Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada Appendix D - Corrective Action Investigation Report, Central Nevada Test Area, CAU 417  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, and consisting of three separate land withdrawal areas (UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4), CAU 417 is comprised of 34 corrective action sites (CASs) including 2 underground storage tanks, 5 septic systems, 8 shaker pad/cuttings disposal areas, 1 decontamination facility pit, 1 burn area, 1 scrap/trash dump, 1 outlier area, 8 housekeeping sites, and 16 mud pits. Four field events were conducted between September 1996 and June 1998 to complete a corrective action investigation indicating that the only contaminant of concern was total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) which was found in 18 of the CASs. A total of 1,028 samples were analyzed. During this investigation, a statistical approach was used to determine which depth intervals or layers inside individual mud pits and shaker pad areas were above the State action levels for the TPH. Other related field sampling activities (i.e., expedited site characterization methods, surface geophysical surveys, direct-push geophysical surveys, direct-push soil sampling, and rotosonic drilling located septic leachfields) were conducted in this four-phase investigation; however, no further contaminants of concern (COCs) were identified. During and after the investigation activities, several of the sites which had surface debris but no COCs were cleaned up as housekeeping sites, two septic tanks were closed in place, and two underground storage tanks were removed. The focus of this CADD was to identify CAAs which would promote the prevention or mitigation of human exposure to surface and subsurface soils with contaminant concentrations above preliminary action levels. Based on the potential exposure pathways, several risk-based CAAs were developed and evaluated against the individual CAS requirements. It was determined that a combination of the CAAs would be recommended to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of these sites and to eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the TPH-contaminated soils.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations office

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

2

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 300: Surface Release Areas Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 300 is located in Areas 23, 25, and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is located approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 300 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 as Surface Release Areas and is comprised of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs), which are associated with the identified Building (Bldg): {sm_bullet} CAS 23-21-03, Bldg 750 Surface Discharge {sm_bullet} CAS 23-25-02, Bldg 750 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 23-25-03, Bldg 751 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-60-01, Bldg 3113A Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-60-02, Bldg 3901 Outfall {sm_bullet} CAS 25-62-01, Bldg 3124 Contaminated Soil {sm_bullet} CAS 26-60-01, Bldg 2105 Outfall and Decon Pad The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 23-21-03, 23-25-02, and 23-25-03 is no further action. As a best management practice, approximately 48 feet of metal piping was removed from CAS 23-25-02 and disposed of as sanitary waste. The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 25-60-01, 25-60-02, 25-62-01, and 26-60-01, is clean closure. Closure activities for these CASs included removing and disposing of soil impacted with total petroleum hydrocarbons-diesel range organics (TPH-DRO), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs), and cesium (Cs)-137, concrete impacted with TPH-DRO, and associated piping impacted with TPH-DRO. CAU 300 was closed in accordance with the NDEP-approved CAU 300 Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006). The closure activities specified in the CAP were based on the recommendations presented in the CAU 300 Corrective Action Decision Document (NNSA/NSO, 2005). This Closure Report documents CAU 300 closure activities. During closure activities, approximately 40 cubic yards (yd3) of low-level waste consisting of TPH-DRO-, PCB-, and Cs-137-impacted soil and debris, approximately 7 yd3 of hydrocarbon waste consisting of TPH-DRO-impacted soil, and approximately 66 yd3 of sanitary debris consisting of soil and concrete debris were generated, managed, and disposed of appropriately. Waste minimization techniques, such as the utilization of field screening and laboratory analysis to determine the extent of excavation required, were employed during the performance of closure work.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan provides methods for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document for the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 (DOE/NV, 1999). The CNTA is located in the Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, approximately 137 kilometers (85 miles) northeast of Tonopah, Nevada. The CNTA consists of three separate land withdrawal areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4, all of which are accessible to the public. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs). Results of the investigation activities completed in 1998 are presented in Appendix D of the Corrective Action Decision Document (DOE/NV, 1999). According to the results, the only Constituent of Concern at the CNTA is total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH). Of the 34 CASs, corrective action was proposed for 16 sites in 13 CASs. In fiscal year 1999, a Phase I Work Plan was prepared for the construction of a cover on the UC-4 Mud Pit C to gather information on cover constructibility and to perform site management activities. With Nevada Division of Environmental Protection concurrence, the Phase I field activities began in August 1999. A multi-layered cover using a Geosynthetic Clay Liner as an infiltration barrier was constructed over the UC-4 Mud Pit. Some TPH impacted material was relocated, concrete monuments were installed at nine sites, signs warning of site conditions were posted at seven sites, and subsidence markers were installed on the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover. Results from the field activities indicated that the UC-4 Mud Pit C cover design was constructable and could be used at the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP). However, because of the size of the UC-1 CMP this design would be extremely costly. An alternative cover design, a vegetated cover, is proposed for the UC-1 CMP.

K. Campbell

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration plan details the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area (Tonopah Test Range). CAU 484 consists of sites located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. CAU 484 consists of the following six Corrective Action Sites: (1) CAS RG-52-007-TAML, Davis Gun Penetrator Test; (2) CAS TA-52-001-TANL, NEDS Detonation Area; (3) CAS TA-52-004-TAAL, Metal Particle Dispersion Test; (4) CAS TA-52-005-TAAL, Joint Test Assembly DU Sites; (5) CAS TA-52-006-TAPL, Depleted Uranium Site; and (6) CAS TA-54-001-TANL, Containment Tank and Steel Structure

Bechel Nevada

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r r r r r t r r t r r r * r r r r r r CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA ,FACILITY RECORDS 1970 UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMlSSION NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE LAS VEGAS, NEVADA September 1970 Prepared By Holmes & Narver. Inc. On-Continent Test Division P.O. Box 14340 Las Vegas, Nevada 338592 ...._- _._--_ .. -- - - - - - - .. .. - .. - - .. - - - CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA FACILITY RECORDS 1970 This page intentionally left blank - - .. - - - PURPOSE This facility study has been prepared in response to a request of the AEC/NVOO Property Management Division and confirmed by letter, W. D. Smith to L. E. Rickey, dated April 14, 1970, STS Program Administrative Matters. The purpose is to identify each facility, including a brief description, the acquisition cost either purchase and/or construction, and the AE costs if identi- fiable. A narrative review of the history of the subcontracts

6

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Hot Creek Valley, Nevada For Calendar Year 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites, CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit, and CAS 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill, and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits (5), an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action.

None

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA, FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This post-closure inspection and monitoring report has been prepared according to the stipulations laid out in the Closure Report (CR) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA)--Surface (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV], 2001), and the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This report provides an analysis and summary of site inspections, subsidence surveys, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data for CAU 417, which is located in Hot Creek Valley, Nye County, Nevada. This report covers Calendar Year 2004. Inspections at CAU 417 are conducted quarterly to document the physical condition of the UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4 soil covers, monuments, signs, fencing, and use restricted areas. The physical condition of fencing, monuments, and signs is noted, and any unusual conditions that could impact the integrity of the covers are reported. The objective of the soil moisture monitoring program is to monitor the stability of soil moisture conditions within the upper 1.2 meters (m) (4 feet [ft]) of the UC-1 Central Mud Pit (CMP) cover and detect changes that may be indicative of moisture movement exceeding the cover design performance expectations.

BECHTEL NEVADA; NNSA NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General...

9

POST CLOSURE INSPECTION AND MONITORING REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 417: CENTRAL NEVADA TEST AREA - SURFACE, HOT CREEK VALLEY, NEVADA; FOR CALENDAR YEAR 2005  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417, Central Nevada Test Area - Surface, is located in Hot Creek Valley in northern Nye County, Nevada, and consists of three areas commonly referred to as UC-1, UC-3, and UC-4. CAU 417 consists of 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) which were closed in 2000 (U. S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office, 2001). Three CASs at UC-1 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-01, Central Mud Pit (CMP), a vegetated soil cover was constructed over the mud pit. At the remaining two sites CAS 58-09-02, Mud Pit and 58-09-05, Mud Pits (3), aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the CAS boundaries. Three CASs at UC-3 were closed in place with administrative controls. Aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries at CAS 58-09-06, Mud Pits (5), CAS 58-25-01, Spill and CAS 58-10-01, Shaker Pad Area. Two CASs that consist of five sites at UC-4 were closed in place with administrative controls. At CAS 58-09-03, Mud Pits 9, an engineered soil cover was constructed over Mud Pit C. At the remaining three sites in CAS 58-09-03 and at CAS 58-10-05, Shaker Pad Area, aboveground monuments and warning signs were installed to mark the site boundaries. The remaining 26 CASs at CAU 417 were either clean-closed or closed by taking no further action. Quarterly post-closure inspections are performed at the CASs that were closed in place at UC-I, UC-3, and UC-4. During calendar year 2005, site inspections were performed on March 15, June 16, September 22, and December 7. The inspections conducted at the UC-1 CMP documented that the site was in good condition and continued to show integrity of the cover unit. No new cracks or fractures were observed until the December inspection. A crack on the west portion of the cover showed evidence of lateral expansion; however, it is not at an actionable level. The crack will be sealed by filling with bentonite during the first quarter of 2006 and monitored during subsequent inspections. The cover vegetation was healthy and well established. No issues were identified with the CMP fence, gate, or subsidence monuments. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other two UC-1 locations. The inspections at UC-3 indicated that the sites are in excellent condition. All monuments and signs showed no displacement, damage, or removal. A small erosion gully from spring rain runoff was observed during the June inspection, but it did not grow to an actionable level during 2005. No other issues or concerns were identified. Inspections performed at UC-4 Mud Pit C cover revealed that erosion rills were formed during March and September exposing the geosynthetic clay liner. Both erosion rills were repaired within 90 days of reporting. Sparse vegetation is present on the cover. The overall condition of the monuments, fence, and gate are in good condition. No issues were identified with the warning signs and monuments at the other four UC-4 locations. Subsidence surveys were conducted at UC-1 CMP and UC-4 Mud Pit C in March and September of 2005. The results of the subsidence surveys indicate that the covers are performing as expected, and no unusual subsidence was observed. The June vegetation survey of the UC-1 CMP cover and adjacent areas indicated that the revegetation has been very successful. The vegetation should continue to be monitored to document any changes in the plant community and identify conditions that could potentially require remedial action in order to maintain a viable vegetative cover on the site. Vegetation surveys should be conducted only as required. Precipitation during 2005 was above average, with an annual rainfall total of 21.79 centimeters (8.58 inches). Soil moisture content data show that the UC-1 CMP cover is performing as designed, with evapotranspiration effectively removing water from the cover. It is recommended to continue quarterly site inspections and the collection of soil moisture data for the UC-1 CMP cove

NONE

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The Nevada Test Site as a Lunar Analog Test Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a large (1,350 square miles) secure site currently operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy and was established in 1951 to provide a venue for testing nuclear weapons. Three areas with a variety of elevation and geological parameters were used for testing, but the largest number of tests was in Yucca Flat. The Yucca Flat area is approximately 5 miles wide and 20 miles long and approximately 460 subsidence craters resulted from testing in this area. The Sedan crater displaced approximately 12 million tons of earth and is the largest of these craters at 1,280 feet across and 320 feet deep. The profiles of Sedan and the other craters offer a wide variety of shapes and depths that are ideally suited for lunar analog testing.

Sheldon Freid

2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

11

BSA 08-21: Calibration Test Surface for Surface Profilometers  

Describes a test tool that can be used to calibrate surface profilometers. Surface profilometers are basic metrology tools used to characterize high ...

12

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 484: Surface Debris, Waste Sites, and Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Revision 0)  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 484 Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) activities called for the identification and remediation of surface hot spot depleted uranium (DU) with some excavation to determine the vertical extent of contamination (NNSA/NSO, 2004). During the CAU 484 SAFER investigation (conducted November 2003 through August 2007), approximately 50 locations containing DU were identified on Antelope Lake. All but four locations (CA-1, SA-5-9, SA-12-15, and SA-4) were remediated. Figure 1-1 shows locations of the four use restriction (UR) sites. The four locations were determined to have failed the SAFER conceptual site model assumption of a small volume hot spot. Two of the locations (CA-1 and SA-5-9) were excavated to depths of 3.5 to 7 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs), and a third location (SA-12-15) with a footprint of 30 by 60 ft was excavated to a depth of 0.5 ft. At the fourth site (SA-4), the discovery of unexploded ordnance (UXO) halted the excavation due to potential safety concerns. Remediation activities on Antelope Lake resulted in the removal of approximately 246 cubic yards (yd3) of DU-impacted soil from the four UR sites; however, Kiwi surveys confirmed that residual DU contamination remained at each of the four sites. (The Kiwi was a Remote Sensing Laboratory [RSL] vehicle equipped with a data-acquisition system and four sodium iodide gamma detectors. Surveys were conducted with the vehicle moving at a rate of approximately 10 miles per hour with the gamma detectors positioned 14 to 28 inches [in.] above the ground surface [NNSA/NSO, 2004]).

Mark Burmeister

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Packing efficiency and accessible surface area of crumpled graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphene holds promise as an ultracapacitor due to its high specific surface area and intrinsic capacitance. To exploit both, a maximum surface area must be accessible while the two-dimensional (2D) graphene is deformed ...

Cranford, Steven Wayne

14

Flow Test At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Colrado Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Colado Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

15

Test surfaces useful for calibration of surface profilometers  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides for test surfaces and methods for calibration of surface profilometers, including interferometric and atomic force microscopes. Calibration is performed using a specially designed test surface, or the Binary Pseudo-random (BPR) grating (array). Utilizing the BPR grating (array) to measure the power spectral density (PSD) spectrum, the profilometer is calibrated by determining the instrumental modulation transfer.

Yashchuk, Valeriy V; McKinney, Wayne R; Takacs, Peter Z

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

100 area excavation treatability test plan  

SciTech Connect

This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Development and screening of remedial alternatives for the 100 Area, using existing data, have been completed and are documented in the 100 Area Feasibility Study, Phases 1 and 2 (DOE-RL 1992a). Based on the results of the FS, the Treatability Study Program Plan (DOE-RL 1992b) identifies and prioritizes treatability studies for the 100 Area. The data from the treatability study program support future focused FS, interim remedial measures (IRM) selection, operable unit final remedy selection, remedial design, and remedial actions. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992b). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These completed operational testing activities demonstrated the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

19

200 Area treated effluent disposal facility operational test specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met.

Crane, A.F.

1995-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

20

Flow Test At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Wister Area Exploration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Flow Test At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Maui Area Exploration...

22

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Stillwater Earthquake Sequence, Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

23

Synthesis of High Surface Area Foams for Functional and ...  

A substantially higher surface area is very desirable in porous metallic bulk materials for functional applications such as catalysts, hydrogen storag ...

24

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Facebook icon Twitter icon Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

25

Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And...

26

Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And...

27

Observations of Nuclear Explosive Melt Glass Textures and Surface Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This memo report summarizes our current knowledge of the appearance of melt glass formed and subsequently deposited in the subsurface after an underground nuclear test. We have collected archived pictures and melt glass samples from a variety of underground nuclear tests that were conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) during the U.S. nuclear testing program. The purpose of our work is to better determine the actual variation in texture and surface area of the melt glass material. This study is motivated by our need to better determine the rate at which the radionuclides incorporated in the melt glass are released into the subsurface under saturated and partially saturated conditions. The rate at which radionuclides are released from the glass is controlled by the dissolution rate of the glass. Glass dissolution, in turn, is a strong function of surface area, glass composition, water temperature and water chemistry (Bourcier, 1994). This work feeds into an ongoing experimental effort to measure the change in surface area of analog glasses as a function of dissolution rate. The conclusions drawn from this study help bound the variation in the textures of analog glass samples needed for the experimental studies. The experimental work is a collaboration between Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Earth and Environmental Sciences-Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (EES-LLNL). On March 4, 1999 we hosted a meeting at LLNL to present and discuss our findings. The names of the attendees appear at the end of this memo. This memo report further serves to outline and summarize the conclusions drawn from our meeting. The United States detonated over 800 underground nuclear tests at the NTS between 1951 and 1992. In an effort to evaluate the performance of the nuclear tests, drill-back operations were carried out to retrieve samples of rock in the vicinity of the nuclear test. Drill-back samples were sent to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and analyzed for diagnostic purposes. As a result of these activities, a body of knowledge consisting of personal accounts, photos, reports and archived solid samples was gained regarding the physical nature of the melt glass that formed during an underground nuclear test. In this memo report, we summarize previously published reports, compile archived photos, document and describe melt glass samples and summarized discussions from former field engineers and radiochemists who had direct knowledge of drill-back samples. All the information presented in the report was gathered from unclassified sources. We have included as wide a variation of samples as we could document. Unfortunately, as part of the drill-back and diagnostic efforts, it was not common practice to photograph or physically describe the material returned to the surface.

Kersting, A B; Smith, D K

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

28

A variational level set approach for surface area minimization of triply-periodic surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study triply-periodic surfaces with minimal surface area under a constraint in the volume fraction of the regions (phases) that the surface separates. Using a variational level set method formulation, we present a theoretical characterization ...

Y. Jung; K. T. Chu; S. Torquato

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Surface moisture measurement system hardware acceptance test report  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the hardware acceptance test for the Surface Moisture Measurement System (SMMS). This test verified that the mechanical and electrical features of the SMMS functioned as designed and that the unit is ready for field service. The bulk of hardware testing was performed at the 306E Facility in the 300 Area and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility in the 400 Area. The SMMS was developed primarily in support of Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Safety Programs for moisture measurement in organic and ferrocyanide watch list tanks.

Ritter, G.A., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area (Redirected from Nevada Test And Training Range Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

31

200 area effluent treatment facility opertaional test report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (200 Area ETF) operational testing activities. These Operational testing activities demonstrated that the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area ETF have been met and identified open items which require retesting.

Crane, A.F.

1995-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

32

MOISTURE AND SURFACE AREA MEASUREMENTS OF PLUTONIUM-BEARING OXIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To ensure safe storage, plutonium-bearing oxides are stabilized at 950 C for at least two hours in an oxidizing atmosphere. Stabilization conditions are expected to decompose organic impurities, convert metals to oxides, and result in moisture content below 0.5 wt%. During stabilization, the specific surface area is reduced, which minimizes readsorption of water onto the oxide surface. Plutonium oxides stabilized according to these criteria were sampled and analyzed to determine moisture content and surface area. In addition, samples were leached in water to identify water-soluble chloride impurity content. Results of these analyses for seven samples showed that the stabilization process produced low moisture materials (< 0.2 wt %) with low surface area ({le} 1 m{sup 2}/g). For relatively pure materials, the amount of water per unit surface area corresponded to 1.5 to 3.5 molecular layers of water. For materials with chloride content > 360 ppm, the calculated amount of water per unit surface area increased with chloride content, indicating hydration of hygroscopic salts present in the impure PuO{sub 2}-containing materials. The low moisture, low surface area materials in this study did not generate detectable hydrogen during storage of four or more years.

Crowder, M.; Duffey, J.; Livingston, R.; Scogin, J.; Kessinger, G.; Almond, P.

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

33

Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Nevada Test And Training Range Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (5) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

34

SAW determination of surface area of thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

N.sub.2 adsorption isotherms are measured from thin films on SAW devices. The isotherms may be used to determine the surface area and pore size distribution of thin films.

Frye, Gregory C. (Albuquerque, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Ricco, Antonio J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Cube and Sphere Surface Area and Relative Size  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cube and Sphere Surface Area and Relative Size Cube and Sphere Surface Area and Relative Size Name: Andrea Status: student Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Will a sphere that has the identical surface area as a cube fit inside the cube? Replies: The surface area of a cube is 6L^2 where L is the length of a side. The surface area of a sphere is 4 pi r^2 where r is the radius of the sphere Setting these two terms equal (which we do because the surface areas are equal, [we do not need and exact number, mind you. We just have to know they are equal.]) and doing some algebra we find that the cube has a side 1.414 times as long as the radius of the sphere. BUT WAIT. The radius of the sphere is only half its size (diameter)! To hold the sphere, the cube needs a side of 2r or twice the sphere's radius!! It is only 1.414 times as long so, the sphere will not fit.

36

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details...

37

Flow Test At Alum Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Alum Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Alum Geothermal...

38

Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

39

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Idaho Cleanup Project completes work at Test Area North complex at DOEs Idaho site Loss-Of-Fluid Test Reactor Facility (before) Idaho Cleanup Project workers have completed all...

40

Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Quantification of the pressure response prior to 600 minutes is not always possible. Short-duration (< 24-hour) injection or pump tests are conducted with the drilling rig equipment, and long-duration (21-day) injection and pump tests are then conducted with the permanent pumping facilities. References Allman, D. W.; Goldman, D.; Niemi, W. L. (1 January 1979) Evaluation of testing and reservoir parameters in geothermal wells at Raft

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Nevada Test And Training Range Area Exploration Technique Geographic Information System Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) occupies over 3 million acres in southern Nevada (Figure 1). We recently assessed potential utility-grade geothermal resources and possible target areas for exploration by constructing a GIS of this area and applying the occurrence model ideas outlined above (ITSI, 2003; Sabin et al., 2004). We list below many of the factors considered.

42

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At East Mesa Geothermal Area (1983) Exploration Activity Details Location East Mesa Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection volume at both East Mesa and Raft River suggests that, for both reservoirs, permeability remained uniform with increasing distance from the

43

Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Norman (2002) shows that the Cerro Prieto gas analyses collected by Cathy Janik and Alfred Truesdell from1977 to 1998 plot on a C02/N2 condensation

44

Stress Test At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress Test At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Stress Test At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Stress Test At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Stress Test Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis EGS potential of Coso Geothermal Region Notes A hydraulic fracturing stress test at 3,703 feet TVD was used to constrain a normal faulting and strike-slip faulting stress tensor for this reservoir. The shear and normal stresses resolved on the fracture and fault planes were calculated and used to identify the subset of critically stressed planes that act to maintain permeability within the Coso Geothermal Field. References

45

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Flow tests of well CGEH No. 1 were conducted. LBL performed eight temperature surveys after completion of the well to estimate equilibrium reservoir temperatures. Downhole fluid samples were obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), and a static pressure profile was obtained. The first test began September 5, 1978 using nitrogen stimulation to initiate flow; this procedure resulted in small flow and subsequent filling of the bottom hole with drill cuttings. The second test, on November 2, 1978, utilized a nitrogen-foam-water mixture to clean residual particles from bottom hole,

46

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1993 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the steam and water mass flow rate Notes The method involves precisely metered injection of liquid and vapor phase tracers into the two-phase production pipeline and concurrent sampling of each phase downstream of the injection point. Subsequent chemical analysis of the steam and water samples for tracer content enables the calculation of mass flowrate for each phase given the known mass injection rates of

47

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 2006 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To characterize the flow patterns of fluid injected into well 68-20RD. Notes A conservative liquid phase tracer, 2-naphthalene sulfonate, and a two-phase tracer, ethanol, were injected into well 68-20RD. Surrounding production wells were sampled over the subsequent 125 days and analyzed for the two tracers. The results demonstrate the efficacy of the simultaneous use of liquid-phase and two-phase tracers in fluid-depleted geothermal

48

Tracer Testing At Raft River Geothermal Area (1983) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3) 3) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To develop chemical tracing procedures for geothermal areas. Notes Two field experiments were conducted to develop chemical tracer procedures for use with injection-backflow testing, one on the fracture-permeability Raft River reservoir and the other on the matrix-permeability East Mesa reservoir. Results from tests conducted with incremental increases in the injection volume at both East Mesa and Raft River suggests that, for both reservoirs, permeability remained uniform with increasing distance from the well bore. Increased mixing during quiescent periods, between injection and

49

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To allow for the lateral and vertical extrapolation of core and test data and bridged the gap between surface geophysical data and core analyses. Notes Temperature and flowmeter logs provide evidence that these fractures and faults are conduits that conduct hot water to the wells. One of the intermediate depth core holes penetrated a hydrothermally altered zone that includes several fractures producing hot water. This altered production

50

Uranium and Aluminosilicate Surface Precipitation Tests  

SciTech Connect

The 2H evaporator at the Savannah River Site has been used to treat an aluminum-rich waste stream from canyon operations and a silicon-rich waste stream from the Defense Waste Processing Facility. The formation of aluminosilicate scale in the evaporator has caused significant operational problems. Because uranium has been found to accumulate in the aluminosilicate solids, the scale deposition has introduced criticality concerns as well. The objective of the tests described in this report is to determine possible causes of the uranium incorporation in the evaporator scale materials. The scope of this task is to perform laboratory experiments with simulant solutions to determine if (1) uranium can be deposited on the surfaces of various sodium aluminosilicate (NAS) forms and (2) aluminosilicates can form on the surfaces of uranium-containing solids. Batch experiments with simulant solutions of three types were conducted: (1) contact of uranium solutions/sols with NAS coatings on stainless steel surfaces, (2) contact of uranium solutions with NAS particles, and (3) contact of precipitated uranium-containing particles with solutions containing aluminum and silicon. The results show that uranium can be incorporated in NAS solids through encapsulation in bulk agglomerated NAS particles of different phases (amorphous, zeolite A, sodalite, and cancrinite) as well as through heterogeneous deposition on the surfaces of NAS coatings (amorphous and cancrinite) grown on stainless steel. The results also indicate that NAS particles can grow on the surfaces of precipitated uranium solids. Particularly notable for evaporator operations is the finding that uranium solids can form on existing NAS scale, including cancrinite solids. If NAS scale is present, and uranium is in sufficient concentration in solution to precipitate, a portion of the uranium can be expected to become associated with the scale. The data obtained to date on uranium-NAS affinity are qualitative. A necessary next step is to quantitatively determine the amounts of uranium that may be incorporated into NAS scale solids under differing conditions e.g., varying silicon/aluminum ratio, uranium concentration, temperature, and deposition time.

Hu, M.Z.

2002-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

51

Home Area Network Test, Evaluation, and Diagnostics Tools  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed description of a set of tools that may be used for evaluation of the communication quality of Home Area Networks (HANs). The development of these tools is a continuation of work begun in 2008 and documented in EPRI report 1020106, "Home Area Network Performance Metrics and Monitoring." This report presents advancements and modifications made during 2011 to extend the capabilities of these test tools for a range of applications. This report also introduces hardware and soft...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

52

Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Aerial Photography At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Nevada Test And Training Range Area Exploration Technique Aerial Photography Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes We re-examined most of the area using newer orthophotography, SPOT, and Thematic Mapper images, and identified several areas of possible late Quaternary surface faulting (Figure 3). References A. E. Sabin, J. D. Walker, J. Unruh, F. C. Monastero (2004) Toward The Development Of Occurrence Models For Geothermal Resources In The Western United States Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Aerial_Photography_At_Nevada_Test_And_Training_Range_Area_(Sabin,_Et_Al.,_2004)&oldid=386843

53

Marysville Test Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Test Well Geothermal Area Test Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Test Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.75333333,"lon":-112.3766667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

Radiation Portal Monitoring Test Area and Large Detector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a transformation. In the summer of 2007, work began on the nearly 200,000-square-foot Physical Sciences Facility, equipment and staff displaced from accelerated cleanup of Hanford's 300 Area. This federally financed detection and testing · Borderandinterdiction technology · Materialsdevelopmentand engineering

55

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. C. , 1978. Report on Hydrofracturing Tests for In SituStress Measurements, Near Surface Test Facility, Hole DC-11,Layout for Hanford Near-Surface Test Facility. Submitted to

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Injectivity Test At Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, Reese River Area (Henkle & Ronne, 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Reese River Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes On March 22, 2007 a brief injectivity test was preformed after the slotted liner had been installed. Water was injected at flow rates of 6.3 l/s, 13 l/s and 19 l/s and the pressure and temperature was recorded down hole at a depth of 926 m. At the higher flow rate, the test was interrupted several times to repair leaks at the surface. From the recorded pressure an approximate injectivity index of 10 l/s/MPa was calculated. References William R. Henkle, Joel Ronne (2008) Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling And Testing Retrieved from

57

Tracer Testing At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Tracer Testing Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine the EGS potential of the Coso Geothermal Field Notes A dramatic decrease in the ratio of chloride to boron was observed in the liquid discharge of a well proposed for EGS development. The decrease appears to be related to the transformation of some feed zones in the well from liquid-dominated to vapor-dominated. High concentrations of boron are transported to the wellbore in the steam, where it fractionates to the liquid phase flowing in from liquid-dominated feed zones. The high-boron steam is created when the reservoir liquid in some of the feed zones boils

58

High Surface Area Molybdenum Nitride Support for Fuel Cell Electrodes  

SciTech Connect

Alternative supports for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells were synthesized and catalytic activity was explored using electrochemical analysis. High surface area, molybdenum nitride supports were synthesized by rapidly heating a gel of polyethyleneimine bound molybdenum in a tube furnace under a forming gas atmosphere. Subsequent disposition of platinum through an incipient wetness approach lead to dispersed crystallites of platinum on the conductive support. All the ceramic materials were characterized with XRD, SEM, TEM and electrochemical analysis. The supports without platinum are highly stable to acidic aqueous conditions and show no signs of oxygen reduction reactivity (ORR). However, once the 20 wt % platinum is added to the material, ORR activity comparable to XC72 based materials is observed.

Blackmore, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Elbaz, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Bauer, E D [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brosha, Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); More, Karren Leslie [ORNL; Mccleskey, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Burrell, A [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Satcher, Joe (Patterson, CA); Tillotson, Thomas (Tracy, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence (Pleasanton, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

An Aerial Radiological Survey of Selected Areas of Area 18 - Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the proficiency training for the Radiological Mapping mission of the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), a survey team from the Remote Sensing Laboratory-Nellis (RSL-Nellis) conducted an aerial radiological survey of selected areas of Area 18 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the purpose of mapping man-made radiation deposited as a result of the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I tests. The survey area centered over the Johnnie Boy ground zero but also included the ground zero and deposition area of the Little Feller I test, approximately 7,000 feet (2133 meters) southeast of the Johnnie Boy site. The survey was conducted in one flight. The completed survey covered a total of 4.0 square miles. The flight lines (with the turns) over the surveyed areas are presented in Figure 1. One 2.5-hour-long flight was performed at an altitude of 100 ft above ground level (AGL) with 200 foot flight-line spacing. A test-line flight was conducted near the Desert Rock Airstrip to ensure quality control of the data. The test line is not shown in Figure 1. However, Figure 1 does include the flight lines for a ''perimeter'' flight. The path traced by the helicopter flying over distinct roads within the survey area can be used to overlay the survey data on a base map or image. The flight survey lines were flown in an east-west orientation perpendicular to the deposition patterns for both sites. This technique provides better spatial resolution when contouring the data. The data were collected by the AMS data acquisition system (REDAR V) using an array of twelve 2-inch x 4-inch x 16-inch sodium iodide (NaI) detectors flown on-board a twin-engine Bell 412 helicopter. Data, in the form of gamma energy spectra, were collected every second over the course of the survey and were geo-referenced using a differential Global Positioning System. Spectral data allows the system to distinguish between ordinary fluctuations in natural background radiation levels and the signature produced by man-made radioisotopes. Spectral data can also identify specific radioactive isotopes. Based on the results of the RSL NTS 1994 surveys, this area was chosen for a resurvey to improve the spatial resolution of the reported depositions for the Johnnie Boy and Little Feller I events. In addition, the survey was expected to confirm the absence of detectable concentrations of Americium-241 (Am-241) at the Johnnie Boy site and attempt to confirm the presence of Uranium-235 (U-235).

Craig Lyons

2009-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

An X-Band Gun Test Area at SLAC  

SciTech Connect

The X-Band Test Area (XTA) is being assembled in the NLCTA tunnel at SLAC to serve as a test facility for new RF guns. The first gun to be tested will be an upgraded version of the 5.6 cell, 200 MV/m peak field X-band gun designed at SLAC in 2003 for the Compton Scattering experiment run in ASTA. This new version includes some features implemented in 2006 on the LCLS gun such as racetrack couplers, increased mode separation and elliptical irises. These upgrades were developed in collaboration with LLNL since the same gun will be used in an injector for a LLNL Gamma-ray Source. Our beamline includes an X-band acceleration section which takes the electron beam up to 100 MeV and an electron beam measurement station. Other X-Band guns such as the UCLA Hybrid gun will be characterized at our facility.

Limborg-Deprey, C.; Adolphsen, C.; Chu, T.S.; Dunning, M.P.; Jobe, R.K.; Jongewaard, E.N.; Hast, C.; Vlieks, A.E.; Wang, F.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Marsh, R.A.; Anderson, S.G.; Hartemann, F.V.; Houck, T.L.; /LLNL, Livermore

2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

An update for the MuCool test area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Construction of a new facility known as the MuCool Test Area (MTA) has been completed at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. This facility supports research in new accelerator technologies for future endeavors such as a Neutrino Factory or Muon Collider. During the summer of 2004, an initial set of tests was completed for the filling of a convection-style liquid hydrogen absorber designed by KEK. The absorber contained 6.2 liquid liters of hydrogen and was tested for a range of heating conditions to quantify the absorber's heat exchanger performance. Future work at Fermilab includes the design, construction, and installation of a forced-flow absorber to be used with other components built to investigate the properties of a muon ionization cooling channel. A Tevatron-style refrigerator/compressor building is to be operational by spring of 2006 in support of the absorber tests and also to provide 5-K helium and liquid nitrogen to a 5-T solenoid magnet, an active element of the future test apparatus. The refrigerator will be configured in such a manner as to meet the 5 K and 14-20-K helium needs of the MTA. This paper reviews the challenges and successes of the past KEK absorber tests as well as looks into the future cryogenic capabilities and intentions of the site.

Bross, A.; Cummings, M.A.; Darve, C.; Ishimoto, S.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Norris, B.; Pei, L.; /Fermilab /KEK, Tsukuba /Northern Illinois U.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

100 Area excavation treatability test plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This test plan documents the requirements for a treatability study on field radionuclide analysis and dust control techniques. These systems will be used during remedial actions involving excavation. The data from this treatability study will be used to support the feasibility study (FS) process. Excavation is one of the high-priority, near-term, treatability study needs identified in the program plan (DOE-RL 1992f). Excavation of contaminated soils and buried solid wastes is included in several of the alternatives identified in the 100 Area FS. Although a common activity, excavation has only been used occasionally at the Hanford Site for waste removal applications. The most recent applications are excavation of the 618-9 burial ground and partial remediation of the 316-5 process trenches (DOE-RL 1992a, 1992b). Both projects included excavation of soil and dust control (using water sprays). Excavation is a well-developed technology and equipment is readily available; however, certain aspects of the excavation process require testing before use in full-scale operations. These include the following: Measurement and control of excavation-generated dust and airborne contamination; verification of field analytical system capabilities; demonstration of soil removal techniques specific to the 100 Area waste site types and configurations. The execution of this treatability test may produce up to 500 yd{sub 3} of contaminated soil, which will be used for future treatability tests. These tests may include soil washing with vitrification of the soil washing residuals. Other tests will be conducted if soil washing is not a viable alternative.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Plutonium-aerosol emission rates and potential inhalation exposure during cleanup and treatment test at Area 11, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

A Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test was conducted in 1981 at Area 11, Nevada Test Site. Its purpose was to evaluate the effectiveness of using a large truck-mounted vacuum cleaner similar to those used to clean paved streets for cleaning radiological contamination from the surface of desert soils. We found that four passes with the vehicle removed 97% of the alpha contamination and reduced resuspension by 99.3 to 99.7%. Potential exposure to cleanup workers was slight when compared to natural background exposure. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

Shinn, J.H.; Homan, D.N.

1985-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

65

Hanford 100-D Area Biostimulation Treatability Test Results  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a treatability test designed to demonstrate that in situ biostimulation can be applied to help meet cleanup goals in the Hanford Site 100-D Area. In situ biostimulation has been extensively researched and applied for aquifer remediation over the last 20 years for various contaminants. In situ biostimulation, in the context of this project, is the process of amending an aquifer with a substrate that induces growth and/or activity of indigenous bacteria for the purpose of inducing a desired reaction. For application at the 100-D Area, the purpose of biostimulation is to induce reduction of chromate, nitrate, and oxygen to remove these compounds from the groundwater. The in situ biostimulation technology is intended to provide supplemental treatment upgradient of the In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier previously installed in the Hanford 100-D Area and thereby increase the longevity of the ISRM barrier. Substrates for the treatability test were selected to provide information about two general approaches for establishing and maintaining an in situ permeable reactive barrier based on biological reactions, i.e., a biobarrier. These approaches included 1) use of a soluble (miscible) substrate that is relatively easy to distribute over a large areal extent, is inexpensive, and is expected to have moderate longevity; and 2) use of an immiscible substrate that can be distributed over a reasonable areal extent at a moderate cost and is expected to have increased longevity.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Elmore, Rebecca P.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Sklarew, Deborah S.; Johnson, Christian D.; Oostrom, Martinus; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Bilskis, Christina L.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Peterson, John E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Gasperikova, E.; Ajo-Franklin, J.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

Flow Test At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Fort Bliss Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fort Bliss Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

67

Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Glass Buttes Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

68

Flow Test At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location The Needles Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

69

Flow Test At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

70

Flow Test At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Gabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Gabbs Valley Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

71

Tracer Testing At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracer Testing At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Tracer Testing At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP)...

72

PEROXIDE DESTRUCTION TESTING FOR THE 200 AREA EFFLUENT TREATMENT FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hydrogen peroxide decomposer columns at the 200 Area Effluent Treatment Facility (ETF) have been taken out of service due to ongoing problems with particulate fines and poor destruction performance from the granular activated carbon (GAC) used in the columns. An alternative search was initiated and led to bench scale testing and then pilot scale testing. Based on the bench scale testing three manganese dioxide based catalysts were evaluated in the peroxide destruction pilot column installed at the 300 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility. The ten inch diameter, nine foot tall, clear polyvinyl chloride (PVC) column allowed for the same six foot catalyst bed depth as is in the existing ETF system. The flow rate to the column was controlled to evaluate the performance at the same superficial velocity (gpm/ft{sup 2}) as the full scale design flow and normal process flow. Each catalyst was evaluated on peroxide destruction performance and particulate fines capacity and carryover. Peroxide destruction was measured by hydrogen peroxide concentration analysis of samples taken before and after the column. The presence of fines in the column headspace and the discharge from carryover was generally assessed by visual observation. All three catalysts met the peroxide destruction criteria by achieving hydrogen peroxide discharge concentrations of less than 0.5 mg/L at the design flow with inlet peroxide concentrations greater than 100 mg/L. The Sud-Chemie T-2525 catalyst was markedly better in the minimization of fines and particle carryover. It is anticipated the T-2525 can be installed as a direct replacement for the GAC in the peroxide decomposer columns. Based on the results of the peroxide method development work the recommendation is to purchase the T-2525 catalyst and initially load one of the ETF decomposer columns for full scale testing.

HALGREN DL

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

73

Field investigation at the Faultless Site Central Nevada Test Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of groundwater monitoring at non-Nevada Test Site underground nuclear test sites raised questions about the potential for radionuclide migration from the Faultless event and how to best monitor for such migration. With its long standing interest in the Faultless area and background in Nevada hydrogeology, the Desert Research Institute conducted a field investigation in FY92 to address the following issues: The status of chimney infilling (which determines the potential for migration); the best level(s) from which to collect samples from the nearby monitoring wells, HTH-1 and HTH-2; the status of hydraulic heads in the monitoring well area following records of sustained elevated post-shot heads. The field investigation was conducted from July 27 to 31 and August 4 to 7, 1992. Temperature and electrical conductivity logging were performed in HTH-1, HTH-2, and UC-1-P-2SR. Water samples were collected from HTH-1 and HTH-2. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) also collected samples during the July trip, including samples from UC-1-P-2SR. This report presents the data gathered during these field excursions and some preliminary conclusions. Full interpretation of the data in light of the issues listed above is planned for FY93.

Chapman, J.B.; Mihevc, T.M.; Lyles, B.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Standard Test Method for Gravimetric Determination of Nonvolatile Residue (NVR) in Environmentally Controlled Areas for Spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the determination of nonvolatile residue (NVR) fallout in environmentally controlled areas used for the assembly, testing, and processing of spacecraft. 1.2 The NVR of interest is that which is deposited on sampling plate surfaces at room temperature: it is left to the user to infer the relationship between the NVR found on the sampling plate surface and that found on any other surfaces. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. No other units of measurement are included in this standard.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Compilation of modal analyses of volcanic rocks from the Nevada Test Site area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Volcanic rock samples collected from the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, between 1960 and 1985 were analyzed by thin section to obtain petrographic mode data. In order to provide rapid accessibility to the entire database, all data from the cards were entered into a computerized database. This computer format will enable workers involved in stratigraphic studies in the Nevada Test Site area and other locations in southern Nevada to perform independent analyses of the data. The data were compiled from the mode cards into two separate computer files. The first file consists of data collected from core samples taken from drill holes in the Yucca Mountain area. The second group of samples were collected from measured sections and surface mapping traverses in the Nevada Test Site area. Each data file is composed of computer printouts of tables with mode data from thin section point counts, comments on additional data, and location data. Tremendous care was taken in transferring the data from the cards to computer, in order to preserve the original information and interpretations provided by the analyzer. In addition to the data files above, a file is included that consists of Nevada Test Site petrographic data published in other US Geological Survey and Los Alamos National Laboratory reports. These data are presented to supply the user with an essentially complete modal database of samples from the volcanic stratigraphic section in the Nevada Test Site area. 18 refs., 4 figs.

Page, W.R.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I Guidelines Manual for Surface Monitoring of GeothermalA07 Final Report GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OFi t a t i o n s o f t h e Manual PRELIMINARY INVESTIGATION I

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

GUIDELINES MANUAL FOR SURFACE MONITORING OF GEOTHERMAL AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1976, "Blowout o f a Geothermal Well", California Geology,in Rocks from Two Geothermal Areas'' , -- P1 anetary ScienceMonitoring Ground Movement in Geothermal Areas", Hydraul ic

Til, C. J. Van

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Effect of geometric configuration and surface area on the thermal transmittance of edge-sealed draperies  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory studies were carried out to investigate the influence of fabric structure and geometric configuration of multilayer window draperies on the thermal insulation characteristics of drapery models. Drapery assemblies representing various configurations of drapery fullness, lining fullness, and spatial separation between lining and drapery fabrics were sealed at sides, top, and bottom to a full-scale window built into an insulated wall between a cold chamber, which simulated outdoor winter conditions, and the inside of a test room, which was maintained at indoor winter conditions. Thermal transmittance of the window/fabric systems was measured by transducers mounted on the surface of the window glass. The temperature of the cold chamber, the temperature and relative humidity of the test room, and the heat transfer were monitored by a desk-top computer system. The influence of fabric structure, drapery and lining, fabric surface area, and volume of air space within the drapery assembly on thermal transmittance are discussed.

Epps, H.H.; Goswami, B.C.; Hassenboehler, C.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Massive Hanford Test Reactor Removed- Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor removed from Hanfords 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, WA Hanfords River Corridor contractor, Washington Closure Hanford, has met a significant cleanup challenge on the U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Hanford Site by removing a 1,082-ton nuclear test reactor from the 300 Area.

80

Cryogenics for the MuCool Test Area (MTA)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

MuCool Test Area (MTA) is a complex of buildings at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which are dedicated to operate components of a cooling cell to be used for Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D. The long-term goal of this facility is to test ionization cooling principles by operating a 25-liter liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) absorber embedded in a 5 Tesla superconducting solenoid magnet. The MTA solenoid magnet will be used with RF cavities exposed to a high intensity beam. Cryogens used at the MTA include LHe, LN{sub 2} and LH{sub 2}. The latter dictates stringent system design for hazardous locations. The cryogenic plant is a modified Tevatron refrigerator based on the Claude cycle. The implementation of an in-house refrigerator system and two 300 kilowatt screw compressors is under development. The helium refrigeration capacity is 500 W at 14 K. In addition the MTA solenoid magnet will be batch-filled with LHe every 2 days using the same cryo-plant. This paper reviews cryogenic systems used to support the Muon Collider and Neutrino Factory R&D programs and emphasizes the feasibility of handling cryogenic equipment at MTA in a safe manner.

Darve, Christine; Norris, Barry; Pei, Liu-Jin; /Fermilab

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ARM: Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Surface Radiation Measurement Quality Control testing, including climatologically configurable limits

Gary Hodges; Tom Stoffel; Mark Kutchenreiter; Bev Kay; Aron Habte; Michael Ritsche; Victor Morris; Mary Anderberg

82

Land surface cleanup of plutonium at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS) covers approximately 3300 km{sup 2} of high desert and is located approximately 100 km northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Soil contaminated by plutonium exists on the NTS and surrounding areas from safety tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s. About 150 curies of contamination have been measured over 1200 hectares of land surface. Most contamination is found in the top 5 cm of soil but may be found deep as 25 cm. The cost of conventional removal and disposal of the full soil volume has been estimated at over $500,000,000. This study is directed toward minimizing the volume of waste which must be further processed and disposed of by precisely controlling soil removal depth. The following soil removal machines were demonstrated at the NTS: (1) a CMI Corporation Model PR-500FL pavement profiler, (2) a CMI Corporation Model Tr-225B trimmer reclaimer, (3) a Caterpillar Model 623 elevating scraper equipped with laser depth control, (4) a Caterpillar Model 14G motor grader equipped with laser depth control, (5) a Caterpillar Model 637 auger scraper, and (6) a XCR Series Guzzler vacuum truck. 5 refs., 5 figs.

Ebeling, L.L.; Evans, R.B.; Walsh, E.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Does the Surface Pressure Equal the Weight per Unit Area of a Hydrostatic Atmosphere?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common statement that the surface pressure in a hydrostatic atmosphere is equal to the weight per unit area of the air aloft is shown to be true only for a Cartesian world. Here the unit area is the surface area of the base of the atmospheric ...

Peter R. Bannon; Craig H. Bishop; James B. Kerr

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Flow Test At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity...

85

Flow Test At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Rye Patch Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Rye Patch Area...

86

Flow Test At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Pueblo Area...

87

Flow Test At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Silver Peak Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Silver Peak Area...

88

Flow Test At New River Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At New River Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location New River Area...

89

Flow Test At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pot Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Hot Pot Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Hot...

90

Boundary Layer Characteristics over Areas of Inhomogeneous Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes results from a June 1992 field program to study the response of the boundary layer over a site with well-defined extreme differences in sensible and latent heat fluxes over clearly separated areas, each with characteristic ...

J. C. Doran; W. J. Shaw; J. M. Hubbe

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This closure report (CR) provides documentation for the closure of the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area (RCRSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 407 identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). CAU 407 is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The TTR is approximately 225 kilometers (km) (140 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). The RCRSA is located on the northeast comer of the intersection of Main Road and Browne's Lake Road, which is approximately 8 km (5 mi) south of Area 3 (Figure 1). The RCRSA was used during May and June of 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, and personnel from the Double Tracks and Clean Slate tests. Investigation of the RCRSA was conducted from June through November of 1998. A Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1999) was approved in October of 1999. The purpose of this CR is to: Document the closure activities as proposed in the Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (DOEM, 2000). Obtain a Notice of Completion from the NDEP. Recommend the movement of CAU 407 from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the FFACO. The following is the scope of the closure actions implemented for CAU 407: Removal and disposal of surface soils which were over three times background for the area. Soils identified for removal were disposed of at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Excavated areas were backfilled with clean borrow soil located near the site. A soil cover was constructed over the waste disposal pit area, where subsurface constituents of concern remain. The site was fenced and posted as an ''Underground Radioactive Material'' area.

T. M. Fitzmaurice

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Impervious Areas: Examining the Undermining Effects on Surface Water Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study explored the relationship between increased proportions of imperviousness in a watershed on surface water quality and examined the effectiveness of using remote sensing to systematically and accurately determine impervious surfaces. A supervised maximum likelihood algorithm was used to classify the 2008 high resolution National Agriculture Imagery Program (NAIP) imagery into six classifications. A stratified random sampling scheme was conducted to complete an accuracy assessment of the classification. The overall accuracy was 85%, and the kappa coefficient was 0.80. Additionally, field sampling and chemical analysis techniques were used to examine the relationship between impervious surfaces and water quality in a rainfall simulation parking lot study. Results indicated that day since last rain event had the most significant effect on surface water quality. Furthermore, concrete produced higher dissolved organic carbon (DOC), dissolved organic nitrogen (DON), potassium and calcium in runoff concentrations than did asphalt. Finally, a pollutant loading application model was used to estimate pollutant loadings for three watersheds using two scenarios. Results indicated that national data may overestimate annual pollutant loads by approximately 700%. This study employed original techniques and methodology to combine the extraction of impervious surfaces, utilization of local rainfall runoff data and hydrological modeling to increase planners' and scientists' awareness of using local data and remote sensing data to employ predictive hydrological modeling.

Young, De'Etra Jenra

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a functioninterfacial mass-transport resistance was established.

He, Qinggang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

D0 Experimental Area Emergency Backup Power and Generator Test  

SciTech Connect

The DO experimental area has a generator designated as emergency power. This generator provides power for critical loads and starts automatically upon loss of commercial power. This note concerns the testing of this generator. A list of loads is attached to this note. One of the loads on the emergency power grid is a 10KVA Uninterruptable Power Supply(UPS). The UPS powers the cryogenic controls and Oxygen deficiency hazard equipment(ODH) and has a minimum rating of 20 minutes while on its batteries(to cover the transfer time to/from the emergency generator). Jan 23,1991 at 1640 hrs this system was tested under the supervision of the Terry Ross, Marv Johnson, Dan Markley, Kelly Dixon, and John Urbin. The power feeder to the emergency power grid at DO was disconnected. The generator responded immediately and was supplying power to the emergency power grid in less than 10 seconds. During the 10 seconds that there was no power on the emergency grid the UPS switched on its inverter and provided uninterrupted power to the cryogenic control system and the ODH system. All of the motorized equipment shut off instrument air compressor, vacuum pumps 1 and 2, insulating vacuum blower, glycol cooling pumps, cooling tower fan, and Exhaust Fan 7(EF7). Upon reengagement of power to the grid from the emergency generator, all of the motorized loads started back up with the exception of vacuum pumps 1 and 2, and the UPS inverter turned off. Vacuum pumps 1 and 2 were delay started 20 seconds by the cryogenic control system as not to cause too large of a surge in power by all of the inductive loads starting at once. The DO building elevator which is also on emergency power was test run while the emergency generator was on line with all other emergency loads. The emergency generator current was 140 amps with all loads on line and running except the building elevator. This load of 140 amps is 27% of the generator's capacity. The cryogenic control and ODH system continued to function properly throughout the entire test due to the UPS responding correctly to each power situation. The cryogenic control system isolated both the Utility(UV) and insulating(IV) vacuum systems as to preserve their vacua while the pumps were off. Once the vacuum pumps were reestablished the IV and UV vacua were put back on line to their respective pumps by the cryogenic control system. The instrument air is backed up by a high pressure trailer, regulated down to instrument air pressure and switches automatically on line through a check valve. During the time that the instrument air compressor was off, instrument air never went below 80 psig (high pressure regulator setting).

Markley, D.; /Fermilab

1991-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

95

D0 Experimental Area Emergency Backup Power and Generator Test  

SciTech Connect

The DO experimental area has a generator designated as emergency power. This generator provides power for critical loads and starts automatically upon loss of commercial power. This note concerns the testing of this generator. A list of loads is attached to this note. One of the loads on the emergency power grid is a 10KVA Uninterruptable Power Supply(UPS). The UPS powers the cryogenic controls and Oxygen deficiency hazard equipment(ODH) and has a minimum rating of 20 minutes while on its batteries(to cover the transfer time to/from the emergency generator). Jan 23,1991 at 1640 hrs this system was tested under the supervision of the Terry Ross, Marv Johnson, Dan Markley, Kelly Dixon, and John Urbin. The power feeder to the emergency power grid at DO was disconnected. The generator responded immediately and was supplying power to the emergency power grid in less than 10 seconds. During the 10 seconds that there was no power on the emergency grid the UPS switched on its inverter and provided uninterrupted power to the cryogenic control system and the ODH system. All of the motorized equipment shut off instrument air compressor, vacuum pumps 1 and 2, insulating vacuum blower, glycol cooling pumps, cooling tower fan, and Exhaust Fan 7(EF7). Upon reengagement of power to the grid from the emergency generator, all of the motorized loads started back up with the exception of vacuum pumps 1 and 2, and the UPS inverter turned off. Vacuum pumps 1 and 2 were delay started 20 seconds by the cryogenic control system as not to cause too large of a surge in power by all of the inductive loads starting at once. The DO building elevator which is also on emergency power was test run while the emergency generator was on line with all other emergency loads. The emergency generator current was 140 amps with all loads on line and running except the building elevator. This load of 140 amps is 27% of the generator's capacity. The cryogenic control and ODH system continued to function properly throughout the entire test due to the UPS responding correctly to each power situation. The cryogenic control system isolated both the Utility(UV) and insulating(IV) vacuum systems as to preserve their vacua while the pumps were off. Once the vacuum pumps were reestablished the IV and UV vacua were put back on line to their respective pumps by the cryogenic control system. The instrument air is backed up by a high pressure trailer, regulated down to instrument air pressure and switches automatically on line through a check valve. During the time that the instrument air compressor was off, instrument air never went below 80 psig (high pressure regulator setting).

Markley, D.; /Fermilab

1991-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

96

Specification of Surface Roughness for Hydraulic Flow Test Plates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed to determine the surface roughness of the corrosion layer on aluminum clad booster fuel plates for the proposed Gas Test Loop (GTL) system to be incorporated into the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. A layer of boehmite (a crystalline, non-porous gamma-alumina hydrate) is typically pre-formed on the surface of the fuel cladding prior to exposure to reactor operation to prevent the uncontrolled buildup of corrosion product on the surface. A representative sample coupon autoclaved with the ATR driver fuel to produce the boehmite layer was analyzed using optical profilometry to determine the mean surface roughness, a parameter that can have significant impact on the coolant flow past the fuel plates. This information was used to specify the surface finish of mockup fuel plates for a hydraulic flow test model. The purpose of the flow test is to obtain loss coefficients describing the resistance of the coolant flow paths, which are necessary for accurate thermal hydraulic analyses of the water-cooled booster fuel assembly. It is recommended that the surface roughness of the boehmite layer on the fuel cladding be replicated for the flow test. While it is very important to know the order of magnitude of the surface roughness, this value does not need to be matched exactly. Maintaining a reasonable dimensional tolerance for the surface finish on each side of the 12 mockup fuel plates would ensure relative uniformity in the flow among the four coolant channels. Results obtained from thermal hydraulic analyses indicate that 15% deviation from a surface finish (i.e., Ra) of 0.53 m would have a minimal effect on coolant temperature, coolant flow rate, and fuel temperature.

Donna Post Guillen; Timothy S. Yoder

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITYNEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Areas of the Event Horizon and Stationary Limit Surface for a Kerr Black Hole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an elementary evaluation of the surface areas of the event horizon and stationary limit surface for an uncharged Kerr black hole. The latter appears not to have been previously given in the literature, and permits us to suggest new geometrical / physical interpretations of these areas.

Pickett, C A

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lightning Dock, Animas Valley, New Mexico geothermal area was discovered when a rancher found boiling water while drilling a shallow stock tank welt (Elston, Deal, et. al, 1983). There are no surface manifestations of present or past geothermal activity in the Animas Valley. Norman and Bernhart (1982) analyzed the gases in the discovery well and 15 stock tank wells nearby (Figure 1).

100

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689258

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689255"

102

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=689392

103

Microsoft Word - Sludge Test Area CX Determination Form12172012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sludge Test Facility at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) [CX-TWPC-13-0001] Sludge Test Facility at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) [CX-TWPC-13-0001] Program or Field Office: Environmental Management - Oak Ridge Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: The proposed action is to construct and operate a sludge test facility at the Transuranic (TRU) Waste Processing Center (TWPC) to conduct testing activities for sludge mobilization, mixing, and removal from the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST). The testing is needed to develop appropriate, compliant treatment to a final waste form that will meet the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). This testing is needed for the mobilization, removal, and treatment of the sludge regardless of

104

Nevada Test Site 2008 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2008 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

105

Test probe for surface mounted leadless chip carrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A test probe for a surface mounted leadless chip carrier is disclosed. The probed includes specially designed connector pins which allow size reductions in the probe. A thermoplastic housing provides spring action to ensure good mechanical and electrical contact between the pins and the contact strips of a leadless chip carrier. Other features include flexible wires molded into the housing and two different types of pins alternately placed in the housing. These features allow fabrication of a smaller and simpler test probe.

Meyer, Kerry L. (Raytown, MO); Topolewski, John (Lenexa, KS)

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

106

SRF Test Areas Cryogenic System Controls Graphical User Interface  

SciTech Connect

Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory has constructed a superconducting 1.3 GHz cavity test facility at Meson Detector Building (MDB) and a superconducting 1.3 GHz cryomodule test facility located at the New Muon Lab Building (NML). The control of these 2K cryogenic systems is accomplished by using a Synoptic graphical user interface (GUI) to interact with the underlying Fermilab Accelerator Control System. The design, testing and operational experience of employing the Synoptic client-server system for graphical representation will be discussed. Details on the Synoptic deployment to the MDB and NML cryogenic sub-systems will also be discussed. The implementation of the Synoptic as the GUI for both NML and MDB has been a success. Both facilities are currently fulfilling their individual roles in SCRF testing as a result of successful availability of the cryogenic systems. The tools available for creating Synoptic pages will continue to be developed to serve the evolving needs of users.

DeGraff, B.D.; Ganster, G.; Klebaner, A.; Petrov, A.D.; Soyars, W.M.; /Fermilab

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

107

Recent Progress of RF Cavity Study at Mucool Test Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summar of presentation is: (1) MTA is a multi task working space to investigate RF cavities for R&D of muon beam cooling channel - (a) Intense 400 MeV H{sup -} beam, (b) Handle hydrogen (flammable) gas, (c) 5 Tesla SC solenoid magnet, (d) He cryogenic/recycling system; (2) Pillbox cavity has been refurbished to search better RF material - Beryllium button test will be happened soon; (3) E x B effect has been tested in a box cavity - Under study (result seems not to be desirable); (4) 201 MHz RF cavity with SRF cavity treatment has been tested at low magnetic field - (a) Observed some B field effect on maximum field gradient and (b) Further study is needed (large bore SC magnet will be delivered end of 2011); and (5) HPRF cavity beam test has started - (a) No RF breakdown observed and (b) Design a new HPRF cavity to investigate more plasma loading effect.

Yonehara, Katsuya; /Fermilab

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

108

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2008 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To confirm resource using flow tests Notes Both production and injection wells were flow tested. Aslo includes interference testing across the well field. References Glaspey, Douglas J. (30 January 2008) Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Raft_River_Geothermal_Area_(2008)&oldid=473856

109

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Stillwater Earthquake Sequence, Central Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Historic Surface Faulting and Paleoseismicity in the Area of the 1954 Rainbow Mountain-Stillwater Earthquake Sequence, Central Nevada Abstract The Rainbow Mountain area was the site of three surface-rupturing earthquakes on 6 July and 23 August 1954. More than 50 field measurements of surface offsets constrain the distribution of slip along the discontinuous and distributed rupture zone that formed during the earthquake sequence. Vertical offsets reach a maximum of ~0.8 m with the average vertical offset being ~0.2 m. In contrast to original reports, we

110

An aerial radiological survey of the Tonopah Test Range including Clean Slate 1,2,3, Roller Coaster, decontamination area, Cactus Springs Ranch target areas. Central Nevada  

SciTech Connect

An aerial radiological survey was conducted of major sections of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in central Nevada from August through October 1993. The survey consisted of aerial measurements of both natural and man-made gamma radiation emanating from the terrestrial surface. The initial purpose of the survey was to locate depleted uranium (detecting {sup 238}U) from projectiles which had impacted on the TTR. The examination of areas near Cactus Springs Ranch (located near the western boundary of the TTR) and an animal burial area near the Double Track site were secondary objectives. When more widespread than expected {sup 241}Am contamination was found around the Clean Slates sites, the survey was expanded to cover the area surrounding the Clean Slates and also the Double Track site. Results are reported as radiation isopleths superimposed on aerial photographs of the area.

Proctor, A.E.; Hendricks, T.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

112

Appendix B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

B B Surface Infiltration and Aquifer Test Data This page intentionally left blank Infiltration Tests This page intentionally left blank 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 TIME (MIN) 200 250 TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 TIME (MIN) zoo 800 1000 TIME (MIN) 0 150 300 450 600 750 , 900 1050 1200 1350 1500 1650 1800 TIME (MIN) TIME (MIN) 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 800 900 1000 1100 1200 1300 1400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST I 300 400 TIME (MIN) INF-8 TEST 2 200 250 300 TIME (MIN) 200 250 TIME (MIN) zoo 800 1000 TIME (MIN) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 TIME (MIN) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 400 450 500 550 600 TIME (MIN) September 1997 Alluvial Aquifer Tests This page intentionally left blank - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

113

Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Abstract N/A Authors James Kauahikaua and Douglas Klein Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS, 1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A Citation James Kauahikaua,Douglas Klein. 1978. Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A. Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS. 2:363-366. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Results_of_Electric_Survey_in_the_Area_of_Hawaii_Geothermal_Test_Well_HGP-A&oldid=682499

114

Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References David I. Norman, Joseph Moore (2004) Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Surface_Gas_Sampling_At_Lightning_Dock_Area_(Norman_%26_Moore,_2004)&oldid=689367"

115

The Relationship Between the Surface Wind Field and Convective Precipitation over the St. Louis Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rainfall, wind and temperature data at the surface for a mesoscale area surrounding St. Louis, Missouri for seven summer days in 1975 were used to determine qualitative and quantitative relationships between divergence, and the location, timing ...

Gary L. Achtemeier

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Derivation of Effective Aerodynamic Surface Roughness in Urban Areas from Airborne Lidar Terrain Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated technique was developed that uses only airborne lidar terrain data to derive the necessary parameters for calculation of effective aerodynamic surface roughness in urban areas. The technique provides parameters for geometric models ...

Donald E. Holland; Judith A. Berglund; Joseph P. Spruce; Rodney D. McKellip

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Water Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (1973) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Water Sampling Activity Date 1973 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis At least 380 hot springs and wells are known to occur throughout the central and southern parts of Idaho. Notes One hundred twenty-four of 380 hot springs and wells in the central and southern parts of Idaho were inventoried as a part of the study reported on herein. At the spring vents and wells visited, the thermal waters flow from rocks ranging in age from Precambrian to Holocene and from a wide range of

118

Development and Testing of a Groundwater Management Model for the Faultless Underground Nuclear Test, Central Nevada Test Area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document describes the development and application of a user-friendly and efficient groundwater management model of the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) and surrounding areas that will allow the U.S. Department of Energy and state personnel to evaluate the impact of future proposed scenarios. The management model consists of a simple hydrologic model within an interactive groundwater management framework. This framework is based on an object user interface that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey and has been used by the Desert Research Institute researchers and others to couple disparate environmental resource models, manage the necessary temporal and spatial data, and evaluate model results for management decision making. This framework was modified and applied to the CNTA and surrounding Hot Creek Valley. The utility of the management model was demonstrated through the application of hypothetical future scenarios including mineral mining, regional expansion of agriculture, geothermal energy production, and export of water to large urban areas outside the region. While the results from some of the scenarios indicated potential impacts to the region near CNTA and others did not, together they demonstrate the usefulness of the management tool for managers who need to evaluate the impact proposed changes in groundwater use in or near CNTA may have on radionuclide migration.

Douglas P. Boyle; Gregg Lamorey; Scott Bassett; Greg Pohll; Jenny Chapman

2006-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

119

Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Benoit Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Core holes enabled injection and flow testing up to 70 gpm. References Dick Benoit, Joe Moore, Colin Goranson, David Blackwell (2005) Core Hole Drilling And Testing At The Lake City, California Geothermal Field Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Lake_City_Hot_Springs_Area_(Benoit_Et_Al.,_2005)&oldid=386872" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes

120

200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility operational test specification. Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document identifies the test specification and test requirements for the 200 Area Treated Effluent Disposal Facility (200 Area TEDF) operational testing activities. These operational testing activities, when completed, demonstrate the functional, operational and design requirements of the 200 Area TEDF have been met. The technical requirements for operational testing of the 200 Area TEDF are defined by the test requirements presented in Appendix A. These test requirements demonstrate the following: pump station No.1 and associated support equipment operate both automatically and manually; pump station No. 2 and associated support equipment operate both automatically and manually; water is transported through the collection and transfer lines to the disposal ponds with no detectable leakage; the disposal ponds accept flow from the transfer lines with all support equipment operating as designed; and the control systems operate and status the 200 Area TEDF including monitoring of appropriate generator discharge parameters.

Crane, A.F.

1995-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Flow Test At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Page Edit History Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Flow Test At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal...

122

Flow Test At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Flint...

123

Flow Test At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Mcgee Mountain Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mcgee Mountain...

124

Flow Test At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Crump's Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Crump's Hot...

125

Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At San Emidio Desert Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location San Emidio...

126

Flow Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location...

127

Flow Test At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Newberry Caldera Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry...

128

Flow Test At Soda Lake Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Soda Lake Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Soda Lake...

129

Toward New Candidates for Hydrogen Storage: High Surface Area Carbon Aerogels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report the hydrogen surface excess sorption saturation value of 5.3 wt% at 30 bar pressure at 77 K, from an activated carbon aerogel with a surface area of 3200 m{sup 2}/g as measured by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) analysis. This sorption value is one of the highest we have measured in a material of this type, comparable to values obtained in high surface area activated carbons. We also report, for the first time, the surface area dependence of hydrogen surface excess sorption isotherms of carbon aerogels at 77 K. Activated carbon aerogels with surface areas ranging from 1460 to 3200 m{sup 2}/g are evaluated and we find a linear dependence of the saturation of the gravimetric density with BET surface area for carbon aerogels up to 2550 m{sup 2}/g, in agreement with data from other types of carbons reported in the literature. Our measurements show these materials to have a differential enthalpy of adsorption at zero coverage of {approx}5 to 7 kJ/mole. We also show that the introduction of metal nanoparticles of nickel improves the sorption capacity while cobalt additions have no effect.

Kabbour, H; Baumann, T F; Satcher, J H; Saulnier, A; Ahn, C C

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

130

Test probe for surface mounted leadless chip carrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A test probe for a surface mounted leadless chip carrier is disclosed. The probe includes specially designed connector pins which allow size reductions in the probe. A thermoplastic housing provides spring action to ensure good mechanical and electrical contact between the pins and the contact strips of a leadless chip carrier. Other features include flexible wires molded into the housing and two different types of pins alternately placed in the housing. These features allow fabrication of a smaller and simpler test probe. 1 fig.

Meyer, K.L.; Topolewski, J.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

131

Modeling Surface Sensible Heat Flux Using Surface Radiative Temperatures in a Simple Urban Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sensible heat fluxes over a light industrial area in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, are analyzed from observed tower fluxes and modeled using a bulk heat transfer approach. The bulk transfer models are initialized using remotely sensed ...

J. A. Voogt; C. S. B. Grimmond

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR site. References Z. V. Dash, H. D. Murphy, R. L. Aamodt, R. G. Aguilar, D. W. Brown, D. A. Counce, H. N. Fisher, C. O. Grigsby, H. Keppler, A. W. Laughlin, R. M. Potter, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo Jr, G. Zyvoloski (1983) Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Reservoir Testing- 1978 To 1980 Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Injectivity_Test_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Dash,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511316"

133

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BOMASS PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to December 31, 2004 which covers the first six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, supply requests were processed and supplies including biomass test particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546) in the size range of 100-200 microns were obtained from a cofiring pilot plant research facility owned by Southern Company, Birmingham, AL. Morehouse has completed setting up of the gravimetric technique measurement system in the heat transfer laboratory, department of physics and dual degree engineering, Morehouse College. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed setting up of the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system to characterize shape and mass for individual biomass particles. Testing of the gravimetric system, and calibration of the cameras and imaging systems using known sizes of polystyrene particles are in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera

135

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J.

136

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells.

137

Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

138

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

139

Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid

140

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

Field, J.G.

1994-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

142

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Injectivity_Test_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511318

143

EA-1050: Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

50: Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project, Idaho Falls, 50: Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho EA-1050: Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project, Idaho Falls, Idaho SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's proposal to remove 344 canisters of Three Mile Island core debris and commercial fuels from the Test Area North Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel repository is available. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 6, 1996 EA-1050: Finding of No Significant Impact Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project

144

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for the Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area Corrective Action Unit 407 in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved Corrective Action Alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999). The RCRSA was used during May and June of 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, and personnel from the Clean Slate tests. The Constituents of Concern (COCs) identified during the site characterization include plutonium, uranium, and americium. No other COCS were identified. The following closure actions will be implemented under this plan: (1) Remove and dispose of surface soils which are over three times background for the area. Soils identified for removal will be disposed of at an approved disposal facility. Excavated areas will be backfilled with clean borrow soil fi-om a nearby location. (2) An engineered cover will be constructed over the waste disposal pit area where subsurface COCS will remain. (3) Upon completion of the closure and approval of the Closure Report by NDEP, administrative controls, use restrictions, and site postings will be used to prevent intrusive activities at the site. Barbed wire fencing will be installed along the perimeter of this unit. Post closure monitoring will consist of site inspections to determine the condition of the engineered cover. Any identified maintenance and repair requirements will be remedied within 90 working days of discovery and documented in writing at the time of repair. Results of all inspections/repairs for a given year will be addressed in a single report submitted annually to the NDEP.

T. M. Fitzmaurice

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1985-1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1985-1986) Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1985-1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1985-1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 1985 - 1986 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Understand the connectivity of the production and injection wells. Notes A long-term flow test was conducted involving one producing well (well 43-7), one injector (well 88-1), and two observation wells (well 66-6 and California Energy Co's well 71A-7). The flow test included a well production metering system and a water injection metering system. References Sanyal, S.; Menzies, A.; Granados, E.; Sugine, S.; Gentner, R.

146

Flow Test At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Flow Test At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes After the Welaco temperature survey was completed for TG52-7, preparations were completed for a controlled airlift test. This test was completed in the period from 19-20 September 2003 for some 23 hours. The well produced steady state flow of about 320-325 gpm at a wellhead temperature of 126.7degrees C (260degreesF). This production rate is equivalent to about 162,000 pounds per hour, with the production temperature producing usable

147

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding GRED II Notes Geothermal Resource Exploration and Definition Projects Raft River (GRED II): Re-assessment and testing of previously abandoned production wells. The objective of the U.S. Geothermal effort is to re-access the available wellbores, assess their condition, perform extensive testing of the reservoir to determine its productive capacity, and perform a resource utilization assessment. At the time of this paper, all five wells had been

148

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Raft River Geothermal Area (2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2006 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine field hydraulic conductivity using borehole impeller flowmeter data Notes A quantitative evaluation of borehole-impeller flowmeter data leads to estimated field hydraulic conductivity. Data were obtained during an injection test of a geothermal well at the Raft River geothermal test site in Idaho. Both stationary and trolling calibrations of the flowmeter were made in the well. Methods were developed to adjust for variations in hole

149

Solderability and environmental testing of Sn-plated surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of atmospheric corrosion on the solderability of Sn plated surfaces was evaluated with 60Sn-40Pb solder. Tin thicknesses of 10, 50, and 150 {mu}in on Ni plated Cu were studied. The 10 {mu}in. plating gave the smallest solder meniscus rise. A general decrease in contact angle, or increase in wettability, was observed with increasing Sn plating. The environmental exposures retarded the wetting rate and increased the time to maximum wetting, particularly with only 10 {mu}in. of Sn. Although the solderability of the 50 and 150 {mu}in. surfaces wee not significantly affected by the test conditions, an intermediate plating thickness of 100 {mu}in. is preferred for processing flexibility. 13 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Sorensen, N.R.; Hosking, F.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

F/H Area ETF effluent (H-016 outfall), ceriodaphnia survival/reproduction test, test date: March 21, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This toxicity test was conducted to determine if the effluent from the F/H area at Savannah River Plant affects the survival or reproduction of the test organisms during a seven day period. The test involved exposing the test organisms to a series of dilutions of the effluent. At each dilution the survival and reproduction of ten test organisms was recorded. Each effluent dilution was compared to a control set of test organisms. Survival data were analyzed by Fisher`s Exact Test and the Trimmed Spearman-Karber test to determine the effluent concentration necessary to cause statistically significant (p = 0.05) mortality. Reproduction data was analyzed for normality, homogeneity of variance and equality of replicates among dilutions to determine the appropriate statistical test for analysis of statistical differences in reproduction among dilutions. Results are summarized.

Specht, W.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

F/H Area ETF effluent (H-016 outfall), ceriodaphnia survival/reproduction test, test date: March 21, 1991  

SciTech Connect

This toxicity test was conducted to determine if the effluent from the F/H area at Savannah River Plant affects the survival or reproduction of the test organisms during a seven day period. The test involved exposing the test organisms to a series of dilutions of the effluent. At each dilution the survival and reproduction of ten test organisms was recorded. Each effluent dilution was compared to a control set of test organisms. Survival data were analyzed by Fisher's Exact Test and the Trimmed Spearman-Karber test to determine the effluent concentration necessary to cause statistically significant (p = 0.05) mortality. Reproduction data was analyzed for normality, homogeneity of variance and equality of replicates among dilutions to determine the appropriate statistical test for analysis of statistical differences in reproduction among dilutions. Results are summarized.

Specht, W.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

153

Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

154

Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Surface Gas Sampling At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Surface Gas Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

155

Flow Test At Chena Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2007) Chena Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Chena Area (Benoit, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Chena Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Dick Benoit, Gwen Holdmann, David Blackwell (2007) Low Cost Exploration, Testing, And Development Of The Chena Geothermal Resource Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Chena_Area_(Benoit,_Et_Al.,_2007)&oldid=387083" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services OpenEI partners with a broad range of international organizations to grow

156

Beam Test of a Large Area nonn Silicon Strip Detector with Fast Binary Readout Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beam Test of a Large Area n­on­n Silicon Strip Detector with Fast Binary Readout Electronics Y test was carried out for the non­irradiated and the irradiated detector modules. Efficiency, noise occupancy and performance in the edge regions were analyzed using the beam test data. High efficiency

157

Beam Test of a Large Area nonn Silicon Strip Detector with Fast Binary Readout Electronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Beam Test of a Large Area n­on­n Silicon Strip Detector with Fast Binary Readout Electronics Y modules was irradiated with protons to a fluence of 1.2 ? 10 14 p/cm 2 . A beam test was carried out in the edge regions were analyzed using the beam test data. High efficiency both for the non

158

Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed October 22, 2013 - 6:10pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment A new groundwater monitoring/validation (MV) well was installed at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) in September 2013. LM proposed this well to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to enhance the existing monitoring network and to expedite the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) closure process for the CNTA Subsurface Corrective Action Unit. CNTA is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, adjacent to U.S. Highway 6, about 30 miles north of Warm Springs, Nevada. CNTA was the site of "Project Faultless," a test site where a

159

Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed Construction of MV-6 Well Pad at the Central Nevada Test Area Completed October 22, 2013 - 6:10pm Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment A new groundwater monitoring/validation (MV) well was installed at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) in September 2013. LM proposed this well to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) to enhance the existing monitoring network and to expedite the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) closure process for the CNTA Subsurface Corrective Action Unit. CNTA is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, adjacent to U.S. Highway 6, about 30 miles north of Warm Springs, Nevada. CNTA was the site of "Project Faultless," a test site where a

160

F/H Area ETF effluent (H-016 outfall) ceriodaphnia survival/reproduction test, test date: December 28, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This toxicity test was conducted to determine if the effluent from the H/F area of Savannah River Plant affect the survival or reproduction of the test organisms during a seven day period. The test involved exposing the test organisms to a series of dilutions of the effluent. At each dilution the survival and reproduction of ten test organisms was recorded. Each effluent dilution was compared to a control set of test organisms. Survival data were analyzed by Fisher`s Exact Test and Probit Analysis to determine the effluent concentration necessary to cause statistically significant (p=0.05) mortality. Reproduction data was analyzed for normality, homogeneity of variance and equality of replicates among dilutions to determine the appropriate statistical test for analysis of statistical differences in reproduction among dilutions. Results are summarized.

Specht, W.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

F/H Area ETF effluent (H-016 outfall) ceriodaphnia survival/reproduction test, test date: December 28, 1989  

SciTech Connect

This toxicity test was conducted to determine if the effluent from the H/F area of Savannah River Plant affect the survival or reproduction of the test organisms during a seven day period. The test involved exposing the test organisms to a series of dilutions of the effluent. At each dilution the survival and reproduction of ten test organisms was recorded. Each effluent dilution was compared to a control set of test organisms. Survival data were analyzed by Fisher's Exact Test and Probit Analysis to determine the effluent concentration necessary to cause statistically significant (p=0.05) mortality. Reproduction data was analyzed for normality, homogeneity of variance and equality of replicates among dilutions to determine the appropriate statistical test for analysis of statistical differences in reproduction among dilutions. Results are summarized.

Specht, W.L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Corrective action investigation plan for CAU Number 453: Area 9 Landfill, Tonopah Test Range  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 9 Landfill, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 453/Corrective Action (CAS) 09-55-001-0952, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The Area 9 Landfill is located northwest of Area 9 on the TTR. The landfill cells associated with CAU 453 were excavated to receive waste generated from the daily operations conducted at Area 9 and from range cleanup which occurred after test activities.

NONE

1997-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

163

ENVIRONMENTAL IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE IlONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1975 Nonitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT(26-1)-539 for the U . S . ENERGY RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION EMSL-LV-5 39-4 May 1976 ENVIRONMENTAL 14ONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December I975 Monitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 APRIL 1976 This work performed under a Memorandum of

164

Characterization Report for the 92-Acre Area of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. This report summarizes characterization and monitoring work pertinent to the 92-Acre Area in the southeast part of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites. The decades of characterization and assessment work at the Area 5 RWMS indicate that the access controls, waste operation practices, site design, final cover design, site setting, and arid natural environment contribute to a containment system that meets regulatory requirements and performance objectives for the short- and long-term protection of the environment and public. The available characterization and Performance Assessment information is adequate to support design of the final cover and development of closure plans. No further characterization is warranted to demonstrate regulatory compliance. U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office is proceeding with the development of closure plans for the six closure units of the 92-Acre Area.

Bechtel Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium.

King, David E. (Lakewood, CO); Herdt, Gregory C. (Denver, CO); Czanderna, Alvin W. (Denver, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Self assembled molecular monolayers on high surface area materials as molecular getters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to a gettering material that may be used as a filtration medium to remove pollutants from the environment. The gettering material comprises a high surface area material having a metal surface that chemically bonds n-alkanethiols in an organized manner thereby forming a molecular monolayer over the metal surface. The n-alkanethiols have a free functional group that interacts with the environment thereby binding specific pollutants that may be present. The gettering material may be exposed to streams of air in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems or streams of water to remove specific pollutants from either medium. 9 figs.

King, D.E.; Herdt, G.C.; Czanderna, A.W.

1997-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

167

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range, approximately 386 kilometers (240 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 425 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 consisted of a large pile of concrete rubble from the original Hard Target and construction debris associated with the Tornado Rocket Sled Tests. CAU 425 was closed in accordance with the FFACO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2002). CAU 425 was closed by implementing the following corrective actions: The approved corrective action for this unit was clean closure. Closure activities included: (1) Removal of all the debris from the site. (2) Weighing each load of debris leaving the job site. (3) Transporting the debris to the U.S. Air Force Construction Landfill for disposal. (4) Placing the radioactive material in a U.S. Department of Transportation approved container for proper transport and disposal. (5) Transporting the radioactive material to the Nevada Test Site for disposal. (6) Regrading the job site to its approximate original contours/elevation.

K. B. Campbell

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Corrective action plan for corrective action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mercury Fire Training Pit is a former fire training area located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Mercury Fire Training Pit was used from approximately 1965 to the early 1990s to train fire-fighting personnel at the NTS, and encompasses an area approximately 107 meters (m) (350 feet [ft]) by 137 m (450 ft). The Mercury Fire Training Pit formerly included a bermed burn pit with four small burn tanks, four large above ground storage tanks an overturned bus, a telephone pole storage area, and areas for burning sheds, pallets, and cables. Closure activities will include excavation of the impacted soil in the aboveground storage tank and burn pit areas to a depth of 1.5 m (5 ft), and excavation of the impacted surface soil downgradient of the former ASTs and burnpit areas to a depth of 0.3 m (1 ft). Excavated soil will be disposed in the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill at the NTS.

Nacht, S.

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

170

Flow Test At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (DOE GTP) Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Pilgrim Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References (1 January 2011) GTP ARRA Spreadsheet Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Pilgrim_Hot_Springs_Area_(DOE_GTP)&oldid=402456" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities ARRA Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 1863028959 Varnish cache server

171

Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geodetic Survey At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Nevada Test And Training Range Area Exploration Technique Geodetic Survey Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes NAFR straddles the boundary of the Walker Lane belt and the Basin and Range extensional province. Neotectonic motions are inferred from GPS and seismic observations. GPS velocities indicate that the strain field changes from the east-west extension typical of the Basin and Range to the northwest-southeast-directed transtension characteristic of the Walker Lane belt across the region.

172

Injectivity Test At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Injectivity Test At Newberry Caldera Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Newberry Caldera Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes After circulating the mud out of the hole and replacing it with clear water, we attempted two injection tests; one into the open hole section (51 16'- 5360') below the HQ liner, and one into the annulus outside the uncemented part (2748' - -4800') of the liner. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration

173

Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Water samples were collected during nitrogen-stimulated flow tests in 1978, but no information was provided on sampling conditions. The well was flowed again for the last time in 1982, but the flow test lasted only 1 h (Thompson, 1985). References Cathy J. Janik, Marcia K. McLaren (2010) Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two

174

Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1978 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Results of Electric Survey in the Area of Hawaii Geothermal Test Well HGP-A...

175

Nevada Test Site Area 25. Radiological survey and cleanup project, 1974-1983. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes radiological survey, decontamination and decommissioning of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 25 facilities and land areas incorporated in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station (NRDS). Buildings, facilities and support systems used after 1959 for nuclear reactor and engine testing were surveyed for the presence of radioactive contamination. The cleanup was part of the Surplus Facilities Management Program funded by the Department of Energy's Richland Operations Office. The radiological survey portion of the project encompassed portable instrument surveys and removable contamination surveys (swipe) for alpha and beta plus gamma radiation contamination of facilities, equipment and land areas. Soil sampling was also accomplished. The majority of Area 25 facilities and land areas have been returned to unrestricted use. Remaining radiologically contaminated areas are posted with warning signs and barricades. 12 figures.

McKnight, R.K.; Rosenberry, C.E.; Orcutt, J.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental insulation, mantle cooling, and the surface area of oceans and continents A. Lenardica, Rice University, Houston, TX 77251-1892, United States b School of Mathematical Sciences, Building 28 May 2005 Abstract It is generally assumed that continents, acting as thermal insulation above

Manga, Michael

177

Aquifer Testing Recommendations for Supporting Phase II of the T Area Technetium-99 Data Objectives Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aquifer characterization needs are currently being assessed to optimize pump-and-treat remedial strategies within the 200-ZP-1 operable unit, specifically for the immediate area of the 241-T Tank Farm. This report provides a general discussion of the six identified hydrologic test methods for possible subsequent characterization within the 241-T Tank Farm area and details for implementing the large-scale recovery test after terminating pumping at the 241-Tank Farm extraction well locations.

Spane, Frank A.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

178

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This corrective action plan provides the closure implementation methods for the Area 3 Landfill Complex, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 424, located at the Tonopah Test Range. The Area 3 Landfill Complex consists of 8 landfill sites, each designated as a separate corrective action site.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

179

Closure report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations steam-cleaning discharge area, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) provides documentation of the completed corrective action at the Area 12 Fleet Operations site located in the southeast portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Field work was performed in July 1997 as outlined in the Corrective Action Plan (CAP). The CAP was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in June 1997. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) Number 12-19-01 and is the only CAS in Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. The former Area 12 Fleet Operations Building 12-16 functioned as a maintenance facility for light- and heavy-duty vehicles from approximately 1965 to January 1993. Services performed at the site included steam-cleaning, tire service, and preventative maintenance on vehicles and equipment. Past activities impacted the former steam-cleaning discharge area with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as oil.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Geology and surface geochemistry of the Roosevelt Springs Known Geothermal Resource Area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available data on the Roosevelt area were synthesized to determine the spatial arrangement of the rocks, and the patterns of mass and energy flow within them. The resulting model lead to a new interpretation of the geothermal system, and provided ground truth for evaluating the application of soil geochemistry to exploration for concealed geothermal fields. Preliminary geochemical studies comparing the surface microlayer to conventional soil sampling methods indicated both practical and chemical advantages for the surface microlayer technique, which was particularly evident in the case of As, Sb and Cs. Subsequent multi-element analyses of surface microlayer samples collected over an area of 100 square miles were processed to produce single element contour maps for 41 chemical parameters. Computer manipulation of the multi-element data using R-mode factor analysis provided the optimum method of interpretation of the surface microlayer data. A trace element association of As, Sb and Cs in the surface microlayer provided the best indication of the leakage of geothermal solutions to the surface, while regional mercury trends may reflect the presence of a mercury vapour anomaly above a concealed heat source.

Lovell, J.S.; Meyer, W.T.; Atkinson, D.J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Private Water Well Testing in Areas Impacted by Marcellus Shale Gas Drilling (Updated November 15th in the absence of shale-gas drilling, well owners are strongly encouraged to evaluate their water on a regular testing in order to more specifically document potential impacts of Marcellus Shale gas development

Manning, Sturt

182

Injectivity Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Part of the injection testing used downhole packers for isolating various zones and evaluating their permeability. By running the packers into the hole on N-rod ( 2.75"+K610 OD), the annulus was roughly the same cross-sectional area as the inside of the pipe. It was then possible to inject into either the zone above the packer or the one below, and compare the infectivity of those intervals. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr., Ronald D. Jacobsen, Gene Polik (1999) Slimhole Handbook- Procedures And Recommendations For Slimhole Drilling And Testing In Geothermal Exploration

183

Thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tracer tests for determining fracture-matrix heat transfer area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in FracturedFRACTURE-MATRIX HEAT TRANSFER AREA Karsten Pruess andimprove the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the

Pruess, K.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Uncertainty Studies of Real Anode Surface Area in Computational Analysis for Molten Salt Electrorefining  

SciTech Connect

This study examines how much cell potential changes with five differently assumed real anode surface area cases. Determining real anode surface area is a significant issue to be resolved for precisely modeling molten salt electrorefining. Based on a three-dimensional electrorefining model, calculated cell potentials compare with an experimental cell potential variation over 80 hours of operation of the Mark-IV electrorefiner with driver fuel from the Experimental Breeder Reactor II. We succeeded to achieve a good agreement with an overall trend of the experimental data with appropriate selection of a mode for real anode surface area, but there are still local inconsistencies between theoretical calculation and experimental observation. In addition, the results were validated and compared with two-dimensional results to identify possible uncertainty factors that had to be further considered in a computational electrorefining analysis. These uncertainty factors include material properties, heterogeneous material distribution, surface roughness, and current efficiency. Zirconium's abundance and complex behavior have more impact on uncertainty towards the latter period of electrorefining at given batch of fuel. The benchmark results found that anode materials would be dissolved from both axial and radial directions at least for low burn-up metallic fuels after active liquid sodium bonding was dissolved.

Sungyeol Choi; Jaeyeong Park; Robert O. Hoover; Supathorn Phongikaroon; Michael F. Simpson; Kwang-Rag Kim; Il Soon Hwang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Radiation shielding calculations for MuCool test area at Fermilab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets being developed for cooling intense muon beams. In this shielding study the results of Monte Carlo radiation shielding calculations performed using the MARS14 code for the MuCool Test Area and including the downstream portion of the target hall and berm around it, access pit, service building, and parking lot are presented and discussed within the context of the proposed MTA experimental configuration.

Igor Rakhno; Carol Johnstone

2004-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 490, Station 44 Burn Area is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). CAU 490 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and includes for Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) Fire Training Area (CAS 03-56-001-03BA); (2) Station 44 Burn Area (CAS RG-56-001-RGBA); (3) Sandia Service Yard (CAS 03-58-001-03FN); and (4) Gun Propellant Burn Area (CAS 09-54-001-09L2).

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2010  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of Navarro-Interra LLC, and supports environmental restoration efforts by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office. Safety decisions must be made before a surface crater area, or potential surface crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and surface crater formation are input into their safety decisions. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the surface collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, and ground motion. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty.

Pawloski, G A

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

188

Injectivity Test At Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Vale Hot Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Vale Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Injectivity Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analysis of the two injection tests performed at the exploration slimhole site during May, 1995 yielded estimates for the permeability-thickness product (transmissivity) kh of 0.25 and 0.23 Da-fi, based on pressure fall off after injection (see Section IV-a). Using the pressure buildup for the second test, a transmissivity of 0.610 Da-ft was estimated. These estimates are approximately an order of magnitude smaller than the kh values estimated for the nearby A-Alt well which was tested in 1994. References Jim Combs, John T. Finger, Colin Goranson, Charles E. Hockox Jr.,

189

Flow Test At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Flow Test At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Long Valley Caldera Area (Farrar, Et Al., 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The pressure data collected during a 50-h-long flow test at LVEW in September 2001 are best matched using solutions for a flow system consisting of a steeply dipping fracture with infinite hydraulic conductivity, surrounded by a finite-conductivity rock matrix. At shallow

190

Microsoft Word - Poster Abstract_2010_CMU_High Surface Area Materials.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1th Annual SECA Workshop Poster Abstract 1th Annual SECA Workshop Poster Abstract Topic: High Surface Area, Mesoporous (La, Sr)MnO 3 For Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes Robin Chao, Graduate Student in Carnegie Mellon University 5700 Bunkerhill St. Apt 705, Pittsburgh, PA 15206 USA, hchao@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-260-5687 Dr. John Kitchin, Professor of Chemical Engineering in Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh PA, 15213, jkitchin@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-268-7803 Dr. Paul Salvador, Professor of Material Science and Engineering in Carnegie Mellon University 149 Roberts Eng Hall, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, paul7@andrew.cmu.edu, 412-268-2702 Abstract: The efficiency of the solid oxide fuel cell is limited by the cathode polarizations. One essential approach is to include high-surface-area cathode materials into the fabrication. However, conventional synthesis methods to

191

Surface area generation and droplet size control in solvent extraction systems utilizing high intensity electric fields  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for solvent extraction where droplets are shattered by a high intensity electric field. These shattered droplets form a plurality of smaller droplets which have a greater combined surface area than the original droplet. Dispersion, coalescence and phase separation are accomplished in one vessel through the use of the single pulsing high intensity electric field. Electric field conditions are chosen so that simultaneous dispersion and coalescence are taking place in the emulsion formed in the electric field. The electric field creates a large amount of interfacial surface area for solvent extraction when the droplet is disintegrated and is capable of controlling droplet size and thus droplet stability. These operations take place in the presence of a counter current flow of the continuous phase.

Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Wham, Robert M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate Surface Area and Enzymatic Digestibility  

SciTech Connect

To clarify the specific effect of biomass substrate surface area on its enzymatic digestibility, factors of fiber size reduction and swelling changes were investigated by using poplar substrates with controlled morphological and chemical properties after modified chemical pulping. Results showed that fiber size changes had insignificant influence on enzymatic hydrolysis, although the external surface area increased up to 41% with the reduction of fiber size. Swelling changes caused by increased biomass fiber porosities after PFI refining showed a significant influence on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. It is also found that chemical properties such as xylan and lignin content can influence the swelling effect. Xylan is confirmed to facilitate substrate hydrolysability by swelling, while lignin restricts swelling effect and thus minimizes the enzyme accessibility to substrates.

Ju, Xiaohui; Grego, Courtnee; Zhang, Xiao

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2005 to December 31, 2005 which covers the third six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse continued to obtain additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in the last reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has obtained raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (C{sub d}/m) information for several biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated in the last reporting period. Preliminary results of the mean mass and the shape data obtained are reported here, and more data collection is in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

SURFACE AREA, VOLUME, MASS, AND DENSITY DISTRIBUTIONS FOR SIZED BIOMASS PARTICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This semi-annual technical progress report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period January 01, 2006 to June 30, 2006 which covers the fourth six months of the project. Presently work is in progress to characterize surface area, volume, mass, and density distributions for sized biomass particles. During this reporting period, Morehouse completed obtaining additional mean mass measurements for biomass particles employing the gravimetric technique measurement system that was set up in a previous reporting period. Simultaneously, REM, our subcontractor, has completed obtaining raw data for surface area, volume, and drag coefficient to mass ratio (Cd/m) information for 9 more biomass particles employing the electrodynamic balance (EDB) measurement system that was calibrated before in this project. Results of the mean mass data obtained to date are reported here, and analysis of the raw data collected by REM is in progress.

Ramanathan Sampath

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

195

Relationships between gas-liquid interfacial surface area, liquid saturation, and light transmission in variably saturated porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relationships between gas-liquid interfacial surface area, liquid saturation, and light transmission in variably saturated porous media Abstract Liquid saturation and gas-liquid interfacial area the specific gas-liquid interfacial area from the area under the primarydrainage branch of the Seff -h

Weisbrod, Noam

196

Synthetic process for preparation of high surface area electroactive compounds for battery applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the preparation of electroactive cathode compounds useful in lithium-ion batteries, comprising exothermic mixing of low-cost precursors and calcination under appropriate conditions. The exothermic step may be a spontaneous flameless combustion reaction. The disclosed process can be used to prepare any lithium metal phosphate or lithium mixed metal phosphate as a high surface area single phase compound.

Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

197

Flow Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Flow_Test_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511312" Category: Exploration Activities What links here Related changes

198

Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Modeling-Computer Simulations At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Nevada Test And Training Range Area Exploration Technique Modeling-Computer Simulations Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR) occupies over 3 million acres in southern Nevada (Figure 1). We recently assessed potential utility-grade geothermal

199

Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lake City site, which is located in far northeastern California, consists of a previously identified geothermal site that has been explored with both geophysics and drilling (Hedel, 1981), but has not been

200

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package  

SciTech Connect

Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume IV - Hydrologic Parameter Data Documentation Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume IV of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the hydrologic parameter data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VIII - Risk Assessment Documentation Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume VIII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the risk assessment documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Lithology and Stratigraphy of Holes Drilled in LANL-Use Areas of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Geologic data for ten holes drilled in areas used by Los Alamos National Laboratory at the Nevada Test Site are presented in this report. The holes include emplacement holes, instrumentation holes, and Underground Test Area wells drilled during calendar years 1991 through 1995. For each hole a stratigraphic log, a detailed lithologic log, and one or two geologic cross sections are presented, along with a supplemental data sheet containing information about the drilling operations, geology, or references. For three of the holes, graphic data summary sheets with geologic and geophysical data are provided as plates.

Lance B. Prothro; Sigmund L. Drellack, Jr.; Brian M. Allen

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Tests - 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done at the request of National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) and supports the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration for the Nevada Site Office Borehole Management Program (BMP). The primary objective of this program is to close (plug) weapons program legacy boreholes that are deemed no longer useful. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Our statements on cavity collapse and crater formation are input into their safety decisions. The BMP is an on-going program to address hundreds of boreholes at the NTS. Each year NSTec establishes a list of holes to be addressed. They request the assistance of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory Containment Programs to provide information related to the evolution of collapse history and make statements on completeness of collapse as relates to surface crater stability. These statements do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who had been active in weapons testing activities performed these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 3 LLNL test locations in areas 2 and 12: Kennebec in U2af, Cumberland in U2e, and Yuba in U12b.10.

Pawloski, G A

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

205

HYDROLASING OF CONTAMINATED UNDERWATER BASIN SURFACES AT THE HANFORD K-AREA  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses selecting and Implementing hydrolasing technology to reduce radioactive contamination in preparing to dispose of the K Basins; two highly contaminated concrete basins at the Hanford Site. A large collection of spent nuclear fuel stored for many years underwater at the K Basins has been removed to stable, dry, safe storage. Remediation activities have begun for the remaining highly contaminated water, sludge, and concrete basin structures. Hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate and prepare the basin structures for disposal. The U. S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site is considered the world's largest environmental cleanup project. The site covers 1,517 Km{sup 2} (586 square miles) along the Columbia River in an arid region of the northwest United States (U.S.). Hanford is the largest of the US former nuclear defense production sites. From the World War II era of the mid-1940s until the late-1980s when production stopped, Hanford produced 60 percent of the plutonium for nuclear defense and, as a consequence, produced a significant amount of environmental pollution now being addressed. Spent nuclear fuel was among the major challenges for DOE's environmental cleanup mission at Hanford. The end of production left Hanford with about 105,000 irradiated, solid uranium metal fuel assemblies--representing approximately 2,100 metric tons (80 percent of DOE's spent nuclear fuel). The fuel was ultimately stored in the K Basins water-filled, concrete basins attached to Hanford's K East (KE) and K West (KW) reactors. K Basin's fuel accounted for 95 percent of the total radioactivity in Hanford's former reactor production areas. Located about 457 meters (500 yards) from the Columbia River, the K Basins are two indoor, rectangular structures of reinforced concrete; each filled with more than 3.8 million liters (one million gallons) of water that has become highly contaminated with long-lived radionuclides. At the KW Basin, fuel was packaged and sealed in canisters. At the KE Basin, fuel was stored in open canisters that were exposed to water in the basin. The irradiated spent nuclear fuel corroded during long-term, wet storage; resulting in thousands of fuel assemblies becoming severely corroded and/or damaged. Corrosion, especially in the KE Basin, contributed to the formation of a layer of radioactive sludge in the basins. Sludge removal is now progressing and will be followed by dewatering and dispositioning the concrete structures. The DOE Richland Operations Office (RL) has given Fluor Hanford Inc./Fluor Government Group (Fluor) the task of preparing Hanford's K Basins for decontamination and disposal. Prior to dewatering, hydrolasing will be used to decontaminate the basin surfaces to prepare them for disposal. By removing highly contaminated surface layers of concrete, hydrolasing will be used to meet the dose objectives for protecting workers and complying with regulations for transporting demolition debris. Fluor has innovated, tested, and planned the application of the hydrolasing technology to meet the challenge of decontaminating highly radioactive concrete surfaces underwater. Newly existing technology is being adapted to this unique challenge.

CHRONISTER, G.B.

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

206

Use of the WECC WAMS in Wide Area Probing Tests for Validation of System Performance & Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During 2005 and 2006 the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) performed three major tests of western system dynamics. These tests used a Wide Area Measurement System (WAMS) based primarily on Phasor Measurement Units (PMUs) to determine response to events including the insertion of the 1400-MW Chief Joseph braking resistor, probing signals, and ambient events. Test security was reinforced through real-time analysis of wide area effects, and high-quality data provided dynamic profiles for interarea modes across the entire western interconnection. The tests established that low-level optimized pseudo-random 20-MW probing with the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI) roughly doubles the apparent noise that is natural to the power system, providing sharp dynamic information with negligible interference to system operations. Such probing is an effective alternative to use of the 1400-MW Chief Joseph dynamic brake, and it is under consideration as a standard means for assessing dynamic security.

Hauer, John F.; Mittelstadt, William; Martin, Kenneth E.; Burns, J. W.; Lee, Harry; Pierre, John W.; Trudnowski, Daniel

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Radiation shielding issues for MuCool test area at Fermilab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MuCool Test Area (MTA) is an intense primary beam facility derived directly from the Fermilab Linac to test heat deposition and other technical concerns associated with the liquid hydrogen targets being developed for cooling intense muon beams. In this study the origin of the outgoing collimated neutron beam is examined. An alternative shielding option for MTA is investigated as well as the hypothetical worst case of experimental setup is considered.

Rakhno, I.; Johnstone, C.; /Fermilab

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Offsite environmental monitoring report. Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A principal activity of the Offsite Radiological Safety Program is routine environmental monitoring for radioactive materials in various media and for radiation in areas which may be affected by nuclear tests. It is conducted to document compliance with standards, to identify trends, and to provide information to the public. This report summarizes these activities for CY 1982.

Black, S. C.; Grossman, R. F.; Mullen, A. A.; Potter, G. D.; Smith, D. D. [comps.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Closure report for housekeeping category, Corrective Action Unit 349, Area 12, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Closure Report summarizes the corrective actions which were completed at the Corrective Action Sites within Corrective Action Unit 349 Area 12 at the Nevada Test Site. Current site descriptions, observations and identification of wastes removed are included on FFACO Corrective Action Site housekeeping closure verification forms.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

None

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 453: Area 9 UXO Landfill, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This corrective action plan proposes the closure method for the area 9 unexploded Ordnance landfill, corrective action unit 453 located at the Tonopah Test Range. The area 9 UXO landfill consists of corrective action site no. 09-55-001-0952 and is comprised of three individual landfill cells designated as A9-1, A9-2, and A9-3. The three landfill cells received wastes from daily operations at area 9 and from range cleanups which were performed after weapons testing. Cell locations and contents were not well documented due to the unregulated disposal practices commonly associated with early landfill operations. However, site process knowledge indicates that the landfill cells were used for solid waste disposal, including disposal of UXO.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Statistical Test of the Distribution of Sea Surface Deflection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the common statistical tests are based upon statistically independent data. Many observations of physical phenomena are statistically dependent, as is indicated by the sample-autocorrelation function. In this paper, a test is presented ...

A. P. J. Abrahamse; J. van Heteren; A. P. Roskam; J. Bouman

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Radiation shielding tests in the Meson beamline in the master substation area  

SciTech Connect

A review of shielding uncovered a weak region in a portion of the proton beam transport to the Meson Area. Preliminary CASIM Monte Carlo studies indicated dose rates at the surface under abnormal operating conditions would be above the Fermilab Radiation Guide limits. Measurements made on December 15 and 16 confirmed this concern. Further comparisons of data with CASIM predictions are discussed. 5 refs., 22 figs., 8 tabs.

Coleman, R.; Kissel, W.; Leveling, A.; Moore, C.D.; Vylet, V.

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

Irene Farnham

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emission Testing of Washington Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses M. Melendez, J. Taylor, and J. Zuboy National Renewable Energy Laboratory W.S. Wayne West Virginia University D. Smith U.S. Department of Energy Technical Report NREL/TP-540-36355 December 2005 Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses M. Melendez, J. Taylor, and J. Zuboy National Renewable Energy Laboratory W.S. Wayne West Virginia University D. Smith U.S. Department of Energy Prepared under Task No. FC05-9000 Technical Report NREL/TP-540-36355 December 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov

216

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

217

Validation Analysis of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Central Nevada Test Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site undergoing environmental restoration. The CNTA is located about 95 km northeast of Tonopah, Nevada, and 175 km southwest of Ely, Nevada (Figure 1.1). It was the site of the Faultless underground nuclear test conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (DOE's predecessor agency) in January 1968. The purposes of this test were to gauge the seismic effects of a relatively large, high-yield detonation completed in Hot Creek Valley (outside the Nevada Test Site [NTS]) and to determine the suitability of the site for future large detonations. The yield of the Faultless underground nuclear test was between 200 kilotons and 1 megaton (DOE, 2000). A three-dimensional flow and transport model was created for the CNTA site (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and determined acceptable by DOE and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for predicting contaminant boundaries for the site.

A. Hassan; J. Chapman; H. Bekhit; B. Lyles; K. Pohlmann

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

218

Comparison of equilibria and kinetics of high surface area activated carbon produced from different precursors and by different chemical treatments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activated carbons prepared by chemical activation of coal and macadamia nutshell precursors with KOH and ZnCl{sub 2} have been studied in terms of their equilibrium and dynamic characteristics. These characteristics were then related to the micropore properties: surface area, volume, and half-width. Volumetric techniques were used for equilibria characterization and an FT-IR batch adsorber for dynamics. Carbons activated by KOH resulted in a more microporous structure, while those activated by zinc chloride were more mesoporous. High surface area samples were further studied in terms of their methane adsorption uptake. It was found that nutshell-derived activated carbons have a higher adsorption capacity per unit mass than those derived from coal; however, this was offset by lower particle density (mass/volume). High-pressure (2 GPa) pelletization of the carbons used for dynamic testing had a detrimental effect on capacity, presumably from pore collapse. Dynamic characteristics were found to be rather similar between the samples, with those treated with KOH displaying slower adsorption time scales.

Ahmadpour, A.; King, B.A.; Do, D.D. [Univ. of Queensland, St. Lucia, Queensland (Australia)

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Porosity and surface area evolution during weathering of two igneous rocks  

SciTech Connect

During weathering, rocks release nutrients and storewater vital for growth ofmicrobial and plant life. Thus, the growth of porosity as weathering advances into bedrock is a life-sustaining process for terrestrial ecosystems. Here, we use small-angle and ultra small-angle neutron scattering to show how porosity develops during initial weathering under tropical conditions of two igneous rock compositions, basaltic andesite and quartz diorite. The quartz diorite weathers spheroidally while the basaltic andesite does not. The weathering advance rates of the two systems also differ, perhaps due to this difference in mechanism, from 0.24 to 100 mm kyr1, respectively. The scattering data document how surfaces inside the feldspar-dominated rocks change as weathering advances into the protolith. In the unaltered rocks, neutrons scatter fromtwo types of featureswhose dimensions vary from6 nmto 40 lm: pores and bumps on pore grain surfaces. These features result in scattering data for both unaltered rocks that document multi-fractal behavior: scattering is best described by amass fractal dimension (Dm) and a surface fractal dimension (Ds) for features of length scales greater than and less than 1 lm, respectively. In the basaltic andesite, Dm is approximately 2.9 and Ds is approximately 2.7. The mechanism of solute transport during weathering of this rock is diffusion. Porosity and surface area increase from 1.5%to 8.5%and 3 to 23 m2 g1 respectively in a relatively consistent trend across themm-thick plagioclase reaction front. Across this front, both fractal dimensions decrease, consistentwith development of amoremonodisperse pore networkwith smoother pore surfaces. Both changes are consistent largely with increasing connectivity of pores without significant surface roughening, as expected for transport-limited weathering. In contrast, porosity and surface area increase from 1.3% to 9.5% and 1.5 to 13 m2 g1 respectively across a many cm-thick reaction front in the spheroidally weathering quartz diorite. In that rock, Dm is approximately 2.8 andDs is approximately 2.5 prior to weathering. These two fractals transform during weathering to multiple surface fractals as micro-cracking reduces the size of diffusion-limited subzones of thematrix.Across the reaction front of plagioclase in the quartz diorite, the specific surface area and porosity change very little until the pointwhere the rock disaggregates into saprolite. The different patterns in porosity development of the two rocks are attributed to advective infiltration plus diffusion in the rock that spheroidally fractures versus diffusion-only in the rock that does not. Fracturing apparently diminishes the size of the diffusion-limited parts of the spheroidally weathering rock system to promote infiltration of meteoric fluids, thereforeexplaining the faster weathering advance rate into that rock.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis [Colorado School of Mines, Golden; Cole, David [Ohio State University; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Jin, Lixin [University of Texas, El Paso; Buss, Heather [University of Bristol, UK; Brantley, S. L. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2011-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Testing for Deterministic Trends in Global Sea Surface Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term variability in global sea surface temperature (SST) is often quantified by the slope from a linear regression fit. Attention is then focused on assessing the statistical significance of the derived slope parameter, but the adequacy of ...

Susana M. Barbosa

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 407: Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 407, Roller Coaster RADSAFE Area (RCRSA), under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located on Tonopah Test Range (TTR), CAU 407 is located approximately 140 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, and five miles south of Area 3. The RCRSA was used during May and June of 1963 to decontaminate vehicles, equipment, and personnel from the Clean Slate tests. As a result of these operations, the surface and subsurface soils in the area have been impacted by plutonium and other contaminants of potential concern associated with decontamination activities. In June and July 1998, corrective action investigation activities were performed at CAU 407 (as outlined in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan [CAIP]). The purpose of this investigation was to determine if any analytes were present at the site in concentrations above the preliminary action levels (PALs). The results indicated in the detection of plutonium above the PAL in samples taken from surface and subsurface soil within the exclusion zone, and uranium and americium detected above the PAL in samples taken from surface soil within the exclusion zone. No other COCs were identified above PALs specified in the CAIP. Based on this data, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were defined: (1) to prevent or mitigate human exposure to surface and subsurface soil containing COCs, and (2) to prevent adverse impacts to groundwater quality. To accomplish these objectives, five CAAs were developed and evaluated. Based on the results of the detailed and comparative analysis of these alternatives, Alternative 3 (Partial Excavation, Disposal, and Administrative Controls With a Surface Cap) was chosen as the preferred alternative. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated, the applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, the CAOs under DOE Order 5400.5 and 10 Code of Federal Regulations 20, and the reduction of potential future exposure pathways to subsurface contaminated soil.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

1999-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

224

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) has been prepared for the Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps (CWD), Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143 in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order [FFACO] (FFACO, 1996) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 143: Area 25, Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. CAU 143 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09 CWD No.1, and 25-23-03 CWD No.2. The Area 25 CWDs are historic disposal units within the Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD), and Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) compounds located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The R-MAD and E-MAD facilities originally supported a portion of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station in Area 25 of the NTS. CWD No.1 CAS 25-23-09 received solid radioactive waste from the R-MAD Compound (East Trestle and West Trench Berms) and 25-23-03 CWD No.2 received solid radioactive waste from the E-MAD Compound (E-MAD Trench).

D. S. Tobiason

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Cleanup and treatment (CAT) test: a land-area decontamination project utilizing a vacuum method of soil removal  

SciTech Connect

Areas 11 and 13 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) are contaminated with varying concentrations of Pu-239, 240 and Am-241. An investigation of a vacuum method of soil removal, the Cleanup and Treatment (CAT) test, was conducted over a 3-month period in the plutonium safety shot or Plutonium Valley portion of Area 11. Soil in Plutonium Valley is of the Aridisol Order. The surface 0 to 10 cm is a gravelly loam, and is strongly alkaline (pH 8.8). A large truck-mounted vacuum unit, rather than conventional earth-moving equipment, was used as the primary soil collection unit. Effectiveness of the vacuum method of soil removal was evaluated in relation to conventional earthmoving procedures, particularly in terms of volume reduction of removed soil achieved over conventional techniques. Radiological safety considerations associated with use of the vacuum unit were evaluated in relation to their impact on a full-scale land decontamination program. Environmental and operational impacts of devegetation with retention of root crowns or root systems were investigated. It is concluded that the CAT test was successful under difficult environmental conditions.

Orcutt, J.A.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

The Effects of Remotely Sensed Plant Functional Type and Leaf Area Index on Simulations of Boreal Forest Surface Fluxes by the NCAR Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The land surface models used with atmospheric models typically characterize landscapes in terms of generalized biome types. However, the advent of highspatial resolution satellite-derived data products such as land cover and leaf area index (LAI)...

Keith W. Oleson; Gordon B. Bonan

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

Susan Evans

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Borehole and geohydrologic data for test hole USW UZ-6, Yucca Mountain area, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Test hole USW UZ-6, located 1.8 kilometers west of the Nevada Test Site on a major north-trending ridge at Yucca Mountain, was dry drilled in Tertiary tuff to a depth of 575 meters. The area near this site is being considered by the US Department of Energy for potential construction of a high-level, radioactive-waste repository. Test hole USW UZ-6 is one of seven test holes completed in the unsaturated zone as part of the US Geological Survey`s Yucca Mountain Project to characterize the potential repository site. Data pertaining to borehole drilling and construction, lithology of geologic units penetrated, and laboratory analyses for hydrologic characteristics of samples of drill-bit cuttings are included in this report.

Whitfield, M.S. Jr.; Loskot, C.L. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Cope, C.M. [Foothill Engineering Consultants, Inc., Golden, CO (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Langasite Surface Acoustic Wave Sensors: Fabrication and Testing  

SciTech Connect

We report on the development of harsh-environment surface acoustic wave sensors for wired and wireless operation. Surface acoustic wave devices with an interdigitated transducer emitter and multiple reflectors were fabricated on langasite substrates. Both wired and wireless temperature sensing was demonstrated using radar-mode (pulse) detection. Temperature resolution of better than 0.5C was achieved between 200C and 600C. Oxygen sensing was achieved by depositing a layer of ZnO on the propagation path. Although the ZnO layer caused additional attenuation of the surface wave, oxygen sensing was accomplished at temperatures up to 700C. The results indicate that langasite SAW devices are a potential solution for harsh-environment gas and temperature sensing.

Zheng, Peng; Greve, David W.; Oppenheim, Irving J.; Chin, Tao-Lun; Malone, Vanessa

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geothermometry At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Nevada Test And Training Range Area Exploration Technique Geothermometry Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Groundwater data are limited to a portion of NAFR; data are more plentiful beyond the range boundaries. Geothermometry yields calculated groundwater temperatures generally ranging from 30 to 105degrees C, with a rough correlation between the SiO2-chalcedony and the Na-K-Na (Mg-corrected) geothermometers. References A. E. Sabin, J. D. Walker, J. Unruh, F. C. Monastero (2004) Toward The Development Of Occurrence Models For Geothermal Resources In The

231

Treatability Test Plan for 300 Area Uranium Stabilization through Polyphosphate Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has initiated a study into possible options for stabilizing uranium at the 300 Area using polyphosphate injection. As part of this effort, PNNL will perform bench- and field-scale treatability testing designed to evaluate the efficacy of using polyphosphate injections to reduced uranium concentrations in the groundwater to meet drinking water standards (30 ug/L) in situ. This technology works by forming phosphate minerals (autunite and apatite) in the aquifer that directly sequester the existing aqueous uranium in autunite minerals and precipitates apatite minerals for sorption and long term treatment of uranium migrating into the treatment zone, thus reducing current and future aqueous uranium concentrations. Polyphosphate injection was selected for testing based on technology screening as part of the 300-FF-5 Phase III Feasibility Study for treatment of uranium in the 300-Area.

Vermeul, Vincent R.; Williams, Mark D.; Fritz, Brad G.; Mackley, Rob D.; Mendoza, Donaldo P.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Williams, Bruce A.; Wellman, Dawn M.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Facility Closure Report for T-Tunnel (U12t), Area 12, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Facility Closure Report (FCR) has been prepared to document the actions taken to permanently close the remaining accessible areas of U12t-Tunnel (T-Tunnel) in Area 12 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The closure of T-Tunnel was a prerequisite to transfer facility ownership from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) to the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). Closure of the facility was accomplished with the cooperation and concurrence of both NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). The purpose of this FCR is to document that the closure of T-Tunnel complied with the closure requirements specified in the Facility Closure Plan for N- and T-Tunnels Area 12, Nevada Test Site (Appendix D) and that the facility is ready for transfer to NNSA/NSO. The Facility Closure Plan (FCP) is provided in Appendix D. T-Tunnel is located approximately 42 miles north of Mercury in Area 12 of the NTS (Figure 1). Between 1970 and 1987, T-Tunnel was used for six Nuclear Weapons Effects Tests (NWETs). The tunnel was excavated horizontally into the volcanic tuffs of Rainier Mesa. The T-Tunnel complex consists of a main access drift with two NWET containment structures, a Gas Seal Plug (GSP), and a Gas Seal Door (GSD) (Figure 2). The T-Tunnel complex was mothballed in 1993 to preserve the tunnel for resumption of testing, should it happen in the future, to stop the discharge of tunnel effluent, and to prevent unauthorized access. This was accomplished by sealing the main drift GSD.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY2005 Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes FY 2005 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains five chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and Bechtel Nevada (BN).

Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Hudson, G B; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Nimz, G J; Ramon, E C; Rose, T P; Shuller, L; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

234

Area G Perimeter Surface-Soil Sampling Environmental Surveillance for Fiscal Year 1998 Hazardous and Solid Waste Group (ESH-19)  

SciTech Connect

Material Disposal Area G (Area G) is at Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Area G has been the principal facility for the disposal of low-level, solid-mixed, and transuranic waste since 1957. It is currently LANL's primary facility for radioactive solid waste burial and storage. As part of the annual environmental surveillance effort at Area G, surface soil samples are collected around the facility's perimeter to characterize possible radionuclide movement off the site through surface water runoff During 1998, 39 soil samples were collected and analyzed for percent moisture, tritium, plutonium-238 and 239, cesium-137 and americium-241. To assess radionuclide concentrations, the results from these samples are compared with baseline or background soil samples collected in an undisturbed area west of the active portion Area G. The 1998 results are also compared to the results from analogous samples collected during 1996 and 1997 to assess changes over this time in radionuclide activity concentrations in surface soils around the perimeter of Area G. The results indicate elevated levels of all the radionuclides assessed (except cesium-137) exist in Area G perimeter surface soils vs the baseline soils. The comparison of 1998 soil data to previous years (1996 and 1997) indicates no significant increase or decrease in radionuclide concentrations; an upward or downward trend in concentrations is not detectable at this time. These results are consistent with data comparisons done in previous years. Continued annual soil sampling will be necessary to realize a trend if one exists. The radionuclide levels found in the perimeter surface soils are above background but still considered relatively low. This perimeter surface soil data will be used for planning purposes at Area G, techniques to prevent sediment tm.nsport off-site are implemented in the areas where the highest radionuclide concentrations are indicated.

Marquis Childs

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 25 Vehicle Washdown. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was performed during March 1999 at each CAS. Soil samples were collected at each CAS using a direct-push method. Soil samples were collected from the surface to depths of up to 2.7 m (9 ft) below ground surface. In addition, the gravel sump at CAS 25-07-02 (F and J Roads Pad) was sampled using a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from depths of 0 to 0.6 m (0 to 2 ft) below the gravel layer in the sump.

D. S. Tobiason

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Forward-Looking Assimilation of MODIS-Derived Snow-Covered Area into a Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snow cover over land has a significant impact on the surface radiation budget, turbulent energy fluxes to the atmosphere, and local hydrological fluxes. For this reason, inaccuracies in the representation of snow-covered area (SCA) within a land ...

Benjamin F. Zaitchik; Matthew Rodell

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Relationships between Cloud Type and Amount, Precipitation, and Surface Temperature in the Mackenzie River Valley-Beaufort Sea Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly data from climatological stations in the Mackenzie River valley-Beaufort Sea area of northern Canada have been examined to determine the relationships between cloud type and amount, precipitation, and surface temperatures. During all ...

G. A. Isaac; R. A. Stuart

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Area-Averaged Surface Fluxes in a Semiarid Region with Partly Irrigated Land: Lessons Learned from EFEDA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Field Experiment in a Desertification-Threatened Area (EFEDA) provides a comprehensive land surface dataset for a semiarid Mediterranean environment with natural vegetation and cultivated dry and irrigated land. This paper discusses ...

M. Anna Osann Jochum; Hendrik A. R. de Bruin; Albert A. M. Holtslag; Alfonso Calera Belmonte

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

ERRATA Sheet for ''Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada''  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Appendix A the second sentence of the first paragraph on Page A-1-1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, erroneously cites the EPA DQO guidance outline as (EPA, 1994). The correct citation is (EPA, 2000).

K. B. Campbell

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Testing the surface detector simulation for the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The building block of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is a water Cherenkov tank. The response to shower particles is simulated using a dedi. program based on GEANT4. To check the simulation chain, we compare the simulated signals produced by cosmic muons at various zenith angles with experimental data from a special Cherenkov detector equipped with a muon hodoscope. The signals from muon-decay electrons and the evolution of the charge with water level are also studied.

Ghia, Piera L

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Testing the surface detector simulation for the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The building block of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is a water Cherenkov tank. The response to shower particles is simulated using a dedicated program based on GEANT4. To check the simulation chain, we compare the simulated signals produced by cosmic muons at various zenith angles with experimental data from a special Cherenkov detector equipped with a muon hodoscope. The signals from muon-decay electrons and the evolution of the charge with water level are also studied.

Piera L. Ghia; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

242

Testing and evaluation of large-area heliostats for solar thermal applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two heliostats representing the state-of-the-art in glass-metal designs for central receiver (and photovoltaic tracking) applications were tested and evaluated at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, New Mexico from 1986 to 1992. These heliostats have collection areas of 148 and 200 m{sup 2} and represent low-cost designs for heliostats that employ glass-metal mirrors. The evaluation encompassed the performance and operational characteristics of the heliostats, and examined heliostat beam quality, the effect of elevated winds on beam quality, heliostat drives and controls, mirror module reflectance and durability, and the overall operational and maintenance characteristics of the two heliostats. A comprehensive presentation of the results of these and other tests is presented. The results are prefaced by a review of the development (in the United States) of heliostat technology.

Strachan, J.W.; Houser, R.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO{sub 2} at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere. 3 figs.

Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

244

Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO.sub.2 at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere.

Lagasse, Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM); Schroeder, John L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1999-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fracture Surface Area Effects on Fluid Extraction and the Electrical Resistivity of Geothermal Reservoir Rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory measurements of the electrical resistivity of fractured analogue geothermal reservoir rocks were performed to investigate the resistivity contrast caused by active boiling and to determine the effects of variable fracture dimensions and surface area on water extraction. Experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 10 h4Pa (100 bars) and temperatures to 170 C. Fractured samples show a larger resistivity change at the onset of boiling than intact samples. Monitoring the resistivity of fractured samples as they equilibrate to imposed pressure and temperature conditions provides an estimate of fluid migration into and out of the matrix. Measurements presented are an important step toward using field electrical methods to quantitatively search for fractures, infer saturation, and track fluid migration in geothermal reservoirs.

Roberts, J J; Detwiler, R L; Ralph, W; Bonner, B

2002-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

246

Synthesis of High Surface Area Alumina Aerogels without the Use of Alkoxide Precursors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alumina aerogels were prepared through the addition of propylene oxide to aqueous or ethanolic solutions of hydrated aluminum salts, AlCl{sub 3} {center_dot} 6H{sub 2}O or Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} {center_dot} 9H{sub 2}O, followed by drying with supercritical CO{sub 2}. This technique affords low-density (60-130 kg/m{sup 3}), high surface area (600-700 m{sup 2}/g) alumina aerogel monoliths without the use of alkoxide precursors. The dried alumina aerogels were characterized using elemental analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, powder X-ray diffraction, solid state NMR, acoustic measurements and nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction and TEM analysis indicated that the aerogel prepared from hydrated AlCl{sub 3} in water or ethanol possessed microstructures containing highly reticulated networks of pseudoboehmite fibers, 2-5 nm in diameter and of varying lengths, while the aerogels prepared from hydrated Al(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} in ethanol were amorphous with microstructures comprised of interconnected spherical particles with diameters in the 5-15 nm range. The difference in microstructure resulted in each type of aerogel displaying distinct physical and mechanical properties. In particular, the alumina aerogels with the weblike microstructure were far more mechanically robust than those with the colloidal network, based on acoustic measurements. Both types of alumina aerogels can be transformed to {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} through calcination at 800 C without a significant loss in surface area or monolithicity.

Baumann, T F; Gash, A E; Chinn, S C; Sawvel, A M; Maxwell, R S; Satcher Jr., J H

2004-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

247

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) documents the activities performed to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996, and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SA4FER) Plan for CAU 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 2001). CAU 398 consists of the following thirteen Corrective Action Sites (CASs) all located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1): CAS 25-25-02, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-03, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-04, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-05, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-06, Oil Spills, CAS 25-25-07, Hydraulic Oil Spill(s), CAS 25-25-08, Hydraulic Oil Spill(s), CAS 25-25-16, Diesel Spill (from CAS 25-01-02), CAS 25-25-17, Subsurface Hydraulic Oil Spill, CAS 25-44-0 1, Fuel Spill, CAS 25-44-04, Acid Spill (from CAS 25-01-01), CAS 25-44-02, Spill, and CAS 25-44-03, Spill. Copies of the analytical results for the site verification samples are included in Appendix B. Copies of the CAU Use Restriction Information forms are included in Appendix C.

K. B. Campbell

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 240: Area 25 Vehicle Washdown Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Area 25 Vehicle Washdown, Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 240, was clean-closed following the approved Corrective Action Decision Document closure alternative and in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU consists of thee Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-07-01 - Vehicle Washdown Area (Propellant Pad); 25-07-02 - Vehicle Washdown Area (F and J Roads Pad); and 25-07-03 - Vehicle Washdown Station (RADSAFE Pad). Characterization activities indicated that only CAS 25-07-02 (F and J Roads Pad) contained constituents of concern (COCs) above action levels and required remediation. The COCs detected were Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel, cesium-137, and strontium-90. The F and J Roads Pad may have been used for the decontamination of vehicles and possibly disassembled engine and reactor parts from Test Cell C. Activities occurred there during the 1960s through early 1970s. The F and J Roads Pad consisted of a 9- by 5-meter (m) (30- by 15-foot [ft]) concrete pad and a 14- by 13-m (46-by 43-ft) gravel sump. The clean-closure corrective action consisted of excavation, disposal, verification sampling, backfilling, and regrading. Closure activities began on August 21, 2000, and ended on September 19, 2000. Waste disposal activities were completed on December 12, 2000. A total of 172 cubic meters (223 cubic yards) of impacted soil was excavated and disposed. The concrete pad was also removed and disposed. Verification samples were collected from the bottom and sidewalls of the excavation and analyzed for TPH diesel and 20-minute gamma spectroscopy. The sample results indicated that all impacted soil above remediation standards was removed. The closure was completed following the approved Corrective Action Plan. All impacted waste was disposed in the Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill. All non-impacted debris was disposed in the Area 9 Construction Landfill and the Area 23 Sanitary Landfill.

D. L. Gustafason

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

250

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 261: Area 25 Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for the Corrective Action Unit (CAU)261 Area 25 Test Cell A Leachfield System in accordance with the Federal Facility and Consent Order (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection [NDEP] et al., 1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 1999). Investigation of CAU 261 was conducted from February through May of 1999. There were no Constituents of Concern (COCs) identified at Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-05-07 Acid Waste Leach Pit (AWLP). COCs identified at CAS 25-05-01 included diesel-range organics and radionuclides. The following closure actions will be implemented under this plan: Because COCs were not found at CAS 25-05-07 AWLP, no action is required; Removal of septage from the septic tank (CAS 25-05-01), the distribution box and the septic tank will be filled with grout; Removal of impacted soils identified near the initial outfall area; and Upon completion of this closure activity and approval of the Closure Report by NDEP, administrative controls, use restrictions, and site postings will be used to prevent intrusive activities at the site.

T. M. Fitzmaurice

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Closure Plan for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the preliminary closure plan for the Area 5 RWMS at the NTS that was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (DOE, 2005a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure schedule, updated closure inventory, updated site and facility characterization data, the Title II engineering cover design, and the closure process for the 92-Acre Area of the RWMS. The format and content of this site-specific plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). This interim closure plan meets closure and post-closure monitoring requirements of the order DOE O 435.1, manual DOE M 435.1-1, Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 191, 40 CFR 265, Nevada Administrative Code (NAC) 444.743, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) requirements as incorporated into NAC 444.8632. The Area 5 RWMS accepts primarily packaged low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and asbestiform low-level waste (ALLW) for disposal in excavated disposal cells.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Corrective action investigation plan for CAU No. 424: Area 3 Landfill Complex, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Correction Action Investigation Plan contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the Area 3 Landfill Complex, CAU No. 424, which is located at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR). The TTR, included in the Nellis Air Force Range, is approximately 255 kilometers (140 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. The CAU 424 is comprised of eight individual landfill sites that are located around and within the perimeter of the Area 3 Compound. Due to the unregulated disposal activities commonly associated with early landfill operations, an investigation will be conducted at each CAS to complete the following tasks: identify the presence and nature of possible contaminant migration from the landfills; determine the vertical and lateral extent of possible contaminant migration; ascertain the potential impact to human health and the environment; and provide sufficient information and data to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective action strategies for each CAS.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Three-Dimensional Bayesian Geostatistical Aquifer Characterization at the Hanford 300 Area using Tracer Test Data  

SciTech Connect

Tracer testing under natural or forced gradient flow holds the potential to provide useful information for characterizing subsurface properties, through monitoring, modeling and interpretation of the tracer plume migration in an aquifer. Non-reactive tracer experiments were conducted at the Hanford 300 Area, along with constant-rate injection tests and electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) profiling. A Bayesian data assimilation technique, the method of anchored distributions (MAD) [Rubin et al., 2010], was applied to assimilate the experimental tracer test data with the other types of data and to infer the three-dimensional heterogeneous structure of the hydraulic conductivity in the saturated zone of the Hanford formation. In this study, the Bayesian prior information on the underlying random hydraulic conductivity field was obtained from previous field characterization efforts using the constant-rate injection tests and the EBF data. The posterior distribution of the conductivity field was obtained by further conditioning the field on the temporal moments of tracer breakthrough curves at various observation wells. MAD was implemented with the massively-parallel three-dimensional flow and transport code PFLOTRAN to cope with the highly transient flow boundary conditions at the site and to meet the computational demands of MAD. A synthetic study proved that the proposed method could effectively invert tracer test data to capture the essential spatial heterogeneity of the three-dimensional hydraulic conductivity field. Application of MAD to actual field data shows that the hydrogeological model, when conditioned on the tracer test data, can reproduce the tracer transport behavior better than the field characterized without the tracer test data. This study successfully demonstrates that MAD can sequentially assimilate multi-scale multi-type field data through a consistent Bayesian framework.

Chen, Xingyuan; Murakami, Haruko; Hahn, Melanie S.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Zachara, John M.; Rubin, Yoram

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 261: Area 25 Test Cell A Leachfield System, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Closure Report (CR) is to provide documentation of the completed corrective action at the Test Cell A Leachfield System and to provide data confirming the corrective action. The Test Cell A Leachfield System is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 261. Remediation of CAU 261 is required under the FFACO (1996). CAU 261 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 140 kilometers (87 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 261 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASS): CAS 25-05-01, Leachfield; and CAS 25-05-07, Acid Waste Leach Pit (AWLP) (Figures 2 and 3). Test Cell A was operated during the 1960s and 1970s to support the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. Various operations within Building 3124 at Test Cell A resulted in liquid waste releases to the Leachfield and the AWLP. The following existing site conditions were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1999): Soil in the leachfield was found to exceed the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) Action Level for petroleum hydrocarbons, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) preliminary remediation goals for semi volatile organic compounds, and background concentrations for strontium-90; Soil below the sewer pipe and approximately 4.5 meters (m) (15 feet [ft]) downstream of the initial outfall was found to exceed background concentrations for cesium-137 and strontium-90; Sludge in the leachfield septic tank was found to exceed the NDEP Action Level for petroleum hydrocarbons and to contain americium-241, cesium-137, uranium-234, uranium-238, potassium-40, and strontium-90; No constituents of concern (COC) were identified at the AWLP. The NDEP-approved CADD (DOWNV, 1999) recommended Corrective Action Alternative 2, ''Closure of the Septic Tank and Distribution Box, Partial Excavation, and Administrative Controls.'' The corrective action was performed following the NDEP-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (DOE/NV, 2000).

T. M. Fitzmaurice

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Knoxville Area Transit: Propane Hybrid ElectricTrolleys; Advanced Technology Vehicles in Service, Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

website and in print publications. website and in print publications. TESTING ADVANCED VEHICLES KNOXVILLE AREA TRANSIT ◆ PROPANE HYBRID ELECTRIC TROLLEYS Knoxville Area Transit PROPANE HYBRID ELECTRIC TROLLEYS NREL/PIX 13795 KNOXVILLE AREA TRANSIT (KAT) is recognized nationally for its exceptional service to the City of Knoxville, Tennessee. KAT received the American Public Transportation Associa- tion's prestigious Outstanding Achievement Award in 2004.

258

Corrective action plan for CAU Number 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations, Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the method for implementing the corrective action alternative as provided in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). Detailed information of the site history and results of previous characterizations can be found in the Work Plan, the Preliminary Investigation Report, and the Phase 2 Characterization Report. Previous characterization investigations were completed as a condition of the Temporary Water Pollution Control Permit issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) on July 14, 1992. The scope of this report is to prepare a CAP based upon the selected remedial alternative for closure of the Area 12, Building 12-16 Fleet Operations steam cleaning discharge area. The effluent discharge area has been impacted by volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as oil. The maximum hydrocarbon and VOC concentrations detected in the Preliminary and Phase 2 Site Characterization Investigations are summarized.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Underground Test Area Project Waste Management Plan (Rev. No. 2, April 2002)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) initiated the UGTA Project to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The UGTA Project investigation sites have been grouped into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) in accordance with the most recent version of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The primary UGTA objective is to gather data to characterize the groundwater aquifers beneath the NTS and adjacent lands. The investigations proposed under the UGTA program may involve the drilling and sampling of new wells; recompletion, monitoring, and sampling of existing wells; well development and hydrologic/ aquifer testing; geophysical surveys; and subsidence crater recharge evaluation. Those wastes generated as a result of these activities will be managed in accordance with existing federal and state regulations, DOE Orders, and NNSA/NV waste minimization and pollution prevention objectives. This Waste Management Plan provides a general framework for all Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project participants to follow for the characterization, storage/accumulation, treatment, and disposal of wastes generated by UGTA Project activities. The objective of this waste management plan is to provide guidelines to minimize waste generation and to properly manage wastes that are produced. Attachment 1 to this plan is the Fluid Management Plan and details specific strategies for management of fluids produced under UGTA operations.

IT Corporation, Las Vegas

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

260

AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR U N D E R G R O U N  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR U AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR U N D E R G R O U N D NUCLEAR .DETONATIONS -9.\c January through December 1996 by the Monitoring Applications Laboratory National Enviscnmental Research Center LT . S . EFTtPlgRO%RIENFA& PROTECTIQN AGENCY LPS Vegas, Nevada -"& -% ~d*.".::. Published Hay 1975 This work p e r f o w e d under a Memorandum o f Understanding No. AT(26-1)-539) for the U. S. ENERGY RESEARCH B D E V E L O P M E X T ABMINISTRATIQN d ~ P v . a - r . . . - . -.. . . . . * . "+ . - : I - : : - ... 1-11.; ~ ~ ~ % ~ ! ~ $ ' ; : L : ; ~ : ~ ~ ~ ~ . . T h i s r e p o r t was prepared a s an account of work sponsored by t h e United S t a t e s Government. N e i t h e r t h e United S t a t e s nor t h e United S t a t e s Energy Research and Development A d m i n i s t r a t i o n , n o r any of t h e i r employees, nor any of t h e i r c o n

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 135: Areas 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135, Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, was closed in accordance with the approved Corrective Action Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). CAU 135 consists of three Corrective Action Sites (CAS). Two of these CAS's were identified in the Corrective Action Investigation Data Quality Objective meeting as being improperly identified as underground storage tanks. CAS 25-02-03 identified as the Deluge Valve Pit was actually an underground electrical vault and CAS 25-02-10 identified as an Underground Storage Tank was actually a former above ground storage tank filled with demineralized water. Both of these CAS's are recommended for a no further action closure. CAS 25-02-01 the Underground Storage Tanks commonly referred to as the Engine Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault was closed by decontaminating the vault structure and conducting a radiological verification survey to document compliance with the Nevada Test Site unrestricted use release criteria. The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, (CAS 25-02-01), referred to as the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault, were used to receive liquid waste from all of the radioactive and cell service area drains at the E-MAD Facility. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation conducted in June 1999, discussed in ''The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada'' (DOE/NV, 199a), one sample from the radiological survey of the concrete vault interior exceeded radionuclide preliminary action levels. The analytes from the sediment samples exceeded the preliminary action levels for polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. The CAU 135 closure activities consisted of scabbling radiological ''hot spots'' from the concrete vault, and the drilling removal of the cement-lined vault sump. Field activities began on November 28, 2000, and ended on December 4, 2000. After verification samples were collected, the vault was repaired with cement. The concrete vault sump, soil excavated beneath the sump, and compactable hot line trash were disposed at the Area 23 Sanitary Landfill. The vault interior was field surveyed following the removal of waste to verify that unrestricted release criteria had been achieved. Since the site is closed by unrestricted release decontamination and verification, post-closure care is not required.

D. H. Cox

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

HEATER TEST PLANNING FOR THE NEAR SURFACE TEST FACILITY AT THE HANFORD RESERVATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heater Experiment at Hanford. Berkeley, Lawre ;e BerkeleyTest Facility, Hole DC-11, Hanford Reservation. Prepared forof Gable Mountain Basalt Cores, Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

DuBois, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Surface Area, Volume, Mass, and Density Distributions for Sized Biomass Particles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final technical report describes work performed at Morehouse College under DOE Grant No. DE-FC26-04NT42130 during the period July 01, 2004 to June 30, 2007 which covers the entire performance period of the project. 25 individual biomass particles (hardwood sawdust AI14546 in the size range of 100-200 microns) were levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and their external surface area, volume, and drag coefficient/mass (C{sub d}/m) ratios were characterized applying highly specialized video based and high-speed diode array imaging systems. Analysis methods were employed using shape and drag information to calculate mass and density distributions for these particles. Results of these measurements and analyses were validated by independent mass measurements using a particle weighing and counting technique. Similar information for 28 PSOC 1451D bituminous coal particles was retrieved from a previously published work. Using these two information, density correlations for coal/biomass blends were developed. These correlations can be used to estimate the density of the blend knowing either the volume fraction or the mass fraction of coal in the blend. The density correlations presented here will be useful in predicting the burning rate of coal/biomass blends in cofiring combustors. Finally, a discussion on technological impacts and economic projections of burning biomass with coal in US power plants is presented.

Ramanathan Sampath

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Relationships among Remotely Sensed Data, Surface Energy Balance, and Area-Averaged Fluxes over Partially Vegetated Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous recent field experiments have examined the use of remote sensing to estimate land surface fluxes of latent and sensible heat using combinations of thermal, visible, and near-infrared data. While substantial progress has been made, ...

M. A. Friedl

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

NA

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Closure plan for CAU No. 93: Area 6 steam cleaning effluent ponds, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

The steam cleaning effluent ponds (SCEP) waste unit is located in Area 6 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Nevada Operations Office operates the NTS and has entered into a trilateral agreement with the State of Nevada and the Defense Special Weapons Agency (DSWA). The trilateral agreement provides a framework for identifying, characterizing, remediating, and closing environmental sites on the NTS and associated bombing ranges. The SCEP waste unit consists of: two steam cleaning effluent ponds; layout pad and associated grease trap; Building 6-623 steam cleaning pad; test pad; Building 6-623 grease trap; Building 6-800 steam cleaning pad; Building 6-800 separator; Building 6-621 sump; and the concrete asbestos piping connecting these components to both SCEPs. Clean closure is the recommended closure strategy for the majority of the components within this CAU. Four components of the unit (Building 6-621 Sump, Test Pad Grease Trap, Building 6-623 Steam Cleaning Pad, and North SCEP pipeline) are recommended to be closed in place. This closure plan provides the strategy and backup information necessary to support the clean closure of each of the individual components within CAU 93. Analytical data generated during the characterization field work and earlier sampling events indicates the majority of CAU 93 soil and infrastructure is non-hazardous (i.e., impacted primarily with petroleum hydrocarbons).

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1993 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory - Las Vegas (EMSL-LV). This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ionization chambers (PICs); by biological monitoring of foodstuffs including animal tissues and food crops; and by measurement of radioactive material deposited in humans.

Chaloud, D.J; Daigler, D.M.; Davis, M.G. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The application of borehole logging to characterize the hydrogeology of the Faultless site, Central Nevada Test Area  

SciTech Connect

The Central Nevada Test Area was the site of the Faultless underground nuclear test that could be a source of radionuclide contamination to aquifers in Hot Creek Valley, Nevada. Field studies in 1992 and 1993 have used hydrologic logging and water sampling to determine the adequacy of the current groundwater monitoring network and the status of water-level recovery to pre-shot levels in the nuclear chimney. The field studies have determined that there is a possibility for contaminant migration away from the Faultless event though the pre-event water level has not been attained, while new data raise questions about the ability of the current monitoring network to detect migration. Hydrologic logs from the postshot hole (drilled into the chimney created by the nuclear detonation) reveal inflow around 485 m below land surface. The physical and chemical characteristics of the inflow water indicate that its source is much deeper in the chimney, perhaps driven upward in a convection cell generated by heat near the nuclear cavity. Logging and sampling at monitoring wells HTH-1 and HTH-2 revealed that the completion of HTH-1 may be responsible for its elevated water level (as compared to pre-nuclear test levels) and may have also created a local mound in the water table in the alluvium that accounts for higher post-test water levels at HTH-2. This mound would serve to divert flow around the monitoring wells, so that only migration of contaminants through the underlying, higher pressure, volcanic units is currently monitored. A hydraulic high found in an abandoned hole located between the nuclear chimney and the monitoring wells further reduces the likelihood of HTH-1 or HTH-2 intercepting contaminant migration.

Chapman, J.B.; Mihevc, T.M.; Lyles, B.F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Spatial and Temporal Surface Spectral Reflectivity Over the ARM SGP CART Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Towards Development of a Synthesized Database of Spatial and Temporal Surface Spectral Reflectivity Over the ARM SGP CART Area A. P. Trishchenko, Y. Luo, R. Latifovic, W. Park, J. Cihlar, and B. Hwang Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Z. Li and M. C. Cribb University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland Introduction Surface albedo is a key variable determining the disposition of solar radiation between the surface and the atmosphere. Reliable mapping of surface albedo and improved understanding of radiation interactions at the surface are required for advancing weather forecasting and climate studies. The ground-based observations are limited to a handful of locations sparsely distributed in the South Great Plains (SGP). Frequently, they represent only small-scale features of surface reflective properties and

271

Numerical prediction of basalt response for near-surface test facility heater tests No. 1 and No. 2  

SciTech Connect

This report details the numerical predictions undertaken by Dames and Moore for Rockwell Hanford Operations' Basalt Waste Isolation Project. Predictions are made for the temperatures, stresses, strains and displacements in the basalt around Full-Scale Heater Tests No. 1 and No. 2 at the Near-Surface Test Facility using the finite element code DAMSWEL. The rock around the main heaters was modeled using an axisymmetric idealization in which deformational properties were transversely isotropic with a bilinear stress/strain relationship which was independent of temperature. The selection of the input parameters represents an engineering assessment of their values based on the results of laboratory tests and in situ measurements. The predictive modeling analysis, using the best information available as of April 1980, was completed prior to test startup. Additional information on geology, geological characterization, rock-mass characterization, laboratory properties, and field properties of basalt is being acquired on a regular basis as part of the overall Near-Surface Test Facility test program. An assessment of the effect of additions to the data base upon the predictive modeling and test analysis shall be made on a periodic basis.

Hocking, G.; Williams, J.R.; Boonlualohr, P.; Mathews, I.; Mustoe, G.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Area G perimeter surface-soil and single-stage water sampling: Environmental surveillance for fiscal year 95. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

ESH-19 personnel collected soil and single-stage water samples around the perimeter of Area G at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during FY 95 to characterize possible radionuclide movement out of Area G through surface water and entrained sediment runoff. Soil samples were analyzed for tritium, total uranium, isotopic plutonium, americium-241, and cesium-137. The single-stage water samples were analyzed for tritium and plutonium isotopes. All radiochemical data was compared with analogous samples collected during FY 93 and 94 and reported in LA-12986 and LA-13165-PR. Six surface soils were also submitted for metal analyses. These data were included with similar data generated for soil samples collected during FY 94 and compared with metals in background samples collected at the Area G expansion area.

Childs, M.; Conrad, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Influence of Variations in Surface Treatment on 24-Hour Forecasts with a Limited Area Model, Including a Comparison of Modeled and Satellite-Measured Surface Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of variations in surface parameters on 24-hour limited area forecasts has been examined on a day in July 1981. The vehicle for the study is a ten-level primitive equation model covering most of the continental United States. Variations ...

George Diak; Stacey Heikkinen; John Rates

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

In Situ Bioremediation Interim Remedial Action Report, Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-07B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Interim Remedial Action Report is for the in situ bioremediation remedial component of Operable Unit 1-07B at Test Area North at the Idaho National Laboratory. Under U.S. Environmental Protection Agency guidance, an interim report for a long-term groundwater remedial action provides a chronology of events and a description of the remedial action facilities, systems, components, and operating documents that lead to a declaration that the system is operational and functional. It is the conclusion of this report that the in situ bioremediation remedial component includes the infrastructure and programs necessary to achieve the objectives of the in situ bioremediation remedial component for contaminated groundwater in the vicinity of the TSF-05 well; therefore, it can be deemed operational and functional. iii ivCONTENTS ABSTRACT.................................................................................................................................................iii

Unit -b; Prepared For The

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Limited-Area Model Sensitivity to the Complexity of Representation of the Land Surface Energy Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By coupling a multimode land surface scheme with a regional climate model, three scientific issues are addressed in this paper: (i) the regional model's sensitivity to the different levels of complexity presented by the land surface ...

H. Zhang; A. Henderson-Sellers; A. J. Pitman; C. E. Desborough; J. L. McGregor; J. J. Katzfey

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post-closure-posting requirements for the mounded/capped basement structure, as well as for the entire CAU, are addressed in Section 4.2.10. The site contains radiologically impacted surfaces and hazardous materials. Based on review of the historical information for CAU 116 and recent site inspections, there is sufficient process knowledge to close CAU 116 using the SAFER process. CAUs that may be closed using the SAFER process have conceptual corrective actions that are clearly identified. Consequently, corrective action alternatives can be chosen prior to completing a corrective action investigation, given anticipated investigation results. The SAFER process combines elements of the data quality objective (DQO) process and the observational approach to plan and conduct closure activities. The DQOs are used to identify the problem and define the type and quality of data needed to complete the investigation phase of the SAFER process. The purpose of the investigation phase is to verify the adequacy of existing information used to determine the chosen corrective action. The observational approach provides a framework for managing uncertainty during the planning and decision-making phases of the project. The SAFER process allows for technical decisions to be made based on information gathered during site visits, interviews, meetings, research, and a consensus of opinion by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) team members. Any uncertainties are addressed by documented assumptions that are verified by sampling and analysis, data evaluation, onsite observations, and contingency plans, as necessary. Closure activities may proceed simultaneously with site characterization as sufficient data are gathered to confirm or disprove the assumptions made during selection of the corrective action. If, at any time during the closure process, new information is discovered that indicates that closure activities should be revised, closure activities will be reevaluated as appropriate. Based on a detailed review of historical documentation, there is sufficient process know

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Closure Plan for the Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Area 3 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RMWS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is managed and operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec) for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). This document is the first update of the interim closure plan for the Area 3 RWMS, which was presented in the Integrated Closure and Monitoring Plan (ICMP) (DOE, 2005). The format and content of this plan follows the Format and Content Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Closure Plans (DOE, 1999a). The major updates to the plan include a new closure date, updated closure inventory, the new institutional control policy, and the Title II engineering cover design. The plan identifies the assumptions and regulatory requirements, describes the disposal sites and the physical environment in which they are located, presents the design of the closure cover, and defines the approach and schedule for both closing and monitoring the site. The Area 3 RWMS accepts low-level waste (LLW) from across the DOE Complex in compliance with the NTS Waste Acceptance Criteria (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The Area 3 RWMS accepts both packaged and unpackaged unclassified bulk LLW for disposal in subsidence craters that resulted from deep underground tests of nuclear devices in the early 1960s. The Area 3 RWMS covers 48 hectares (119 acres) and comprises seven subsidence craters--U-3ax, U-3bl, U-3ah, U-3at, U-3bh, U-3az, and U-3bg. The area between craters U-3ax and U-3bl was excavated to form one large disposal unit (U-3ax/bl); the area between craters U-3ah and U-3at was also excavated to form another large disposal unit (U-3ah/at). Waste unit U-3ax/bl is closed; waste units U-3ah/at and U-3bh are active; and the remaining craters, although currently undeveloped, are available for disposal of waste if required. This plan specifically addresses the closure of the U-3ah/at and the U-3bh LLW units. A final closure cover has been placed on unit U-3ax/bl (Corrective Action Unit 110) at the Area 3 RWMS. Monolayer-evapotranspirative closure cover designs for the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units are provided in this plan. The current-design closure cover thickness is 3 meters (10 feet). The final design cover will have an optimized cover thickness, which is expected to be less than 3 m (10 ft). Although waste operations at the Area 3 RWMS have ceased at the end of June 2006, disposal capacity is available for future disposals at the U-3ah/at and U-3bh units. The Area 3 RWMS is expected to start closure activities in fiscal year 2025, which include the development of final performance assessment and composite analysis documents, closure plan, closure cover design for construction, cover construction, and initiation of the post-closure care and monitoring activities. Current monitoring at the Area 3 RWMS includes monitoring the cover of the closed mixed waste unit U-3ax/bl as required by the Nevada Department of Environmental Protection, and others required under federal regulations and DOE orders. Monitoring data, collected via sensors and analysis of samples, are needed to evaluate radiation doses to the general public, for performance assessment maintenance, to demonstrate regulatory compliance, and to evaluate the actual performance of the RWMSs. Monitoring provides data to ensure the integrity and performance of waste disposal units. The monitoring program is designed to forewarn management and regulators of any failure and need for mitigating actions. The plan describes the program for monitoring direct radiation, air, vadose zone, biota, groundwater, meteorology, and subsidence. The requirements of post-closure cover maintenance and monitoring will be determined in the final closure plan.

NSTec Environmental Management

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 346: Areas 8, 10 Housekeeping Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report documents the closure activities conducted for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 346: Areas 8, 10 Housekeeping Sites. CAU 346 is listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) and consists of the following 14 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 8 and 10 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS): (1) CAS 08-22-04: Drums (2); (2) CAS 08-22-11: Drums; Bucket; (3) CAS 08-24-02: Battery; (4) CAS 10-14-01: Transformer; (5) CAS 10-22-06: Drum (Gas Block); (6) CAS 10-22-10: Drum (Gas Block); (7) CAS 10-22-12: Drum (Gas Block); (8) CAS 10-22-13: Drum (Gas Block); (9) CAS 10-22-16: Drum (Gas Block); (10) CAS 10-22-22: Drum; (11) CAS 10-22-25: Drum; (12) CAS 10-22-36: Paint Can; (13) CAS 10-22-37: Gas Block; and (14) CAS 10-24-11: Battery. Closure activities consisted of closing each CAS by removing debris and/or material, disposing of the generated waste, and verifying that each site was clean-closed by visual inspection and/or laboratory analysis of soil verification samples.

K. B. Campbell

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

THE WIDE-AREA ENERGY STORAGE AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM PHASE II Final Report - Flywheel Field Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operated for the U.S. department of Energy (DOE) by Battelle Memorial Institute for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) and California Energy Commission (CEC). A wide-area energy management system (WAEMS) is a centralized control system that operates energy storage devices (ESDs) located in different places to provide energy and ancillary services that can be shared among balancing authorities (BAs). The goal of this research is to conduct flywheel field tests, investigate the technical characteristics and economics of combined hydro-flywheel regulation services that can be shared between Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and California Independent System Operator (CAISO) controlled areas. This report is the second interim technical report for Phase II of the WAEMS project. This report presents: 1) the methodology of sharing regulation service between balancing authorities, 2) the algorithm to allocate the regulation signal between the flywheel and hydro power plant to minimize the wear-and-tear of the hydro power plants, 3) field results of the hydro-flywheel regulation service (conducted by the Beacon Power), and 4) the performance metrics and economic analysis of the combined hydro-flywheel regulation service.

Lu, Ning; Makarov, Yuri V.; Weimar, Mark R.; Rudolph, Frank; Murthy, Shashikala; Arseneaux, Jim; Loutan, Clyde; Chowdhury, S.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

LITERATURE REVIEW OF PUO2 CALCINATION TIME AND TEMPERATURE DATA FOR SPECIFIC SURFACE AREA  

SciTech Connect

The literature has been reviewed in December 2011 for calcination data of plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) from plutonium oxalate Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} precipitation with respect to the PuO{sub 2} specific surface area (SSA). A summary of the literature is presented for what are believed to be the dominant factors influencing SSA, the calcination temperature and time. The PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} calcination data from this review has been regressed to better understand the influence of calcination temperature and time on SSA. Based on this literature review data set, calcination temperature has a bigger impact on SSA versus time. However, there is still some variance in this data set that may be reflecting differences in the plutonium oxalate preparation or different calcination techniques. It is evident from this review that additional calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} needs to be collected and evaluated to better define the relationship. The existing data set has a lot of calcination times that are about 2 hours and therefore may be underestimating the impact of heating time on SSA. SRNL recommends that more calcination temperature and time data for PuO{sub 2} from Pu(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2} be collected and this literature review data set be augmented to better refine the relationship between PuO{sub 2} SSA and its calcination parameters.

Daniel, G.

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Comprehensive baseline environmental audit of former underground test areas in Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the Comprehensive Baseline Environmental Audit of Former Underground Test Areas (FUTAS) in the States of Colorado, Nevada, and New Mexico. DOE and contractor systems for management of environmental protection activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) were not within the scope of the audit. The audit was conducted May 16-May 26, 1994, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). DOE 5482.1 B, {open_quotes}Environment, Safety, and Health Appraisal Program{close_quotes}, establishes the mission of EH-24, which is to provide comprehensive, independent oversight of Department-wide environmental programs on behalf of the Secretary of Energy. The ultimate goal of EH-24 is to enhance environmental protection and minimize risk to public health and the environment. EH-24 accomplishes its mission using systematic and periodic evaluations of DOE`s environmental programs within line organizations and supplemental activities that strengthen self-assessment and oversight functions within program, field, and contractor organizations. These evaluations function as a vehicle through which the Secretary and program managers are apprised of the status and vulnerabilities of Departmental environmental activities and environmental management systems. Several types of evaluations are conducted, including: (1) comprehensive baseline environmental audits; (2) routine environmental audits; (3) environmental management assessments; and (4) special issue reviews.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

TESTING GROUND BASED GEOPHYSICAL TECHNIQUES TO REFINE ELECTROMAGNETIC SURVEYS NORTH OF THE 300 AREA HANFORD WASHINGTON  

SciTech Connect

Airborne electromagnetic (AEM) surveys were flown during fiscal year (FY) 2008 within the 600 Area in an attempt to characterize the underlying subsurface and to aid in the closure and remediation design study goals for the 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit (OU). The rationale for using the AEM surveys was that airborne surveys can cover large areas rapidly at relatively low costs with minimal cultural impact, and observed geo-electrical anomalies could be correlated with important subsurface geologic and hydrogeologic features. Initial interpretation of the AEM surveys indicated a tenuous correlation with the underlying geology, from which several anomalous zones likely associated with channels/erosional features incised into the Ringold units were identified near the River Corridor. Preliminary modeling resulted in a slightly improved correlation but revealed that more information was required to constrain the modeling (SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site). Both time-and frequency domain AEM surveys were collected with the densest coverage occurring adjacent to the Columbia River Corridor. Time domain surveys targeted deeper subsurface features (e.g., top-of-basalt) and were acquired using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} system along north-south flight lines with a nominal 400 m (1,312 ft) spacing. The frequency domain RESOLVE system acquired electromagnetic (EM) data along tighter spaced (100 m [328 ft] and 200 m [656 ft]) north-south profiles in the eastern fifth of the 200-PO-1 Groundwater OU (immediately adjacent to the River Corridor). The overall goal of this study is to provide further quantification of the AEM survey results, using ground based geophysical methods, and to link results to the underlying geology and/or hydrogeology. Specific goals of this project are as follows: (1) Test ground based geophysical techniques for the efficacy in delineating underlying geology; (2) Use ground measurements to refine interpretations of AEM data; and (3) Improve the calibration and correlation of AEM information. The potential benefits of this project are as follows: (1) Develop a tool to map subsurface units at the Hanford Site in a rapid and cost effective manner; (2) Map groundwater pathways within the River Corridor; and (3) Aid development of the conceptual site model. If anomalies observed in the AEM data can be correlated with subsurface geology, then the rapid scanning and non-intrusive capabilities provided by the airborne surveys can be used at the Hanford Site to screen for areas that warrant further investigation.

PETERSEN SW

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

283

CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT165: AREA 25 AND 26 DRY WELL AND WASH DOWN AREAS, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) documents the closure activities for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, according to the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. CAU 165 consists of 8 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, nevada. Site closure activities were performed according to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 165. CAU 165 consists of the following CASs: (1) CAS 25-07-06, Train Decontamination Area; (2) CAS 25-07-07, Vehicle Washdown; (3) CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well; (4) CAS 25-47-01, Reservoir and French Drain; (5) CAS 25-51-02, Drywell; (6) CAS 25-59-01, Septic System; (7) CAS 26-07-01, Vehicle Washdown Station; and (8) CAS 26-59-01, Septic System. CAU 165, Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, consists of eight CASs located in Areas 25 and 26 of the NTS. The approved closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls.

BECHTEL NEVADA

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

On the Nonpolar Hydration Free Energy of Proteins: Surface Area and Continuum Solvent Models for the Solute-Solvent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Nonpolar Hydration Free Energy of Proteins: Surface Area and Continuum Solvent Models solvent hydration free energy models are an important component of most modern computational methods aimed. The nonpolar component of the hydration free energy, consisting of a repulsive cavity term and an attractive

285

1Satellite Surface Areas The NASA Imager for Magnetosphere-to-Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE) satellite was  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that cover the satellite's surface actually face the sun at any given moment? #12;Answer Key 1 Question 1) satellite was launched on March 25, 2000. The instruments and other electrical systems inside the satellite area of the satellite, and how much electrical power can be collected by the satellite. (Hints - http

286

Water bathing synthesis of high-surface-area nanocrystal-assembled SnO{sub 2} particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles were synthesized in aqueous solutions. The particles showed high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g. It was much higher than that of our previous studies. BJH analyses indicated that the particles had pores of about 2-5 nm. The particles included two kinds of morphologies. The first particles were about 300-1000 nm in diameter, which were assemblies of acicular crystals of 5-10 nm in width and 100-200 nm in length. They contributed high BET surface area. The second particles were about 10,000-3000 nm in diameter, which were assemblies of ellipse crystals of 100-200 in width and 200-400 nm in length. The ellipse crystals consisted of sheet crystals. They connected with a certain angle and arranged their long direction parallel. - Graphical abstract: Acicular crystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles and ellipse crystal assembled SnO{sub 2} particles were synthesized in the aqueous solutions. They showed high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unique SnO{sub 2} nanocrystals were synthesized in an aqueous solution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They were acicular crystals and ellipse crystals. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer They had high BET surface area of 276 m{sup 2}/g.

Masuda, Yoshitake, E-mail: masuda-y@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan); Ohji, Tatsuki; Kato, Kazumi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011, Part 2  

SciTech Connect

This report evaluates collapse evolution for selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly called the Nevada Test Site). The work is being done to support several different programs that desire access to the ground surface above expended underground nuclear tests. The programs include: the Borehole Management Program, the Environmental Restoration Program, and the National Center for Nuclear Security Gas-Migration Experiment. Safety decisions must be made before a crater area, or potential crater area, can be reentered for any work. Evaluation of cavity collapse and crater formation is input into the safety decisions. Subject matter experts from the LLNL Containment Program who participated in weapons testing activities perform these evaluations. Information used included drilling and hole construction, emplacement and stemming, timing and sequence of the selected test and nearby tests, geology, yield, depth of burial, collapse times, surface crater sizes, cavity and crater volume estimations, ground motion, and radiological release information. Both classified and unclassified data were reviewed. The evaluations do not include the effects of erosion that may modify the collapse craters over time. They also do not address possible radiation dangers that may be present. Various amounts of information are available for these tests, depending on their age and other associated activities. Lack of data can hamper evaluations and introduce uncertainty. We make no attempt to quantify this uncertainty. Evaluation of Cavity Collapse and Surface Crater Formation for Selected Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Underground Nuclear Tests - 2011 was published on March 2, 2011. This report, considered Part 2 of work undertaken in calendar year 2011, compiles evaluations requested after the March report. The following unclassified summary statements describe collapse evolution and crater stability in response to a recent request to review 6 LLNL test locations in Yucca Flat, Rainier Mesa, and Pahute Mesa. They include: Baneberry in U8d; Clearwater in U12q; Wineskin in U12r, Buteo in U20a and Duryea in nearby U20a1; and Barnwell in U20az.

Pawloski, G A

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Characterization ReportOperational Closure Covers for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The Area 3 RWMS is located in south-central Yucca Flat and the Area 5 RWMS is located about 15 miles south, in north-central Frenchman Flat. Though located in two separate topographically closed basins, they are similar in climate and hydrogeologic setting. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste, while the Area 3 RWMS uses subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons for the disposal of packaged and unpackaged bulk waste. Over the next several decades, most waste disposal units at both the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are anticipated to be closed. Closure of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs will proceed through three phases: operational closure, final closure, and institutional control. Many waste disposal units at the Area 5RWMS are operationally closed and final closure has been placed on one unit at the Area 3 RWMS (U-3ax/bl). Because of the similarities between the two sites (e.g., type of wastes, environmental factors, operational closure cover designs, etc.), many characterization studies and data collected at the Area 3 RWMS are relevant and applicable to the Area 5 RWMS. For this reason, data and closure strategies from the Area 3 RWMS are referred to as applicable. This document is an interim Characterization Report Operational Closure Covers, for the Area 5 RWMS. The report briefly describes the Area 5 RWMS and the physical environment where it is located, identifies the regulatory requirements, reviews the approach and schedule for closing, summarizes the monitoring programs, summarizes characterization studies and results, and then presents conclusions and recommendations.

Bechtel Nevada Geotechnical Sciences

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E  

SciTech Connect

Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly & Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway.

Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Septic Systems and Discharge Area. CAU 151 consists of the following eight Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 2, 12, and 18 of the Nevada Test Site, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada: (1) CAS 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) CAS 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) CAS 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) CAS 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) CAS 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) CAS 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) CAS 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; and (8) CAS 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed). CAU 151 closure activities were conducted according to the FFACO (FFACO, 1996; as amended February 2008) and the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 151 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2007) from October 2007 to January 2008. The corrective action alternatives included no further action, clean closure, and closure in place with administrative controls. CAU 151 closure activities are summarized in Table 1. Closure activities generated liquid remediation waste, sanitary waste, hydrocarbon waste, and mixed waste. Waste generated was appropriately managed and disposed. Waste that is currently staged onsite is being appropriately managed and will be disposed under approved waste profiles in permitted landfills. Waste minimization activities included waste characterization sampling and segregation of waste streams. Some waste exceeded land disposal restriction limits and required offsite treatment prior to disposal. Other waste meeting land disposal restrictions was disposed of in appropriate onsite or offsite landfills. Waste disposition documentation is included as Appendix C.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 536: Area 3 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 536 is located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site. CAU 536 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 as Area 3 Release Site, and comprises a single Corrective Action Site (CAS): {sm_bullet} CAS 03-44-02, Steam Jenny Discharge The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CAS 03-44-02 is clean closure. Closure activities included removing and disposing of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH)- and polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-impacted soil, soil impacted with plutonium (Pu)-239, and concrete pad debris. CAU 536 was closed in accordance with the NDEP-approved CAU 536 Corrective Action Plan (CAP), with minor deviations as approved by NDEP. The closure activities specified in the CAP were based on the recommendations presented in the CAU 536 Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2004). This Closure Report documents CAU 536 closure activities. During closure activities, approximately 1,000 cubic yards (yd3) of hydrocarbon waste in the form of TPH- and PAH-impacted soil and debris, approximately 8 yd3 of Pu-239-impacted soil, and approximately 100 yd3 of concrete debris were generated, managed, and disposed of appropriately. Additionally, a previously uncharacterized, buried drum was excavated, removed, and disposed of as hydrocarbon waste as a best management practice. Waste minimization techniques, such as the utilization of laboratory analysis to characterize and classify waste streams, were employed during the performance of closure

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 214 is located in Areas 5, 11, and 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). CAU 214 is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as ''Corrective Action Unit 214: Bunkers and Storage Areas,'' and is comprised of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): {sm_bullet} CAS 05-99-01, Fallout Shelters {sm_bullet} CAS 11-22-03, Drum {sm_bullet} CAS 25-23-01, Contaminated Materials {sm_bullet} CAS 25-23-19, Radioactive Material Storage {sm_bullet} CAS 25-34-03, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker) {sm_bullet} CAS 25-34-04, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker) {sm_bullet} CAS 25-34-05, Motor Dr/Gr Assembly (Bunker) {sm_bullet} CAS 25-99-12, Fly Ash Storage {sm_bullet} CAS 25-99-18, Storage Area The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 11-22-03, 25-34-03, 25-34-04, 25-34-05, 25-99-12, and 25-99-18 is No Further Action. Closure activities included: {sm_bullet} Removing and disposing of the fly ash and surrounding wooden structure at CAS 25-99-12 as a best management practice The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CAS 05-99-01 in CAU 214 is Clean Closure. Closure activities included: {sm_bullet} Removing and disposing of soil contaminated with the pesticide dieldrin The NDEP-approved corrective action alternative for CASs 25-23-01 and 25-23-19 is Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities included: {sm_bullet} Removing and disposing of soil contaminated with chromium and soil impacted with the pesticides chlordane and heptachlor {sm_bullet} Implementing use restrictions (UR) at both CASs as detailed in the CAU 214 Corrective Action Plan (CAP) (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2005) {sm_bullet} Posting UR warning signs around CASs 25-23-01 and 25-23-19 on the existing chain link fence

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

300-Area VOC Program Slug Test Characterization Results for Selected Test/Depth Intervals Conducted During the Drilling of Well 399-3-21  

SciTech Connect

This report presents brief test descriptions and analysis results for multiple, stress-level slug tests that were performed at selected test/depth intervals within well 399-3-21 as part of the 300-Area volatile organic compound characterization program. The test intervals were characterized as the borehole was advanced to its final drill depth (45.7 m) and before its completion as a monitor-well facility. The primary objective of the slug tests was to provide information pertaining to the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity with depth at this location and to select the final screen-depth interval for the monitor well. This type of characterization information is important for predicting/simulating contaminant migration (i.e., numerical flow/transport modeling) and designing proper monitor-well strategies within this area.

Spane, Frank A.

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

295

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 417: Central Nevada Test Area Surface, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following site closure activities were performed at the 34 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) comprising Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 417 and are documented in this report: (1) No closure action was taken at 13 CASs (17 sites): 58-05-01,58-07-01,58-05-04, 58-09-05 (Mud Pits C and D only), 58-35-01,58-05-02,58-09-06 (Mud Pits A, B, C, and D), 58-10-06,58-19-01,58-35-02,58-44-04,58-05-04, and 58-09-03 (Mud Pit E only). (2) Housekeeping activities, collecting scrap materials, and transporting to approved landfill sites at the NTS were used to close seven CASs: 58-44-01,58-44-02,58-44-05, 58-98-03,58-98-01,58-98-02, and 58-98-04. (3) Two CASs (58-05-03 and 58-99-01) were closed by excavation and removal of USTs. (4) Two septic tanks (CASs 58-05-05 and 58-05-06) were closed by backfilling with clean fill. (5) Site posting with above-grade monuments and attached warning signs and land-use restrictions were used to close seven CASs (nine sites): 58-09-02,58-09-05 (Mud Pit E only), 58-09-06 (Mud Pit E only), 58-10-01,58-25-01,58-09-03 (Mud Pits A, B, and D), and 58-10-05. (6) Clean closure by excavation soil with TPH levels greater than the NDEP action level of 100 mg/kg and limited regrading was used to close five CASs: 58-10-03,58-44-06, 58-44-03,58-10-02, and 58-10-04. (7) Construction of engineered covers was used to close in place two CASs: 58-09-01 and 58-09-03 (Mud Pit C only). Following construction, a fence was constructed around each cover to prevent damage to the cover or intrusion by wildlife.

K. B. Campbell

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

External Peer Review Team Report Underground Testing Area Subproject for Frenchman Flat, Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An external peer review was conducted to review the groundwater models used in the corrective action investigation stage of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) subproject to forecast zones of potential contamination in 1,000 years for the Frenchman Flat area. The goal of the external peer review was to provide technical evaluation of the studies and to assist in assessing the readiness of the UGTA subproject to progress to monitoring activities for further model evaluation. The external peer review team consisted of six independent technical experts with expertise in geology, hydrogeology,'''groundwater modeling, and radiochemistry. The peer review team was tasked with addressing the following questions: 1. Are the modeling approaches, assumptions, and model results for Frenchman Flat consistent with the use of modeling studies as a decision tool for resolution of environmental and regulatory requirements? 2. Do the modeling results adequately account for uncertainty in models of flow and transport in the Frenchman Flat hydrological setting? a. Are the models of sufficient scale/resolution to adequately predict contaminant transport in the Frenchman Flat setting? b. Have all key processes been included in the model? c. Are the methods used to forecast contaminant boundaries from the transport modeling studies reasonable and appropriate? d. Are the assessments of uncertainty technically sound and consistent with state-of-the-art approaches currently used in the hydrological sciences? 3. Are the datasets and modeling results adequate for a transition to Corrective Action Unit monitoring studiesthe next stage in the UGTA strategy for Frenchman Flat? The peer review team is of the opinion that, with some limitations, the modeling approaches, assumptions, and model results are consistent with the use of modeling studies for resolution of environmental and regulatory requirements. The peer review team further finds that the modeling studies have accounted for uncertainty in models of flow and transport in the Frenchman Flat except for a few deficiencies described in the report. Finally, the peer review team concludes that the UGTA subproject has explored a wide range of variations in assumptions, methods, and data, and should proceed to the next stage with an emphasis on monitoring studies. The corrective action strategy, as described in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, states that the groundwater flow and transport models for each corrective action unit will consider, at a minimum, the following: Alternative hydrostratigraphic framework models of the modeling domain. Uncertainty in the radiological and hydrological source terms. Alternative models of recharge. Alternative boundary conditions and groundwater flows. Multiple permissive sets of calibrated flow models. Probabilistic simulations of transport using plausible sets of alternative framework and recharge models, and boundary and groundwater flows from calibrated flow models. Ensembles of forecasts of contaminant boundaries. Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses of model outputs. The peer review team finds that these minimum requirements have been met. While the groundwater modeling and uncertainty analyses have been quite detailed, the peer review team has identified several modeling-related issues that should be addressed in the next phase of the corrective action activities: Evaluating and using water-level gradients from the pilot wells at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site in model calibration. Re-evaluating the use of geochemical age-dating data to constrain model calibrations. Developing water budgets for the alluvial and upper volcanic aquifer systems in Frenchman Flat. Considering modeling approaches in which calculated groundwater flow directions near the water table are not predetermined by model boundary conditions and areas of recharge, all of which are very uncertain. Evaluating local-scale variations in hydraulic conductivity on the calculated contaminant boundaries. Evaluat

Sam Marutzky

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Emission Testing of Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) Natural Gas and Diesel Transit Buses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An evaluation of emissions of natural gas and diesel buses operated by the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority.

Melendez, M.; Taylor, J.; Wayne, W. S.; Smith, D.; Zuboy, J.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Aerodynamic Properties of Urban Areas Derived from Analysis of Surface Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several methods to determine the aerodynamic characteristics of a site through analysis of its surface form (morphometry) are considered in relation to cities. The measures discussed include zero-plane displacement length (zd), roughness length (...

C. S. B. Grimmond; T. R. Oke

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Sensible Heat Flux-Radiometric Surface Temperature Relationship for Eight Semiarid Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of sensible heat flux, radiometric surface temperature, air temperature, and wind speed made at eight semiarid rangeland sites were used to investigate the sensible heat flux-aerodynamic resistance relationship. The individual sites ...

J. B. Stewart; W. P. Kustas; K. S. Humes; W. D. Nichols; M. S. Moran; H. A. R. de Bruin

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Surface Di-directional Reflectance Properties Over the ARM SGP Area from Satellite Multi-Platform Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bi-Directional Reflectance Properties Bi-Directional Reflectance Properties Over the ARM SGP Area from Satellite Multi-Platform Observations Y. Luo, A. P. Trishchenko, and R. Latifovic Canada Centre for Remote Sensing Natural Resources Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Z. Li Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland Introduction Surface albedo is an important parameter in atmospheric radiation research. Good knowledge of surface bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) is essential in order to obtain the hemispheric reflectance (albedo) using data from satellite systems, which only view the ground at particular angles. Linear kernel-driven BRDF models have been commonly used for simple operational implementation of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A Simple Parcel Method for Prediction of Cumulus Onset and Area-Averaged Cloud Amount over Heterogeneous Land Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this note is to compare several methods for predicting the onset and quantitative amount of cloud cover over heterogeneous land surfaces. Among the methods tested are that of Wilde et al. (1985) and a new, simple parcel approach. ...

Peter J. Wetzel

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Cooperative AtmosphereSurface Exchange Study (CASES) Dataset for Analyzing and Parameterizing the Effects of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Area-Averaged Surface Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiscale dataset that includes atmospheric, surface, and subsurface observations obtained from an observation network covering a region that has a scale order comparable to mesoscale and general circulation models is described and analyzed. ...

David N. Yates; Fei Chen; Margaret A. LeMone; Russell Qualls; Steven P. Oncley; Robert L. Grossman; Edward A. Brandes

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

George, Thomas J. (Star City, WV); Meacham, G. B. Kirby (Shaker Heights, OH)

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

304

Planar fuel cell utilizing nail current collectors for increased active surface area  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of nail current collector members are useful in the gas flow passages of an electrochemical device to optimize the active surfaces of the device and to provide structural support. In addition, the thicknesses of cathode and anode layers within the electrochemical device are varied according to current flow through the device to reduce resistance and increase operating efficiency.

George, Thomas J.; Meacham, G.B. Kirby

1999-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

Surface Melt Area and Water Balance Modeling on the Greenland Ice Sheet 19952005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SnowModel, a physically based snow-evolution modeling system that includes four submodelsMicroMet, EnBal, SnowPack, and SnowTran-3Dwas used to simulate variations in Greenland [including the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS)] surface snow and ice melt,...

Sebastian H. Mernild; Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra; Konrad Steffen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10  

SciTech Connect

This Explanation of Significant Differences (ESD) applies to the remedial actions performed under the Final Record of Decision for Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-1 0, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (DOE-ID 1999) as amended by the Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10 (DOE-ID 2003), the Record of Decision Amendment for the V-Tanks (TSF-09 and TSF-18) and Explanation of Significant Differences for the PM-2A Tanks (TSF-26) and TSF-06, Area IO, at Test Area North, Operable Unit 1-1 0 (DOE-ID 2004a), and the Explanation of Significant Differences for the Record of Decision for the Test Area North Operable Unit 1-10 (DOE-ID 2005). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Idaho Operations Office; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 10; and the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare-now identified as the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ)-signed the Record of Decision (ROD) in December 1999, the 2003 ESD in April 2003, the ROD Amendment/ESD in February 2004, and the 2005 ESD in January 2005. The EPA and DEQ support the need for this ESD.

D. L. Eaton

2007-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume V - Transport Parameter and Source Term Data Documentation Package  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume V of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the transport parameter and source term data. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Focused evaluation of selected remedial alternatives for the underground test area  

SciTech Connect

The Nevada Test Site (NTS), located in Nye County in southern Nevada, was the location of 928 nuclear tests conducted between 1951 and 1992. Of the total tests, 824 were nuclear tests performed underground. This report describes the approach taken to determine whether any specific, proven, cost-effective technologies currently exist to aid in the removal of the radioactive contaminants from the groundwater, in the stabilization of these contaminants, and in the removal of the source of the contaminants.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Investigation of surface inhomogeneity and estimation of the GOES skin temperature assimilation errors of the MM5 implied by the inhomogeneity over Houston metropolitan area  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study developed a parameterization method to investigate the impacts of inhomogeneous land surfaces on mesoscale model simulations using a high-resolution 1-d PBL model. Then, the 1-d PBL model was used to investigate the inhomogeneity-caused model errors in applying the GOES satellite skin temperature assimilation technique into the MM5 over the Houston metropolitan area (HOU). In order to investigate the surface inhomogeneity impacts on the surface fluxes and PBL variables over HOU, homo- and inhomogeneous 1-d PBL model simulations were performed over HOU and compared to each other. The 1-d PBL model was constructed so that the surface inhomogeneities were able to be represented within model grid elements using a methodology similar to Avissar and Pielke (1989). The surface inhomogeneities over HOU were defined using 30-m resolution land cover data produced by Global Environment Management (GEM), Inc. The inhomogeneity parameterization method developed in the 1-d model was applied to a standard MM5 simulation to test the applicability of the parameterization to 3-d mesoscale model simulations. From the 1-d simulations it was inferred that the surface inhomogeneities would enhance the sensible heat flux by about 36 % and reduce the latent heat flux by about 25 %, thereby inducing the warmer (0.7 %) and drier (-1.0 %) PBL and the colder and moister PBL top induced by greater turbulent diffusivities. The 3-d application of the inhomogeneity parameterization indicated consistent results with the 1-d in general, with additional effects of advection and differential local circulation. The original GOES simulation was warmer compared to observations over HOU than over surrounding areas. The satellite data assimilation itself would lead to a warm bias due to erroneous estimation of gridpoint-mean skin temperature by the satellite, but 1-d simulations indicate that the impact of this error should be much weaker than what was observed. It seems that, unless the already existing warm and dry bias of the MM5 is corrected, the inhomogeneity parameterization in the MM5 would adversely affect the MM5 performance. Therefore, consideration of the surface inhomogeneities in the urban area needs to be confined to the GOES skin temperature retrieval errors at the moment.

Han, Sang-Ok

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) describes the remediation activities performed and the results of verification sampling conducted at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box. The CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1) and consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 22-03-01- Sewage Lagoon (CAU 230); and 22-99-01- Strainer Box (CAU 320). Included with CAS 22-99-01 is a buried Imhoff tank and a sludge bed. These CAUs will be collectively referred to in this plan as the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. Site characterization activities were done during September 1999. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) indicated that only the sludge bed (CAS 22-99-01) contained constituents of concern (COC) above action levels and required remediation (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2000a).

D. S. Tobiason

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Final Report - Hydraulic Conductivity with Depth for Underground Test Area (UGTA) Wells  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic conductivity with depth has been calculated for Underground Test Area (UGTA) wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock. The following wells in volcanic tuff are evaluated: ER-EC-1, ER-EC-2a, ER-EC-4, ER-EC-5, ER-5-4#2, ER-EC-6, ER-EC-7, and ER-EC-8. The following wells in carbonate rock are evaluated: ER-7-1, ER-6-1, ER-6-1#2, and ER-12-3. There are a sufficient number of wells in volcanic tuff and carbonate rock to associate the conductivity values with the specific hydrogeologic characteristics such as the stratigraphic unit, hydrostratigraphic unit, hydrogeologic unit, lithologic modifier, and alteration modifier used to describe the hydrogeologic setting. Associating hydraulic conductivity with hydrogeologic characteristics allows an evaluation of the data range and the statistical distribution of values. These results are relevant to how these units are considered in conceptual models and represented in groundwater models. The wells in volcanic tuff illustrate a wide range of data values and data distributions when associated with specific hydrogeologic characteristics. Hydraulic conductivity data within a hydrogeologic characteristic can display normal distributions, lognormal distributions, semi-uniform distribution, or no identifiable distribution. There can be multiple types of distributions within a hydrogeologic characteristic such as a single stratigraphic unit. This finding has implications for assigning summary hydrogeologic characteristics to hydrostratigraphic and hydrogeologic units. The results presented herein are specific to the hydrogeologic characteristic and to the wells used to describe hydraulic conductivity. The wells in carbonate rock are associated with a fewer number of hydrogeologic characteristics. That is, UGTA wells constructed in carbonate rock have tended to be in similar hydrogeologic materials, and show a wide range in hydraulic conductivity values and data distributions. Associations of hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics are graphically presented even when there are only a few data. This approach benchmarks what is currently known about the association of depth-specific hydraulic conductivity and hydrogeologic characteristics.

P. Oberlander; D. McGraw; C. Russell

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

2004 Annual Summary Report for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site (Bechtel Nevada, 2000) requires an annual review to assess the adequacy of the performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for each of the facilities, and reports the results in an annual summary report to the U.S. Department of Energy Headquarters. The Disposal Authorization Statements for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) also require that such reviews be made and that secondary or minor unresolved issues be tracked and addressed as part of the maintenance plan (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]). The U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office performed annual reviews in fiscal year (FY) 2004 by evaluating operational factors and research results that impact the continuing validity of the PA and CA results. This annual summary report presents data and conclusions from the FY 2004 review, and determines the adequacy of the PAs and CAs. Operational factors, such as the waste form and containers, facility design, waste receipts, closure plans, as well as monitoring results and research and development (R&D) activities were reviewed in FY 2004 for the determination of the adequacy of the PAs. Likewise, the environmental restoration activities at the Nevada Test Site relevant to the sources of residual radioactive material that are considered in the CAs, the land-use planning, and the results of the environmental monitoring and R&D activities were reviewed for the determination of the adequacy of the CAs.

Vefa Yucel

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 151: Septic Systems and Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental corrective action alternatives. Corrective Action Unit 151 is located in Areas 2, 12, 18, and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 151 is comprised of the nine Corrective Action Sites (CAS) listed below: (1) 02-05-01, UE-2ce Pond; (2) 12-03-01, Sewage Lagoons (6); (3) 12-04-01, Septic Tanks; (4) 12-04-02, Septic Tanks; (5) 12-04-03, Septic Tank; (6) 12-47-01, Wastewater Pond; (7) 18-03-01, Sewage Lagoon; (8) 18-99-09, Sewer Line (Exposed); and (9) 20-19-02, Photochemical Drain. The CASs within CAU 151 are discharge and collection systems. Corrective Action Site 02-05-01 is located in Area 2 and is a well-water collection pond used as a part of the Nash test. Corrective Action Sites 12-03-01, 12-04-01, 12-04-02, 12-04-03, and 12-47-01 are located in Area 12 and are comprised of sewage lagoons, septic tanks, associated piping, and two sumps. The features are a part of the Area 12 Camp housing and administrative septic systems. Corrective Action Sites 18-03-01 and 18-99-09 are located in the Area 17 Camp in Area 18. These sites are sewage lagoons and associated piping. The origin and terminus of CAS 18-99-09 are unknown; however, the type and configuration of the pipe indicates that it may be a part of the septic systems in Area 18. Corrective Action Site 20-19-02 is located in the Area 20 Camp. This site is comprised of a surface discharge of photoprocessing chemicals.

David A. Strand

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Intensive archaeological survey of the F/H Surface Enhancement Project Area, Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Twelve archaeological sites and four artifact occurrences were located by intensive survey of two tracts of land for the F and H Surface Enhancement Project on the Savannah River Site, Aiken and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Fieldwork in the 480-acre project area included surface reconnaissance of 3.6 linear kilometers of transects, 140 shovel tests along 4.2 linear kilometers of transects, an additional 162 shovel tests at sites and occurrences, and the excavation of six l {times} 2 m test units. All but one of the sites contained artifacts of the prehistoric era; the twelfth site consists of the remains of a twentieth-century home place. The historic site and six of the prehistoric sites consist of limited and/or disturbed contexts of archaeological deposits that have little research potential and are therefore considered ineligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places (NRHP). The remaining five sites have sufficient content and integrity to yield information important to ongoing investigations into upland site use. These sites (38AK146, 38AK535, 38AK539, 38AK541, and 38AK543) are thus deemed eligible for nomination to the NRHP and the Savannah River Archaeological Research Program (SRARP) recommends that they be preserved through avoidance or data recovery.

Sassaman, K.E.; Gillam, J.C.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project, Pacific Northwest Laboratory reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Certain radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the 1964--1966 time period. This report summarizes the literature and database review and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Literature and data review for the surface-water pathway: Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories reviewed literature and data on radionuclide concentrations and distribution in the water, sediment, and biota of the Columbia River and adjacent coastal areas. Over 600 documents were reviewed including Hanford reports, reports by offsite agencies, journal articles, and graduate theses. Radionuclide concentration data were used in preliminary estimates of individual dose for the period 1964 through 1966. This report summarizes the literature and database reviews and the results of the preliminary dose estimates.

Walters, W.H.; Dirkes, R.L.; Napier, B.A.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

ERRATA SHEET for Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Section 2.1.1.3 of the Table of Contents reference on Page v and on Page 12 of the Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 490: Station 44 Burn Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada erroneously refers to the Nevada Environmental Policy Act Determination. The correct title of the referenced document is the National Environmental Policy Act Determination.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Botts Area-Preserving Flux-Form Advection Algorithm: Extension to Higher Orders and Additional Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Botts forward-in-time, positive-definite, area-preserving flux-form advection algorithm is extended to higher orders. The new algorithm versions are tested with two-dimensional flow fields: a purely rotational flow and a purely deformational ...

Alexandre A. Costa; Anto?nio JosC. Sampaio

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The site is located within the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly and Disassembly (R-MAD) compound and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding areas within an existing fenced area measuring approximately 50 x 37 meters (160 x 120 feet). The site was used from the early 1960s to the early 1970s as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station program to decontaminate test-car hardware and tooling. The site was reactivated in the early 1980s to decontaminate a radiologically contaminated military tank. This Closure Report (CR) describes the closure activities performed to allow un-restricted release of the R-MAD Decontamination Facility.

G. N. Doyle

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

atmosphere, but due to vibrations and loss of cooling during some operational tests, fuel fragments in excess of planned releases became entrained in the exhaust and spread in the immediate surrounding area. Cleanup efforts have been undertaken at times to collect the fuel rod fragments and other contamination. Previous environmental investigations in the TCA area have resulted in the creation of a number of use restrictions. The industrial area of TCA is encompassed by a fence and is currently posted as a radioactive material area. Corrective Action Site 30-45-01 (releases associated with the Buggy Plowshare test) is located in Area 30 on Chukar Mesa. It was a Plowshare test where five nuclear devices were buried 140 feet (ft) deep in a row at 150-ft intervals. These devices were detonated on March 12, 1968, to produce a trench 254 ft wide, 865 ft long, and 70 ft deep. The mesa where the test was conducted is surrounded on three sides by ravines, and the entire end of the mesa is fenced and posted as a contamination area. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 2, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 375.

Patrick Matthews

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Surface topographies of two-year coupons of titanium grade 16 from long-term testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using an Atomic Force Microscope, we have examined the surface topographies associated with crevice coupons representing the six classes of coupons of Titanium Grade 16 removed from Long-Term Corrosion testing after two years of immersion. Only on coupons removed from Simulated Concentrated Well Water do we observe features which are likely to represent embryonic pit formation. The coupons removed from the Simulated Acidified Well Water were too rough to yield representative measurements.

Bedrossian, P J

1999-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

323

Testing for a time-varying price-cost markup in the Euro area inflation process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2004). In?ation and relative price variability: short-runand the informativeness of prices. Journal of Money, CreditTesting for a time-varying price-cost markup in the Euro

Bowdler, Christopher; Jansen, Eilev S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Test Reference Year Generation and Evaluation Methods in the Continental Mediterranean Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Different meteorological data series called multiyear data, long-term average measured data series, or test reference years (TRYs) are required for solar energy system simulation. It is known that the use of the multiyear data approach requires a ...

Julia Bilbao; Argimiro Miguel; JosA. Franco; Arturo Ayuso

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

SIZE AND SURFACE AREA OF ICY DUST AGGREGATES AFTER A HEATING EVENT AT A PROTOPLANETARY NEBULA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activity of a young star rises abruptly during an FU Orionis outburst. This event causes a temporary temperature increase in the protoplanetary nebula. H{sub 2}O icy grains are sublimated by this event, and silicate cores embedded inside the ice are ejected. During the high-temperature phase, the silicate grains coagulate to form silicate core aggregates. After the heating event, the temperature drops, and the ice recondenses onto the aggregates. I determined numerically the size distribution of the ice-covered aggregates. The size of the aggregates exceeds 10 {mu}m around the snow line. Because of the migration of the ice to large aggregates, only a small fraction of the silicate core aggregate is covered with H{sub 2}O ice. After the heating event, the surface of an ice-covered aggregate is totally covered by silicate core aggregates. This might reduce the fragmentation velocity of aggregates when they collide. It is possible that the covering silicate cores shield the UV radiation field which induces photodissociation of H{sub 2}O ice. This effect may cause the shortage of cold H{sub 2}O vapor observed by Herschel.

Sirono, Sin-iti [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)] [Earth and Environmental Sciences, Graduate School of Environmental Studies, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A hierarchical framework for coupling surface fluxes to atompsheric general circulation models: The homogeneity test  

SciTech Connect

The atmosphere and the biosphere are inherently coupled to one another. Atmospheric surface state variables such as temperature, winds, water vapor, precipitation, and radiation control biophysical, biogeochemical, and ecological processes at the surface and subsurface. At the same time, surface fluxes of momentum, moisture, heat, and trace gases act as time-dependent boundary conditions providing feedback on atmospheric processes. To understand such phenomena, a coupled set of interactive models is required. Costs are still prohibitive for computing surface/subsurface fluxes directly for medium-resolution atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs), but a technique has been developed for testing large-scale homogeneity and accessing surface parameterizations and models to reduce this computational cost and maintain accuracy. This modeling system potentially bridges the observed spatial and temporal ranges yet allows the incorporation of necessary details about individual ecological community types or biomes and simulates the net momentum, heat, moisture, and trace gas fluxes. This suite of coupled models is defined here as the hierarchical systems flux scheme (HSFS).

Miller, N.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 375: Area 30 Buggy Unit Craters, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 375 is located in Areas 25 and 30 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 375 comprises the two corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 25-23-22, Contaminated Soils Site 30-45-01, U-30a, b, c, d, e Craters Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination present at the CAU 375 CASs is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). This document details an investigation plan that will provide for the gathering of sufficient information to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Corrective Action Site 25-23-22 is composed of the releases associated with nuclear rocket testing at Test Cell A (TCA). Test Cell A was used to test and develop nuclear rocket motors as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station from its construction in 1958 until 1966, when rocket testing began being conducted at Test Cell C. The rocket motors were built with an unshielded nuclear reactor that produced as much as 1,100 kilowatts (at full power) to heat liquid hydrogen to 4,000 degrees Fahrenheit, at which time the expanded gases were focused out a nozzle to produce thrust. The fuel rods in the reactor were not clad and were designed to release fission fragments to the atmosphere, but due to vibrations and loss of cooling during some operational tests, fuel fragments in excess of planned releases became entrained in the exhaust and spread in the immediate surrounding area. Cleanup efforts have been undertaken at times to collect the fuel rod fragments and other contamination. Previous environmental investigations in the TCA area have resulted in the creation of a number of use restrictions. The industrial area of TCA is encompassed by a fence and is currently posted as a radioactive material area. Corrective Action Site 30-45-01 (releases associated with the Buggy Plowshare test) is located in Area 30 on Chukar Mesa. It was a Plowshare test where five nuclear devices were buried 140 feet (ft) deep in a row at 150-ft intervals. These devices were detonated on March 12, 1968, to produce a trench 254 ft wide, 865 ft long, and 70 ft deep. The mesa where the test was conducted is surrounded on three sides by ravines, and the entire end of the mesa is fenced and posted as a contamination area. These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on December 2, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 375.

Patrick Matthews

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Rooting Characteristics of Vegetation Near Areas 3 and 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site--Part 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy emplaced high-specific-activity low-level radioactive wastes and limited quantities of classified transuranic wastes in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1984 to 1989. The boreholes are located at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in southern Nevada. The boreholes were backfilled with native alluvium soil. The surface of these boreholes and trenches is expected to be colonized by native vegetation in the future. Considering the long-term performance of the disposal facilities, bioturbation (the disruption of buried wastes by biota) is considered a primary release mechanism for radionuclides disposed in GCD boreholes as well as trenches at both Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. This report provides information about rooting characteristics of vegetation near Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs. Data from this report are being used to resolve uncertainties involving parameterization of performance assessment models used to characterize the biotic mixing of soils and radionuclide transport processes by biota. The objectives of this study were to: (1) survey the prior ecological literature on the NTS and identify pertinent information about the vegetation, (2) conduct limited field studies to describe the current vegetation in the vicinity of Areas 3 and 5 RWMSs so as to correlate findings with more extensive vegetation data collected at Yucca Mountain and the NTS, ( 3 ) review prior performance assessment documents and evaluate model assumptions based on current ecological information, and (4) identify data deficiencies and make recommendations for correcting such deficiencies.

D. J. Hansen

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

329

Environmental Restoration of Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Funded by the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act)  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Environmental Restoration Program is to address the environmental impacts of weapons testing conducted on the Nevada National Security Site and the Nevada Test and Training Range. The large physical size of these sites, along with limits on funding and other resources available for remediation efforts, means that environmental restoration activities must be prioritized and accomplished incrementally over time. The remediation of a bomblet target area on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), which is located within the Nevada Test and Training Range, was originally planned in 2007 but was not carried out until funding became available in the summer of 2009 through the American Reinvestment and Recovery Act. This activity was implemented in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order established between NNSA/NSO and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. This activity which was complete by the end of Fiscal Year 2010, involved the excavation of disposal pits suspected of containing submunitions and the surface clearance of submunitions on seven target areas amounting to approximately 6.7 square kilometers of land at the TTR. The TTR was used by Sandia National Laboratories from the late 1960s through the mid-1980s to conduct research into the deployment of submunitions. Although there were efforts to identify, collect, and dispose various amounts of unexploded ordnance on the TTR in the past, no comprehensive effort to remediate the entire flightline area for submunitions was undertaken before this project.

Kevin Cabble (NSO), Mark Burmeister and Mark Krauss (N-I)

2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

330

Gas Permeation Testing Results from the Mixed Waste Focus Area Improved Hydrogen Getter Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas permeabilities of more than 20 polymers were measured using pure and mixed gas techniques. The motivation was to determine potential materials that could be used to protect hydrogen getter particles from poisons while permitting sufficient hydrogen rates to enable the getters use in TRUPACT types of containers. A rate of five barrers or larger is needed. Of the materials screened in the pure gas tests, more than 15 qualified. Nine materials qualified in the mixed gas tests, but of the nine only three had high CCl4 rejection rates and four others would greatly reduce the transport of the CCl4.

Mark Stone; Christopher Orme; Eric Peterson; Michael Benson; John Kaszuba; Eugene Mroz; Marc Haga

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the Mud Plant. (4) CAS 03-20-05 contains TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination within the injection well casing soil and TPH-DRO contamination at the depth coincidental with the bottom of the injection well sump. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of future and current operations in Areas 1 and 3 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for the Corrective Action Unit 322 CASs. Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred corrective action for the following CASs: (1) CAS 01-25-01, removal of TPH-DRO contamination would pose a significant safety hazard due to the site location. (2) CAS 03-25-03 No contamination remains at Area A (AST Berm); and thus, no further action is the preferred alternative at this part of the CAS. However at Area B, TPH-DRO contamination is varied in concentration and location and the footprint of the CAS is large, removal of contaminated ''pockets'' would be laborious and cost prohibitive. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-25-03 Area B has been removed and drummed as a best management practice. (3) CAS 03-20-05, TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination are present in the injection well casing soils. Recommend corrective action includes removal of the liquid in the injection well sump (approximately 3 feet (ft) of liquid at 60 ft below ground surface), grouting the sump, and the area within the injection well casing.

Robert Boehlecke

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Electro-catalytically Active, High Surface Area Cathodes for Low Temperature SOFCs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research focused on developing low polarization (area specific resistance, ASR) cathodes for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (IT-SOFCs). In order to accomplish this we focused on two aspects of cathode development: (1) development of novel materials; and (2) developing the relationships between microstructure and electrochemical performance. The materials investigated ranged from Ag-bismuth oxide composites (which had the lowest reported ASR at the beginning of this contract) to a series of pyrochlore structured ruthenates (Bi{sub 2-x}M{sub x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}, where M = Sr, Ca, Ag; Pb{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 6.5}; and Y{sub 2-2x}Pr{sub 2x}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7}), to composites of the pyrochlore ruthenates with bismuth oxide. To understand the role of microstructure on electrochemical performance, we optimized the Ag-bismuth oxide and the ruthenate-bismuth oxide composites in terms of both two-phase composition and particle size/microstructure. We further investigated the role of thickness and current collector on ASR. Finally, we investigated issues of stability and found the materials investigated did not form deleterious phases at the cathode/electrolyte interface. Further, we established the ability through particle size modification to limit microstructural decay, thus, enhancing stability. The resulting Ag-Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} and Bi{sub 2}Ru{sub 2}O{sub 7{sup -}}Bi{sub 0.8}Er{sub 0.2}O{sub 1.5} composite cathodes had ASRs of 1.0 {Omega} cm{sup 2} and 0.73 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 500 C and 0.048 {Omega}cm{sup 2} and 0.053 {Omega}cm{sup 2} at 650 C, respectively. These ASRs are truly impressive and makes them among the lowest IT-SOFC ASRs reported to date.

Eric D. Wachsman

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 165: Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 165: Area 25 and 26 Dry Well and Washdown Areas, Nevada Test Site, Nevada as described in the document Recommendations and Justifications To Remove Use Restrictions Established under the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order dated September 2013. The Use Restriction Removal document was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on October 16, 2013. The approval of the UR Removal document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the UR Removal document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the UR Removal document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the UR Removal document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the UR Removal document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 25-20-01, Lab Drain Dry Well. This UR was established as part of FFACO corrective actions and was based on the presence of tetrachloroethene contamination at concentrations greater than the action level established at the time of the initial investigation. Although total petroleum hydrocarbon diesel-range organics contamination at concentrations greater than the NDEP action level was present at the site, no hazardous constituents of TPH-DRO exceeded the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 9 preliminary remediation goals established at the time of the initial investigation.

Krauss, Mark J.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Density logging and density of rocks in Rainier Mesa Area, Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Density logs from all 35 vertical drill holes in the Rainier Mesa area in which logs were obtained were evaluated and the distribution of densities of units in the geologic section was derived. Densities were obtained in only 10 holes in which calibrated logging tools had been run. The logs from an additional 10 holes were calibrated with core. Densities vary from nearly 1 g/cc in tunnel bed 5 to over 2.8 g/cc in the dolomitic rocks. Log densities were found to agree well with core data in those subunits (chiefly within tunnel beds 3 and 4) where an adequate number of core measurements were available for comparison. Lithologic correlations based on density log signatures were found to extend for more than 8 km in several units and subunits in the area. Although the volcanic rocks in the Rainier Mesa area are comprised of a wider spectrum of minerals than the petroliferous rocks generally involved in most commercial logging applications, grain density may be estimated with good accuracy with only a knowledge of glass and zeolite content. The variability of the Z/A ratio of the matrix in these volcanic rocks is also negligible compared to the value of 0.5 generally assumed in density logging. However, due to the assumptions made concerning the Z/A of water in deriving the output of commercial density tools, one should be aware of the errors inherent in assuming that recorded log densities are true densities. These errors are normally small, being less than 3 percent for compensated limestone'' tools and 2 percent for tools which output electron density. 35 refs., 25 figs., 12 tabs.

Carroll, R.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Underground Test Area Project of the Nevada Test Site: Building Confidence in Groundwater Flow and Transport Models at Pahute Mesa Through Focused Characterization Studies  

SciTech Connect

Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site contains about 8.0E+07 curies of radioactivity caused by underground nuclear testing. The Underground Test Area Subproject has entered Phase II of data acquisition, analysis, and modeling to determine the risk to receptors from radioactivity in the groundwater, establish a groundwater monitoring network, and provide regulatory closure. Evaluation of radionuclide contamination at Pahute Mesa is particularly difficult due to the complex stratigraphy and structure caused by multiple calderas in the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field and overprinting of Basin and Range faulting. Included in overall Phase II goals is the need to reduce the uncertainty and improve confidence in modeling results. New characterization efforts are underway, and results from the first year of a three-year well drilling plan are presented.

Pawloski, G A; Wurtz, J; Drellack, S L

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decon Pond Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following is an addendum to the 'Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 92: Area 6 Decontamination Pond, Nevada Test Site, Nevada', DOE/NV/11718--306, dated April 1999. This addendum includes Use Restriction Information forms and survey maps for CAS 06-04-01, Decon Pad Oil/Water Separator, and CAS 06-05-02, Decontamination Pond (RCRA), that were inadvertently left out of the Closure Report when it was published as a final document.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Numerical Simulation and Test Study on Non-uniform Area Of Round-ended CFST Tubular Tower  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impacts of Poisson ratio of core concrete on the bearing capacity of round-ended CFST tubular tower and non-uniform area were analyzed with test study and the sub-model technology, the most disadvantaged stress state of the structure under the triaxial ... Keywords: round-ended concrete-filled steel(CFST), triaxial compression, Poisson's ratio(), sub-model method, Micro-expansive

Jian-xiong Xie; Zhe-an Lu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense (FFACO, 1996). The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO (1996), CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and the criteria for conducting site investigation activities at the CAU 321 Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage, CAS 22-99-05 Fuel Storage Area. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 321 or the Fuel Storage Area. The Fuel Storage Area is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Fuel Storage Area (Figure 1-2) was used to store fuel and other petroleum products necessary for motorized operations at the historic Camp Desert Rock facility which was operational from 1951 to 1958 at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. The site was dismantled after 1958 (DOE/NV, 1996a).

DOE /NV

1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

339

Housekeeping Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 212: Area 23 Warehouses E and R Chemical Storage, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order was entered into by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy, and the U.S. Department of Defense to identify sites of potential historical contamination and implement corrective actions based on public health and environmental considerations. The facilities subject to this agreement include the Nevada Test Site (NTS), parts of the Tonopah Test Range, parts of the Nellis Air Force Range, the Central Nevada Test Area, and the Project Shoal Area. Corrective Action Sites (CASs) are areas potentially requiring corrective actions and may include solid waste management units, individual disposal, or release sites. Based on geography, technical similarity, agency responsibility, or other appropriate reasons, CASs are grouped together into corrective Action Units (CAUs) for the purposes of determining corrective actions. This report contains the Closure Verification Forms for cleanup activities that were performed at six CASs within CAU 212 on the NTS. The form for each CAS provides the location, directions to the site, general description, and photographs of the site before and after cleanup activities. Housekeeping activities at these sites included removal of debris, drums, batteries, scrap metal, and other material. Based on these activities, no further action is required at these CASs.

USDOE/NV

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Uncertainty and Sensitivity of Contaminant Travel Times from the Upgradient Nevada Test Site to the Yucca Mountain Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada, has been proposed by the U.S. Department of Energy as the nations first permanent geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and highlevel radioactive waste. In this study, the potential for groundwater advective pathways from underground nuclear testing areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) to intercept the subsurface of the proposed land withdrawal area for the repository is investigated. The timeframe for advective travel and its uncertainty for possible radionuclide movement along these flow pathways is estimated as a result of effective-porosity value uncertainty for the hydrogeologic units (HGUs) along the flow paths. Furthermore, sensitivity analysis is conducted to determine the most influential HGUs on the advective radionuclide travel times from the NTS to the YM area. Groundwater pathways are obtained using the particle tracking package MODPATH and flow results from the Death Valley regional groundwater flow system (DVRFS) model developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). Effectiveporosity values for HGUs along these pathways are one of several parameters that determine possible radionuclide travel times between the NTS and proposed YM withdrawal areas. Values and uncertainties of HGU porosities are quantified through evaluation of existing site effective-porosity data and expert professional judgment and are incorporated in the model through Monte Carlo simulations to estimate mean travel times and uncertainties. The simulations are based on two steady-state flow scenarios, the pre-pumping (the initial stress period of the DVRFS model), and the 1998 pumping (assuming steady-state conditions resulting from pumping in the last stress period of the DVRFS model) scenarios for the purpose of long-term prediction and monitoring. The pumping scenario accounts for groundwater withdrawal activities in the Amargosa Desert and other areas downgradient of YM. Considering each detonation in a clustered region around Pahute Mesa (in the NTS operational areas 18, 19, 20, and 30) under the water table as a particle, those particles from the saturated zone detonations were tracked forward using MODPATH to identify hydraulically downgradient groundwater discharge zones and to determine the particles from which detonations will intercept the proposed YM withdrawal area. Out of the 71 detonations in the saturated zone, the flowpaths from 23 of the 71 detonations will intercept the proposed YM withdrawal area under the pre-pumping scenario. For the 1998 pumping scenario, the flowpaths from 55 of the 71 detonations will intercept the proposed YM withdrawal area. Three different effective-porosity data sets compiled in support of regional models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport developed for the NTS and the proposed YM repository are used. The results illustrate that mean minimum travel time from underground nuclear testing areas on the NTS to the proposed YM repository area can vary from just over 700 to nearly 700,000 years, depending on the locations of the underground detonations, the pumping scenarios considered, and the effective-porosity value distributions used. Groundwater pumping scenarios are found to significantly impact minimum particle travel time from the NTS to the YM area by altering flowpath geometry. Pumping also attracts many more additional groundwater flowpaths from the NTS to the YM area. The sensitivity analysis further illustrates that for both the pre-pumping and 1998 pumping scenarios, the uncertainties in effective-porosity values for five of the 27 HGUs considered account for well over 90 percent of the effective-porosity-related travel time uncertainties for the flowpaths having the shortest mean travel times to YM.

J. Zhu; K. Pohlmann; J. Chapman; C. Russell; R.W.H. Carroll; D. Shafer

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Toltec two-axis tracking solar collector with 3M acrylic polyester film reflector surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Toltec solar collector, with acrylic film reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

Harrison, T.D.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Midtemperature solar systems test facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data. Polisolar Model POL solar collector with glass reflector surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Polisolar Model POL solar collector, with glass reflector surfaces, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States.

Harrison, T.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 372: Area 20 Cabriolet/Palanquin Unit Craters Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 372 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 372 is comprised of the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 18-45-02, Little Feller I Surface Crater 18-45-03, Little Feller II Surface Crater 20-23-01, U-20k Contamination Area 20-45-01, U-20L Crater (Cabriolet) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation (CAI) before evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on February 10, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture; Desert Research Institute, and National Security Technologies, LLC. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 372.

Patrick Matthews

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The Area 5 RWMS is a US Department of Energy (DOE)-operated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management site located in northern Frenchman Flat on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Area 5 RWMS has disposed of low-level radioactive waste in shallow unlined pits and trenches since 1960. Transuranic waste (TRU) and high-specific activity waste was disposed in Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes from 1983 to 1989. The purpose of this CA is to determine if continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS poses an acceptable or unacceptable risk to the public considering the total waste inventory and all other interacting sources of radioactive material in the vicinity. Continuing operation of the Area 5 RWMS will be considered acceptable if the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) is less than 100 mrem in a year. If the TEDE exceeds 30 mrem in a year, a cost-benefit options analysis must be performed to determine if cost-effective management options exist to reduce the dose further. If the TEDE is found to be less than 30 mrem in a year, an analysis may be performed if warranted to determine if doses are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA).

V. Yucel

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

TREATABILITY TEST REPORT FOR THE REMOVAL OF CHROMIUM FROM GROUNDWATER AT 100-D AREA USING ELECTROCOAGULATION  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has committed to accelerate cleanup of contaminated groundwater along the Columbia River. The current treatment approach was driven by a series of Interim Action Records of Decision (IAROD) issued in the mid-1990s. Part of the approach for acceleration involves increasing the rate of groundwater extraction for the chromium plume north of the 100-D Reactor and injecting the treated water in strategic locations to hydraulically direct contaminated groundwater toward the extraction wells. The current treatment system uses ion exchange for Cr(VI) removal, with off-site regeneration of the ion exchange resins. Higher flow rates will increase the cost and frequency of ion exchange resin regeneration; therefore, alternative technologies are being considered for treatment at high flow rates. One of these technologies, electrocoagulation (EC), was evaluated through a pilot-scale treatability test. The primary purpose of the treatability study was to determine the effectiveness of Cr(VI) removal and the robustness/implementability of an EC system. Secondary purposes of the study were to gather information about derivative wastes and to obtain data applicable to scaling the process from the treatability scale to full-scale. The treatability study work plan identified a performance objective and four operational objectives. The performance objective for the treatability study was to determine the efficiency (effectiveness) of hexavalent chromium removal from the groundwater, with a desired concentration of {le} 20 micrograms per liter ({micro}g/L) Cr(VI) in the effluent prior to re-injection. Influent and effluent total chromium and hexavalent chromium data were collected using a field test kit for multiple samples per week, and from off-site laboratory analysis of samples collected approximately monthly. These data met all data quality requirements. Two of three effluent chromium samples analyzed in the off-site (that is, fixed) laboratory met the performance objective during the continuous operational testing. Effluent hexavalent chromium analyzed by the field laboratory met the performance goal in over 90 percent of the samples. All effluent hexavalent chromium samples during the batch testing with high influent hexavalent chromium concentrations ({approx}2000 {micro}g/L) met the performance objective. Although the EC system was able to meet the performance goal, it must be noted that it was not uncommon for the system to be operated in recycle mode to achieve the performance goal. The EC unit was sometimes, but not always, capable of a single pass treatment efficiency high enough to meet the performance goal, and recycling water for multiple treatment passes was effective. An operational objective was to determine the volume and composition of the waste streams to enable proper waste designation. The toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) concentrations, pH, and free liquids were determined for solid material from the EC electrodes (mechanically removed scale), the filter press, and the tank bottoms for the effluent and waste collector tanks. These data met all data quality requirements. All solid-phase secondary waste streams were found to be below the TCLP limits for the toxicity characteristic, and a pH value within the limits for the corrosivity characteristic. Out of three samples, two (one of scale from the EC unit and one from filter press solids) failed the free liquid (paint filter) test, which is one of the acceptability criteria for Hanford's Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The solid-phase waste generation rate was about 0.65-gallon of solid waste per 100 gallons of water treated. It is concluded that the solid-phase secondary waste generated from this technology under the conditions at the test site will meet the toxicity and corrosivity criteria for disposal. It is also concluded that with engineering and/or operational improvements, a solid-phase secondary waste could be produced that would meet the free liquid disposal requirements. The second oper

PETERSEN SW

2009-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

Measuring the permeability of Eleana argillite from area 17, Nevada Test Site, using the transient method  

SciTech Connect

Using the transient method, we determine the permeability of high-quartz Eleana argillite from the Nevada Test Site as a function of effective pressure. By comparing calculated and observed pressure decay in the upstream reservoir, we have determined the permeability of intact and fractured specimens at effective pressures ranging from 1.0 to 24.0 MPa. Over this pressure range, Eleana argillite has a low permeability (10{sup -16} to 10{sup -19} cm{sup 2}) when intact and a higher permeability (10{sup -12} to 10{sup -17} cm{sup 2}) with one induced through-going fracture.

Lin, W.

1978-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

347

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

David A. Strand

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 551: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 551, Area 12 muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 551 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 110 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 miles beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 551 is comprised of the four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: (1) 12-01-09, Aboveground Storage Tank and Stain; (2) 12-06-05, Muckpile; (3) 12-06-07, Muckpile; and (4) 12-06-08, Muckpile. Corrective Action Site 12-01-09 is located in Area 12 and consists of an above ground storage tank (AST) and associated stain. Corrective Action Site 12-06-05 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. Corrective Action Site 12-06-07 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. Corrective Action Site 12-06-08 is located in Area 12 and consists of a muckpile associated with the U12 B-Tunnel. In keeping with common convention, the U12B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels will be referred to as the B-, C-, D-, and F-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and sampling of media, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions.

Robert F. Boehlecke

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Test of the Fluctuation Relation in lagrangian turbulence on a free surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The statistics of lagrangian velocity divergence are studied for an assembly of particles in compressible turbulence on a free surface. Under an appropriate definition of entropy, the two-dimensional lagrangian velocity divergence of a particle trajectory represents the local entropy rate, a random variable. The statistics of this rate are shown to be in agreement with the fluctuation relation (FR) over a limited range. The probability distribution functions (PDFs) obtained in this analysis exhibit features different from those observed in previous experimental tests.

M. M. Bandi; J. R. Cressman Jr.; W. I. Goldburg

2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) provides selected corrective action alternatives and proposes the closure methodology for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262, Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point. CAU 262 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Remediation of CAU 262 is required under the FFACO. CAU 262 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS), approximately 100 kilometers (km) (62 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) within CAU 262 are located in the Nuclear Rocket Development Station complex. Individual CASs are located in the vicinity of the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD); and Test Cell C compounds. CAU 262 includes the following CASs as provided in the FFACO (1996); CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage Tank; CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B; CAS 25-04-07, Septic System; CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield; CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield; CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield; and CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well. Figures 2, 3, and 4 show the locations of the R-MAD, the E-MAD, and the Test Cell C CASs, respectively. The facilities within CAU 262 supported nuclear rocket reactor engine testing. Activities associated with the program were performed between 1958 and 1973. However, several other projects used the facilities after 1973. A significant quantity of radioactive and sanitary waste was produced during routine operations. Most of the radioactive waste was managed by disposal in the posted leachfields. Sanitary wastes were disposed in sanitary leachfields. Septic tanks, present at sanitary leachfields (i.e., CAS 25-02-06,2504-06 [Septic Systems A and B], 25-04-07, 25-05-05,25-05-12) allowed solids to settle out of suspension prior to entering the leachfield. Posted leachfields do not contain septic tanks. All CASs located in CAU 262 are inactive or abandoned. However, some leachfields may still receive liquids from runoff during storm events. Results from the 2000-2001 site characterization activities conducted by International Technology (IT) Corporation, Las Vegas Office are documented in the Corrective Action Investigation Report for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This document is located in Appendix A of the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 262. Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. (DOE/NV, 2001).

K. B. Campbell

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

RESULTS OF CHARACTERIZATION TESTS OF THE SURFACES OF A COMMERCIALLY CARBURIZED AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A commercial surface carburization treatment that shows promise for hardening the surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the Spallation Neutron Source against cavitation erosion and pitting caused by the action of pulsed pressure waves in the liquid mercury target has been investigated. To verify promotional claims for the treatment and to uncover any factors that might be of concern for the integrity of a carburized target vessel, some characterization tests of the nature of the surface layers of carburized austenitic 316LN stainless steel were conducted. The findings support most of the claims. The carburized layer is about 35 {micro}m thick. Its indentation hardness is about five times larger than that of the substrate steel and declines rapidly with depth into the layer. The surface is distorted by the treatment, and the austenite lattice is enlarged. The corrosion resistance of the carburized layer in an acid medium is greater than that for untreated austenite. The layer is not brittle; it is plastically deformable and is quite resistant to cracking during straining. Contrary to the provider's assertations, the maximum carbon content of the layer is much less than 6-7 wt% carbon, and the carbon is not simply contained in supersaturated solid solution; some of it is present in a previously unreported iron carbide phase located at the very surface. Large variations were found in the thickness of the layer, and they signify that controls may be needed to ensure a uniform thickness for treatment of the SNS target vessel. Inclusion stringers and {delta}-ferrite phase embraced in the treated layer are less resistant to chemical attack than the treated austenite. From a cavitation pitting perspective under SNS bombardment, such non-austenitic phases may provide preferential sites for pitting. The shallow depth of the hardened layer will require use of protection measures to avoid mishandling damage to the layer during assembly and installation of a target vessel.

Farrell, K

2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Maintenance Plan for the Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1 requires that performance assessments (PAs) and composite analyses (CAs) for low-level waste (LLW) disposal facilities be maintained by the field offices. This plan describes the activities to be performed in maintaining the Performance Assessment (PA) and Composite Analysis (CA) for the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) for the continuing operations of a LLW facility at the DOE complex specifies the conditions for operations based on approval of a PA and CA, and requires the facility to implement a maintenance program to assure that these conditions will remain protective of the public health and the environment in the future. The goal of the maintenance program is to provide that assurance. The maintenance process is an iterative one in which changing conditions may result in a revision of PA and CA; the revised PA and CA may impose a different set of conditions for facility operation, closure, and postclosure. The maintenance process includes managing uncertainty, performing annual reviews, submitting annual summary reports to DOE Headquarters (DOE/HQ), carrying out special analyses, and revising the PAs and CAs, if necessary. Management of uncertainty is an essential component of the maintenance program because results of the original PAs and CAs are understood to be based on uncertain assumptions about the conceptual models; the mathematical models and parameters; and the future state of the lands, disposal facilities, and human activities. The annual reviews for the PAs include consideration of waste receipts, facility specific factors, results of monitoring, and results of research and development (R&D) activities. Likewise, results of ongoing R&D, changes in land-use planning, new information on known sources of residual radioactive materials, and identification of new sources may warrant an evaluation to determine the impacts on the conclusions of the CAs.

V. Yucel

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Addendum to the Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area, Nevada Test Site, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This document constitutes an addendum to the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Discharge Area Nevada Test Site, December 1997 as described in the document Supplemental Investigation Report for FFACO Use Restrictions, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (SIR) dated November 2008. The SIR document was approved by NDEP on December 5, 2008. The approval of the SIR document constituted approval of each of the recommended UR removals. In conformance with the SIR document, this addendum consists of: This page that refers the reader to the SIR document for additional information The cover, title, and signature pages of the SIR document The NDEP approval letter The corresponding section of the SIR document This addendum provides the documentation justifying the cancellation of the UR for CAS 12-19-01, A12 Fleet Ops Steam Cleaning Efflu. This UR was established as part of a Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) corrective action and is based on the presence of contaminants at concentrations greater than the action levels established at the time of the initial investigation (FFACO, 1996). Since this UR was established, practices and procedures relating to the implementation of risk-based corrective actions (RBCA) have changed. Therefore, this UR was reevaluated against the current RBCA criteria as defined in the Industrial Sites Project Establishment of Final Action Levels (NNSA/NSO, 2006). This re-evaluation consisted of comparing the original data (used to define the need for the UR) to risk-based final action levels (FALs) developed using the current Industrial Sites RBCA process. The re-evaluation resulted in a recommendation to remove the UR because contamination is not present at the site above the risk-based FALs. Requirements for inspecting and maintaining this UR will be canceled, and the postings and signage at this site will be removed. Fencing and posting may be present at this site that are unrelated to the FFACO UR such as for radiological control purposes as required by the NV/YMP Radiological Control Manual (NNSA/NSO, 2004). This modification will not affect or modify any non-FFACO requirements for fencing, posting, or monitoring at this site.

Grant Evenson

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV); the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP); and the US Department of Defense. The CAIP is a document that provides or references all of the specific information for investigation activities associated with Corrective Action Units (CAUs) or Corrective Action Sites (CASs). According to the FFACO, CASs are sites potentially requiring corrective action(s) and may include solid waste management units or individual disposal or release sites. A CAU consists of one or more CASs grouped together based on geography, technical similarity, or agency responsibility for the purpose of determining corrective actions. This CAIP contains the environmental sample collection objectives and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at CAU 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of CAS 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The NTS is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1) (DOE/NV, 1996a). The Area 25 Sewage Lagoons (Figure 1-2) (IT, 1999b) are located approximately 0.3 mi south of the Test Cell 'C' (TCC) Facility and were used for the discharge of sanitary effluent from the TCC facility. For purposes of this discussion, this site will be referred to as either CAU 232 or the sewage lagoons.

DOE /NV Operations Office

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Midtemperature Solar Systems Test Facility predictions for thermal performance based on test data: Custom Engineering trough with glass reflector surface and Sandia-designed receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal performance predictions based on test data are presented for the Custom Engineering trough and Sandia-designed receivers, with glass reflector surface, for three output temperatures at five cities in the United States. Two experimental receivers were tested, one with an antireflective coating on the glass envelope around the receiver tube and one without the antireflective coating.

Harrison, T.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 321: Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Weather Station Fuel Storage. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during February 1999. Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method. Soil samples were collected at 0.6-m (2-ft) intervals from the surface to 1.8 m (6 ft) below ground surface. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE, 1999b). Soil sample results indicated that two locations in the bermed area contain total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel at concentrations of 124 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) and 377 mg/kg. This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). The TPH-impacted soil will be removed and disposed as part of the corrective action.

D. S. Tobiason

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 398: Area 25 Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) plan addresses the activities necessary to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 398: Area 25 Spill Sites. CAU 398, located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site, is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (FFACO, 1996), and consists of the following 13 Corrective Action Sites (CASs) (Figure 1): (1) CAS 25-44-01 , a fuel spill on soil that covers a concrete pad. The origins and use of the spill material are unknown, but the spill is suspected to be railroad bedding material. (2) CAS 25-44-02, a spill of liquid to the soil from leaking drums. (3) CAS 25-44-03, a spill of oil from two leaking drums onto a concrete pad and surrounding soil. (4) CAS 25-44-04, a spill from two tanks containing sulfuric acid and sodium hydroxide used for a water demineralization process. (5) CAS 25-25-02, a fuel or oil spill from leaking drums that were removed in 1992. (6) CAS 25-25-03, an oil spill adjacent to a tipped-over drum. The source of the drum is not listed, although it is noted that the drum was removed in 1991. (7) CAS 25-25-04, an area on the north side of the Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facility, where oils and cooling fluids from metal machining operations were poured directly onto the ground. (8) CAS 25-25-05, an area of oil and/or hydraulic fluid spills beneath the heavy equipment once stored there. (9) CAS 25-25-06, an area of diesel fuel staining beneath two generators that have since been removed. (10) CAS 25-25-07, an area of hydraulic oil spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside X-Tunnel. (11) CAS 25-25-08, an area of hydraulic fluid spills associated with a tunnel-boring machine abandoned inside Y-Tunnel. (12) CAS 25-25-16, a diesel fuel spill from an above-ground storage tank located near Building 3320 at Engine Test Stand-1 (ETS-1) that was removed in 1998. (13) CAS 25-25-17, a hydraulic oil spill associated with the historical operations of a vacuum pump oil recovery system at the E-MAD facility.

K. B. Campbell

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Resonance of the Surface Waves. The H/V Ratio in the Metropolitan Area of Bucharest  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work is to evaluate the natural period of oscillation T{sub 0} for soils in Bucharest city area. We will start by examine the elastic waves excited at the surface of an isotropic body by an oscillatory, localized force (Rayleigh waves). We define the 'H/V'-ratio as the ratio of the intensity of the in-plane waves (horizontal waves) to the intensity of the perpendicular-to-the-plane waves (vertical waves). It is shown that this ratio exhibits a resonance at a frequency which is close to the frequency of the transverse waves. It may serve to determine Poison's ratio of the body. We consider the ratio H/V of the horizontal to the vertical component of the Fourier spectrum for the seismic events recorded at 34 locations during the period October 2003 to August 2004. The method gives reliable data regarding the fundamental frequencies for soil deposits and the results of this experiment allows us to improve the known distribution of T{sub 0}--regularly calculated with the approximate formula T = 4h/v{sub s}. The earthquakes with M{sub w}>4 that occurred on 21.01.2004, 07.02.2004, 17.03.2004 and 04.04.2004 will be used as input to compute H/V ratios for each site of a URS stations in the area of Bucharest city. The H/V ratio is also calculated from noise recordings in the same areas. Computation of H/V spectral ratios are performed by means of the SeismicHandler and J-SESAME software showing the reliability of the method used for the sites located in Bucharest. The fundamental period obtained for the majority of sites is in accordance with already known results. By obtaining the fundamental period for much more and different spots situated in the Bucharest area we covered the zones where these data did not exist before. This study is significant in seismic risk mitigation for the Bucharest city area, for a safer seismic design and for the improvement of microzonation efforts.

Balan, Stefan F.; Cioflan, Carmen O.; Apostol, Bogdan F.; Tataru, Dragos; Grecu, Bogdan [National Institute for Earth Physics, Calugareni 12, PO Box MG2, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

359

LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials  

SciTech Connect

The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

2010-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

360

Application of Goubau Surface Wave Transmission Line for Improved Bench Testing of Diagnostic Beamline Elements  

SciTech Connect

In-air test fixtures for beamline elements typically utilize an X-Y positioning stage, and a wire antenna excited by an RF source. In most cases, the antenna contains a standing wave, and is useful only for coarse alignment measurements in CW mode. A surface-wave (SW) based transmission line permits RF energy to be launched on the wire, travel through the beamline component, and then be absorbed in a load. Since SW transmission lines employ travelling waves, the RF energy can be made to resemble the electron beam, limited only by ohmic losses and dispersion. Although lossy coaxial systems are also a consideration, the diameter of the coax introduces large uncertainties in centroid location. A SW wire is easily constructed out of 200 micron magnet wire, which more accurately approximates the physical profile of the electron beam. Benefits of this test fixture include accurate field mapping, absolute calibration for given beam currents, Z-axis independence, and temporal response measurements of sub-nanosecond pulse structures. Descriptions of the surface wave launching technique, transmission line, and instrumentation are presented, along with measurement data.

John Musson, Keith Cole, Sheldon Rubin

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

An Innovative Approach for the Calculation of Exposure Point Concentrations for Large Areas of Surface Radionuclide Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy Rocky Flats site was designated as a wildlife refuge by the Rocky Flats National Wildlife Refuge Act of 2001. Rocky Flats was considered to be one of the most highly contaminated radiological sites in the country. Some portions of the site have low-level radionuclide contamination in surface soils. A site-wide risk and dose assessment to evaluate threats to human health and the environment were performed, so that the site could be released for this land use. The aggressive accelerated action program combined with defensible and innovative risk assessment methods resulted in there being no radionuclides of concern in the final comprehensive risk assessment (DOE 2006). An innovative approach for delineating functional exposure areas and area-weighted exposure point concentration-activities (EPCs) was negotiated with the regulatory agencies in Colorado. This procedure leads to realistic estimates of risk and dose to workers and visitors. This innovative approach to the calculation of EPCs was negotiated with both State and Federal regulators. The value of developing and maintaining good working relationships with regulators responsible for a site can not be overestimated. The building of trust and confidence among responsible parties and regulators is essential for the development and implementation of innovative methods and technologies.

Winchester Chromec, F.; Myers, Jeffrey C. [7800 E. Union Avenue, Denver, Colorado, 801237 (United States)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

362

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232: Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 232 consists of Corrective Action Site 25-03-01, Sewage Lagoon. Corrective Action Unit 232, Area 25 Sewage Lagoons, received sanitary effluent from four buildings within the Test Cell ''C'' Facility from the mid-1960s through approximately 1996. The Test Cell ''C'' Facility was used to develop nuclear propulsion technology by conducting nuclear test reactor studies. Based on the site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern include volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, petroleum hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, pesticides, herbicides, gamma emitting radionuclides, isotopic plutonium, isotopic uranium, and strontium-90. A detailed conceptual site model is presented in Section 3.0 and Appendix A of this Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The conceptual model serves as the basis for the sampling strategy. Under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order, the Corrective Action Investigation Plan will be submitted to the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for approval. Field work will be conducted following approval of the plan. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the Corrective Action Decision Document.

USDOE /NV

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 390: AREAS 9, 10, AND 12 SPILL SITES, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 390 consists four Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 9, 10, and 12 of the Nevada Test Site. The closure activities performed at the CASs include: (1) CAS 09-99-03, Wax, Paraffin: 2 cubic yards of drilling polymer was removed on June 20,2005, and transported to the Area 9 Landfill for disposal. (2) CAS 10-99-01, Epoxy Tar Spill: 2 cubic feet of asphalt waste was removed on June 20,2005, and transported to the Area 9 Landfill for disposal. (3) CAS 10-99-03, Tar Spills: 3 cubic yards of deteriorated asphalt waste was removed on June 20,2005, and transported to the Area 9 Landfill for disposal. (4) CAS 12-25-03, Oil Stains (2); Container: Approximately 16 ounces of used oil were removed from ventilation equipment on June 28,2005, and recycled. One CAS 10-22-19, Drums, Stains, was originally part of CAU 390 but was transferred out of CAU 390 and into CAU 550, Drums, Batteries, and Lead Materials. The transfer was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection on August 19,2005, and a copy of the approval letter is included in Appendix D of this report.

NONE

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 330: Areas 6, 22, and 23 Tanks and Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) documents the activities performed to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 330: Areas 6, 22, and 23 Tanks and Spill Sites, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO of 1996), and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for CAU 330: Areas 6, 22, and 23 Tanks and Spill Sites, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operation Office [NNSA/NV], 2001). CAU 330 consists of the following four Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 06-02-04, 22-99-06, 23-01-02, and 23-25-05 (Figure 1).

A. T. Urbon

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5 Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5 are located in Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) (Figure 1). The site is listed in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 428 and includes Corrective Action Sites 03-05-002-SW01 (Septic Waste System 1 [SWS 1]), and 03-05-002-SW05 (Septic Waste System 5 [SWS 5]). The site history for the CAU is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 1999). SWS 1 consists of two leachfields and associated septic tanks. SWS 1 received effluent from both sanitary and industrial sources from various buildings in Area 3 of the TTR (Figure 2). SWS 5 is comprised of one leachfield and outfall with an associated septic tank. SWS 5 received effluent from sources in Building 03-50 in Area 3 of the TTR (Figure 2). Both systems were active until 1990 when a consolidated sewer system was installed. The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 3 SWS 1 and 5. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during May and June 1999. Samples of the tank contents, leachfield soil, and soil under the tanks and pipes were collected. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Additional sampling was done in May 2000, the results of which are presented in this plan. Soil sample results indicated that two constituents of concern were detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs). Total arsenic was detected at a concentration of 68.7 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). The arsenic was found under the center distribution line at the proximal end of the SWS 5 Leachfield (Figure 3). Total benzo(a)pyrene was detected at a concentration of 480 micrograms per kilogram ({micro}g/kg). The benzo(a)pyrene was found in the soil under the discharge line at SWS 1 Septic Tank 33-1A (Figure 3). These concentrations are above the PALs of 3.0 mg/kg and 360 {micro}g/kg, respectively (DOE/NV, 1999) but are below the hazardous regulatory levels for these constituents. The soil will be excavated and disposed in the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Area 23 Sanitary Landfill.

D. S. Tobiason

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 367: Area 10 Sedan, Ess and Uncle Unit Craters Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 367 is located in Area 10 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 367 comprises the four corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 10-45-01, U-10h Crater (Sedan) 10-45-02, Ess Crater Site 10-09-03, Mud Pit 10-45-03, Uncle Crater Site The CASs in CAU 367 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive contaminants may be present in concentrations that exceed risk-based corrective action (RBCA) levels. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend CAAs for the CASs. Additional information will be generated by conducting a CAI before evaluating and selecting CAAs. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 367 includes the following activities: Move surface debris and/or materials, as needed, to facilitate sampling. Conduct radiological surveys. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine the area where TED at the site exceeds FALs (i.e., corrective action boundary). Evaluate TED to potential receptors in areas along Mercury Highway that have been impacted by a release of radionuclides from the Sedan test. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis related to the drilling mud within CAS 10-09-03, Mud Pit, and any encountered stains or waste as necessary to determine whether COCs are present. If COCs are present, collect additional step-out samples to define the extent of the contamination. Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 104: Area 7 Yucca Flat Atmospheric Test Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

CAU 104 comprises the 15 CASs listed below: (1) 07-23-03, Atmospheric Test Site T-7C; (2) 07-23-04, Atmospheric Test Site T7-1; (3) 07-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site; (4) 07-23-06, Atmospheric Test Site T7-5a; (5) 07-23-07, Atmospheric Test Site - Dog (T-S); (6) 07-23-08, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (T-S); (7) 07-23-09, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (T-S); (8) 07-23-10, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (9) 07-23-11, Atmospheric Test Site - Dixie; (10) 07-23-12, Atmospheric Test Site - Charlie (Bus); (11) 07-23-13, Atmospheric Test Site - Baker (Buster); (12) 07-23-14, Atmospheric Test Site - Ruth; (13) 07-23-15, Atmospheric Test Site T7-4; (14) 07-23-16, Atmospheric Test Site B7-b; (15) 07-23-17, Atmospheric Test Site - Climax These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on April 28, 2011, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 104. The releases at CAU 104 consist of surface-deposited radionuclides from 30 atmospheric nuclear tests. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 104 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. Radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) to the dose-based final action level (FAL). The presence of TED exceeding the FAL is considered a radiological contaminant of concern (COC). Anything identified as a COC will require corrective action. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external dose. Results from the analysis of soil samples will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters will be used to measure external radiological dose. Based on process knowledge of the releases associated with the nuclear tests and radiological survey information about the location and shape of the resulting contamination plume, it was determined that the releases from the nuclear tests are co-located and will be investigated concurrently. A field investigation will be performed to define areas where TED exceeds the FAL and to determine whether other COCs are present at the site. The investigation will also collect information to determine the presence and nature of contamination associated with migration and excavation, as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation. Appendix A provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to each CAS.

Patrick Matthews

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Test Plan to Assess Fire Effects on the Function of an Engineered Surface Barrier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wildfire is a frequent perturbation in shrub steppe ecosystems, altering the flora, fauna, atmosphere, and soil of these systems. Research on the fire effects has focused mostly on natural ecosystems with essentially no attention on engineered systems like surface barriers. The scope of the project is to use a simulated wildfire to induce changes in an engineered surface barrier and document the effects on barrier performance. The main objective is to quantify the effects of burning and the resulting post-fire conditions on alterations in soil physical properties; hydrologic response, particularly the water balance; geochemical properties; and biological properties. A secondary objective is to use the lessons learned to maximize fire protection in the design of long-term monitoring systems based on electronic sensors. A simulated wildfire will be initiated, controlled and monitored at the 200-BP-1 barrier in collaboration with the Hanford Fire Department during the fall of 2008. The north half of the barrier will be divided into nine 12 x 12 m plots, each of which will be randomly assigned a fuel load of 2 kg m-2 or 4 kg m-2. Each plot will be ignited around the perimeter and flames allowed to carry to the centre. Any remaining unburned vegetation will be manually burned off using a drip torch. Progress of the fire and its effects will be monitored using point measurements of thermal, hydrologic, and biotic variables. Three measures of fire intensity will be used to characterize fire behavior: (1) flame height, (2) the maximum temperature at three vertical profile levels, and (3) total duration of elevated temperature at these levels. Pre-burn plant information, including species diversity, plant height, and canopy diameter will be measured on shrubs from the plots to be burned and from control plots at the McGee ranch. General assessments of shrub survival, recovery, and recruitment will be made after the fire. Near-surface soil samples will be collected pre- and post-burn to determine changes in the gravel content of the surface layer so as to quantify inflationary or deflationary responses to fire and to reveal the ability of the surface to resist post-fire erosive stresses. Measures of bulk density, water repellency, water retention, and hydraulic conductivity will be used to characterize changes in infiltration rates and water storage capacity following the fire. Samples will also be analyzed to quantify geochemical changes including changes in soil pH, cation exchange capacity, specific surface area, and the concentration of macro nutrients (e.g. N, P, K) and other elements such as Na, Mg, Ca, that are critical to the post-fire recovery revegetation. Soil CO2 emissions will be measured monthly for one year following the burn to document post-fire stimulation of carbon turnover and soil biogenic emissions. Surface and subsurface temperature measurements at and near monitoring installations will be used to document fire effects on electronic equipment. The results of this study will be used to bridge the gaps in knowledge on the effects of fire on engineered ecosystems (e.g. surface barriers), particularly the hydrologic and biotic characteristics that govern the water and energy balance. These results will also support the development of practical fire management techniques for barriers that are compatible with wildfire suppression strategies. Furthermore, lessons learned will be use to develop installation strategies needed to protect electronic monitoring equipment from the intense heat of fire and the potential damaging effects of smoke and fire extinguishing agents. Such information is needed to better understand long-term barrier performance under extreme conditions, especially if site maintenance and operational funding is lost for activities such as barrier revegetation.

Ward, Anderson L.; Berlin, Gregory T.; Cammann, Jerry W.; Leary, Kevin D.; Link, Steven O.

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effects of Li[sup +}, K{sup +} and Ba{sup 2 sup +} cations on the ORR at model and high surface area Pt and Au surfaces in alkaline solutions.  

SciTech Connect

This Letter reveals new findings on the influence of noncovalent interactions on the electrochemical interface. Using surface X-ray scattering, we demonstrate that the barium cations are located at 3.4 {angstrom} away from the surface, suggesting that they are partially hydrated, though not adsorbed at the surface. The effect of the cation on the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) ranges from significant (Pt) to little (Au), depending on the nature of the metal and cation. Finally, we show that these results, as obtained on well-defined single-crystal surfaces, correlate well with observations on high surface area nanoparticle catalysts.

Strmcnik, D.; van der Vliet, D. F.; Chang, K-C.; Komanicky, V.; Kodama, K.; You, H.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Markovic, N. M. (Materials Science Division); (Safarik Univ.); (Toyota Central R& D Labs.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

371

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 322: Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0 with ROTC 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 322, Areas 1 and 3 Release Sites and Injection Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (1996). Corrective Action Unit 322 is comprised of the following corrective action sites (CASs): (1) 01-25-01 - AST Release Site; (2) 03-25-03 - Mud Plant and AST Diesel Release; and (3) 03-20-05 - Injection Wells and BOP Shop. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide the rationale for the recommendation of a corrective action alternative for each CAS within CAU 322. Corrective action investigation activities were performed from April 2004 through September 2004, as set forth in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were: (1) Determine if contaminants of concern (COCs) are present; (2) If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent; and (3) Provide sufficient information and data to recommend appropriate corrective actions for the CASs. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against appropriate preliminary action levels to identify contaminants of concern for each corrective action site. Radiological field measurements were compared to unrestricted release criteria. Assessment of the data generated from investigation activities revealed the following: (1) CAS 01-25-01 contains an AST berm contaminated with total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) diesel-range organics (DRO). (2) CAS 03-25-03 includes two distinct areas: Area A where no contamination remains from a potential spill associated with an AST, and Area B where TPH-DRO contamination associated with various activities at the mud plant was identified. The Area B contamination was found at various locations and depths. (3) CAS 03-25-03 Area B contains TPH-DRO contamination at various locations and depths in the area associated with the Mud Plant. (4) CAS 03-20-05 contains TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination within the injection well casing soil and TPH-DRO contamination at the depth coincidental with the bottom of the injection well sump. Based on the evaluation of analytical data from the corrective action investigation, review of future and current operations in Areas 1 and 3 of the Nevada Test Site, and the detailed and comparative analysis of the potential corrective action alternatives, the following corrective actions are recommended for the Corrective Action Unit 322 CASs. Closure in Place with Administrative Controls is the preferred corrective action for the following CASs: (1) CAS 01-25-01, removal of TPH-DRO contamination would pose a significant safety hazard due to the site location. (2) CAS 03-25-03 No contamination remains at Area A (AST Berm); and thus, no further action is the preferred alternative at this part of the CAS. However at Area B, TPH-DRO contamination is varied in concentration and location and the footprint of the CAS is large, removal of contaminated ''pockets'' would be laborious and cost prohibitive. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-25-03 Area B has been removed and drummed as a best management practice. (3) CAS 03-20-05, TPH-DRO, metals, and radiological contamination are present in the injection well casing soils. Recommend corrective action includes removal of the liquid in the injection well sump (approximately 3 feet (ft) of liquid at 60 ft below ground surface), grouting the sump, and the area within the injection well casing. The plutonium-239 surface contamination identified at CAS 03-20-05 has been removed and drummed as a best management practice and will be disposed of as low-level radioactive waste. It is recommended that the liquids be removed from the holding tank wells and the sumps of the two outer holding tanks within the BOP Shop, and the sumps be grouted, and the holding tanks filled in to the BOP Shop floor surface. The preferred corrective action alternatives were ev

Boehlecke, Robert

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Area 25 Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Decontamination Facility is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254. CAU 254 is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site and consists of a single Corrective Action Site CAS 25-23-06. CAU 254 will be closed, in accordance with the FFACO of 1996. CAU 254 was used primarily to perform radiological decontamination and consists of Building 3126, two outdoor decontamination pads, and surrounding soil within an existing perimeter fence. The site was used to decontaminate nuclear rocket test-car hardware and tooling from the early 1960s through the early 1970s, and to decontaminate a military tank in the early 1980s. The site characterization results indicate that, in places, the surficial soil and building materials exceed clean-up criteria for organic compounds, metals, and radionuclides. Closure activities are expected to generate waste streams consisting of nonhazardous construction waste. petroleum hydrocarbon waste, hazardous waste, low-level radioactive waste, and mixed waste. Some of the wastes exceed land disposal restriction limits and will require off-site treatment before disposal. The recommended corrective action was revised to Alternative 3- ''Unrestricted Release Decontamination, Verification Survey, and Dismantle Building 3126,'' in an addendum to the Correction Action Decision Document.

C. M. Obi

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU)553: Areas 19, 20 Mud Pits and Cellars, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S.Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. The corrective action sites (CASs) within CAU 553 are located within Areas 19 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site. Corrective Action Unit 553 is comprised of the following CASs: 19-99-01, Mud Spill 19-99-11, Mud Spill 20-09-09, Mud Spill 20-99-03, Mud Spill The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provide data confirming that the closure objectives for CASs within CAU 553 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were or will be performed: Review the current site conditions including the concentration and extent of contamination. Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. Document the Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 553 to be issued by Nevada Division of Environmental Protection.

Al Wickline

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428: Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, REVISION 0, march 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 428, Area 3 Septic Waste Systems 1 and 5, has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office; the State of Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; and the U. S. Department of Defense. Corrective Action Unit 428 consists of Corrective Action Sites 03- 05- 002- SW01 and 03- 05- 002- SW05, respectively known as Area 3 Septic Waste System 1 and Septic Waste System 5. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan is used in combination with the Work Plan for Leachfield Corrective Action Units: Nevada Test Site and Tonopah Test Range, Nevada , Rev. 1 (DOE/ NV, 1998c). The Leachfield Work Plan was developed to streamline investigations at leachfield Corrective Action Units by incorporating management, technical, quality assurance, health and safety, public involvement, field sampling, and waste management information common to a set of Corrective Action Units with similar site histories and characteristics into a single document that can be referenced. This Corrective Action Investigation Plan provides investigative details specific to Corrective Action Unit 428. A system of leachfields and associated collection systems was used for wastewater disposal at Area 3 of the Tonopah Test Range until a consolidated sewer system was installed in 1990 to replace the discrete septic waste systems. Operations within various buildings at Area 3 generated sanitary and industrial wastewaters potentially contaminated with contaminants of potential concern and disposed of in septic tanks and leachfields. Corrective Action Unit 428 is composed of two leachfield systems in the northern portion of Area 3. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern for the site include oil/ diesel range total petroleum hydrocarbons, and Resource Conservation and Recovery Act characteristic volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, and metals. A limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from four of the septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. Additional samples will be analyzed for geotechnical and hydrological properties and a bioassessment may be performed. The technical approach for investigating this Corrective Action Unit consists of the following activities: (1) Perform video surveys of the discharge and outfall lines. (2) Collect samples of material in the septic tanks. (3) Conduct exploratory trenching to locate and inspect subsurface components. (4) Collect subsurface soil samples in areas of the collection system including the septic tanks and outfall end of distribution boxes. (5) Collect subsurface soil samples underlying the leachfield distribution pipes via trenching. (6) Collect surface and near- surface samples near potential locations of the Acid Sewer Outfall if Septic Waste System 5 Leachfield cannot be located. (7) Field screen samples for volatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and radiological activity. (8) Drill boreholes and collect subsurface soil samples if required. (9) Analyze samples for total volatile organic compounds, total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and total petroleum hydrocarbons (oil/ diesel range organics). Limited number of samples will be analyzed for gamma- emitting radionuclides and isotopic uranium from particular septic tanks and if radiological field screening levels are exceeded. (10) Collect samples from native soils beneath the distribution system and analyze for geotechnical/ hydrologic parameters. (11) Collect and analyze bioassessment samples at the discretion of the Site Supervisor if total petroleum hydrocarbons exceed field- screening levels.

DOE /NV

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

375

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site, Nevada: Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office's approach for collecting the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 552: Area 12 Muckpile and Ponds, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 12 on the NTS, CAU 552 consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 12-06-04, Muckpile; 12-23-05, Ponds. Corrective Action Site 12-06-04 in Area 12 consists of the G-Tunnel muckpile, which is the result of tunneling activities. Corrective Action Site 12-23-05 consists of three dry ponds adjacent to the muckpile. The toe of the muckpile extends into one of the ponds creating an overlap of two CASs. The purpose of the investigation is to ensure that adequate data are collected to provide sufficient and reliable information to identify, evaluate, and select technic ally viable corrective actions. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of corrective action alternatives in the corrective action decision document.

U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office

2004-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

376

Sintering Effects on Morphology, Thermal Stability and Surface Area of Sol-Gel Derived Nano-Hydroxyapatite Powder  

SciTech Connect

Hydroxyapatite (HAP) ceramics have been recognized as substitute materials for bone and teeth in orthopedic and dentistry field due to their chemical and biological similarity to human hard tissue. The nanosized and nanocrystalline forms of HAP have great potential to revolutionize the hard tissue-engineering field, starting from bone repair and augmentation to controlled drug delivery systems. This paper reports the synthesis of biomimetic nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) by sol-gel method using calcium nitrate tetrahydrate (CNT) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) as calcium and phosphorus precursors, respectively to obtain a desired Ca/P ratio of 1.67. Deionized water was used as a diluting media for HAP sol preparation and ammonia was used to adjust the pH to 11. After aging, the HAP gel was dried at 55 deg. C and sintered to different temperatures (200 deg. C, 400 deg. C, 600 deg. C, 800 deg. C, 1000 deg. C and 1200 deg. C). The dried and sintered powders were characterized for phase composition using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The particle size and morphology was studied using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The thermal behavior of the dried HAP nanopowder was studied in the temperature range of 55 deg. C to 1000 deg. C using thermal gravimetric analyser (TGA). The BET surface area of absorbance was determined by Nitrogen adsorption using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. The presence of characteristic peaks of the phosphate and OH groups in FTIR spectrums confirmed the formation of pure HAP in dried as well as sintered powders. XRD results also confirmed the formation of stoichiometric nano-HAP. Sintering revealed that with increase in temperature, both the crystallinity and crystallite size of nano-HAP particles increased. The synthesized nano-HAP powder was found to be stable upto 1000 deg. C without any additional phase other than HAP, whereas peak of {beta}-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) was observed at 1200 deg. C. Photomicrograph of TEM showed that the nanopowder sintered at 600 deg. C is composed of hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (26.0-45.6 nm), which is well in agreement with the crystallite size calculated using XRD data. TGA study showed the thermal stability of the synthesized nano-HAP powder. The BET surface area decreased with increase in sintering temperature.

Kapoor, Seema [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chandigarh (India); Batra, Uma [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India); Kohli, Suchita [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chd. (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

377

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 106: Areas 5, 11 Frenchman Flat Atmospheric Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU)106 is located in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 106 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 05-23-02, GMX Alpha Contaminated Area 05-23-05, Atmospheric Test Site - Able 05-45-01, Atmospheric Test Site - Hamilton 05-45-04, 306 GZ Rad Contaminated Area 05-45-05, 307 GZ Rad Contaminated Area These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on January 19, 2010, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU106. The presence and nature of contamination at CAU 106 will be evaluated based on information collected from a field investigation. The CAU includes land areas impacted by the release of radionuclides from a weapons-effect tower test (CAS 05-45-01), a weapons-related airdrop test (CAS05-23-05), equation of state experiments (CAS 05-23-02), and unknown support activities at two sites (CAS 05-45-04 and CAS 05-45-05). Surface-deposited radiological contamination will be evaluated based on a comparison of the total effective dose (TED) at sample plot locations to the dose-based final action level. The TED will be calculated as the total of separate estimates of internal and external doses. Results from the analysis of soil samples collected from sample plots will be used to calculate internal radiological dose. Thermoluminescent dosimeters placed at the center of each sample plot will be used to measure external radiological dose. The presence and nature of contamination from other types of releases (such as migration and excavation as well as any potential releases discovered during the investigation) will be evaluated using soil samples collected from the locations most likely containing contamination, if present. AppendixA provides a detailed discussion of the DQO methodology and the DQOs specific to eachCAS. The scope of the corrective action investigation for CAU 106 includes the following activities: Conduct radiological surveys. Collect and submit environmental samples for laboratory analysis to determine internal doserates and the presence of contaminants of concern. If contaminants of concern are present, collect additional samples to define the extent of thecontamination and determine the area where TED at the site exceeds final action levels (i.e., corrective action boundary). Collect samples of investigation-derived waste, as needed, for waste management purposes.

Patrick Matthews

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan provides the details for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408, Bomblet Target Area. CAU 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range and is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. One Corrective Action Site (CAS) is included in CAU 408: {lg_bullet} CAS TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas Based on historical documentation, personnel interviews, process knowledge, site visits, aerial photography, multispectral data, preliminary geophysical surveys, and the results of data quality objectives process (Section 3.0), clean closure will be implemented for CAU 408. CAU 408 closure activities will consist of identification and clearance of bomblet target areas, identification and removal of depleted uranium (DU) fragments on South Antelope Lake, and collection of verification samples. Any soil containing contaminants at concentrations above the action levels will be excavated and transported to an appropriate disposal facility. Based on existing information, contaminants of potential concern at CAU 408 include explosives. In addition, at South Antelope Lake, bomblets containing DU were tested. None of these contaminants is expected to be present in the soil at concentrations above the action levels; however, this will be determined by radiological surveys and verification sample results. The corrective action investigation and closure activities have been planned to include data collection and hold points throughout the process. Hold points are designed to allow decision makers to review the existing data and decide which of the available options are most suitable. Hold points include the review of radiological, geophysical, and analytical data and field observations.

NSTec Environmental Management

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Well Installation Report for Corrective Action Unit 443, Central Nevada Test Area, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites, Corrective Action Unit 443'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first phase involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data, and inputting the data into a three-dimensional numerical model to depict groundwater flow. The output from the groundwater flow model was used in a transport model to simulate the migration of a radionuclide release (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second phase of modeling (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after NDEP reviewed the first model. This phase was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third phase of modeling updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003). Corrective action alternatives were evaluated and an alternative was submitted in the ''Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface'' (NNSA/NSO, 2004). Based on the results of this evaluation, the preferred alternative for CAU 443 is Proof-of-Concept and Monitoring with Institutional Controls. This alternative was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and will control inadvertent exposure to contaminated groundwater at CAU 443.

Tim Echelard

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks site Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 135 will be closed by unrestricted release decontamination and verification survey, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consert Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU includes one Corrective Action Site (CAS). The Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, (CAS 25-02-01), referred to as the Engine-Maintenance Assembly and Disassembly (E-MAD) Waste Holdup Tanks and Vault, were used to receive liquid waste from all of the radioactive drains at the E-MAD Facility. Based on the results of the Corrective Action Investigation conducted in June 1999 discussed in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 135: Area 25 Underground Storage Tanks, Nevada Test Site, Nevada (DOE/NV,1999a), one sample from the radiological survey of the concrete vault interior exceeded radionuclide preliminary action levels. The analytes from the sediment samples that exceeded the preliminary action levels are polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics, and radionuclides. Unrestricted release decontamination and verification involves removal of concrete and the cement-lined pump sump from the vault. After verification that the contamination has been removed, the vault will be repaired with concrete, as necessary. The radiological- and chemical-contaminated pump sump and concrete removed from the vault would be disposed of at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. The vault interior will be field surveyed following removal of contaminated material to verify that unrestricted release criteria have been achieved.

D. H. Cox

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "test area surface" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 335: Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 335, Area 6 Injection Well and Drain Pit, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996). This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD). However, there is one modification to the selected alternative. Due to the large area that would require fencing, it is proposed that instead of fencing, an appropriate number of warning signs attached to tee posts be used to delineate the use restriction area. CAU 335 is located in Area 6 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) which is approximately 105 kilometers (km) (65 miles [mi]) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 335 is located in the Area 6 Well 3 Yard approximately 39 km (24 mi) north of Mercury, on the Mercury Highway and several hundred feet (ft) west along Road 6-06. CAU 335 consists of the following three Corrective Action Sites (CASs): CAS 06-20-01, Drums, Oil Waste, Spill; CAS 06-20-02, 20-inch Cased Hole; CAS 06-23-03, Drain Pit. The site history for CAU 335 is provided in the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (DOE/NV, 2000). Briefly, CAS 06-20-01, was used for storing material that was pumped out of CAS 06-20-02 and placed into four 208-liter (L) (55-gall [gal]) drums. The drums were taken to the NTS Area 5 Hazardous Waste Accumulation Site in 1991. CAS 06-20-01 will be closed with no further action required. Any spills associated with CAS 06-20-01 are addressed and considered part of CAS 06-20-02. CAS 06-20-02 was used for disposal of used motor oil, wastewater, and debris for an undetermined amount of time. In 1991, the casing was emptied of its contents, excavated, and backfilled. CAS 06-23-03 was used as a depository for effluent waste from truck-washing activities from 1960-1991.

K. B. Campbell

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 168: Area 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, REV 1  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 168 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996 as Area 25 and 26 Contaminated Materials and Waste Dumps. CAU 168 consists of twelve Corrective Action Sites (CASs) in Areas 25 and 26 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. The CASs contain surface and subsurface debris, impacted soil, and contaminated materials. Site characterization activities were conducted in 2002, and the results are presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) for CAU 168 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2006). Site characterization results indicated that soil at several sites exceeded the clean-up criteria for total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and radionuclides. The Nevada Division of Environmental Protection approved the proposed corrective actions specified in the CADD (NNSA/NSO, 2006). The approved corrective actions include no further action, clean closure, and closure in place with administrative controls.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-Lived Surface Caps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someones back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

Piet, Steven James; Breckenridge, Robert Paul; Burns, Douglas Edward

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Testing, Modeling, and Monitoring to Enable Simpler, Cheaper, Longer-lived Surface Caps  

SciTech Connect

Society has and will continue to generate hazardous wastes whose risks must be managed. For exceptionally toxic, long-lived, and feared waste, the solution is deep burial, e.g., deep geological disposal at Yucca Mtn. For some waste, recycle or destruction/treatment is possible. The alternative for other wastes is storage at or near the ground level (in someone's back yard); most of these storage sites include a surface barrier (cap) to prevent downward water migration. Some of the hazards will persist indefinitely. As society and regulators have demanded additional proof that caps are robust against more threats and for longer time periods, the caps have become increasingly complex and expensive. As in other industries, increased complexity will eventually increase the difficulty in estimating performance, in monitoring system/component performance, and in repairing or upgrading barriers as risks are managed. An approach leading to simpler, less expensive, longer-lived, more manageable caps is needed. Our project, which started in April 2002, aims to catalyze a Barrier Improvement Cycle (iterative learning and application) and thus enable Remediation System Performance Management (doing the right maintenance neither too early nor too late). The knowledge gained and the capabilities built will help verify the adequacy of past remedial decisions, improve barrier management, and enable improved solutions for future decisions. We believe it will be possible to develop simpler, longer-lived, less expensive caps that are easier to monitor, manage, and repair. The project is planned to: (a) improve the knowledge of degradation mechanisms in times shorter than service life; (b) improve modeling of barrier degradation dynamics; (c) develop sensor systems to identify early degradation; and (d) provide a better basis for developing and testing of new barrier systems. This project combines selected exploratory studies (benchtop and field scale), coupled effects accelerated aging testing at the intermediate meso-scale, testing of new monitoring concepts, and modeling of dynamic systems. The emphasis on meso-scale (coupled) tests, accelerated effects testing, and dynamic modeling differentiates the project from other efforts, while simultaneously building on that body of knowledge. The performance of evapotranspiration, capillary, and grout-based barriers is being examined. To date, the project can report new approaches to the problem, building new experimental and modeling capabilities, and a few preliminary results.

Piet, S. J.; Breckenridge, R. P.; Burns, D. E.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

385

Addendum 1 Composite Analysis for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

A disposal authorization statement (DAS) was issued by the U.S. Department of Energy/Headquarters (DOE/HQ) on December 5, 2000, authorizing the DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office to continue the operation of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site for the disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste. Prior to the issuance of the DAS, the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) had conducted reviews of the performance assessment (PA) and the composite analysis (CA) for the Area 5 RWMS, in accordance with the requirements of the DOE Radioactive Waste Management Order DOE O 435.1. A brief history of the reviews is as follows. (The reviews were conducted by independent review teams chartered by the LFRG; the review findings and recommendations were issued in review team reports to the LFRG.) The LFRG accepted the initial PA, with conditions, on August 30, 1996. Revision 2.1 to the PA was issued in January 1998, implementing the conditions of acceptance of the 1996 PA. The LFRG reviewed Revision 2.1 as part of the Area 5 RWMS CA review during 2000, and found it acceptable. The CA and the Supplemental Information provided in response to issues identified during the initial review of the CA were accepted by the LFRG. The Supplemental Information (including the responses to four key issues) is included in the Review Team Report to the LFRG, which recommends that it be incorporated into the CA and issued to all known holders of the CA. The Area 5 RWMS DAS requires that the Supplemental Information generated during the DOE/HQ review of the CA be incorporated into the CA within one year of the date of issuance of the DAS. This report, the first addendum to the Area 5 CA, is prepared to fulfill that requirement. The Supplemental Information includes the following: Issues Identified in the Review Team Report; Crosswalk Presentation; and Maintaining Doses As Low As Reasonably Achievable. A summary of this information is included in this report, with the complete text presented in the appendices.

Vefa Yucel

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 408: Bomblet Target Area Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, Revision 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 408: Bomblet Target Area (TTR), Tonopah Test Range, Nevada. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management. Corrective Action Unit 408 is located at the Tonopah Test Range, Nevada, and consists of Corrective Action Site (CAS) TA-55-002-TAB2, Bomblet Target Areas. This CAS includes the following seven target areas: Mid Target Flightline Bomblet Location Strategic Air Command (SAC) Target Location 1 SAC Target Location 2 South Antelope Lake Tomahawk Location 1 Tomahawk Location 2 The purpose of this CR is to provide documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and data confirming that the closure objectives for the CAS within CAU 408 were met. To achieve this, the following actions were performed: Review the current site conditions, including the concentration and extent of contamination. Implement any corrective actions necessary to protect human health and the environment. Properly dispose of corrective action and investigation wastes. Document Notice of Completion and closure of CAU 408 issued by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection. From July 2009 through August 2010, closure activities were performed as set forth in the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 408: Bomblet Target Area, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada. The purposes of the activities as defined during the data quality objectives process were as follows: Identify and remove munitions of explosive concern (MEC) associated with DOE activities. Investigate potential disposal pit locations. Remove depleted uranium-contaminated fragments and soil. Determine whether contaminants of concern (COCs) are present. If COCs are present, determine their nature and extent, implement appropriate corrective actions, and properly dispose of wastes. Analytes detected during the closure activities were evaluated against final action levels to determine COCs for CAU 408. Assessment of the data indicated COCs are not present at CAS TA-55-002-TAB2; therefore, no corrective action is necessary. No use restrictions are required to be placed on this CAU because the investigation showed no evidence of remaining soil contamination or remaining debris/waste upon completion of all investigation activities. The MEC was successfully removed and dispositioned as planned using current best available technologies. As MEC guidance and general MEC standards acknowledge that MEC response actions cannot determine with 100 percent certainty that all MEC and unexploded ordnance (UXO) are removed, the clean closure of CAU 408 will implement a best management practice of posting UXO hazard warning signs near the seven target areas. The signs will warn future land users of the potential for encountering residual UXO hazards. The DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, provides the following recommendations: A Notice of Completion to the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, is requested from the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for closure of CAU 408. Corrective Action Unit 408 should be moved from Appendix III to Appendix IV of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order.

Mark Krauss

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2012 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This report is mandated by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2012. All UGTA organizationsU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)conducted QA activities in FY 2012. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, revising the QAPP, and publishing documents. In addition, processes and procedures were developed to address deficiencies identified in the FY 2011 QAPP gap analysis.

Farnham, Irene; Marutzky, Sam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 342: Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document has been prepared for the Nevada Test Site's Area 23 Mercury Fire Training Pit (Corrective Action Unit 342) in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Corrective Action Unit 342 is comprised of Corrective Action Site 23-56-01. The purpose of this Corrective Action Decision Document is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for Corrective Action Unit 342. The scope of this document consists of the following: Develop corrective action objectives; Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; Develop corrective action alternatives; Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of corrective action alternatives in relation to corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and Recommend and justify a preferred corrective action alternative for the Corrective Action Unit.

DOE/NV

1999-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

389

Underground Test Area Fiscal Year 2013 Annual Quality Assurance Report Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

This report is required by the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Quality Assurance Plan (QAP) and identifies the UGTA quality assurance (QA) activities for fiscal year (FY) 2013. All UGTA organizationsU.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO); Desert Research Institute (DRI); Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Navarro-Intera, LLC (N-I); National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec); and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS)conducted QA activities in FY 2013. The activities included conducting assessments, identifying findings and completing corrective actions, evaluating laboratory performance, and publishing documents. In addition, integrated UGTA required reading and corrective action tracking was instituted.

Krenzien, Susan; Martuzky, Sam

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 554: Area 23 Release Site, Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Information presented in this CAIP includes facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for the selection and evaluation of environmental samples. Corrective Action Unit 554 is located in Area 23 of the Nevada Test Site, which is 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 554 is comprised of one Corrective Action Site (CAS), which is: 23-02-08, USTs 23-115-1, 2, 3/Spill 530-90-002. This site consists of soil contamination resulting from a fuel release from underground storage tanks (USTs). Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 is being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives. Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for this CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable corrective action alternatives that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document for CAU 554. Corrective Action Site 23-02-08 will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on July 15, 2004, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection; U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office; and contractor personnel. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 554.

David A. Strand

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 374: Area 20 Schooner Unit Crater Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 0  

SciTech Connect

Corrective Action Unit 374 is located in Areas 18 and 20 of the Nevada Test Site, which is approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Corrective Action Unit 374 comprises the five corrective action sites (CASs) listed below: 18-22-05, Drum 18-22-06, Drums (20) 18-22-08, Drum 18-23-01, Danny Boy Contamination Area 20-45-03, U-20u Crater (Schooner) These sites are being investigated because existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination is insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives (CAAs). Additional information will be obtained by conducting a corrective action investigation before evaluating CAAs and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS. The results of the field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of viable CAAs that will be presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document. The sites will be investigated based on the data quality objectives (DQOs) developed on October 20, 2009, by representatives of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. The DQO process was used to identify and define the type, amount, and quality of data needed to develop and evaluate appropriate corrective actions for CAU 374.

Patrick Matthews

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Closure Report (CR) documents the activities undertaken to close Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996. Site closure was performed in accordance with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP)-approved Corrective Action Plan (CAP) for CAU 262 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office [NNSA/NV, 2002a]). CAU 262 is located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. CAU 262 consists of the following nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Area 25 of the NTS: CAS 25-02-06, Underground Storage tank CAS 25-04-06, Septic Systems A and B CAS 25-04-07, Septic System CAS 25-05-03, Leachfield CAS 25-05-05, Leachfield CAS 25-05-06, Leachfield CAS 25-05-08, Radioactive Leachfield CAS 25-05-12, Leachfield CAS 25-51-01, Dry Well.

D. S. Tobiason

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Plan (CAP) has been prepared for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 143: Area 25 Contaminated Waste Dumps, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order of 1996. This CAP provides the methodology for implementing the approved corrective action alternative as listed in the Corrective Action Decision Document (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, 2000). The CAU includes two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 25-23-09, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 1; and 25-23-03, Contaminated Waste Dump Number 2. Investigation of CAU 143 was conducted in 1999. Analytes detected during the corrective action investigation were evaluated against preliminary action levels to determine constituents of concern for CAU 143. Radionuclide concentrations in disposal pit soil samples associated with the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility West Trenches, the Reactor Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility East Trestle Pit, and the Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly Facility Trench are greater than normal background concentrations. These constituents are identified as constituents of concern for their respective CASs. Closure-in-place with administrative controls involves use restrictions to minimize access and prevent unauthorized intrusive activities, earthwork to fill depressions to original grade, placing additional clean cover material over the previously filled portion of some of the trenches, and placing secondary or diversion berm around pertinent areas to divert storm water run-on potential.

D. L. Gustafason

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 309: Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) contains project-specific information including facility descriptions, environmental sample collection objectives, and criteria for conducting site investigation activities at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 309, Area 12 Muckpiles, Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nevada. This CAIP has been developed in accordance with the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) (1996) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), and the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD). Corrective Action Unit 309 is located in Area 12 of the NTS, which is approximately 65 miles (mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1-1). Area 12 is approximately 40 mi beyond the main gate to the NTS. Corrective Action Unit 309 is comprised of the three Corrective Action Sites (CASs) shown on Figure 1-1 and listed below: CAS 12-06-09, Muckpile; CAS 12-08-02, Contaminated Waste Dump (CWD); and CAS 12-28-01, I, J, and K-Tunnel Debris. Corrective Action Sites 12-06-09 and 12-08-02 will be collectively referred to as muckpiles in this document. Corrective Action Site 12-28-01 will be referred to as the fallout plume because of the extensive lateral area of debris and fallout contamination resulting from the containment failures of the J-and K-Tunnels. The corrective action investigation (CAI) will include field inspections, radiological surveys, and media sampling, where appropriate. Data will also be obtained to support waste management decisions. The CASs in CAU 309 are being investigated because hazardous and/or radioactive constituents may be present in concentrations that could potentially pose a threat to human health and/or the environment. Existing information on the nature and extent of potential contamination at these sites are insufficient to evaluate and recommend corrective action alternatives for the CASs. Therefore, additional information will be obtained by conducting a CAI prior to evaluating corrective action alternatives and selecting the appropriate corrective action for each CAS.

David A. Strand

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 262: Area 25 Septic Systems and Underground Discharge Point, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision No. 1 (9/2001)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This corrective action investigation plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's approach to collect data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 262 under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 262 consists of nine Corrective Action Sites (CASs): Underground Storage Tank (25-02-06), Septic Systems A and B (25-04-06), Septic System (25-04-07), Leachfield (25-05-03), Leachfield (25-05-05), Leachfield (25-05-06), Radioactive Leachfield (25-05-08), Leachfield (25-05-12), and Dry Well (25-51-01). Situated in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), sites addressed by CAU 262 are located at the Reactor-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (R-MAD); Test Cell C; and Engine-Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly (E-MAD) facilities. The R-MAD, Test Cell C, and E-MAD facilities supported nuclear rocket reactor and engine testing as part of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station. The activities associated with the testing program were conducted between 1958 and 1973. Based on site history collected to support the Data Quality Objectives process, contaminants of potential concern (COPCs) for the site include oil/diesel-range total petroleum hydrocarbons, volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, and gamma-emitting radionuclides, isotopic uranium, isotopic plutonium, strontium-90, and tritium. The scope of the corrective action field investigation at the CAU will include the inspection of portions of the collection systems, sampling the contents of collection system features in situ of leachfield logging materials, surface soil sampling, collection of samples of soil underlying the base of inlet and outfall ends of septic tanks and outfall ends of diversion structures and distribution boxes, collection of s