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  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - WH Energy and Climate Stakeholders 10...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WH Energy and Climate Stakeholders 10-7-09 final.ppt Microsoft PowerPoint - WH Energy and Climate Stakeholders 10-7-09 final.ppt PDF icon Microsoft PowerPoint - WH Energy and ...

  2. Emerging Technologies: HVAC, WH and Appliance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies: HVAC, WH and Appliance BTO Peer Review 2016 Antonio M Bouza antonio.bouza@ee.doe.gov April 5-7, 2016 2 Building Technologies Office (BTO) Ecosystem Codes and Standards Emerging Technologies Residential Buildings Integration Commercial Buildings Integration 3 HVAC, Water Heating and Appliance R&D Strategy: National Labs CRADA projects, FOAs and use of BTO's deployment teams with research homes CRADA : Collaborative Research and Development Agreement More than just discrete

  3. TesSol Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: TesSol Inc Place: Texas Zip: 77808 Product: Solutions provider to fuel cell developers, catalyst companies, and research centres around the world. References:...

  4. Validation of TES Temperature and Water Vapor Retrievals with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The primary objective of the TES (Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer) instrument on the Aura spacecraft is the retrieval of trace gases, especially water vapor and ozone. The TES...

  5. PROJECT PROFILE: kWh Analytics (Incubator 10) | Department of...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    APPROACH kWh Analytics will create the solar industry's largest database of financial payment history for solar financing contracts. This data set would serve as a crucial ...

  6. Current TES Capabilities in TRNSYS (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, H.; Blair, N.

    2003-02-01

    This presentation includes: a brief overview of TRNSYS, a review of current SolarPaces models, potential of other models appropriate for CSP TES, and a review of a project proposal.

  7. Project Summary-TES-SNL.doc. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Project Summary-TES-SNL.doc. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Project Summary-TES-SNL.doc. Abstract not provided. Authors: Siegel, Nathan Phillip Publication Date: ...

  8. Search for WH associated production at D{\\o} Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miconi, Florian

    2012-01-01

    The Higgs mechanism introduced in 1964 gives a satisfactory solution to a major problem of the standard model of elementary particles: the origin of the mass. It predicts the existence of the Higgs scalar boson, which has not been discovered experimentally yet. The Tevatron, a hadron accelerator based at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory near Chicago, has delivered data to its two multi-purpose detectors CDF and DZERO since 1983 up to september 2011. Leaving us about 11 fb{sup -1} of data per experiment to analyze. Associated production of a Higgs boson and a vector gauge boson W or Z is the main search channel for a light standard Higgs boson (i.e. below 135 GeV/c{sup 2}). Using data collected by DZERO, we are looking for this production mode taking advantage of sophisticated techniques to improve the signal sensitivity such as b-jet identification and multivariate discriminants. In the end, a statistical approach allows us to set an upper limit on the ratio between the observed (resp. expected) Higgs production cross section and its theoretical cross section. The latest result obtained in the WH channel using 8.5 fb{sup -1} at DZERO is 4.6 (resp. 3.5) for a 115 GeV/c{sup 2} Higgs boson.

  9. PROJECT PROFILE: kWh Analytics (Phase 3) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kWh Analytics (Phase 3) PROJECT PROFILE: kWh Analytics (Phase 3) Funding Opportunity: Orange Button (SB-DATA) SunShot Subprogram: Soft Costs Location: San Francisco, CA Amount Awarded: $1,000,000 Awardee Cost Share: $1,000,000 kWh Analytics will support the adoption of industry-led data standards, including the development of a data format translation software tool, Solar BabelFish, which will instantly translate original data formats into data standards. This will significantly reduce the time

  10. text in "Max kWh" fields | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    it should as we are trying to prevent users from writing "less than X", "greater than Y", etc. and follow the intention of the "Max kWh" field. Also there should be a warning...

  11. Using Encapsulated Phase Change Material in Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Concentrating Solar Power (EPCM-TES)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathur, Anoop

    2013-12-15

    Terrafore successfully demonstrated and optimized the manufacturing of capsules containing phase-changing inorganic salts. The phase change was used to store thermal energy collected from a concentrating solar-power plant as latent heat. This latent heat, in addition to sensible heat increased the energy density (energy stored per unit weight of salt) by over 50%, thus requiring 40% less salt and over 60% less capsule container. Therefore, the cost to store high-temperature thermal energy collected in a concentrating solar power plant will be reduced by almost 40% or more, as compared to conventional two-tank, sensible-only storage systems. The cost for thermal energy storage (TES) system is expected to achieve the Sun Shot goal of $15 per kWh(t). Costs associated with poor heat-transfer in phase change materials (PCM) were also eliminated. Although thermal energy storage that relies on the latent heat of fusion of PCM improves energy density by as much as 50%, upon energy discharge the salt freezes and builds on the heat transfer surfaces. Since these salts have low thermal conductivity, large heat-transfer areas, or larger conventional heat-exchangers are needed, which increases costs. By encapsulating PCM in small capsules we have increased the heat transfer area per unit volume of salt and brought the heat transfer fluid in direct contact with the capsules. These two improvements have increased the heat transfer coefficient and boosted heat transfer. The program was successful in overcoming the phenomenon of melt expansion in the capsules, which requires the creation of open volume in the capsules or shell to allow for expansion of the molten salt on melting and is heated above its melting point to 550°C. Under contract with the Department of Energy, Terrafore Inc. and Southwest Research Institute, developed innovative method(s) to economically create the open volume or void in the capsule. One method consists of using a sacrificial polymer coating as the

  12. U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and/or

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), September 2003 | Department of Energy CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and/or Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), September 2003 U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and/or Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), September 2003 This 2003 chart of U.S. CHP installations incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and/or Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC) was prepared by the Cool Solutions Company of Lisle, Illinois, for UT-Battelle,

  13. Technology Potential of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Systems in Federal Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chvala, William D.

    2001-07-31

    This document presents the findings of a technology market assessment for thermal energy storage (TES) in space cooling applications. The potential impact of TES in Federal facilities is modeled using the Federal building inventory with the appropriate climatic and energy cost data. In addition, this assessment identified acceptance issues and major obstacles through interviews with energy services companies (ESCOs), TES manufacturers, and Federal facility staff.

  14. Complex-compound low-temperature TES system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockenfeller, U.

    1989-03-01

    Development of a complex-compound low-temperature TES system is described herein from basic chemical principles through current bench scale system development. Important application engineering issues and an economic outlook are addressed as well. The system described uses adsorption reactions between solid metal inorganic salts and ammonia refrigerant. It is the coordinative nature of these reactions that allows for storage of ammonia refrigerant within the solid salt crystals that function as a chemical compressor during on peak periods (substituting the mechanical compressor) and release ammonia during off peak periods while a mechanical vapor compression system provides the necessary reactor pressure and heat.

  15. WH Mapathon

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    House Mapathon 2015 Refresh To contribute, follow these instructions. For more information on this effort, visit: http:mapgive.state.govwhmapathon. Progress depicted in the map...

  16. Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with conventional'' HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

  17. Case studies of thermal energy storage (TES) systems: Evaluation and verification of system performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akbari, H.; Sezgen, O.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed two case studies to review and analyze energy performance of thermal energy storage CMS systems in commercial buildings. Our case studies considered two partial ice storage systems in Northern California. For each case, we compiled historical data on TES design, installation, and operation. This information was further enhanced by data obtained through interviews with the building owners and operators. The performance and historical data of the TES systems and their components were grouped into issues related to design, installation, operation, and maintenance of the systems. Our analysis indicated that (1) almost all problems related to the operation of TES and non-TES systems could be traced back to the design of the system, and (2) the identified problems were not unique to the TES systems. There were as many original problems with ``conventional`` HVAC systems and components as with TES systems. Judging from the problems related to non-TES components identified in these two case studies, it is reasonable to conclude that conventional systems have as many problems as TES systems, but a failure, in a TES system may have a more dramatic impact on thermal comfort and electricity charges. The objective of the designers of the TES systems in the case-study buildings was to design just-the-right-size systems so that both the initial investment and operating costs would be minimized. Given such criteria, a system is typically designed only for normal and steady-state operating conditions-which often precludes due consideration to factors such as maintenance, growth in the needed capacity, ease of the operation, and modularity of the systems. Therefore, it is not surprising to find that these systems, at least initially, did not perform to the design intent and expectation and that they had to go through extended periods of trouble-shooting.

  18. ETs HVAC, WH and Appliance R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ET's HV!, WH and !ppliance R&D Antonio M. Bouza, DOE/BTO Technology Manager April 24-25, 2014 Introduction Program Goals: * Support BTO's goals to achieve 50 percent building energy savings * By 2020, develop technologies enabling 20 percent energy savings in HVAC; 30 percent energy savings in water heating, and 10 percent energy savings in appliances * By 2030, develop technologies enabling 40 percent energy savings in HVAC; 60 percent energy savings in water heating, and 20 percent

  19. ETs HVAC, WH and Appliance R&D

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ET's HVAC, WH and Appliance R&D Antonio M. Bouza, DOE/BTO Technology Manager April 14-15 2015 2 Introduction Program Goals: Support BTO's goals to achieve 50 percent building energy savings * By 2020, develop technologies enabling 10 percent energy savings in HVAC; 20 percent energy savings in water heating, and 15 percent energy savings in appliances * By 2030, develop technologies enabling 25 percent energy savings in HVAC; 35 percent energy savings in water heating, and 30 percent energy

  20. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in the $WH \\to \\ell \

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagai, Yoshikazu; /Tsukuba U.

    2010-02-01

    We have searched for the Standard Model Higgs boson in the WH {yields} lvbb channel in 1.96 TeV pp collisions at CDF. This search is based on the data collected by March 2009, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.3 fb-1. The W H channel is one of the most promising channels for the Higgs boson search at Tevatron in the low Higgs boson mass region.

  1. Integrating CSP w/ TES into a Utility System | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Integrating CSP w/ TES into a Utility System Integrating CSP w/ TES into a Utility System This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042513_albert.pdf (1.81 MB) More Documents & Publications EA-1683: Final Environmental Assessment SunShot Vision Study: February 2012 (Book), SunShot, Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE) A New Generation of Parabolic Trough

  2. CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh Annually with a Motor Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2005-11-01

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs annually by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.

  3. CEMEX: Cement Manufacturer Saves 2.1 Million kWh Annually with a Motor Retrofit Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-06-25

    This DOE Industrial Technologies Program spotlight describes how the CEMEX cement manufacturing plant in Davenport, California, saves 2 million kWh and $168,000 in energy costs annually by replacing 13 worn-out motors with new energy-efficient ones.

  4. Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO{sub 2} with HIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulawik, S. S.; Worden, J. R.; Wofsy, S. C.; Biraud, S. C.; Nassar, R.; Jones, D. B.A.; Olsen, E. T.; Osterman, G. B.

    2012-02-01

    Comparisons are made between mid-tropospheric Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) satellite measurements and ocean profiles from three Hiaper Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) campaigns and land aircraft profiles from the United States Southern Great Plains (SGP) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site over a 4-yr period. These comparisons are used to characterize the bias in the TES CO{sub 2} estimates and to assess whether calculated and actual uncertainties and sensitivities are consistent. The HIPPO dataset is one of the few datasets spanning the altitude range where TES CO{sub 2} estimates are sensitive, which is especially important for characterization of biases. We find that TES CO{sub 2} estimates capture the seasonal and latitudinal gradients observed by HIPPO CO{sub 2} measurements; actual errors range from 0.8–1.2 ppm, depending on the campaign, and are approximately 1.4 times larger than the predicted errors. The bias of TES versus HIPPO is within 0.85 ppm for each of the 3 campaigns; however several of the sub-tropical TES CO{sub 2} estimates are lower than expected based on the calculated errors. Comparisons of aircraft flask profiles, which are measured from the surface to 5 km, to TES CO{sub 2} at the SGP ARM site show good agreement with an overall bias of 0.1 ppm and rms of 1.0 ppm. We also find that the predicted sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} estimates is too high, which results from using a multi-step retrieval for CO{sub 2} and temperature. We find that the averaging kernel in the TES product corrected by a pressure-dependent factor accurately reflects the sensitivity of the TES CO{sub 2} product.

  5. Search for WH associated production in pp? collisions at ?s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; sman, B.; Atkins, S.; Atramentov, O.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; Cruz-Burelo, E. De La; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dorland, T.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Cruz, I. Heredia-De La; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Huske, N. K.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Polozov, P.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Safronov, G.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.

    2012-08-13

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L?5.3 fb? collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp? Collider. Events containing a W?l? candidate (with l corresponding to e or ?) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product of the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (MH). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed MH=115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.

  6. External review of the thermal energy storage (TES) cogeneration study assumptions. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, B.Y.; Poirier, R.N.

    1996-08-01

    This report is to provide a detailed review of the basic assumptions made in the design, sizing, performance, and economic models used in the thermal energy storage (TES)/cogeneration feasibility studies conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) staff. This report is the deliverable required under the contract.

  7. Search for WH associated production in 5.3 fb -1 of pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Alves, G.A.; et al

    2011-03-01

    We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in collisions at a center of mass energy of in 5.3 fb -1 of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from Standard Model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and expected backgrounds, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for mH=115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branchingmore » fraction of H → bb¯ to its Standard Model prediction, which is consistent with an expected limit of 4.8.« less

  8. High-Temperature Phase Change Materials (PCM) Candidates for Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gomez, J. C.

    2011-09-01

    It is clearly understood that lower overall costs are a key factor to make renewable energy technologies competitive with traditional energy sources. Energy storage technology is one path to increase the value and reduce the cost of all renewable energy supplies. Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies have the ability to dispatch electrical output to match peak demand periods by employing thermal energy storage (TES). Energy storage technologies require efficient materials with high energy density. Latent heat TES systems using phase change material (PCM) are useful because of their ability to charge and discharge a large amount of heat from a small mass at constant temperature during a phase transformation like melting-solidification. PCM technology relies on the energy absorption/liberation of the latent heat during a physical transformation. The main objective of this report is to provide an assessment of molten salts and metallic alloys proposed as candidate PCMs for TES applications, particularly in solar parabolic trough electrical power plants at a temperature range from 300..deg..C to 500..deg.. C. The physical properties most relevant for PCMs service were reviewed from the candidate selection list. Some of the PCM candidates were characterized for: chemical stability with some container materials; phase change transformation temperatures; and latent heats.

  9. Development of zinc-bromine batteries for utility energy storage. First annual report, 1 September 1978-31 August 1979. [8-kWh submodule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putt, R.; Attia, A.J.; Lu, P.Y.; Heyland, J.H.

    1980-05-01

    Development work on the Zn/Br battery is reported. A major improvement was the use of a bipolar cell design; this design is superior with respect to cost, performance, and simplicity. A cost and design study for an 80-kWh module resulted in a cost estimate of $54/kWh(1979$) for purchased materials and components, on the basis of 2500 MWh of annual production. A cell submodule (nominal 2 kWh) of full-sized electrodes (1 ft/sup 2/) accrued over 200 continuous cycles in a hands-off, automatic routine with efficiencies in the range of 53 to 56%. Initial testing of a full-sized 8-kWh submodule demonstrated energy efficiencies of 65 to 67%. 23 figures, 10 tables. (RWR)

  10. Development of 8 kWh Zinc bromide battery as a precursor of battery for electric power storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, T.; Ando, Y.; Fujii, E.; Hirotu, A.; Ito, H.; Kanazashi, M.; Misaki, H.; Yamamoto, A.

    1984-08-01

    Zinc bromide battery is characterized with its room temperature operation, simple construction and easy maintenance. After four years' research and development of electrode materials, electrolyte composition, battery stack construction and other components, we prepared 1 kW class (8 kWh) battery for the first interim official evaluation. This battery showed a good and stable energy efficiency of 80% after 130 cycles of 1.25 kW 8 hours charge and 1.0 kW 8 hours discharge.

  11. A chemical confirmation of the faint Boötes II dwarf spheroidal galaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, Andreas; Rich, R. Michael

    2014-10-10

    We present a chemical abundance study of the brightest confirmed member star of the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Boötes II from Keck/HIRES high-resolution spectroscopy at moderate signal-to-noise ratios. At [Fe/H] = –2.93 ± 0.03(stat.) ± 0.17(sys.), this star chemically resembles metal-poor halo field stars and the signatures of other faint dwarf spheroidal galaxies at the same metallicities in that it shows enhanced [α/Fe] ratios, Solar Fe-peak element abundances, and low upper limits on the neutron-capture element Ba. Moreover, this star shows no chemical peculiarities in any of the eight elements we were able to measure. This implies that the chemical outliers found in other systems remain outliers pertaining to the unusual enrichment histories of the respective environments, while Boo II appears to have experienced an enrichment history typical of its very low mass. We also re-calibrated previous measurements of the galaxy's metallicity from the calcium triplet (CaT) and find a much lower value than reported before. The resulting broad metallicity spread, in excess of one dex, the very metal-poor mean, and the chemical abundance patterns of the present star imply that Boötes II is a low-mass, old, metal-poor dwarf galaxy and not an overdensity associated with the Sagittarius Stream as has been previously suggested based on its sky position and kinematics. The low, mean CaT metallicity of –2.7 dex falls right on the luminosity-metallicity relation delineated over four orders of magnitude from the more luminous to the faintest galaxies. Thus Boötes II's chemical enrichment appears representative of the galaxy's original mass, while tidal stripping and other mass loss mechanisms were probably not significant as for other low-mass satellites.

  12. Search for WH associated production in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; et al

    2012-08-13

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L≈5.3 fb⁻¹ collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp̄ Collider. Events containing a W→lν candidate (with l corresponding to e or μ) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product ofmore » the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (MH). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed MH=115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.« less

  13. A $WH \\to \\tau \

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meijer, Melvin Michael

    2012-06-25

    This thesis describes a search for an elusive particle: the Higgs boson. The search is motivated by the urge to understand the fundamental building blocks of our universe.

  14. Chlorine hazard evaluation for the zinc-chlorine electric vehicle battery. Final technical report. [50 kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalosh, R. G.; Bajpai, S. N.; Short, T. P.; Tsui, R. K.

    1980-04-01

    Hazards associated with conceivable accidental chlorine releases from zinc-chlorine electric vehicle batteries are evaluated. Since commercial batteries are not yet available, this hazard assessment is based on both theoretical chlorine dispersion models and small-scale and large-scale spill tests with chlorine hydrate (which is the form of chlorine storage in the charged battery). Six spill tests involving the chlorine hydrate equivalent of a 50-kWh battery indicate that the danger zone in which chlorine vapor concentrations intermittently exceed 100 ppM extends at least 23 m directly downwind of a spill onto a warm (30 to 38/sup 0/C) road surface. Other accidental chlorine release scenarios may also cause some distress, but are not expected to produce the type of life-threatening chlorine exposures that can result from large hydrate spills. Chlorine concentration data from the hydrate spill tests compare favorably with calculations based on a quasi-steady area source dispersion model and empirical estimates of the hydrate decomposition rate. The theoretical dispersion model was combined with assumed hydrate spill probabilities and current motor vehicle accident statistics in order to project expected chlorine-induced fatality rates. These calculations indicate that expected chlorine fataility rates are several times higher in a city such as Los Angeles with a warm and calm climate than in a colder and windier city such as Boston. Calculated chlorine-induced fatality rate projections for various climates are presented as a function of hydrate spill probability in order to illustrate the degree of vehicle/battery crashworthiness required to maintain chlorine-induced fatality rates below current vehicle fatality rates due to fires and asphyxiations. 37 figures, 19 tables.

  15. Search for $WH$ associated production in 5.3 fb$^{-1}$ of $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Alves, Gilvan Augusto; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; /Nijmegen U. /Fermilab

    2010-12-01

    We present a search for associated production of Higgs and W bosons in p{bar p} collisions at a center of mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in 5.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity recorded by the D0 experiment. Multivariate analysis techniques are applied to events containing one lepton, an imbalance in transverse energy, and one or two b-tagged jets to discriminate a potential WH signal from standard model backgrounds. We observe good agreement between data and background, and set an upper limit of 4.5 (at 95% confidence level and for m{sub H} = 115 GeV) on the ratio of the WH cross section multiplied by the branching fraction of H {yields} b{bar b} to its standard model prediction. A limit of 4.8 is expected from simulation.

  16. Effects of Diet on Resource Utilization by a Model Human Gut Microbiota Containing Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, a Symbiont with an Extensive Glycobiome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNulty, Nathan; Wu, Meng; Erickson, Alison L; Pan, Chongle; Erickson, Brian K; Martens, Eric C; Pudlo, Nicholas A; Muegge, Brian; Henrissat, Bernard; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Gordon, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The human gut microbiota is an important metabolic organ, yet little is known about how its individual species interact, establish dominant positions, and respond to changes in environmental factors such as diet. In this study, gnotobiotic mice were colonized with an artificial microbiota comprising 12 sequenced human gut bacterial species and fed oscillating diets of disparate composition. Rapid, reproducible, and reversible changes in the structure of this assemblage were observed. Time-series microbial RNA-Seq analyses revealed staggered functional responses to diet shifts throughout the assemblage that were heavily focused on carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. High-resolution shotgun metaproteomics confirmed many of these responses at a protein level. One member, Bacteroides cellulosilyticus WH2, proved exceptionally fit regardless of diet. Its genome encoded more carbohydrate active enzymes than any previously sequenced member of the Bacteroidetes. Transcriptional profiling indicated that B. cellulosilyticus WH2 is an adaptive forager that tailors its versatile carbohydrate utilization strategy to available dietary polysaccharides, with a strong emphasis on plant-derived xylans abundant in dietary staples like cereal grains. Two highly expressed, diet-specific polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs) in B. cellulosilyticus WH2 were identified, one with characteristics of xylan utilization systems. Introduction of a B. cellulosilyticus WH2 library comprising .90,000 isogenic transposon mutants into gnotobiotic mice, along with the other artificial community members, confirmed that these loci represent critical diet-specific fitness determinants. Carbohydrates that trigger dramatic increases in expression of these two loci and many of the organism s 111 other predicted PULs were identified by RNA-Seq during in vitro growth on 31 distinct carbohydrate substrates, allowing us to better interpret in vivo RNA-Seq and proteomics data. These results offer insight

  17. X-ray-selected galaxy groups in Boötes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vajgel, Bruna; Lopes, Paulo A. A.; Jones, Christine; Forman, William R.; Murray, Stephen S.; Goulding, Andrew; Andrade-Santos, Felipe

    2014-10-10

    We present the X-ray and optical properties of the galaxy groups selected in the Chandra X-Boötes survey. We used follow-up Chandra observations to better define the group sample and their X-ray properties. Group redshifts were measured from the AGN and Galaxy Evolution Survey spectroscopic data. We used photometric data from the NOAO Deep Wide Field Survey to estimate the group richness (N {sub gals}) and the optical luminosity (L {sub opt}). Our final sample comprises 32 systems at z < 1.75 with 14 below z = 0.35. For these 14 systems, we estimate velocity dispersions (σ {sub gr}) and perform a virial analysis to obtain the radii (R {sub 200} and R {sub 500}) and total masses (M {sub 200} and M {sub 500}) for groups with at least 5 galaxy members. We use the Chandra X-ray observations to derive the X-ray luminosity (L{sub X} ). We examine the performance of the group properties σ{sub gr}, L {sub opt}, and L{sub X} , as proxies for the group mass. Understanding how well these observables measure the total mass is important to estimate how precisely the cluster/group mass function is determined. Exploring the scaling relations built with the X-Boötes sample and comparing these with samples from the literature, we find a break in the L{sub X} -M {sub 500} relation at approximately M {sub 500} = 5 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉} (for M {sub 500} > 5 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉}, M{sub 500}∝L{sub X}{sup 0.61±0.02}, while for M {sub 500} ≤ 5 × 10{sup 13} M {sub ☉}, M{sub 500}∝L{sub X}{sup 0.44±0.05}). Thus, the mass-luminosity relation for galaxy groups cannot be described by the same power law as galaxy clusters. A possible explanation for this break is the dynamical friction, tidal interactions, and projection effects that reduce the velocity dispersion values of the galaxy groups. By extending the cluster luminosity function to the group regime, we predict the number of groups that new X-ray surveys, particularly eROSITA, will detect. Based on our cluster

  18. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Associated WH Production in 9.7 fb? of pp? Collisions with the D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besanon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Prez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Thry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Dliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Garca-Gonzlez, J. A.; Garca-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grnendahl, S.; Grnewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffr, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaa-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martnez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Ptroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Snchez-Hernndez, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Sldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.

    2012-09-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and two or three jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-quark jet. The search is primarily sensitive to WH?l?bb production and uses data corresponding to 9.7 fb? of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp Collider at ?s=1.96 TeV. We observe agreement between the data and the expected background. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production of a standard model Higgs boson of 5.2?SM, where ?SM is the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7?SM.

  19. Search for $WH$ associated production in $p \\bar{p}$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=1.96\\,{\\rm TeV}$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Abbott, Braden Keim; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Alexeev, Guennadi D.; Alkhazov, Georgiy D.; Alton, Andrew K.; Alverson, George O.; Aoki, Masato; Askew, Andrew Warren

    2012-03-01

    This report describes a search for associated production of W and Higgs bosons based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of L {approx} 5.3 fb{sup -1} collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Collider. Events containing a W {yields} {ell}{nu} candidate (with {ell} corresponding to e or {mu}) are selected in association with two or three reconstructed jets. One or two of the jets are required to be consistent with having evolved from a b quark. A multivariate discriminant technique is used to improve the separation of signal and backgrounds. Expected and observed upper limits are obtained for the product of the WH production cross section and branching ratios and reported in terms of ratios relative to the prediction of the standard model as a function of the mass of the Higgs boson (M{sub H}). The observed and expected 95% C.L. upper limits obtained for an assumed M{sub H} = 115 GeV are, respectively, factors of 4.5 and 4.8 larger than the value predicted by the standard model.

  20. Search for associated Higgs boson production WH ---> WWW* ---> l+- nu l-prime+- nu-prime + X in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Agram, J.-L.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota

    2006-07-01

    The authors present a search for associated Higgs boson production in the process p{bar p} {yields} WH {yields} WWW* {yields} {ell}{sup {+-}}{nu} {ell}{prime}{sup {+-}} {nu}{prime} + X in final states containing two like-sign isolated electrons or muons (e{sup {+-}}e{sup {+-}}, e{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {+-}}, or {mu}{sup {+-}} {mu}{sup {+-}}). The search is based on D0 Run II data samples corresponding to integrated luminosities of 360-380 pb{sup -1}. No excess is observed over the predicted standard model background. They set 95% C.L. upper limits on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) x Br(H {yields} WW*) between 3.2 and 2.8 pb for Higgs masses from 115 to 175 GeV.

  1. TES for Residential Settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-07-31

    The article discusses thermal energy storage approaches for residential buildings. This article addresses both brick bank storage and phase change material technologies. The energy savings and market potential of these thermal energy storage methods are reviewed as well.

  2. High-performance batteries for electric-vehicle propulsion and stationary energy storage. Progress report, October 1978-September 1979. [40 kWh, Li-Al and Li-Si anodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, D. L.; Steunenberg, R. K.; Chilenskas, A. A.; Gay, E. C.; Battles, J. E.; Hornstra, F.; Miller, W. E.; Vissers, D. R.; Roche, M. F.; Shimotake, H.; Hudson, R.; Askew, B. A.; Sudar, S.

    1980-03-01

    The research, development, and management activities of the programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and at contractors' laboratories on high-temperature batteries during the period October 1978 to September 1979 are reported. These batteries are being developed for electric-vehicle propulsion and for stationary energy-storage applications. The present cells, which operate at 400 to 500/sup 0/C, are of a vertically oriented, prismatic design with one or more inner positive electrodes of FeS or FeS/sub 2/, facing negative electrodes of lithium-aluminum or lithium-silicon alloy, and molten LiCl-KC1 electrolyte. During this reporting period, cell and battery development work has continued at ANL and contractors' laboratories. A 40 kWh electric-vehicle battery (designated Mark IA) was fabricated and delivered to ANL for testing. During the initial heat-up, one of the two modules failed due to a short circuit. A failure analysis was conducted, and the Mark IA program completed. Development work on the next electric-vehicle battery (Mark II) was initiated at Eagle-Picher Industries, Inc. and Gould, Inc. Work on stationary energy-storage batteries during this period has consisted primarily of conceptual design studies. 107 figures, 67 tables.

  3. kWh Analytics: Quality Ratings for PV

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation summarizes the information given during the SunShot Grand Challenge Summit and Technology Forum, June 13-14, 2012.

  4. Habilitation thesis on STT and Higgs searches in WH production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnenschein, Lars; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2006-12-01

    The detector of the D0 experiment at the proton anti-proton collider Tevatron in Run II is discussed in detail. The performance of the collider and the experiment is presented. Standard model Higgs searches with integrated luminosities between 260 pb{sup -1} and 950 pb{sup -1} and their combination are performed. No deviation from SM background expectation has been observed. Sensitivity prospects at the Tevatron are shown.

  5. Category:WH Mapathan Todo List | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (Utility Company) City of Hallettsville, Texas (Utility Company) C cont. City of Hope, Arkansas (Utility Company) City of Wall Lake, Iowa (Utility Company) City of Warroad,...

  6. wh_mission_status.pdf | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    White House Mission Requests Memorandum FOIA-Summary of Findings: Circumstances surrounding decisions regarding the security clearance, access and work assignments FIA-16-0027 - In ...

  7. program design. Final report Brown, W.H.; Gopalakrishnan, S....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    an improved basis for the design, procurement, testing, and operation of large feed pumps with increased reliability and stability over the full range of operating conditions....

  8. Search for massive WH resonances decaying into the $$\\ell \

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2016-04-28

    In this study, a search for a massive resonancemore » $${\\mathrm{W}^{\\prime }}$$ decaying into a W and a Higgs boson in the $$\\ell \

  9. Tes Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Korean manufacturer of semiconductor capital equipment; works with LG Electronics to build PECVD equipment Coordinates: 37.22229, 127.227028 Show Map Loading...

  10. TES-SNL.ppt. (Conference) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: DOE solar peer review held March 9-10, 2009 in denver, CO.; Related Information: Proposed for presentation at the DOE solar ...

  11. EA-98-L_WSPP_w-TES.pdf

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

  12. 2014 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    17.05 Maine 15.27 12.70 8.95 0.00 12.65 Massachusetts 17.39 14.68 12.74 8.76 15.35 New Hampshire 17.53 14.34 11.93 0.00 15.22 Rhode Island 17.17 14.56 12.86 14.89 15.41 Vermont ...

  13. "2014 Total Electric Industry- Average Retail Price (cents/kWh...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "Massachusetts",17.390969,14.676411,12.740483,8.7639584,15.354558 "New Hampshire",17.52928,14.339091,11.929516,0,15.220362 "Rhode Island",17.167946,14.560559,12.86...

  14. Electric rate that shifts hourly may foretell spot-market kWh

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, N.

    1985-11-25

    Four California industrial plants have cut their electricity bills up to 16% by shifting from the traditional time-of-use rates to an experimental real-time program (RTP) that varies prices hourly. The users receive a price schedule reflecting changing generating costs one day in advance to encourage them to increase power consumption during the cheapest time periods. Savings during the pilot program range between $11,000 and $32,000 per customer. The hourly cost breakdown encourages consumption during the night and early morning. The signalling system could be expanded to cogenerators and independent small power producers. If an electricity spot market develops, forecasters think a place on the stock exchanges for future-delivery contracts could develop in the future.

  15. Statistical Analysis of Microarray Data with Replicated Spots: A Case Study withSynechococcusWH8102

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thomas, E. V.; Phillippy, K. H.; Brahamsha, B.; Haaland, D. M.; Timlin, J. A.; Elbourne, L. D. H.; Palenik, B.; Paulsen, I. T.

    2009-01-01

    Until recently microarray experiments often involved relatively few arrays with only a single representation of each gene on each array. A complete genome microarray with multiple spots per gene (spread out spatially across the array) was developed in order to compare the gene expression of a marine cyanobacterium and a knockout mutant strain in a defined artificial seawater medium. Statistical methods were developed for analysis in the special situation of this case study where there is gene replication within an array and where relatively few arrays are used, which can be the case with current array technology. Due in partmoreto the replication within an array, it was possible to detect very small changes in the levels of expression between the wild type and mutant strains. One interesting biological outcome of this experiment is the indication of the extent to which the phosphorus regulatory system of this cyanobacterium affects the expression of multiple genes beyond those strictly involved in phosphorus acquisition.less

  16. Statistical Analysis of Microarray Data with Replicated Spots: A Case Study with Synechococcus WH8102

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Thomas, E. V.; Phillippy, K. H.; Brahamsha, B.; Haaland, D. M.; Timlin, J. A.; Elbourne, L. D. H.; Palenik, B.; Paulsen, I. T.

    2009-01-01

    Until recently microarray experiments often involved relatively few arrays with only a single representation of each gene on each array. A complete genome microarray with multiple spots per gene (spread out spatially across the array) was developed in order to compare the gene expression of a marine cyanobacterium and a knockout mutant strain in a defined artificial seawater medium. Statistical methods were developed for analysis in the special situation of this case study where there is gene replication within an array and where relatively few arrays are used, which can be the case with current array technology. Due in partmore » to the replication within an array, it was possible to detect very small changes in the levels of expression between the wild type and mutant strains. One interesting biological outcome of this experiment is the indication of the extent to which the phosphorus regulatory system of this cyanobacterium affects the expression of multiple genes beyond those strictly involved in phosphorus acquisition.« less

  17. Structure of a Bud6/Actin Complex Reveals a Novel WH2-like Actin...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: Structure; Journal Volume: ... Sponsoring Org: NIH Country of Publication: United States Language: ENGLISH Word Cloud ...

  18. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500Wh/L

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  19. Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newmarker, Marc; Campbell, Mark

    2012-03-16

    Design, validate at prototype level, and then demonstrate a full size, 800 MWht Thermal Energy Storage (TES) system based on Phase Changing Material (PCM) TES modules with round trip efficiency in excess of 93%. The PCM TES module would be the building block of a TES system which can be deployed at costs inline with the DOE benchmark of 2020. The development of a reliable, unsophisticated, modular, and scalable TES system designed to be massmanufactured utilizing advanced automated fabrication and assembly processes and field installed in the most cost-effective configuration could facilitate the attainment of a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of $.07/kWh by 2015. It was believed that the DOE targets can be attained by finding the best combinationTES module size, its optimal integration in the power cycle, and readily available PCM. Work under this project ultimately focused on the development and performance evaluation of a 100kWht prototype heat exchanger. The design utilizes a commercially available heat exchanger product to create a unique latent heat PCM storage module. The novel ideal associated with this technology is the inclusion of an agitation mechanism that is activated during the discharge process to improve heat transfer. The prototype unit did not meet the performance goals estimated through modeling, nor did the estimated costs of the system fall in line with the goals established by DOE.

  20. Applications of cogeneration with thermal energy storage technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaram, S.; Katipamula, S.; Williams, H.R.

    1995-03-01

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the U.S. Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage (TES) Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility-scale applications [utility thermal energy storage (UTES)]. Several of these storage technologies can be used in a new or an existing power generation facility to increase its efficiency and promote the use of the TES technology within the utility and the industrial sectors. The UTES project has included a study of both heat storage and cool storage systems for different utility-scale applications. The study reported here has shown that an oil/rock diurnal TES system, when integrated with a simple gas turbine cogeneration system, can produce on-peak power for $0.045 to $0.06 /kWh, while supplying a 24-hour process steam load. The molten salt storage system was found to be less suitable for simple as well as combined-cycle cogeneration applications. However, certain advanced TES concepts and storage media could substantially improve the performance and economic benefits. In related study of a chill TES system was evaluated for precooling gas turbine inlet air, which showed that an ice storage system could be used to effectively increase the peak generating capacity of gas turbines when operating in hot ambient conditions.

  1. Life Cycle Assessment of a Parabolic Trough Concentrating Solar Power Plant and Impacts of Key Design Alternatives: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G. A.; Burkhardt, J. J.; Turchi, C. S.

    2011-09-01

    Climate change and water scarcity are important issues for today's power sector. To inform capacity expansion decisions, hybrid life cycle assessment is used to evaluate a reference design of a parabolic trough concentrating solar power (CSP) facility located in Daggett, California, along four sustainability metrics: life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, water consumption, cumulative energy demand (CED), and energy payback time (EPBT). This wet-cooled, 103 MW plant utilizes mined nitrate salts in its two-tank, thermal energy storage (TES) system. Design alternatives of dry-cooling, a thermocline TES, and synthetically-derived nitrate salt are evaluated. During its life cycle, the reference CSP plant is estimated to emit 26 g CO2eq per kWh, consume 4.7 L/kWh of water, and demand 0.40 MJeq/kWh of energy, resulting in an EPBT of approximately 1 year. The dry-cooled alternative is estimated to reduce life cycle water consumption by 77% but increase life cycle GHG emissions and CED by 8%. Synthetic nitrate salts may increase life cycle GHG emissions by 52% compared to mined. Switching from two-tank to thermocline TES configuration reduces life cycle GHG emissions, most significantly for plants using synthetically-derived nitrate salts. CSP can significantly reduce GHG emissions compared to fossil-fueled generation; however, dry-cooling may be required in many locations to minimize water consumption.

  2. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  3. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, ormore » during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.« less

  4. The Higgs boson in the Standard Model theoretical constraints and a direct search in the wh channel at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huske, Nils Kristian; /Paris U., VI-VII

    2010-09-01

    We have presented results in two different yet strongly linked aspects of Higgs boson physics. We have learned about the importance of the Higgs boson for the fate of the Standard Model, being either only a theory limited to explaining phenomena at the electroweak scale or, if the Higgs boson lies within a mass range of 130 < m{sub H} < 160 GeV the SM would remain a self consistent theory up to highest energy scales O(m{sub Pl}). This could have direct implications on theories of cosmological inflation using the Higgs boson as the particle giving rise to inflation in the very early Universe, if it couples non-minimally to gravity, an effect that would only become significant at very high energies. After understanding the immense meaning of proving whether the Higgs boson exists and if so, at which mass, we have presented a direct search for a Higgs boson in associated production with a W boson in a mass range 100 < m{sub H} < 150 GeV. A light Higgs boson is favored regarding constraints from electroweak precision measurements. As a single analysis is not yet sensitive for an observation of the Higgs boson using 5.3 fb{sup -1} of Tevatron data, we set limits on the production cross section times branching ratio. At the Tevatron, however, we are able to combine the sensitivity of our analyses not only across channels or analyses at a single experiment but also across both experiments, namely CDF and D0. This yields to the so-called Tevatron Higgs combination which, in total, combines 129 analyses from both experiments with luminosities of up to 6.7 fb{sup -1}. The results of a previous Tevatron combination led to the first exclusion of possible Higgs boson masses since the LEP exclusion in 2001. The latest Tevatron combination from July 2010 can be seen in Fig. 111 and limits compared to the Standard Model expectation are listed in Table 23. It excludes a SM Higgs boson in the regions of 100 < m{sub H} < 109 GeV as well as 158 < m{sub H} < 175 GeV based on the observed final limits at 95% C.L. In the most interesting low mass region between 115 and 135 GeV, even the full Tevatron combination is not yet sensitive enough to exclude a Higgs boson, or to even prove its existence with a meaningful significance. Fig. 112 shows a projection plot for sensitivity to the SM Higgs boson at the Tevatron as a measure of increasing luminosity. The 10 fb{sup -1} projection is a rather conservative outlook for the coming year of data taking as the Tevatron runs smoothly and the run till the end of 2011 is assured. By now, already 9 fb{sup -1} have been recorded by the two experiments. As the extrapolation plot shows, this amount of luminosity will allow to exclude the Higgs boson over a wide mass range at a 95% C.L. With the LHC at CERN now running and successfully collecting first data, it is worth looking at projections of Higgs boson sensitivity at the current center of mass energy of 7 TeV of the LHC accelerator. Fig. 113 shows a projection of a possible SM Higgs boson exclusion using 1 fb{sup -1} of LHC data collected by the ATLAS experiment. An exclusion is expected between 135 and 188 GeV at 95% C.L., combining the three decay channels H {yields} WW, H {yields} ZZ and H {yields} {gamma}{gamma}. A combination between LHC experiments would possibly yield an even broader range of excluded Higgs boson mass points. Therefore, whether at the Tevatron or the LHC, exciting times in the exclusion or possible discovery of the SM Higgs boson lie ahead.

  5. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline WY UT ID INDEX MAP...

  6. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline WY UT ID INDEX MAP 2001...

  7. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    BOE Reserve Class No 2001 reserves 0.1 - 10 MBOE 10.1 - 100 MBOE 100.1 - 1,000 MBOE 1,000.1 - 10,000 MBOE 10,000.1 - 100,000 MBOE > 100,000 MBOE Basin Outline WY UT ID INDEX MAP ...

  8. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Liquids Reserve Class No 2001 liquids reserves 0.1 - 10 Mbbl 10.1 - 100 Mbbl 100.1 - 1,000 Mbbl 1,000.1 - 10,000 Mbbl 10,000.1 - 100,000 Mbbl Basin Outline WY UT ID INDEX MAP 2001 ...

  9. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Gas Reserve Class No 2001 gas reserves 0.1 - 10 MMCF 10.1 - 100 MMCF 100.1 - 1,000 MMCF 1,000.1 - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline WY UT ID INDEX ...

  10. Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh- Without New Dams

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    $30.6 million Recovery Act investment by the Department of Energy highlights the additional potential of hydro power

  11. WH ITNEY CAN YON-CART ER CR K YELLOW CR EEK_WY_D PIN EVIEW AN

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    - 10,000 MMCF 10,000.1 - 100,000 MMCF > 100,000 MMCF Basin Outline WY UT ID INDEX MAP 2001 Reserve Summary for Wyoming Thrust Belt Fields Wyoming Thrust Belt Oil & Gas Fields ...

  12. U.S. Solar Holdings Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Jake; Stekli, Joe; Rueckert, Tommy; Irwin, Levi; Mehos, Mark; Ho, Cliff

    2012-03-06

    This report summarizes the work of the US Solar Thermal Storage LLC (“USSTS”) team on SandShifter subproject for Phase 2 of U.S. Department of Energy’s FOA #DE-FC36-08GO18155.005. This subproject develops a new-to-the-world, disruptive technology which leverages an abundant, inexpensive, and benign material, Sand, for application in Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in association with power generation from Concentrating Solar Thermal (CST) systems. Sand, as a standalone TES media, has a 10 to 25X cost per unit of storage capacity cost advantage over the prevailing technology, molten salt. The work summarized herein suggests that SandShifter, which has a non-linear cost curve favoring higher hours of storage, could likely achieve economics of $15 per kWh-th or less for several hours of storage in high temperature steam- or salt-as-HTF configurations with further technology development.

  13. Transition-Edge Sensor X-Ray Fluorescence (TES-XRF) for High...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) is a technique for material identification. A low energy electron gun bombards a thin foil anode to produce a spectrum of x-rays that irradiate a material ...

  14. Research and Development for Novel Thermal Energy Storage Systems (TES) for Concentrating Solar Power (CSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faghri, Amir; Bergman, Theodore L; Pitchumani, Ranga

    2013-09-26

    The overall objective was to develop innovative heat transfer devices and methodologies for novel thermal energy storage systems for concentrating solar power generation involving phase change materials (PCMs). Specific objectives included embedding thermosyphons and/or heat pipes (TS/HPs) within appropriate phase change materials to significantly reduce thermal resistances within the thermal energy storage system of a large-scale concentrating solar power plant and, in turn, improve performance of the plant. Experimental, system level and detailed comprehensive modeling approaches were taken to investigate the effect of adding TS/HPs on the performance of latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) systems.

  15. THE NRC HAS ISSUED Ati ACTION PLAN FOR CLEANUP OF 46 SfTES that...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    paflies; implementation of the plan in p&cuar ,&s ,-:, may require the ... Aberdeen, Md.; Army Arsenal, Water- town, Pa.; Babcock 8 Wilcox. Parks Township and Apollo. ...

  16. Materials Data on Ag2TeS3 (SG:9) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  17. Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems- FY13 Q3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the third quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  18. Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems- FY13 Q1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress for this Savannah Reiver National Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  19. ACCURATE STELLAR KINEMATICS AT FAINT MAGNITUDES: APPLICATION TO THE BOOeTES I DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koposov, Sergey E.; Gilmore, G.; Walker, M. G.; Belokurov, V.; Evans, N. Wyn; Okamoto, S.; Penarrubia, J.; Fellhauer, M.; Gieren, W.; Geisler, D.; Monaco, L.; Norris, J. E.; Wilkinson, M.; Wyse, R. F. G.; Zucker, D. B.

    2011-08-01

    We develop, implement, and characterize an enhanced data reduction approach which delivers precise, accurate, radial velocities from moderate resolution spectroscopy with the fiber-fed VLT/FLAMES+GIRAFFE facility. This facility, with appropriate care, delivers radial velocities adequate to resolve the intrinsic velocity dispersions of the very faint dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies. Importantly, repeated measurements let us reliably calibrate our individual velocity errors (0.2 kms{sup -1} {<=} {delta}{sub V} {<=} 5 km s{sup -1}) and directly detect stars with variable radial velocities. We show, by application to the Booetes I dSph, that the intrinsic velocity dispersion of this system is significantly below 6.5 km s{sup -1} reported by previous studies. Our data favor a two-population model of Booetes I, consisting of a majority 'cold' stellar component, with velocity dispersion 2.4{sup +0.9}{sub -0.5} km s{sup -1}, and a minority 'hot' stellar component, with velocity dispersion {approx}9 km s{sup -1}, although we cannot completely rule out a single component distribution with velocity dispersion 4.6{sup 0.8}{sub -0.6} km s{sup -1}. We speculate that this complex velocity distribution actually reflects the distribution of velocity anisotropy in Booetes I, which is a measure of its formation processes.

  20. Preliminary TES design optimization study for a simple periodic brick plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, J.B.; Olszewski, M.; Solomon, A.D.

    1989-03-01

    A general optimization method has been developed for maximizing the return on investment for a brick plant re-using waste heat with the capability of storing energy over periods when a kiln is not operating. The duct connections between devices and storage along with the operating schedule of flow rates in these ducts are the independent variables available for control. A combination of combinatorial search algorithms along with a dynamic programming model and the simplex method are layered to provide the optimization technique.

  1. Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment Materials

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23–25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona.

  2. Development and Performance Evaluation of High Temperature Concrete for Thermal Energy Storage for Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Panneer Selvam; Hale, Micah; Strasser, Matt

    2013-03-31

    Thermal energy can be stored by the mechanism of sensible or latent heat or heat from chemical reactions. Sensible heat is the means of storing energy by increasing the temperature of the solid or liquid. Since the concrete as media cost per kWhthermal is $1, this seems to be a very economical material to be used as a TES. This research is focused on extending the concrete TES system for higher temperatures (500 °C to 600 °C) and increasing the heat transfer performance using novel construction techniques. To store heat at high temperature special concretes are developed and tested for its performance. The storage capacity costs of the developed concrete is in the range of $0.91-$3.02/kWhthermal. Two different storage methods are investigated. In the first one heat is transported using molten slat through a stainless steel tube and heat is transported into concrete block through diffusion. The cost of the system is higher than the targeted DOE goal of $15/kWhthermal. The increase in cost of the system is due to stainless steel tube to transfer the heat from molten salt to the concrete blocks.The other method is a one-tank thermocline system in which both the hot and cold fluid occupy the same tank resulting in reduced storage tank volume. In this model, heated molten salt enters the top of the tank which contains a packed bed of quartzite rock and silica sand as the thermal energy storage (TES) medium. The single-tank storage system uses about half the salt that is required by the two-tank system for a required storage capacity. This amounts to a significant reduction in the cost of the storage system. The single tank alternative has also been proven to be cheaper than the option which uses large concrete modules with embedded heat exchangers. Using computer models optimum dimensions are determined to have an round trip efficiency of 84%. Additionally, the cost of the structured concrete thermocline configuration provides the TES

  3. Economic Competitiveness of U.S. Utility-Scale Photovoltaics Systems in 2015: Regional Cost Modeling of Installed Cost ($/W) and LCOE ($/kWh)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Ran; James, Ted L.; Chung, Donald; Gagne, Douglas; Lopez, Anthony; Dobos, Aron

    2015-06-14

    Utility-scale photovoltaics (PV) system growth is largely driven by the economic metrics of total installed costs and levelized cost of electricity (LCOE), which differ by region. This study details regional cost factors, including environment (wind speed and snow loads), labor costs, material costs, sales taxes, and permitting costs using a new system-level bottom-up cost modeling approach. We use this model to identify regional all-in PV installed costs for fixed-tilt and one-axis tracker systems in the United States with consideration of union and non-union labor costs in 2015. LCOEs using those regional installed costs are then modeled and spatially presented. Finally, we assess the cost reduction opportunities of increasing module conversion efficiencies on PV system costs in order to indicate the possible economic impacts of module technology advancements and help future research and development (R&D) effects in the context of U.S. SunShot targets.

  4. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson in Associated WH Production in 9.7 fb⁻¹ of pp̄ Collisions with the D0 Detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Askew, A.; et al

    2012-09-20

    We present a search for the standard model Higgs boson in final states with a charged lepton (electron or muon), missing transverse energy, and two or three jets, at least one of which is identified as a b-quark jet. The search is primarily sensitive to WH→lνbb¯ production and uses data corresponding to 9.7 fb⁻¹ of integrated luminosity collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron pp¯ Collider at √s=1.96 TeV. We observe agreement between the data and the expected background. For a Higgs boson mass of 125 GeV, we set a 95% C.L. upper limit on the production ofmore » a standard model Higgs boson of 5.2×σSM, where σSM is the standard model Higgs boson production cross section, while the expected limit is 4.7×σSM.« less

  5. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  6. ELEMENTAL ABUNDANCES AND THEIR IMPLICATIONS FOR THE CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT OF THE BOOeTES I ULTRAFAINT GALAXY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Gerard; Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Monaco, Lorenzo; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Geisler, D. E-mail: jen@mso.anu.edu.au E-mail: lmonaco@eso.org E-mail: dgeisler@astro-udec.cl

    2013-01-20

    We present a double-blind analysis of high-dispersion spectra of seven red giant members of the Booetes I ultrafaint dwarf spheroidal galaxy, complemented with re-analysis of a similar spectrum of an eighth-member star. The stars cover [Fe/H] from -3.7 to -1.9 and include a CEMP-no star with [Fe/H] = -3.33. We conclude from our chemical abundance data that Booetes I has evolved as a self-enriching star-forming system, from essentially primordial initial abundances. This allows us uniquely to investigate the place of CEMP-no stars in a chemically evolving system, in addition to limiting the timescale of star formation. The elemental abundances are formally consistent with a halo-like distribution, with enhanced mean [{alpha}/Fe] and small scatter about the mean. This is in accord with the high-mass stellar initial mass function in this low-stellar-density, low-metallicity system being indistinguishable from the present-day solar neighborhood value. There is a non-significant hint of a decline in [{alpha}/Fe] with [Fe/H]; together with the low scatter, this requires low star formation rates, allowing time for supernova ejecta to be mixed over the large spatial scales of interest. One star has very high [Ti/Fe], but we do not confirm a previously published high value of [Mg/Fe] for another star. We discuss the existence of CEMP-no stars, and the absence of any stars with lower CEMP-no enhancements at higher [Fe/H], a situation that is consistent with knowledge of CEMP-no stars in the Galactic field. We show that this observation requires there be two enrichment paths at very low metallicities: CEMP-no and 'carbon-normal'.

  7. BOO-1137-AN EXTREMELY METAL-POOR STAR IN THE ULTRA-FAINT DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY BOOeTES I

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Gilmore, Gerard; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    2010-03-01

    We present high-resolution (R {approx} 40,000), high-signal-to-noise ratio (20-90) spectra of an extremely metal-poor giant star Boo-1137 in the 'ultra-faint' dwarf spheroidal galaxy (dSph) Booetes I, absolute magnitude M{sub V} {approx} -6.3. We derive an iron abundance of [Fe/H] = -3.7, making this the most metal-poor star as yet identified in an ultra-faint dSph. Our derived effective temperature and gravity are consistent with its identification as a red giant in Booetes I. Abundances for a further 15 elements have also been determined. Comparison of the relative abundances, [X/Fe], with those of the extremely metal-poor red giants of the Galactic halo shows that Boo-1137 is 'normal' with respect to C and N, the odd-Z elements Na and Al, the iron-peak elements, and the neutron-capture elements Sr and Ba, in comparison with the bulk of the Milky Way halo population having [Fe/H] {approx}<-3.0. The alpha-elements Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti are all higher by DELTA[X/Fe] {approx} 0.2 than the average halo values. Monte Carlo analysis indicates that DELTA[alpha/Fe] values this large are expected with a probability {approx}0.02. The elemental abundance pattern in Boo-1137 suggests inhomogeneous chemical evolution, consistent with the wide internal spread in iron abundances we previously reported. The similarity of most of the Boo-1137 relative abundances with respect to halo values, and the fact that the alpha-elements are all offset by a similar small amount from the halo averages, points to the same underlying galaxy-scale stellar initial mass function, but that Boo-1137 likely originated in a star-forming region where the abundances reflect either poor mixing of supernova (SN) ejecta, or poor sampling of the SN progenitor mass range, or both.

  8. Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment Materials- F13 Q1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  9. C10DIV.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh) per Worker (thousand kWh) per Building (thousand dollars) per Square Foot (dollars) per kWh (dollars) NEW ENGLAND...

  10. Entergy Arkansas - Small Business Energy Efficiency Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount Lighting and Lighting Controls: 0.21 per kWh Window Film: .35 per kWh Duct Sealing:.35 per kWh Ceiling Insulation: .35 per kWh Refrigeration:...

  11. Database (Report) of U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) and/or Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), 2004

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Development of a database, in Excel format, listing CHP installations incorporating thermal energy storage or turbine inlet cooling.

  12. CHEMICAL ENRICHMENT IN THE FAINTEST GALAXIES: THE CARBON AND IRON ABUNDANCE SPREADS IN THE BOOeTES I DWARF SPHEROIDAL GALAXY AND THE SEGUE 1 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norris, John E.; Yong, David; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.; Gilmore, Gerard; Belokurov, V.; Zucker, Daniel B.; Frebel, Anna; Wilkinson, Mark I.

    2010-11-10

    We present an AAOmega spectroscopic study of red giants in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxy Booetes I (M{sub V} {approx} -6) and the Segue 1 system (M{sub V} {approx} -1.5), either an extremely low luminosity dwarf galaxy or an unusually extended globular cluster. Both Booetes I and Segue 1 have significant abundance dispersions in iron and carbon. Booetes I has a mean abundance of [Fe/H] = -2.55 {+-} 0.11 with an [Fe/H] dispersion of {sigma} = 0.37 {+-} 0.08, and abundance spreads of {Delta}[Fe/H] = 1.7 and {Delta}[C/H] = 1.5. Segue 1 has a mean of [Fe/H] = -2.7 {+-} 0.4 with [Fe/H] dispersion of {sigma} = 0.7 {+-} 0.3, and abundances spreads of {Delta}[Fe/H] = 1.6 and {Delta}[C/H] = 1.2. Moreover, Segue 1 has a radial-velocity member at four half-light radii that is extremely metal-poor and carbon-rich, with [Fe/H] = -3.5, and [C/Fe] = +2.3. Modulo an unlikely non-member contamination, the [Fe/H] abundance dispersion confirms Segue 1 as the least-luminous ultra-faint dwarf galaxy known. For [Fe/H] < -3.0, stars in the Milky Way's dwarf galaxy satellites exhibit a dependence of [C/Fe] on [Fe/H] similar to that in Galactic field halo stars. Thus, chemical evolution proceeded similarly in the formation sites of the Galaxy's extremely metal-poor halo stars and in the ultra-faint dwarf galaxies. We confirm the correlation between (decreasing) luminosity and both (decreasing) mean metallicity and (increasing) abundance dispersion in the Milky Way dwarf galaxies at least as faint as M{sub V} = -5. The very low mean iron abundances and the high carbon and iron abundance dispersions in Segue 1 and Booetes I are consistent with highly inhomogeneous chemical evolution starting in near zero-abundance gas. These ultra-faint dwarf galaxies are apparently surviving examples of the very first bound systems.

  13. CLUSTERING OF OBSCURED AND UNOBSCURED QUASARS IN THE BOOeTES FIELD: PLACING RAPIDLY GROWING BLACK HOLES IN THE COSMIC WEB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hickox, Ryan C.; Alexander, David M.; Goulding, Andrew D.; Myers, Adam D.; Brodwin, Mark; Forman, William R.; Jones, Christine; Murray, Stephen S.; Eisenstein, Daniel; Caldwell, Nelson; Brown, Michael J. I.; Cool, Richard J.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dey, Arjun; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Assef, Roberto J.; Eisenhardt, Peter R.; Gorjian, Varoujan; Stern, Daniel; Le Floc'h, Emeric

    2011-04-20

    We present the first measurement of the spatial clustering of mid-infrared-selected obscured and unobscured quasars, using a sample in the redshift range 0.7 < z < 1.8 selected from the 9 deg{sup 2} Booetes multiwavelength survey. Recently, the Spitzer Space Telescope and X-ray observations have revealed large populations of obscured quasars that have been inferred from models of the X-ray background and supermassive black hole evolution. To date, little is known about obscured quasar clustering, which allows us to measure the masses of their host dark matter halos and explore their role in the cosmic evolution of black holes and galaxies. In this study, we use a sample of 806 mid-infrared-selected quasars and {approx}250,000 galaxies to calculate the projected quasar-galaxy cross-correlation function w{sub p} (R). The observed clustering yields characteristic dark matter halo masses of log(M{sub halo} [h {sup -1} M{sub sun}]) = 12.7{sup +0.4}{sub -0.6} and 13.3{sup +0.3}{sub -0.4} for unobscured quasars (QSO-1s) and obscured quasars (Obs-QSOs), respectively. The results for QSO-1s are in excellent agreement with previous measurements for optically selected quasars, while we conclude that the Obs-QSOs are at least as strongly clustered as the QSO-1s. We test for the effects of photometric redshift errors on the optically faint Obs-QSOs, and find that our method yields a robust lower limit on the clustering; photo-z errors may cause us to underestimate the clustering amplitude of the Obs-QSOs by at most {approx}20%. We compare our results to previous studies, and speculate on physical implications of stronger clustering for obscured quasars.

  14. Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This TES technology is also appropriate for Rankine and Brayton power converters. Solar ... DOE has funded four different concepts for solar phase change TES, including one other ...

  15. NREL: Concentrating Solar Power Research - Collector R&D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal energy storage (TES) research at NREL focuses on reducing the costs of thermal storage and electricity from concentrating solar power (CSP) plants. NREL's TES effort ...

  16. U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Thermal Energy Storage (TES) andor Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC) was prepared by the ... Thermal Energy Storage (TES) andor Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), 2004 Guide to ...

  17. Database (Report) of U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Storage (TES) andor Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), 2004 Database (Report) of U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Thermal Energy Storage (TES) andor Turbine Inlet Cooling (TIC), ...

  18. Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment Materials Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment ...

  19. Project Profile: Degradation Mechanisms for Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for thermal energy storage (TES) and heat transfer fluid (HTF) containment materials. ... fluids operating at temperatures between 600C and 900C as HTF and TES materials. ...

  20. Orange & Rockland Utils Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    kWh Commercial: 0.1230kWh Industrial: 0.0580kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Orange & Rockland Utils Inc (New York). Scroll leftright to...

  1. City of Fort Collins, Colorado (Utility Company) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Average Rates Residential: 0.0926kWh Commercial: 0.0737kWh Industrial: 0.0562kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data for Fort Collins City...

  2. Cumberland Elec Member Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Residential: 0.1060kWh Commercial: 0.1120kWh Industrial: 0.0733kWh The following table contains monthly sales and revenue data...

  3. PHEVs Component Requirements and Efficiencies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel Consumption l100km Electrical Consumption Whkm Conventional Split HEV PHEV 8kWh Split Optimum Engine Power PHEV 12 kWh Series Thermostat Control PHEV 16 kWh Series ...

  4. City of Sidney, Nebraska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Average Rates Residential: 0.1070kWh Commercial: 0.0878kWh Industrial: 0.0555kWh References "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File1a" Retrieved from...

  5. City of Seward, Alaska (Utility Company) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png Average Rates Residential: 0.2030kWh Commercial: 0.2160kWh Industrial: 0.1730kWh References "EIA Form EIA-861...

  6. Fluidized-bed technology enabling the integration of high temperature solar receiver CSP systems with steam and advanced power cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakadjian, B.; Hu, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Flynn, T.; Santelmann, K.; Ma, Z.

    2015-05-01

    Solar Particle Receivers (SPR) are under development to drive concentrating solar plants (CSP) towards higher operating temperatures to support higher efficiency power conversion cycles. The novel high temperature SPR-based CSP system uses solid particles as the heat transfer medium (HTM) in place of the more conventional fluids such as molten salt or steam used in current state-of-the-art CSP plants. The solar particle receiver (SPR) is designed to heat the HTM to temperatures of 800 °C or higher which is well above the operating temperatures of nitrate-based molten salt thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The solid particles also help overcome some of the other challenges associated with molten salt-based systems such as freezing, instability and degradation. The higher operating temperatures and use of low cost HTM and higher efficiency power cycles are geared towards reducing costs associated with CSP systems. This paper describes the SPR-based CSP system with a focus on the fluidized-bed (FB) heat exchanger and its integration with various power cycles. The SPR technology provides a potential pathway to achieving the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) target of $0.06/kWh that has been set by the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot initiative.

  7. Fluidized-bed technology enabling the integration of high temperature solar receiver CSP systems with steam and advanced power cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sakadjian, B.; Hu, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Flynn, T.; Santelmann, K.; Ma, Z.

    2015-06-05

    Solar Particle Receivers (SPR) are under development to drive concentrating solar plants (CSP) towards higher operating temperatures to support higher efficiency power conversion cycles. The novel high temperature SPR-based CSP system uses solid particles as the heat transfer medium (HTM) in place of the more conventional fluids such as molten salt or steam used in current state-of-the-art CSP plants. The solar particle receiver (SPR) is designed to heat the HTM to temperatures of 800 °C or higher which is well above the operating temperatures of nitrate-based molten salt thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The solid particles also help overcome some of the other challenges associated with molten salt-based systems such as freezing, instability and degradation. The higher operating temperatures and use of low cost HTM and higher efficiency power cycles are geared towards reducing costs associated with CSP systems. This paper describes the SPR-based CSP system with a focus on the fluidized-bed (FB) heat exchanger and its integration with various power cycles. Furthermore, the SPR technology provides a potential pathway to achieving the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) target of $0.06/kWh that has been set by the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot initiative.

  8. Fluidized-bed technology enabling the integration of high temperature solar receiver CSP systems with steam and advanced power cycles

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sakadjian, B.; Hu, S.; Maryamchik, M.; Flynn, T.; Santelmann, K.; Ma, Z.

    2015-06-05

    Solar Particle Receivers (SPR) are under development to drive concentrating solar plants (CSP) towards higher operating temperatures to support higher efficiency power conversion cycles. The novel high temperature SPR-based CSP system uses solid particles as the heat transfer medium (HTM) in place of the more conventional fluids such as molten salt or steam used in current state-of-the-art CSP plants. The solar particle receiver (SPR) is designed to heat the HTM to temperatures of 800 °C or higher which is well above the operating temperatures of nitrate-based molten salt thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The solid particles also help overcome somemore » of the other challenges associated with molten salt-based systems such as freezing, instability and degradation. The higher operating temperatures and use of low cost HTM and higher efficiency power cycles are geared towards reducing costs associated with CSP systems. This paper describes the SPR-based CSP system with a focus on the fluidized-bed (FB) heat exchanger and its integration with various power cycles. Furthermore, the SPR technology provides a potential pathway to achieving the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) target of $0.06/kWh that has been set by the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot initiative.« less

  9. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    4A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures per Building (thousand kWh) per Square Foot (kWh)...

  10. Table C10. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per Square Foot (kWh)","per...

  11. Building America FY14 Projects by Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... 40% New All Integrated Design (& WH packages) CA ARBI (DEG) Retrofit on Purchase & Data Mining Community Scale Verification Retrofit SF Integrated Design (& WH packages) All All ...

  12. Building America FY14 Project Matrix - by Research Team

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    40% New All Integrated Design (& WH packages) CA ARBI (DEG) Retrofit on Purchase & Data Mining Community Scale Verification Retrofit SF Integrated Design (& WH packages) All All ...

  13. Latest in Village Scale Clean Energy Technology

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... * Generally calculated on monthly or annual basis * Total energy savings * Loading on ... Power Wind n Penetratio ous Instantane (kWh) Demand Energy Primary (kWh) Produced ...

  14. Developing a Cost Model and Methodology to Estimate Capital Costs for Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G.

    2011-12-01

    This report provides an update on the previous cost model for thermal energy storage (TES) systems. The update allows NREL to estimate the costs of such systems that are compatible with the higher operating temperatures associated with advanced power cycles. The goal of the Department of Energy (DOE) Solar Energy Technology Program is to develop solar technologies that can make a significant contribution to the United States domestic energy supply. The recent DOE SunShot Initiative sets a very aggressive cost goal to reach a Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) of 6 cents/kWh by 2020 with no incentives or credits for all solar-to-electricity technologies.1 As this goal is reached, the share of utility power generation that is provided by renewable energy sources is expected to increase dramatically. Because Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) is currently the only renewable technology that is capable of integrating cost-effective energy storage, it is positioned to play a key role in providing renewable, dispatchable power to utilities as the share of power generation from renewable sources increases. Because of this role, future CSP plants will likely have as much as 15 hours of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) included in their design and operation. As such, the cost and performance of the TES system is critical to meeting the SunShot goal for solar technologies. The cost of electricity from a CSP plant depends strongly on its overall efficiency, which is a product of two components - the collection and conversion efficiencies. The collection efficiency determines the portion of incident solar energy that is captured as high-temperature thermal energy. The conversion efficiency determines the portion of thermal energy that is converted to electricity. The operating temperature at which the overall efficiency reaches its maximum depends on many factors, including material properties of the CSP plant components. Increasing the operating temperature of the power generation

  15. Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reddy, Ramana G.

    2013-10-23

    The explicit UA program objective is to develop low melting point (LMP) molten salt thermal energy storage media with high thermal energy storage density for sensible heat storage systems. The novel Low Melting Point (LMP) molten salts are targeted to have the following characteristics: 1. Lower melting point (MP) compared to current salts (<222ºC) 2. Higher energy density compared to current salts (>300 MJ/m3) 3. Lower power generation cost compared to current salt In terms of lower power costs, the program target the DOE's Solar Energy Technologies Program year 2020 goal to create systems that have the potential to reduce the cost of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) to less than $15/kWh-th and achieve round trip efficiencies greater than 93%. The project has completed the experimental investigations to determine the thermo-physical, long term thermal stability properties of the LMP molten salts and also corrosion studies of stainless steel in the candidate LMP molten salts. Heat transfer and fluid dynamics modeling have been conducted to identify heat transfer geometry and relative costs for TES systems that would utilize the primary LMP molten salt candidates. The project also proposes heat transfer geometry with relevant modifications to suit the usage of our molten salts as thermal energy storage and heat transfer fluids. The essential properties of the down-selected novel LMP molten salts to be considered for thermal storage in solar energy applications were experimentally determined, including melting point, heat capacity, thermal stability, density, viscosity, thermal conductivity, vapor pressure, and corrosion resistance of SS 316. The thermodynamic modeling was conducted to determine potential high temperature stable molten salt mixtures that have thermal stability up to 1000 °C. The thermo-physical properties of select potential high temperature stable (HMP) molten salt mixtures were also experimentally determined. All the salt mixtures align with the go

  16. Low-Cost MHTES Systems for CSP | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems - FY13 Q1 Low-Cost Metal Hydride TES Systems - FY13 Q3 Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System - FY13 ...

  17. --No Title--

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Using Electricity (million |Electricity Energy Intensity | | | (billion kWh) | square feet | (kWhsquare foot) | | |---+---...

  18. Upright Vacuum Sweeps Up the Competition in #EnergyFaceoff Round...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vacuum: 297 W (297 x 1)1000 .297 kWh per week (weekly consumption) .297 kWhweek x 52 weeks 15.44 kWh (annual energy consumption) 15.44 kWh x 0.11kWh 1.70 per year Hair ...

  19. DOE Challenge Home Case Study: Near Zero Maine Home II, Vassalboro...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... without PV 15,218 kWh, with PV 19,536 kWh; 393 gallons of oil * Annual PV production: projected 4,204 kWh, actual 5,400 kWh DOE CHALLENGE HOME Near Zero Maine Home 2 (Most ...

  20. Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies: Recent Advancements and Future Opportunities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renaissance in Flow-Cell Technologies Recent Advancements and Future Opportunities Mike Perry Project Leader, Electrochemical Systems United Technologies Research Center ec c es UTC Proprietary Grand Challenges in Electrical Energy Storage (EES) SCALE & COST: Want to go from Wh to kWh to MWh...  El tri Vehicl  Grid-Scale $100/kWh GRIDS Program Target  Portable Devices > $500/kWh  Electric Vehicles $250/kWh BEEST Program Target Wh UTC Proprietary Batteries are currently < 1%

  1. Energy Incentive Programs, New Hampshire | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    What public-purpose-funded energy efficiency programs are available in my state? In 2002, the New Hampshire Public Utilities Commission allocated 1.8 mills per kWh (0.0018kWh) of ...

  2. Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Each home's 2.2-kW photovoltaic system produced about 3,330 kWh during the 12 months studied, about half the average consumption of each household (7,007 kWh). Premier Homes chose ...

  3. TVA - Green Power Providers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Years 11-20: retail electric rate 2014 Premium Rates: Solar: 0.04kWh Wind, Biomass, and Hydro: 0.03kWh Summary Note: Enrollment for 2015 was conducted from January 26th to...

  4. Delmarva- Green Energy Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Prior to July 2007, the Delmarva fund collected $0.000178 per kWh (0.178 mills/kWh) to fund renewable energy and energy efficiency incentive programs. The collections were increased to $0.000356...

  5. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    . Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Space Heat- ing Cool- ing Venti- lation Water Heat- ing...

  6. Pacific Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Name Utility Administrator Pacific Power Website http:www.pacificpower.netbusseepi.html State California Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.12kWh-0.18kWh...

  7. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti-...

  8. Released: September, 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption (kWh) by End Use for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)" ,"Total ","Space Heat- ing","Cool- ing","Venti- lation","Water...

  9. Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL Development of Large Format Lithium Ion Cells with Higher Energy Density Exceeding 500WhL 2012 DOE ...

  10. Building America Case Study: Community-Scale Energy Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PERFORMANCE DATA Annual Energy Consumption: Average: 15,459 kWh Median: 15,252 kWh ... To that end, the U.S. Department of Energy Building America team IBACOS analyzed ...

  11. NV Energy (Southern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25 Window Film: 0.50sq. ft. Variable Speed Drives: 45HP Hotel Room Occupancy Sensor: 55unit Commercial Custom Retrofit: 0.10kWh on peak; 0.05kWh off peak New...

  12. NV Energy (Northern Nevada) - SureBet Business Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    25 Window Film: 0.50sq. ft. Variable Speed Drives: 45HP Hotel Room Occupancy Sensor: 55unit Commercial Custom Retrofit: 0.10kWh on peak; 0.05kWh off peak New...

  13. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Fund Prior to July 2007, the Delmarva fund collected 0.000178 per kWh (0.178 millskWh) to fund renewable energy and energy efficiency incentive programs. The...

  14. Advancing PEVs and the Future of PEV R&D and Deployment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PHEVs and EREVs Future Next Generation Li-ion or Li-metal Chemistry with 3x energy density Battery Cost (kWh) Energy Density (WhL) 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2014 2013...

  15. South Carolina Municipalities- Green Power Purchasing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Participating residential customers are able to purchase this green power for $3 per 100 kWh block. Commercial participants are able to purchase the power for $6 per 200 kWh block.

  16. SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION ANNUAL REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Estimated annual energy* (millions kWh) actual net energy (millions kWh) Beaver 1965 112,000 172 161 Blakely Mountain 1956 75,000 169 119 Broken Bow 1970 100,000 129 186 Bull ...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    538,800 35 Average retail price (centskWh) 33.43 1 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    684,481 33 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.68 39 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20,316,681 2 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.09 46 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    28,310 49 Average retail price (centskWh) 15.41 5 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,576,943 20 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.17 33 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    34,883,315 1 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.94 37 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,255,974 22 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.18 43 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3,151,592 10 Average retail price (centskWh) 12.65 11 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    33,870 48 Average retail price (centskWh) 12.11 12 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    696,6330 32 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.65 50 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,763,652 19 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.60 27 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,364,746 13 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.15 44 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,181,447 24 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.73 23 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  10. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    138,573,884 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.44 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  11. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    1,227,421 23 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.35 42 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  12. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    253,513 39 Average retail price (centskWh) 17.46 2 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  13. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    201,071 40 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.18 19 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  14. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    11,180,448 3 Average retail price (centskWh) 15.15 8 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  15. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    60,865 47 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.16 20 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  16. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1,388,386 21 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.76 49 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  17. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    844,760 29 Average retail price (centskWh) 12.10 13 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  18. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2,463,339 11 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.40 29 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  19. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    944,590 27 Average retail price (centskWh) 7.13 51 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  20. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1,123,692 25 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.52 28 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  1. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    use 7,958,621 4 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.06 35 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  2. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    89 51 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.05 36 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  3. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    4,565,846 8 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.03 22 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  4. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2,117,420 17 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.57 17 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  5. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    83,636 46 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.06 21 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  6. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    391,720 37 Average retail price (centskWh) 8.15 45 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  7. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5,462 50 Average retail price (centskWh) 14.57 9 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  8. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5,375,185 5 Average retail price (centskWh) 10.77 16 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  9. EIA - State Electricity Profiles

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    3,439,427 9 Average retail price (centskWh) 9.36 30 kWh Kilowatthours. Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." ...

  10. Nyseg non-residential adjustment fees? | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    MFC on Nyseg's site and each is less than 0.005kWh. That being said, the posted value matches my expectations more for high New York electricity rates (0.16kWh). Am I missing...

  11. Thermal energy storage program description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimers, E.

    1989-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sponsored applied research, development, and demonstration of technologies aimed at reducing energy consumption and encouraging replacement of premium fuels (notably oil) with renewable or abundant indigenous fuels. One of the technologies identified as being able to contribute to these goals is thermal energy storage (TES). Based on the potential for TES to contribute to the historic mission of the DOE and to address emerging energy issues related to the environment, a program to develop specific TES technologies for diurnal, industrial, and seasonal applications is underway. Currently, the program is directed toward three major application targets: (1) TES development for efficient off-peak building heating and cooling, (2) development of advanced TES building materials, and (3) TES development to reduce industrial energy consumption.

  12. Evaluation Framework and Analyses for Thermal Energy Storage Integrated with Packaged Air Conditioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kung, F.; Deru, M.; Bonnema, E.

    2013-10-01

    Few third-party guidance documents or tools are available for evaluating thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with packaged air conditioning (AC), as this type of TES is relatively new compared to TES integrated with chillers or hot water systems. To address this gap, researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory conducted a project to improve the ability of potential technology adopters to evaluate TES technologies. Major project outcomes included: development of an evaluation framework to describe key metrics, methodologies, and issues to consider when assessing the performance of TES systems integrated with packaged AC; application of multiple concepts from the evaluation framework to analyze performance data from four demonstration sites; and production of a new simulation capability that enables modeling of TES integrated with packaged AC in EnergyPlus. This report includes the evaluation framework and analysis results from the project.

  13. U.S. Virgin Islands Feed-In Tariff

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In May of 2014, AB 7586 created a feed-in-tariff that would allow owners of solar photovotaic systems ranging between 10 kWh and 500 kWh to sell their energy for approximately 26 cents per kWh. Two...

  14. Methods for Analyzing the Economic Value of Concentrating Solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CSP-TES) provides multiple quantifiable benefits compared to CSP without storage or to solar photovoltaic (PV) technology, including higher energy value, ancillary services value,...

  15. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H.R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  16. Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2012-11-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  17. Summary of: Simulating the Value of Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage in a Production Cost Model (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Hummon, M.

    2013-02-01

    Concentrating solar power (CSP) deployed with thermal energy storage (TES) provides a dispatchable source of renewable energy. The value of CSP with TES, as with other potential generation resources, needs to be established using traditional utility planning tools. Production cost models, which simulate the operation of grid, are often used to estimate the operational value of different generation mixes. CSP with TES has historically had limited analysis in commercial production simulations. This document describes the implementation of CSP with TES in a commercial production cost model. It also describes the simulation of grid operations with CSP in a test system consisting of two balancing areas located primarily in Colorado.

  18. SREL Reprint #3006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Beverly Collins, Rebecca Sharitz, Kathryn Madden, and John Dilustro Savannah River Ecology ... on dry, sandy ridgetops and supports a suite of rare or uncommon plant species (TES). ...

  19. Commercial Buildings Characteristics 1992

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The categories asked were thermal energy storage (TES) or pump storage; passive solar features; geothermal energy; well water for cooling; waste incineration to produce...

  20. Cool Trends in District Energy: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This 2005 survey considers the use of cool Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in District Cooling utility applications. cooltrendsinde.pdf (86.08 KB) More Documents & Publications ...

  1. Corrosion in Very High-Temperature Molten Salt for Next Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems for High Performance High Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment Materials - F13 Q1

  2. DOE/FEMP Welcome and Announcements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Tetra Tech Inc.OR Natl. Guard Wells Fargo Insurance USA Connecticut General Assembly M&M Cartage TES Engineering Westminster Canterbury *Cox Enterprises Inc. *Marine Corps Base ...

  3. INTERMEDIATE ENERGY X-RAY (IEX) BEAMLINE AT THE ADVANCED PHOTON...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    INTERMEDIATE ENERGY X-RAY (IEX) BEAMLINE AT THE ADVANCED PHOTON SOURCE Jessica McChesney, APS beamline scientist, connecting the transition edge sensor (TES) detector to the...

  4. Beamline 29-ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering (RSXS) Diffractometer: 7-axes "kappa" geometry 10 K closed-cycle cryostat Detectors: Microchannel plate, area detector Electron yield detector TES...

  5. Project Profile: Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Innovative Application of Maintenance-Free Phase-Change Thermal Energy Storage for Dish ... a thermal energy storage (TES) system that, when combined with Infinia's ...

  6. Project Profile: Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Novel Molten Salts Thermal Energy Storage for Concentrating Solar Power Generation Project ... They will conduct detailed tests using a laboratory-scale TES system to: Graphic of a ...

  7. Project Profile: Heat Transfer and Latent Heat Storage in Inorganic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Terrafore logo Terrafore, under the Thermal Storage FOA, is developing an economically feasible thermal energy storage (TES) system based on phase change materials (PCMs), for CSP ...

  8. Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power ... salt thermal energy storage (TES) system that can interface with Infinia's ...

  9. Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Concentrating Solar Power Project Profile: Reducing the Cost of Thermal Energy Storage for ... is looking at innovative ways to reduce thermal energy storage (TES) system costs. ...

  10. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... develop and validate an innovative, scalable phase change salt thermal energy storage (TES) system that can interface with Infinia's family of free-piston Stirling engines (FPSE). ...

  11. Search for: "stirling engines" | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... The unique innovation in this project is an integrated TES... for minimizing the levelized cost of energy (LCOE). ... The primary loop includes the nuclear reactor with the lower ...

  12. Lightweighting and Propulsion Materials Roadmapping Workshop...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Turbo-machinery * Exhaust and cooling systems - Semi-structural and non- ... - HDV 20% recovery - LDV Turbo Thermoelectric(TEs) LDV - 25% improvement (37% e) ...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... ; Maasakkers, J. D. ; Butz, A. ; Hasekamp, O. ; Biraud, S. C. March 2016 , Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons) Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) ...

  14. Case Study: Innovative Energy Efficiency Approaches in NOAAs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Because of Reduced Water Flow to TES ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) ... Two 2,000 Kilowatt (kW) diesel standby generators are ...

  15. Yizhi Fang

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of modulated charge order in copper oxide superconductors with Transition Edge Sensor (TES) and Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors . Posted by: Becki Gagnon (...

  16. Microsoft PowerPoint - Sumpter_Nanoscale_2014.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    can cause a remarkable polymorphism during the solution crystallization of TES ADT. This control over polymorphism is important because crystalline packings...

  17. Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics | Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanowire Single Photon Detector (SNSPD) and superconducting Transition-Edge Sensor (TES). An SSPD is an ultra-thin, ultra-narrow (nm scale) superconducting meander that is...

  18. Potential industrial applications for composite phase-change materials as thermal energy storage media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spanner, G.E.; Wilfert, G.L.

    1989-07-01

    Considerable effort has been spent by the US Department of Energy and its contractors over the last few years to develop composite phase-change materials (CPCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES). This patented TES medium consists of a phase-change material (typically a salt or metal alloy) that is retained within the porous structure of a supporting material (typically a ceramic). The objectives of this study were to (1) introduce CPCMs to industries that may not otherwise be aware of them, (2) identify potentially attractive applications for CPCM in industry, (3) determine technical requirements that will affect the design of CPCM's for specific applications, and (4) generate interest among industrial firms for employing CPCM TES in their processes. The approach in this study was to examine a wide variety of industries using a series of screens to select those industries that would be most likely to adopt CPCM TES in their processes. The screens used in this study were process temperature, presence of time-varying energy flows, energy intensity of the industry, and economic growth prospects over the next 5 years. After identifying industries that passed all of the screens, representatives of each industry were interviewed by telephone to introduce them to CPCM TES, assess technical requirements for CPCM TES in their industry, and determine their interest in pursuing applications for CPCM TES. 11 refs., 4 tabs.

  19. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    5. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  20. ETATP13AppA.PDF

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Page of DATE TIME CONNECT DISCONNECT SOC READING VEHICLE ODOMETER BATTERY TEMP. kWh METER READING COMMENTS INITIALS 1999 E lectric T ransportation A pplications All ...

  1. Rocky Mountain Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Administrator Rocky Mountain Power Website http:www.rockymountainpower.netbusseepiwyomingnfmref.html State Wyoming Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.15kWh...

  2. Rocky Mountain Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Administrator Rocky Mountain Power Website http:www.rockymountainpower.netbusseepiutahnfmref.html State Utah Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.12kWh annual...

  3. Rocky Mountain Power - Energy FinAnswer | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Administrator Rocky Mountain Power Website http:www.rockymountainpower.netbusseepiidahonfmref.html State Idaho Program Type Rebate Program Rebate Amount 0.12kWh...

  4. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Introduction The 1993 Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) was the first to permit the estimation of annual kilowatthours (kWh) used for lighting. The survey contained more...

  5. TVA - Mid-Sized Renewable Standard Offer Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    kWh Summary The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) now compliments the small generation Green Power Providers Program by providing incentives for mid-sized renewable energy...

  6. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  7. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  8. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  9. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity (million square...

  10. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  11. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Building Size for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  12. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 1" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  13. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  14. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  15. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  16. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using Electricity...

  17. Released: Dec 2006

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per Square...

  18. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  19. Building-Level Intensities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,,,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  20. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,,"Total Floorspace of...

  1. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  2. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of Buildings Using...

  3. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace...

  4. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total Floorspace of...

  5. Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    . Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003: Part 3" ,"Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh)",,,"Total...

  6. Memorandum of Understanding Between the U.S. Department of Health...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    applicable, survivors of such employees suffering from illnesses incurred by such ... and evaluating SEC petitions and for responding to issues raised by ABR WH and the ...

  7. Renewable Energy Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... with lowest cost fossil fuel - Natural Gas, projected as .06kWh and achieve 20 ... studies, and optimized transmission integration. Market barriers will additionally provide ...

  8. "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    "," ",," "," " ,,"Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and" "Economic","Electricity","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(b)","Natural Gas(c)","NGL(d)","Coal" "Characteristic(a)","(kWh)","(gallons)","...

  9. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Boilers, Heat Pumps, Programmable Thermostats, Other EE Orcas Power & Light- MORE Green Power Program Incentive payments will be paid per kilowatt hour (kWh) of production,...

  10. Property:Incentive/QuantNotes | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    kWh if offsetting electric water heater or 60 therms if the offsetting natural gas or propane. California Solar Initiative - Solar Thermal Program (California) + This program...

  11. Key Concepts in Project Development and Financing in Alaska

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...kWh * Calculates present value of the total cost of - ... - Different capital cost - Risk, return, and capacities ... and either production tax credit (PTC) or income tax credit ...

  12. Microsoft Word - Future Power Systems 20 - The Smart Enterprise...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    all gives inefficient burn which costs more in fuel and emissions per kWh. Future Power Systems 20 The Smart Enterprise, its Objective and Forecasting. Steve ...

  13. Upgrading the UES Measure List

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "Present Value of Region Act's 10% Conservation Credit (kWh)" * Sequence of columns (reading left to right) does not follow logical thinking What We Propose * Improve...

  14. PPL Electric Utilities - Custom Energy Efficiency Program | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    0.08 per projected first year kWh savings Summary Prospective applicants should contact their PPL Electric Utilities Key Account Manager before beginning any project. If...

  15. Table C12. Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Expenditures by Census Region, 1999" ,"Total Electricity Expenditures (million dollars)",,,,"Electricity Expenditures (dollars)" ,,,,,"per kWh",,,,"per Square Foot"...

  16. Tax Credits, Rebates & Savings | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    mills per kWh) and applied only to... Eligibility: Commercial, Industrial, Investor-Owned Utility, Municipal Utilities, Residential, Cooperative Utilities, Institutional Savings...

  17. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    0A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Climate Zonea for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  18. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    9A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 3 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  19. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    2A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Year Constructed for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  20. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Division for All Buildings, 2003: Part 2 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of...

  1. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    5A. Electricity Consumption and Conditional Energy Intensity by Census Region for All Buildings, 2003 Total Electricity Consumption (billion kWh) Total Floorspace of Buildings...

  2. Energy Cost Calculator for Faucets and Showerheads | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Use gal Annual Water Cost Lifetime Water Cost WITH ELECTRIC WATER HEATING Annual Energy Use kWh Annual Energy Cost Lifetime Energy Cost ...

  3. Alaska Strategic Energy Plan and Planning Handbook

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Electric usage (annual, kWh) Heating fuel usage (annual, gallons) Other information Teacher Housing HUD or Housing Authority Housing Owner Built Renewable Energy Sources Readily ...

  4. 7atab.xlsx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Average residential electricity usage per customer (kWh) ...... 2,924 2,350 3,190 ... , DOEEIA-0226; and Electric Power Annual , DOEEIA-0348. Minor discrepancies ...

  5. SAND2010-5782C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... so their usage should not unduly affect the predictions from the simulation. ... The histogram displays counts of inverter-arrays in categories of annual kWh energy ...

  6. (Thermal energy storage technologies for heating and cooling applications)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomlinson, J.J.

    1990-12-19

    Recent results from selected TES research activities in Germany and Sweden under an associated IEA annex are discussed. In addition, several new technologies for heating and cooling of buildings and automobiles were reviewed and found to benefit similar efforts in the United states. Details of a meeting with Didier-Werke AG, a leading German ceramics manufacturer who will provide TES media necessary for the United States to complete field tests of an advanced high temperature latent heat storage material, are presented. Finally, an overview of the December 1990 IEA Executive Committee deliberations on TES is presented.

  7. ITP Industrial Distributed Energy: Database of U.S. CHP Installations...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Database of U.S. CHP Installations Incorporating Prepared for: UT-Battelle, Oak Ridge National Laboratory sheet 1 of 5 Thermal Energy Storage (TES) andor Turbine Inlet Cooling ...

  8. Active Project Justification Statements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    David Weitzman P1138-2007REV 3102014 DOE-STD-XXXX, DOE Environmental Laboratory Pro ciency Tes ng Program Administra on and Par cipa on AU-20 PJS Non Concurrence Resolu on ...

  9. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  10. Cool Trends on Campus: A Survey of Thermal Energy Storage Use...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A survey was conducted to develop a database documenting and quantifying the use of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) in campus applications. cooltrendsoncampus.pdf (97.88 KB) More ...