sensor systems were remotely operated and data acquisition was completed through the established Sensor Remote Access System (SRAS) hosted on the DOE D&D Knowledge Management Information Tool (D&D DKM-IT) server. The ISDN Phase 3 Fluid Injection Test successfully demonstrated the feasibility of embedding sensor systems to assess moisture-fluid flow and resulting transport potential for contaminate mobility through a cementitious material/grout monolith. The ISDSN embedded sensor systems activated for the fluid injection test highlighted the robustness of the sensor systems and the importance of configuring systems in-depth (i.e., complementary sensors and measurements) to alleviate data acquisition gaps.

Serrato, M.

2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

98

Former Worker Program - Beryllium Testing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beryllium Testing Beryllium Testing Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Beryllium is a naturally occurring metal and is not radioactive. Because of its properties, beryllium has been part of the atomic energy and nuclear weapons industries since the 1940s. Exposure to beryllium and certain beryllium compounds can result in beryllium sensitization, which may develop into a disease of the lungs called chronic beryllium disease (CBD). Beryllium sensitization is an "allergic" condition to beryllium that can develop primarily after a person breathes air containing beryllium mists, dusts, and fumes. Even brief or small exposures to beryllium can lead to sensitization and/or CBD. However, most people exposed to beryllium will NOT get the disease. Other beryllium-related disorders can affect the skin, liver, spleen, heart, eye, or kidney. These disorders often occur in the presence of CBD.

99

Cottonseed Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing in Cottonseed Oil for Bleached Color, Refined Color, Free Fatty Acids, Moisture and Volatiles, Soap. Cottonseed Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist che

100

Nutritional Labeling Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Nutritional Labeling to determine Total Fat, FAME, Total Protein, Vitamin A, Vitamin D, Vitamin E Nutritional Labeling Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certif

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Gas Chromatography Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Gas Chromatography to determine Fatty Acid Composition and Iodine Value using AOCS methods Ce 1-62 and Cd 1c-85. Gas Chromatography Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs appl

102

Phosphorus in Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory Proficiency Testing service for Phosphorus in soybean oil Phosphorus in Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laboratories Laboratory methods oils profici

103

Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Award Winners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proficiency testing labs or laboratories awarded by AOCS. Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Award Winners Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laboratories Laboratory methods oils proficiency reference

104

A Physical Protection Systems Test Bed for International Counter-Trafficking System Development  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical protection systems have a widespread impact on the nuclear industry in areas such as nuclear safeguards, arms control, and trafficking of illicit goods (e.g., nuclear materials) across international borders around the world. Many challenges must be overcome in design and deployment of foreign border security systems such as lack of infrastructure, extreme environmental conditions, limited knowledge of terrain, insider threats, and occasional cultural resistance. Successful security systems, whether it be a system designed to secure a single facility or a whole border security system, rely on the entire integrated system composed of multiple subsystems. This test bed is composed of many unique sensors and subsystems, including wireless unattended ground sensors, a buried fiber-optic acoustic sensor, a lossy coaxial distributed sensor, wireless links, pan-tilt-zoom cameras, mobile power generation systems, unmanned aerial vehicles, and fiber-optic-fence intrusion detection systems. A Common Operating Picture software architecture is utilized to integrate a number of these subsystems. We are currently performance testing each system for border security and perimeter security applications by examining metrics such as probability of sense and a qualitative understanding of the sensor s vulnerability of defeat. The testing process includes different soil conditions for buried sensors (e.g., dry, wet, and frozen) and an array of different tests including walking, running, stealth detection, and vehicle detection. Also, long term sustainability of systems is tested including performance differences due to seasonal variations (e.g. summer versus winter, while raining, in foggy conditions). The capabilities of the test bed are discussed. Performance testing results, both at the individual component level and integrated into a larger system for a specific deployment (in situ), help illustrate the usefulness and need for integrated testing facilities to carry out this mission. The test bed provides access to grassy fields, wooded areas, and a large waterway three distinct testing environments. The infrastructure supporting deployment of systems at the test bed includes grid power, renewable power systems, climate controlled enclosures, high bandwidth wireless links, and a fiber optic communications backbone. With over 10 acres of dedicated area and direct waterway access, the test bed is well suited for long term test and evaluation of physical protection and security systems targeting a wide range of applications.

Stinson, Brad J [ORNL; Kuhn, Michael J [ORNL; Donaldson, Terrence L [ORNL; Richardson, Dave [ORNL; Rowe, Nathan C [ORNL; Younkin, James R [ORNL; Pickett, Chris A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Specialty Oils. Samples tested include Walnut Oil, Pecan Oil, Pistachio Oil, Sesame Seed Oil, Flax Seed Oil, Neem Oil, Safflower Oil, Sunflower Oil. Specialty Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Pro

106

Cyber Security Audit and Attack Detection Toolkit: National SCADA Test Bed  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Audit and Attack Detection Toolkit: National SCADA Audit and Attack Detection Toolkit: National SCADA Test Bed May 2008 Cyber Security Audit and Attack Detection Toolkit: National SCADA Test Bed May 2008 This project of the cyber security audit and attack detection toolkit is adding control system intelligence to widely deployed enterprise vulnerability scanners and security event managers While many energy utilities employ vulnerability scanners and security event managers (SEM) on their enterprise systems, these tools often lack the intelligence necessary to be effective in control systems. This two-year project aims to integrate control system intelligence into widely deployed vulnerability scanners and SEM, and to integrate security incident detection intelligence into control system historians. These upgrades will

107

Introduction of the Renewable Micro-Grid Test-Bed Dr. Wenxin Liu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbine: PMSM, 3kW, 8.3A Wind Generator: PMSM, 3kW, 8.3A 3 AC/DC Converter & DC/AC Inverter Wind Wind Turbine #1 3kW, 8.3A Wind Turbine #2 3kW Wind Generator #2 3kW RS232 Communication Renewable-bed Wind Turbine Generator Simulators ES Simulator AC Load M/G Set 1 Overview of the Micro-grid Test

Johnson, Eric E.

108

An office building used as a federal test bed for energy-efficient roofs  

SciTech Connect

The energy savings benefits of re-covering the roof of an existing federal office building with a sprayed polyurethane foam system are documented. The building is a 12,880 ft{sup 2} (1,197 m{sup 2}), 1 story, masonry structure located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN. Prior to re-covering, the roof had a thin fiberglass insulation layer, which had become partially soaked because of water leakage through the failed built-up roof membrane. The average R-value for this roof measured at 2 hr{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{center_dot}{degrees}F/Btu (0.3 m{sup 2} {center_dot}K/W). After re-covering the roof, it measured at 13 hr{center_dot}ft{sup 2}{degrees}F/Btu (2.3 m{sup 2}{center_dot}K/W). The building itself is being used as a test bed to document the benefits of a number of energy efficiency improvements. As such, it was instrumented to measure the half-hourly energy consumption of the whole building and of the individual rooftop air conditioners, the roof heat fluxes and the interior air and roof temperatures. These data were used to evaluate the energy effectiveness of the roof re-covering action. The energy savings analysis was done using the DOE-2.lE building simulation program, which was calibrated to match the measured data. The roof re-covering led to around 10% cooling energy savings and around 50% heating energy savings. The resulting energy cost reductions alone are not sufficient to justify re-covered roofs for buildings having high internal loads, such as the building investigated here. However the energy savings do contribute significantly to the measure`s Savings-to-Investment Ratio (SIR).

McLain, H.A.; Christian, J.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Dynamic performance of packed-bed dehumidifiers: experimental results from the SERI desiccant test loop  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discussed are the design and construction of a desiccant test loop and results of tests with a silica-gel-packed bed. The test loop consists of two centrifugal fans, two duct heaters, a steam humidifier, 24.4m (80 ft) of 30-cm (12-in.) circular duct, instrumentation, and a test section. The loop is capable of testing adsorption and desorption modes at flow rates up to 0.340 kg/s (600 scfm) and at regeneration temperatures up to 120/sup 0/C (248/sup 0/F). Tests of a 74-cm(29-in.)-diameter, 3.2-cm(1.25-in.)-thick silica gel bed indicated that mass transfer occurs more readily in the adsorption direction than in the desorption direction. Pressure drop data indicated that the resistance of each of the two screens that hold the silica gel in place was equivalent to 2.5-cm(1-in.) of silica gel due to plugging. Results of the tests were also used to validate a SERI desiccant computer model, DESSIM.

Kutscher, C F; Barlow, R S

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Resource Assessment & Production Testing for Coal Bed Methane in the Illinois Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to assess the economic coal bed methane potential of the Illinois Basin, the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana and Kentucky performed a geological assessment of their respective parts of the Illinois Basin. A considerable effort went into generating cumulative coal thickness and bed structure maps to identify target areas for exploratory drilling. Following this, the first project well was drilled in White County, Illinois in October 2003. Eight additional wells were subsequently drilled in Indiana (3) and Kentucky (5) during 2004 and 2005. In addition, a five spot pilot completion program was started with three wells being completed. Gas contents were found to be variable, but generally higher than indicated by historical data. Gas contents of more than 300 scf/ton were recovered from one of the bore holes in Kentucky. Collectively, our findings indicate that the Illinois Basin represents a potentially large source of economic coal bed methane. Additional exploration will be required to refine gas contents and the economics of potential production.

Cortland Eble; James Drahovzal; David Morse; Ilham Demir; John Rupp; Maria Mastalerz; Wilfrido Solano

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequently Asked Questions for: Frequently Asked Questions for: DOE's Round Robin Test Program May 2011 i Table of Contents Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 1 What products will be tested? .......................................................................................................... 1 What is the testing process? .............................................................................................................. 1 What labs can participate in testing? ............................................................................................... 2 Who pays for the testing? ................................................................................................................. 2

112

Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Feed Microscopy using microscopic examination of animal feed samples and AAFCO terminology. Feed Microscopy Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Agricultural Microscopy agri-food sector agricultural Agricultural Micr

113

Oilseed Meal Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Oilseed Meals.Samples in this series include Soybean Meal, Canola Meal, Peanut Meal, cottonseed Meal, Safflower Meal, Protein Concentrate. Oilseed Meal Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Pr

114

System tests and applications photovoltaic program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of all the photovoltaic system tests and application experiments that have been initiated since the start of the US DOE Photovoltaics Program in 1975 is presented. They are organized in the following manner for ease of reference: (1) application experiments: these are independently designed and constructed projects which are funded by DOE; (2) system field tests: projects designed and monitored by the national laboratories involved in the photovoltaic program; (3) exhibits: designed to acquaint the general public to photovoltaics; (4) component field tests: real time endurance testing conducted to monitor module reliability under actual environmental conditions; and (5) test facilities: descriptions of the four national laboratories involved in the photovoltaic program.

Not Available

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Sequestration and Enhanced Coal Bed Methane: Tanquary Farms Test Site, Wabash County, Illinois  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a pilot project to test storage of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the Springfield Coal Member of the Carbondale Formation (Pennsylvanian System), in order to gauge the potential for large-scale CO{sub 2} sequestration and/or enhanced coal bed methane recovery from Illinois Basin coal beds. The pilot was conducted at the Tanquary Farms site in Wabash County, southeastern Illinois. A four-well design?? an injection well and three monitoring wells??was developed and implemented, based on numerical modeling and permeability estimates from literature and field data. Coal cores were taken during the drilling process and were characterized in detail in the lab. Adsorption isotherms indicated that at least three molecules of CO{sub 2} can be stored for each displaced methane (CH{sub 4}) molecule. Microporosity contributes significantly to total porosity. Coal characteristics that affect sequestration potential vary laterally between wells at the site and vertically within a given seam, highlighting the importance of thorough characterization of injection site coals to best predict CO{sub 2} storage capacity. Injection of CO{sub 2} gas took place from June 25, 2008, to January 13, 2009. A ??continuous? injection period ran from July 21, 2008, to December 23, 2008, but injection was suspended several times during this period due to equipment failures and other interruptions. Injection equipment and procedures were adjusted in response to these problems. Approximately 92.3 tonnes (101.7 tons) of CO{sub 2} were injected over the duration of the project, at an average rate of 0.93 tonne (1.02 tons) per day, and a mode injection rate of 0.6??0.7 tonne/day (0.66??0.77 ton/day). A Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) program was set up to detect CO{sub 2 leakage. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels were monitored as were indirect indicators of CO{sub 2} leakage such as plant stress, changes in gas composition at wellheads, and changes in several shallow groundwater characteristics (e.g., alkalinity, pH, oxygen content, dissolved solids, mineral saturation indices, and isotopic distribution). Results showed that there was no CO{sub 2} leakage into groundwater or CO{sub 2} escape at the surface. Post-injection cased hole well log analyses supported this conclusion. Numerical and analytical modeling achieved a relatively good match with observed field data. Based on the model results the plume was estimated to extend 152 m (500 ft) in the face cleat direction and 54.9 m (180 ft) in the butt cleat direction. Using the calibrated model, additional injection scenarios??injection and production with an inverted five-spot pattern and a line drive pattern??could yield CH{sub 4} recovery of up to 70%.

Scott Frailey; Thomas Parris; James Damico; Roland Okwen; Ray McKaskle; Charles Monson; Jonathan Goodwin; E. Beck; Peter Berger; Robert Butsch; Damon Garner; John Grube; Keith Hackley; Jessica Hinton; Abbas Iranmanesh; Christopher Korose; Edward Mehnert; Charles Monson; William Roy; Steven Sargent; Bracken Wimmer

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Cyber Security Testing and Training Programs for Industrial Control Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Service providers rely on industrial control systems (ICS) to manage the flow of water at dams, open breakers on power grids, control ventilation and cooling in nuclear power plants, and more. In today's interconnected environment, this can present a serious cyber security challenge. To combat this growing challenge, government, private industry, and academia are working together to reduce cyber risks. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a key contributor to the Department of Energy National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Control Systems Security Program (CSSP), both of which focus on improving the overall security posture of ICS in the national critical infrastructure. In support of the NSTB, INL hosts a dedicated SCADA testing facility which consists of multiple control systems supplied by leading national and international manufacturers. Within the test bed, INL researchers systematically examine control system components and work to identify vulnerabilities. In support of the CSSP, INL develops and conducts training courses which are designed to increase awareness and defensive capabilities for IT/Control System professionals. These trainings vary from web-based cyber security trainings for control systems engineers to more advanced hands-on training that culminates with a Red Team/ Blue Team exercise that is conducted within an actual control systems environment. INL also provides staffing and operational support to the DHS Industrial Control Systems Cyber Emergency Response Team (ICS-CERT) Security Operations Center which responds to and analyzes control systems cyber incidents across the 18 US critical infrastructure sectors.

Daniel Noyes

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Electron Beam Powder Bed Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Materials, Processes and Applications for Additive Manufacturing : Electron Beam Powder Bed Processes Program Organizers: Andrzej...

118

DEVELOPMENT OF A SENSOR NETWORK TEST BED FOR ISD MATERIALS AND STRUCUTRAL CONDITION MONITORING  

SciTech Connect

The P Reactor at the Savannah River Site is one of the first reactor facilities in the US DOE complex that has been placed in its end state through in situ decommissioning (ISD). The ISD end state consists of a grout-filled concrete civil structure within the concrete frame of the original building. To evaluate the feasibility and utility of remote sensors to provide verification of ISD system conditions and performance characteristics, an ISD Sensor Network Test Bed has been designed and deployed at the Savannah River National Laboratory. The test bed addresses the DOE-EM Technology Need to develop a remote monitoring system to determine and verify ISD system performance. Commercial off-the-shelf sensors have been installed on concrete blocks taken from walls of the P Reactor Building. Deployment of this low-cost structural monitoring system provides hands-on experience with sensor networks. The initial sensor system consists of: (1) Groutable thermistors for temperature and moisture monitoring; (2) Strain gauges for crack growth monitoring; (3) Tiltmeters for settlement monitoring; and (4) A communication system for data collection. Preliminary baseline data and lessons learned from system design and installation and initial field testing will be utilized for future ISD sensor network development and deployment.

Zeigler, K.; Ferguson, B.; Karapatakis, D.; Herbst, C.; Stripling, C.

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

119

Fluidized-bed potato waste drying experiments at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized-bed dryer was built and operated at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site in south central Idaho to test the feasibility of using low-temperature (145/sup 0/C or lower) geothermal fluids as an energy source for drying operations. The dryer performed successfully on two potato industry waste products that had a solid content of 5 to 13%. The dried product was removed as a sand-like granular material or as fines with a flour-like texture. Test results, observations, and design recommendations are presented. Also presented is an economic evaluation for commercial-scale drying plants using either geothermal low-temperature water or oil as a heat source.

Cole, L.T.; Schmitt, R.C.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

A nonlinear programming test problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure 1 is a flow diagram of the chemical process. The test problem was a hydrocarbon refrigeration process in which the feed stream (stream number 1 of Figure 1) is a vapor mixture of ethane, propane, and n-butane (subscripts e, p and b, respectively) ...

D. M. Himmelblau

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Substance Abuse Testing Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Services » New Employee Orientation » Substance Abuse Testing Services » New Employee Orientation » Substance Abuse Testing Program Substance Abuse Testing Program Executive Order 12564, Drug-Free Federal Workplace, states in part that "the use of illegal drugs or the use of legal drugs illegally by Federal employees impairs the efficiency of Federal Agencies, jeopardizes public health and safety, and violates the public trust." Substance abuse increases the burden on other employees who do not use illegal drugs and also is an economic problem due to lost productivity in the workplace, insurance claims, sick benefits, accidents, and theft. Abusers endanger all who rely on them for their well being and safety. The Department's Substance Abuse Testing Program covers all Federal employees of the Department of Energy. Authorization for this program comes

122

Summary and assessment of METC zinc ferrite hot coal gas desulfurization test program, final report: Volume 2, Appendices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has conducted a test program to develop a zinc ferrite-based high temperature desulfurization process which could be applied to fuel gas entering downstream components such as molten carbonate fuel cells or gas turbines. As a result of prior METC work with iron oxide and zinc oxide sorbents, zinc ferrite evolved as a candidate with the potential for high capacity, low equilibrium levels of H/sub 2/S, and structural stability after multiple regenerations. The program consisted of laboratory-scale testing with a two-inch diameter reactor and simulated fixed-bed gasifier gas; bench-scale testing with a six-inch diameter reactor and actual gas from the METC 42-inch fixed bed gasifier; as well as laboratory-scale testing of zinc ferrite with simulated fluidized bed gasifier gas. Data from sidestream testing are presented. 18 refs.

Underkoffler, V.S.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

CRUCIBLE TESTING OF TANK 48H RADIOACTIVEWASTE SAMPLE USING FLUIDIZED BED STEAMREFORMING TECHNOLOGY FOR ORGANICDESTRUCTION  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of crucible scale testing with actual radioactive Tank 48H material was to duplicate the test results that had been previously performed on simulant Tank 48H material. The earlier crucible scale testing using simulants was successful in demonstrating that bench scale crucible tests produce results that are indicative of actual Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) pilot scale tests. Thus, comparison of the results using radioactive Tank 48H feed to those reported earlier with simulants would then provide proof that the radioactive tank waste behaves in a similar manner to the simulant. Demonstration of similar behavior for the actual radioactive Tank 48H slurry to the simulant is important as a preliminary or preparation step for the more complex bench-scale steam reformer unit that is planned for radioactive application in the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) Shielded Cells Facility (SCF) later in 2008. The goals of this crucible-scale testing were to show 99% destruction of tetraphenylborate and to demonstrate that the final solid product produced is sodium carbonate. Testing protocol was repeated using the specifications of earlier simulant crucible scale testing, that is sealed high purity alumina crucibles containing a pre-carbonated and evaporated Tank 48H material. Sealing of the crucibles was accomplished by using an inorganic 'nepheline' sealant. The sealed crucibles were heat-treated at 650 C under constant argon flow to inert the system. Final product REDOX measurements were performed to establish the REDuction/OXidation (REDOX) state of known amounts of added iron species in the final product. These REDOX measurements confirm the processing conditions (pyrolysis occurring at low oxygen fugacity) of the sealed crucible environment which is the environment actually achieved in the fluidized bed steam reformer process. Solid product dissolution in water was used to measure soluble cations and anions, and to investigate insoluble fractions of the product solids. Radioanalytical measurements were performed on the Tank 48H feed material and on the dissolved products in order to estimate retention of Cs-137 in the process. All aspects of prior crucible scale testing with simulant Tank 48H slurry were demonstrated to be repeatable with the actual radioactive feed. Tetraphenylborate destruction was shown to be >99% and the final solid product is sodium carbonate crystalline material. Less than 10 wt% of the final solid products are insoluble components comprised of Fe/Ni/Cr/Mn containing sludge components and Ti from monosodium titanate present in Tank 48H. REDOX measurements on the radioactive solid products indicate a reducing atmosphere with extremely low oxygen fugacity--evidence that the sealed crucible tests performed in the presence of a reductant (sugar) under constant argon purge were successful in duplicating the pyrolysis reactions occurring with the Tank 48H feed. Soluble anion measurements confirm that using sugar as reductant at 1X stoichiometry was successful in destroying nitrate/nitrite in the Tank 48H feed. Radioanalytical measurements indicate that {approx}75% of the starting Cs-137 is retained in the solid product. No attempts were made to analyze/measure other potential Cs-137 in the process, i.e., as possible volatile components on the inner surface of the alumina crucible/lid or as offgas escaping the sealed crucible. The collective results from these crucible scale tests on radioactive material are in good agreement with simulant testing. Crucible scale processing has been shown to duplicate the complex reactions of an actual fluidized bed steam reformer. Thus this current testing should provide a high degree of confidence that upcoming bench-scale steam reforming with radioactive Tank 48H slurry will be successful in tetraphenylborate destruction and production of sodium carbonate product.

Crawford, C

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

124

Valve test program: response to TMI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) pressurized-water reactor (PWR) safety and relief valve test program was speedily organized to assess valve operability after a pressurizer relief valve malfunctioned at Three Mile Island (TMI). Comprehensive full-scale testing at several facilities validated the basic designs in use today. 2 figures.

Lihach, N.; Bilanin, W.; Carey, J.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

CLIC RF High Power Production Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

The CLIC Power Extraction and Transfer Structure (PETS) is a passive microwave device in which bunches of the drive beam interact with the impedance of the periodically loaded waveguide and generate RF power for the main linac accelerating structure. The demands on the high power production ({approx} 150 MW) and the needs to transport the 100 A drive beam for about 1 km without losses, makes the PETS design rather unique and the operation very challenging. In the coming year, an intense PETS testing program will be implemented. The target is to demonstrate the full performance of the PETS operation. The testing program overview and test results available to date are presented.

Syratchev, I.; Riddone, G.; /CERN; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC

2011-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

126

Lemnos Interoperable Security Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Security Program More Documents & Publications SECURITY CORE FUNCTION AND DEFINITION REPORT Lemnos Interoperable Security DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan...

127

Real-Time Building Energy Simulation Using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

Most commercial buildings do not perform as well in practice as intended by the design and their performances often deteriorate over time. Reasons include faulty construction, malfunctioning equipment, incorrectly configured control systems and inappropriate operating procedures (Haves et al., 2001, Lee et al., 2007). To address this problem, the paper presents a simulation-based whole building performance monitoring tool that allows a comparison of building actual performance and expected performance in real time. The tool continuously acquires relevant building model input variables from existing Energy Management and Control System (EMCS). It then reports expected energy consumption as simulated of EnergyPlus. The Building Control Virtual Test Bed (BCVTB) is used as the software platform to provide data linkage between the EMCS, an EnergyPlus model, and a database. This paper describes the integrated real-time simulation environment. A proof-of-concept demonstration is also presented in the paper.

Pang, Xiufeng; Bhattachayra, Prajesh; O'Neill, Zheng; Haves, Philip; Wetter, Michael; Bailey, Trevor

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Some preliminary results from the NWTC direct-drive, variable-speed test bed  

SciTech Connect

With the remarkable rise in interest in variable-speed operation of larger wind turbines, it has become important for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) to have access to a variable-speed test bed that can be specially instrumented for research. Accordingly, a three-bladed, 10-meter, downwind, Grumman Windstream machine has been equipped with a set of composite blades and a direct-coupled, permanent-magnet, 20 kilowatt generator. This machine and its associated control system and data collection system are discussed. Several variations of a maximum power control algorithm have been installed on the control computer. To provide a baseline for comparison, several constant speed algorithms have also been installed. The present major effort is devoted to daytime, semi-autonomous data collection.

Carlin, P.W.; Fingersh, L.J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Peach Bottom test element program. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirty-three test elements were irradiated in the Peach Bottom high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of the testing program for advanced HTGRs. Extensive postirradiation examinations and evaluations of 21 of these irradiation experiments were performed. The test element irradiations were simulated using HTGR design codes and data. Calculated fuel burnups, power profiles, fast neutron fluences, and temperatures were verified via destructive burnup measurements, gamma scanning, and in-pile thermocouple readings corrected for decalibration effects. Analytical techniques were developed to improve the quality of temperature predictions through feedback of nuclear measurements into thermal calculations. Dimensional measurements, pressure burst tests, diametral compression tests, ring-cutting tests, strip-cutting tests, and four-point bend tests were performed to measure residual stress, strain, and strength distributions in H-327 graphite structures irradiated in the test elements.

Saurwein, J.J.; Holzgraf, J.F.; MIller, C.M.; Myers, B.F.; Wallroth, C.F.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

100 Hour test of the pressurized woodchip-fired gravel bed combustor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion of wood chips in a packed bed combustor for a gas turbine cogeneration system is described. A discussion on flue gas emissions and mass balances is included.

Ragland, K.W.; Aerts, D.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Integrated test vehicle program plan: revision C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This edition dated August 26, 1977, is Revision C of the Integrated Test Vehicle, Program Plan, Phase II - Deliverable Item 2-7-1. The original edition was issued on May 27, 1977. Corrections were made and issued as Proposed Modifications for Integrated Test Vehicle, Program Plan, dated July 8, 1977. For the purpose of documenting changes, the July 8, 1977, version is caled Revision A. The edition dated August 5, 1977, is called Revision B. Each paragraph in this edition is marked to indicate technical changes from previous editions.

Not Available

1977-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

132

THAI Multi-Compartment Containment Test Program  

SciTech Connect

The THAI experimental programme includes combined-effect investigations on thermal hydraulics, hydrogen, and fission product (iodine and aerosols) behaviour in LWR containments under severe accident conditions. An overview on the experiments performed up to now and on the future test program is presented, in combination with a selection of typical results to illustrate the versatility of the test facility and the broad variety of topics investigated. (authors)

Kanzleiter, T.; Poss, G. [Becker Technologies GmbH, Koelner Strasse 6, 65760 Eschborn (Germany); Funke, F. [AREVA ANP (Germany); Allelein, H.J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit - mbH (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Cooperative field test program for wind systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO{sub 4}, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

135

FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMED MINERAL WASTE FORMS: CHARACTERIZATION AND DURABILITY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) is being considered as a potential technology for the immobilization of a wide variety of high sodium low activity wastes (LAW) such as those existing at the Hanford site, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and the Savannah River Site (SRS). The addition of clay, charcoal, and a catalyst as co-reactants with the waste denitrates the aqueous wastes and forms a granular mineral waste form that can subsequently be made into a monolith for disposal if necessary. The waste form produced is a multiphase mineral assemblage of Na-Al-Si (NAS) feldspathoid minerals with cage and ring structures and iron bearing spinel minerals. The mineralization occurs at moderate temperatures between 650-750 C in the presence of superheated steam. The cage and ring structured feldspathoid minerals atomically bond radionuclides like Tc-99 and Cs-137 and anions such as SO4, I, F, and Cl. The spinel minerals stabilize Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous species such as Cr and Ni. Granular mineral waste forms were made from (1) a basic Hanford Envelope A low-activity waste (LAW) simulant and (2) an acidic INL simulant commonly referred to as sodium bearing waste (SBW) in pilot scale facilities at the Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC) Science and Technology Applications Research (STAR) facility in Idaho Falls, ID. The FBSR waste forms were characterized and the durability tested via ASTM C1285 (Product Consistency Test), the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Toxic Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), and the Single Pass Flow Through (SPFT) test. The results of the SPFT testing and the activation energies for dissolution are discussed in this study.

Jantzen, C; Troy Lorier, T; John Pareizs, J; James Marra, J

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

136

UHM/HNEI EV test and evaluation program  

SciTech Connect

The electric vehicle (EV) program of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) focuses primarily on the field testing of promising EV/traction batteries. The intent is to utilize typical driving cycles to develop information that verifies or refutes what is obtained in the laboratory. Three different types of battery were assigned by the US DOE for testing in this program: Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160, Exide GC-5, Trojan T-145. We added the following battery to the test program: ALCO2200. HNEI's existing EVs were utilized as test beds. The following EVs were chosen in our program: Converted Ford Escort station wagon, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Dodge van (typically daily driving distances, 10--30 miles). Capacity testing is a very effective way of monitoring the status of battery modules. Based on capacity tests, corrective action such as battery replacement, additional charging, adjusting terminal connections, etc., may be taken to maintain good performance. About 15,500 miles and 600 cycles have been accumulated on the Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160 battery pack. Five of its 18 modules have been changed. Based on DOE's standard, the battery has reached the end of its useful life. Nevertheless, the battery pack is still operational and its operating range is still greater than 40 miles per charge. It is too early to evaluate the life expectancy of the other three batteries, the Trojan T-145, Exide GC-5, and Alco 2200. No module has been replaced in these three packs. The Trojan T-145 battery is a very promising EV traction battery in terms of quality and reliability versus price. HNEI will keep the Trojan and Exide battery packs in operation. The Alco 2200 batteries will be transferred to another vehicle. The Additional Charging Method seems to be an effective way of restoring weak modules. The Smart Voltmeter'' developed by HNEI is a promising way of monitoring the remaining range for an EV.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

UHM/HNEI EV test and evaluation program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The electric vehicle (EV) program of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI) focuses primarily on the field testing of promising EV/traction batteries. The intent is to utilize typical driving cycles to develop information that verifies or refutes what is obtained in the laboratory. Three different types of battery were assigned by the US DOE for testing in this program: Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160, Exide GC-5, Trojan T-145. We added the following battery to the test program: ALCO2200. HNEI`s existing EVs were utilized as test beds. The following EVs were chosen in our program: Converted Ford Escort station wagon, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Ford Escort two-door sedan, Converted Dodge van (typically daily driving distances, 10--30 miles). Capacity testing is a very effective way of monitoring the status of battery modules. Based on capacity tests, corrective action such as battery replacement, additional charging, adjusting terminal connections, etc., may be taken to maintain good performance. About 15,500 miles and 600 cycles have been accumulated on the Sonnenschein Dryfit 6V-160 battery pack. Five of its 18 modules have been changed. Based on DOE`s standard, the battery has reached the end of its useful life. Nevertheless, the battery pack is still operational and its operating range is still greater than 40 miles per charge. It is too early to evaluate the life expectancy of the other three batteries, the Trojan T-145, Exide GC-5, and Alco 2200. No module has been replaced in these three packs. The Trojan T-145 battery is a very promising EV traction battery in terms of quality and reliability versus price. HNEI will keep the Trojan and Exide battery packs in operation. The Alco 2200 batteries will be transferred to another vehicle. The Additional Charging Method seems to be an effective way of restoring weak modules. The ``Smart Voltmeter`` developed by HNEI is a promising way of monitoring the remaining range for an EV.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

The High Level Vibration Test Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of cooperative agreements between the United States and Japan, tests have been performed on the seismic vibration table at the Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory of Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center (NUPEC) in Japan. The objective of the test program was to use the NUPEC vibration table to drive large diameter nuclear power piping to substantial plastic strain with an earthquake excitation and to compare the results with state-of-the-art analysis of the problem. The test model was designed by modifying the 1/2.5 scale model of the PWR primary coolant loop. Elastic and inelastic seismic response behavior of the test model was measured in a number of test runs with an increasing excitation input level up to the limit of the vibration table. In the maximum input condition, large dynamic plastic strains were obtained in the piping. Crack initiation was detected following the second maximum excitation run. The test model was subjected to a maximum acceleration well beyond what nuclear power plants are designed to withstand. This paper describes the overall plan, input motion development, test procedure, test results and comparisons with pre-test analysis. 4 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs.

Hofmayer, C.H.; Curreri, J.R.; Park, Y.J.; Kato, W.Y. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Kawakami, S. (Nuclear Power Engineering Test Center, Tokyo (Japan))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

140

Damage measurements on the NWTC direct-drive, variable-speed test bed  

SciTech Connect

The NWTC (National Wind Technology Center) Variable-Speed Test Bed turbine is a three-bladed, 10-meter, downwind machine that can be run in either fixed-speed or variable-speed mode. In the variable-speed mode, the generator torque is regulated, using a discrete-stepped load bank to maximize the turbine`s power coefficient. At rated power, a second control loop that uses blade pitch to maintain rotor speed essentially as before, i.e., using the load bank to maintain either generator power or (optionally) generator torque. In this paper, the authors will use this turbine to study the effect of variable-speed operation on blade damage. Using time-series data obtained from blade flap and edge strain gauges, the load spectrum for the turbine is developed using rainflow counting techniques. Miner`s rule is then used to determine the damage rates for variable-speed and fixed-speed operation. The results illustrate that the controller algorithm used with this turbine introduces relatively large load cycles into the blade that significantly reduce its service lifetime, while power production is only marginally increased.

Sutherland, H.J. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carlin, P.W. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of fluid bed heat exchanger optimization parameters. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainty in the relationship of specific bed material properties to gas-side heat transfer in fluidized beds has inhibited the search for optimum bed materials and has led to over-conservative assumptions in the design of fluid bed heat exchangers. An experimental program was carried out to isolate the effects of particle density, thermal conductivity, and heat capacitance upon fluid bed heat transfer. A total of 31 tests were run with 18 different bed material loads on 12 material types; particle size variations were tested on several material types. The conceptual design of a fluidized bed evaporator unit was completed for a diesel exhaust heat recovery system. The evaporator heat transfer surface area was substantially reduced while the physical dimensions of the unit increased. Despite the overall increase in unit size, the overall cost was reduced. A study of relative economics associated with bed material selection was conducted. For the fluidized bed evaporator, it was found that zircon sand was the best choice among materials tested in this program, and that the selection of bed material substantially influences the overall system costs. The optimized fluid bed heat exchanger has an estimated cost 19% below a fin augmented tubular heat exchanger; 31% below a commercial design fluid bed heat exchanger; and 50% below a conventional plain tube heat exchanger. The comparisons being made for a 9.6 x 10/sup 6/ Btu/h waste heat boiler. The fluidized bed approach potentially has other advantages such as resistance to fouling. It is recommended that a study be conducted to develop a systematic selection of bed materials for fluidized bed heat exchanger applications, based upon findings of the study reported herein.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Mixed Seed Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Mixed Seed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laboratory Proficiency Testing service for Sunflower,Safflower, and Canola to test Oil, Clean Seed Basis, Nitrogen, Free Fatty Acids, Glucosinolates, Chlorophyll. Mixed Seed Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Mixed Seed Laboratory Proficiency Program

143

Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 18. Program data summary and correlations. [C/sub 2/ and C/sub 3/ hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A single-staged, fixed-bed, Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and government agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas Group (MIFGa). This report is the eighteenth volume in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This specific report summarizes the results of eighteen different gasification tests in which fourteen different fuels were gasified from August 1982 to August 1985. The summaries and analyses reported here include correlations of product yields and compositions with coal analyses and gasifier operating conditions. Also included here are discussions of limitations to throughput, transient response of the gasifier, the grate performance model, and a discussion of electrostatic precipitation in coal gas medium. 25 refs., 41 figs., 6 tabs.

Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Lannto, O.; Pui, D.; Yeh, R.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

DURABILITY TESTING OF FLUIDIZED BED STEAM REFORMER WASTE FORMS FOR SODIUM BEARING WASTE AT IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY  

SciTech Connect

Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) processing of Sodium Bearing Waste simulants was performed in December 2006 by THOR{sup sm} Treatment Technologies LLC (TTT) The testing was performed at the Hazen Research Inc. (HRI) pilot plant facilities in Golden, CO. FBSR products from these pilot tests on simulated waste representative of the SBW at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) were subsequently transferred to the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for characterization and leach testing. Four as-received Denitration and Mineralization Reformer (DMR) granular/powder samples and four High Temperature Filter (HTF) powder samples were received by SRNL. FBSR DMR samples had been taken from the ''active'' bed, while the HTF samples were the fines collected as carryover from the DMR. The process operated at high fluidizing velocities during the mineralization test such that nearly all of the product collected was from the HTF. Active bed samples were collected from the DMR to monitor bed particle size distribution. Characterization of these crystalline powder samples shows that they are primarily Al, Na and Si, with > 1 wt% Ca, Fe and K. The DMR samples contained less than 1 wt% carbon and the HTF samples ranged from 13 to 26 wt% carbon. X-ray diffraction analyses show that the DMR samples contained significant quantities of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} startup bed. The DMR samples became progressively lower in starting bed alumina with major Na/Al/Si crystalline phases (nepheline and sodium aluminosilicate) present as cumulative bed turnover occurred but 100% bed turnover was not achieved. The HTF samples also contained these major crystalline phases. Durability testing of the DMR and HTF samples using the ASTM C1285 Product Consistency Test (PCT) 7-day leach test at 90 C was performed along with several reference glass samples. Comparison of the normalized leach rates for the various DMR and HTF components was made with the reference glasses and the Low Activity Waste (LAW) specification for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Vitrification Plant (WTP). Normalized releases from the DMR and HTF samples were all less than 1 g/m{sup 2}. For comparison, normalized release from the High-Level Waste (HLW) benchmark Environmental Assessment (EA) glass for Si, Li, Na and B ranges from 2 to 8 g/m{sup 2}. The normalized release specification for LAW glass for the Hanford WTP is 2 g/m{sup 2}. The Toxicity Characteristic Leach Test (TCLP) was performed on DMR and HTF as received samples and the tests showed that these products meet the criteria for the EPA RCRA Universal Treatment Standards for all of the constituents contained in the starting simulants such as Cr, Pb and Hg (RCRA characteristically hazardous metals) and Ni and Zn (RCRA metals required for listed wastes).

Crawford, C; Carol Jantzen, C

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

145

Empirical investigation towards the effectiveness of Test First programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Test First (TF) programming, which is based on an iterative process of ''setting up test cases, implementing the functionality, and having all test cases passed'', has been put forward for decades, however knowledge of the evidence of the Test First ... Keywords: Agile methods, Empirical software engineering, Programming paradigms, Software engineering process, Software testing, Testing strategies

Liang Huang; Mike Holcombe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Improved pyrolysis submodel for the Wen Fixed-Bed Gasifier Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized model for devolatilization of large coal particles typically encountered in a fixed or moving bed gasifier has been developed. Two models were developed, one which does not consider diffusion of the volatile matter from the coal during devolatilization and the other which does consider diffusion of volatile species through the coal matrix. Both models predict a time-temperature history of the particle in a convective heat transfer environment.

Adesanya, B.A.; Ruffin, Y.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Improved pyrolysis submodel for the Wen Fixed-Bed Gasifier Program. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A generalized model for devolatilization of large coal particles typically encountered in a fixed or moving bed gasifier has been developed. Two models were developed, one which does not consider diffusion of the volatile matter from the coal during devolatilization and the other which does consider diffusion of volatile species through the coal matrix. Both models predict a time-temperature history of the particle in a convective heat transfer environment.

Adesanya, B.A.; Ruffin, Y.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Genetically Modified Organism(GMO) in Roundup Ready, Soy Flour, Non-Modified Soy Flour samples. Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs appli

149

Vegetable Oil for Color Only Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Vegetable Oil for Color Only. Sample Includes soybean oil. Vegetable Oil for Color Only Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Program (LPP) aocs applicants certified chemist chemists Lab laborat

150

DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet DOE's Round Robin Test Program FAQ Sheet This document is the May 2011 version of the Frequently Asked Questions about the US Department of...

151

Automating the mutation testing of aspect-oriented Java programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aspect-Oriented Programming has introduced new types of software faults that may be systematically tackled with mutation testing. However, such testing approach requires adequate tooling support in order to be properly performed. This paper addresses ... Keywords: aspect-oriented programming, mutation testing, test automation, testing tools

Fabiano Cutigi Ferrari; Elisa Yumi Nakagawa; Awais Rashid; Jos Carlos Maldonado

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program

Abdou, Mohamed

153

IOC-AOCS Olive Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Olive Oil to test Fatty Acid Composition, Free Fatty Acids, Peroxide Value, Sterenes, Sterols, Stigmastadienes, Triglycerides (ECN 42), UV extinction, Waxes. IOC-AOCS Olive Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Oli

154

Marine Products and Marine Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Marine Products and Marine Oil samples to test Anisidine Value, Free Fatty Acid, Iodine Value, Insoluble Impurities, Moisture, Peroxide Value. Marine Products and Marine Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Labo

155

Solid Fat Content by NMR Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Solid Fat Content by NMR using AOCS Test Method Cd 16-93 to determine solid fat content in Margarine Oil, Vegetable Shortening, Emulsified Shortening Solid Fat Content by NMR Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Labor

156

Supplemental Comprehensive Report to Congress - Clean Coal Technology Program. Tidd Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) Project  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) in February 1987 submitted a Comprehensive Report to Congress for a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) project entitled {open_quotes}Tidd PFBC (Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion) Demonstration Project.{close_quotes} In that document, DOE reported to Congress that the Government share of project costs would be $60,200,000 and that the participant agreed to absorb any cost overruns, even though the public law contained provisions which would allow DOE to share in project cost growths up to 25 percent of the original financial assistance. This Supplemental Report is being submitted because DOE now intends to increase its contribution to the project by approximately 11 percent to facilitate extension of the original 3-year operating period by one additional year. DOE`s overall percentage cost share resulting from this extension will not exceed DOE`s overall percentage cost share in the original agreement.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion cold flow model tests of Phase 2 carbonizer  

SciTech Connect

Under US Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023, Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) is developing a second-generation pressurized fulidized bed (PFB) combustion system. The second-generation system is an improvement over first-generation pressurized systems because higher gas turbine inlet temperatures, and thus greater system efficiencies can be achieved. In first-generation systems, the gas turbine operates at temperatures lower than those in the PFB combusting bed, with the latter being limited to approximately 1600{degree}F to control alkali release/gas turbine hot corrosion. The second-generation system overcomes this temperature restriction by including a carbonizer and a topping combustor in the system. The carbonizer is a PFB combustion unit that converts coal to a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The char is transferred to a PFB combustor (PFBC), where it is burned. The flue gas from the PFBC and the fuel gas from the carbonizer go to the topping combustor, where the fuel gas is burned and gas turbine inlet temperatures in excess of 2100{degree}F are generated. The PFBC can be operated with or without coal fed along with the char. Steam is generated in the PFBC, and additional coal fed to the PFBC with the char will result in more steam generation. However, excess air must be kept at a level sufficient to support combustion of the fuel gas in the topping combustor.

Shenker, J.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A linear program for testing local realism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a linear program that is capable of determining whether a set of correlations can be captured by a local realistic model. If the correlations can be described by such a model, the linear program outputs a joint probability distribution that produces the given correlations. If the correlations cannot be described under the assumption of local realism, the program outputs a Bell inequality violated by the correlations.

Matthew B. Elliott

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

159

Operational Surveillance Testing Program for Fossil Generating Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operational surveillance test OST guideline can be used to develop a comprehensive surveillance testing program that enhances the testing performed by operations personnel. The OST programs observed at fossil generating stations contain inconsistencies in the content and in the effectiveness of operational testing. Some industry equipment failures can be attributed to the lack of effective surveillance testing. The bases for OSTs are similar to the bases for the plants preventive maintenance PM progr...

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

160

Duct Testing | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Duct Testing This video offers tips and instruction for duct testing, and is a portion of the Duct Leakage Testing presentation given at Energy Codes 2009. Estimated Length: 12...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MGCR HEAT EXCHANGER TEST PROGRAM. Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The Maritime Gas-cooled Reactor (MGCR) project has conipleted the study and design of a closed-cycle gasturbine propulsion plant utilizing a helium- cooled nuclear reactor as the heat source. The cycle employs a counterflow shell- and-tube regenerator to attain a high thermodynamic cycle efficiency. A heat exchanger test program was conducted to compile and correlate sufficient experimental data for the aerodynamic and thermal design of the prototype regenerator. The model heat exchanger was similar in configaration to the prototype unit. The pressure-drop and heat-transfer performance of a compact parallel-flow tube bundle is given hoth in the unsupported configuration and with airfoil-shaped tube supports distributed along the bundle. The Fanning friction factor with the airfoil-shaped supports is approximately 70% greater than for the unsupported tube configuration. The airfoil supports effect a 40% increase in Colburn's heat transfer factor, j, over the unsupported configuration. Determinations of the unsupported-tube values of friction factor and Colburn-j agreed well with the literature. A section is devoted to the application of these data to the design of exchangers. The correlated data, representing some 1200 individual runs, cover a range of Reynolds number from 10,000 to 500,000. The moderate pressure-drop increment due to the airfoil-shaped supports, in conjunction with the favorable increase in heat-transfer rate, becomes especially important in the design of compact gas-to-gas heat exchangers with very low friction pressure losses. The concluding section of the report compares the size, weight, and cost of conventional baffled-shell units and the MGCR design for the requirements of the MGCR cycle. The MGCR design was one-fifth the volume, one-fourth the weight, and one-third the cost of comparable baffled-shell units. (auth)

Paulson, H.C. II

1961-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing Activity North American PHEV Demonstration Monthly Summary Report - Hymotion Prius (V2Green data logger) Total Number Vehicles - 169 (May 2010) Total Cumulative Test...

163

Olive Oil Sensory Panel Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Olive oil. Sensory panel determination of Extra Virgin, Virgin, Lampante using International Olive Council guideline COI/T.20/Doc. No 15/Rev. 4 Olive Oil Sensory Panel Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Olive Oil

164

NIOP-AOCS Fats and Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for NIOP-AOCS Fats & Oils, samples in this series include crude coconut oil, RB Palm Oil, Crude Safflower Oil, Crude sunflower Oil. NIOP-AOCS Fats and Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Progr

165

Co-Simulation of Building Energy and Control Systems with the Building Controls Virtual Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cfd simulations. Energy and Buildings, 37(4):333344, Aprilsimulation program. Energy and Buildings, 33(4):443457,analysis integration. Energy and Buildings, 36(8): 737748,

Wetter, Michael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Real-Time Building Energy Simulation Using EnergyPlus and the Building Controls Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy and Buildings, 33: 319-331. Haves, P. , Salsbury,using simulation. Energy and Buildings, 32:5-17. US DOE.a new-generation building energy simulation program.

Pang, Xiufeng

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

HOWSE (HOt Water SAver) test program. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of recovering heat from a domestic dishwasher was demonstrated in a working, full scale model. That project showed it could be done. This test program showed the HOWSE to be effective and safe over a period of eighteen months. The data from the test program is essential to show safety for requesting approval for use of this appliance by building code authorities.

Olson, W.R.

1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Single Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) Test Results of Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) Waste Forms used for LAW Immobilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several supplemental technologies for treating and immobilizing Hanford low activity waste (LAW) are being evaluated. One such immobilization technology being considered is the Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming (FBSR) granular product. The FBSR granular product is composed of insoluble sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) feldspathoid minerals. Production of the FBSR mineral product has been demonstrated both at the industrial and laboratory scale. Single-Pass Flow-Through (SPFT) tests at various flow rates have been conducted with the granular products fabricated using these two methods. Results show that the materials exhibit a relatively low forward dissolution rate on the order of 10-3 g/(m2d) with the material made in the laboratory giving slightly higher values.

Neeway, James J.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Williams, Benjamin D.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Cordova, Elsa A.; Strandquist, Sara C.; Dage, DeNomy C.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

169

Test Programming by Program Composition and Symbolic Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Classical test generation techniques rely on search through gate-level circuit descriptions, which results in long runtimes. In some instances, classical techniques cannot be used because they would take longer than the ...

Shirley, Mark H.

170

GOED Nutraceutical Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Global Organization for EPA and DHA Omega-3 /GOED Nutraceutical Oils in Marine Oil samples using AOCS methods Ce 1i-07, GOED Monograph, Cd 3d-63, Cd 8b-90, Cd 18-90. GOED Nutraceutical Oils Laboratory Proficiency Testing

171

Solair heater program: solair applications study test program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three prototypes of low cost solar forced air heating using evacuated tube collectors for application to hot water and space heating were tested in various climates in the US during the period winter/spring 1976/1977. The data acquisition and data analysis are reported. (MHR)

Not Available

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

FUEL ELEMENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM FOR THE PEBBLE BED REACTOR. Quarterly Progress Report for November 1, 1959 to January 31, 1960  

SciTech Connect

A variety of spherical uranium--graphite fuel elements for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) was fabricated. Poor results with sintered alumina coated UO/ sub 2/ particles led to the development of slumina coating by vspor deposition, for which good results have been obtained. A variety of sub-surface metal, metal carbide, and ceramic coatings located between an unfueled graphite shell and the fueled core of a PBR fuel element was prepared and examined. Most of the materials and processes showed poor results. Excellent metal recoveries were achieved from the metal oxide--graphite system using the grind-leach technique of reprocessing. Test results on Si-- SiC coated fuel elements showed good fission product retention in neutron activation tests, a self-welding tendency between adjacent spheres at 2500 deg F surface temperature, and no evidence of failure when an interanl gas pressure of 300 psi was applied. Fission product release rates from a pyrolytic carbon coated specimen under low-level irradiation were obtained at 150 to 1900 deg F. The design of the in-pile loop to study the behavior of fission products escaping from PBR fuel elements wss established. (C.J.G.)

1960-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Palm Oil Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Palm Oil determinations via P4.3 PORIM, P4.1 PORIM, P2.5 PORIM, Cd 1d-92, P4.2 PORIM, Cd 96b-93,

174

Second generation pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) research and development, Phase 2 -- Task 4, carbonizer testing. Volume 1, Test results  

SciTech Connect

During the period beginning November 1991 and ending September 1992, a series of tests were conducted at Foster Wheeler Development Corporation in a fluidized-bed coal carbonizer to determine its performance characteristics. The carbonizer was operated for 533 hours in a jetting fluidized-bed configuration during which 36 set points (steady-state periods) were achieved. Extensive data were collected on the feed and product stream compositions, heating values, temperatures, and flow rates. With these data, elemental and energy balances were computed to evaluate and confirm accuracy of the data. The carbonizer data were not as self-consistent as could be desired (balance closure imperfection). A software package developed by Science Ventures, Inc., of California, called BALAID, was used to reconcile the carbonizer data; the details of the reconciliation have been given in Volume 1 of this report. The reconciled data for the carbonizer were rigorously analyzed, correlations were developed, and the model was updated accordingly. The model was then used in simulating each of the 36 steady-state periods achieved in the pilot plant. The details are given in this Volume of the report.

Froehlich, R.; Robertson, A.; Vanhook, J.; Goyal, A.; Rehmat, A.; Newby, R.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Marine Oil Fatty Acid Profile Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing provider for Marine Products and Marine Oil Fatty Acid Profile to test Fatty Acid Composition with AOCS methods Ce 1b-89 or Ce 1i-07. Marine Oil Fatty Acid Profile Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Prog

176

DOE Field Operations Program EV and HEV Testing  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energys (DOE) Field Operations Program tests advanced technology vehicles (ATVs) and disseminates the testing results to provide fleet managers and other potential ATV users with accurate and unbiased information on vehicle performance. The ATVs (including electric, hybrid, and other alternative fuel vehicles) are tested using one or more methods - Baseline Performance Testing (EVAmerica and Pomona Loop), Accelerated Reliability Testing, and Fleet Testing. The Program (http://ev.inel.gov/sop) and its nine industry testing partners have tested over 30 full-size electric vehicle (EV) models and they have accumulated over 4 million miles of EV testing experience since 1994. In conjunction with several original equipment manufacturers, the Program has developed testing procedures for the new classes of hybrid, urban, and neighborhood EVs. The testing of these vehicles started during 2001. The EVS 18 presentation will include (1) EV and hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) test results, (2) operating experience with and performance trends of various EV and HEV models, and (3) experience with operating hydrogen-fueled vehicles. Data presented for EVs will include vehicle efficiency (km/kWh), average distance driven per charge, and range testing results. The HEV data will include operating considerations, fuel use rates, and range testing results.

Francfort, James Edward; Slezak, L. A.

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Overview of PNGV Battery Development and Test Programs  

SciTech Connect

Affordable, safe, long-lasting, high-power batteries are requisites for successful commercialization of hybrid electric vehicles. The U.S. Department of Energys Office of Advance Automotive Technologies and the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles are funding research and development programs to address each of these issues. An overview of these areas is presented along with a summary of battery development and test programs, as well as recent performance data from several of these programs.

Motloch, Chester George; Murphy, Timothy Collins; Sutula, Raymond; Miller, Ted J.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sheath insulator final test report, TFE Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sheath insulator in a thermionic cell has two functions. First, the sheath insulator must electrically isolate the collector form the outer containment sheath tube that is in contact with the reactor liquid metal coolant. Second, The sheath insulator must provide for high uniform thermal conductance between the collector and the reactor coolant to remove away waste heat. The goals of the sheath insulator test program were to demonstrate that suitable ceramic materials and fabrication processes were available, and to validate the performance of the sheath insulator for TFE-VP requirements. This report discusses the objectives of the test program, fabrication development, ex-reactor test program, in-reactor test program, and the insulator seal specifications.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Page 9, Department of Energy Substance Abuse Testing Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 of 11 Previous Page DOE Substance Abuse Testing Program Executive Order 12564, Drug-Free Federal Workplace, states in part that "the use of illegal drugs or the use of legal...

180

Prototype steam generator test at SCTI/ETEC. Acoustic program test plan. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated test plan covering programs at General Electric (ARSD), Rockwell International (RI) and Argonne National Laboratory (CT). It provides an overview of the acoustic leak detection test program which will be completed in conjunction with the prototype LMFBR steam generator at the Energy Technology Engineering Laboratory. The steam generator is installed in the Sodium Components Test Installation (SCTI). Two acoustic detection systems will be used during the test program, a low frequency system developed by GE-ARSD (GAAD system) and a high frequency system developed by RI-AI (HALD system). These systems will be used to acquire data on background noise during the thermal-hydraulic test program. Injection devices were installed during fabrication of the prototype steam generator to provide localized noise sources in the active region of the tube bundle. These injectors will be operated during the steam generator test program, and it will be shown that they are detected by the acoustic systems.

Greene, D.A.; Thiele, A.; Claytor, T.N.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Test experience with multiterminal HVDC load flow and stability programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A powerful new set of load flow and stability programs for the study of HVdc systems has recently been completed. During the development of the programs novel applications of multiterminal HVdc systems were investigated, firstly on a large test system and later on actual utility models. This paper describes the test systems used, the HVdc systems studied and some of the interesting system related aspects of the HVdc system performance.

Chapman, D.G.; Davies, J.B. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); McNichol, J.R. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); Gulachenski, E.M.; Doe, S. (New England Power Service Co., Westboro, MA (US)); Balu, N.J. (EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (US))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Cable separation; What do industry testing programs show  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the findings of the working group on independence criteria. The working group reviewed several test reports on cable separation testing programs undertaken by electric power utilities to demonstrate adequate independence of electrical circuits within nuclear power plants systems. The materials and methodology used to conduct the tests are discussed. Test results are presented in summary with recommendations for reductions and enhancements to the separation distances of IEEE Std. 384.

De Young, G.L. (Commonwealth Edison Co., Chicago, IL (USA)); Disosway, J.J. (Carolina Power and Light Co., Raleigh, NC (USA)); Doman, G.L. (Westinghouse, Hanford, CO (US)); Hazeltine, J. (Wyle Labs., Norco, CA (USA)); Jamison, R.C. (Yankee Atomic Electric (US)); Killen, T.S. (Bechtel National, Inc., Aiken, SC (USA)); Yanosy, P.L. (Combustion Engineering, Inc., Windsor, CT (USA)); Zar, M.S. (Sargent and Lundy, Chicago, IL (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOEs Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

FIRE, A Test Bed for ARIES-RS/AT Advanced Physics and Plasma Technology  

SciTech Connect

The overall vision for FIRE [Fusion Ignition Research Experiment] is to develop and test the fusion plasma physics and plasma technologies needed to realize capabilities of the ARIES-RS/AT power plant designs. The mission of FIRE is to attain, explore, understand and optimize a fusion dominated plasma which would be satisfied by producing D-T [deuterium-tritium] fusion plasmas with nominal fusion gains {approx}10, self-driven currents of {approx}80%, fusion power {approx}150-300 MW, and pulse lengths up to 40 s. Achieving these goals will require the deployment of several key fusion technologies under conditions approaching those of ARIES-RS/AT. The FIRE plasma configuration with strong plasma shaping, a double null pumped divertor and all metal plasma-facing components is a 40% scale model of the ARIES-RS/AT plasma configuration. ''Steady-state'' advanced tokamak modes in FIRE with high beta, high bootstrap fraction, and 100% noninductive current drive are suitable for testing the physics of the ARIES-RS/A T operating modes. The development of techniques to handle power plant relevant exhaust power while maintaining low tritium inventory is a major objective for a burning plasma experiment. The FIRE high-confinement modes and AT-modes result in fusion power densities from 3-10 MWm{sup -3} and neutron wall loading from 2-4 MWm{sup -2} which are at the levels expected from the ARIES-RS/AT design studies.

Dale M. Meade

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

185

FIRE, A Test Bed for ARIES-RS/AT Advanced Physics and Plasma Technology  

SciTech Connect

The overall vision for FIRE [Fusion Ignition Research Experiment] is to develop and test the fusion plasma physics and plasma technologies needed to realize capabilities of the ARIES-RS/AT power plant designs. The mission of FIRE is to attain, explore, understand and optimize a fusion dominated plasma which would be satisfied by producing D-T [deuterium-tritium] fusion plasmas with nominal fusion gains {approx}10, self-driven currents of {approx}80%, fusion power {approx}150-300 MW, and pulse lengths up to 40 s. Achieving these goals will require the deployment of several key fusion technologies under conditions approaching those of ARIES-RS/AT. The FIRE plasma configuration with strong plasma shaping, a double null pumped divertor and all metal plasma-facing components is a 40% scale model of the ARIES-RS/AT plasma configuration. ''Steady-state'' advanced tokamak modes in FIRE with high beta, high bootstrap fraction, and 100% noninductive current drive are suitable for testing the physics of the ARIES-RS/A T operating modes. The development of techniques to handle power plant relevant exhaust power while maintaining low tritium inventory is a major objective for a burning plasma experiment. The FIRE high-confinement modes and AT-modes result in fusion power densities from 3-10 MWm{sup -3} and neutron wall loading from 2-4 MWm{sup -2} which are at the levels expected from the ARIES-RS/AT design studies.

Dale M. Meade

2004-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

186

LEDA - A HIGH-POWER TEST BED OF INNOVATION AND OPPORTUNITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-energy demonstration accelerator (LEDA) is an operational 6.7-MeV. 100-mA proton accelerator consisting of an injector, radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), and all associated integration equipment. In order to achieve this unprecedented level of performance (670-kW of beam power) from an RFQ, a number of design innovations were required. They will highlight a number of those more significant technical advances, including those in the proton injector, the RFQ configuration, the RF klystrons, the beam stop, and the challenges of beam measurements. In addition to identifying the importance of these innovations to LEDA performance, they will summarize the plans for further testing, and the possibilities for addition of more accelerating structures, including the planned use of very-low-beta super-conducting structures. LEDA's current and upgradable configuration is appropriate for several future high-power accelerators, including those for the transmutation of radioactive waste.

J. SCHNEIDER; R. SHEFFIELD

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bus Research and Testing Program Heavy-duty Chassis Dynamometer and Emissions Testing Facility, hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide from transit buses and heavy-duty vehicles when they are tested on simulated includes a heavy-duty chassis dynamometer, required for conducting these tests, as well as a heavy

Lee, Dongwon

188

Improving Ventilation and Saving Energy: Laboratory Study in aModular Classroom Test Bed  

SciTech Connect

The primary goals of this research effort were to develop, evaluate, and demonstrate a practical HVAC system for classrooms that consistently provides classrooms with the quantity of ventilation in current minimum standards, while saving energy, and reducing HVAC-related noise levels. This research was motivated by several factors, including the public benefits of energy efficiency, evidence that many classrooms are under-ventilated, and public concerns about indoor environmental quality in classrooms. This project involved the installation and verification of the performance of an Improved Heat Pump Air Conditioning (IHPAC) system, and its comparison, a standard HVAC system having an efficiency of 10 SEER. The project included the verification of the physical characteristics suitable for direct replacement of existing 10 SEER systems, quantitative demonstration of improved energy efficiency, reduced acoustic noise levels, quantitative demonstration of improved ventilation control, and verification that the system would meet temperature control demands necessary for the thermal comfort of the occupants. Results showed that the IHPAC met these goals. The IHPAC was found to be a direct bolt-on replacement for the 10 SEER system. Calculated energy efficiency improvements based on many days of classroom cooling or heating showed that the IHPAC system is about 44% more efficient during cooling and 38% more efficient during heating than the 10 SEER system. Noise reduction was dramatic, with measured A-weighed sound level for fan only operation conditions of 34.3 dB(A), a reduction of 19 dB(A) compared to the 10 SEER system. Similarly, the IHPAC stage-1 and stage-2 compressor plus fan sound levels were 40.8 dB(A) and 42.7 dB(A), reductions of 14 and 13 dB(A), respectively. Thus, the IHPAC is 20 to 35 times quieter than the 10 SEER systems depending upon the operation mode. The IHPAC system met the ventilation requirements and was able to provide consistent outside air supply throughout the study. Indoor CO2 levels with simulated occupancy were maintained below 1000 ppm. Finally temperature settings were met and controlled accurately. The goals of the laboratory testing phase were met and this system is ready for further study in a field test of occupied classrooms.

Apte, Michael G.; Buchanan, Ian S.; Faulkner, David; Fisk,William J.; Lai, Chi-Ming; Spears, Michael; Sullivan, Douglas P.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Secondary Waste Form Screening Test ResultsTHOR Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix  

SciTech Connect

Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

2011-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

1-800-CALL-H.E.P. -- Experiences on a voice-over-IP test bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly interactive Internet applications such as Voice-over-IP are extremely sensitive to network performance. Even on high performance research networks, many cases will require the use of differentiated services to achieve high (toll) quality conversations. In this talk the authors will describe a test bed over the Energy Sciences network (ESnet) between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Sandia National Laboratory (Sandia). In particular the characteristics of Voice-over-IP calls between LBNL and SLAC will be reviewed and the effect of low, moderate and high congestion on the link will be quantified. The use of Per Hop Behavior (PHB) in IP headers with Weighted Fair Queuing (WFQ) in routers and the benefit they provide will be explained. A model of flows and performance will be presented and new techniques to predict the quality of calls are under development and will be reviewed. Comparisons with telephone reliability will be discussed and the feasibility of wide spread deployment of VoIP in HEP will be considered.

Matthews, W.

2000-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

191

EBR-2 (Experimental Breeder Reactor-2) test programs  

SciTech Connect

The Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) is a sodium cooled power reactor supplying about 20 MWe to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) grid and, in addition, is the key component in the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). EBR-2's testing capability is extensive and has seen four major phases: (1) demonstration of LMFBR power plant feasibility, (2) irradiation testing for fuel and material development, (3) testing the off-normal performance of fuel and plant systems and (4) operation as the IFR prototype, developing and demonstrating the IFR technology associated with fuel and plant design. Specific programs being carried out in support of the IFR include advanced fuels and materials development, advanced control system development, plant diagnostics development and component testing. This paper discusses EBR-2 as the IFR prototype and the associated testing programs. 29 refs.

Sackett, J.I.; Lehto, W.K.; Lindsay, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Planchon, H.P.; Lambert, J.D.B.; Hill, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales. Volume 2, Task 3, Testing of process improvement concepts: Final report, September 1987--May 1991  

SciTech Connect

This final report, Volume 2, on ``Process Improvement Concepts`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). Results of work on electroseparation of shale oil and fines conducted by IIT is included in this report, as well as work conducted by IGT to evaluate the restricted pipe discharge system. The work was conducted as part of the overall program on ``Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting of Eastern Oil Shales.``

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Bed material agglomeration during fluidized bed combustion. Technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to determine the physical and chemical reactions which lead to the undesired agglomeration of bed material during fluidized bed combustion and to relate these reactions to specific causes. A survey of agglomeration and deposit formation in industrial fluidized bed boilers is in progress. Preliminary results indicate that at least five boilers were experiencing some form of bed material agglomeration. In these instances it was observed that large particles were forming within the bed which were larger that the feed. Four operators could confirm that the larger bed particles had formed due to bed particles sticking together or agglomerating. Deposit formation was reported at nine sites with these deposits being found most commonly at coal feed locations and in cyclones. Other deposit locations included side walls and return loops. Examples of these agglomerates and deposits have been received from five of the surveyed facilities. Also during this quarter, a bulk sample of Illinois No. 6 coal was obtained from the Fossil Energy Program at Ames Laboratory here at Iowa State University and prepared for combustion tests. This sample was first ground to a top-size of 3/8`` using a jaw crusher then a size fraction of 3/8`` {times} 8 (US mesh) was then obtained by sieving using a Gilson Test-Master. This size fraction was selected for the preliminary laboratory-scale experiments designed to simulate the dense bed conditions that exist in the bottom of CFB combustors. To ensure uniformity of fuel composition among combustion runs, the sized coal was riffled using, a cone and long row method and stored in bags for each experiment. During this quarter additional modifications were made to achieve better control of fluidization regimes and to aid in monitoring the hydrodynamic and chemical conditions within the reactor.

Brown, R.C.; Dawson, M.R.; Noble, S.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Distributed Power Program DER Pilot Test at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The DOE Distributed Power Program conducted a pilot test of interconnection test procedures November 12-16, 2001 at Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The objective of this pilot test was to respond to Congressional direction in the Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act of 2001 to complete a distributed power demonstration at the Nevada Test Site and validated interconnection tests in the field. The demonstration consisted of field verification of tests in IEEE P1547 (Draft 7) that are required for interconnection of distributed generation equipment to electrical power systems. Some of the testing has been conducted in a laboratory setting, but the Nevada Test Site provided a location to verify the interconnection tests in the field. The testing also provided valuable information for evaluating the potential for the Nevada Test Site to host future field-testing activities in support of Distributed Energy Resources System Integration R&D.

Kroposki, B.; DeBlasio, R.; Galdo, J.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Insulator seal final test report, TFE Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective was to demonstrate the technology readiness of a Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and with a full-power life of 7 years. This report documents one portion of the testing program, that of the Insulator seals. The insulator seal isolates the space filled with gaseous fission products from the cesium filled interelectrode gap. It also assures that electrons flow from the collector of one cell to the emitter of an axially adjacent cell. Fabrication, materials and testing information are presented.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

A 32-month gasifier mechanistic study and downstream unit process development program for the pressurized ash-agglomerating fluidized bed gasification system: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Work is underway at KRW Energy Systems to develop operating experience and process performance information for a pressurized fluidized-bed agglomerating-ash coal gasification system. The KRW Process Development Unit at Waltz Mill, PA, will be operated from 1985 through 1987 to test (1) an in-bed desulfurization and alkali removal system, and (2) an external hot gas zinc ferrite desulfurization system, and (3) an intergrated in-bed/external-bed system to provide for collection and anaylsis of mechanistic process data. An exploratory test(TP-036-1) was conducted in December 1984 on the newly installed in-bed desulfurization system. Five set points were completed, including an initial air-blown baseline set point without dolomite and four in the dolomite, desulfurization mode. An evaluation of spent reactivity decreased rapidly as the utilization during TP-036-1 indicated that sorbent reactivity decreased rapidly as the utilization of the sorbent approached 60%. 31 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the fourth quarter of 1990, steady-state performance testing at the Nucla Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) resumed under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. Co-sponsorship of the Demonstration Test Program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was completed on June 15, 1990. From October through December, 1990, Colorado-Ute Electric Association (CUEA) completed a total of 23 steady-state performance tests, 4 dynamic tests, and set operating records during November and December as the result of improved unit operating reliability. Highlight events and achievements during this period of operation are presented.

Not Available

1991-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Avoiding Carbon Bed Hot Spots in Thermal Process Off-Gas Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (radioactive and hazardous) wastes. Test programs performed in recent years have shown that mercury in off-gas streams from processes that treat radioactive wastes can be controlled using fixed beds of activated sulfur-impregnated carbon, to levels low enough to comply with air emission regulations such as the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards. Carbon bed hot spots or fires have occurred several times during these tests, and also during a remediation of tanks that contained mixed waste. Hot spots occur when localized areas in a carbon bed become heated to temperatures where oxidation occurs. This heating typically occurs due to heat of absoption of gas species onto the carbon, but it can also be caused through external means such as external heaters used to heat the carbon bed vessel. Hot spots, if not promptly mitigated, can grow into bed fires. Carbon bed hot spots and fires must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Hot spots are detected by (a) monitoring in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (b) more important, monitoring of bed outlet gas CO concentrations. Hot spots are mitigated by (a) designing for appropriate in-bed gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) appropriate monitoring and control of gas and bed temperatures and compositions, and (c) prompt implementation of corrective actions if bed hot spots are detected. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from.

Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Utility Communication Architecture (UCA) International Testing and Quality Assurance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document covers the status and background of the Testing Quality Assurance Program (QAP) for the Utility Communication Architecture International Users Group (UCAIug) and the related support for testing of International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61850 conformant devices. Through a project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), American Electric Power, and other founding utilities, the UCAIug has been given the responsibility for promoting the Utility Communication Archite...

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Cooperative field test program for wind systems. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the Federal Wind Energy Program, managed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), are (1) to assist industry and utilities in achieving a multi-regional US market penetration of wind systems, and (2) to establish the United States as the world leader in the development of advanced wind turbine technology. In 1984, the program conducted a series of planning workshops with representatives from the wind energy industry to obtain input on the Five-Year Research Plan then being prepared by DOE. One specific suggestion that came out of these meetings was that the federal program should conduct cooperative research tests with industry to enhance the technology transfer process. It was also felt that the active involvement of industry in DOE-funded research would improve the state of the art of wind turbine technology. DOE established the Cooperative Field Test Program (CFTP) in response to that suggestion. This program was one of the first in DOE to feature joint industry-government research test teams working toward common objectives.

Bollmeier, W.S. II; Dodge, D.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

Carlsbad Field Office

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Thermionic Fuel Element performance: TFE Verification Program. Final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a Thermionic Fuel Element (TFE) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full power life of 7 years. A TFE was designed that met the reliability and lifetime requirements for a 2 MW(e) conceptual reactor design. Analysis showed that this TFE could be used over the range of 0.5 to 5 megawatts. This was used as the basis for designing components for test and evaluation. The demonstration of a 7-year component lifetime capability was through the combined use of analytical models and accelerated, confirmatory tests in a fast test reactor. Iterative testing was performed in which the results of one test series led to evolutionary improvements in the next test specimens. The TFE components underwent screening and initial development testing in ex-reactor tests. Several design and materials options were considered for each component. As screening tests permitted, down selection occurred to very specific designs and materials. In parallel with ex-reactor testing, and fast reactor component testing, components were integrated into a TFE and tested in the TRIGA test reactor at GA. Realtime testing of partial length TFEs was used to test support, alignment and interconnective TFE components, and to verify TFE performance in-reactor with integral cesium reservoirs. Realtime testing was also used to verify the relation between TFE performance and fueled emitter swelling, to test the durability of intercell insulation, to check temperature distributions, and to verify the adequacy over time of the fission gas venting channels. Predictions of TFE lifetime rested primarily on the accelerated component testing results, as correlated and extended to realtime by the use of analytical models.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Detailed technical plan for Test Program Element-III (TPE-III) of the first wall/blanket shield engineering test program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experimental requirements, test-bed design, and computational requirements are reviewed and updated. Next, in Sections 3, 4 and 5, the experimental plan, instrumentation, and computer plan, respectively, are described. Finally, Section 6 treats other considerations, such as personnel, outside participation, and distribution of results.

Turner, L.R.; Praeg, W.F.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

EPRI MOV Performance Prediction Program: Friction Separate Effects Test Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The coefficient of sliding friction between the internal components of a gate valve is an important factor in determining the thrust required to operate the valve. An EPRI test program measured coefficients of friction between typical gate valve internal materials using specimens that duplicated the contact configurations occurring in valves.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

CARBON BED MERCURY EMISSIONS CONTROL FOR MIXED WASTE TREATMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury has had various uses in nuclear fuel reprocessing and other nuclear processes, and so is often present in radioactive and mixed (both radioactive and hazardous according tohe Resource Conservation and Recovery Act) wastes. Depending on regulatory requirements, the mercury in the off-gas must be controlled with sometimes very high efficiencies. Compliance to the Hazardous Waste Combustor (HWC) Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) standards can require off-gas mercury removal efficiencies up to 99.999% for thermally treating some mixed waste streams. Several test programs have demonstrated this level of off-gas mercury control using fixed beds of granular sulfur-impregnated activated carbon. Other results of these tests include: (a) The depth of the mercury control mass transfer zone was less than 15-30 cm for the operating conditions of these tests, (b) MERSORB carbon can sorb Hg up to 19 wt% of the carbon mass, and (c) the spent carbon retained almost all (98 99.99%) of the Hg; but when even a small fraction of the total Hg dissolves, the spent carbon can fail the TCLP test when the spent carbon contains high Hg concentrations. Localized areas in a carbon bed that become heated through heat of adsorption, to temperatures where oxidation occurs, are referred to as bed hot spots. Carbon bed hot spots must be avoided in processes that treat radioactive and mixed waste. Key to carbon bed hot spot mitigation are (a) designing for sufficient gas velocity, for avoiding gas flow maldistribution, and for sufficient but not excessive bed depth, (b) monitoring and control of inlet gas flowrate, temperature, and composition, (c) monitoring and control of in-bed and bed outlet gas temperatures, and (d) most important, monitoring of bed outlet CO concentrations. An increase of CO levels in the off-gas downstream of the carbon bed to levels about 50-100 ppm higher than the inlet CO concentration indicate CO formation in the bed, caused by carbon bed hot spots. Corrective actions must be implemented quickly if bed hot spots are detected, using a graded approach and sequence starting with corrective actions that are simple, quick, cause the least impact to the process, and are easiest to recover from. Multiple high and high-high alarm levels should be used, with appropriate corrective actions for each level.

Nick Soelberg; Joe Enneking

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Pressurized fluidized-bed combustion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US DOE pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) research and development program is designed to develop the technology and data base required for the successful commercialization of the PFBC concept. A cooperative program with the US, West Germany, and the UK has resulted in the construction of the 25 MWe IEA-Grimethorpe combined-cycle pilot plant in England which will be tested in 1981. A 13 MWe coal-fired gas turbine (air cycle) at Curtis-Wright has been designed and construction scheduled. Start-up is planned to begin in early 1983. A 75 MWe pilot plant is planned for completion in 1986. Each of these PFBC combined-cycle programs is discussed. The current status of PFB technology may be summarized as follows: turbine erosion tolerance/hot gas cleanup issues have emerged as the barrier technology issues; promising turbine corrosion-resistant materials have been identified, but long-term exposure data is lacking; first-generation PFB combustor technology development is maturing at the PDU level; however, scale-up to larger size has not been demonstrated; and in-bed heat exchanger materials have been identified, but long-term exposure data is lacking. The DOE-PFB development plan is directed at the resolution of these key technical issues. (LCL)

Not Available

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

BNL NONLINEAR PRE TEST SEISMIC ANALYSIS FOR THE NUPEC ULTIMATE STRENGTH PIPING TEST PROGRAM.  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has been conducting a multi-year research program to investigate the behavior of nuclear power plant piping systems under large seismic loads. The objectives of the program are: to develop a better understanding of the elasto-plastic response and ultimate strength of nuclear piping; to ascertain the seismic safety margin of current piping design codes; and to assess new piping code allowable stress rules. Under this program, NUPEC has performed a large-scale seismic proving test of a representative nuclear power plant piping system. In support of the proving test, a series of materials tests, static and dynamic piping component tests, and seismic tests of simplified piping systems have also been performed. As part of collaborative efforts between the United States and Japan on seismic issues, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC) and its contractor, the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), are participating in this research program by performing pre-test and post-test analyses, and by evaluating the significance of the program results with regard to safety margins. This paper describes BNL's pre-test analysis to predict the elasto-plastic response for one of NUPEC's simplified piping system seismic tests. The capability to simulate the anticipated ratcheting response of the system was of particular interest. Analyses were performed using classical bilinear and multilinear kinematic hardening models as well as a nonlinear kinematic hardening model. Comparisons of analysis results for each plasticity model against test results for a static cycling elbow component test and for a simplified piping system seismic test are presented in the paper.

DEGRASSI,G.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,C.; SUZUKI,K.; NAMITA,Y.

2003-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

209

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification  

SciTech Connect

This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the first and second quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semiannual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semiannually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

Parker, G.B.; Currie, J.W.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Mobile Energy Laboratory energy-efficiency testing programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes energy-efficiency testing activities applying the Mobile Energy Laboratory (MEL) testing capabilities during the third and fourth quarters of fiscal year (FY) 1991. The MELs, developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), are administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Naval Energy and Environmental Support Activity (NEESA) for energy testing and energy conservation program support functions at federal facilities. The using agencies principally fund MEL applications, while DOE/FEMP funds program administration and capability enhancement activities. This report fulfills the requirements established in Section 8 of the MEL Use Plan (PNL-6861) for semi-annual reporting on energy-efficiency testing activities using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee, formally established in 1989, developed the MEL Use Plan and meets semi-annually to establish priorities for energy-efficient testing applications using the MEL capabilities. The MEL Use Committee is composed of one representative each of the US Department of Energy, US Army, US Air Force, US Navy, and other federal agencies.

Parker, G B; Currie, J W

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Electric vehicle/photovoltaic test and evaluation program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of South Florida (USF) in collaboration with Florida utilities and other organizations have executed a research and development program for the test and evaluation of Electric Vehicles. Its activity as one of 13 US Department of Energy (DOE) Electric Vehicle Test Site Operators was funded by DOE and the Florida Energy Office (FEO). The purpose of this program was to determine the efficiency of electric vehicles under commuter and fleet conditions in Florida. An additional feature of this program was the development of a utility interconnected photovoltaic (PV) system for charging electric vehicles with solar energy. USF developed an effective and economical automated on board Mobile Data Acquisition System (MDAS) that records vehicle operating data with minimum operator interface. Computer programs were written by the USF team to achieve processing and analysis of the vehicles` MDAS data, again minimizing human involvement, human effort and human error. A large number of passenger cars, vans and pickup trucks were studied. Procedures for monitoring them were developed to a point where the equipment is commercially available and its operation has become routine. The nations first PV solar powered electric vehicle charging station and test facility was designed, developed and put into operation under this program. The charging station is capable of direct DC-DC (PV to battery) or AC-DC (power grid to battery) charging and it routes unused PV power to the University`s power grid for other use. The DC-DC charging system is more efficient, more dependable and safer than DC-AC-DC and traditional methods of DC-DC charging. A fortuitous correlation was observed between battery charging demand and solar power availability in commuter application of electric vehicles.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

OTEC-1 Power System Test Program: test plan for first deployment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes in detail all tests planned for the first eight-month deployment of OTEC-1, a test facility constructed by the US Department of Energy in order to test heat exchangers for closed-cycle power plants using ocean thermal energy. Tests to be performed during the first-deployment period are aimed primarily at determining (1) the effectiveness of countermeasures in preventing biofouling of the heat exchanters, (2) the extent of environmental impacts associated with operation of an OTEC facility, and (3) the performance of a 1-MWe, titanium shell-and-tube evaporator and condenser pair. The condenser to be tested has plain tubes, and the evaporator employs the Linde High Flux surface on the working-fluid (ammonia) side to enhance the heat-transfer rate. This plan provides a statement of the objectives and priorities of the test program, describes the test equipment, gives a detailed account of all tests to be performed and the test schedule, and discusses provisions for management of the test program.

None

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

FAQ's for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program dated December 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FAQ for: ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Pilot Program December 2010 Table of Contents Introduction............................................................................................................................... 1 What product types will be tested? ................................................................................................. 1 Will testing continue after the State Energy Efficient Appliance Rebate Program (SEEARP) ends? .................................................................................................................................................... 1 For Consumers .......................................................................................................................... 1

215

Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work conducted from September 1, 2003 through December 31, 2007 on the project entitled Advanced Utility Mercury-Sorbent Field-Testing Program. The project covers the testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant and the Duke Power Cliffside and Buck Stations. The St. Clair Plant used a blend of subbituminous and bituminous coal and controlled the particulate emissions by means of a cold-side ESP. The Duke Power Stations used bituminous coals and controlled their particulate emissions by means of hot-side ESPs. The testing at the Detroit Edison St. Clair Plant demonstrated that mercury sorbents could be used to achieve high mercury removal rates with low injection rates at facilities that burn subbituminous coal. A mercury removal rate of 94% was achieved at an injection rate of 3 lb/MMacf over the thirty day long-term test. Prior to this test, it was believed that the mercury in flue gas of this type would be the most difficult to capture. This is not the case. The testing at the two Duke Power Stations proved that carbon- based mercury sorbents can be used to control the mercury emissions from boilers with hot-side ESPs. It was known that plain PACs did not have any mercury capacity at elevated temperatures but that brominated B-PAC did. The mercury removal rate varies with the operation but it appears that mercury removal rates equal to or greater than 50% are achievable in facilities equipped with hot-side ESPs. As part of the program, both sorbent injection equipment and sorbent production equipment was acquired and operated. This equipment performed very well during this program. In addition, mercury instruments were acquired for this program. These instruments worked well in the flue gas at the St. Clair Plant but not as well in the flue gas at the Duke Power Stations. It is believed that the difference in the amount of oxidized mercury, more at Duke Power, was the difference in instrument performance. Much of the equipment was purchased used and all of the equipment has nearly reached the end of its useful service.

Ronald Landreth

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Long-Term Inflow And Structural Test Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Long-term Inflow and Structural Test (LIST) program is collecting long-term, continuous inflow and structural response data to characterize the extreme loads on wind turbines. A heavily instrumented Micon 65/13M turbine with SERI 8-m blades is being used as the first test turbine for this program. This turbine and its two sister turbines are located in Bushland, TX, a test site that exposes the turbines to a wind regime that is representative of a Great Plains commercial site. The turbines and their inflow are being characterized with 60 measurements: 34 to characterize the inflow, 19 to characterize structural response, and 7 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. The primary characterization of the inflow into the LIST turbine relies upon an array of five sonic anemometers. Primary characterization of the structural response of the turbine uses several sets of strain gauges to measure bending loads on the blades and the tower and two accelerometers to measure the motion of the nacelle. Data from the various instruments are sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using a newly developed data acquisition system that features a time-synchronized continuous data stream that is telemetered from the turbine rotor. The data, taken continuously, are automatically divided into 10-minute segments and archived for analysis. Preliminary data are presented to illustrate the operation of the turbine and the data acquisition and analysis system.

Herbert J. Sutherland; Perry L. Jones; Byron A. Neal

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

TRUPACT-II Hydrogen G-Valve Program Test Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This test plan describes the objectives, scope, participants, and components of the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) Hydrogen G-Value Program (GH2P). The GH2P builds on the experience, results, and experimental setup of the TRUPACT-II Matrix Depletion Program (MDP) to establish effective hydrogen G-values (G-values) for additional waste matrices. This plan details the experimental design and test matrices for experiments to measure the G-value for additional waste matrices, including first- and second-stage sludges at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and molten salt extraction residues with varying amounts of residual moisture (i.e., unbound water). Data collected from the GH2P will be used to support an application to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for G-values and corresponding wattage limits for the TRUPACT-II payloads containing these waste matrices. The testing will also evaluate the ability to determine G-values on a waste stream basis.

Mroz, Eugene J.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 9 & 10: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO  

SciTech Connect

PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

John D. Bess

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

The Long-Term Inflow and Structural Test Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Long-term Inflow and Structural Test (LIST) program is collecting long-term, continuous inflow and structural response data to characterize the extreme loads on wind turbines. A heavily instrumented Micon 65/13M turbine with SERI 8-m blades is being used as the first test turbine for this test program. This turbine and its two sister turbines are located in Bushland, TX a test site that exposes the turbines to a wind regime that is representative of a Great Plains commercial site. The turbines and their inflow are being characterized with 60 measurements: 34 to characterize the inflow, 19 to characterize structural response, and 7 to characterize the time-varying state of the turbine. The primary characterization of the inflow into the LIST turbine relies upon an array of five sonic anemometers. These three-axis anemometers are placed approximately 2-diameters upstream of the turbine in a pattern designed to describe the inflow. Primary characterization of the structural response of the turbine uses several sets of strain gauges to measure bending loads on the blades and the tower and two accelerometers to measure the motion of the nacelle. Data from the various instruments are sampled at a rate of 30 Hz using a newly developed data acquisition system that features a time-synchronized continuous data stream that is telemetered from the turbine rotor. The data, taken continuously, are automatically divided into 10-minute segments and archived for analysis. Preliminary data are presented to illustrate the operation of the turbine and the data acquisition and analysis system.

SUTHERLAND,HERBERT J; JONES,PERRY L.; NEAL,BYRON A.

2000-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

220

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

Radiological Control Managers' Council

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated in a test-bed bus. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project, the research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated into test-bed buses, began as a multi-phase U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project in 1989. Phase I had a goal of developing two competing half-scale (25 kW) brassboard phosphoric acid fuel cell systems. An air-cooled and a liquid-cooled fuel cell system were developed and tested to verify the concept of using a fuel cell and a battery in a hybrid configuration wherein the fuel cell supplies the average power required for operating the vehicle and a battery supplies the `surge` or excess power required for acceleration and hill-climbing. Work done in Phase I determined that the liquid-cooled system offered higher efficiency.

NONE

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

222

Second generation pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) research and development, Phase 2 --- Task 4, carbonizer testing. Volume 2, Data reconciliation  

SciTech Connect

During the period beginning November 1991 and ending September 1992, a series of tests were conducted at Foster Wheeler Development Corporation in a fluidized-bed coal carbonizer to determine its performance characteristics. The carbonizer was operated for 533 hours in a jetting fluidized-bed configuration during which 36 set points (steady-state periods) were achieved. Extensive data were collected on the feed and product stream compositions, heating values, temperatures, and flow rates. With these data, elemental and energy balances were computed to evaluate and confirm accuracy of the data. The carbonizer data were not as self-consistent as could be desired (balance closure imperfection). A software package developed by Science Ventures, Inc., of California, called BALAID, was used to reconcile the carbonizer data; the details of the reconciliation have been given in Volume 1 of this report. The reconciled data for the carbonizer were rigorously analyzed, correlations were developed, and the model was updated accordingly. The model was then used in simulating each of the 36 steady-state periods achieved in the pilot plant. The details are given in this Volume one. This Volume 2 provides details of the carbonizer data reconciliation.

Froehlich, R.; Robertson, A.; Vanhook, J.; Goyal, A.; Rehmat, A.; Newby, R.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Ferrocyanide safety program: Moisture migration test in ferrocyanide simulant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the initial phases of the Ferrocyanide Safety Program, it was presumed that actual sludge in tanks would behave as if it were a two-phase system in which a brine phase would seep through the insoluble solid phase of ferrocyanide and other precipitated salts. After flowsheet materials were produced and extensively tested, it became apparent that the ferrocyanide precipitates held extensive quantities of water (50% by weight or more) that were far above what would be expected from hydrated salts. Because little or no draining of this fluid occurred over a period of months, it was concluded that the precipitates and their solution would act as a homogeneous single phase in much the same way as natural clays. Suggestions were made that the testing of clays could add to existing knowledge of sludge hydraulic and rheologic properties, at a much-reduced cost in chemicals and time over that required for flowsheet materials. Tests were conducted in a 400-L volume of ferrocyanide sludge simulant to determine thermal characteristics around heated zones. At low heat loads, surface vapor losses were much lower than return rates, resulting in no net change in water content. Under boiling conditions, no bulk dryout occurred. These results were consistent with the results from earlier small-scale experiments.

Crippen, M.D.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

WORLD TRADE CENTER INDOOR DUST TEST AND CLEAN PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: This Test and Clean Program plan is the result of ongoing efforts to monitor the current environmental conditions for residents and workers impacted by the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers. In March 2004, EPA convened an expert technical review panel to provide individual guidance and assistance to the Agency in its use of available exposure and health surveillance databases and registries to characterize any remaining exposures and risks, identify unmet public health needs, and to individually recommend steps to further minimize the risks associated with the aftermath of the WTC attack. The WTC Expert Technical Review Panel (WTC Panel) members met periodically in open meetings to interact with EPA and the public about plans to monitor for the presence of WTC dust in indoor environments and to individually suggest additional measures that could be undertaken by EPA and others to evaluate the dispersion of the plume and the geographic extent of environmental impact from the collapse of the WTC towers. The WTC Panel members were charged, in part, with reviewing data from post-cleaning verification sampling to be done by EPA in the residential areas included in EPA Region 2's 2002-3 Indoor Air Residential Assistance Program to verify that recontamination has not

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

LOWER MANHATTAN INDOOR DUST TEST AND CLEAN PROGRAM PLAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background: This Test and Clean Program plan is the result of ongoing efforts to respond to concerns of residents and workers impacted by the collapse of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers. In March 2004, EPA convened an expert technical review panel to provide individual guidance and assistance to the Agency in its use of available exposure and health surveillance databases and registries to characterize any remaining exposures and risks, identify unmet public health needs, and individually recommend steps to further minimize the risks associated with the aftermath of the WTC attack. The WTC Expert Technical Review Panel (WTC Panel) members met periodically in open meetings to interact with EPA and the public about plans to monitor for the presence of WTC dust in indoor environments and to individually suggest additional measures that could be undertaken by EPA and others to evaluate the dispersion of the plume and the geographic extent of environmental impact from the collapse of the WTC towers. The WTC Panel members were charged, in part, with reviewing data from post-cleaning verification sampling to be done by EPA in the residential areas included in EPA Region 2's 2002-2003 Indoor Air Residential Assistance Program to verify that recontamination has not

unknown authors

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Testing fluidized bed incinerators for energy-efficient operation for the Southtowns Sewage Treatment Agency. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two methods for improving the energy efficiency of fluidized bed sludge incinerators were evaluated. The first method used paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents for municipal sludge instead of lime and ferric chloride. Automatic control of the incinerator was the second method evaluated for energy savings. To evaluate the use of paper pulp and polymer as conditioning agents, varying quantities of paper pulp were added to the liquid sludge to determine the optimal sludge-to-paper pulp ratio. The effect of the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge on plant operations also was evaluated. When compared to sludge conditioned with lime and ferric chloride, the paper pulp and polymer-conditioned sludge had similar cake release and feed characteristics, higher BTU values for the dry sludge solids, required less auxiliary fuel for incineration, and generated less ash for disposal. The paper pulp and polymer did not have any appreciable negative effects on the operation of the wastewater treatment plant. It was estimated that processing and incinerating the sludge conditioned with paper pulp and polymer resulted in a cost savings of up to $91.73 per dry ton of activated sludge solids. To evaluate the effect of automatic control, all the incinerator operating parameters including air flow rates, fuel oil feed rates, and sludge feed rates, were automatically monitored and controlled to minimize auxiliary fuel oil use and to keep the incinerator running at optimal conditions. Although effective, the estimated cost savings for automatic control of the incinerator were small.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Interlinked Test Results for Fusion Fuel Processing and Blanket Tritium Recovery Systems Using Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulated fuel processing (cryogenic distillation columns and a palladium diffuser) and CMSB (cryogenic molecular sieve bed) systems were linked together, and were operated. The validity of the CMSB was discussed through this experiment as an integrated system for the recovery of blanket tritium. A gas stream of hydrogen isotopes and He was supplied to the CMSB as the He sweep gas in blanket of a fusion reactor. After the breakthrough of tritium was observed, regeneration of the CMSB was carried out by evacuating and heating. The hydrogen isotopes were finally recovered by the diffuser. At first, only He gas was sent by the evacuating. The hydrogen isotopes gas was then rapidly released by the heating. The system worked well against the above drastic change of conditions. The amount of hydrogen isotopes gas finally recovered by the diffuser was in good agreement with that adsorbed by the CMSB. The dynamic behaviors (breakthrough and regeneration) of the system were explained well by a set of basic codes.

Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Hayashi, Takumi; Kawamura, Yoshinori; Iwai, Yasunori; Isobe, Kanetsugu; Uzawa, Masayuki; Nishi, Masataka [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (Japan)

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Transportable Heavy Duty Emissions Testing Laboratory and Research Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to quantify the emissions from heavy-duty vehicles operating on alternative fuels or advanced fuel blends, often with novel engine technology or aftertreatment. In the first year of the program West Virginia University (WVU) researchers determined that a transportable chassis dynamometer emissions measurement approach was required so that fleets of trucks and buses did not need to be ferried across the nation to a fixed facility. A Transportable Heavy-Duty Vehicle Emissions Testing Laboratory (Translab) was designed, constructed and verified. This laboratory consisted of a chassis dynamometer semi-trailer and an analytic trailer housing a full scale exhaust dilution tunnel and sampling system which mimicked closely the system described in the Code of Federal Regulations for engine certification. The Translab was first used to quantify emissions from natural gas and methanol fueled transit buses, and a second Translab unit was constructed to satisfy research demand. Subsequent emissions measurement was performed on trucks and buses using ethanol, Fischer-Tropsch fuel, and biodiesel. A medium-duty chassis dynamometer was also designed and constructed to facilitate research on delivery vehicles in the 10,000 to 20,000lb range. The Translab participated in major programs to evaluate low-sulfur diesel in conjunction with passively regenerating exhaust particulate filtration technology, and substantial reductions in particulate matter were recorded. The researchers also participated in programs to evaluate emissions from advanced natural gas engines with closed loop feedback control. These natural gas engines showed substantially reduced levels of oxides of nitrogen. For all of the trucks and buses characterized, the levels of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and particulate matter were quantified, and in many cases non-regulated species such as aldehydes were also sampled. Particle size was also quantified during selected studies. A laboratory was established at WVU to provide for studies which supported and augmented the Translab research, and to provide for development of superior emissions measurement systems. This laboratory research focused on engine control and fuel sulfur issues. In recent years, as engine and aftertreatment technologies advanced, emissions levels were reduced such that they were at or below the Translab detectable limits, and in the same time frame the US Environmental Protection Agency required improved measurement methodologies for engine emissions certification. To remain current and relevant, the researchers designed a new Translab analytic system, housed in a container which can be transported on a semi-trailer. The new system's dilution tunnel flow was designed to use a subsonic venturi with closed loop control of blower speed, and the secondary dilution and particulate matter filter capture were designed to follow new EPA engine certification procedures. A further contribution of the program has been the development of techniques for creating heavy-duty vehicle test schedules, and the creation of schedules to mimic a variety of truck and bus vocations.

David Lyons

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

High-temperature turbine technology program hot-gas path development test. Part II. Testing  

SciTech Connect

This topical report of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) Phase II program presents the results of testing full-scale water-cooled first-stage and second-stage turbine nozzles at design temperature and pressure to verify that the designs are adequate for operation in a full-scale turbine environment. Low-cycle fatigue life of the nozzles was demonstrated by subjecting cascade assemblies to several hundred simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycles. This testing was accomplished in the Hot-Gas Path Development Test Stand (HGPDTS), which is capable of evaluating full-scale combustion and turbine nozzle components. A three-throat cascade of the first-stage turbine nozzle was successfully tested at a nozzle inlet gas temperature of 2630/sup 0/F and a nozzle inlet pressure of 11.3 atmospheres. In addition to steady-state operation at the design firing temperature, the nozzle cascade was exposed to a simulated startup/shutdown turbine cycle by varying the firing temperature. A total of 42 h at the design point and 617 thermal cycles were accumulated during the test periods. First-stage nozzle test results show that measured metal and coolant temperatures correspond well to the predicted design values. This nozzle design has been shown to be fully satisfactory for the application (2600/sup 0/F), with growth capability to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature. A post-test metallurgical examination of sectioned portions of the tested nozzles shows a totally bonded structure, confirming the test results and attesting to the successful performance of water-cooled composite nozzle hardware.

Horner, M.W.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

NYU-DOE Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New York University (NYU), under a Department of Energy (DOE) Contract, has designed and constructed a sub-pilot scale Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustor (PFBC) Facility at the Antonio Ferri Laboratories, Westbury, Long Island. The basic feature of this Experimental Research Facility is a well-instrumented, 30-inch diameter coal combustor capable of operating up to 10 atm and provided with a liberal number of ports, making it a versatile unit for study of fundamental in-bed phenomena. Additionally, the overall design features make it a flexible facility for solving a variety of industrial research problems. The main objectives of the facility are two-fold: (1) to perform research in important areas of Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustion like low-grade fuel combustion under pressure; and (2) to provide the PFBC community with a experimental research tool for basic and applied research in order to accelerate the commercialization of this technology. New York University will initially test the facility of burning low-grade fuels under pressure. During the test program, emphasis will be placed on burning North Dakota lignite under pressures up to 7 atm. The performance of lignite with regard to its feeding, combustion efficiency, sulfur adsorption and sorbent requirements will be investigated. This report describes the various systems of the PFBC facility and operating procedures, and presents an outline of the test program planned for the facility. Other details are provided in the Equipment and Maintenance Manual, Test Program and Data Acquisition Manual, and Training Manual.

Zakkay, V.; Kolar, A.; Sellakumar, K.; Srinivasaragavan, S.; Miller, G.; Panunzio, S.; Joseph, A.; Sundaresan, C.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Gas-cooled fast breeder reactor steady-state irradiation testing program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The requirements for the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor irradiation program are specified, and an irradiation program plan which satisfies these requirements is presented. The irradiation program plan consists of three parts and includes a schedule and a preliminary cost estimate: (1) a steady-state irradiation program, (2) irradiations in support of the design basis transient test program, and (3) irradiations in support of the GRIST-2 safety test program. Data from the liquid metal fast breeder reactor program are considered, and available irradiation facilities are examined.

Acharya, R.T.; Campana, R.J.; Langer, S.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

General-Purpose Heat Source development: Extended series test program large fragment tests  

SciTech Connect

General-Purpose Heat Source radioisotope thermoelectric generators (GPHS-RTGs) will provide electric power for the NASA Galileo and European Space Agency Ulysses missions. Each GPHS-RTG comprises two major components: GPHS modules, which provide thermal energy, and a thermoelectric converter, which converts the thermal energy into electric power. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in a GPHS-RTG contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled capsules. LANL conducted a series of safety verification tests on the GPHS-RTG before the scheduled May 1986 launch of the Galileo spacecraft to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in potential accident environments. As a result of the Challenger 51-L accident in January 1986, NASA postponed the launch of Galileo; the launch vehicle was reconfigured and the spacecraft trajectory was modified. These actions prompted NASA to reevaluate potential mission accidents, and an extended series safety test program was initiated. The program included a series of large fragment tests that simulated the collision of solid rocket booster (SRB) fragments, generated in an SRB motor case rupture or resulting from a range safety officer SRB destruct action, with the GPHS-RTG. The tests indicated that fueled clads, inside a converter, will not breach or release fuel after a square (142 cm on a side) SRB fragment impacts flat-on at velocities up to 212 m/s, and that only the leading fueled capsules breach and release fuel after the square SRB fragment impacts the modules, inside the converter, edge-on at 95 m/s. 8 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

Cull, T.A.

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Brayton Point Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of the impacts of future mercury regulations to Brayton Point Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has variable (29-75%) native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables and activated carbon on mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included: (1) Plant and PG&E National Energy Group corporate personnel; (2) Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI); (3) United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL); (4) ADA-ES, Inc.; (5) NORIT Americas, Inc.; (6) Apogee Scientific, Inc.; (7) TRC Environmental Corporation; (8) URS Corporation; (9) Quinapoxet Solutions; (10) Energy and Environmental Strategies (EES); and (11) Reaction Engineering International (REI). The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall, the objectives of this field test program were to determine the impact of activated carbon injection on mercury control and balance-of-plant processes on Brayton Point Unit 1. Brayton Point Unit 1 is a 250-MW unit that fires a low-sulfur eastern bituminous coal. Particulate control is achieved by two electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) in series. The full-scale tests were conducted on one-half of the flue gas stream (nominally 125 MW). Mercury control sorbents were injected in between the two ESPs. The residence time from the injection grid to the second ESP was approximately 0.5 seconds. In preparation for the full-scale tests, 12 different sorbents were evaluated in a slipstream of flue gas via a packed-bed field test apparatus for mercury adsorption. Results from these tests were used to determine the five carbon-based sorbents that were tested at full-scale. Conditions of interest that were varied included SO{sub 3} conditioning on/off, injection concentrations, and distribution spray patterns. The original test plan called for parametric testing of NORIT FGD carbon at 1, 3, and 10 lbs/MMacf. These injection concentrations were estimated based on results from the Pleasant Prairie tests that showed no additional mercury removal when injection concentrations were increased above 10 lbs/MMacf. The Brayton Point parametric test data indicated that higher injection concentrations would achieve higher removal efficiencies and should be tested. The test plan was altered to include testing at 20 lbs/MMacf. The first test at this higher rate showed very high removal across the second ESP (>80%). Unlike the ''ceiling'' phenomenon witnessed at Pleasant Prairie, increasing sorbent injection concentration resulted in further capture of vapor-phase mercury. The final phase of field-testing was a 10-day period of continuous injection of NORIT FGD carbon. During the first five days, the injection concentration was held at 10 lbs/MMacf, followed by nominally five days of testing at an injection concentration of 20 lbs/MMacf. The mercury removal, as measured by the semi-continuous emission monitors (S-CEM), varied between 78% and 95% during the 10 lbs/MMacf period and increased to >97% when the injection concentration was increased to 20 lbs/MMacf. During the long-term testing period, mercury measurements following EPA's draft Ontario Hydro method were conducted by TRC Environmental Corporation at both 10 and 20 lbs/MMacf test conditions. The Ontario Hydro data showed that the particulate mercury removal was similar between the two conditions of 10 or 20 lbs/MMacf and removal efficiencies were greater than 99%. Elemental mercury was not detected in any samples, so no conclusions as to its removal can be drawn. Removal of oxidized mercury, on the other hand, increased from 68% to 93% with the higher injection concentration. These removal rates agreed well with the S-CEM results.

Michael D. Durham

2005-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

234

CIRCULATING MOVING BED COMBUSTION PROOF OF CONCEPT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circulating Moving Bed (CMB) combustion technology has its roots in traditional circulating fluidized bed technology and involves a novel method of solid fuel combustion and heat transfer. CMB technology represents a step change in improved performance and cost relative to conventional PC and FBC boilers. The CMB heat exchanger preheats the energy cycle working fluid, steam or air, to the high temperature levels required in systems for advanced power generation. Unique features of the CMB are the reduction of the heat transfer surfaces by about 60% as a result of the enhanced heat transfer rates, flexibility of operation, and about 30% lower cost over existing technology. The CMB Phase I project ran from July 2001 through March 2003. Its objective was to continue development of the CMB technology with a series of proof of concept tests. The tests were conducted at a scale that provided design data for scale up to a demonstration plant. These objectives were met by conducting a series of experiments in ALSTOM Powers Multi-use Test Facility (MTF). The MTF was modified to operate under CMB conditions of commercial interest. The objective of the tests were to evaluate gas-to-solids heat transfer in the upper furnace, assess agglomeration in the high temperature CMB bubbling bed, and evaluate solids-to-tube heat transfer in the moving bed heat exchanger. The Phase I program results showed that there are still some significant technical uncertainties that needed to be resolved before the technology can be confidently scaled up for a successful demonstration plant design. Work remained in three primary areas: scale up of gas to solid heat transfer high temperature finned surface design the overall requirements of mechanical and process design. The CMB Phase II workscope built upon the results of Phase I and specifically addressed the remaining technical uncertainties. It included a scaled MTF heat transfer test to provide the necessary data to scale up gas-to-solids heat transfer. A stress test rig was built and tested to provide validation data for a stress model needed to support high temperature finned surface design. Additional cold flow model tests and MTF tests were conducted to address mechanical and process design issues. This information was then used to design and cost a commercial CMB design concept. Finally, the MBHE was reconfigured into a slice arrangement and tested for an extended duration at a commercial CFB plant.

Jukkola, Glen

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Technical progress and community relations activities for the fluidized bed thermal treatment process at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970's and 1980's in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed incinerators. Rocky Flat's fluidized bed system operates at low temperatures ([approximately]525--600[degrees]C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating either sodium carbonate or a mixture of sodium carbonate and bicarbonate (Trona) in the bed media. This obviates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas. It is expected that once in production, the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste feed. The current development program for the full-scale system is a nationwide effort incorporating input from national laboratories, universities, regulatory agencies, and private companies to assure the most current technology is utilized and that regulatory concerns are addressed. In addition to resolving technological issues, the fluidized bed program is addressing public concerns with a proactive community relations program.

Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Technical progress and community relations activities for the fluidized bed thermal treatment process at the Rocky Flats Plant  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed system is being developed at Rocky Flats for the treatment of mixed waste (a mixture of radioactive and chemically hazardous waste). The current program builds on experience gained in the 1970`s and 1980`s in tests with bench-scale, pilot-scale, and demonstration-scale fluidized bed incinerators. Rocky Flat`s fluidized bed system operates at low temperatures ({approximately}525--600{degrees}C) which eliminates many of the disadvantages associated with high temperature thermal treatment processes. The bed makes use of in situ neutralization of acidic off-gases by incorporating either sodium carbonate or a mixture of sodium carbonate and bicarbonate (Trona) in the bed media. This obviates using wet scrubbers to treat the off-gas. It is expected that once in production, the fluidized bed process will yield up to a 40:1 reduction in the volume of the waste feed. The current development program for the full-scale system is a nationwide effort incorporating input from national laboratories, universities, regulatory agencies, and private companies to assure the most current technology is utilized and that regulatory concerns are addressed. In addition to resolving technological issues, the fluidized bed program is addressing public concerns with a proactive community relations program.

Semones, G.B.; Williams, P.M.; Stiefvater, S.P.; Mitchell, D.L.; Roecker, B.D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Smart Grid R&D Program AOP Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CERTS Microgrid Test Bed Renewable Integration Analysis Smart Grid R&D Program Peer Review 3 November 2010 Joe Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Lab December 2008 Relevance to OE...

238

NUCLA Circulating Atmospheric Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project. 1990 Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this DOE Cooperative Agreement is to conduct a cost-shared clean coal technology project to demonstrate the feasibility of circulating fluidized bed combustion technology and to evaluate economic, environmental, and operational benefits of CFB steam generators on a utility scale. At the conclusion of the Phase 2 program, testing related to satisfying these objectives was completed. Data analysis and reporting are scheduled for completion by October 1991. (VC)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

NERVA Program. Operating procedure: cart cooling system, Test Cell A  

SciTech Connect

The instructions described in this procedure are typical of the operation of Test Cell A relative to the KIWI-B4A. Operation of Test Cell A relative to the NRX reactor will require modifications dictated by specific test requirements. Under NRX conditions, it will be the responsibility of the test cell manager to evaluate the capabilities of Test Cell A in terms of given test requirements and then set forth detailed checklists which will be compatible with the test requirements.

1963-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Evaluating program analysis and testing tools with the RUGRAT random benchmark application generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Benchmarks are heavily used in different areas of computer science to evaluate algorithms and tools. In program analysis and testing, open-source and commercial programs are routinely used as bench- marks to evaluate different aspects of algorithms ...

Ishtiaque Hussain; Christoph Csallner; Mark Grechanik; Chen Fu; Qing Xie; Sangmin Park; Kunal Taneja; B. M. Mainul Hossain

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

TransDPOR: a novel dynamic partial-order reduction technique for testing actor programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To detect hard-to-find concurrency bugs, testing tools try to systematically explore all possible interleavings of the transitions in a concurrent program. Unfortunately, because of the nondeterminism in concurrent programs, exhaustively exploring all ...

Samira Tasharofi; Rajesh K. Karmani; Steven Lauterburg; Axel Legay; Darko Marinov; Gul Agha

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Fueled emitter final test report TFE Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program built directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addressed that concern.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Converter performance TFE Verification Program. Final test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report details TFE Verification Program, the objective, of which is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW(e) range, and a full-power life of 7 years. The TFE Verification Program built directly on the technology and data base developed in the 1960s and early 1970s in an AEC/NASA program, and in the SP-100 program conducted in 1983, 1984 and 1985. In the SP-100 program, the attractive features of thermionic power conversion technology were recognized but concern was expressed over the lack of fast reactor irradiation data. The TFE Verification Program addressed that concern.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Center (DRRC) performed a technology evaluation for the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) Emerging Technologies Programs. This report summarizes the design, deployment,...

245

A test program to determine the structural properties of unreinforced hollow clay tile masonry walls at the DOE Oak Ridge plants  

SciTech Connect

A recent Department of Energy (DOE) General Design Criteria'' has emphasized the importance of determining the adequacy and safety of both new and existing facilities to natural phenomenon hazards. Many of the buildings at the DOE Oak Ridge facilities are constructed with unreinforced masonry hollow clay tile infill walls -- in some cases these walls comprise a substantial part of the lateral force resistance for a building. In order to perform a realistic assessment of the strength of the buildings to seismic events it is important to accurately predict the behavior of these walls. Very little information is currently available on hollow clay tile masonry, its structural properties and behavior. As the in-situ condition of these walls throughout the plants is suspect due to their age and exposure to numerous chemicals, a test program was initiated at the Oak Ridge plants to obtain material properties for use in the natural phenomena hazards analysis. This paper presents the preliminary results of that testing program. The following tests on clay-tile walls, units, and panels were performed: (1) in-situ mortar bed shear strength, (2) compression strength, (3) splitting tensile strength, and (4) diagonal tension (shear) strength of panels which had been removed from existing walls. The testing program is ongoing, is being expanded, and will include not only in-plane tests, but out-of-plane bending testing as well. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.

1989-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

High uranium density dispersion fuel for the reduced enrichment of research and test reactors program.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work describes the fabrication of a high uranium density fuel for the Reduced Enrichment of Research and Test Reactors Program. In an effort to (more)

[No author

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Status of Heavy Vehicle Diesel Emission Control Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Test Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DECSE test program is well under way to providing data on effects of sulfur levels in diesel fuel on performance of emission control technologies.

George Sverdrup

1999-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

248

JM to Revise DOE O 3792.3, Drug-Free Federal Workplace Testing Implementation Program  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The subject directive provides requirements and responsibilities for the implementation of a workplace program to test for the use of illegal drugs to ...

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

249

HTR-PROTEUS Pebble Bed Experimental Program Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3: Hexagonal Close Packing with a 1:2 Moderator-to-Fuel Pebble Ratio  

SciTech Connect

In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. Four benchmark experiments were evaluated in this report: Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3. These core configurations represent the hexagonal close packing (HCP) configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS experiment with a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:2. Core 1 represents the only configuration utilizing ZEBRA control rods. Cores 1A, 2, and 3 use withdrawable, hollow, stainless steel control rods. Cores 1 and 1A are similar except for the use of different control rods; Core 1A also has one less layer of pebbles (21 layers instead of 22). Core 2 retains the first 16 layers of pebbles from Cores 1 and 1A and has 16 layers of moderator pebbles stacked above the fueled layers. Core 3 retains the first 17 layers of pebbles but has polyethylene rods inserted between pebbles to simulate water ingress. The additional partial pebble layer (layer 18) for Core 3 was not included as it was used for core operations and not the reported critical configuration. Cores 1, 1A, 2, and 3 were determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

John D. Bess; Barbara H. Dolphin; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Igor Lengar; Oliver Kberl

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Analysis of Well ER-6-2 Testing, Yucca Flat FY 2004 Testing Program, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the analysis of data collected for Well ER-6-2 during fiscal year (FY) 2004 Yucca Flat well development and testing program (herein referred to as the ''testing program''). Participants in Well ER-6-2 field development and hydraulic testing activities were: Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), Bechtel Nevada (BN), Desert Research Institute (DRI), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas-Harry Reid Center (UNLV-HRC). The analyses of data collected from the Well ER-6-2 testing program were performed by the SNJV.

Greg Ruskauff

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

MintEra : a testing environment for Java programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce MintEra, an automatic testcase generator and verifier. Using an simple, easy-to-read yet expressive language called AAL, users can specify representation- invariants and assertions within programs. MintEra ...

Al-Naffouri, Basel Y

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Soybean Reference Chemistry and/or NIR Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lab Proficiency Testing service for Whole Soybeans and Soybean Meal. Provided by Soybean Quality Traits (SQT) sponsored by the United Soybean Board. Soybean Reference Chemistry and/or NIR Laboratory Proficiency Testing Program Laboratory Proficiency Progr

253

Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to established and qualified standards. Working with industry, academia, and the U.S. government, SwRI set out to develop an accepted set of evaluation standards and analytical methodologies. Critical measurements of hydrogen sorption properties in the Laboratory have been based on three analytical capabilities: 1) a high-pressure Sievert-type volumetric analyzer, modified to improve low-temperature isothermal analyses of physisorption materials and permit in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of the samples gas space; 2) a static, high-pressure thermogravimetric analyzer employing an advanced magnetic suspension electro-balance, glove-box containment, and capillary interface for in situ mass spectroscopic analysis of the samples gas space; and 3) a Laser-induced Thermal Desorption Mass Spectrometer (LTDMS) system for high thermal-resolution desorption and mechanistic analyses. The Laboratory has played an important role in down-selecting materials and systems that have emerged from the MCoEs.

Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

254

Generation of test data structures using constraint logic programming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of Bounded-Exhaustive Testing (BET) is the automatic generation of all the test cases satisfying a given invariant, within a given bound. When the input has a complex structure, the development of correct and efficient generators becomes ...

Valerio Senni; Fabio Fioravanti

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Improving participation rates in Minnesota's residential audit program: a test marketing program  

SciTech Connect

In response to lower than anticipated requests for in-home energy audits, the Minnesota Energy Division joined Northern States Power and the Marketing Dept. of the University of Minnesota in conducting a test marketing experiment during May and June 1982. The goal of the experiment was to determine if marketing approaches other than direct mail could increase household participation in the utility sponsored Residential Conservation Service (RCS) audit program. Two delivery methods, mail and door-to-door visit by community volunteer, were used to distribute experimental marketing materials to 2,160 sampled households in 3 St. Paul area neighborhoods. Marketing materials were the standard mailed audit offer, a waterflow restrictor and two versions of a do-it-yourself home energy audit. A marketing treatment consisted of one or more of the marketing materials delivered to a residence by either of the delivery methods, direct mail or door-to-door. The impact of each treatment on audit request rates was evaluated.

Not Available

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) Coal Bed Methane Protection Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Institutional Fuel Distributor Program Info State Montana Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Montana Department of Natural Resources and Conservation The Coal Bed Methane Protection Act establishes a long-term coal bed methane protection account and a coal bed methane protection program for the purpose of compensating private landowners and water right holders for damage to land and to water quality and availability that is attributable to the development of coal bed methane wells. The Act aims to provide for

257

User Guide for EPRI API Test Program, Version 2.02.024  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the EPRI Application Program Interface (API) Test Program is to provide software developers with an example, including source code, for understanding how to develop programs that use the EPRI API. The EPRI API is defined so that application program developers can use a single standard API for interfacing to a wide variety of data sources. The EPRI API encompasses operations for Common Data Access including create, read, update, delete and fine grained notification of data changes.

2000-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORE 4: RANDOM PACKING WITH A 1:1 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO  

SciTech Connect

In its deployment as a pebble bed reactor (PBR) critical facility from 1992 to 1996, the PROTEUS facility was designated as HTR-PROTEUS. This experimental program was performed as part of an International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the Validation of Safety Related Physics Calculations for Low Enriched HTGRs. Within this project, critical experiments were conducted for graphite moderated LEU systems to determine core reactivity, flux and power profiles, reaction-rate ratios, the worth of control rods, both in-core and reflector based, the worth of burnable poisons, kinetic parameters, and the effects of moisture ingress on these parameters. One benchmark experiment was evaluated in this report: Core 4. Core 4 represents the only configuration with random pebble packing in the HTR-PROTEUS series of experiments, and has a moderator-to-fuel pebble ratio of 1:1. Three random configurations were performed. The initial configuration, Core 4.1, was rejected because the method for pebble loading, separate delivery tubes for the moderator and fuel pebbles, may not have been completely random; this core loading was rejected by the experimenters. Cores 4.2 and 4.3 were loaded using a single delivery tube, eliminating the possibility for systematic ordering effects. The second and third cores differed slightly in the quantity of pebbles loaded (40 each of moderator and fuel pebbles), stacked height of the pebbles in the core cavity (0.02 m), withdrawn distance of the stainless steel control rods (20 mm), and withdrawn distance of the autorod (30 mm). The 34 coolant channels in the upper axial reflector and the 33 coolant channels in the lower axial reflector were open. Additionally, the axial graphite fillers used in all other HTR-PROTEUS configurations to create a 12-sided core cavity were not used in the randomly packed cores. Instead, graphite fillers were placed on the cavity floor, creating a funnel-like base, to discourage ordering effects during pebble loading. Core 4 was determined to be acceptable benchmark experiment.

John D. Bess; Leland M. Montierth

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Comment submitted by A. O. Smith Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From: Adams, Charlie From: Adams, Charlie Sent: Friday, May 06, 2011 03:38 PM To: Adams, Charlie Cc: Dana, Paul; Parker, Mike; Porter, Jerry; Schulz, Matt; Schuh, Darrell; Roy Smith; Ted Poulin; Berning, Dave; Dan Snyder Subject: Comments on ENERGY STAR verification testing program Hi, Ashley. A.O. Smith has the following comments in regard to DOE's ENERGY STAR® verification test program: * DOE and EPA appear to be working to pool the units tested under each program so that there is no double testing of units, and that all units tested count towards the total required for test during the specified period. This is great, and we appreciate their efforts. * In the selection for testing, we agree that new technologies and units that are above the Energy Star level of performance are of interest, but the majority of testing should be

260

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the utilitys electrical power grid; 2) an approach toElectrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and powertheir electrical integration. In combined-heat-and-power

Eto, Joe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the utilitys electrical power grid; 2) an approach toElectrical and Electronics Engineers Standard 1547 and powertheir electrical integration. In combined-heat-and-power

ETO, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emerging potential of distributed generation using a systemKeywords: CHP, UPS, distributed generation, intentionalmanagement systems, distributed generation, and modeling

Lasseter, R. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

needed to operate microgrids consisting of generatingdemonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or moreimprovements offered by microgrids. KEYWORDS Field

Eto, Joe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Autonomous Control of Microgrids, IEEE PES Meeting,engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of smallreduction of cost, meshed microgrids and frequency based

Lasseter, R. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

needed to operate microgrids consisting of generatingdemonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or moreimprovements offered by microgrids. KEYWORDS Field

ETO, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eto. 2002. Integration of Distributed Energy Resources: Thesite. In this context, distributed energy resources smallelectric power. The distributed energy resources portfolio

ETO, J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper on Integration of Distributed Energy Resources: Thesite. In this context, distributed energy resources smallelectric power. The distributed energy resources portfolio

Eto, Joe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and John Stevens are with Sandia National Laboratories,of the Technical Staff at Sandia National Labs in the Energybefore taking a job with Sandia National Laboratories and

Lasseter, R. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power conditioning system which together provide the necessary power and voltage control required for operation

Lasseter, R. H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

SAE J2579 Validation Testing Program: Powertech Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Safety Working Group at the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) has developed a new 'systems-level' document for hydrogen vehicles. This document, SAE TIR J2579, is a new approach to certification standards for components. The document eliminates the need for dozens of test samples, tested in isolation from each other. SAE TIR J2579 describes the components which create the 'high-pressure envelope', the components whose primary function is the containment of the high-pressure hydrogen on-board the vehicle, and has created a sequential test based on those specific components.

McDougall, M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

B61-12 Life Extension Program Radar Drop Tests Completed Successfully |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

B61-12 Life Extension Program Radar Drop Tests Completed Successfully | B61-12 Life Extension Program Radar Drop Tests Completed Successfully | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > Media Room > Press Releases > B61-12 Life Extension Program Radar Drop Tests ... Press Release B61-12 Life Extension Program Radar Drop Tests Completed Successfully

272

Improving Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

New test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the residential building retrofit market. Reducing the energy use of existing homes in the United States offers significant energy-saving opportunities, which can be identified through building simulation software tools that calculate optimal packages of efficiency measures. To improve the accuracy of energy analysis for residential buildings, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Buildings Research team developed the Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), a method for diagnosing and correcting errors in building energy audit software and calibration procedures. BESTEST-EX consists of building physics and utility bill calibration test cases, which software developers can use to compare their tools simulation findings to reference results generated with state-of-the-art simulation tools. Overall, the BESTEST-EX methodology: (1) Tests software predictions of retrofit energy savings in existing homes; (2) Ensures building physics calculations and utility bill calibration procedures perform to a minimum standard; and (3) Quantifies impacts of uncertainties in input audit data and occupant behavior. BESTEST-EX is helping software developers identify and correct bugs in their software, as well as develop and test utility bill calibration procedures.

Not Available

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Improving Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

New test procedure evaluates quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the residential building retrofit market. Reducing the energy use of existing homes in the United States offers significant energy-saving opportunities, which can be identified through building simulation software tools that calculate optimal packages of efficiency measures. To improve the accuracy of energy analysis for residential buildings, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) Buildings Research team developed the Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX), a method for diagnosing and correcting errors in building energy audit software and calibration procedures. BESTEST-EX consists of building physics and utility bill calibration test cases, which software developers can use to compare their tools simulation findings to reference results generated with state-of-the-art simulation tools. Overall, the BESTEST-EX methodology: (1) Tests software predictions of retrofit energy savings in existing homes; (2) Ensures building physics calculations and utility bill calibration procedures perform to a minimum standard; and (3) Quantifies impacts of uncertainties in input audit data and occupant behavior. BESTEST-EX is helping software developers identify and correct bugs in their software, as well as develop and test utility bill calibration procedures.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ocean Thermal Energy Converstion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part B  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part B provides an annotated test list and describes component tests and system tests.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

275

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator In Situ Pressure Test Guidelines, Revision 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information in this document provides guidance for the performance of in situ pressure testing of steam generator tubes. In situ pressure testing refers to hydrostatic pressure tests performed on installed tubing in the field. Such testing is considered a direct means of evaluating tube structural and leakage integrity. In situ pressure testing can be used to support condition monitoring of steam generator tube integrity.This is a required document for a steam generator program developed ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

Alternatives Analysis for the Resumption of Transient Testing Program  

SciTech Connect

An alternatives analysis was performed for resumption of transient testing. The analysis considered eleven alternatives including both US international facilities. A screening process was used to identify two viable alternatives from the original eleven. In addition, the alternatives analysis includes a no action alternative as required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The alternatives considered in this analysis included: 1. Restart the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT) 2. Modify the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) which includes construction of a new hot cell and installation of a new hodoscope. 3. No Action

Lee Nelson

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Control Systems Security Test Center - FY 2004 Program Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2004, the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center (CSSC) was established at Idaho National Laboratory to execute assessment activities to reduce the vulnerability of the nations critical infrastructure control systems to terrorist attack. The CSSC implements a program to accomplish the five goals presented in the US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security. This report summarizes the first year funding of startup activities and program achievements that took place in FY 2004 and early FY 2005. This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Security Center of the National Cyber Security Division of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs federal departments to identify and prioritize the critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the National Cyber Security Division to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems.

Robert E. Polk; Alen M. Snyder

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary flow and pressure testing of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, as part of the preparations for the initial 90-day segment of the Long-Term Flow Test, has revealed several significant features concerning the hydraulic behavior of this reservoir as a function of injection and production pressure levels. Of most significance to the future operation of HDR power plants is the influence of elevated production backpressure on the effective reservoir flow impedance (i.e., the difference between injection and production pressures, divided by the production flow rate). It has been found that the effective flow impedance at high backpressure is significantly lower than the corresponding impedance at low backpressure. At an injection pressure of 3700 psi and a back-pressure of 2210 psi, the effective flow impedance for the present reservoir is 20 psi/gpm--less than 40% of the effective flow impedance for similar injection conditions, but at low backpressure (about 170 psi). Recently, a 10-day reservoir flow test was conducted at a somewhat lower backpressure of 1500 psi, and at a slightly higher injection pressure of 3750 psi. At these new conditions, there was an increase in the effective reservoir flow impedance to 23.6 psi/gpm, but also a significant increase in the production flow rate and temperature--from 74 gpm to 95 gpm, and from 154 C to 180 C. The net reservoir water loss rate averaged over the last 5 days of this latest flow test was 7.3 gpm, which corresponds to a net recovery of 93% of the injected water--a very significant result that has been obtained from our preliminary reservoir flow testing. Under both of these high backpressure flow conditions, the reservoir was not extending, as evidenced by a very low rate of water loss and the absence of microseismic activity.

Brown, Donald W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

Spent fuel sabotage aerosol ratio program : FY 2004 test and data summary.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program has been underway for several years. This program provides data that are relevant to some sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks, and associated risk assessments. The program also provides significant technical and political benefits in international cooperation. We are quantifying the Spent Fuel Ratio (SFR), the ratio of the aerosol particles released from HEDD-impacted actual spent fuel to the aerosol particles produced from surrogate materials, measured under closely matched test conditions, in a contained test chamber. In addition, we are measuring the amounts, nuclide content, size distribution of the released aerosol materials, and enhanced sorption of volatile fission product nuclides onto specific aerosol particle size fractions. These data are the input for follow-on modeling studies to quantify respirable hazards, associated radiological risk assessments, vulnerability assessments, and potential cask physical protection design modifications. This document includes an updated description of the test program and test components for all work and plans made, or revised, during FY 2004. It also serves as a program status report as of the end of FY 2004. All available test results, observations, and aerosol analyses plus interpretations--primarily for surrogate material Phase 2 tests, series 2/5A through 2/9B, using cerium oxide sintered ceramic pellets are included. Advanced plans and progress are described for upcoming tests with unirradiated, depleted uranium oxide and actual spent fuel test rodlets. This spent fuel sabotage--aerosol test program is coordinated with the international Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC) and supported by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Mo, Tin (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Billone, Michael C. (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Young, F. I. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC); Coats, Richard Lee; Burtseva, Tatiana (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Luna, Robert Earl; Dickey, Roy R.; Sorenson, Ken Bryce; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Thompson, Nancy Slater (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Hibbs, Russell S. (U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC); Gregson, Michael Warren; Lange, Florentin (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Tsai, Han-Chung (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Summary of the Solar Two Test and Evaluation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar Two was a collaborative, cost-shared project between eleven US industry and utility partners and the U. S. Department of Energy to validate molten-salt power tower technology. The Solar Two plant, located east of Barstow, CA, was comprised of 1926 heliostats, a receiver, a thermal storage system and a steam generation system. Molten nitrate salt was used as the heat transfer fluid and storage media. The steam generator powered a 10 MWe, conventional Rankine cycle turbine. Solar Two operated from June 1996 to April 1999. The major objective of the test and evaluation phase of the project was to validate the technical characteristics of a molten salt power tower. This paper describes the significant results from the test and evaluation activities.

PACHECO,JAMES E.; REILLY,HUGH E.; KOLB,GREGORY J.; TYNER,CRAIG E.

2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review With mounting evidence suggesting an increased probability that malicious attacks may be launched against energy control systems, there is a critical need to understand specific cyber vulnerabilities and corresponding mitigation strategies. This need is being addressed by SCADA/ Energy Management System (EMS) Cyber Security Assessments conducted at the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) facility at INL and at on-site field installations of control systems. Visualization & Controls Program Peer Review More Documents & Publications DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan Vulnerability Analysis of Energy Delivery Control Systems - 2011

282

Rivesville multicell fluidized bed boiler. Annual technical progress report. July 1978-June 1979  

SciTech Connect

Design, construction and test program of a 300,000 lb/hr steam generating capacity multicell fluidized bed boiler (MFB), as a pollution free method of burning high-sulfur or highly corrosive coals, is being carried out. The concept involves burning fuels such as coal, in a fluidized bed of limestone particles that react with the sulfur compounds formed during combustion to reduce air pollution. Nitrogen oxide emissions are also reduced at the lower combustion temperatures. The CaSO/sub 4/ produced in the furnace is discharged with the ash or regenerated to CaO for reuse in the fluidized bed. Information is presented on continued operation of the Rivesville MFB steam generating plant in a commercial mode and for determining performance and emission characteristics; studies and tests on flyash characterization and reinjection, fuel feed eductors and needles, air distributor, corrosion-erosion and sulfur capture; engineering studies to improve MFB performance and reliability.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Comment submitted by Energizer Battery Manufacturing, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energizer Battery Manufacturing, Inc 25225 Detroit Rd. Westlake, OH 44145 Energizer Comments On DOE Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR 1. In the "Conditions and Criteria for Recognition of Certification Bodies for the ENERGY STAR® Program" document on page 3 it states in 3.a.i.2.a that "Annually test at least 10% of all ENERGY STAR qualified models the CB has certified or for which it has received qualified product data". Does the 10% of qualified models pertain to all products the lab has certified or is it 10% of each companies product? This is unclear, please add sufficient detail. 2. On page 7 under program funding, it states "For products tested by DOE under the ENERGY STAR verification program, DOE pays all costs for obtaining and testing products. Verification programs administered by CBs are

284

Safety Evaluation Report, pump and valve inservice testing program, Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EG and G, Inc., report presents the results of our evaluation of the Maine Yankee Atomic Power Station, Inservice Testing Program for pumps and valves whose function is important to safety.

Rockhold, H.C.; Stromberg, H.M.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Template for Submission of Risk-Informed Inservice Testing Program for Pumps and Valves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants must update their inservice testing program for pumps and valves to the latest ASME code every ten years. This report provides a template for requesting an alternative to the technical requirements contained in that code.

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

286

Employing the EPRI Vista Program for Test Burn Risk Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The drive to use fuel switching as a means to meet more stringent SO2 and NOX emissions requirements has in many cases led to both a reduction in power station efficiency and a poorer net plant heat rate (NPHR) at the power station, as well as significant reductions in operating margins and increases in the risk of unit derates. One excellent method to manage or mitigate this risk is a comprehensive test burn for fuels under consideration. The objectives of this technical report are to demonstrate how th...

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a progress report for the period of July 1, 1990 to 31 August 1990 on activities at Colorado State University in a program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems. Topics covered are: solar heating with isothermal collectors; solid cooling with solid desiccant; liquid desiccant cooling systems; solar heating systems; solar water heaters; fields tests; and program management. 6 figs., 2 tabs. (FSD)

Not Available

1990-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

288

Test Program for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Exhaust Diffuser  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research relates to improving the efficiency of flow in a turbine exhaust, and thus, that of the turbine and power plant. The Phase I SBIR project demonstrated the technical viability of strutlets to control stalls on a model diffuser strut. Strutlets are a novel flow-improving vane concept intended to improve the efficiency of flow in turbine exhausts. Strutlets can help reduce turbine back pressure, and incrementally improve turbine efficiency, increase power, and reduce greenhouse gas emmission. The long-term goal is a 0.5 percent improvement of each item, averaged over the US gas turbine fleet. The strutlets were tested in a physical scale model of a gas turbine exhaust diffuser. The test flow passage is a straight, annular diffuser with three sets of struts. At the end of Phase 1, the ability of strutlets to keep flow attached to struts was demonstrated, but the strutlet drag was too high for a net efficiency advantage. An independently sponsored followup project did develop a highly-modified low-drag strutlet. In combination with other flow improving vanes, complicance to the stated goals was demonstrated for for simple cycle power plants, and to most of the goals for combined cycle power plants using this particular exhaust geometry. Importantly, low frequency diffuser noise was reduced by 5 dB or more, compared to the baseline. Appolicability to other diffuser geometries is yet to be demonstrated.

Norris, Thomas R.

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Summary Report on FY12 Small-Scale Test Activities High Temperature Electrolysis Program  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of the apparatus and the single cell testing results performed at Idaho National Laboratory during JanuaryAugust 2012. It is an addendum to the Small-Scale Test Report issued in January 2012. The primary program objectives during this time period were associated with design, assembly, and operation of two large experiments: a pressurized test, and a 4 kW test. Consequently, the activities described in this report represent a much smaller effort.

James O'Brien

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Hanford Permanent Isolation Barrier Program: Asphalt technology test plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Permanent Isolation Barriers use engineered layers of natural materials to create an integrated structure with backup protective features. The objective of current designs is to develop a maintenance-free permanent barrier that isolates wastes for a minimum of 1000 years by limiting water drainage to near-zero amounts. Asphalt is being used as an impermeable water diversion layer to provide a redundant layer within the overall barrier design. Data on asphalt barrier properties in a buried environment are not available for the required 100-year time frame. The purpose of this test plan is to outline the activities planned to obtain data with which to estimate performance of the asphalt layers.

Freeman, H.D.; Romine, R.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Fast Flux Test Facility Asbestos Location Tracking Program  

SciTech Connect

Procedure Number HNF-PRO-408, revision 0, paragraph 1.0, ''Purpose,'' and paragraph 2.0, ''Requirements for Facility Management of Asbestos,'' relate building inspection and requirements for documentation of existing asbestos-containing building material (ACBM) per each building assessment. This documentation shall be available to all personnel (including contractor personnel) entering the facility at their request. Corrective action was required by 400 Area Integrated Annual Appraisal/Audit for Fiscal Year 1992 (IAA-92-0007) to provide this notification documentation. No formal method had been developed to communicate the location and nature of ACBM to maintenance personnel in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) 400 Area. The scope of this Data Package Document is to locate and evaluate any ACBM found at FFTF which constitutes a baseline. This includes all buildings within the protected area. These findings are compiled from earlier reports, numerous work packages and engineering evaluations of employee findings.

REYNOLDS, J.A.

1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

292

NREL Improves Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improves Improves Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a new test procedure to increase the quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the building retrofit market. The Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) is a test procedure that enables software developers to evaluate the performance of their audit tools in modeling energy use and savings in existing homes when utility bills are available for model cali- bration. Similar to NREL's previous energy analysis tests, such as HERS BESTEST and other BESTEST suites included in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, BESTEST-EX compares soft- ware simulation findings to reference results generated with state-of-the-art

293

An outdoor exposure testing program for optical materials used in solar thermal electric technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Developing low-cost, durable advanced optical materials is important for making solar thermal energy. technologies viable for electricity production. The objectives of a new outdoor testing program recently initiated by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are to determine the expected lifetimes of candidate reflector materials and demonstrate their optical durability in real-world service conditions. NREL is working with both utilities and industry in a collaborative effort to achieve these objectives. To date, simulated/accelerated exposure testing of these materials has not been correlated with actual outdoor exposure testing. Such a correlation is desirable to provide confidence in lifetime predictions based upon accelerated weathering results. This outdoor testing program will allow outdoor exposure data to be obtained for realistic environments and will establish a data base for correlating simulated/accelerated outdoor exposure data with actual outdoor exposure data. In this program, candidate reflector materials are subjected to various outdoor exposure conditions in a network of sites across the southwestern United States. Important meteorological data are continuously recorded at these sites; these data will be analyzed for possible correlations with material optical performance. Weathered samples are characterized on a regular basis using a series of optical tests. These tests provide the basis for tracking material performance and durability with exposure time in the various outdoor environments. This paper describes the outdoor testing program in more detail including meteorological monitoring capabilities and the optical tests that are performed on these materials.

Wendelin, T.; Jorgensen, G.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine who to admit (and, in some cases, to award merit-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Admission Test Preparation Admission test scores help professional and graduate programs determine-prepared for these tests. Some are tests of aptitude in quantitative skills, verbal and analytical reasoning and/or writing ability (e.g., GRE, LSAT, GMAT), while others are tests of content knowledge (e.g., GRE Subject Tests

Hampton, Randy

295

Comment submitted by Whirlpool Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ADMINISTRATIVE CENTER * 2000 N. M63 - MD 3005 * BENTON HARBOR, MI 49022 * 269.923.4646 ADMINISTRATIVE CENTER * 2000 N. M63 - MD 3005 * BENTON HARBOR, MI 49022 * 269.923.4646 May 9, 2011 Via email Ashley Armstrong U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov Re: DOE ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Program Dear Ms. Armstrong: We appreciate the opportunity to comment on the DOE Verification Testing Program that was put forth on April 22, 2011 (DOE Testing Document). As a very active member of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM), we have worked closely with them in the development of the comments they have submitted (under separate cover)

296

Heat transfer characteristics of a fluidized bed : stirling engine system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A fluidized bed combustion (FBC) system was designed to provide heat energy to the head of a Stirling cycle engine. Preliminary testing with a simulated (more)

Anzalone, Thomas M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Program on Technology Innovation: Preliminary Test Protocol for Vehicle/Grid System Compatibility Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report defines step-by-step procedures for performing system compatibility compliance testing of plug-in electric vehicles. The tests described cover both the vehicle as a load (charging operation) and as a generation source (vehicle-to-grid operation). With many original equipment manufacturers of automobiles poised to release plug-in electric vehicles in the coming months, evaluating the interaction of these vehicles with the power grid has become an important issue. Because consumers are likely t...

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

Not Available

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

299

State of Fluidized Bed Combustion Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new combustion technology has been developed in the last decade that permits the burning of low quality coal, lignite and other fuels, while maintaining stack emissions within State and Federal EPA limits. Low quality fuels can be burned directly in fluidized beds while taking advantage of low furnace temperatures and chemical activity within the bed to limit SO2 and NOx emissions, thereby eliminating the need for stack gas scrubbing equipment. The excellent heat transfer characteristics of the fluidized beds also result in a reduction of total heat transfer surface requirements, thus reducing the size and cost of steam generators. Tests on beds operating at pressures of one to ten atmospheres, at temperatures as high as 1600oF, and with gas velocities in the vicinity of four to twelve feet per second, have proven the concept. Early history of this technology is traced, and the progress that has been made in the development of fluidized bed combustion boilers, as well as work currently underway, in the United States and overseas, is reviewed. Details on the fluidized bed boiler installations at Alexandria, Virginia (5,000 lbs/hr), Georgetown University (100,000 lbs/hr), and Rivesville, West Virginia (300,000 Ibs/hr) are presented, and test results are discussed. Potential application of fluidized bed boilers in industrial plants using lignite and lignite refuse is examined. The impact of proposed new DOE and EPA regulations on solid fuels burning is also examined.

Pope, M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Laboratory studies on corrosion of materials for fluidized bed combustion applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive corrosion test program was conducted at Argonne National Laboratory to evaluate the corrosion performance of metallic structural materials in environments that simulate both steady-state and off-normal exposure conditions anticipated in fluidized bed combustion (FBC) systems. This report discusses the possible roles of key parameters, such as sorbent and gas chemistries, metal temperature, gas cycling conditions, and alloy pretreatment, in the corrosion process. Data on scale thickness and intergranular penetration depth are presented for several alloys as a function of the chemistry of the exposure environment, deposit chemistry, and exposure time. Test results were obtained to compare the corrosion behavior of materials in the presence of reagent grade sorbent compounds and spent-bed materials from bubbling- and circulating-fluid-bed systems. Finally, the laboratory test results were compared with metal wastage information developed over the years in several fluidized bed test facilities. Metallic alloys chosen for the tests were carbon steel, Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo and Fe-9Cr-1Mo ferritic steels. Types 304 and 310 stainless steel, and Incoloy 800. 26 refs., 61 figs., 8 tabs.

Natesan, K.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Office of Technology Development Program for Research, Development, Demonstration, Testing, and Evaluation. FY 1993 Program Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE has set a goal to clean up its complex and to bring all sites into compliance with applicable environmental regulations. This initiative is slated for completion by the year 2019. Four years ago there was no coordinated plan for identifying or cleaning these contaminated sites. Since 1989, DOE`s Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management has invested time, money, and manpower to establish a wide range of programs to meet this immense challenge. DOE is responsible for waste management and clean up of more than 100 contaminated installations in 36 states and territories. This includes 3,700 sites: over 26,000 acres, with hazardous or radioactive contaminated surface or groundwater, soil, or structures; over 26,000 acres requiring remediation, with the number growing as new sites are defined; 500 surplus facilities awaiting decontamination and decommissioning and approximately 5,000 peripheral properties (residences, businesses) that have soil contaminated with uranium tailings.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

EBR-2 (Experimental Breeder Reactor-2), IFR (Integral Fast Reactor) prototype testing programs  

SciTech Connect

The Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) is a sodium cooled power reactor supplying about 20 MWe to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) grid and, in addition, is the key component in the development of the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). EBR-2's testing capability is extensive and has seen four major phases: (1) demonstration of LMFBR power plant feasibility, (2) irradiation testing for fuel and material development. (3) testing the off-normal performance of fuel and plant systems and (4) operation as the IFR prototype, developing and demonstrating the IFR technology associated with fuel and plant design. Specific programs being carried out in support of the IFR include advanced fuels and materials development and component testing. This paper discusses EBR-2 as the IFR prototype and the associated testing programs. 29 refs.

Lehto, W.K.; Sackett, J.I.; Lindsay, R.W. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA). EBR-II Div. Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Planchon, H.P.; Lambert, J.D.B. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive test program has been envisioned by ERDA to accomplish the OTEC program objectives of developing an industrial and technological base that will lead to the commercial capability to successfully construct and economically operate OTEC plants. This study was performed to develop alternative non-site specific OTEC test facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program including both land and floating test facilities. A progression of tests was established in which OTEC power cycle component designs proceed through advanced research and technology, component, and systems test phases. This progression leads to the first OTEC pilot plant and provides support for following developments which potentially reduce the cost of OTEC energy. It also includes provisions for feedback of results from all test phases to enhance modifications to existing designs or development of new concepts. The tests described should be considered as representative of generic types since specifics can be expected to change as the OTEC plant design evolves. Emphasis is placed on defining the test facility which is capable of supporting the spectrum of tests envisioned. All test support facilities and equipment have been identified and included in terms of space, utilities, cost, schedule, and constraints or risks. A highly integrated data acquisition and control system has been included to improve test operations and facility effectiveness through a centralized computer system capable of automatic test control, real-time data analysis, engineering analyses, and selected facility control including safety alarms. Electrical power, hydrogen, and ammonia are shown to be technically feasible as means for transmitting OTEC power to a land-based distribution point. (WHK)

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

304

General-Purpose Heat Source Development: Safety Verification Test Program. Flyer plate test series  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular component of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide electric power for space missions. The initial RTG applications will be for the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. Each of the 18 GPHS modules in an RTG contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) has been conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS fueled clads to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System Vehicle (space shuttle) is one conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests to simulate the fragment environment that the RTG and GPHS modules would experience in such an event. These tests deal specifically with the flat-on collision of flyer-plate-type fragments with bare, simulant-fueled (depleted UO/sub 2/) clads. Results of these tests suggest that the fueled clad is only minimally breached by collision with 3.53-mm-thick flyer-plate-type fragments of space shuttle alloy at velocities up to 1170 m/s. However, collision of a 38.1-mm-thick plate with a bare GPHS clad, at a velocity of 270 m/s, results in a total release of fuel.

Cull, T.A.; Pavone, D.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Testing Protocols and Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI-Resnet Development  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Testing Protocols & Results: Testing Protocols & Results: Airport Sound Program Experience and BPI/RESNET Development Spring 2012 Residential Energy Efficiency Stakeholder Meeting: Combustion Safety in Tight Houses Jim Fitzgerald Center for Energy and Environment Building Performance Institute Page 2  Weatherization, custom windows & central air conditioning  Attic insulation, wall insulation, and attic air sealing - borrowed specs from energy programs and used weatherization contractors  Average house leakage: 7.8 ACH50 before 5.4 ACH50 after MSP secret: this Airport Sound Program does weatherization work to reduce sound All Tightening of Existing Homes Can Affect Combustion Appliance Safety Tightening work was done on 3000 homes with no testing, what could possibly go wrong?

306

Comment submitted by the Bradford White Corporation (BWC) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 16, 2011 May 16, 2011 Ms. Ashley Armstrong U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Building Technologies Program, EE-2J 1000 Independence Avenue SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Dear Ms. Armstrong: On behalf of Bradford White Corporation, I would like to express our appreciation for the opportunity to comment on the DOE Verification Testing in support of the ENERGY STAR ® program for water heaters. Please find the comments of Bradford White Corporation (BWC), below. Bradford White Energy strongly urges DOE and the ENERGY STAR program to adopt a five (5) percent tolerance on all Energy Factor (EF) results, no matter the number of representative test samples. The experimental error associated with the water heater EF test protocol is in excess of 5% and is well

307

Test Plan for Heat Cycle Research Program, Phase I Supercritical Cycle Tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The 60 kW Heat Cycle Research Facility (HCRF) provides a means of examining different concepts and components associated with the generation of electrical power from a geothermal resource using a binary power cycle. In this power cycle the heat or energy in a hot geothermal fluid is transferred to a secondary working fluid. This working fluid is vaporized in the heat exchange process and the vapor is in turn expanded through a turbine which drives a generator producing electrical power. the heat or energy in the vapor leaving the turbine is transferred to a circulating cooling water in the condenser where the working fluid is condensed to a liquid which can be pumped back to the heaters, completing the cycle. This waste heat load in the condenser is in turn transferred from the cooling water to the atmosphere in a cooling tower. The HCRF allows the different components described in the cycle above to be tested as well as the basic cycle itself. This cycle may vary in that the heaters, condenser, cooling system, pumps, etc. may differ in number and type, however the basic cycle does not change significantly. During this sequence of tests, the HCRF is operated using a supercritical vapor generator and a vertical condenser where the condensation occurs inside of the tubes as opposed to the shell side more commonly used in these applications. In addition to providing the data to be used to evaluate the design of these heat exchangers, these supercritical tests provide cycle and component performance data with both single component working fluids and working fluids comprised of different mixtures of hydrocarbons. The use of these mixtures promises to improve cycle performance, in terms of watt-hours per pound of geothermal fluid, provided the countercurrent flow paths can be maintained between the fluids in both the condenser and the heaters. The supercritical heaters and the condenser to be used in this series of tests were designed to provide the desired countercurrent flow paths.

Mines, Greg L.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Status of the Virginia Power/DOE Cooperative Cask Testing/Demonstration Program: A video presentation  

SciTech Connect

This paper is documentation of a video presentation and provides a brief summary of the Virginia power/US Department of Energy Cooperative Cask Testing/Demonstration Program. The program consists of two phases. The first phase has been completed and involved the unlicensed performance testing (heat transfer and shielding) of three metal spent fuel storage casks at the federally owned Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The second phase is ongoing and consists of licensed demonstrations of standard casks from two different vendors and of one or two enhanced capacity casks. 6 refs., 1 tab.

McKinnon, M.A.; Creer, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Collantes, C.E. (Department of Energy, Richland, WA (USA). Richland Operations Office)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

General-Purpose Heat Source Safety Verification Test program: Edge-on flyer plate tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will supply power for the Galileo and Ulysses space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. The GPHS modules provide power by transmitting the heat of STYPu -decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Each module contains four STYPuO2-fueled clads and generates 250 W(t). Because the possibility of a launch vehicle explosion always exists, and because such an explosion could generate a field of high-energy fragments, the fueled clads within each GPHS module must survive fragment impact. The edge-on flyer plate tests were included in the Safety Verification Test series to provide information on the module/clad response to the impact of high-energy plate fragments. The test results indicate that the edge-on impact of a 3.2-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (2219-T87) plate traveling at 915 m/s causes the complete release of fuel from capsules contained within a bare GPHS module, and that the threshold velocity sufficient to cause the breach of a bare, simulant-fueled clad impacted by a 3.5-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (5052-T0) plate is approximately 140 m/s.

George, T.G.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Explosion overpressure test series: General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test program  

SciTech Connect

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular, radioisotope heat source that will be used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to supply electric power for space missions. The first two uses will be the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. The RTG for these missions will contain 18 GPHS modules, each of which contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) was conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System vehicle (space shuttle) is a conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests that simulated the overpressure exposure the RTG and GPHS modules could experience in such an event. Results of these tests, in which we used depleted UO/sub 2/ as a fuel simulant, suggest that exposure to overpressures as high as 15.2 MPa (2200 psi), without subsequent impact, does not result in a release of fuel.

Cull, T.A.; George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

METAL FILTERS FOR PRESSURIZED FLUID BED COMBUSTION (PFBC) APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation technologies (IGCC, PFBC, PCFBC, and Hipps) are currently under development and demonstration. Efforts at the Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on the development and demonstration of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for power generation. As part of the demonstration effort, SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field-tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report reviews SWPC's material and component assessment efforts, identifying the performance, stability, and life of porous commercial metal, advanced alloy, and intermetallic filters under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions.

M.A. Alvin

2004-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

312

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

313

Power Performance Testing Progress in the DOE/EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program (TVP), tests are conducted to characterize the power performance of individual wind turbines at each wind project. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions, from arid to arctic. Initial results and experiences of the testing were reported the WindPower 2000 conference. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing and new results from the past year.

Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory); Randall, G.; McCoy, T; Vandenbosche, J. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC)

2001-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Fluidized bed calciner apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for remotely calcining a slurry or solution feed stream of toxic or hazardous material, such as ammonium diurante slurry or uranyl nitrate solution, is disclosed. The calcining apparatus includes a vertical substantially cylindrical inner shell disposed in a vertical substantially cylindrical outer shell, in which inner shell is disposed a fluidized bed comprising the feed stream material to be calcined and spherical beads to aid in heat transfer. Extending through the outer and inner shells is a feed nozzle for delivering feed material or a cleaning chemical to the beads. Disposed in and extending across the lower portion of the inner shell and upstream of the fluidized bed is a support member for supporting the fluidized bed, the support member having uniform slots for directing uniform gas flow to the fluidized bed from a fluidizing gas orifice disposed upstream of the support member. Disposed in the lower portion of the inner shell are a plurality of internal electric resistance heaters for heating the fluidized bed. Disposed circumferentially about the outside length of the inner shell are a plurality of external heaters for heating the inner shell thereby heating the fluidized bed. Further, connected to the internal and external heaters is a means for maintaining the fluidized bed temperature to within plus or minus approximately 25.degree. C. of a predetermined bed temperature. Disposed about the external heaters is the outer shell for providing radiative heat reflection back to the inner shell.

Owen, Thomas J. (West Richland, WA); Klem, Jr., Michael J. (Richland, WA); Cash, Robert J. (Richland, WA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Bed Surface Patchiness in Gravel-Bed Rivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this case was a completely armored, immobile bed. Table 2.4that gravel beds are armored because equal mobil- ity

Nelson, Peter August

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Feasibility of an appliance energy testing and labeling program for Sri Lanka  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency program when other mandatory safety programs and manufacturer quality programs exist in other forms. CFL

Biermayer, Peter; Busch, John; Hakim, Sajid; Turiel, Issac; du Pont, Peter; Stone, Chris

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Nucla circulating atmospheric fluidized bed demonstration project. Quarterly technical progress report, October--December 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the fourth quarter of 1990, steady-state performance testing at the Nucla Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) resumed under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. Co-sponsorship of the Demonstration Test Program by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) was completed on June 15, 1990. From October through December, 1990, Colorado-Ute Electric Association (CUEA) completed a total of 23 steady-state performance tests, 4 dynamic tests, and set operating records during November and December as the result of improved unit operating reliability. Highlight events and achievements during this period of operation are presented.

Not Available

1991-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

318

Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively supported and coordinated by both the U.S. and international program participants in Germany, France, and others, as part of the International Working Group for Sabotage Concerns of Transport and Storage Casks (WGSTSC).

Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A. (Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, France); Koch, Wolfgang (Fraunhofer Institut fur Toxikologie und Experimentelle Medizin, Germany); Pretzsch, Gunter Guido (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Brucher, Wenzel (Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit, Germany); Steyskal, Michele D.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Improvements needed in the Environmental Protection Agency's testing program for radon measurement companies  

SciTech Connect

Radon, a naturally occurring, colorless, odorless gas, has been shown to cause lung cancer. As a result, EPA and the Public Health Service advise homeowners to test their homes and to take action if elevated radon levels are discovered. However, GAO believes that to make health decisions, homeowners need more assurance that the radon test results they obtain are accurate. This report discusses how greater accuracy in radon measurements would result from mandating company participation in the Radon Measurement Proficiency program and requiring radon measurement firms to meet minimum quality assurance requirements as a condition to participation. In addition, to ensure that state programs provide a minimum degree of control and consistency over radon measurement companies, GAO recommends that EPA issue guidance on the type of state programs and level of control it believes are needed at the state level in order to provide homeowners with adequate assurances that radon measurements are accurate.

Hembra, R.L.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program: Full-scale testing and demonstration final report.  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of the Wildfire ignition resistant home design(WIRHD) program was to develop a home evaluation tool that could assess the ignition potential of a structure subjected to wildfire exposures. This report describes the tests that were conducted, summarizes the results, and discusses the implications of these results with regard to the vulnerabilities to homes and buildings.

Quarles, Stephen, L.; Sindelar, Melissa

2011-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Feasibility of an appliance energy testing and labeling program for Sri Lanka  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility study evaluated the costs and benefits of establishing a program for testing, labeling and setting minimum efficiency standards for appliances and lighting in Sri Lanka. The feasibility study included: refrigerators, air-conditioners, flourescent lighting (ballasts & CFls), ceiling fans, motors, and televisions.

Biermayer, Peter; Busch, John; Hakim, Sajid; Turiel, Issac; du Pont, Peter; Stone, Chris

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

TEST PROGRAM FOR ALUMINA REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This test program sets a multi-phased development path to support the development of the Lithium Hydrotalcite process, in order to raise its Technology Readiness Level from 3 to 6, based on tasks ranging from laboratory scale scientific research to integrated pilot facilities.

SAMS TL; GEINESSE D

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Field Operations Program - U.S. Postal Service - Fountain Valley Electric Carrier Route Vehicle Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Postal Service (USPS) has ordered 500 light-duty electric carrier route vehicles (ECRV) mostly for their delivery carriers to use in several California locations. The 500 ECRVs have been defined as a demonstration fleet to support a decision of potentially ordering 5,500 additional ECRVs. Several different test methods are being used by the USPS to evaluate the 500-vehicle deployment. One of these test methods is the ECRV Customer Acceptance Test Program at Fountain Valley, California. Two newly manufactured ECRVs were delivered to the Fountain Valley Post Office and eighteen mail carriers primarily drove the ECRVs on ''park and loop'' mail delivery routes for a period of 2 days each. This ECRV testing consisted of 36 route tests, 18 tests per vehicle. The 18 mail carriers testing the ECRVs were surveyed for the opinions on the performance of the ECRVs. The U.S. Department of Energy, through its Field Operations Program, is supporting the USPS's ECRV testing activities both financially and with technical expertise. As part of this support, Field Operations Program personnel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have compiled this report based on the data generated by the USPS and its testing contractor (Ryerson, Master and Associates, Inc.) During the 36 route tests, the two test vehicles were driven a total of 474 miles, averaging 13 mile per test. The distance of the 36 route tests ranged from 4 to 34 miles. Both miles driven and State-of-Charge (SOC) data was collected for only 28 of the route tests. During these 28 tests, the ECRVs were driven a total of 447 miles. The SOC used during the 28 tests averaged a 41% decrease and the average distance driven was 16 miles. This suggests that a 16-mile route uses almost half of the ECRV's battery energy. The 18 carriers also rated 12 ECRV traits that included the physical design of the ECRVs as well as their performance. Based on a scale of 1 being the lowest and 5 being highest, or best, the overall average score for the ECRV was 4.3. The report also included individual comments from the ECRV drivers.

Francfort, J.E.

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

324

Field Operations Program - US Postal Service Fountain Valley Electric Carrier Route Vehicle Testing  

SciTech Connect

The United States Postal Service (USPS) has ordered 500 light-duty electric carrier route vehicles (ECRV) mostly for their delivery carriers to use in several California locations. The 500 ECRVs have been defined as a demonstration fleet to support a decision of potentially ordering 5,500 additional ECRVs. Several different test methods are being used by the USPS to evaluate the 500-vehicle deployment. One of these test methods is the ECRV Customer Acceptance Test Program at Fountain Valley, California. Two newly manufactured ECRVs were delivered to the Fountain Valey Post Office and eighteen mail carriers primarily drove the ECRVs on "park and loop" mail delivery routes for a period of 2 days each. This ECRV testing consisted of 36 route tests, 18 tests per vehicle. The 18 mail carriers testing the ECRVs were surveyed for the opinions on the performance of the ECRVs. The U.S. Department of Energy, through its Field Operations Program, is supporting the USPS's ECRV testing activities both financially and with technical expertise. As part of this support, Field Operations Program personnel at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory have compiled this report based on the data generated by the USPS and its testing contractor (Ryerson, Master and Associates, Inc.) During the 36 route tests, the two test vehicles were driven a total of 474 miles, averaging 13 mile per test. The distance of the 36 route tests ranged from 4 to 34 miles. Both miles driven and State-of-Charge (SOC) data was collected for only 28 of the route tests. During these 28 tests, the ECRVs were driven a total of 447 miles. The SOC used during the 28 tests averaged a 41% decrease and the average distance driven was 16 miles. This suggests that a 16-mile route uses almost half of the ECRV's battery energy. The 18 carriers also rated 12 ECRV traits that included the physical design of the ECRVs as well as their performance. Based on a scale of 1 being the lowest and 5 being highest, or best, the overall average score for the ECRV was 4.3. The report also included individual comments from the ECRV drivers.

Francfort, James Edward

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Review of present groundwater monitoring programs at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater monitoring at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is conducted to detect the presence of radionuclides produced by underground nuclear testing and to verify the quality and safety of groundwater supplies as required by the State of Nevada and federal regulations, and by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. Groundwater is monitored at water-supply wells and at other boreholes and wells not specifically designed or located for traditional groundwater monitoring objectives. Different groundwater monitoring programs at the NTS are conducted by several DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) contractors. Presently, these individual groundwater monitoring programs have not been assessed or administered under a comprehensive planning approach. Redundancy exists among the programs in both the sampling locations and the constituents analyzed. Also, sampling for certain radionuclides is conducted more frequently than required. The purpose of this report is to review the existing NTS groundwater monitoring programs and make recommendations for modifying the programs so a coordinated, streamlined, and comprehensive monitoring effort may be achieved by DOE/NV. This review will be accomplished in several steps. These include: summarizing the present knowledge of the hydrogeology of the NTS and the potential radionuclide source areas for groundwater contamination; reviewing the existing groundwater monitoring programs at the NTS; examining the rationale for monitoring and the constituents analyzed; reviewing the analytical methods used to quantify tritium activity; discussing monitoring network design criteria; and synthesizing the information presented and making recommendations based on the synthesis. This scope of work was requested by the DOE/NV Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and satisfies the 1993 (fiscal year) HRMP Groundwater Monitoring Program Review task.

Hershey, R.L.; Gillespie, D.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

HTR-PROTEUS PEBBLE BED EXPERIMENTAL PROGRAM CORES 5, 6, 7, & 8: COLUMNAR HEXAGONAL POINT-ON-POINT PACKING WITH A 1:2 MODERATOR-TO-FUEL PEBBLE RATIO  

SciTech Connect

PROTEUS is a zero-power research reactor based on a cylindrical graphite annulus with a central cylindrical cavity. The graphite annulus remains basically the same for all experimental programs, but the contents of the central cavity are changed according to the type of reactor being investigated. Through most of its service history, PROTEUS has represented light-water reactors, but from 1992 to 1996 PROTEUS was configured as a pebble-bed reactor (PBR) critical facility and designated as HTR-PROTEUS. The nomenclature was used to indicate that this series consisted of High Temperature Reactor experiments performed in the PROTEUS assembly. During this period, seventeen critical configurations were assembled and various reactor physics experiments were conducted. These experiments included measurements of criticality, differential and integral control rod and safety rod worths, kinetics, reaction rates, water ingress effects, and small sample reactivity effects (Ref. 3). HTR-PROTEUS was constructed, and the experimental program was conducted, for the purpose of providing experimental benchmark data for assessment of reactor physics computer codes. Considerable effort was devoted to benchmark calculations as a part of the HTR-PROTEUS program. References 1 and 2 provide detailed data for use in constructing models for codes to be assessed. Reference 3 is a comprehensive summary of the HTR-PROTEUS experiments and the associated benchmark program. This document draws freely from these references. Only Cores 9 and 10 are evaluated in this benchmark report due to similarities in their construction. The other core configurations of the HTR-PROTEUS program are evaluated in their respective reports as outlined in Section 1.0. Cores 9 and 10 were evaluated and determined to be acceptable benchmark experiments.

John D. Bess

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Short and long-term tests of elastomers with hot hostile fluids. Environmental Compatibility Test Program final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Equipment manufacturers and elastomer houses were called to find the best currently available high-temperature elastomers. Tensile specimens of 46 such compounds were immersion tested for five days in six 190C fluids of interest: isobutane, brine, ASTM No. 1 oil, ASTM No. 3 oil, Pacer DHT-185M synthetic oil, and Chevron Cylinder Grade 460X oil. The best eight were selected based upon the least change in mechanical properties. These eight were then simultaneously tested (a) by immersion in five 190C fluids for six months and (b) as 0-rings for 46 hours at 190C, 230C, and 265C (accelerated ageing) in three fluids and at a differential pressure of 21 MPa. Based upon these 0-ring tests, four compounds were selected for testing as 0-rings in three 204C fluids at 21 MPa differential pressure. The data were evaluated and conclusions were drawn. Conclusions and recommendations are provided. There was immersion testing of primarily L'Garde compounds in brine and CL3 mineral oil for 6 months at 190C. L'Garde had formulated several compounds specifically for 260C brine, and their applicability to a specific problem was assessed early in the program.

Friese, G.J.

1982-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fluid-bed-augmented CAES systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) systems are potentially attractive for future electric utility load leveling applications. A potential long-term weakness of the conventional CAES concept is its reliance on clean petroleum fuels during the power generation period. This consumption of petroleum could be completely eliminated by the use of coal-fired fluid bed combustors in second generation CAES plants. A large number of CAES power system configurations are possible using atmospheric fluid bed combustion (AFBC) and pressurized fluid bed combustion (PFBC). The fuel consumption rates for these systems are generally comparable to those for oil-fired CAES systems. The future prognosis for using PFBC in CAES systems looks good. Recent corrosion and erosion experiments in fluid bed systems suggest that gas turbines with acceptable lifetimes in fluid bed systems suggest that gas turbines with acceptable lifetimes are a distinct possibility. The commercial status of these systems depends on the outcome of extensive corrosion/erosion testing in static and rotating test rigs. CAES systems using AFBC may be an attractive alternative to using PFBC, although the materials problem would then be transferred from the turbine to the high temperature heat exchanger surface. A reasonable expectation for the date of commercialization of fluid bed augmented CAES system ranges from 10 to 15 years.

Giramonti, A. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

NREL Develops Diagnostic Test Cases To Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Develops Develops Diagnostic Test Cases To Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Residential and Commercial Buildings research groups developed a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations. Eight test cases were developed to test surface conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes in building energy simulation programs. These algorithms are used to predict energy flow through external opaque surfaces such as walls, ceilings, and floors. The test cases consist of analyti- cal and vetted numerical heat transfer solutions that have been available for decades, which increases confidence in test results. NREL researchers adapted these solutions for comparisons with building energy simulation results.

330

Comment submitted by United Lighting, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From: Donald C Plunkett [mailto:donplunkett@gmail.com] From: Donald C Plunkett [mailto:donplunkett@gmail.com] Sent: Wednesday, April 27, 2011 11:12 AM To: Certification@energystar.gov; ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov Cc: luminaires@energystar.gov Subject: (EPA & DOE) Verification Testing Sample Size The EPA and DOE Energy Star verification testing program is an unfair trade practice that burdens small independent US manufacturers while benefiting large importing multinationals. The large multinational Energy Star Partners, independently or through manufacturing associations, expend "millions" of dollars lobbying the EPA and other government agencies (ref: Lobbying Reports via Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995) to influence Energy Star programs toward their own interests. Not to mention the DOE has

331

Comprehensive report to Congress: Clean Coal Technology Program: Arvah B. Hopkins circulating fluidized-bed repowering project: A project proposed by: The City of Tallahassee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project involves the repowering of a 250-megawatt electrical (MWe) natural gas- or oil-fired boiler with a coal-fired atmospheric circulating fluidized-bed (CFB) boiler to provide steam to an existing turbine generator. The boiler will be the largest of its type. After construction and shakedown, the City of Tallahassee (CoT) plant will be operated for 24 months with at least three different eastern coals. Final coal selection will be based on the Fuels Selection Study, which is part of Phase I-A of the project. Cost, financial, and technical data from the CoT CFB will be provided the utility industry for evaluation of a 250-MWe CFB as a commercially viable clean coal alternative. The objective of the Arvah B. Hopkins CFB Repowering Project is to demonstrate an efficient, economical, and environmentally superior method of generating electric power from coal. The work to be performed under the Cooperative Agreement includes the design, construction, and operation of the demonstration plant. 4 figs.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Experimental development of a two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incinerator  

SciTech Connect

The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) is conducting an experimental program to develop and test through pilot-plant scale of operation, IGT's two-stage fluidized-bed/cyclonic agglomerating incinerator (TSI). The TSI is based on combining the fluidized-bed agglomeration/gasification technology and the cyclonic combustion/incineration technology, which have been developed at IGT over many years. The TSI is a unique and extremely flexible combustor that can operate over a wide range of conditions in the fluidized-bed first stage from low temperature (desorption) to high temperature (agglomeration) including gasification of high-Btu wastes. The TSI can easily and efficiently destroy solid, liquid and gaseous organic wastes, while containing solid inorganic contaminants within an essentially non-leachable glassy matrix, suitable for disposal in an ordinary landfill. This paper presents the results of tests conducted in a batch, fluidized-bed bench-scale unit (BSU) with commercially available clean'' top soil and the same soil spiked with lead and chromium compounds. The objectives of these tests were to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve soil agglomeration and to evaluate the leaching characteristics of the soil agglomerates formed. 7 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Mensinger, M.C.; Rehmat, A.; Bryan, B.G.; Lau, F.S. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Shearer, T.L. (Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Duggan, P.A. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Optimized FFTF Acceptance Test Program covering Phases III, IV, and V  

SciTech Connect

A detailed review of Phases III, IV, and V of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program has been completed. The purpose of this review was to formulate that test sequence which not only meets requirements for safe, reliable and useful operation of the plant, but also results in the earliest prudent demonstration of full-power performance. A test sequence based on the underlying assumption that sodium flows into the secondary sodium storage tank (T-44) no later than August 31, 1978, is described in detail. A time-scale which allows extra time to put systems and equipment into operation the first time, debugging, and learning how to operate most effectively has been superimposed on the test sequence. Time is not included for major equipment malfunctions. This test plan provides the basis for coordinating the many and varied activities and interfaces necessary for successful and timely execution of the FFTF Acceptance Test Program. In this report, the need dates have been identified for presently scheduled test articles and standard core components.

Wykoff, W.R.; Jones, D.H.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

EIS-0289: JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

289: JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project 289: JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project EIS-0289: JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project SUMMARY This EIS assesses environmental issues associated with constructing and demonstrating a project that would be cost-shared by DOE and JEA (formerly the Jacksonville Electric Authority) under the Clean Coal Technology Program. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD December 7, 2000 EIS-0289: Record of Decision JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project, Jacksonville, Duval County, FL June 1, 2000 EIS-0289: Final Environmental Impact Statement JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor Project August 1, 1999 EIS-0289: Draft Environmental Impact Statement JEA Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustor

335

WindoWorks: A flexible program for computerized testing of accelerator control system electronic circuit boards  

SciTech Connect

Since most accelerator control system circuit boards reside in a commercial bus architecture, such as CAMAC or VMEbus, a computerized test station is needed for exercising the boards. This test station is needed for the development of newly designed prototypes, for commissioning newly manufactured boards, for diagnosing boards which have failed in service, and for long term testing of boards with intermittent failure problems. WindoWorks was created to address these needs. It is a flexible program which runs on a PC compatible computer and uses a PC to bus crate interface. WindoWorks was designed to give the user a flexible way to test circuit boards. Each test is incapsulated into a window. By bringing up several different windows the user can run several different tests simultaneously. The windows are sizable, and moveable. They have data entry boxes so that the test can be customized to the users preference. The windows can be used in conjunction with each other in order to create supertests. There are several windows which are generic. They can be used to test basic functions on any VME (or CAMAC) board. There are other windows which have been created to test specific boards. New windows for testing specific boards can be easily created by a Pascal programmer using the WindoWorks framework.

Utterback, J.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Program Description and Results APPENDICES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Program Description and Results APPENDICES Mary Ann Piette David Watson Naoya Motegi Sila Kiliccote Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS90R3111 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 August 30, 2007 This work described in this report was coordinated by the Demand Response Research Center and funded by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy Research Program, under Work for Others Contract No. 150-99-003, Am #1 and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. LBNL Report Number 62218 2 Table of Contents List of Tables ......................................................................................................................................3

337

EXPERT PANEL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE ASSESSMENT OF FY2008 CORROSION AND STRESS CORROSION CRACKING SIMULANT TESTING PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Expert Panel Oversight Committee (EPOC) has been overseeing the implementation of selected parts of Recommendation III of the final report, Expert Panel workshop for Hanford Site Double-Shell Tank Waste Chemistry Optimization, RPP-RPT-22126. Recommendation III provided four specific requirements necessary for Panel approval of a proposal to revise the chemistry control limits for the Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs). One of the more significant requirements was successful performance of an accelerated stress corrosion cracking (SCC) experimental program. This testing program has evaluated the optimization of the chemistry controls to prevent corrosion in the interstitial liquid and supernatant regions of the DSTs.

BOOMER KD

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

NREL Develops Diagnostic Test Cases to Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations in order to achieve more accurate energy use and savings predictions. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Residential and Commercial Buildings research groups developed a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations. Eight test cases were developed to test surface conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes in building energy simulation programs. These algorithms are used to predict energy flow through external opaque surfaces such as walls, ceilings, and floors. The test cases consist of analytical and vetted numerical heat transfer solutions that have been available for decades, which increases confidence in test results. NREL researchers adapted these solutions for comparisons with building energy simulation results. Testing the new cases with EnergyPlus identified issues with the conduction finite difference (CondFD) heat transfer algorithm in versions 5 and 6. NREL researchers resolved these issues for EnergyPlus version 7. The new test cases will help users and developers of EnergyPlus and other building energy tools to identify and fix problems associated with solid conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes and their boundary conditions. In the long term, improvements to software algorithms will result in more accurate energy use and savings predictions. NREL researchers plan to document the set of test cases and make them available for future consideration by validation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 140: Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs. EnergyPlus users will also have access to the improved CondFD model in version 7 after its next scheduled release.

Not Available

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Comment submitted by Earthjustice regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AL AS KA C AL IF O R N I A FL O R I D A M I D - P A C I F I C N O R T H E A S T N O R T H E R N R O C K I E S N O R T H W E S T R O C K Y M O U N T A I N W A S H I N G T O N , D C I N T E R N A T I O N A L BY E-MAIL Ashley Armstrong U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 208-0121 ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov Re: Energy Star verification testing proposal Earthjustice submits the following comments on DOE's proposed verification testing program for Energy Star certified appliances. 1. Introduction We are pleased to see DOE moving forward with a plan to verify Energy Star certifications. A strong program of verification testing is necessary to protect consumers, to fully realize the potential energy savings from the program, and to restore confidence in a brand that has

340

Technical requirements for the actinide source-term waste test program  

SciTech Connect

This document defines the technical requirements for a test program designed to measure time-dependent concentrations of actinide elements from contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) waste immersed in brines similar to those found in the underground workings of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). This test program wig determine the influences of TRU waste constituents on the concentrations of dissolved and suspended actinides relevant to the performance of the WIPP. These influences (which include pH, Eh, complexing agents, sorbent phases, and colloidal particles) can affect solubilities and colloidal mobilization of actinides. The test concept involves fully inundating several TRU waste types with simulated WIPP brines in sealed containers and monitoring the concentrations of actinide species in the leachate as a function of time. The results from this program will be used to test numeric models of actinide concentrations derived from laboratory studies. The model is required for WIPP performance assessment with respect to the Environmental Protection Agency`s 40 CFR Part 191B.

Phillips, M.L.F.; Molecke, M.A.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Summary of Large-and Small-Scale Unreinforced Masonry Test Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A five-year, large- and small-scale, static and dynamic experimental research program, in which more than 700 tests were conducted, has demonstrated that unreinforced masonry infills are more ductile and resist lateral loads more effectively than anticipated by conventional code procedures. The tests were conducted both in the laboratory and on existing structures at the Department of Energy's Y-12 National Security Complex. The experimental data indicate that the combination of a steel frame and infill material efficiently resists lateral loads--the infilling provides significant lateral stiffness while the surrounding frame adds ductility and confinement to the overall system. The results from approximately 25 moderate- and full-scale tests on infills showed that with simulated seismic loads, the frames confined the masonry, and the load-carrying capacity of the infill was considerably above the load that caused initial cracking. This finding was a significant departure from classical code approaches that assumed first cracking to be failure of an unreinforced masonry wall. The experimental program, performed for the US Department of Energy, consisted of the following large-scale tests on infills: in situ airbag pressure testing, shake-table tests, and the application of quasi-static in-plane and out-of-plane drift loads. This paper provides a summary of the overall experimental methodology and results.

Fricke, K.E.

2002-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

342

Bed inventory overturn in a circulating fluid bed riser with pant-leg structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The special phenomenon, nominated as bed inventory overturn, in circulating fluid bed (CFB) riser with pant-leg structure was studied with model calculation and experimental work. A compounded pressure drop mathematic model was developed and validated with the experimental data in a cold experimental test rig. The model calculation results agree well with the measured data. In addition, the intensity of bed inventory overturn is directly proportional to the fluidizing velocity and is inversely proportional to the branch point height. The results in the present study provide significant information for the design and operation of a CFB boiler with pant-leg structure. 15 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Jinjing Li; Wei Wang; Hairui Yang; Junfu Lv; Guangxi Yue [Tsinghua University, Beijing (China). Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Internal Technical Report, Hydrothermal Injection Program - East Mesa 1983-84 Test Data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents a test data index and a data plots for a series of 12 drawdown and tracer injection-withdrawal tests in porous-media aquifers at the East Mesa Geothermal Field located in the Imperial Valley near El Centro, California. Test and instrumentation summaries are also provided. The first 10 of these tests were completed during July and August 1983. The remaining 2 tests were completed in February 1984, after a 6-month quiescent period, in which tracers were left in the reservoir. The test wells used were 56-30 and 56-19, with 38-30 supplying water for the injection phase and 52-29 used as a disposal well during the backflowing of the test wells. Six other wells in the surrounding area were measured periodically for possible hydrologic effects during testing. It is not the intent of this report to supply analyzed data, but to list the uninterpreted computer stored data available for analysis. The data have been examined only to the extent to ensure that they are reasonable and internally consistent. This data is stored on permanent files at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cyber Computer Complex. The main processors for this complex are located at the Computer Science Center (CSC) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. The Hydrothermal Injection Test program, funded by the Department of Energy, was a joint effort between EG and G Idaho, Inc., the University of Utah Research Institute (UURI) and Republic Geothermal, Inc. (RGI) of Santa Fe Springs, California.

Freiburger, R.M.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Leach test methodology for the Waste/Rock Interactions Technology Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental leach studies in the WRIT Program have two primary functions. The first is to determine radionuclide release from waste forms in laboratory environments which attempt to simulate repository conditions. The second is to elucidate leach mechanisms which can ultimately be incorporated into nearfield transport models. The tests have been utilized to generate rates of removal of elements from various waste forms and to provide specimens for surface analysis. Correlation between constituents released to the solution and corresponding solid state profiles is invaluable in the development of a leach mechanism. Several tests methods are employed in our studies which simulate various proposed leach incident scenarios. Static tests include low temperature (below 100/sup 0/C) and high temperature (above 100/sup 0/C) hydrothermal tests. These tests reproduce nonflow or low-flow repository conditions and can be used to compare materials and leach solution effects. The dynamic tests include single-pass, continuous-flow(SPCF) and solution-change (IAA)-type tests in which the leach solutions are changed at specific time intervals. These tests simulate repository conditions of higher flow rates and can also be used to compare materials and leach solution effects under dynamic conditions. The modified IAEA test is somewhat simpler to use than the one-pass flow and gives adequate results for comparative purposes. The static leach test models the condition of near-zero flow in a repository and provides information on element readsorption and solubility limits. The SPCF test is used to study the effects of flowing solutions at velocities that may be anticipated for geologic groundwaters within breached repositories. These two testing methods, coupled with the use of autoclaves, constitute the current thrust of WRIT leach testing.

Bradley, D.J.; McVay, G.L.; Coles, D.G.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following tasks: Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Beneficiation Research; Operation of PFH on Beneficiated Shale; Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization; and Project Management and Reporting. Accomplishments for this period for these tasks are presented.

Lau, F.S.; Mensinger, M.C.; Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

i Automated Critical Peak Pricing Field Tests: 2006 Pilot Program Description and Results Mary Ann Piette David Watson Naoya Motegi Sila Kiliccote Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory MS90R3111 1 Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 June 19, 2007 LBNL Report Number 62218 ii Acknowledgements The work described in this report was funded by the Emerging Technologies Program at Pacific Gas and Electric Company. Additional funding was provided by the Demand Response Research Center which is funded by the California Energy Commission (Energy Commission), Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) Program, under Work for Others Contract No.500-03-026, Am #1 and by the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. The authors are grateful for the extensive

347

Comment submitted by Consumers Union regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 9, 2011 Ms. Ashley Armstrong U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 Via: ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov. Re: Comments on Department of Energy's Energy Star Verification Testing Introduction Consumers Union of United States, Inc., 1 publisher of Consumer Reports®, submits the following comments in response to the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE" or "Department") in the above-referenced matter. Comments Consumers Union has consistently urged DOE to strengthen its verification program for energy usage claims for appliances and is very 1 Consumers Union of United States, Inc., publisher of Consumer Reports®, is a nonprofit membership organization chartered in 1936 to provide consumers with information, education,

348

Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6/2/11 6/2/11 Comments to the following DOE Proposed Rules: 10 CFR Part 431 [Docket No. EERE-2010-BT-TP-0036] RIN 1904-AC38 Energy Efficiency Program for Certain Commercial and Industrial Equipment: Test Procedures for Automatic Commercial Ice Makers Submitted by: Mary C. Howe, President, Howe Corporation, Chicago, IL 60642 mchowe@howecorp.com CORPORATION 1650 N Elston Ave * Chicago, IL. 60642 * (773) 235-0200 * Fax (773) 235-0269 * E-mail: howeinfo@howecorp.com 2 Item 1 - DOE also requests comment on the proposal that the use of amended test procedure be required upon the effective date of any test procedure final rule, 30 days after publication in the Federal Register. In the case of the addition of continuous production remote condenser ACIM's, the outside testing

349

Comment submitted by BSH Home Appliances Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

B B S H H O M E A P P L I A N C E S C O R P O R A T I O N May 9, 2011 Via E-Mail Ashley Armstrong U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov Re: BSH Comments regarding the document titled "DOE Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR" dated April 22, 2011. Dear Ms. Armstrong: BSH supports the efforts of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Department of Energy (DOE) to ensure products meet the labeled energy ratings. We encourage an open approach with stakeholder involvement. BSH offers the following comments for consideration. Section 6.1: Test Lab Selection * We fully agree that test labs should have ISO 17025 accreditation, but further would state

350

Comment submitted by InterMetro Industries Corp. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

InterMetro Industries Corp. InterMetro Industries Corp. 651 North Washington Street Wilkes-Barre, PA 18705-0557 USA T (570) 706-3121 bill.sickles@emerson.com May 5, 2011 Via email to: ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov Certification@energystar.gov. InterMetro Industries welcomes the opportunity to comment on the DOE ENERGY STAR verification program as outlined in the April 2, 2011 DOE document. It appears

351

Power Performance Testing Activities in the DOE-EPRI Turbine Verification Program  

SciTech Connect

As part of the US Department of Energy/Electric Power Research Institute (DOE-EPRI) Wind Turbine Verification Program, Global Energy Concepts (GEC) is engaged in planning and conducting power performance tests for wind turbines in Searsburg, Vermont; Glenmore, Wisconsin; Algona, Iowa; Springview, Nebraska; Kotzebue, Alaska; and Big Spring, Texas. The turbines under investigation include a 550-kW Zond Z-40 FS, a 600-kW Tacke 600e, two 750-kW Zond Z-50s, a 66-kW AOC 15/50, a 660-kW Vestas V-47, and a 1.65-MW Vestas V-66. The testing is performed in a variety of terrain types, including mountains, plains, deserts, and coastal tundra; and under a wide range of atmospheric conditions from arid to arctic. Because one goal of this testing program is to gain experience with the new International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 61400-12 standard, all of the measurements are being performed in accordance with this new standard. This paper presents the status of the power performance testing at each site, the methodologies employed, test results available, and lessons learned from the application of the IEC standard. Any sources of uncertainty are discussed, and attention is given to the relative importance of each aspect of the IEC standard in terms of its contribution to the overall measurement uncertainty.

VandenBosche, J.; McCoy, T.; Rhoads, H. (Global Energy Concepts, LLC); McNiff, B. (McNiff Light Industry); Smith, B. (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

2000-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Field Operations Program Chevrolet S-10 (Lead-Acid) Accelerated Reliability Testing - Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Accelerated Reliability testing of five lead-acid battery-equipped Chevrolet S-10 electric vehicles by the US Department of Energy's Field Operations Program and the Program's testing partners, Electric Transportation Applications (ETA) and Southern California Edison (SCE). ETA and SCE operated the S-10s with the goal of placing 25,000 miles on each vehicle within 1 year, providing an accelerated life-cycle analysis. The testing was performed according to established and published test procedures. The S-10s' average ranges were highest during summer months; changes in ambient temperature from night to day and from season-to-season impacted range by as much as 10 miles. Drivers also noted that excessive use of power during acceleration also had a dramatic effect on vehicle range. The spirited performance of the S-10s created a great temptation to inexperienced electric vehicle drivers to ''have a good time'' and to fully utilize the S-10's acceleration capability. The price of injudicious use of power is greatly reduced range and a long-term reduction in battery life. The range using full-power accelerations followed by rapid deceleration in city driving has been 20 miles or less.

J. Francfort (INEEL); J. Argueta; M. Wehrey (Southern California Edison); D. Karner; L. Tyree (Electric Transportation Applications)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Development of second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, Foster Wheeler Development Corporation, and its team members, Westinghouse, Gilbert/Commonwealth, and the Institute of Gas Technology are developing second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion technology capable of achieving net plant efficiency in excess of 45 percent based on the higher heating value of the coal. A three-phase program entails design and costing of a 500 MWe power plant and identification of developments needed to commercialize this technology (Phase 1), testing of individual components (Phase 2), and finally testing these components in an integrated mode (Phase 3). This paper briefly describes the results of the first two phases as well as the progress on the third phase. Since other projects which use the same technology are in construction or in negotiation stages -- namely, the Power System Development Facility and the Four Rivers Energy Modernization Projects -- brief descriptions of these are also included.

Wolowodiuk, W.; Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Bonk, D. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Gas Generation Testing Program at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

The data quality objectives (DQOs) for the Program are to evaluate compliance with the limits on total gas generation rates, establish the concentrations of hydrogen and methane in the total gas flow, determine the headspace concentration of VOCs in each drum prior to the start of the test, and obtain estimates of the concentrations of several compounds for mass balance purposes. Criteria for the selection of waste containers at the INEL and the parameters that must be characterized prior to and during the tests are described. Collection of gaseous samples from 55-gallon drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for the gas generation testing is discussed. Analytical methods and calibrations are summarized. Administrative quality control measures described in this QAPjP include the generation, review, and approval of project documentation; control and retention of records; measures to ensure that personnel, subcontractors or vendors, and equipment meet the specifications necessary to achieve the required data quality for the project.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The eight-month program for 1990 is separated into seven tasks. There are tasks for each of the three solar houses, a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, a management task, and a task funding travel to attend the Field Monitoring for a Purpose'' workshop which was held April 2--5, 1990, in Gothenburg, Sweden. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 7 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Comment submitted by Traulsen regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4401 Blue Mound Rd. www.traulsen.com 817 740-6733 4401 Blue Mound Rd. www.traulsen.com 817 740-6733 Fort Worth, Texas 76106 cboryca@traulsen.com 800 825-8220 Date: May 9, 2011 To: Ms. Ashley Armstrong, Ms. Brenda Edwards From: Mr. Chris Boryca, Engineer II Cc: John Davis, Walt Boryca, Gary Hoying, Mike Lynch, Joe Sanders, Jennifer Baker Reid Subject: DOE Verification in Support of Energy Star These comments are in response to the document released on April 22, 2011 related to verification testing in support of Energy Star. As a general statement Traulsen is pleased to hear that the DOE and EPA are working together. We do have several concerns, some of which the DOE has seen before and will be quickly restated. 6.3 Manufacturer Notification Traulsen believes that barring manufacturers who operate qualified "Client Test Data Program" test labs from

360

Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

70th anniversary lecture 70th anniversary lecture Laboratory's role in Cold War nuclear weapons testing program focus of next 70th anniversary lecture Lab's role in the development of nuclear weapons during the Cold War period will be discussed by Byron Ristvet of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. September 5, 2013 This photograph captures the expanding fireball of the world's first full-scale hydrogen bomb test, Ivy-Mike, which was conducted Oct. 31, 1952. This photograph captures the expanding fireball of the world's first full-scale hydrogen bomb test, Ivy-Mike, which was conducted Oct. 31, 1952. Contact Steve Sandoval Communications Office (505) 665-9206 Email "Los Alamos National Laboratory's role in conjunction with the Department of Defense in meeting this challenge with new nuclear weapon

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Comment submitted by the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

⋅ WASHINGTON, DC ⋅ LOS ANGELES ⋅ BEIJING ⋅ CHICAGO ⋅ WASHINGTON, DC ⋅ LOS ANGELES ⋅ BEIJING ⋅ CHICAGO San Francisco, CA 94104 TEL 415 875-6100 FAX 415 875-6161 www.nrdc.org NRDC Comments on DOE's April 22, 2011 Verification Testing in Support of Energy Star Proposal Submitted by: Noah Horowitz Senior Scientist Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) May 9, 2011 On behalf of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and it's more than 1.3 million members and e-activists, we respectfully submit comments on DOE's Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR proposal. Verification testing programs are critical to ensure that products are performing as promised and consumers are receiving the energy and utility savings claimed by the manufacturer. With one exception, NRDC strongly supports DOE's proposal for conducting verification

362

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems, (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters, (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems, (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project, (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research, and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report.

Not Available

1992-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

363

Overview of LASL oil shale program  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) is involved in a broad spectrum of oil shale-related activities for the US Department of Energy (DOE), including the bed preparation design of a modified in situ retort. This aspect of oil shale research has been identified by DOE as one of the limiting technologies impeding commerical, in situ development of oil shale. The retort bed must have uniform particle size, permeability, and void distributions to allow proper retorting and optimum resource recovery. Controlled fracturing using chemical explosives and carefully designed blasting schemes are the only feasible methods to attain this distribution. This approach to the bed preparation problem is a coordinated research program of explosives characterization, dynamic rock mechanics, predictive computer modeling, and field verification tests. The program is designed to develop the predictive fracturing capability required for the optimum rubbing of the shale.

Morris, W.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program: 1986 annual report. [Economic planning, technical assessment, field tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Thermal Energy Storage Evaluation Program activities were initiated to provide economic planning, technical assessment and field testing support for the thermal energy storage program, as well as management of the overall program for the DOE. Economic planning included two assessment studies. In technical assessment, issues that might affect an assessment were outlined for the development of a standard methodology to conduct assessments; work is underway to establish ''market-based'' cost and performance goals for cool storage technologies in residential applications; planning has begun for investigation of benefits in incorporating aquifer thermal energy storage with heat pumps; and plans are being formulated to evaluate the potential benefit of using aquifer thermal energy storage to augment power plant cooling. Field testing to develop technologies for the recovery and reuse of industrial waste heat began with the instrumentation design for the ceramic/salt matrix in an operating brick-making plant. Work in advanced studies by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory continued on thermochemical conversion and storage using small particles as the heat exchanger catalyst. In SO/sub 3/ dissociation experiments at 645/sup 0/C using light and dark conditions, results clearly demonstrated the benefit in directly radiantly heating the catalyst to accomplish the endothermic step of a thermochemical storage reaction.

Drost, M.K.; Bates, J.M.; Brown, D.R.; Weijo, R.O.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Mixed waste chemical compatibility: A testing program for plastic packaging components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations in the United States have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified by the US Department of Transportation (DOT, 49 CFR 173) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 10 CFR 71). The design requirements for both hazardous [49 CFR 173.24 (e)(1)] and radioactive [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] materials packaging specify packaging compatibility, i.e., that the materials of the packaging @d any contents be chemically compatible with each other. Furthermore, Type A [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] and Type B (10 CFR 71.43) packaging design requirements stipulate that there be no significant chemical, galvanic, or other reaction between the materials and contents of the package. Based on these requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The program attempts to assure any regulatory body that the issue of packaging material compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. This program has been described in considerable detail in an internal SNL document, the Chemical Compatibility Test Plan & Procedure Report (Nigrey 1993).

Nigrey, P.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fluid bed material transfer method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

Pinske, Jr., Edward E. (Akron, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and process are disclosed for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance. 2 figs.

Rehmat, A.G.; Patel, J.G.

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

368

Apparatus for controlling fluidized beds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and process for control and maintenance of fluidized beds under non-steady state conditions. An ash removal conduit is provided for removing solid particulates from a fluidized bed separate from an ash discharge conduit in the lower portion of the grate supporting such a bed. The apparatus and process of this invention is particularly suitable for use in ash agglomerating fluidized beds and provides control of the fluidized bed before ash agglomeration is initiated and during upset conditions resulting in stable, sinter-free fluidized bed maintenance.

Rehmat, Amirali G. (Westmont, IL); Patel, Jitendra G. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1987-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

369

Staged fluidized bed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to oil shale retorting and more particularly to staged fluidized bed oil shale retorting. Method and apparatus are disclosed for narrowing the distribution of residence times of any size particle and equalizing the residence times of large and small particles in fluidized beds. Particles are moved up one fluidized column and down a second fluidized column with the relative heights selected to equalize residence times of large and small particles. Additional pairs of columns are staged to narrow the distribution of residence times and provide complete processing of the material.

Mallon, R.G.

1983-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

370

Seismic monitoring of the June, 1988 Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program flow/injection test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the seismic monitoring project was to characterize in detail the micro-seismic activity related to the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Program (SSSDP) flow-injection test in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. Our goal was to determine if any sources of seismic energy related to the test were observable at the surface. We deployed our recording stations so that we could detect and locate both impulsive microearthquakes and continuous seismic noise energy. Our network, which was sensitive enough to be triggered by magnitude 0.0 or larger events, found no impulsive microearthquakes in the vicinity of the flow test in the 8 month period before the test and only one event during the flow test. This event has provided the opportunity to compare the detection and location capabilities of small networks and arrays in a geothermal environment. At present, we are carefully scanning all of the data that we collected during the flow test for evidence of anomalous seismic noise sources and for impulsive events smaller than the network detection threshold (magnitude 0.0). 8 refs., 4 figs.

Jarpe, S.P.; Kasameyer, P.W.; Hutchings, L.J.; Hauk, T.F.

1988-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

371

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Intertechnology Corporation proposed test and evaluation plan, commercial buildings. National Solar Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report has three major parts. The first of these derives the requirements for the Test and Evaluation plan from the System Level Plan which is summarized in Section II. The second part contains the proposed plan to fill these requirements and includes hardware and software recommendations as well as procedures and management considerations. Primary emphasis has been given to the remote site because this is the area in which the commercial part of the demonstration is most unique. Finally, some pre-demonstration activities are described. The pilot program is intended to resolve a number of issues which arose in the course of the T and E plan. These relate to choice of scan frequencies, compression algorithms, etc. It is also intended to confirm performance and cost effectiveness of the site data collection package. The base line measurements of attitudes, etc. provide a reference mark against which one can measure the non-technical effectiveness of the demonstration program. (WDM)

None

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation and upgrading, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The program is divided into the following active tasks: Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 8. project management and reporting; and Task 9. information required for the National Environmental Policy Act. In order to accomplish all of the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, is working with four other institutions: The University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Alabama College of Engineering (UA), University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program quarter from June 1, 1992 through August 31, 1992.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

NREL Improves Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) to increase the quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the building retrofit market. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a new test procedure to increase the quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the building retrofit market. The Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) is a test procedure that enables software developers to evaluate the performance of their audit tools in modeling energy use and savings in existing homes when utility bills are available for model calibration. Similar to NREL's previous energy analysis tests, such as HERS BESTEST and other BESTEST suites included in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, BESTEST-EX compares software simulation findings to reference results generated with state-of-the-art simulation tools such as EnergyPlus, SUNREL, and DOE-2.1E. The BESTEST-EX methodology: (1) Tests software predictions of retrofit energy savings in existing homes; (2) Ensures building physics calculations and utility bill calibration procedures perform to a minimum standard; and (3) Quantifies impacts of uncertainties in input audit data and occupant behavior. BESTEST-EX includes building physics and utility bill calibration test cases. The diagram illustrates the utility bill calibration test cases. Participants are given input ranges and synthetic utility bills. Software tools use the utility bills to calibrate key model inputs and predict energy savings for the retrofit cases. Participant energy savings predictions using calibrated models are compared to NREL predictions using state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

NREL Improves Building Energy Simulation Programs Through Diagnostic Testing (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This technical highlight describes NREL research to develop Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) to increase the quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the building retrofit market. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have developed a new test procedure to increase the quality and accuracy of energy analysis tools for the building retrofit market. The Building Energy Simulation Test for Existing Homes (BESTEST-EX) is a test procedure that enables software developers to evaluate the performance of their audit tools in modeling energy use and savings in existing homes when utility bills are available for model calibration. Similar to NREL's previous energy analysis tests, such as HERS BESTEST and other BESTEST suites included in ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, BESTEST-EX compares software simulation findings to reference results generated with state-of-the-art simulation tools such as EnergyPlus, SUNREL, and DOE-2.1E. The BESTEST-EX methodology: (1) Tests software predictions of retrofit energy savings in existing homes; (2) Ensures building physics calculations and utility bill calibration procedures perform to a minimum standard; and (3) Quantifies impacts of uncertainties in input audit data and occupant behavior. BESTEST-EX includes building physics and utility bill calibration test cases. The diagram illustrates the utility bill calibration test cases. Participants are given input ranges and synthetic utility bills. Software tools use the utility bills to calibrate key model inputs and predict energy savings for the retrofit cases. Participant energy savings predictions using calibrated models are compared to NREL predictions using state-of-the-art building energy simulation programs.

Not Available

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty research and development FY95-96 program plan  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for the United States Government`s (USG) research and development (R&D) functions for monitoring nuclear explosions in the context of a Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT). This responsibility includes the November 1993 transfer of the Department of Defense`s (DoD) CTBT R&D responsibility to DOE. The DOE research program builds on the broad base of USG expertise developed historically and includes R&D for detecting, locating, identifying, and characterizing nuclear explosions in all environments. The Office of Research and Development (NN-20), within the Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security, formulates and executes the efforts necessary to meet the Department`s responsibilities. The following DOE laboratories as a team will support NN-20 in implementing the program plan: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. DOE has committed to a cooperative program that draws upon the core competencies of the national laboratories and upon the strengths of other government agencies and the private sector (academia and industry). The integration of resources under a common direction will allow the program to be flexible and responsive to changing technical and policy requirements while maximizing the effectiveness of funding appropriations. DOE will develop and demonstrate appropriate technologies, algorithms, procedures, and integrated systems in a cost-effective and timely manner. The program comprises seismic, radionuclide, hydroacoustic, and infrasound monitoring; on-site inspection; space-based monitoring; and automated data processing elements.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Design and testing of the magnetic quadrupole for the Heavy Ion Fusion Program  

SciTech Connect

The Heavy Ion Fusion Program at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory is conducting experiments in the transport and acceleration of ``driverlike`` beams. The single beam coming from the four-to-one beam combiner will be transported in a lattice of pulsed magnetic quadrupoles. The present beam transport consists of high field, short aspect ratio magnetic quadrupoles to maximize the transportable current. This design could also be converted to be superconducting for future uses in a driver. The pulsed quadrupole will develop a maximum field of two Tesla and will be housed within the induction accelerator cells at the appropriate lattice period. Hardware implementation of the physics requirements and full parameter testing is described.

Benjegerdes, R.; Faltens, A.; Fawley, W.; Peters, C.; Reginato, L.; Stuart, M.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology  

SciTech Connect

The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPEs technology refines coal by employing a novel catalyst to crack the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild catalytic gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPEs catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to fluidize the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in near-zero hazardous air or water pollution. This technology would also be conducive to the efficient coproduction of methane and hydrogen while also generating a relatively pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) or sequestration. Specific results of bench-scale testing in the 4- to 38-lb/hr range in the EERC pilot system demonstrated high methane yields approaching 15 mol%, with high hydrogen yields approaching 50%. This was compared to an existing catalytic gasification model developed by GPE for its process. Long-term operation was demonstrated on both Powder River Basin subbituminous coal and on petcoke feedstocks utilizing oxygen injection without creating significant bed agglomeration. Carbon conversion was greater than 80% while operating at temperatures less than 1400F, even with the shorter-than-desired reactor height. Initial designs for the GPE gasification concept called for a height that could not be accommodated by the EERC pilot facility. More gas-phase residence time should allow the syngas to be converted even more to methane. Another goal of producing significant quantities of highly concentrated catalyzed char for catalyst recovery and material handling studies was also successful. A PdCu membrane was also successfully tested and demonstrated to produce 2.54 lb/day of hydrogen permeate, exceeding the desired hydrogen permeate production rate of 2.0 lb/day while being tested on actual coal-derived syngas that had been cleaned with advanced warm-gas cleanup systems. The membranes did not appear to suffer any performance degradation after exposure to the cleaned, warm syngas over a nominal 100-hour test.

Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

State of Industrial Fluidized Bed Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new combustion technique has been developed in the last decade that permits the burning of low quality coal, lignite and other fuels, while maintaining stack emissions within State and Federal limits. Low quality fuels can be burned directly in fluidized beds while taking advantage of low furnace temperatures am chemical activity within the bed to limit S02 am NOx emissions, thereby eliminating the need for stack gas scrubbing equipment. The excellent heat transfer characteristics of the fluidized beds also result in a reduction of total heat transfer surface requirements, thus reducing the size and cost of steam generators. Recent tests on commercial units have proven the concept. This paper reviews the progress that has been trade in the development of fluidized bed combustion boilers, as well as work currently under way in the United States and overseas. Details on the installation at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., am at other locations are presented, am operational results are discussed. Potential application of fluidized bed boilers in industrial plants using lignite and lignite refuse is also examined.

Mesko, J. E.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Comment submitted by CertainTeed Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

From: Snyder, Richard A. (Roofing) [mailto:Richard.A.Snyder@saint-gobain.com] From: Snyder, Richard A. (Roofing) [mailto:Richard.A.Snyder@saint-gobain.com] Sent: Monday, May 09, 2011 1:02 PM To: ESTAR_Verification_Testing Cc: Chad.Fisher@us.ul.com; Matt.Overbee@ulenvironment.com; Brandt, Jim C. Subject: Verification Testing Concerns - Asphalt Roofing Products Importance: High Kathleen, I have many concerns and questions about Energy Star Verification program as it relates to Asphalt Roofing Shingles. I am VERY concerned because the attachment seems to imply that a decision on this matter could be made TODAY!!! Is that a possibility? I am not aware of much discussion going on, but if there is please make it public and let me know where to view it. 1) My first question is...is the attached document meant to cover asphalt roofing shingles? Many

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Comment submitted by Hobart/ITW Food Equipment Group regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 9, 2011 May 9, 2011 DOE Verification Program May 9, 2011 Ashley Armstrong US Department of Energy Reference: DOE Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR Subject: Comments from Hobart, Div. ITW Food Equipment Group Dear Ms. Armstrong, Hobart/ITW Food Equipment Group has been working diligently with the US EPA through NAFEM to ensure that the ENERGY STAR enhancements are fair to Food Service Equipment manufacturers. One of the mainstays has always been that Commercial Food Service equipment should not be required to be verification tested by a third party laboratory. We firmly believe that the proven method of periodic inspections by third-party certification bodies is more than adequate for verifying compliance with energy consumption standards. To that end, we

382

Comment submitted by the Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Date: May 9, 2011 To: ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov From: Mary Ann Dickinson, President and CEO Re: Comments on DOE Verification Testing in Support of Energy Star (www1.eere.energy.gov/buildings/appliance_standards/pdfs/estar_verification_process.pdf) The Alliance for Water Efficiency is pleased to provide DOE with comments on the above document. We are a North American non-profit organization, composed of diverse stakeholders with significant experience in water efficiency programs and conservation policies. Our mission is to promote the efficient and sustainable use of water, to promote cost-effective water efficiency measures that will reduce wasteful consumption, reduce the need for additional drinking water and waste water capacity, and provide multiple

383

Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Packed Bed Combustion: An Overview William Hallett Dept. of Mechanical Engineering Université d'Ottawa - University of Ottawa #12;Packed Bed Combustion - University of Ottawa - CICS 2005 Introduction air fuel feedproducts xbed grate Packed Bed Combustion: fairly large particles of solid fuel on a grate, air supplied

Hallett, William L.H.

384

Integrated operation of a pressurized fixed-bed gasifier, hot gas desulfurization system, and turbine simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall objective of the General Electric Hot Gas Cleanup (HGCU) Program is to develop a commercially viable technology to remove sulfur, particulates, and halogens from a high-temperature fuel gas stream using a moving bed, regenerable mixed metal oxide sorbent based process. The HGCU Program is based on the design and demonstration of the HGCU system in a test facility made up of a pilot-scale fixed bed gasifier, a HGCU system, and a turbine simulator in Schenectady, NY, at the General Electric Research and Development Center. The objectives of the turbine simulator testing are (1) to demonstrate the suitability of fuel gas processed by the HGCU system for use in state-of-the-art gas turbines firing at 2,350 F rotor inlet temperature and (2) to quantify the combustion characteristics and emissions on low-Btu fuel gas. The turbine simulator program also includes the development and operation of experimental combustors based on the rich-quench-lean concept (RQL) to minimize the conversion of ammonia and other fuel-bound nitrogen species to NO{sub x} during combustion. The HGCU system and turbine simulator have been designed to process approximately 8,000 lb/hr of low heating value fuel gas produced by the GE fixed bed gasifier. The HGCU system has utilized several mixed metal oxide sorbents, including zinc ferrite, zinc titanate, and Z-Sorb, with the objective of demonstrating good sulfur removal and mechanical attrition resistance as well as economic cost characteristics. Demonstration of halogen removal and the characterization of alkali and trace metal concentrations in the fuel gas are subordinate objectives of the overall program. This report describes the results of several long-duration pilot tests.

Bevan, S.; Ayala, R.E.; Feitelberg, A.; Furman, A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

L:\\Instructions & Informational Documents\\I106 Available Proficiency Testing ProgramsAmerican Association for Laboratory Accreditation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This list is by no means comprehensive, but merely includes contact information for proficiency testing programs of which A2LA is aware. This list is divided into those programs that are currently A2LA-accredited and those that are not A2LA-accredited. For those programs that are accredited by A2LA, please refer to their detailed Scope of Accreditation, located on the A2LA Website. We also encourage you to check the websites of our Mutual Recognition Agreement Partners for PT Providers accredited by them. A2LA recommends that, whenever possible, A2LA-accredited testing and calibration laboratories use accredited PT Providers to meet the A2LA requirements for participation in proficiency testing. However, we recognize that accredited PT Providers may not be available for all technical disciplines, or that specific accreditation programs may mandate participation in other comparisons. Therefore, if there are no accredited alternatives available and if the samples offered by the non-accredited programs below are relevant to the work your laboratory performs, we recommend that you contact them to discuss enrollment options. Participation in the programs noted with * * is required by specific A2LA programs of accreditation. A2LA ACCREDITED PROFICIENCY TESTING PROGRAMS (Please refer to Scopes of Accreditation on A2LA website for more details.)

Steve Arpie; Arlene Fox

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Fixed-bed gasification research using US coals. Volume 17. Gasification and liquids recovery of four US coals  

SciTech Connect

A single-staged, fixed-bed Wellman-Galusha gasifier coupled with a hot, raw gas combustion system and scrubber has been used to gasify numerous coals from throughout the United States. The gasification test program is organized as a cooperative effort by private industrial participants and government agencies. The consortium of participants is organized under the Mining and Industrial Fuel Gas (MIFGa) group. This report is the seventeenth in a series of reports describing the atmospheric pressure, fixed-bed gasification of US coals. This report describes the gasification and pyrolysis liquids recovery test for four different coals: Illinois No. 6, SUFCO, Indianhead lignite, and Hiawatha. This test series spanned from July 15, 1985, through July 28, 1985. 4 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

Thimsen, D.; Maurer, R.E.; Pooler, A.R.; Pui, D.; Liu, B.; Kittelson, D.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Development of topping combustor for advanced concept pressurized fluidized-bed combustion  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to develop a topping combustor to operate in a Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed (PFBC) Combined Cycle power generation system. The combustor must be able to: lightoff with a high heating value fuel and compressor discharge air to heat the fluidized bed(s) and provide power for PFBC and carbonizer off-line; operate with 1,600 F oxygen depleted air from the PFBC and high heating value fuel to handle carbonizer off-line conditions; ramp up to 100% carbonizer syngas firing (normal operation) by firing a blend of decreasing high heating value fuel and increasing low heating value syngas; utilize the vitiated air, at temperatures up to 1,600 F for as much cooling of the metal combustor as possible, thus minimizing the compressor bypass air needed for combustor cooling; provide an acceptance exit temperature pattern at the desired burner outlet temperature (BOT); minimize the conversion of fuel bound nitrogen (FBN) present in the syngas to NO{sub x}; and have acceptably high combustion efficiency, and low emissions of carbon monoxide, UHC, etc. This paper reports the results of tests of a 14 inch diameter topping combustor with a modified fuel-rich zone conducted in June 1993, design of an 18 inch diameter topping combustor to be tested in June 1994 and afterwards, and results of a 50% scale cold flow model which has been built and tested.

Domeracki, W.F.; Dowdy, T.E.; Bachovchin, D.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Comparison of experimental and computed solids motion and bed dynamics for fluidized beds containing obstacles  

SciTech Connect

The ensemble- and time-averaged solids velocity field and bed dynamics in the form of pressure oscillations taken in the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's (UIUC) atmospheric thin (3.81 by 40 cm) bubbling fluidized bed which contained a simulated triangular pitch tube array consisting of five round 5.08 cm diameter cylinders are analyzed in this paper using Argonne National Laboratory's hydrodynamic model FLUFIX implemented on its CRAY-XMP supercomputer. The bed material consisted of soda lime glass beads having a narrow size range averaging 460 {mu}m in diameter. The fluidizing air was introduced at 39 cm/s. Generally correct solids motion is predicted by the FLUFIX computer program. The uncertainties in the UIUC solids motion data vary greatly from location to location; hence, a sensitivity analysis was performed varying the inlet fluidizing gas velocity distribution. A convergence study was performed by varying (1) the size of the mesh used to approximate the obstacles, and (2) the accuracy of the numerical solution. The authors demonstrate essential grid independence for time-averaged axial solids velocities and porosities for the tubes modeled as 2 {times} 2 and 4 {times} 4 squares and a very tight convergence. Good agreement is obtained for the power spectra of the absolute pressure fluctuations using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) technique. The computed and experimental major frequencies lie in a relatively narrow range of 2-3 Hz. Computer animations of the computer simulations qualitatively visualize features of the bed dynamics including bubble formation from the tubes, bed expansion and collapse and side-to-side sloshing. Solids motion and the associated bed dynamics are the key to understanding the erosion processes in fluidized-bed combustors. 7 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

Lyczkowski, R.W.; Gamwo, I.K.; Dobran, F. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Ai, Y.H.; Chao, B.T.; Chen, M.M. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Staged fluidized bed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for narrowing the distribution of residence times of any size particle and equalizing the residence times of large and small particles in fluidized beds. Particles are moved up one fluidized column and down a second fluidized column with the relative heights selected to equalize residence times of large and small particles. Additional pairs of columns are staged to narrow the distribution of residence times and provide complete processing of the material.

Mallon, Richard G. (Livermore, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

NETL: Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCTDP) - Round 3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Advanced Electric Power Generation - Fluidized Bed Combustion McIntosh Unit 4A PCFB Demonstration Project - Project Brief [PDF-186KB] Lakeland Department of Electric & Water, Lakeland, FL PROGRAM PUBLICATIONS Annual/Quarterly Technical Reports Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) Repowering Project, Annual Report, January - December 1993 (Apr 1994) -- Not Available Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) Repowering Project, Annual Report, August 1991 - December 1992 (Apr 1993) -- Not Available Interim Reports Karhula Hot Gas Cleanup Test Results (June 1994) -- Not Available PCFB Repowering Project 80 MW Plant Description (May 1994) -- Not Available Comprehensive Report to Congress Comprehensive Report to Congress on the Clean Coal Technology Progam: Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Demonstration Project (June 1991) -- Not Available

392

FIELD TEST PROGRAM TO DEVELOP COMPREHENSIVE DESIGN, OPERATING, AND COST DATA FOR MERCURY CONTROL SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

PG&E NEG Salem Harbor Station Unit 1 was successfully tested for applicability of activated carbon injection as a mercury control technology. Test results from this site have enabled a thorough evaluation of mercury control at Salem Harbor Unit 1, including performance, estimated cost, and operation data. This unit has very high native mercury removal, thus it was important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury capture. The team responsible for executing this program included plant and PG&E headquarters personnel, EPRI and several of its member companies, DOE, ADA, Norit Americas, Inc., Hamon Research-Cottrell, Apogee Scientific, TRC Environmental Corporation, Reaction Engineering, as well as other laboratories. The technical support of all of these entities came together to make this program achieve its goals. Overall the objectives of this field test program were to determine the mercury control and balance-of-plant impacts resulting from activated carbon injection into a full-scale ESP on Salem Harbor Unit 1, a low sulfur bituminous-coal-fired 86 MW unit. It was also important to understand the impacts of process variables on native mercury removal (>85%). One half of the gas stream was used for these tests, or 43 MWe. Activated carbon, DARCO FGD supplied by NORIT Americas, was injected upstream of the cold side ESP, just downstream of the air preheater. This allowed for approximately 1.5 seconds residence time in the duct before entering the ESP. Conditions tested in this field evaluation included the impacts of the Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) system on mercury capture, of unburned carbon in the fly ash, of adjusting ESP inlet flue gas temperatures, and of boiler load on mercury control. The field evaluation conducted at Salem Harbor looked at several sorbent injection concentrations at several flue gas temperatures. It was noted that at the mid temperature range of 322-327 F, the LOI (unburned carbon) lost some of its ability to capture vapor phase Hg, however activated carbon performed relatively well. At the normal operating temperatures of 298-306 F, mercury emissions from the ESP were so low that both particulate and elemental mercury were ''not detected'' at the detection limits of the Ontario Hydro method for both baseline and injection tests. The oxidized mercury however, was 95% lower at a sorbent injection concentration of 10 lbs/MMacf compared with baseline emissions. When the flue gas temperatures were increased to a range of 343-347 F, mercury removal efficiencies were limited to <25%, even at the same sorbent injection concentration. Other tests examined the impacts of fly ash LOI, operation of the SNCR system, and flue gas temperature on the native mercury capture without sorbent injection. Listed below are the main conclusions from this program: (1) SNCR on/off test showed no beneficial effect on mercury removal caused by the SNCR system. (2) At standard operating temperatures ({approx} 300 F), reducing LOI from 30-35% to 15-20% had minimal impact on Hg removal. (3) Increasing flue gas temperatures reduced Hg removal regardless of LOI concentrations at Salem Harbor (minimum LOI was 15%). Native mercury removal started to fall off at temperatures above 320 F. ACI effectiveness for mercury removal fell off at temperatures above 340 F. (4) Test method detection limits play an important role at Salem Harbor due to the low residual emissions. Examining the proposed MA rule, both the removal efficiency and the emission concentrations will be difficult to demonstrate on an ongoing basis. (5) Under tested conditions the baseline emissions met the proposed removal efficiency for 2006, but not the proposed emission concentration. ACI can meet the more-stringent 2012 emission limits, as long as measurement detection limits are lower than the Ontario Hydro method. SCEM testing was able to verify the low emissions. For ACI to perform at this level, process conditions need to match those obtained during testing.

Michael D. Durham

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Colorado State University program for developing, testing, evaluating and optimizing solar heating and cooling systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is to develop and test various integrated solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water systems, and to evaluate their performance. Systems composed of new, as well as previously tested, components are carefully integrated so that effects of new components on system performance can be clearly delineated. The SEAL-DOE program includes six tasks which have received funding for the 1991--92 fifteen-month period. These include: (1) a project employing isothermal operation of air and liquid solar space heating systems; (2) a project to build and test several generic solar water heaters; (3) a project that will evaluate advanced solar domestic hot water components and concepts and integrate them into solar domestic hot water systems; (4) a liquid desiccant cooling system development project; (5) a project that will perform system modeling and analysis work on solid desiccant cooling systems research; and (6) a management task. The objectives and progress in each task are described in this report. 6 figs.

Not Available

1991-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

394

The development of an integrated multistaged fluid bed retorting process. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the progress made on the development of an integrated multistage fluidized bed retorting process (KENTORT II) during the period of October 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. The KENTORT II process includes integral fluidized bed zones for pyrolysis (shale oil production), gasification (synthesis gas production), and combustion of the spent oil shale for process heat. The purpose of this program is to design and test the KENTORT II process at the 50-lb/hr scale. The work completed this year involved several different areas. Basic studies of the cracking and coking kinetics of shale oil vapors were carried out in fluidized and fixed bed reactors using both freshly generated shale oil vapors and model compounds. The design and fabrication of the 50-lb/hr KENTORT II reactor was completed and installation of the process components was initiated. The raw oil shale sample (Cleveland Member from Montgomery County, Kentucky) for the program was mined, prepared, characterized and stored. A preliminary study of KENTORT II-derived oil for possible paving applications was completed, and it was concluded that the shale exhibits acceptable properties as an asphalt recycling agent.

Carter, S.; Vego, A.; Stehn, J.; Taulbee, D.; Robl, T.; Hower, J.; Mahboub, K.; Robertson, R.; Hornsberger, P.; Oduroh, P.; Simpson, A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales  

SciTech Connect

The Devonian oil shales of the Eastern United States are a significant domestic energy resource. The overall objective of the multi-year program, initiated in October 1987 by the US Department of Energy is to perform the research necessary to develop the Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Eastern oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. The results of the original 3-year program, which was concluded in May 1991, have been summarized in a four-volume final report published by IGT. DOE subsequently approved a 1-year extension to the program to further develop the PFH process specifically for application to beneficiated shale as feedstock. Studies have shown that beneficiated shale is the preferred feedstock for pressurized hydroretorting. The program extension is divided into the following active tasks. Task 3. testing of process improvement concepts; Task 4. beneficiation research; Task 5. operation of PFH on beneficiated shale; Task 6. environmental data and mitigation analyses; Task 7. sample procurement, preparation, and characterization; and Task 8. project management and reporting. In order to accomplish all the program objectives, the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the prime contractor, worked with four other institutions: the University of Alabama/Mineral Resources Institute (MRI), the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER), the University of Nevada (UN) at Reno, and Tennessee Technological University (TTU). This report presents the work performed during the program extension from June 1, 1991 through May 31, 1992.

Roberts, M.J.; Mensinger, M.C.; Rue, D.M.; Lau, F.S. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Schultz, C.W. (Alabama Univ., University, AL (United States)); Parekh, B.K. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States)); Misra, M. (Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States)); Bonner, W.P. (Tennessee Technological Univ., Cookeville, TN (United States))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

DOE-STD-3022-98; DOE Standard DOE HEPA Filter Test Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22-98 22-98 May 1998 Superseding DOE NE F 3-42 January 1987 DOE STANDARD DOE HEPA FILTER TEST PROGRAM U.S. Department of Energy FSC 4460 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from the Office of Scientific and Technical Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 37831; (423) 576-8401. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. Order No. DE98001294 DOE-STD-3022-98 iii FOREWORD 1. This Department of Energy (DOE) Standard is approved for use by all DOE components and contractors.

397

DOE-STD-3026-99; DOE Standard Filter Test Facility Quality Program Plan  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6-99 6-99 February 1999 Superseding DOE NE F 3-44 July 1986 DOE STANDARD FILTER TEST FACILITY QUALITY PROGRAM PLAN U.S. Department of Energy FSC 4460 Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-3026-99 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy standard supercedes DOE NE F 3-44 and is approved for use by all DOE components and their contractors.

398

Cesium reservoir and interconnective components. Final test report: TFE Verification Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The program objective is to demonstrate the technology readiness of a TFE (thermionic fuel element) suitable for use as the basic element in a thermionic reactor with electric power output in the 0.5 to 5.0 MW range. A thermionic converter must be supplied with cesium vapor for two reasons. Cesium atoms adsorbed on the surface of the emitter cause a reduction of the emitter work function to permit high current densities without excessive heating of the emitter. The second purpose of the cesium vapor is to provide space-charge neutralization in the emitter-collector gap so that the high current densities may flow across the gap unattenuated. The function of the cesium reservoir is to provide a source of cesium atoms, and to provide a reserve in the event that cesium is lost from the plasma by any mechanism. This can be done with a liquid cesium metal reservoir in which case it is heated to the desired temperature with auxiliary heaters. In a TFE, however, it is desirable to have the reservoir passively heated by the nuclear fuel. In this case, the reservoir must operate at a temperature intermediate between the emitter and the collector, ruling out the use of liquid reservoirs. Integral reservoirs contained within the TFE will produce cesium vapor pressures in the desired range at typical electrode temperatures. The reservoir material that appears to be the best able to meet requirements is graphite. Cesium intercalates easily into graphite, and the cesium pressure is insensitive to loading for a given intercalation stage. The goals of the cesium reservoir test program were to verify the performance of Cs-graphite reservoirs in the temperature-pressure range of interest to TFE operation, and to test the operation of these reservoirs after exposure to a fast neutron fluence corresponding to seven year mission lifetime. In addition, other materials were evaluated for possible use in the integral reservoir.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal program summary report compilation. Volume 2-A: Resource description, program history, wells tested, university and company based research, site restoration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy established a geopressured-geothermal energy program in the mid 1970`s as one response to America`s need to develop alternate energy resources in view of the increasing dependence on imported fossil fuel energy. This program continued for 17 years and approximately two hundred million dollars were expended for various types of research and well testing to thoroughly investigate this alternative energy source. This volume describes the following studies: Geopressured-geothermal resource description; Resource origin and sediment type; Gulf Coast resource extent; Resource estimates; Project history; Authorizing legislation; Program objectives; Perceived constraints; Program activities and structure; Well testing; Program management; Program cost summary; Funding history; Resource characterization; Wells of opportunity; Edna Delcambre No. 1 well; Edna Delcambre well recompletion; Fairfax Foster Sutter No. 2 well; Beulah Simon No. 2 well; P.E. Girouard No. 1 well; Prairie Canal No. 1 well; Crown Zellerbach No. 2 well; Alice C. Plantation No. 2 well; Tenneco Fee N No. 1 well; Pauline Kraft No. 1 well; Saldana well No. 2; G.M. Koelemay well No. 1; Willis Hulin No. 1 well; Investigations of other wells of opportunity; Clovis A. Kennedy No. 1 well; Watkins-Miller No. 1 well; Lucien J. Richard et al No. 1 well; and the C and K-Frank A. Godchaux, III, well No. 1.

John, C.J.; Maciasz, G.; Harder, B.J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Bed drain cover assembly for a fluidized bed  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A loose fitting movable cover plate (36), suitable for the severe service encountered in a fluidized bed combustor (10), restricts the flow of solids into the combustor drain lines (30) during shutdown of the bed. This cover makes it possible to empty spent solids from the bed drain lines which would otherwise plug the piping between the drain and the downstream metering device. This enables use of multiple drain lines each with a separate metering device for the control of solids flow rate.

Comparato, Joseph R. (Bloomfield, CT); Jacobs, Martin (Hartford, CT)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test bed program" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Comment submitted by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2011 9, 2011 Via E-Mail Ashley Armstrong U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Program 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20585-0121 ESTARVerificationTesting@ee.doe.gov Re: DOE ENERGY STAR Verification Testing Program Dear Ms. Armstrong: On behalf of the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM), I would like to provide our comments on the DOE Verification Testing Program, as outlined in the document dated April 22, 2011 (DOE Testing Document). AHAM represents manufacturers of major, portable and floor care home appliances, and suppliers to the industry. AHAM's membership includes over 150 companies throughout the world. In the U.S., AHAM members employ tens of thousands of people and produce more than 95% of the household appliances shipped for sale. The factory shipment value of these products

402

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

403

GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS CONTROL BY OXYGEN FIRING IN CIRCULATING FLUIDIZED BED BOILERS: PHASE II--PILOT SCALE TESTING AND UPDATED PERFORMANCE AND ECONOMICS FOR OXYGEN FIRED CFB WITH CO2 CAPTURE  

SciTech Connect

Because fossil fuel fired power plants are among the largest and most concentrated producers of CO{sub 2} emissions, recovery and sequestration of CO{sub 2} from the flue gas of such plants has been identified as one of the primary means for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emissions. In this Phase II study, ALSTOM Power Inc. (ALSTOM) has investigated one promising near-term coal fired power plant configuration designed to capture CO{sub 2} from effluent gas streams for sequestration. Burning fossil fuels in mixtures of oxygen and recirculated flue gas (made principally of CO{sub 2}) essentially eliminates the presence of atmospheric nitrogen in the flue gas. The resulting flue gas is comprised primarily of CO{sub 2}, along with some moisture, nitrogen, oxygen, and trace gases like SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}. Oxygen firing in utility scale Pulverized Coal (PC) fired boilers has been shown to be a more economical method for CO{sub 2} capture than amine scrubbing (Bozzuto, et al., 2001). Additionally, oxygen firing in Circulating Fluid Bed Boilers (CFB's) can be more economical than in PC or Stoker firing, because recirculated gas flow can be reduced significantly. Oxygen-fired PC and Stoker units require large quantities of recirculated flue gas to maintain acceptable furnace temperatures. Oxygen-fired CFB units, on the other hand, can accomplish this by additional cooling of recirculated solids. The reduced recirculated gas flow with CFB plants results in significant Boiler Island cost savings resulting from reduced component The overall objective of the Phase II workscope, which is the subject of this report, is to generate a refined technical and economic evaluation of the Oxygen fired CFB case (Case-2 from Phase I) utilizing the information learned from pilot-scale testing of this concept. The objective of the pilot-scale testing was to generate detailed technical data needed to establish advanced CFB design requirements and performance when firing coals and delayed petroleum coke in O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixtures. Firing rates in the pilot test facility ranged from 2.2 to 7.9 MM-Btu/hr. Pilot-scale testing was performed at ALSTOM's Multi-use Test Facility (MTF), located in Windsor, Connecticut.

Nsakala ya Nsakala; Gregory N. Liljedahl; David G. Turek

2004-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

404

INVESTIGATION OF FUEL CHEMISTRY AND BED PERFORMANCE IN A FLUIDIZED BED BLACK LIQUOR STEAM REFORMER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Utah project ''Investigation of Fuel Chemistry and Bed Performance in a Fluidized Bed Black Liquor Steam Reformer'' (DOE award number DE-FC26-02NT41490) was developed in response to a solicitation for projects to provide technical support for black liquor and biomass gasification. The primary focus of the project is to provide support for a DOE-sponsored demonstration of MTCI's black liquor steam reforming technology at Georgia-Pacific's paper mill in Big Island, Virginia. A more overarching goal is to improve the understanding of phenomena that take place during low temperature black liquor gasification. This is achieved through five complementary technical tasks: (1) construction of a fluidized bed black liquor gasification test system, (2) investigation of bed performance, (3) evaluation of product gas quality, (4) black liquor conversion analysis and modeling and (5) computational modeling of the Big Island gasifier. Four experimental devices have been constructed under this project. The largest facility, which is the heart of the experimental effort, is a pressurized fluidized bed gasification test system. The system is designed to be able to reproduce conditions near the black liquor injectors in the Big Island steam reformer, so the behavior of black liquor pyrolysis and char gasification can be quantified in a representative environment. The gasification test system comprises five subsystems: steam generation and superheating, black liquor feed, fluidized bed reactor, afterburner for syngas combustion and a flue gas cooler/condenser. The three-story system is located at University of Utah's Industrial Combustion and Gasification Research Facility, and all resources there are available to support the research.

Kevin Whitty

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Run - Beyond - Cladding - Breach (RBCB) test results for the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) metallic fuels program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1984 Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) began an aggressive program of research and development based on the concept of a closed system for fast-reactor power generation and on-site fuel reprocessing, exclusively designed around the use of metallic fuel. This is the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). Although the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) has used metallic fuel since its creation 25 yeas ago, in 1985 ANL began a study of the characteristics and behavior of an advanced-design metallic fuel based on uranium-zirconium (U-Zr) and uranium-plutonium-zirconium (U-Pu-Zr) alloys. During the past five years several areas were addressed concerning the performance of this fuel system. In all instances of testing the metallic fuel has demonstrated its ability to perform reliably to high burnups under varying design conditions. This paper will present one area of testing which concerns the fuel system's performance under breach conditions. It is the purpose of this paper to document the observed post-breach behavior of this advanced-design metallic fuel. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Batte, G.L. (Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Hoffman, G.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program. Topical report: Cathode compatibility tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

Johnson, W.H.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Fast fluidized bed steam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A steam generator in which a high-velocity, combustion-supporting gas is passed through a bed of particulate material to provide a fluidized bed having a dense-phase portion and an entrained-phase portion for the combustion of fuel material. A first set of heat transfer elements connected to a steam drum is vertically disposed above the dense-phase fluidized bed to form a first flow circuit for heat transfer fluid which is heated primarily by the entrained-phase fluidized bed. A second set of heat transfer elements connected to the steam drum and forming the wall structure of the furnace provides a second flow circuit for the heat transfer fluid, the lower portion of which is heated by the dense-phase fluidized bed and the upper portion by the entrained-phase fluidized bed.

Bryers, Richard W. (Flemington, NJ); Taylor, Thomas E. (Bergenfield, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Coal Bed Methane Primer  

SciTech Connect

During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of stakeholders to present a consistent and complete synopsis of the key issues involved with CBM. In light of the numerous CBM NEPA documents under development this Primer could be used to support various public scoping meetings and required public hearings throughout the Western States in the coming years.

Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

409

Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales. Progress report, December 1991--February 1992  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to perform the research necessary to develop the pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting (PFH) process for producing oil from Easter oil shales. The program also incorporates research on technologies in areas such as raw shale preparation, beneficiation, product separation, and waste disposal that have the potential of improving the economics and/or environmental acceptability of recovering oil from oil shales using the PFH process. Accomplishments for this period are presented for the following tasks: Testing of Process Improvement Concepts; Beneficiation Research; Operation of PFH on Beneficiated Shale; Environmental Data and Mitigation Analyses; Sample Procurement, Preparation, and Characterization; and Project Management and Reporting. 24 figs., 19 tabs. (AT)

Lau, F.S.; Mensinger, M.C.; Roberts, M.J.; Rue, D.M.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase is described. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves. 3 figures.

Scott, C.D.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

411

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed reactor system which utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary and tertiary particulate phases, continuously introduced and removed simultaneously in the cocurrent and countercurrent mode, act in a role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Means for introducing and removing the sorbent phases include feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marasco, Joseph A. (Kingston, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Biparticle fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed reactor system utilizes a fluid phase, a retained fluidized primary particulate phase, and a migratory second particulate phase. The primary particulate phase is a particle such as a gel bead containing an immobilized biocatalyst. The secondary particulate phase, continuously introduced and removed in either cocurrent or countercurrent mode, acts in a secondary role such as a sorbent to continuously remove a product or by-product constituent from the fluid phase. Introduction and removal of the sorbent phase is accomplished through the use of feed screw mechanisms and multivane slurry valves.

Scott, Charles D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marasco, Joseph A. (Kingston, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Fluidized bed boiler feed system  

SciTech Connect

A fluidized bed boiler feed system for the combustion of pulverized coal. Coal is first screened to separate large from small particles. Large particles of coal are fed directly to the top of the fluidized bed while fine particles are first mixed with recycled char, preheated, and then fed into the interior of the fluidized bed to promote char burnout and to avoid elutriation and carryover.

Jones, Brian C. (Windsor, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

RELATIVE HUMIDITY TESTS IN SUPPORT OF THE 3013 STORAGE AND SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

Techniques to control the initial relative humidity over oxide/salt mixtures have been developed using cerium oxide as a surrogate for plutonium oxide. Such control is required to validate certain assumptions in the Department of Energy Standard DOE-STD-3013, and to provide essential information to support field surveillance at the storage sites for excess plutonium oxides. Concern over the validity of the assumption that corrosion induced degradation in 3013 containers could be controlled by assuring that the moisture content of any stored oxide/salt mixture was below 0.5 w t% arose when stress corrosion cracks were found in test samples exposed at room temperature to plutonium oxide/salt mixtures having a moisture content only marginally above 0.5 wt %. Additionally, analysis of the stress corrosion cracking observations suggests that the initial relative humidity over the oxide/salt mixture may play a major role in the cracking process. The investigations summarized in this report provide the procedures necessary to control the initial relative humidity to selected values within the range of 16 to 50% by controlling the loading relative humidity (18 to 60%) and the oxide/salt mixture water content (0.05 to 0.45 wt %). The studies also demonstrated that the initial relative humid