National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for terrestrial ecosystem science

  1. Terrestrial Ecosystem Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface

  2. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on ...

  3. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sediments and Related Deposits terrestrial climate change Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on archives that incorporate and preserve information about changes in temperature, precipitation, nutrients, vegetation, fire history, etc. The resolution and length of such paleoclimate/ecological records is dependent on the type of archive. Although much

  4. Observing terrestrial ecosystems and the carbon cycle from space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schimel, David; Pavlick, Ryan; Fisher, Joshua B.; Asner, Gregory P.; Saatchi, Sassan; Townsend, Philip; Miller, Charles E.; Frankenberg, Christian; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Cox, Peter

    2015-02-06

    Modeled terrestrial ecosystem and carbon cycle feedbacks contribute substantial uncertainty to projections of future climate. The limitations of current observing networks contribute to this uncertainty. Here we present a current climatology of global model predictions and observations for photosynthesis, biomass, plant diversity and plant functional diversity. Carbon cycle tipping points occur in terrestrial regions where fluxes or stocks are largest, and where biological variability is highest, the tropics and Arctic/Boreal zones. Global observations are predominately in the mid-latitudes and are sparse in high and low latitude ecosystems. Observing and forecasting ecosystem change requires sustained observations of sufficient density in time and space in critical regions. Using data and theory available now, we can develop a strategy to detect and forecast terrestrial carbon cycle-climate interactions, by combining in situ and remote techniques.

  5. USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2007-01-12

    Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

  6. Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience. Potential utility of a multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

    2014-01-30

    Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

  7. Modeling the role of terrestrial ecosystems in the global carbon cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emanuel, W.R.; Post, W.M.; Shugart, H.H. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A model for the global biogeochemical cycle of carbon which includes a five-compartment submodel for circulation in terrestrial ecosystems of the world is presented. Although this terrestrial submodel divides carbon into compartments with more functional detail than previous models, the variability in carbon dynamics among ecosystem types and in different climatic zones is not adequately treated. A new model construct which specifically treats this variability by modeling the distribution of ecosystem types as a function of climate on a 0.5/sup 0/ latitude by 0.5/sup 0/ longitude scale of resolution is proposed.

  8. ARM - Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  9. Impacts of Environmental Nanoparticles on Chemical, Biological and Hydrological Processes in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2012-01-01

    This chapter provides insights on nanoparticle (NP) influence or control on the extent and timescales of single or coupled physical, chemical, biological and hydrological reactions and processes that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. Examples taken from the literature that show how terrestrial NPs may determine the fate of the aqueous and sorbed (adsorbed or precipitated) chemical species of nutrients and contaminants, are also included in this chapter. Specifically, in the first section, chapter objectives, term definitions and discussions on size-dependent properties, the origin and occurrence of NP in terrestrial ecosystems and NP toxicity, are included. In the second section, the topic of the binary interactions of NPs of different sizes, shapes, concentrations and ages with the soil solution chemical species is covered, focusing on NP formation, stability, aggregation, ability to serve as sorbents, or surface-mediated precipitation catalysts, or electron donors and acceptors. In the third section, aspects of the interactions in the ternary systems composed of environmental NP, nutrient/contaminant chemical species, and the soil/sediment matrix are discussed, focusing on the inhibitory and catalytic effects of environmental NP on nutrient/contaminant advective mobility and mass transfer, adsorption and desorption, dissolution and precipitation and redox reactions that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. These three review sections are followed by a short summary of future research needs and directions, the acknowledgements, the list of the references, and the figures.

  10. ARM - Key Science Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  11. Reviews and syntheses: Four decades of modeling methane cycling in terrestrial ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Fengming; Hanson, Paul J.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Thornton, Peter E.; Riley, William J.; Song, Xia; Graham, David E.; Song, Changchun; Tian, Hanqin

    2016-06-28

    Over the past 4 decades, a number of numerical models have been developed to quantify the magnitude, investigate the spatial and temporal variations, and understand the underlying mechanisms and environmental controls of methane (CH4) fluxes within terrestrial ecosystems. These CH4 models are also used for integrating multi-scale CH4 data, such as laboratory-based incubation and molecular analysis, field observational experiments, remote sensing, and aircraft-based measurements across a variety of terrestrial ecosystems. Here we summarize 40 terrestrial CH4 models to characterize their strengths and weaknesses and to suggest a roadmap for future model improvement and application. Our key findings are that (1) themore » focus of CH4 models has shifted from theoretical to site- and regional-level applications over the past 4 decades, (2) large discrepancies exist among models in terms of representing CH4 processes and their environmental controls, and (3) significant data–model and model–model mismatches are partially attributed to different representations of landscape characterization and inundation dynamics. Three areas for future improvements and applications of terrestrial CH4 models are that (1) CH4 models should more explicitly represent the mechanisms underlying land–atmosphere CH4 exchange, with an emphasis on improving and validating individual CH4 processes over depth and horizontal space, (2) models should be developed that are capable of simulating CH4 emissions across highly heterogeneous spatial and temporal scales, particularly hot moments and hotspots, and (3) efforts should be invested to develop model benchmarking frameworks that can easily be used for model improvement, evaluation, and integration with data from molecular to global scales. These improvements in CH4 models would be beneficial for the Earth system models and further simulation of climate–carbon cycle feedbacks.« less

  12. Reviews and syntheses: Four decades of modeling methane cycling in terrestrial ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Fengming; Hanson, Paul J.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Thornton, Peter E.; Riley, William J.; Song, Xia; Graham, David E.; Song, Changchun; Tian, Hanqin

    2016-01-28

    A number of numerical models have been developed to quantify the magnitude, over the past 4 decades, such that we have investigated the spatial and temporal variations, and understand the underlying mechanisms and environmental controls of methane (CH4) fluxes within terrestrial ecosystems. These CH4 models are also used for integrating multi-scale CH4 data, such as laboratory-based incubation and molecular analysis, field observational experiments, remote sensing, and aircraft-based measurements across a variety of terrestrial ecosystems. Here we summarize 40 terrestrial CH4 models to characterize their strengths and weaknesses and to suggest a roadmap for future model improvement and application. Our keymore » findings are that (1) the focus of CH4 models has shifted from theoretical to site- and regional-level applications over the past 4 decades, (2) large discrepancies exist among models in terms of representing CH4 processes and their environmental controls, and (3) significant data–model and model–model mismatches are partially attributed to different representations of landscape characterization and inundation dynamics. Furthermore three areas for future improvements and applications of terrestrial CH4 models are that (1) CH4 models should more explicitly represent the mechanisms underlying land–atmosphere CH4 exchange, with an emphasis on improving and validating individual CH4 processes over depth and horizontal space, (2) models should be developed that are capable of simulating CH4 emissions across highly heterogeneous spatial and temporal scales, particularly hot moments and hotspots, and (3) efforts should be invested to develop model benchmarking frameworks that can easily be used for model improvement, evaluation, and integration with data from molecular to global scales. Finally, these improvements in CH4 models would be beneficial for the Earth system models and further simulation of climate–carbon cycle feedbacks.« less

  13. Convergence of microbial assimilations of soil carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in terrestrial ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Hui, Dafeng; King, Anthony Wayne; Song, Xia; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhang, Lihua

    2015-11-27

    How soil microbes assimilate carbon-C, nitrogen-N, phosphorus-P, and sulfur-S is fundamental for understanding nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. We compiled a global database of C, N, P, and S concentrations in soils and microbes and developed relationships between them by using a power function model. The C:N:P:S was estimated to be 287:17:1:0.8 for soils, and 42:6:1:0.4 for microbes. We found a convergence of the relationships between elements in soils and in soil microbial biomass across C, N, P, and S. The element concentrations in soil microbial biomass follow a homeostatic regulation curve with soil element concentrations across C, N, Pmore » and S, implying a unifying mechanism of microbial assimilating soil elements. This correlation explains the well-constrained C:N:P:S stoichiometry with a slightly larger variation in soils than in microbial biomass. Meanwhile, it is estimated that the minimum requirements of soil elements for soil microbes are 0.8 mmol C Kg–1 dry soil, 0.1 mmol N Kg–1 dry soil, 0.1 mmol P Kg–1 dry soil, and 0.1 mmol S Kg–1 dry soil, respectively. Lastly, these findings provide a mathematical explanation of element imbalance in soils and soil microbial biomass, and offer insights for incorporating microbial contribution to nutrient cycling into Earth system models.« less

  14. Convergence of microbial assimilations of soil carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Hui, Dafeng; King, Anthony Wayne; Song, Xia; Thornton, Peter E.; Zhang, Lihua

    2015-11-27

    How soil microbes assimilate carbon-C, nitrogen-N, phosphorus-P, and sulfur-S is fundamental for understanding nutrient cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. We compiled a global database of C, N, P, and S concentrations in soils and microbes and developed relationships between them by using a power function model. The C:N:P:S was estimated to be 287:17:1:0.8 for soils, and 42:6:1:0.4 for microbes. We found a convergence of the relationships between elements in soils and in soil microbial biomass across C, N, P, and S. The element concentrations in soil microbial biomass follow a homeostatic regulation curve with soil element concentrations across C, N, P and S, implying a unifying mechanism of microbial assimilating soil elements. This correlation explains the well-constrained C:N:P:S stoichiometry with a slightly larger variation in soils than in microbial biomass. Meanwhile, it is estimated that the minimum requirements of soil elements for soil microbes are 0.8 mmol C Kg–1 dry soil, 0.1 mmol N Kg–1 dry soil, 0.1 mmol P Kg–1 dry soil, and 0.1 mmol S Kg–1 dry soil, respectively. Lastly, these findings provide a mathematical explanation of element imbalance in soils and soil microbial biomass, and offer insights for incorporating microbial contribution to nutrient cycling into Earth system models.

  15. DOE/SC-ARM-13-011 Green Ocean Amazon Terrestrial Ecosystem Collaborati...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    late successional species) that can inform future versions of the CLM Ecosystem Demography model (Moorcroft et al. 2001). This will be an interactive process, with changes in...

  16. Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Levis, Samuel

    2014-03-07

    Fire is the primary terrestrial ecosystem disturbance agent on a global scale. It affects carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon to atmosphere directly and immediately from biomass burning (i.e., fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (i.e., fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment about the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire direct and indirect effects. This study is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with NCAR community land model CLM4.5 as the model platform. Results show that fire decreases net carbon gain of the global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 average across the 20th century, as a results of fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Fire generally decreases the average carbon gains of terrestrial ecosystems in post-fire regions, which are significant over tropical savannas and part of forests in North America and the east of Asia. The general decrease of carbon gains in post-fire regions is because fire direct and indirect effects have similar spatial patterns and the former (to decrease carbon gain) is generally stronger. Moreover, the effect of fire on net carbon balance significantly declines prior to ~1970 with trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire indirect effect and increases afterward with trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire direct effect.

  17. Separating stressor influences from environmental variability: eight case studies from aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Clements, Will; Gerritsen, Jeroen; Hatch, Audrey; Jepson, Paul; Reynoldson, Trefor; Thom, Ronald M.

    2001-12-03

    It can be difficult to unambiguously establish the influences of a particular stressor or group of stressors in a complex ecosystem, except, perhaps, when the effects are extreme (Luoma and Carter, 1991). Yet this is a critical problem we face when attempting to understand the influences of human activities on ecosystems. Single experiments or studies are rarely adequate to establish cause and effect in complex ecosystems, and many of the individual approaches available to demonstrate stressor effects have important inadequacies. A multi-faceted body of work is usually at the center of most examples where stressor effects are explained. In this chapter seven case studies are presented where effects or influences of multiple stressors were explained and separated from natural variability. The goal of this chapter is to demonstrate that identification of stressor effects is tractable, although not necessarily simple; and to illustrate some specific strategies that have worked. We also present one case study where the quest for cause and effect is just beginning, to illustrate the range of challenges involved as a body of work begins to be established. The examples are from several different fields of ecology, they cover a variety of scales and a mix of disciplines.

  18. Air Handler Condensate Recovery at the Environmental Protection Agency’s Science and Ecosystem Support Division

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Case study details EPA's decision to address water conservation and management for its Science and Ecosystem Support Division due to a severe drought. The plan aimed to reduce potable water usage through an air handler condensate recovery project.

  19. Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

    2010-08-27

    The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO

  20. ARM - Selected Science Team Applications - FY 2008

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Applications - FY 2008 The

  1. ARM - Selected Science Team Applications - FY 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Applications - FY 2009 The

  2. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1991

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1991 Dr. Richard

  3. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1992

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1992 Dr. R.

  4. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1994

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1994 Dr. Thomas

  5. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1995

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1995 Dr. R.

  6. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1997

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1997 Dr. Thomas

  7. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1998

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 1998 Dr. Shepard

  8. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2000

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2000 The Office

  9. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2002

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2002 The Office

  10. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2003

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2003 The Office

  11. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2005

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2005 The Office

  12. ARM - Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2006

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Science Research Themes Research Highlights Journal Articles Collaborations Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team Meetings ASR Meetings Accomplishments Accomplishments in Atmospheric Science, 2008-2013 (PDF, 7.4MB) ARM Accomplishments from the Science Program and User Facility, 1989-2008 (PDF, 696KB) Selected Science Team Proposals - FY 2006 The Office

  13. [Climate implications of terrestrial paleoclimate]. Quaternary Sciences Center, Desert Research Institute annual report, fiscal year 1994/1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wigand, P.E.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to collect terrestrial climate indicators for paleoclimate synthesis. The paleobiotic and geomorphic records are being examined for the local and regional impact of past climates to assess Yucca Mountain`s suitability as a high-level nuclear waste repository. In particular these data are being used to provide estimates of the timing, duration and extremes of past periods of moister climate for use in hydrological models of local and regional recharge that are being formulated by USGS and other hydrologists for the Yucca Mountain area. The project includes botanical, faunal, and geomorphic components that will be integrated to accomplish this goal. To this end personnel at the Quaternary Sciences Center of the Desert Research Institute in Reno, Nevada are conducting the following activities: Analyses of packrat middens; Analysis of pollen samples; and Determination of vegetation climate relationships.

  14. ECOSYSTEM IMPACTS OF GEOENGINEERING: A Review for Developing a Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russell, Lynn M.; Rasch, Philip J.; Mace, Georgina; Jackson, Robert B.; Shepherd, John; Liss, Peter; Leinen, Margaret; Schimel, David; Vaughan, Naomi E.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Boyd, Philip W.; Norby, Richard J.; Caldeira, Ken; Merikanto, Joonas; Artaxo, Paulo; Melillo, Jerry; Morgan, M. Granger

    2012-06-01

    Geoengineering methods are intended to reduce the magnitude of climate change. Climate change in some regions is already having demonstrable effects on ecosystem structure and functioning. Two different types of geoengineering activities have been proposed: carbon dioxide removal (CDR), which includes a range of engineered and biological processes to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, and solar radiation management (SRM, or sunlight reflection methods), whereby a small percentage of sunlight is reflected back into space to offset warming from greenhouse gases. In this review, we evaluate some of the possible impacts of CDR and SRM on the physical climate and their subsequent influence on ecosystems, including the risks and uncertainties associated with new kinds of purposeful perturbations to Earth. Specifically, we find evidence that, if implemented successfully, some CDR methods and continue use of some SRM methods) could alleviate some of the deleterious ecosystem impacts associated with climate changes that might occur in the foreseeable future.

  15. RADIATION DOSE ASSESSMENT FOR THE BIOTA OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS IN THE SHORELINE ZONE OF THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COOLING POND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radiation exposure of the biota in the shoreline area of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Cooling Pond was assessed to evaluate radiological consequences from the decommissioning of the Cooling Pond. The article addresses studies of radioactive contamination of the terrestrial faunal complex and radionuclide concentration ratios in bodies of small birds, small mammals, amphibians, and reptiles living in the area. The data were used to calculate doses to biota using the ERICA Tool software. Doses from {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs were calculated using the default parameters of the ERICA Tool and were shown to be consistent with biota doses calculated from the field data. However, the ERICA dose calculations for plutonium isotopes were much higher (2-5 times for small mammals and 10-14 times for birds) than the doses calculated using the experimental data. Currently, the total doses for the terrestrial biota do not exceed maximum recommended levels. However, if the Cooling Pond is allowed to drawdown naturally and the contaminants of the bottom sediments are exposed and enter the biological cycle, the calculated doses to biota may exceed the maximum recommended values. The study is important in establishing the current exposure conditions such that a baseline exists from which changes can be documented following the lowering of the reservoir water. Additionally, the study provided useful radioecological data on biota concentration ratios for some species that are poorly represented in the literature.

  16. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, JD; Berg, LK

    2015-12-01

    Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the Southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the summertime growing season when intense turbulence induced by surface radiation couples the land surface to clouds. Current convective cloud parameterizations contain uncertainties resulting in part from insufficient coincident data that couples cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to inhomogeneities in boundary layer and aerosol properties. The Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) campaign is designed to provide a detailed set of measurements that are needed to obtain a more complete understanding of the life cycle of shallow clouds by coupling cloud macrophysical and microphysical properties to land surface properties, ecosystems, and aerosols. HI-SCALE consists of 2, 4-week intensive observational periods, one in the spring and the other in the late summer, to take advantage of different stages and distribution of “greenness” for various types of vegetation in the vicinity of the Atmospheric Radiation and Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as well as aerosol properties that vary during the growing season. Most of the proposed instrumentation will be deployed on the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF) Gulfstream 1 (G-1) aircraft, including those that measure atmospheric turbulence, cloud water content and drop size distributions, aerosol precursor gases, aerosol chemical composition and size distributions, and cloud condensation nuclei concentrations. Routine ARM aerosol measurements made at the surface will be supplemented with aerosol microphysical properties measurements. The G-1 aircraft will complete transects over the SGP Central Facility at multiple altitudes within the boundary layer, within clouds, and above clouds.

  17. Terrestrial sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2010-01-08

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  18. Terrestrial sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2008-03-10

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  19. Climate Perspectives: Change in the Terrestrial Arctic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Perspectives: Change in the Terrestrial Arctic Climate Perspectives An interactive exploration of Arctic climate science through prisms of the visual arts, literary arts, info-vis, ...

  20. Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reveal climate change drivers and ecosystem impacts Perfect geological greenhouse gas ... Advanced computational Earth sciences Atmospheric, climate and ecosystem science Geology ...

  1. Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Solutions Navigate Section Our Vision National User Facilities Research Areas In Focus Global Solutions Climate and Ecosystem Sciences Division The Climate and Ecosystem ...

  2. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science Science Stockpile Stewardship National Security National Competitiveness Fusion and Ignition Energy for the Future How to Make a Star Discovery Science Photon Science HAPLS

  3. Planning the Next Generation of Arctic Ecosystem Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D [International Arctic Research Center; Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

    2011-01-01

    Climate Change Experiments in High-Latitude Ecosystems; Fairbanks, Alaska, 13-14 October 2010; A 2-day climate change workshop was held at the International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks. The workshop, sponsored by Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), was attended by 45 subject matter experts from universities, DOE national laboratories, and other federal and nongovernmental organizations. The workshop sought to engage the Arctic science community in planning for a proposed Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE-Arctic) project in Alaska (http:// ngee.ornl.gov/). The goal of this activity is to provide data, theory, and models to improve representations of high-latitude terrestrial processes in Earth system models. In particular, there is a need to better understand the processes by which warming may drive increased plant productivity and atmospheric carbon uptake and storage in biomass and soils, as well as those processes that may drive an increase in the release of methane (CH{sub 4}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) through microbial decomposition of soil carbon stored in thawing permafrost. This understanding is required to quantify the important feedback mechanisms that define the role of terrestrial processes in regional and global climate.

  4. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, 400-700 nm) are often required for detailed process modeling of terrestrial photosynthesis and ecosystem-atmosphere carbon exchange. ...

  5. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Science Cutting edge, multidisciplinary national-security science. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets The thermal traits of a leaf, critical for photosynthesis, may be under strong evolutionary selection that occurs in response to environmental temperatures. Here a thermal leaf image details temperature variation, which greatly affects plant functions since temperature is closely linked to metabolic kinetics-the plant's

  6. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Science & Technology Images of Lab scientists and researchers at work. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets PHOTOS BY TOPIC Careers Community Visitors Environment History Science The Lab Click thumbnails to enlarge. Photos arranged by most recent first, horizontal formats before vertical. See Flickr for more sizes and details. Astronomical simulation in the CAVE - 1 Astronomical simulation in the CAVE - 1 Scientist sees

  7. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Science Office of Science β β * * * Office of Science α γ Office of * * * * * Office of Science Office of Science * α * * Office of Science α * * μ * * α 287 115 10.59 32 ms 283 113 10.12 100 ms 279 111 10.38 0.17 s 271 107 9.35 1.2 s 267 105 SF 1.8 h 275 109 10.35 12 ms 289 115 10.31 520 ms 285 113 9.74/9.48 4.5 s 281 111 SF 1 s 287 115 10.59 32 ms 283 113 10.12 100 ms 279 111 10.38 0.17 s 07 5 s 275 109 10.35 12 ms 285 1 9.74/ 4.5 281 111 SF 1 s 288 115 10.48 171 ms 284 113

  8. science

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    through the Predictive Capability Framework (PCF). The PCF is a long-term integrated roadmap to guide the science, technology and engineering activities and Directed Stockpile...

  9. A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the Global Carbon Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen C. Piper

    2005-10-15

    The primary goal of our research program, consistent with the goals of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and funded by the terrestrial carbon processes (TCP) program of DOE, has been to improve understanding of changes in the distribution and cycling of carbon among the active land, ocean and atmosphere reservoirs, with particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Our approach is to systematically measure atmospheric CO2 to produce time series data essential to reveal temporal and spatial patterns. Additional measurements of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio of CO2 provide a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, our research also involved interpretations of the observations by models, measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water, and of CO2 in air near growing land plants.

  10. Environmental Sciences Division. Annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1980. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1981-03-01

    Research conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division for the Fiscal Year 1980 included studies carried out in the following Division programs and sections: (1) Advanced Fossil Energy Program, (2) Nuclear Program, (3) Environmental Impact Program, (4) Ecosystem Studies Program, (5) Low-Level Waste Research and Development Program, (6) National Low-Level Waste Program, (7) Aquatic Ecology Section, (8) Environmental Resources Section, (9) Earth Sciences Section, and (10) Terrestrial Ecology Section. In addition, Educational Activities and the dedication of the Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park are reported. Separate abstracts were prepared for the 10 sections of this report.

  11. T.G. Hinton: Radioactive Contaminants in Terrestrial Ecosystems...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Savannah River Ecology Laboratory P O Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802 (803) 725-7454 office (803) 725-3309 fax thinton(at)uga.edu Dr. Hinton has published numerous papers on plant ...

  12. Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wikipedia to forecast diseases November 13, 2014 Los Alamos research published in Public Library of Science LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 13, 2014-Scientists can now monitor and forecast diseases around the globe more effectively by analyzing views of Wikipedia articles, according to a team from Los Alamos National Laboratory. "A global disease-forecasting system will improve the way we respond to epidemics," scientist Sara Del Valle said. "In the same way we check the weather each

  13. A comprehensive data acquisition and management system for an ecosystem-scale peatland warming and elevated CO2 experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krassovski, M. B.; Riggs, J. S.; Hook, L. A.; Nettles, W. R.; Hanson, P. J.; Boden, T. A.

    2015-11-09

    Ecosystem-scale manipulation experiments represent large science investments that require well-designed data acquisition and management systems to provide reliable, accurate information to project participants and third party users. The SPRUCE project (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change, http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is such an experiment funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE), Office of Science, Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) Program. The SPRUCE experimental mission is to assess ecosystem-level biological responses of vulnerable, high carbon terrestrial ecosystems to a range of climate warming manipulations and an elevated CO2 atmosphere. SPRUCE provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemicalmore » processes, and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, and the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere). The SPRUCE experiment will generate a wide range of continuous and discrete measurements. In order to successfully manage SPRUCE data collection, achieve SPRUCE science objectives, and support broader climate change research, the research staff has designed a flexible data system using proven network technologies and software components. The primary SPRUCE data system components are the following; 1. data acquisition and control system – set of hardware and software to retrieve biological and engineering data from sensors, collect sensor status information, and distribute feedback to control components; 2. data collection system – set of hardware and software to deliver data to a central depository for storage and further processing; and 3. data management plan – set of plans, policies, and practices to control consistency, protect data integrity, and deliver data. This publication presents our approach to meeting the challenges of

  14. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cycle Terrestrial Carbon Cycle "Only about half of the CO2 released into the atmosphere by human activities currently resides in the atmosphere, the rest absorbed on land and in the oceans. The period over which the carbon will be sequestered is unclear, and the efficiency of future sinks is unknown." US Carbon Cycle Research Plan "We" desire to be able to predict the future spatial and temporal distribution of sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 and their interaction

  15. Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (HI-SCALE) Science Plan (Program Document) | SciTech Connect Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Holistic Interactions of Shallow Clouds, Aerosols, and Land-Ecosystems (HI-SCALE) Science Plan Cumulus convection is an important component in the atmospheric radiation budget and hydrologic cycle over the Southern Great Plains and over many regions of the world, particularly during the

  16. A comprehensive data acquisition and management system for an ecosystem-scale peatland warming and elevated CO2 experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krassovski, M. B.; Riggs, J. S.; Hook, L. A.; Nettles, W. R.; Hanson, P. J.; Boden, T. A.

    2015-11-09

    Ecosystem-scale manipulation experiments represent large science investments that require well-designed data acquisition and management systems to provide reliable, accurate information to project participants and third party users. The SPRUCE project (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climatic and Environmental Change, http://mnspruce.ornl.gov) is such an experiment funded by the Department of Energy's (DOE), Office of Science, Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) Program. The SPRUCE experimental mission is to assess ecosystem-level biological responses of vulnerable, high carbon terrestrial ecosystems to a range of climate warming manipulations and an elevated CO2 atmosphere. SPRUCE provides a platform for testing mechanisms controlling the vulnerability of organisms, biogeochemical processes, and ecosystems to climatic change (e.g., thresholds for organism decline or mortality, limitations to regeneration, biogeochemical limitations to productivity, and the cycling and release of CO2 and CH4 to the atmosphere). The SPRUCE experiment will generate a wide range of continuous and discrete measurements.

    In order to successfully manage SPRUCE data collection, achieve SPRUCE science objectives, and support broader climate change research, the research staff has designed a flexible data system using proven network technologies and software components. The primary SPRUCE data system components are the following; 1. data acquisition and control system – set of hardware and software to retrieve biological and engineering data from sensors, collect sensor status information, and distribute feedback to control components; 2. data collection system – set of hardware and software to deliver data to a central depository for storage and further processing; and 3. data management plan – set of plans, policies, and practices to control consistency, protect data integrity, and

  17. Federal interagency ecosystem management initiative: Great Lakes ecosystem case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cordle, S.

    1995-12-01

    In August 1994 a team of representatives from six Federal agencies conducted a case study of ecosystem management practices in the Great Lakes. Its report was based on interviews carried out in Chicago, Illinois, and Ann Arbor, Michigan; on phone interviews; and on written materials provided by Federal and State officials as well as representatives of Tribal organizations, non-governmental organizations, academia, industry, and the International Joint Commission. The report describes mainly what the participants told or provided to the survey team, with a few explicit conclusions and recommendations from the team. The issues covered by the survey included Legal, Institutional, Science and Information, Budget, and Public Participation.

  18. Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

    2014-09-12

    Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on “Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep Subsurface” was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundation’s Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

  19. Biodiversity and industry ecosystem management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, W.G.

    1996-11-01

    Biodiversity describes the array of interacting, genetically distinct populations and species in a region, the communities they are functioning parts. Ecosystem health is a process identifying biological indicators, end points, and values. The decline of populations or species, an accelerating trend worldwide, can lead to simplification of ecosystem processes, thus threatening the stability an sustainability of ecosystem services directly relevant to human welfare in the chain of economic and ecological relationships. The challenge of addressing issues of such enormous scope and complexity has highlighted the limitations of ecology-as-science. Additionally, biosphere-scale conflicts seem to lie beyond the scope of conventional economics, leading to differences of opinion about the commodity value of biodiversity and of the services that intact ecosystems provide. In the fact of these uncertainties, many scientists and economists have adopted principles that clearly assign burdens of proof to those who would promote the loss of biodiversity and that also establish {open_quotes}near-trump{close_quotes} (preeminent) status for ecological integrity. Electric utility facilities and operations impact biodiversity whenever construction, operation, or maintenance of generation, delivery, and support facilities alters landscapes and habitats and thereby impacts species. Although industry is accustomed to dealing with broad environmental concerns (such as global warming or acid rain), the biodiversity issue invokes hemisphere-side, regional, local, and site-specific concerns all at the same time. Industry can proactively address these issues of scope and scale in two main ways: first, by aligning strategically with the broad research agenda put forth by informed scientists and institutions; and second, by supporting focused management processes whose results will contribute incrementally to the broader agenda of rebuilding or maintaining biodiversity. 40 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Biological Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear Science Share Your Research NERSC Citations Home Science at...

  1. Graduate student theses supported by DOE`s Environmental Sciences Division

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Parra, B.M.

    1995-07-01

    This report provides complete bibliographic citations, abstracts, and keywords for 212 doctoral and master`s theses supported fully or partly by the U.S. Department of Energy`s Environmental Sciences Division (and its predecessors) in the following areas: Atmospheric Sciences; Marine Transport; Terrestrial Transport; Ecosystems Function and Response; Carbon, Climate, and Vegetation; Information; Computer Hardware, Advanced Mathematics, and Model Physics (CHAMMP); Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM); Oceans; National Institute for Global Environmental Change (NIGEC); Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV); Integrated Assessment; Graduate Fellowships for Global Change; and Quantitative Links. Information on the major professor, department, principal investigator, and program area is given for each abstract. Indexes are provided for major professor, university, principal investigator, program area, and keywords. This bibliography is also available in various machine-readable formats (ASCII text file, WordPerfect{reg_sign} files, and PAPYRUS{trademark} files).

  2. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W.; Hayes, Daniel J; Mcclelland, James W; Peterson, Bruce; Mcguire, David; Melillo, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western

  3. Photosynthesis, Nitrogen, Their Adjustment and its Effects on Ecosystem Carbon Gain at Elevated CO{sub 2}l. A Comparison of Loblolly and Ponderosa Pines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, J. Timothy; Eichelmann, Hillar Y.; Tissue, David T.; Lewis, James D.; Picone, Johnn B.; Ross, Peter D.

    1996-12-01

    A functional understanding of terrestrial ecosystem carbon processes is essential for two reasons. First, carbon flow is a most fundamental aspects of ecosystem function as it mediates most of the energy flow in these systems. Second, carbon flow also mediates the majority of energy flow in the global economy and will do for the foreseeable future. The increased atmospheric carbon dioxide and its inevitable flow through global ecosystems will influence ecosystem processes. There is, of course, great interest in the potential of ecosystems to sequester some of the carbon being loaded into the atmosphere by economic activity.

  4. Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

    2012-12-01

    The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

  5. Shelf-sea ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-01-01

    An analysis of the food chain dynamics of the Oregon, Alaskan, and New York shelves is made with respect to differences in physical forcing of these ecosystems. The world's shelves are 10% of the area of the ocean, yield 99% of the world's fish catch, and may be a major sink in the global CO/sub 2/ budget.

  6. Overview of the federal interagency ecosystem management initiative

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huke, S.

    1995-12-01

    In early 1994, the White House established a Federal Interagency Ecosystem Management Task Force and Working Group to implement the ecosystem management recommendation in the Vice President`s National Performance Review. The Task Force identified seven ecosystems where mature interagency ecosystem-based activities are mature and ongoing and may provide valuable lessons for broader application. Case studies of each of the seven ecosystems were prepared by interagency teams conducting interviews with representatives of federal, state, and local governments and private interests. The seven ecosystems are: the Southern Appalachian Highlands, Anacostia River Watershed, Prince William Sound, Pacific Northwest Forests, Coastal Louisiana, South Florida, and Great Lakes ecosystems. A final synthesis report, scheduled for completion in the Spring of 1995, will provide an overview of constraints, opportunities, and recommendations in five issue areas: legal, budgetary, science, institutional, policy, and public involvement. A second phase of this initiative will entail the development of ecosystem management strategies for three {open_quotes}new initiatives{close_quotes} laboratories.

  7. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1992 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grove, L.K.; Wildung, R.E.

    1993-03-01

    The 1992 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US Department of Energy (DOE) describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year 1992. This report consists of four volumes oriented to particular segments of the PNL program, describing research performed for the DOE Office of Health and Environmental Research in the Office of Energy Research. The parts of the 1992 Annual Report are: Biomedical Sciences; Environmental Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences; and Physical Sciences. This Report is Part 2: Environmental Sciences. Included in this report are developments in Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development, Interactions with Educational Institutions, Technology Transfer, Publications, and Presentations. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. The Technology Transfer section of this report describes a number of examples in which fundamental research is laying the groundwork for the technology needed to resolve important environmental problems. The Interactions with Educational Institutions section of the report illustrates the results of a long-term, proactive program to make PNL facilities available for university and preuniversity education and to involve educational institutions in research programs. The areas under investigation include the effect of geochemical and physical phenomena on the diversity and function of microorganisms in deep subsurface environments, ways to address subsurface heterogeneity, and ways to determine the key biochemical and physiological pathways (and DNA markers) that control nutrient, water, and energy dynamics in arid ecosystems and the response of these systems to disturbance and climatic change.

  8. Toward “optimal” integration of terrestrial biosphere models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwalm, Christopher R.; Huntingzger, Deborah; Fisher, Joshua B.; Michalak, A. M.; Bowman, Kevin; Cias, Philippe; Cook, Robert B.; El-Masri, Bassil; Hayes, Daniel J.; Huang, Maoyi; Ito, A.; Jain, Atul K.; King, Anthony W.; Lei, Huimin; Liu, Junjie; Lu, Chaoqun; Mao, Jiafu; Peng, Shushi; Poulter, Benjamin; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Schaefer, Kevin; Shi, Xiaoying; Tao, Bo; Tian, Hanqin; Wang, Weile; Wei, Yaxing; Yang, Jia; Zeng, Ning

    2015-06-10

    Multi-model ensembles (MME) are commonplace in Earth system modeling. Here we perform MME integration using a 10-member ensemble of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) from the Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). We contrast optimal (skill-based for present-day carbon cycling) versus naïve (“one model – one vote”) integration. MsTMIP optimal and naïve mean land sink strength estimates (–1.16 vs. –1.15 Pg C per annum respectively) are statistically indistinguishable. This holds also for grid cell values and extends to gross uptake, biomass, and net ecosystem productivity. TBM skill is similarly indistinguishable. The added complexity of skill-based integration does not materially change MME values. This suggests that carbon metabolism has predictability limits and/or that all models and references are misspecified. Resolving this issue requires addressing specific uncertainty types (initial conditions, structure, references) and a change in model development paradigms currently dominant in the TBM community.

  9. 2015 | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    ... nitrogen cycles (CLM-CN), the carbon and water coupling in leaf-level photosynthetic ... computational simulations of ecosystem water processes. 03.01.15Science Highlight New ...

  10. Ecosystem carbon storage capacity as affected by disturbance regimes: A general theoretical model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, Ensheng; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Weile; Wang, Han; Hayes, Daniel J; McGuire, A. David; Hastings, Alan; Schimel, David

    2012-01-01

    Disturbances have been recognized as a key factor shaping terrestrial ecosystem states and dynamics. A general model that quantitatively describes the relationship between carbon storage and disturbance regime is critical for better understanding large scale terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics. We developed a model (REGIME) to quantify ecosystem carbon storage capacities (E[x]) under varying disturbance regimes with an analytical solution E[x] = U {center_dot} {tau}{sub E} {center_dot} {lambda}{lambda} + s {tau} 1, where U is ecosystem carbon influx, {tau}{sub E} is ecosystem carbon residence time, and {tau}{sub 1} is the residence time of the carbon pool affected by disturbances (biomass pool in this study). The disturbance regime is characterized by the mean disturbance interval ({lambda}) and the mean disturbance severity (s). It is a Michaelis-Menten-type equation illustrating the saturation of carbon content with mean disturbance interval. This model analytically integrates the deterministic ecosystem carbon processes with stochastic disturbance events to reveal a general pattern of terrestrial carbon dynamics at large scales. The model allows us to get a sense of the sensitivity of ecosystems to future environmental changes just by a few calculations. According to the REGIME model, for example, approximately 1.8 Pg C will be lost in the high-latitude regions of North America (>45{sup o} N) if fire disturbance intensity increases around 5.7 time the current intensity to the end of the twenty-first century, which will require around 12% increases in net primary productivity (NPP) to maintain stable carbon stocks. If the residence time decreased 10% at the same time additional 12.5% increases in NPP are required to keep current C stocks. The REGIME model also lays the foundation for analytically modeling the interactions between deterministic biogeochemical processes and stochastic disturbance events.

  11. Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for...

  12. Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by Anthropogenic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by Anthropogenic Climate Change? Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Are GRACE-era Terrestrial Water Trends Driven by ...

  13. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications ...

  14. Redefining fine roots improves understanding of belowground contributions to terrestrial biosphere processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCormack, M. Luke; Dickie, Ian A.; Eissenstat, David M.; Fahey, Timothy J.; Fernandez, Christopher W.; Guo, Dali; Helmisaari, Helja -Sisko; Hobbie, Erik A.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Jackson, Robert B.; Leppälammi-Kujansuu, Jaana; Norby, Richard J.; Phillips, Richard P.; Pregitzer, Kurt S.; Pritchard, Seth G.; Rewald, Boris; Zadworny, Marcin

    2015-03-10

    Fine roots acquire essential soil resources and mediate biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Estimates of carbon and nutrient allocation to build and maintain these structures remain uncertain due to challenges in consistent measurement and interpretation of fine-root systems. We define fine roots as all roots less than or equal to 2 mm in diameter, yet it is now recognized that this approach fails to capture the diversity of form and function observed among fine-root orders. We demonstrate how order-based and functional classification frameworks improve our understanding of dynamic root processes in ecosystems dominated by perennial plants. In these frameworks, fine roots are separated into either individual root orders or functionally defined into a shorter-lived absorptive pool and a longer-lived transport fine root pool. Furthermore, using these frameworks, we estimate that fine-root production and turnover represent 22% of terrestrial net primary production globally a ca. 30% reduction from previous estimates assuming a single fine-root pool. In the future we hope to develop tools to rapidly differentiate functional fine-root classes, explicit incorporation of mycorrhizal fungi in fine-root studies, and wider adoption of a two-pool approach to model fine roots provide opportunities to better understand belowground processes in the terrestrial biosphere.

  15. Redefining fine roots improves understanding of belowground contributions to terrestrial biosphere processes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McCormack, M. Luke; Dickie, Ian A.; Eissenstat, David M.; Fahey, Timothy J.; Fernandez, Christopher W.; Guo, Dali; Helmisaari, Helja -Sisko; Hobbie, Erik A.; Iversen, Colleen M.; Jackson, Robert B.; et al

    2015-03-10

    Fine roots acquire essential soil resources and mediate biogeochemical cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. Estimates of carbon and nutrient allocation to build and maintain these structures remain uncertain due to challenges in consistent measurement and interpretation of fine-root systems. We define fine roots as all roots less than or equal to 2 mm in diameter, yet it is now recognized that this approach fails to capture the diversity of form and function observed among fine-root orders. We demonstrate how order-based and functional classification frameworks improve our understanding of dynamic root processes in ecosystems dominated by perennial plants. In these frameworks, finemore » roots are separated into either individual root orders or functionally defined into a shorter-lived absorptive pool and a longer-lived transport fine root pool. Furthermore, using these frameworks, we estimate that fine-root production and turnover represent 22% of terrestrial net primary production globally a ca. 30% reduction from previous estimates assuming a single fine-root pool. In the future we hope to develop tools to rapidly differentiate functional fine-root classes, explicit incorporation of mycorrhizal fungi in fine-root studies, and wider adoption of a two-pool approach to model fine roots provide opportunities to better understand belowground processes in the terrestrial biosphere.« less

  16. DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  17. Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Finding of No Significant Impact page 1 Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program Finding of No Significant Impact Bonneville Power Administration DOE/EA-2006 July 2016 SUMMARY Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) announces its environmental findings for the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program. The ongoing program, implemented by BPA and United States Army Corps of Engineers (Corps), involves activities and projects to restore

  18. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Thornton, Peter E; Post, Wilfred M

    2013-01-01

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  19. Development of Monitoring & Verification Technology (MVT) for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems: Instrumentation and Protocols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wielopolski, Lucian

    2008-09-29

    The objective of this CRADA is to further develop the Multiple Elemental Soil Analysis (MESA) system, based on inelastic neutron scattering technology that was originally developed by Dr. Lucian Wielopolski at BNL. The scope of this CRADA will center on the quantification and monitoring of non-destructive in situ carbon loading in soils to evaluate land application emission reduction activities. To accomplish this objective, the CRADA will center on three main joint activities as described below: A. To further develop and characterize a prototype, field deployable MESA system for static and scanning purposes. B. To develop applicable protocols for agricultural land applications; system validation and field sampling schemes. C. To implement field experiments for independent systems validation, verification, and acceptance by third parties for use in the market segment and commercialization. The technical approach involves a system for monitoring characteristic gamma rays emitted from carbon nuclei stimulated by inelastic neutron scattering from a carbon nucleus. The system consists of a neutron generator emitting fast, 14 MeV, neutrons, shielding materials, and a detection system with nuclear electronics for data acquisition. Following standard system calibration, the results are produced immediately at the end of the counting period.

  20. Ecosystem Spectroscopy: Investigating Associations between Hyperspectr...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ecosystem dynamics at the biosphere-atmosphere interface to enable more accurate climate forecasting. Although our ability to forecast ecosystem functions and climate at the...

  1. Determining the appropriate scope: Assessing at the ecosystem level

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southerland, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Traditional approaches to determining the scope of environmental impact assessment have been based on an ad hoc selection of issues by the project proponent and other interested parties. Resulting in an inadequate consideration of both cumulative effects and impacts on biodiversity. Although public involvement in scoping the assessment must by resource-oriented, rather than activity-oriented, the appropriate scope of environmental impact assessment is the ecosystem. Drawing from the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) guidance on the consideration of biodiversity under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the growing consensus on principles of ecosystem management, scoping should begin with the large-scale ecosystem focusing on essential components potentially affected by the project to determine the appropriate bounds for the study. Although the science of analyzing ecosystems has many limitation, progress in improving environmental impact assessment can be made at any of the three increasingly difficult steps in assessing at the ecosystem level: (1) The first step involves bounding the assessment within the regional context to address cumulative effects and biodiversity. The adoption of a landscape scale has proven to be the most effective solution to the problems of setting boundaries for study units in time and space that do not omit important sources, endpoints (indicators), or processes. (2) The second step involves the use of higher-level indicators to characterize biodiversity and ecosystem integrity. Useful measures include community indices of biological integrity and landscape parameters such as habitat composition and fragmentation. (3) The third step involves identifying ecosystem thresholds (i.e., carrying capacities) to analyze the significance of cumulative impacts. Trends analysis can help identify potential threshold effects when process models are not available.

  2. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  3. ARM - 2008 Performance Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  4. ARM - Funded Research Proposals

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  5. ARM - Research Themes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  6. ARM - 2006 Performance Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  7. ARM - 2007 Performance Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Earth System Modeling Regional & Global Climate Modeling Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Performance Metrics User Meetings Past ARM Science Team ...

  8. Science and Science Fiction

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Scherrer, Robert [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States

    2009-09-01

    I will explore the similarities and differences between the process of writing science fiction and the process of 'producing' science, specifically theoretical physics. What are the ground rules for introducing unproven new ideas in science fiction, and how do they differ from the corresponding rules in physics? How predictive is science fiction? (For that matter, how predictive is theoretical physics?) I will also contrast the way in which information is presented in science fiction, as opposed to its presentation in scientific papers, and I will examine the relative importance of ideas (as opposed to the importance of the way in which these ideas are presented). Finally, I will discuss whether a background as a research scientist provides any advantage in writing science fiction.

  9. Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation, 2007-2008 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merz, Norm

    2009-02-18

    The overarching goals of the 'Kootenai River Floodplain Ecosystem Operational Loss Assessment, Protection, Mitigation and Rehabilitation' Project (BPA Project No.2002-011-00) are to: (1) assess abiotic and biotic factors (i.e., geomorphologic, hydrological, aquatic and riparian/floodplain communities) in determining a definitive composition of ecological integrity, (2) develop strategies to assess and mitigate losses of ecosystem functions, and (3) produce a regional operational loss assessment framework. To produce a scientifically defensible, repeatable, and complete assessment tool, KTOI assembled a team of top scientists in the fields of hydrology, hydraulics, ornithology, entomology, statistics, and river ecology, among other expertise. This advisory team is known as the Research Design and Review Team (RDRT). The RDRT scientists drive the review, selection, and adaptive management of the research designs to evaluate the ecologic functions lost due to the operation of federal hydropower facilities. The unique nature of this project (scientific team, newest/best science, adaptive management, assessment of ecological functions, etc.) has been to work in a dynamic RDRT process. In addition to being multidisciplinary, this model KTOI project provides a stark contrast to the sometimes inflexible process (review, re-review, budgets, etc.) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. The project RDRT is assembled annually, with subgroups meeting as needed throughout the year to address project issues, analyses, review, and interpretation. Activities of RDRT coordinated and directed the selection of research and assessment methodologies appropriate for the Kootenai River Watershed and potential for regional application in the Columbia River Basin. The entire RDRT continues to meet annually to update and discuss project progress. RDRT Subcontractors work in smaller groups throughout the year to meet project objectives. Determining the extent to which

  10. Science Briefs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Briefs Science Briefs Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. Science Briefs - 2016» Science Briefs - 2015» Science Briefs - 2014» Science Briefs - 2013» Science Briefs - 2012» Science Briefs - 2011» Elizabeth Kelly Kelly named Fellow of the American Statistical Association The American Statistical Association (ASA) has honored Elizabeth Kelly with the title of Fellow. - 8/2/16 Beverly Aikin, left, and Ellen Cerreta

  11. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  12. Ecotoxicology of tropical marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, E.C.; Gassman, N.J.; Firman, J.C.; Richmond, R.H.; Power, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    The negative effects of chemical contaminants on tropical marine ecosystems are of increasing concern as human populations expand adjacent to these communities. Watershed streams and ground water carry a variety of chemicals from agricultural, industrial, and domestic activities, while winds and currents transport pollutants from atmospheric and oceanic sources to these coastal ecosystems. The implications of the limited information available on impacts of chemical stressors on mangrove forests, seagrass meadows, and coral reefs are discussed in the context of ecosystem management and ecological risk assessment. Three classes of pollutants have received attention: heavy metals, petroleum, and synthetic organics. Heavy metals have been detected in all three ecosystems, causing physiological stress, reduced reproductive success, and outright mortality in associated invertebrates and fishes. Oil spills have been responsible for the destruction of entire coastal shallow-water communities, with recovery requiring years. Herbicides are particularly detrimental to mangroves and seagrasses and adversely affect the animal-algal symbioses in corals. Pesticides interfere with chemical cues responsible for key biological processes, including reproduction and recruitment of a variety of organisms. Information is lacking with regard to long-term recovery, indicator species, and biomarkers for tropical communities. Critical areas that are beginning to be addressed include the development of appropriate benchmarks for risk assessment, baseline monitoring criteria, and effective management strategies to protect tropical marine ecosystems in the face of mounting anthropogenic disturbance.

  13. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements VI (ACME VI) Science Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biraud, S

    2015-12-01

    From October 1 through September 30, 2016, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Aerial Facility will deploy the Cessna 206 aircraft over the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, collecting observations of trace-gas mixing ratios over the ARM’s SGP facility. The aircraft payload includes two Atmospheric Observing Systems, Inc., analyzers for continuous measurements of CO2 and a 12-flask sampler for analysis of carbon cycle gases (CO2, CO, CH4, N2O, 13CO2, 14CO2, carbonyl sulfide, and trace hydrocarbon species, including ethane). The aircraft payload also includes instrumentation for solar/infrared radiation measurements. This research is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility and Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Program and builds upon previous ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements (ARM-ACME) missions. The goal of these measurements is to improve understanding of 1) the carbon exchange at the SGP site, 2) how CO2 and associated water and energy fluxes influence radiative forcing, convective processes and CO2 concentrations over the SGP site, and 3) how greenhouse gases are transported on continental scales.

  14. Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Del Grande, Nancy Kerr

    1977-01-25

    A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

  15. Long-period solar-terrestrial variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonett, C.P. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies aimed at extending the record of solar-terrestrial variability to longer periods are discussed in a critical review of US research from the period 1987--1990. Sections are devoted to the sunspot index, radioactive carbon studies, a potential climate connection between radiocarbon changes and the solar irradiance cycle, Be-10 studies, geological laminae, solar neutrino counts, and the construction of data sets. Also included is a selective bibliography. 66 refs.

  16. Engineering approaches to ecosystem restoration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    This proceedings CD ROM contains 127 papers on developing and evaluating engineering approaches to wetlands and river restoration. The latest engineering developments are discussed, providing valuable insights to successful approaches for river restoration, wetlands restoration, watershed management, and constructed wetlands for stormwater and wastewater treatment. Potential solutions to a wide variety of ecosystem concerns in urban, suburban, and coastal environments are presented.

  17. The relationship of ecosystem management to NEPA and its goals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, C.G.; Randolph, J.

    2000-07-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was intended to promote a systematic, comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to planning and decision making, including the integration of the natural and social sciences and the design arts. NEPA critics have cited three key shortcomings in its implementation: (1) a lack of engagement with the NEPA process early in the planning process through interdisciplinary collaboration; (2) a lack of rigorous science and the incorporation of ecological principles and techniques; and (3) a lack of emphasis on the Act's substantive goals and objectives. In recent years and independent of NEPA, a policy of ecosystem management has been developed, which represents a fundamental change from a fragmented, incremental planning and management approach to a holistic, comprehensive, interdisciplinary land and resource management effort. The authors postulate that by incorporating ecosystem management principles in their planning and decisionmaking, federal agencies can address the shortcomings in NEPA implementation and move closes to NEPA's intent. A case analysis of EISs prepared by the USDA Forest Service before and after adopting an ecosystem management approach supports their hypothesis.

  18. Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ecosystem Japan Co Ltd Place: Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan Zip: 160-0002 Sector: Solar Product: Japan-based installer of solar...

  19. Final Report to DOE’s Office of Science (BER) submitted by Ram Oren (PI) of DE-FG02-00ER63015 (ended on 09/14/2009) entitled “Controls of Net Ecosystem Exchange at an Old Field, a Pine Plantation, & a Hardwood Forest under Identical Climatic & Edaphic Conditions”

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oren, Ram; Oishi, AC; Palmroth, Sari; Butnor, JR; Johnsen, KH

    2014-03-17

    The project yielded papers on fluxes (energy, water and carbon dioxide)between each ecosystem and the atmosphere, and explained the temporal dynamics of fluxes based on intrinsic (physiology, canopy leaf area and structure) and extrinsic (atmospheric and edaphic conditions). Comparisons between any two of the ecosystems, and among all three followed, attributing differences in behavior to different patterns of phenology and differential sensitivities to soil and atmospheric humidity. Finally, data from one-to-three of the ecosystems (incorporated into FluxNet data archive) were used in syntheses across AmeriFlux sites and even more broadly across FluxNet sites.

  20. Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

    2013-08-08

    Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

  1. Advanced Stirling conversion systems for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaltens, R.K.

    1987-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) is developing heat engines for terrestrial Solar distributed Heat Receivers. SNLA has identified the Stirling to be one of the most promising candidates for the terrestrial applications. The free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) has the potential to meet the DOE goals for both performance and cost. Free-piston Stirling activities which are directed toward a dynamic power source for the space application are being conducted. Space power system requirements include high efficiency, very long life, high reliability and low vibration. The FPSE has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either solar or nuclear powered. Generic free-piston technology is currently being developed for use with a residential heat pump under an Interagency Agreement. Also, an overview is presented of proposed conceptual designs for the Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) using a free-piston Stirling engine and a liquid metal heat pipe receiver. Power extraction includes both a linear alternator and hydraulic output capable of delivering approximately 25 kW of electrical power to the electric utility grid. Target cost of the engine/alternator is 300 dollars per kilowatt at a manufacturing rate of 10,000 units per year. The design life of the ASCS is 60,000 h (30 y) with an engine overhaul at 40,000 h (20 y). Also discussed are the key features and characteristics of the ASCS conceptual designs.

  2. Plutonium Isotopes in the Terrestrial Environment at the Savannah...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plutonium Isotopes in the Terrestrial Environment at the Savannah River Site, USA. A Long-Term Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plutonium Isotopes in the ...

  3. Consideration of Ecosystem for ICME

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju

    2013-01-01

    As the Integrated Computational Materials Engineering (ICME) emerges as a hot topic, computation, experimentation, and digital database are identified as its three major components. Efforts are being actively made from various aspects to bring ICME to reality. However, many factors that would affect ICEM development still remain vague. This paper is an attempt to discuss the needs for establishing a database centered ecosystem to facilitate ICEM development.

  4. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal

  5. Detection Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Project Description Chemistry used in measurement and detection science plays a crucial role in the Laboratory's Science of Signatures scientific thrust. Measurement and detection science areas that require chemistry include nuclear and radiological, materials, biological, energy, climate, and space. Los Alamos scientists integrate chemical-science capabilities to ensure that the Laboratory can

  6. Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Materials Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Materials Physics and Applications» Materials Science and Technology» Institute for Materials Science» Materials Science Rob Dickerson uses a state-of-the-art transmission electron microscope at the Electron Microscopy Laboratory managed by Los

  7. Computer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cite Seer Department of Energy provided open access science research citations in chemistry, physics, materials, engineering, and computer science IEEE Xplore Full text...

  8. Accelerating Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerating Science with the NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program Wahid Bhimji , ... Early User Program, focused on real science applications and workflows that can ...

  9. Nuclear Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Nuclear Science Experimental and theoretical nuclear research carried out at NERSC is driven by the quest for improving our understanding of the building blocks of...

  10. Science Gateways

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    About Science Gateways A science gateway is a web-based interface to access HPC computers ... perform shared computations, and generally interact with NERSC resources over the web. ...

  11. Accelerator Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerator Science Accelerator Science ReframAccelerator.jpg Particle accelerators are among the largest, most complex, and most important scientific instruments in the world....

  12. Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

  13. Is sustainability science really a science?

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Is sustainability science really a science? Is sustainability science really a science? The team's work shows that although sustainability science has been growing explosively ...

  14. Terrestrial mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: Phase 1. Environmental Restoration Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.; Christensen, S.W.; Offerman, H.; Scarbrough-Luther, P.

    1995-06-01

    This report presents the results of the first phase in development of a habitat map of the terrestrial ecosystem on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). During this phase, a satellite image of the ORR was classified into land use/land cover types, the classified image was incorporated into a geographic information system map of the ORR, and the accuracy of the map was assessed. A habitat map is a critical foundation for evaluation of the potential impact of historical (or ongoing) contamination on terrestrial biota of the ORR. The abundance and distribution of wildlife species and plant communities of concern are intrinsically linked to the abundance and distribution of habitat on which those species and communities rely. Thus, the impact of spatially discrete patches of contamination on those biota is directly proportional to the degree of overlap between habitat and contamination. Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper satellite imagery was used to create the land use/land cover map. A Thematic Mapper image consists of seven images of the same point on the earth produced by seven separate sensors, each of which detects a unique part of the electromagnetic spectrum. Separately and in various combinations, these spectral images can be correlated with vegetation type or other land cover type. The image selected for this map was from April 13, 1994, and covers 189,000 ha.

  15. Solar terrestrial coupling through space plasma processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birn, J.

    2000-12-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project investigates plasma processes that govern the interaction between the solar wind, charged particles ejected from the sun, and the earth's magnetosphere, the region above the ionosphere governed by the terrestrial magnetic field. Primary regions of interest are the regions where different plasma populations interact with each other. These are regions of particularly dynamic plasma behavior, associated with magnetic flux and energy transfer and dynamic energy release. The investigations concerned charged particle transport and energization, and microscopic and macroscopic instabilities in the magnetosphere and adjacent regions. The approaches combined space data analysis with theory and computer simulations.

  16. Explosives Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explosives Science Explosives Science Current efforts in explosives science cover many areas critical to national security. One particular area is the need for countermeasures against explosive threats. v Comprehensive explosives process Los Alamos National Laboratory offers a comprehensive explosives process. This process leverages entire technical divisions dedicated to explosives science. Los Alamos scientists combine advanced expertise and capabilities with modern facilities. These assets

  17. Statistical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Statistical Sciences Applying statistical reasoning and rigor to multidisciplinary scientific investigations Contact Us Group Leader James Gattiker (Acting) Email Deputy Group Leader Geralyn Hemphill (Acting) Email Group Administrator LeeAnn Martinez (505) 667-3308 Email Statistical Sciences Statistical Sciences provides statistical reasoning and rigor to multidisciplinary scientific investigations and development, application, and communication of cutting-edge statistical sciences research.

  18. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal lecture series

  19. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal lecture series

  20. Explore Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Explore Explore Science Create your own science adventure by exploring our varied exhibits, and learn what inspired our scientists, engineers and technicians to discover new things. August 18, 2014 boys conducting experiment [Science is] a great game. It is inspiring and refreshing. The playing field is the universe itself. -I.I. Rabi Science is thinking in an organized way about things. You don't need a license or permission to practice science. Scientists are interested in just about anything

  1. Chemical Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Science Chemical Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Actinide Chemistry» Modeling and Simulation in the Chemical Sciences» Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry» Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science» Chemical Researcher Jeff Pietryga shows two vials of different-size nanocrystals, each

  2. Science Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Science Events Learn about our science by coming to Frontiers in Science lectures, catch Cafe Scientific events in your community, or come to sicence events at the Bradbury Science Museum. Sep 27 Tue 7:00 AM Systems Approaches in Immunology Inn and Spa at Loretto - Santa Fe, NM Advancements in immunology can be made through the development of theoretical and experimental techniques supplying models that bring together phenomena at different levels of complexity to study mechanisms that

  3. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal lecture series

  4. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Print Science Highlights Featured scientific research based on publications resulting from work done at the ALS. Highlights are nominated by management and beamline scientists for their scientific significance. Current highlights (2004-present), highlight archives (1995-2004), and Summary Slides of ALS Science Highlights are also available. Science Briefs Short reports on recent research submitted by ALS beamline scientists and users. Science Cafés Informal lecture series

  5. Building an Innovation Ecosystem | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building an Innovation Ecosystem Building an Innovation Ecosystem June 30, 2016 - 4:13pm Addthis Graphic by Sarah Harman Graphic by Sarah Harman Mike Mueller Senior Digital Content Strategist, EERE Communications What are the key facts? EERE's Technology-to-Market program has been carefully studying and strengthening a nationwide innovation ecosystem to give game-changing clean energy technologies a fighting chance at success. Through significant stakeholder engagement and careful coordination,

  6. Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hide Map References: Skipso - The Cleantech Ecosystem1 The Cleantech Open Innovation Lab2 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it....

  7. Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies (Text Version)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This is a text version of the Manufacturing Ecosystems and Keystone Technologies video, originally presented on March 12, 2012 at the MDF Workshop held in Chicago, Illinois.

  8. Science Engagement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Engagement Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web Site Feedback: info@es.net Science Engagement The ESnet Science Engagement team's mission is to ensure that science collaborations at every scale, in every domain, have the information and

  9. Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C.; Ross, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

  10. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1984 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Ecological sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novich, C.M.

    1985-02-01

    Research progress is reported in the following areas: (1) the terrestrial ecology of semi-arid sites; (2) marine sciences; (3) radionuclide fate and effects; (4) waste mobilization, fate and effects; and (5) theoretical research on environmental sampling. (ACR)

  11. Dynamics and transformations of radionuclides in soils and ecosystem health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellows, Robert J. ); Ainsworth, Calvin C. ); Driver, Crystal J. ); Cataldo, Dominic A. )

    1998-12-01

    The chemical behavior of radionuclides can vary widely in soil and sediment environments. Equally important, for a given radionuclide the physico-chemical properties of the solids and aqueous phase can greatly influence a radionuclides behavior. Radionuclides can conceivably occur in soils as soluble-free, inorganic-soluble-complexed, organic-soluble, complexed, adsorbed, precipitated, coprecipitated, or solid structural species. While it is clear that an assessment of a radionuclide?s soil chemistry and potential shifts in speciation will yield a considerable understanding of its behavior in the natural environment, it does not directly translate to bioavailability or its impact on ecosystems health. The soil chemical factors have to be linked to food chain considerations and other ecological parameters that directly tie to an analysis of ecosystem health. In general, the movement of radionuclides from lower to higher trophic levels diminishes with each trophic level in both aqua tic and terrestrial systems. In some cases, transfer is limited because of low absorption/assimilation by successive trophic organisms (Pu, U); for other radionuclides (Tc, H) assimilation may be high but rapid metabolic turnover and low retention greatly reduce tissue concentrations available to predator species. Still others are chemical analogs of essential elements whose concentrations are maintained under strict metabolic control in tissues (Cs) or are stored in tissues seldom consumed by other organisms (Sr storage in exoskeleton, shells, and bone). Therefore, the organisms that receive the greatest ingestion exposures are those in lower trophic positions or are in higher trophic levels but within simple, short food chains. Food source, behavior, and habitat influence the accumulation of radionuclides in animals.

  12. Photon Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo Gallery The latest photos from NNSA headquarters and across the nuclear security enterprise. The latest photos from NNSA headquarters and across the nuclear security enterprise. Visit us on Flickr

    science Photon Science Along with its primary missions-global security, energy security, basic science, and national competitiveness-the NIF & Photon Science Directorate also pursues research and development projects to innovate and develop cutting-edge technologies in support of those

  13. Science Briefs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    feed-image Digg: ALSBerkeleyLab Facebook Page: 208064938929 Flickr: advancedlightsource/albums Twitter: AdvLightSource YouTube: AdvancedLightSource Home Science Highlights Science Briefs Science Briefs ALS Science Briefs are short (250 words maximum) descriptions of recently published ALS-related work. These "brief" highlights also include one image, a caption (50 words), and the publication citation. All ALS users and beamline scientists are invited to fill out the short submission

  14. Science Digests

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Digests Science Digests Our Science Digests embrace complex issues around our science, technologies, and mission in a series of mini-articles that provide a context for our historical approach, current problem solving and our vision for the future. Spatial partitioning for the ocean simulation data set. Data triage enables extreme-scale computing Data selection and triage are important techniques for large-scale data, which can drastically reduce the amount of data written to disk or

  15. Big Science

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Dr. Thomas Zacharia

    2010-01-08

    Big science seeks big solutions for the most urgent problems of our times. Video courtesy Cray, Inc.

  16. Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Huazhong Science Technology University Yongtai Science Technology Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Huazhong Science & Technology University Yongtai Science & Technology Co...

  17. Nitrogen attenuation of terrestrial carbon cycle response to global environmental factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, Atul; Yang, Xiaojuan; Kheshgi, Haroon; Mcguire, David; Post, Wilfred M

    2009-01-01

    Nitrogen cycle dynamics have the capacity to attenuate the magnitude of global terrestrial carbon sinks and sources driven by CO2 fertilization and changes in climate. In this study, two versions of the terrestrial carbon and nitrogen cycle components of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) are used to evaluate how variation in nitrogen availability influences terrestrial carbon sinks and sources in response to changes over the 20th century in global environmental factors including atmospheric CO2 concentration, nitrogen inputs, temperature, precipitation and land use. The two versions of ISAM vary in their treatment of nitrogen availability: ISAM-NC has a terrestrial carbon cycle model coupled to a fully dynamic nitrogen cycle while ISAM-C has an identical carbon cycle model but nitrogen availability is always in sufficient supply. Overall, the two versions of the model estimate approximately the same amount of global mean carbon uptake over the 20th century. However, comparisons of results of ISAM-NC relative to ISAM-C reveal that nitrogen dynamics: (1) reduced the 1990s carbon sink associated with increasing atmospheric CO2 by 0.53 PgC yr1 (1 Pg = 1015g), (2) reduced the 1990s carbon source associated with changes in temperature and precipitation of 0.34 PgC yr1 in the 1990s, (3) an enhanced sink associated with nitrogen inputs by 0.26 PgC yr1, and (4) enhanced the 1990s carbon source associated with changes in land use by 0.08 PgC yr1 in the 1990s. These effects of nitrogen limitation influenced the spatial distribution of the estimated exchange of CO2 with greater sink activity in high latitudes associated with climate effects and a smaller sink of CO2 in the southeastern United States caused by N limitation associated with both CO2 fertilization and forest regrowth. These results indicate that the dynamics of nitrogen availability are important to consider in assessing the spatial distribution and temporal dynamics of terrestrial carbon sources and

  18. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry

    2014-07-01

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  19. Climate & Earth Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Energy Science Engineering Science Environmental Science Fusion Science Math & Computer Science Nuclear...

  20. Geosciences | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geosciences Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Reports and Activities Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Geosciences Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Basic research in geosciences underpins knowledge of the terrestrial impacts and limitations of energy technologies and informs the nation's strategy for mitigating

  1. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1982. Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 2090. [Lead abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 14 sections of the Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report. The other 2 sections deal with educational activities. The programs discussed deal with advanced fuel energy, toxic substances, environmental impacts of various energy technologies, biomass, low-level radioactive waste management, the global carbon cycle, and aquatic and terrestrial ecology. (KRM)

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Pajarito Aerosol Coupling to Ecosystems...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    woodland site used for DOE sponsored ecosystem research to measure the aerosol life ... PACE will measure changes in biogenic volatile organic from PJ ecosystem, the ...

  3. The sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere to climatic change: A simulation of the middle Holocene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, J.A.

    1994-12-01

    A process-based ecosystem model, DEMETER, is used to simulate the sensitivity of the terrestrial biosphere to changes in climate. In this study, DEMETER is applied to the two following climatic regimes: (1) the modern observed climate and (2) a simulated mid-Holocene climate (6000 years before present). The mid-Holocene climate is simulated using the GENESIS global climate model, where shifts in the Earth`s orbital parameters result in warmer northern continents and enhanced monsoons in Asia, North Africa, and North America. DEMETER simulates large differences between modern and mid-Holocene vegetation cover: (1) mid-Holocene boreal forests extend farther poleward than present in much of Europe, Asia, and North America, and (2) mid-Holocene North African grasslands extend substantially farther north than present. The simulated patterns of mid-Holocene vegetation are consistent with many features of the paleobotanical record. Simulated mid-Holocene global net primary productivity is approximately 3% larger than present, largely due to the increase of boreal forest and tropical grasslands relative to tundra and desert. Global vegetation carbon is higher at 6 kyr B.P. compared to present by roughly the same amount (4%). Mid-Holocene global litter carbon is larger than present by 10%, while global soil carbon is approximately 1% less. Despite the regional changes in productivity and carbon storage the simulated total carbon storage potential of the terrestrial biosphere (not including changes in peat) does not change significantly between the two simulations. 53 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Science Briefs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Briefs Science Briefs Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Elizabeth Kelly Kelly named Fellow of the American Statistical Association The American Statistical Association (ASA) has honored Elizabeth Kelly with the title of Fellow. - 8/2/16 Beverly Aikin, left, and Ellen Cerreta Aikin and Cerreta named as ASM Fellows ASM

  5. Energy Sciences

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    Materials Scientists are advancing the fundamental science of materials within the context of global energy-related challenges. They are developing experimental and theoretical...

  6. Information Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science and Technology (ASIS&T) American Society for Indexing (ASI) Digital Library Federation (DLF) National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) Special...

  7. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum ... how nanoparticles work, while "Algae to Biofuels: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum," gives ...

  8. Computational Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Advanced Materials Laboratory Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies Combustion Research Facility Computational Science Research Institute Joint BioEnergy Institute About EC News ...

  9. Ecosystem Spectroscopy - Investigating associations between hyperspect...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yuki's research interests include ecosystem functions and processes, big eco-geospatial data analytics, and geospatial cloud analytics. Yuki holds a B.A. and M.S. degrees in...

  10. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990–2009

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    King, Anthony W.; Andres, Robert; Davis, Kenneth J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, Daniel J.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; de Jong, Bernardus; Kurz, Werner; McGuire, A. David; Vargas, Rodrigo; et al

    2015-01-21

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land–atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990–2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or other greenhouse gases. This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North Americanmore » land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from -890 to -280 Tg C yr-1, where the mean of atmospheric inversion estimates forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land sink) and the inventory-based estimate using the production approach the upper (a smaller land sink). This relatively large range is due in part to differences in how the approaches represent trade, fire and other disturbances and which ecosystems they include. Integrating across estimates, \\"best\\" estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are -472 ± 281 Tg C yr-1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and -360 Tg C yr-1 (with an interquartile range of -496 to -337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. With North America's mean annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the period 1990–2009 equal to 1720 Tg C yr-1 and assuming the estimate of -472 Tg C yr-1 as an approximation of the true terrestrial CO2 sink, the continent's source : sink ratio for this time period was 1720:472, or nearly 4

  11. North America's net terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere 1990–2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Anthony W.; Andres, Robert; Davis, Kenneth J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, Daniel J.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; de Jong, Bernardus; Kurz, Werner; McGuire, A. David; Vargas, Rodrigo; Wei, Yaxing; West, Tristram O.; Woodall, Chris W.

    2015-01-21

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land–atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America (Canada, United States, and Mexico) over the period 1990–2009. Only CO2 is considered, not methane or other greenhouse gases. This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North American land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from -890 to -280 Tg C yr-1, where the mean of atmospheric inversion estimates forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land sink) and the inventory-based estimate using the production approach the upper (a smaller land sink). This relatively large range is due in part to differences in how the approaches represent trade, fire and other disturbances and which ecosystems they include. Integrating across estimates, \\"best\\" estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are -472 ± 281 Tg C yr-1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and -360 Tg C yr-1 (with an interquartile range of -496 to -337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. With North America's mean annual fossil fuel CO2 emissions for the period 1990–2009 equal to 1720 Tg C yr-1 and assuming the estimate of -472 Tg C yr-1 as an approximation of the

  12. Impact of elevated CO2 on a Florida Scrub-oak Ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, Bert G

    2013-01-01

    Since May of 1996, we have conducted an experiment in Florida Scrub Oak to determine the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 and climate change on carbon, water, and nutrient cycling in this important terrestrial ecosystem. Florida scrub oak is the name for a collective of species occupying much of the Florida peninsula. The dominant tree species are oaks and the dwarf structure of this community makes it an excellent system in which to test hypotheses regarding the potential capacity of woody ecosystems to assimilate and sequester anthropogenic carbon. Scrub oak is fire dependent with a return cycle of 10-15 years, a time which would permit an experiment to follow the entire cycle. Our site is located on Cape Canaveral at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida. After burning in 1995, we built 16 open top chambers, half of which have been fumigated with pure CO2 sufficient to raise the concentration around the plants to 350 ppm above ambient. In the intervening 10 years we have non destructively measured biomass of shoots and roots, ecosystem gas exchange using chambers and eddy flux, leaf photosynthesis and respiration, soil respiration, and relevant environmental factors such as soil water availability, temperature, light, etc. The overwhelming result from analysis of our extensive data base is that elevated CO2 has had a profound impact on this ecosystem that, overall, has resulted in increased carbon accumulation in plant shoots, roots and litter. Our measurements of net ecosystem gas exchange also indicate that the ecosystem has accumulated carbon much in excess of the increased biomass or soil carbon suggesting a substantial export of carbon through the porous, sandy soil into the water table several meters below the surface. A major discovery is the powerful interaction between the stimulation of growth, photosynthesis, and respiration by elevated CO2 and other environmental factors particularly precipitation and nitrogen. Our measurements focused attention on

  13. Thermal Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thermal Sciences NETL's Thermal Sciences competency provides the scientific, engineering, and technology development community with innovative and efficient approaches to measure, harness, and convert thermal energy. Research includes sensors, advanced energy concepts, and thermodynamic optimization, specifically: Sensors and Diagnostics Advanced sensor and diagnostic technology to develop and evaluate advanced methods for non-intrusive measurement and measurement in extreme environments.

  14. Evaluating the Contribution of Climate Forcing and Forest Dynamics to Accelerating Carbon Sequestration by Forest Ecosystems in the Northeastern U.S.: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munger, J. William; Foster, David R.; Richardson, Andrew D.

    2014-10-01

    This report summarizes work to improve quantitative understanding of the terrestrial ecosystem processes that control carbon sequestration in unmanaged forests It builds upon the comprehensive long-term observations of CO2 fluxes, climate and forest structure and function at the Harvard Forest in Petersham, MA. This record includes the longest CO2 flux time series in the world. The site is a keystone for the AmeriFlux network. Project Description The project synthesizes observations made at the Harvard Forest HFEMS and Hemlock towers, which represent the dominant mixed deciduous and coniferous forest types in the northeastern United States. The 20+ year record of carbon uptake at Harvard Forest and the associated comprehensive meteorological and biometric data, comprise one of the best data sets to challenge ecosystem models on time scales spanning hourly, daily, monthly, interannual and multi-decadal intervals, as needed to understand ecosystem change and climate feedbacks.

  15. Science DMZ Case Studies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU Science DMZ @ Penn & VTTI Science DMZ @ NOAA Science DMZ @ NERSC Science DMZ @ ALS Multi-facility Workflow Case Study News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Case Studies » Science DMZ Case Studies Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science

  16. NREL: Energy Sciences - Chemical and Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Photovoltaic Program and DOE Basic Energy Sciences Program. Materials Science. The Materials Science Group's research...

  17. Carbon Cycling and Biosequestration Integrating Biology and Climate Through Systems Science Report from the March 2008 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graber, J.; Amthor, J.; Dahlman, R.; Drell, D.; Weatherwax, S.

    2008-12-01

    One of the most daunting challenges facing science in the 21st Century is to predict how Earth's ecosystems will respond to global climate change. The global carbon cycle plays a central role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels and thus Earth's climate, but our basic understanding of the myriad of tightly interlinked biological processes that drive the global carbon cycle remains limited at best. Whether terrestrial and ocean ecosystems will capture, store, or release carbon is highly dependent on how changing climate conditions affect processes performed by the organisms that form Earth's biosphere. Advancing our knowledge of biological components of the global carbon cycle is thus crucial to predicting potential climate change impacts, assessing the viability of climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies, and informing relevant policy decisions. Global carbon cycling is dominated by the paired biological processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Photosynthetic plants and microbes of Earth's land-masses and oceans use solar energy to transform atmospheric CO{sub 2} into organic carbon. The majority of this organic carbon is rapidly consumed by plants or microbial decomposers for respiration and returned to the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Coupling between the two processes results in a near equilibrium between photosynthesis and respiration at the global scale, but some fraction of organic carbon also remains in stabilized forms such as biomass, soil, and deep ocean sediments. This process, known as carbon biosequestration, temporarily removes carbon from active cycling and has thus far absorbed a substantial fraction of anthropogenic carbon emissions.

  18. National Security Science Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science NSS Archive National Security Science Latest Issue:July 2015 past issues All Issues submit National Security Science Archive National Security Science magazine...

  19. Basic Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic Energy Sciences Basic Energy Sciences Supporing research to understand, predict and ... The DOE Office of Science's Basic Energy Sciences program equips scientists with a ...

  20. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; Holst, T.; Hörtnagl, L.; Karl, T.; Laffineur, Q.; Neftel, A.; McKinney, K.; Munger, J. W.; Pallardy, S. G.; Schade, G. W.; Seco, R.; Schoon, N.

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis of the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be taken of

  1. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux. Synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wohlfahrt, G.; Amelynck, C.; Ammann, C.; Arneth, A.; Bamberger, I.; Goldstein, A. H.; Gu, L.; Guenther, A.; Hansel, A.; Heinesch, B.; et al

    2015-07-09

    Methanol is the second most abundant volatile organic compound in the troposphere and plays a significant role in atmospheric chemistry. While there is consensus about the dominant role of living plants as the major source and the reaction with OH as the major sink of methanol, global methanol budgets diverge considerably in terms of source/sink estimates, reflecting uncertainties in the approaches used to model and the empirical data used to separately constrain these terms. Here we compiled micrometeorological methanol flux data from eight different study sites and reviewed the corresponding literature in order to provide a first cross-site synthesis ofmore » the terrestrial ecosystem-scale methanol exchange and present an independent data-driven view of the land–atmosphere methanol exchange. Our study shows that the controls of plant growth on production, and thus the methanol emission magnitude, as well as stomatal conductance on the hourly methanol emission variability, established at the leaf level, hold across sites at the ecosystem level. Unequivocal evidence for bi-directional methanol exchange at the ecosystem scale is presented. Deposition, which at some sites even exceeds methanol emissions, represents an emerging feature of ecosystem-scale measurements and is likely related to environmental factors favouring the formation of surface wetness. Methanol may adsorb to or dissolve in this surface water and eventually be chemically or biologically removed from it. Management activities in agriculture and forestry are shown to increase local methanol emission by orders of magnitude; however, they are neglected at present in global budgets. While contemporary net land methanol budgets are overall consistent with the grand mean of the micrometeorological methanol flux measurements, we caution that the present approach of simulating methanol emission and deposition separately is prone to opposing systematic errors and does not allow for full advantage to be

  2. The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project – Part 2: Environmental driver data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Michalak, Anna M.; Viovy, Nicolas; Post, Wilfred M.; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Schaeffer, Kevin; Jacobson, Andrew R.; Lu, Chaoqun; et al

    2014-12-05

    Ecosystems are important and dynamic components of the global carbon cycle, and terrestrial biospheric models (TBMs) are crucial tools in further understanding of how terrestrial carbon is stored and exchanged with the atmosphere across a variety of spatial and temporal scales. Improving TBM skills, and quantifying and reducing their estimation uncertainties, pose significant challenges. The Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal multi-scale and multi-model intercomparison effort set up to tackle these challenges. The MsTMIP protocol prescribes standardized environmental driver data that are shared among model teams to facilitate model model and model observation comparisons. Inmore » this article, we describe the global and North American environmental driver data sets prepared for the MsTMIP activity to both support their use in MsTMIP and make these data, along with the processes used in selecting/processing these data, accessible to a broader audience. Based on project needs and lessons learned from past model intercomparison activities, we compiled climate, atmospheric CO2 concentrations, nitrogen deposition, land use and land cover change (LULCC), C3 / C4 grasses fractions, major crops, phenology and soil data into a standard format for global (0.5⁰ x 0.5⁰ resolution) and regional (North American: 0.25⁰ x 0.25⁰ resolution) simulations. In order to meet the needs of MsTMIP, improvements were made to several of the original environmental data sets, by improving the quality, and/or changing their spatial and temporal coverage, and resolution. The resulting standardized model driver data sets are being used by over 20 different models participating in MsTMIP. Lastly, the data are archived at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center (ORNL DAAC, http://daac.ornl.gov) to provide long-term data management and distribution.« less

  3. Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batavia Prairie and Agricultural Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Matamala, Roser [ANL; Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry [ANL; Cook, David [ANL; Pekour, Mikhail [ANL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. [University of Illinois at Chicago

    Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

  4. Walker Branch Watershed Ecosystems Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Walker Branch Watershed is located on the U. S. Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation near Oak Ridge, in Anderson County, Tennessee. The Walker Branch Watershed Project began in 1967 under sponsorship of the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission (now the U. S. Department of Energy). Initially, the project centered primarily on the geologic and hydrologic processes that control the amounts and chemistry of water moving through the watershed. Past projects have included: • U. S. Department of Energy funded studies of watershed hydrology and forest nutrient dynamics • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration funded studies of forest micrometeorology • Studies of atmospheric deposition under the National Atmospheric Deposition Program • The International Biological Program Eastern Deciduous Forest Biome Project • National Science Foundation sponsored studies of trace element cycling and stream nutrient spiraling • Electric Power Research Institute funded studies of the effects of acidic deposition on canopy processes and soil chemistry. These projects have all contributed to a more complete understanding of how forest watersheds function and have provided insights into the solution of energy-related problems associated with air pollution, contaminant transport, and forest nutrient dynamics. This is one of a few sites in the world characterized by long-term, intensive environmental studies. The Walker Branch Watershed website at http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ provides maps, photographs, and data on climate, precipitation, atmospheric deposition, stream discharge and runoff, stream chemistry, and vegetation. [Taken from http://walkerbranch.ornl.gov/ABOUTAAA.HTM

  5. Science Magazine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & ANALYSIS www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 339 8 FEBRUARY 2013 635 Steven Chu, the fi rst Nobel-winning scien- tist to lead the sprawling U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has rarely...

  6. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology and algae biofuels exhibits open July 26 at the Bradbury Science Museum July 22, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 22, 2013-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum is opening two new exhibits July 26 as part of the Laboratory's 70th Anniversary celebration. One is a nanotechnology exhibit featuring the Laboratory's Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies (CINT) and the other is an algae biofuel exhibit from the Laboratory and the New Mexico Consortium. An opening

  7. Science Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Science Facilities The focal point for basic and applied R&D programs with a primary focus on energy but also encompassing medical, biotechnology, high-energy physics, and advanced scientific computing programs. Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies» Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT)» Electron Microscopy Lab» Ion Beam Materials Lab» Isotope Production Facility» Los Alamos Neutron Science Center» Lujan Center» Matter-Radiation Interactions in

  8. Measurement Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    wins 2016 Joseph F. Keithley Award for Advances in Measurement Science October 15, 2015 Honors to Albert Migliori, developer of resonant ultrasound spectroscopy LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Oct. 15, 2015-Los Alamos National Laboratory physicist Albert Migliori, having led the development of a powerful tool for important measurements in condensed matter physics including superconductivity, is being given the Joseph F. Keithley Award For Advances in Measurement Science, the top instrumentation prize of the

  9. Molecular Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecular Science NETL's Molecular Science competency provides technology-enabling computational and experimental insight into the atomic-level processes occurring in condensed matter and gas phase systems or at the heterogeneous surface-gas interfaces used for energy applications. Research includes molecular optimization as well as both classical and high-throughput material design, specifically: Molecular Optimization Development and application of new computational approaches in the general

  10. Nuclear Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 American Nuclear Society US Department of Energy Nuclear Science & Engineering Education Sourcebook 2013 North American Edition American Nuclear Society Education, Training, and Workforce Division US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Editor and Founder John Gilligan Professor of Nuclear Engineering North Carolina State University Version 5.13 Welcome to the 2013 Edition of the Nuclear Science and Engineering Education (NS&EE)

  11. Isotope Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Production 35 years of experience in isotope production, processing, and applications. Llllll Committed to the safe and reliable production of radioisotopes, products, and services. Contact: Kevin John LANL Isotope Program Manager kjohn@lanl.gov 505-667-3602 Sponsored by the Department of Energy National Isotope Program http://www.nuclear.energy.gov/isotopes/nelsotopes2a.html Isotopes for Environmental Science Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are used as

  12. Chemical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemical Science Chemical Science Plant fatty acids are used in a vast range of products, from polymers to plastics and soaps to industrial feed stocks -- making up an estimated $150 billion market annually. A new discovery of inserting double bonds in the fatty acids could show the way to the designer production of plant fatty acids, and, in turn, to new industrial applications and new products. <a href

  13. Energy Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Science Energy Science Print Our current fossil-fuel-based system is causing potentially catastrophic changes to our planet. The quest for renewable, nonpolluting sources of energy requires us to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Light-source facilities-the synchrotrons of today and the next-generation light sources of tomorrow-are the scientific tools of choice for exploring the electronic and atomic structure

  14. Fermilab | Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    feature photo feature photo feature photo feature photo feature photo Science Navbar Toggle About Quick Info Science History Leadership and Organization Leadership Organizational chart Committees and Councils Photo and Video Gallery Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and Environment Contact Related Links DOE FRA UChicago URA Newsroom Spotlight Press releases Fact sheets and brochures symmetry Interactions.org Photo and video archive Resources for ... Employees Researchers, postdocs and

  15. MCNP6 Cosmic & Terrestrial Background Particle Fluxes -- Release 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMath, Garrett E.; McKinney, Gregg W.; Wilcox, Trevor

    2015-01-23

    Essentially a set of slides, the presentation begins with the MCNP6 cosmic-source option, then continues with the MCNP6 transport model (atmospheric, terrestrial) and elevation scaling. It concludes with a few slides on results, conclusions, and suggestions for future work.

  16. What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science Website What Makes Science, Science? Research, Shared Effort ... & A New Office of Science Website ...

  17. EFFECTS OF ELEVATED CO2 ON ROOT FUNCTION AND SOIL RESPIRATION IN A MOJAVE DESERT ECOSYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nowak, Robert S.

    2007-12-19

    belowground in relatively recalcitrant forms. Indeed, a model-based analysis predicted that the arid/semiarid southwestern bioclimatic region had one of the highest rates of net carbon storage in the United States over the past century (Schimel et al. 2000). Second, root systems of desert plants are often extensive (Foxx et al. 1984, Hartle et al. 2006) with relatively large proportions of roots deep in the soil (Schenk & Jackson 2002). Thus, an understanding of belowground processes in desert ecosystems provides information on the potential for terrestrial carbon sequestration in desert ecosystems.

  18. Coso geothermal environmental overview study ecosystem quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitner, P.

    1981-09-01

    The Coso Known Geothermal Resource Area is located just east of the Sierra Nevada, in the broad transition zone between the Mohave and Great Basin desert ecosystems. The prospect of large-scale geothermal energy development here in the near future has led to concern for the protection of biological resources. Objectives here are the identification of ecosystem issues, evaluation of the existing data base, and recommendation of additional studies needed to resolve key issues. High-priority issues include the need for (1) site-specific data on the occurrence of plant and animal species of special concern, (2) accurate and detailed information on the nature and extent of the geothermal resource, and (3) implementation of a comprehensive plan for ecosystem protection.

  19. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-01-01

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  20. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; Prentice, I. Collin; Thornton, Peter E.; Wang, Shusen; Wang, Yingping; Weng, Ensheng; Iversen, Colleen M.; McCarthy, Heather R.; Warren, Jeffrey; Oren, Ram; Norby, Richard J

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced a clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.

  1. Using Ecosystem Experiments to Improve Vegetation Models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medlyn, Belinda; Zaehle, S; DeKauwe, Martin G.; Walker, Anthony P.; Dietze, Michael; Hanson, Paul J.; Hickler, Thomas; Jain, Atul; Luo, Yiqi; Parton, William; et al

    2015-05-21

    Ecosystem responses to rising CO2 concentrations are a major source of uncertainty in climate change projections. Data from ecosystem-scale Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments provide a unique opportunity to reduce this uncertainty. The recent FACE Model–Data Synthesis project aimed to use the information gathered in two forest FACE experiments to assess and improve land ecosystem models. A new 'assumption-centred' model intercomparison approach was used, in which participating models were evaluated against experimental data based on the ways in which they represent key ecological processes. Identifying and evaluating the main assumptions caused differences among models, and the assumption-centered approach produced amore » clear roadmap for reducing model uncertainty. We explain this approach and summarize the resulting research agenda. We encourage the application of this approach in other model intercomparison projects to fundamentally improve predictive understanding of the Earth system.« less

  2. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1993 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2: Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This 1993 Annual Report from Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to the US DOE describes research in environment and health conducted during fiscal year (FY) 1993. The report is divided into four parts, each in a separate volume. This part, Volume 2, covers Environmental Sciences. The research is directed toward developing a fundamental understanding of subsurface and terrestrial systems as a basis for both managing these critical resources and addressing environmental problems such as environmental restoration and global change. There are sections on Subsurface Science, Terrestrial Science, Technology Transfer, Interactions with Educational Institutions, and Laboratory Directed Research and Development.

  3. Terrestrial Heat Flow In The North Island Of New Zealand | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Terrestrial Heat Flow In The North Island Of New Zealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Terrestrial Heat Flow In The North...

  4. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stockpile stewardship focus of 70th anniversary lecture December 12, 2013 Last in year-long series of public talks at Bradbury Science Museum LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 12, 2013-The role Los Alamos National Laboratory plays in stockpile stewardship is the focus of the final 70th Anniversary Lecture Dec. 18 at the Bradbury Science Museum. Jon Ventura, Los Alamos's executive staff advisor to the Principal Associate Director for Weapons Programs, will give the talk beginning at 5:30 p.m. "For 70

  5. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Early social history of Los Alamos focus of 70th anniversary lecture at Bradbury Science Museum May 2, 2013 NMSU history professor Jon Hunner speaks May 8 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 2, 2013-The early social history of Los Alamos during Los Alamos National Laboratory's Manhattan Project beginnings will be discussed at a talk by Jon Hunner at 5:30 p.m., May 8 at the Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum. The talk is part of the Laboratory's 70th anniversary lecture series. Hunner heads the Department of

  6. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Maintaining nuclear stability in times of transition focus of talk at Bradbury Science Museum January 9, 2014 First in series of evening lectures open to public LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Jan. 9, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory Senior Fellow Houston "Terry" Hawkins talks about the role that the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile plays in maintaining the nation's defense - and that of our allies - in a talk at 5:30 p.m., Jan. 15 at the Bradbury Science Museum. The talk is the first in a

  7. Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emerging threats to global security focus of March 12 talk at Bradbury Science Museum March 6, 2014 Terry Wallace to address Lab's role in helping the government meet national security challenges LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 6, 2014-Terry Wallace, principal associate director for Global Security at Los Alamos National Laboratory, will talk about potential emerging threats in a lecture at 5:30 p.m., March 12 at the Bradbury Science Museum. The talk is the third in a series of evening lectures planned

  8. Science Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights Science Highlights Science highlights feature research conducted by staff and users at the ALS. If a Power Point summary slide or a PDF handout of the highlight is available, you will find it linked beneath the highlight listing and on the highlight's page. You may also print a version of a highlight by clicking the print icon associated with each highlight. New Catalyst Boosts Selective Formation of Olefins from Syngas Print Wednesday, 10 August 2016 00:00 Experiments at the ALS have

  9. Secrets of the Soil (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodie, Eoin; Northen, Trent; Jansson, Janet; Torn, Margaret

    2011-11-07

    Four Berkeley Lab scientists unveil the "Secrets of the Soil"at this Nov. 7, 2011 Science at the Theater event. Eoin Brodie, Janet Jansson, Margaret Torn and Trent Northen talk about their research and how soil could hold the key to our climate and energy future.The discussion was moderated by John Harte, who holds a joint professorship in the Energy and Resources Group and the Ecosystem Sciences Division of UC Berkeley's College of Natural Resources

  10. Update on Washington initiatives on ecosystem management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostka, D.

    1995-12-01

    A biological {open_quotes}revolution{close_quotes} is in progress. Due to initiatives of the Clinton-Gore administration, biologists across the nation are trying to define and use a new concept called ecosystem management. {open_quotes}Ecosystem management{close_quotes} was born in the frustration of trying to deal with the spotted owl controversy in the Northwest. Biologists could not agree on what should be done. And the biologists and economists rarely got together to try to solve problems. Some astute individuals realized that to achieve a sustainable development, ecosystems would have to be managed on a much larger scale than merely small plots of lands. And people from many different backgrounds and disciplines would need to come together to find solutions. This paper will present the views of a Washington insider who has been a player (although too frequently a minor league player!) in administration initiatives to infuse ecosystem management principles and practices in our national conscience. Today, federal agency staff talk to those in other offices within their own agency. Federal agency staff also work on joint projects across federal agencies. In addition, state government, nonprofits, universities, interested individuals, and tribal governments are becoming involved. This is the biological {open_quotes}revolution{close_quotes} that is in progress. The emphasis is shifting from looking at the life history and problems of single species to a much broader approach of examining many species, including humans. The author will present a report on results of the ecosystem management initiative in the last year and point out some of the hurdles still ahead.

  11. Baseline measurements of terrestrial gamma radioactivity at the CEBAF site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Smith, A.R.

    1991-10-01

    A survey of the gamma radiation background from terrestrial sources was conducted at the CEBAF site, Newport News, Virginia, on November 12--16, 1990, to provide a gamma radiation baseline for the site prior to the startup of the accelerator. The concentrations and distributions of the natural radioelements in exposed soil were measured, and the results of the measurements were converted into gamma-ray exposure rates. Concurrently, samples were collected for laboratory gamma spectral analyses.

  12. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Recovery Applications | Department of Energy Progress in reliable high temperature segmented thermoelectric devices and potential for producing electricity from waste heat from energy intensive industrial processes and transportation vehicles exhaust are discussed fluerial.pdf (3.11 MB) More Documents & Publications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications High Reliability, High TemperatureThermoelectric Power Generation Materials and

  13. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) is launching the first Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) on Disasters and Ecosystems, which features ecosystem-based solutions for disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation, case studies, guest speakers, etc.

  14. Microbes as engines of ecosystem function: When does community...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Language: English Subject: microbial diversity; functional gene; statistical modeling; microbial ecology; ecosystem processes; respiration; nitrification; denitrification Word ...

  15. 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ......... 89 3 I. Introduction Key Takeaways Market Takeaways: The Smart Grid vendor ecosystem is an increasingly interdependent web of companies. ...

  16. National Security Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science National Security Science Latest Issue:July 2015 past issues All Issues submit National Security Science Showcasing Los Alamos National Laboratory's work on nuclear...

  17. Nuclear Science & Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science & Technology Nuclear Science & Technology1354608000000Nuclear Science & TechnologySome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access. No...

  18. Top Science of 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liquid-scanning technology boosts airport security science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Top Science of 2013 Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research...

  19. ORISE: Forensic Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forensic Science Forensic Science The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) provides direct forensic analytical support, consulting and training services to United...

  20. Top Science of 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RAPTOR telescope witnesses black hole birth science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg Top Science of 2013 Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research...

  1. Fire Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear Energy

  2. Discovery Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    universe Discovery Science Since the beginning of civilization, humans have marveled at the night sky and pondered the vast stretches of the universe. The invention of telescopes in the 17th century revealed the first details of the Moon and the planets in our solar system. Four hundred years later, space-based observatories such as NASA's Hubble and Kepler regularly capture amazing vistas of billions of galaxies millions of light years away. Despite these advances, astronomers have only been

  3. Science Pillars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pillars Harnessing our scientific capabilities for national security solutions Los Alamos National Laboratory LA-UR-15-27068 Benefits of the Science Pillars The Laboratory's greatest strength is in our multidisciplinary capabilities. The Pillars draw on these capabilities- across traditional organizational and disciplinary boundaries-to help us accomplish our missions. The LDRD Strategic Investment Plan is built around the Pillars. The Laboratory's External Reviews are organized by Pillar.

  4. Information Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 Information Sciences Uncovering actionable knowledge and generating insight into exascale datasets from heterogeneous sources in real time Leadership Group Leader Amy Larson (Acting) Email Deputy Group Leader Gowri Srinivasan (Acting) Email Contact Us Administrator Yvonne McKelvey Email Conceptual illustration of futuristic data stream processing. Developing methods and tools for understanding complex interactions and extracting actionable information from massive data streams. Basic and

  5. Bradbury Science Museum - Science on Wheels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science, technology, engineering and mathematics and promote public understanding and ... science, technology, engineering and mathematics, and the work of Los Alamos National ...

  6. Maximum entropy models of ecosystem functioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertram, Jason

    2014-12-05

    Using organism-level traits to deduce community-level relationships is a fundamental problem in theoretical ecology. This problem parallels the physical one of using particle properties to deduce macroscopic thermodynamic laws, which was successfully achieved with the development of statistical physics. Drawing on this parallel, theoretical ecologists from Lotka onwards have attempted to construct statistical mechanistic theories of ecosystem functioning. Jaynes’ broader interpretation of statistical mechanics, which hinges on the entropy maximisation algorithm (MaxEnt), is of central importance here because the classical foundations of statistical physics do not have clear ecological analogues (e.g. phase space, dynamical invariants). However, models based on the information theoretic interpretation of MaxEnt are difficult to interpret ecologically. Here I give a broad discussion of statistical mechanical models of ecosystem functioning and the application of MaxEnt in these models. Emphasising the sample frequency interpretation of MaxEnt, I show that MaxEnt can be used to construct models of ecosystem functioning which are statistical mechanical in the traditional sense using a savanna plant ecology model as an example.

  7. Measures of the Effects of Agricultural Practices on Ecosystem Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Polasky, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    Agriculture produces more than just crops. Agricultural practices have environmental impacts that affect a wide range of ecosystem services, including water quality, pollination, nutrient cycling, soil retention, carbon sequestration, and biodiversity conservation. In turn, ecosystem services affect agricultural productivity. Understanding the contribution of various agricultural practices to the range of ecosystem services would help inform choices about the most beneficial agricultural practices. To accomplish this, however, we must overcome a big challenge in measuring the impact of alternative agricultural practices on ecosystem services and of ecosystem services on agricultural production.

  8. Science DMZ Implemented at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ ...

  9. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER`s mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  10. Life sciences and environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The DOE laboratories play a unique role in bringing multidisciplinary talents -- in biology, physics, chemistry, computer sciences, and engineering -- to bear on major problems in the life and environmental sciences. Specifically, the laboratories utilize these talents to fulfill OHER's mission of exploring and mitigating the health and environmental effects of energy use, and of developing health and medical applications of nuclear energy-related phenomena. At Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) support of this mission is evident across the spectrum of OHER-sponsored research, especially in the broad areas of genomics, structural biology, basic cell and molecular biology, carcinogenesis, energy and environment, applications to biotechnology, and molecular, nuclear and radiation medicine. These research areas are briefly described.

  11. Terrestrial-based radiation upsets: a cautionary tale (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Word Cloud More Like This Full Text File size NAView ...

  12. Science and Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Innovation Science and Innovation Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research facilities allow us to develop solutions to complex problems, and to support partners and collaborators, all with the goal of strengthening national security and making a safer world. Science & Engineering Capabilities» Science Programs» Science Facilities» Features» Science Pillars» Faces of Science The people behind our science Radical Supercomputing Extreme speeds, big data,

  13. Science Brief Submission Form

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Brief Submission Form Science Brief Submission Form Print Tuesday, 01 May 2007 00:00 Loading... < Prev

  14. Global patterns and controls of soil organic carbon dynamics as simulated by multiple terrestrial biosphere models: Current status and future directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Hanqin; Lu, Chaoqun; Yang, Jia; Banger, Kamaljit; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Michalak, Anna M.; Cook, Robert; Ciais, Philippe; Hayes, Daniel; Huang, Maoyi; Ito, Akihiko; Jain, Atul K.; Lei, Huimin; Mao, Jiafu; Pan, Shufen; Post, Wilfred M.; Peng, Shushi; Poulter, Benjamin; Ren, Wei; Ricciuto, Daniel; Schaefer, Kevin; Shi, Xiaoying; Tao, Bo; Wang, Weile; Wei, Yaxing; Yang, Qichun; Zhang, Bowen; Zeng, Ning

    2015-06-05

    Soil is the largest organic carbon (C) pool of terrestrial ecosystems, and C loss from soil accounts for a large proportion of land-atmosphere C exchange. Therefore, a small change in soil organic C (SOC) can affect atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO₂) concentration and climate change. In the past decades, a wide variety of studies have been conducted to quantify global SOC stocks and soil C exchange with the atmosphere through site measurements, inventories, and empirical/process-based modeling. However, these estimates are highly uncertain, and identifying major driving forces controlling soil C dynamics remains a key research challenge. This study has compiled century-long (1901–2010) estimates of SOC storage and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) from 10 terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) in the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project and two observation-based data sets. The 10 TBM ensemble shows that global SOC estimate ranges from 425 to 2111 Pg C (1 Pg = 10¹⁵ g) with a median value of 1158 Pg C in 2010. The models estimate a broad range of Rh from 35 to 69 Pg C yr⁻¹ with a median value of 51 Pg C yr⁻¹ during 2001–2010. The largest uncertainty in SOC stocks exists in the 40–65°N latitude whereas the largest cross-model divergence in Rh are in the tropics. The modeled SOC change during 1901–2010 ranges from –70 Pg C to 86 Pg C, but in some models the SOC change has a different sign from the change of total C stock, implying very different contribution of vegetation and soil pools in determining the terrestrial C budget among models. The model ensemble-estimated mean residence time of SOC shows a reduction of 3.4 years over the past century, which accelerate C cycling through the land biosphere. All the models agreed that climate and land use changes decreased SOC stocks, while elevated atmospheric CO₂ and nitrogen deposition over intact ecosystems increased SOC stocks—even though the responses varied significantly

  15. Global patterns and controls of soil organic carbon dynamics as simulated by multiple terrestrial biosphere models: Current status and future directions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tian, Hanqin; Lu, Chaoqun; Yang, Jia; Banger, Kamaljit; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Michalak, Anna M.; Cook, Robert; Ciais, Philippe; Hayes, Daniel; et al

    2015-06-05

    Soil is the largest organic carbon (C) pool of terrestrial ecosystems, and C loss from soil accounts for a large proportion of land-atmosphere C exchange. Therefore, a small change in soil organic C (SOC) can affect atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO₂) concentration and climate change. In the past decades, a wide variety of studies have been conducted to quantify global SOC stocks and soil C exchange with the atmosphere through site measurements, inventories, and empirical/process-based modeling. However, these estimates are highly uncertain, and identifying major driving forces controlling soil C dynamics remains a key research challenge. This study has compiled century-longmore » (1901–2010) estimates of SOC storage and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) from 10 terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) in the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project and two observation-based data sets. The 10 TBM ensemble shows that global SOC estimate ranges from 425 to 2111 Pg C (1 Pg = 10¹⁵ g) with a median value of 1158 Pg C in 2010. The models estimate a broad range of Rh from 35 to 69 Pg C yr⁻¹ with a median value of 51 Pg C yr⁻¹ during 2001–2010. The largest uncertainty in SOC stocks exists in the 40–65°N latitude whereas the largest cross-model divergence in Rh are in the tropics. The modeled SOC change during 1901–2010 ranges from –70 Pg C to 86 Pg C, but in some models the SOC change has a different sign from the change of total C stock, implying very different contribution of vegetation and soil pools in determining the terrestrial C budget among models. The model ensemble-estimated mean residence time of SOC shows a reduction of 3.4 years over the past century, which accelerate C cycling through the land biosphere. All the models agreed that climate and land use changes decreased SOC stocks, while elevated atmospheric CO₂ and nitrogen deposition over intact ecosystems increased SOC stocks—even though the responses varied

  16. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auerbach, S.I.; Reichle, D.E.

    1982-04-01

    Research programs from the following sections and programs are summarized: aquatic ecology, environmental resources, earth sciences, terrestrial ecology, advanced fossil energy program, toxic substances program, environmental impacts program, biomass, low-level waste research and development program, US DOE low-level waste management program, and waste isolation program.

  17. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This annual report summarizes activities in the Aquatic Ecology, Earth Sciences, Environmental Analyses, and Terrestrial Ecology sections, as well as in the Fossil Energy, Biomass, Low-Level Waste Research and Management, and Global Carbon Cycle Programs. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each section. (ACR)

  18. Science Magazine

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MAY 2013 VOL 340 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org 914 EIGHT NUCLEAR ENGINEERS SIT IN HIGH- backed leather chairs, their laptop comput- ers perched on sleek wood consoles. The lights are so low that the corners of the room fade to black. Up front, a roomwide video screen shows a half-dozen other researchers from locations around the country. A cryptic conversation rattles on: "Rod, we have to be careful. Right now the Cobra to de Novo isn't even using DTK." Welcome to the Consortium for

  19. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fe-s image » Links Scientific Highlight Peters Lab MSU News e! Science News Physorg.com » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces The Structure of an Algal Hydrogenase Reveals the Assembly and Evolution of Complex Metalloenzymes summary written by Raven Hanna The potential for using biological enzymes to make hydrogen to use as a renewable energy source is a hot topic, but little is known about how these complex enzymes assemble and work. The [FeFe]-hydrogenase enzyme binds

  20. Science Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    H1N1 Flu » Links Scientific Highlight Wilson Lab Scripps Press Release Scripps Philanthrophy Science Magazine Vanderbilt Reporter » Share this Article Laboratree Ologeez SciLink LabSpaces Structural Basis for Senior Immunity to the Current H1N1 Flu summary written by Raven Hanna An unusual property of the last year's H1N1 "swine flu" virus pandemic is that it disproportionately affected the young. People over the age of around 65 showed much less vulnerability than to more typical

  1. Science Cafe

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cafés Science Cafe April 27, 2015-Special ALS Colloquium Print Wednesday, 22 April 2015 13:19 Special Event on Monday, April 27 @ 12 noon, USB 15-253 X-Ray Microscopy: The First 120 Years Janos Kirz, ALS Abstract Röntgen's great discovery became an instant public sensation. Fascination with the "new kind of rays" that could reveal the structure of opaque objects swept the world in 1896. Fifty years later it was widely recognized that the short wavelength of the radiation should open

  2. Proceedings of the Columbia River Estuary Conference on Ecosystem Restoration.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Bonneville Power Administration

    2008-08-01

    The 2008 Columbia River Estuary Conference was held at the Liberty Theater in Astoria, Oregon, on April 19-20. The conference theme was ecosystem restoration. The purpose of the conference was to exchange data and information among researchers, policy-makers, and the public, i.e., interrelate science with management. Conference organizers invited presentations synthesizing material on Restoration Planning and Implementation (Session 1), Research to Reduce Restoration Uncertainties (Session 2), Wetlands and Flood Management (Session 3), Action Effectiveness Monitoring (Session 4), and Management Perspectives (Session 5). A series of three plenary talks opened the conference. Facilitated speaker and audience discussion periods were held at the end of each session. Contributed posters conveyed additional data and information. These proceedings include abstracts and notes documenting questions from the audience and clarifying answers from the presenter for each talk. The proceedings also document key points from the discussion periods at the end of each session. The conference program is outlined in the agenda section. Speaker biographies are presented in Appendix A. Poster titles and authors are listed in Appendix B. A list of conference attendees is contained in Appendix C.

  3. Pacific Northwest Laboratory: Annual report for 1986 to the DOE Office of Energy Research: Part 2, Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-09-01

    This report summarizes progress in environmental sciences research conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Office of Health and Environmental Research in FY 1986. The program is focused on terrestrial, subsurface, and coastal marine systems, and this research forms the basis, in conjunction with remote sensing, for definition and quantification of processes leading to impacts at the global level. This report is organized into sections devoted to Detection and Management of Change in Terrestrial Systems, Biogeochemical Phenomena, Subsurface Microbiology and Transport, Marine Sciences, and Theoretical (Quantitative) Ecology. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual projects.

  4. Terrestrial Sequestration of CO2 – An Assessment of Research Needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dove, Patricia; Richter, Frank; Rudnicki, John W; Harris, Jerry; Logan, John M.; Warpinski, Norman R; Wawersik, Wolfgang R; Wilson, John L; Wong, Teng-Fong; Ortoleva, Peter J; Orr, Jr., Franklin M; Pyrak-Nolte, Laura

    1998-11-02

    Scientific debate about global warming prompted the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (OBES) of the U.S. Department of Energy to assess a broad range of research possibilities that might result in more efficient energy and reduce the amount of greenhouse gases emitted to the atmosphere. Therefore, in May 1998, the Geosciences Research Program of OBES invited eleven panelists to a workshop in order to address the potential for the sequestration of CO2 in geologic formations as part of a possible OBES initiative on climate change technology. Starting with knowledge gained from the industrial use of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery, the panelists were asked to identify the fundamental scientific and technical issues that would enhance the safety, efficiency and predictability of terrestrial CO2 sequestration. This report is the product of the May, 1998 workshop and subsequent discussions among the panelists. Although many of the problems discussed cut across traditional geoscience disciplines, the background of the workshop participants naturally lead to a paper with four sections representing the perspectives of geohydrology, geochemistry, geomechanics, and geophysics.

  5. Coastal ecosystems of the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, R.C.; Markovits, P.S.; Kirkwood, J.B.

    1981-02-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to provide training on recent developments in understanding coastal ecosystems in the southeastern United States for Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) field personnel and other natural resource managers in the region. Major emphasis was given to three types of systems: marshes, mangroves, and sea grasses. Other systems such as coral reefs, mud flats, bottomland hardwoods, and estuaries were discussed in less detail. Twenty-three papers were presented during the workshop. One of these was abstracted and indexed individually for EDB/ERA.

  6. Simulation games that integrate research, entertainment, and learning around ecosystem services

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Costanza, Robert; Chichakly, Karim; Dale, Virginia; Farber, Steve; Finnigan, David; Grigg, Kat; Heckbert, Scott; Kubiszewski, Ida; Lee, Harry; Liu, Shuang; et al

    2014-11-07

    Humans currently spend over 3 billion person-hours per week playing computer games. Most of these games are purely for entertainment, but use of computer games for education has also expanded dramatically. At the same time, experimental games have become a staple of social science research but have depended on relatively small sample sizes and simple, abstract situations, limiting their range and applicability. If only a fraction of the time spent playing computer games could be harnessed for research, it would open up a huge range of new opportunities. We review the use of games in research, education, and entertainment andmore » develop ideas for integrating these three functions around the idea of ecosystem services valuation. This approach to valuation can be seen as a version of choice modeling that allows players to generate their own scenarios taking account of the trade-offs embedded in the game, rather than simply ranking pre-formed scenarios. We outline a prototype game called Lagom Island to test the proposition that gaming can be used to reveal the value of ecosystem services. Ultimately, our prototype provides a potential pathway and functional building blocks for approaching the relatively untapped potential of games in the context of ecosystem services research.« less

  7. Science DMZ for ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU Science DMZ @ Penn & VTTI Science DMZ @ NOAA Science DMZ @ NERSC Science DMZ @ ALS Multi-facility Workflow Case Study Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web

  8. Faces of Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Faces of Science Meet the scientists behind the science at Los Alamos. Many of them felt a calling to science at an early age...now they work at a world-class research facility where childhood dreams may become reality. Faces of Science 70 Years of Innovations 50 Years of Space LANL Top Science 2014 Top Ten Innovations of 2013 Energy Sustainability Radical Supercomputing Science Digests FACES OF SCIENCE The people behind our science x x MATHEMATICS Polish scientist Stanislaw Ulam found

  9. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1983 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Ecological sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, B.E.

    1984-02-01

    The 1983 annual report highlights research in five areas funded by the Ecological Sciences Division of the Office of Energy Research. The five areas include: western semi-arid ecosystems; marine sciences; mobilization fate and effects of chemical wastes; radionuclide fate and effects; and statistical and quantitative research. The work was accomplished under 19 individual projects. Individual projects are indexed separately.

  10. "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent Monitoring and Real-Time Response Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Thinking"...

  11. "Thinking" Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Telescopes: An Autonomous Robotic Ecosystem for Persistent Monitoring and Real-Time Response Citation Details In-Document Search Title: "Thinking" Telescopes: An...

  12. T.G. Hinton: Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Ecosystems...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Remediation of Radioactively Contaminated Ecosystems Thomas G. Hinton Savannah River Ecology ... availability from sequential extractions compared to plant uptake of 137Cs and 90Sr. ...

  13. Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solar Electric Corp aka Solar MW Energy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ecosystem Solar Electric Corp, aka Solar MW Energy Inc Place: Ontario, California Zip: 91761 Product:...

  14. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Dataset: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems, 1960-2012 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic...

  15. Plant Root Characteristics and Dynamics in Arctic Tundra Ecosystems...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and dynamics, and their role in key ecosystem processes in the Arctic. Authors: Sullivan, Paddy ; Sloan, Victoria ; Warren, Jeff ; McGuire, Dave ; Euskirchen, Eugenie ;...

  16. Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2009-03-06

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

  17. Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2008-10-01

    Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

  18. Predicting long-term carbon sequestration in response to CO2 enrichment: How and why do current ecosystem models differ?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walker, Anthony P.; Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Asao, Shinichi; Hickler, Thomas; Parton, William; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wang, Ying -Ping; Wårlind, David; et al

    2015-04-27

    Large uncertainty exists in model projections of the land carbon (C) sink response to increasing atmospheric CO2. Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments lasting a decade or more have investigated ecosystem responses to a step change in atmospheric CO2 concentration. To interpret FACE results in the context of gradual increases in atmospheric CO2 over decades to centuries, we used a suite of seven models to simulate the Duke and Oak Ridge FACE experiments extended for 300 years of CO2 enrichment. We also determine key modeling assumptions that drive divergent projections of terrestrial C uptake and evaluate whether these assumptions can bemore » constrained by experimental evidence. All models simulated increased terrestrial C pools resulting from CO2 enrichment, though there was substantial variability in quasi-equilibrium C sequestration and rates of change. In two of two models that assume that plant nitrogen (N) uptake is solely a function of soil N supply, the net primary production response to elevated CO2 became progressively N limited. In four of five models that assume that N uptake is a function of both soil N supply and plant N demand, elevated CO2 led to reduced ecosystem N losses and thus progressively relaxed nitrogen limitation. Many allocation assumptions resulted in increased wood allocation relative to leaves and roots which reduced the vegetation turnover rate and increased C sequestration. Additionally, self-thinning assumptions had a substantial impact on C sequestration in two models. As a result, accurate representation of N process dynamics (in particular N uptake), allocation, and forest self-thinning is key to minimizing uncertainty in projections of future C sequestration in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.« less

  19. System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Patrick W

    2011-04-12

    A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

  20. A Graded Approach for Evaluating Radiation Doses to Acquatic and Terrestrial Biota

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2012-08-14

    This technical standard provides methods, models, and guidance within a graded approach that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors may use to evaluate doses of ionizing radiation to populations of aquatic animals, terrestrial plants, and terrestrial animals from DOE activities for the purpose of demonstrating protection relative to Dose Rate Guidelines.

  1. Capabilities: Science Pillars

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pillars Capabilities: Science Pillars The Lab's four Science Pillars harness our scientific capabilities for national security solutions. What are the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Science Pillars? The Laboratory has established the Science Pillars under four main themes to bring together the Laboratory's diverse array of scientific capabilities and expertise: Information, Science, and Technology Pillar Materials for the Future Pillar Nuclear and Particle Futures Pillar Science of Signatures

  2. Bradbury Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable energy is focus of New Science on Wheels programs offered by Bradbury Science Museum September 21, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory is taking science on the road to area schools LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, September 23, 2010-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum Science on Wheels educational program is offering new, renewable energy-related workshops during the 2010-11 school year. The classes are designed to generate interest in science and renewable energy by

  3. Materials Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MST Materials Science and Technology Providing world-leading, innovative, and agile materials science and technology solutions for national security missions. MST is metallurgy. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and technology for Los Alamos National Laboratory. READ MORE MST is engineered materials. The Materials Science and Technology Division provides scientific and technical leadership in materials science and

  4. BES Science Network Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Network Requirements Report of the Basic Energy Sciences Network Requirements Workshop Conducted June 4-5, 2007 BES Science Network Requirements Workshop Basic Energy Sciences Program Office, DOE Office of Science Energy Sciences Network Washington, DC - June 4 and 5, 2007 ESnet is funded by the US Dept. of Energy, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) program. Dan Hitchcock is the ESnet Program Manager. ESnet is operated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, which

  5. Basic Energy Sciences Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic Energy Sciences Reports Basic Energy Sciences Reports The list below of Basic Energy Sciences workshop reports addresses the status of some important research areas that can help identify research directions for a decades-to-century materials and energy strategy. Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Workshop Reports The Energy Challenges Report: New Science for a Secure and Sustainable Energy Future This Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) report summarizes a 2008 study by the

  6. Energy flow, nutrient cycling, and ecosystem resilience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeAngelis, D.L.

    1980-08-01

    The resilience, defined here as the speed with which a system returns to equilibrium state following a perturbation, is investigated for both food web energy models and nutrient cycling models. Previous simulation studies of food web energy models have shown that resilience increases as the flux of energy through the food web per unit amount of energy in the steady state web increases. Studies of nutrient cycling models have shown that resilience increases as the mean number of cycles that nutrient (or other mineral) atoms make before leaving the system decreases. In the present study these conclusions are verified analytically for general ecosystem models. The behavior of resilience in food web energy models and nutrient cycling models is a reflection of the time that a given unit, whether of energy or matter, spends in the steady state system. The shorter this residence time is, the more resilient the system is.

  7. Nuclear Materials Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Materials Science Our multidisciplinary expertise comprises the core actinide materials science and metallurgical capability within the nuclear weapons production and ...

  8. Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Doon L. Gibbs Laboratory Director Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC Brookhaven National ... on November 12, 2014. Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC (BSA) documented this ...

  9. Science and Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Faces of Science The people behind our science Radical Supercomputing Extreme speeds, big data, powerful simulations 70 Years of Innovation Addressing the nation's most complex...

  10. Fusion Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion Energy Sciences Fusion Energy Sciences Expanding the fundamental understanding of matter at very high temperatures and densities and to build the scientific foundation ...

  11. Faces of Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Our People Faces of Science Contact Us Division Leader David Morris Deputy Division Leader ... In the News Research Highlights Faces of Science Our People Resources Periodic Table ...

  12. Stewardship Science Academic Alliances

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0%2A en NNSA's holds Stewardship Science Academic Programs Annual Review Symposium http:nnsa.energy.govblognnsas-holds-stewardship-science-academic-programs-annual-review-symp...

  13. Science Serving Sustainability

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Goal 8: Science Serving Sustainability LANL takes opportunities to engage the ... ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY GOALS at LANL Community involvement: Andy Erickson and Duncan ...

  14. Science & Technology Review Articles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NIF & Photon Science News Press Releases Experimental Highlights Efficiency Improvements Science & Technology Meetings and Workshops Papers and Presentations NIF&PS People In the ...

  15. ARM - TWP Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science TWP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Manus Island Nauru Island Darwin, AUS ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Year of Tropical...

  16. Computational Earth Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Computational Earth Science We develop and apply a range of high-performance computational methods and software tools to Earth science projects in support of environmental ...

  17. Bioenergy and Biome Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bioenergy and Biome Sciences Bioenergy and Biome Sciences Understanding Earth's biomes makes us better stewards of the planet and better able to preserve our health and lifestyles ...

  18. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that

  19. Applied Ecosystem Analysis - Background : EDT the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment Method.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mobrand, Lars E.

    1996-05-01

    This volume consists of eight separate reports. We present them as background to the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) methodology. They are a selection from publications, white papers, and presentations prepared over the past two years. Some of the papers are previously published, others are currently being prepared for publication. In the early to mid 1980`s the concern for failure of both natural and hatchery production of Columbia river salmon populations was widespread. The concept of supplementation was proposed as an alternative solution that would integrate artificial propagation with natural production. In response to the growing expectations placed upon the supplementation tool, a project called Regional Assessment of Supplementation Project (RASP) was initiated in 1990. The charge of RASP was to define supplementation and to develop guidelines for when, where and how it would be the appropriate solution to salmon enhancement in the Columbia basin. The RASP developed a definition of supplementation and a set of guidelines for planning salmon enhancement efforts which required consideration of all factors affecting salmon populations, including environmental, genetic, and ecological variables. The results of RASP led to a conclusion that salmon issues needed to be addressed in a manner that was consistent with an ecosystem approach. If the limitations and potentials of supplementation or any other management tool were to be fully understood it would have to be within the context of a broadly integrated approach - thus the Ecosystem Diagnosis and Treatment (EDT) method was born.

  20. Pacific Northwest Laboratory annual report for 1982 to the DOE Office of Energy Research. Part 2. Environmental sciences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaughan, B.E.

    1983-02-01

    The following research areas are highlighted: terrestrial and riverine ecology; marine sciences; radionuclide fate and effects; ecological effects of coal conversion; solid waste: mobilization fate and effects; and statistical and theoretical research. A listing of interagency services agreements provided at the end of this report. (PSB)

  1. Global and Regional Ecosystem Modeling: Databases of Model Drivers and Validation Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, R.J.

    2002-03-19

    Understanding global-scale ecosystem responses to changing environmental conditions is important both as a scientific question and as the basis for making policy decisions. The confidence in regional models depends on how well the field data used to develop the model represent the region of interest, how well the environmental model driving variables (e.g., vegetation type, climate, and soils associated with a site used to parameterize ecosystem models) represent the region of interest, and how well regional model predictions agree with observed data for the region. To assess the accuracy of global model forecasts of terrestrial carbon cycling, two Ecosystem Model-Data Intercomparison (EMDI) workshops were held (December 1999 and April 2001). The workshops included 17 biogeochemical, satellite-driven, detailed process, and dynamic vegetation global model types. The approach was to run regional or global versions of the models for sites with net primary productivity (NPP) measurements (i.e., not fine-tuned for specific site conditions) and analyze the model-data differences. Extensive worldwide NPP data were assembled with model driver data, including vegetation, climate, and soils data, to perform the intercomparison. This report describes the compilation of NPP estimates for 2,523 sites and 5,164 0.5{sup o}-grid cells under the Global Primary Production Data Initiative (GPPDI) and the results of the EMDI review and outlier analysis that produced a refined set of NPP estimates and model driver data. The EMDI process resulted in 81 Class A sites, 933 Class B sites, and 3,855 Class C cells derived from the original synthesis of NPP measurements and associated driver data. Class A sites represent well-documented study sites that have complete aboveground and below ground NPP measurements. Class B sites represent more numerous ''extensive'' sites with less documentation and site-specific information available. Class C cells represent estimates of NPP for 0.5{sup o

  2. Solar Energy Science Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Projects Curriculum: Solar Power -(thermodynamics, lightelectromagnetic, radiation, energy transformation, conductionconvection, seasons, trigonometry) Grade Level: ...

  3. Nevada Science of Aerospace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jason Marcks

    2004-07-01

    Funding was used to operate the educational program entitled the Nevada Science of Aerospace Project.

  4. 2016 Nuclear Science Week

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Science Week October 17 - 21, 2016 Nuclear Science Week is a national, broadly observed week-long celebration that focuses on all aspects of nuclear science. Events during this week will provide many learning opportunities about contributions, innovation and careers that can be found by exploring nuclear science. 6-22-16

  5. Fundamental Science Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fundamental Science Applications Fundamental Science Applications Supporing research to understand, predict and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Contact thumbnail of Business Development Executive Don Hickmott Business Development Executive Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 667-8753 Email Fundamental Science Applications The DOE Basic Energy Science (BES) program supports research to understand, predict and ultimately control

  6. Science and Suds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Suds Science and Suds WHEN: Jul 18, 2015 12:00 PM - 4:00 PM WHERE: Los Alamos ScienceFest Beer Garden Ashley Pond, Downtown Los Alamos, NM CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Science and Suds - Social Event Event Description Conversations with real scientists at the Los Alamos ScienceFest Beer Garden SCIENCE & SUDS Stop by the museum's tent in the beer garden at Ashley Pond during Los Alamos ScienceFest to visit with a scientist

  7. Water Science and Technology Board. Annual report 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Water Science and Technology Board during 1991. The WSTB is intended to be a dynamic forum, a mechanism by which the broad community of water science, technology, and policy professionals can help assure high-quality national water programs. The principal products of WSTB studies are written reports which cover a wide range of water resources issues of current national concern. A few recent examples are: Restoration of aquatic ecosystems - science, technologies and public policy; Water transfers in the West - efficiency, equity and the environment; Opportunities in the hydrologic sciences; and Ground water models - scientific and regulatory applications. Projects completed, ongoing studies and published reports are described in detail in their respective sections of this report.

  8. Global patterns and controls of soil organic carbon dynamics as simulated by multiple terrestrial biosphere models. Current status and future directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Hanqin; Lu, Chaoqun; Yang, Jia; Banger, Kamaljit; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Michalak, A. M.; Cook, Robert B.; Ciais, Philippe; Hayes, Daniel J.; Huang, Maoyi; Ito, Akihiko; Jain, Atul K.; Lei, Huimin; Mao, Jiafu; Pan, Shufen; Post, W. M.; Peng, Shushi; Poulter, Benjamin; Ren, Wei; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Schaefer, Kevin; Shi, Xiaoying; Tao, Bo; Wang, Weile; Wei, Yaxing; Yang, Qichun; Zhang, Bowen; Zeng, Ning

    2015-06-05

    Soil is the largest organic carbon (C) pool of terrestrial ecosystems, and loss from soil accounts for a large pro portion of land-atmosphere C exchange. Due to large pool size and variable residence time from years to millennia, even small changes in soil organic C(SOC) have substantial effects on the terrestrial C budget, thereby affecting atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2)concentration and climate change. In the past decades, a wide variety of studies have been conducted to quantify global SOC stocks and soil exchange with the atmosphere through site measurements, inventories, and empirical/process-based modeling. However, these estimates are highly uncertain and identifying major driving forces controlling soil C storage and fluxes remains a key research challenge his study has compiled century-long (1901-2010)estimates of SOC storage and heterotrophic respiration (Rh) from ten terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) in the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) and two observation based datasets. The ten-TBM ensemble shows that global SOC estimate range from 4 to 2111 Pg C (1 Pg = 1015g) with a median value of 1158 Pg C33 in 2010. Modeling approach estimates a broad range of Rh from 35 to 69 Pg C yr-1 with a median value of 51Pg C yr-1 during 200–2010. The largest uncertainty in SOC stocks exists in the 40–65°N latitude band while Rh differences are the largest in the tropics. All the models agreed that climate and land use changes have decreased SOC stocks while elevated CO2 and atmospheric nitrogen deposition have increased SOC stocks though the response varied significantly among models. Model representations of temperature and moisture sensitivity,nutrient limitation and land use partially explain the divergent estimates of global SOC stocks and soil fluxes in this study. In addition, major sources of uncertainty from model estimation include exclusion of SOC storage in

  9. Science & Engineering Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capabilities Science & Engineering Capabilities These capabilities are our science and engineering at work for the national security interest in areas from global climate to cyber security, from nonproliferation to new materials, from clean energy solutions to supercomputing. Accelerators, Electrodynamics» Energy» Materials Science» Bioscience: Bioenergy, Biosecurity, and Health» Engineering» National Security, Weapons Science» Chemical Science» High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids»

  10. Science Requirements Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies News & Publications ESnet News Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Blog ESnet Live Home » Science Engagement » Science Requirements Reviews Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Network Requirements Reviews Requirements Review Reports Case Studies Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1

  11. Committee on Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science SHERWOOD BOEHLERT, CHAIRMAN Ralph M. Hall, Texas, Ranking Democrat www.house.gov/science October 9, 2001 Press Contacts: Heidi Mohlman Tringe (Heidi.Tringe@mail.house.gov) Jeff Donald (Jeffrey.Donald@mail.house.gov) (202)225-4275 BOEHLERT, GRUCCI TO URGE SWIFT CONFIRMATION OF SCIENCE ADVISOR WASHINGTON, DC -- Today, House Science Committee Chairman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY23) and Committee member Felix J. Grucci (R-NY1) will call for the swift confirmation of Presidential Science Advisor

  12. Disentangling climatic and anthropogenic controls on global terrestrial evapotranspiration trends

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wei, Yaxing; Thornton, Peter E.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Fu, Wenting; Fisher, Joshua B.; Dickinson, Robert E.; Shem, Willis; et al

    2015-09-08

    Here, we examined natural and anthropogenic controls on terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) changes from 1982-2010 using multiple estimates from remote sensing-based datasets and process-oriented land surface models. A significant increased trend of ET in each hemisphere was consistently revealed by observationally-constrained data and multi-model ensembles that considered historic natural and anthropogenic drivers. The climate impacts were simulated to determine the spatiotemporal variations in ET. Globally, rising CO2 ranked second in these models after the predominant climatic influences, and yielded a decreasing trend in canopy transpiration and ET, especially for tropical forests and high-latitude shrub land. Increased nitrogen deposition slightly amplified globalmore » ET via enhanced plant growth. Land-use-induced ET responses, albeit with substantial uncertainties across the factorial analysis, were minor globally, but pronounced locally, particularly over regions with intensive land-cover changes. Our study highlights the importance of employing multi-stream ET and ET-component estimates to quantify the strengthening anthropogenic fingerprint in the global hydrologic cycle.« less

  13. Disentangling climatic and anthropogenic controls on global terrestrial evapotranspiration trends

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu; Shi, Xiaoying; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wei, Yaxing; Thornton, Peter E.; Hoffman, Forrest M.; Fu, Wenting; Fisher, Joshua B.; Dickinson, Robert E.; Shem, Willis; Piao, Shilong; Wang, Kaicun; Schwalm, Christopher R.; Tian, Hanqin; Mu, Mingquan; Arain, Altaf; Ciais, Philippe; Cook, Robert; Dai, Yongjiu; Hayes, Daniel; Huang, Maoyi; Huang, Suo; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Ito, Akihiko; Jain, Atul; King, Anthony W.; Lei, Huimin; Lu, Chaoqun; Michalak, Anna M.; Parazoo, Nicholas; Peng, Changhui; Peng, Shushi; Poulter, Benjamin; Schaefer, Kevin; Jafarov, Elchin; Wang, Weile; Zeng, Ning; Zeng, Zhenzhong; Zhao, Fang; Zhu, Qiuan; Zhu, Zaichun

    2015-09-08

    Here, we examined natural and anthropogenic controls on terrestrial evapotranspiration (ET) changes from 1982-2010 using multiple estimates from remote sensing-based datasets and process-oriented land surface models. A significant increased trend of ET in each hemisphere was consistently revealed by observationally-constrained data and multi-model ensembles that considered historic natural and anthropogenic drivers. The climate impacts were simulated to determine the spatiotemporal variations in ET. Globally, rising CO2 ranked second in these models after the predominant climatic influences, and yielded a decreasing trend in canopy transpiration and ET, especially for tropical forests and high-latitude shrub land. Increased nitrogen deposition slightly amplified global ET via enhanced plant growth. Land-use-induced ET responses, albeit with substantial uncertainties across the factorial analysis, were minor globally, but pronounced locally, particularly over regions with intensive land-cover changes. Our study highlights the importance of employing multi-stream ET and ET-component estimates to quantify the strengthening anthropogenic fingerprint in the global hydrologic cycle.

  14. REMM: The Riparian Ecosystem Management Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrance, R.; Altier, L.S.; Williams, R.G.; Inamdar, S.P.; Sheridan, J.M.; Bosch, D.D.; Hubbard, R.K.; Thomas, D.L.

    2000-03-01

    Riparian buffer zones are effective in mitigating nonpoint source pollution and have been recommended as a best management practice (BMP). The Riparian Ecosystem Management Model (REMM) has been developed for researchers and natural resource agencies as a modeling tool that can help quantify the water quality benefits of riparian buffers under varying site conditions. Processes simulated in REMM include surface and subsurface hydrology; sediment transport and deposition; carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus transport, removal, and cycling; and vegetation growth. Management options, such as vegetation type, size of the buffer zone, and biomass harvesting also can be simulated. REMM can be used in conjunction with upland models, empirical data, or estimated loadings to examine scenarios of buffer zone design for a hillslope. Evaluation of REMM simulations with field observations shows generally good agreement between simulated and observed data for groundwater nitrate concentrations and water table depths in a mature riparian forest buffer. Sensitivity analysis showed that changes that influenced the water balance or soil moisture storage affected the streamflow output. Parameter changes that influence either hydrology or rates of nutrient cycling affected total N transport and plant N uptake.

  15. Bradbury Science Museum - Science on Wheels

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To stimulate interest in and enthusiasm for science, technology, engineering and mathematics and promote public understanding and appreciation of Los Alamos National Laboratory...

  16. Observed and modeled ecosystem isoprene fluxes from an oak-dominated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ecosystem isoprene fluxes from an oak-dominated temperate forest and the influence of drought stress Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Observed and modeled ecosystem ...

  17. An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An ecosystem-scale perspective of the net land methanol flux: synthesis of micrometeorological flux measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: An ecosystem-scale ...

  18. Extensions to the CYCLUS Ecosystem in Support of Market-Driven...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Extensions to the CYCLUS Ecosystem in Support of Market-Driven Transition Capability Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Extensions to the CYCLUS Ecosystem in ...

  19. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division's major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  20. Environmental Sciences Division annual progress report for period ending September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hook, R. I.; Hildebrand, S. G.; Gehrs, C. W.; Sharples, F. E.; Shriner, D. S.; Stow, S. H.; Cushman, J. H.; Kanciruk, P.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report summarizes the research and development activities conducted in the Environmental Sciences Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory during fiscal year (FY) 1992, which which extended from October 1, 1991, through September 30, 1992. This report is structured to provide descriptions of current activities and accomplishments in each of the division`s major organizational units. Section activities are described in the Earth and Atmospheric sciences, ecosystem studies, Environmental analysis, environmental biotechnology, and division operations.

  1. Microbes as engines of ecosystem function: When does community structure enhance predictions of ecosystem processes?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Graham, Emily B.; Knelman, Joseph E.; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Siciliano, Steven; Breulmann, Marc; Yannarell, Anthony; Beman, J. M.; Abell, Guy; Philippot, Laurent; Prosser, James; et al

    2016-02-24

    In this study, microorganisms are vital in mediating the earth’s biogeochemical cycles; yet, despite our rapidly increasing ability to explore complex environmental microbial communities, the relationship between microbial community structure and ecosystem processes remains poorly understood. Here, we address a fundamental and unanswered question in microbial ecology: ‘When do we need to understand microbial community structure to accurately predict function?’ We present a statistical analysis investigating the value of environmental data and microbial community structure independently and in combination for explaining rates of carbon and nitrogen cycling processes within 82 global datasets. Environmental variables were the strongest predictors of processmore » rates but left 44% of variation unexplained on average, suggesting the potential for microbial data to increase model accuracy. Although only 29% of our datasets were significantly improved by adding information on microbial community structure, we observed improvement in models of processes mediated by narrow phylogenetic guilds via functional gene data, and conversely, improvement in models of facultative microbial processes via community diversity metrics. Our results also suggest that microbial diversity can strengthen predictions of respiration rates beyond microbial biomass parameters, as 53% of models were improved by incorporating both sets of predictors compared to 35% by microbial biomass alone. Our analysis represents the first comprehensive analysis of research examining links between microbial community structure and ecosystem function. Taken together, our results indicate that a greater understanding of microbial communities informed by ecological principles may enhance our ability to predict ecosystem process rates relative to assessments based on environmental variables and microbial physiology.« less

  2. The OSG Open Facility: A Sharing Ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayatilaka, B.; Levshina, T.; Rynge, M.; Sehgal, C.; Slyz, M.

    2015-12-23

    The Open Science Grid (OSG) ties together individual experiments’ computing power, connecting their resources to create a large, robust computing grid, this computing infrastructure started primarily as a collection of sites associated with large HEP experiments such as ATLAS, CDF, CMS, and DZero. In the years since, the OSG has broadened its focus to also address the needs of other US researchers and increased delivery of Distributed High Through-put Computing (DHTC) to users from a wide variety of disciplines via the OSG Open Facility. Presently, the Open Facility delivers about 100 million computing wall hours per year to researchers who are not already associated with the owners of the computing sites, this is primarily accomplished by harvesting and organizing the temporarily unused capacity (i.e. opportunistic cycles) from the sites in the OSG. Using these methods, OSG resource providers and scientists share computing hours with researchers in many other fields to enable their science, striving to make sure that these computing power used with maximal efficiency. We believe that expanded access to DHTC is an essential tool for scientific innovation and work continues in expanding this service.

  3. Welcome to Greenhouse Gases: Science and Technology: Editorial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.; Maroto-Valer, M.M.

    2011-02-01

    This editorial introduces readers and contributors to a new online journal. Through the publication of articles ranging from peer-reviewed research papers and short communications, to editorials and interviews on greenhouse gas emissions science and technology, this journal will disseminate research results and information that address the global crisis of anthropogenic climate change. The scope of the journal includes the full spectrum of research areas from capture and separation of greenhouse gases from flue gases and ambient air, to beneficial utilization, and to sequestration in deep geologic formations and terrestrial (plant and soil) systems, as well as policy and technoeconomic analyses of these approaches.

  4. Mercury contamination of terrestrial vegetation near a caustic soda factory in Thailand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suckcharoen, S.

    1980-03-01

    The present study is concerned with the fall-out of mercury on some terrestrial plants and one species of aquatic plant growing in the vicinity of the TACSCO factory.

  5. Final Strategic Plan Released by Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Taskforce

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Today (December 5) the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force released its final strategy for long-term restoration in the Gulf, a path forward based on input from states, tribes, federal...

  6. Final Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Task Force Strategic Plan

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The natural resources of the Gulf’s ecosystem are vital to many of the region’s industries that directly support economic progress and job creation, including tourism and recreation, seafood...

  7. Excess /sup 129/Xe in terrestrial samples: A non-primordial hypothesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffee, M.W.; Hudson, G.B.

    1987-03-01

    Excesses of /sup 129/Xe relative to the isotopic composition in air are observed in some terrestrial samples. Traditionally these /sup 129/Xe excesses have been thought to be related to /sup 129/I that was present in abundance in the early solar system. We propose an alternative hypothesis to explain terrestrial /sup 129/Xe excesses based on the production of /sup 129/I from the spontaneous fission of /sup 238/U.

  8. Physical Sciences 2007 Science & Technology Highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazi, A U

    2008-04-07

    The Physical Sciences Directorate applies frontier physics and technology to grand challenges in national security. Our highly integrated and multidisciplinary research program involves collaborations throughout Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Department of Energy, and with academic and industrial partners. The Directorate has a budget of approximately $150 million, and a staff of approximately 350 employees. Our scientists provide expertise in condensed matter and high-pressure physics, plasma physics, high-energy-density science, fusion energy science and technology, nuclear and particle physics, accelerator physics, radiation detection, optical science, biotechnology, and astrophysics. This document highlights the outstanding research and development activities in the Physical Sciences Directorate that made news in 2007. It also summarizes the awards and recognition received by members of the Directorate in 2007.

  9. PNNL: Staff Search - Fundamental & Computational Sciences Directorate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Divisions Advanced Computing, Mathematics & Data Atmospheric Sciences & Global Change Biological Sciences Physical Sciences User Facilities Environmental Molecular Sciences ...

  10. Developing micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for sustainability assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dizdaroglu, Didem

    2015-09-15

    Sustainability assessment is increasingly being viewed as an important tool to aid in the shift towards sustainable urban ecosystems. An urban ecosystem is a dynamic system and requires regular monitoring and assessment through a set of relevant indicators. An indicator is a parameter which provides information about the state of the environment by producing a quantitative value. Indicator-based sustainability assessment needs to be considered on all spatial scales to provide efficient information of urban ecosystem sustainability. The detailed data is necessary to assess environmental change in urban ecosystems at local scale and easily transfer this information to the national and global scales. This paper proposes a set of key micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for monitoring the sustainability of residential developments. The proposed indicator framework measures the sustainability performance of urban ecosystem in 3 main categories including: natural environment, built environment, and socio-economic environment which are made up of 9 sub-categories, consisting of 23 indicators. This paper also describes theoretical foundations for the selection of each indicator with reference to the literature [Turkish] Highlights: • As the impacts of environmental problems have multi-scale characteristics, sustainability assessment needs to be considered on all scales. • The detailed data is necessary to assess local environmental change in urban ecosystems to provide insights into the national and global scales. • This paper proposes a set of key micro-level urban ecosystem indicators for monitoring the sustainability of residential developments. • This paper also describes theoretical foundations for the selection of each indicator with reference to the literature.

  11. Building the American Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem: Cyclotron Road

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Announces New Innovators, Success of First Cohort | Department of Energy the American Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem: Cyclotron Road Announces New Innovators, Success of First Cohort Building the American Clean Energy Innovation Ecosystem: Cyclotron Road Announces New Innovators, Success of First Cohort March 15, 2016 - 2:05pm Addthis Raymond Weitekamp and Corinne Allen utilize the resources and expertise of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory’s Molecular Foundry lab to analyze and

  12. Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs Innovation Ecosystems Spur Rapid Growth for Startups, Entrepreneurs September 14, 2011 - 4:22pm Addthis Rich Earley, CEO of Clean Urban Energy presents at Clean Energy Trust's Clean Energy Challenge in March 2011 | Courtesy of Clean Energy Trust Rich Earley, CEO of Clean Urban Energy presents at Clean Energy Trust's Clean Energy Challenge in March 2011 | Courtesy of Clean Energy Trust Sarah Jane Maxted

  13. Terrestrial perturbation experiments as an environmental assessment tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1980-08-01

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) was initially interpreted as requiring full disclosure of the environmental impacts of a federal action. Because of the limitations of time, money, and manpower, this requirement that all impacts be considered has led to superficial analysis of many important impacts. The President's Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) has provided a solution to this problem by reinterpreting NEPA as requiring analysis of those impacts which have significant bearing on decision making. Because assessment resources can now be concentrated on a few critical issues, it should be possible to perform field perturbation experiments to provide direct evidence of the effects of a specific mixture of pollutants or physical disturbances on the specific receiving ecosystem. Techniques are described for field simulation of gaseous and particulate air pollution, soil pollutants, disturbance of the earth's surface, and disturbance of wildlife. These techniques are discussed in terms of their realism, cost, and the restrictions which they place on the measurement of ecological parameters.

  14. ARM - AMF Science Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Questions Science Plan (PDF, 4.4M) Rob Wood Website Outreach Backgrounders English Version (PDF, 363K) Portuguese Version (PDF, 327K) AMF Posters, 2009 English Version...

  15. Science On Tap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science On Tap Science On Tap WHEN: Mar 19, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, NM 87544 CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375...

  16. Science On Tap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science On Tap Science On Tap WHEN: Nov 19, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, NM 87544 USA SPEAKER: Ray Newell, Quantum...

  17. Science on Tap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January Science on Tap Science on Tap WHEN: Jan 15, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked The Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505...

  18. National Science Bowl

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Science Bowl is a nationwide academic competition that tests students' knowledge in all areas of science. High school and middle school students are...

  19. Middle School Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2015 February Middle School Science Bowl Middle School Science Bowl WHEN: Feb 28, 2015 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM WHERE: Highland High School 4700 Coal Ave SE, Albuquerque, NM...

  20. Information Science, Computing, Applied Math

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Science, Computing, Applied Math Information Science, Computing, Applied Math National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los ...

  1. Science of Signatures - Past Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Institute Science of Signatures - Past Programs Science of Signatures Program Science of Signatures - Past Programs Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860...

  2. Science Cloud 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Cloud 2011 Science Cloud 2011 June 17, 2011 The Magellan teams at NERSC and Argonne recently presented a joint paper detailing their progress and conclusions. At Science Cloud 2011: The Second Workshop on Scientific Cloud Computing, in a paper titled "Magellan: Experiences from a Science Cloud" (PDF, 320KB), lead author Lavanya Ramakrishnan outlined the groups' most recent achievements and conclusions, including a successful run of real-time data analysis for the STAR

  3. NERSC Science Engagements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Science Engagements NERSC Science Engagements At NERSC, science comes first. NERSC systems and services are designed to enable and support cutting-edge research within the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science. NERSC engages with the scientific community in many ways both formally and informally. Among the more formal mechanisms are the NERSC Requirements Reviews, which have now become the DOE Exascale Requirements Reviews jointly with the Argonne and Oak Ridge Leadership Computing

  4. ORISE: Science Education Programs

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Education Programs The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and more than a dozen other federal agencies rely on the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) to help meet future needs in critical science and technology areas through the recruitment and training of our nation's next generation of scientists and engineers. To meet these pressing demands, ORISE assesses current science and technology labor needs and then designs and implements programs that meet the unique goals of

  5. Office of Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office of Science Office of Science Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy security. Advanced Scientific Computing Research» Basic Energy Sciences» Biological and Environmental Research» Fusion Energy Sciences» High Energy Physics» Nuclear Physics» Turning Windows into Solar Panels Turning Windows into Solar Panels READ MORE Scientists study glaciers in McMurdo Dry Valleys in Antarctica

  6. ARM - Science Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Questions Related Links MC3E Home News News & Press MC3E Backgrounder (PDF, 1.61MB) SGP Images ARM flickr site Field Blog ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Deployment Operations Measurements Science Plan (PDF, 3.85 MB) Featured Data Plots SGP Data Plots (all) Experiment Planning Steering Committee Science Questions MC3E Proposal Abstract and Related Campaigns Meetings Cloud Life Cycle Working Group Contacts Michael Jensen, Lead Scientist Science Questions This experiment seeks to use a

  7. ARM - Science Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Questions Related Links SPARTICUS Home AAF Home Deployment Operations Measurements SGP Data Plots NASA Data Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Experiment Planning SPARTICUS Proposal Abstract Science Questions Science and Operations (PDF, 1.01M) SPARTICUS Wiki News News & Press Backgrounder (PDF, 269K) Contacts Gerald Mace, Lead Scientist Science Questions Scatter plot of ice crystal number concentration from two different probes used during TWP-ICE. The differences are significant

  8. ORISE: Science Education Events

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Education Events Science Education Events Recognizing that vast improvements in science, technology, engineering and math are key to innovation and economic growth, the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) manages high-profile local and national education and research initiatives. For example, scholarly competitions, summer education workshops and teacher professional development programs create excitement and inspire educators and students to pursue interests in

  9. Weaving Community and Science

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Weaving Community and Science: Former Summer Intern Is Investigating Plant Uptake of Contaminants on Disposal Cell Covers

  10. Frontiers in Science Archive

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontiers in Science Lectures » Frontiers in Science Archive Frontiers in Science Archive x LInda Anderman (505) 665-9196 Email The Frontiers in Science lecture series are a public service of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellows. Fellows are appointed by the Laboratory Director in recognition of sustained outstanding contributions and exceptional promise for continued professional achievement. All lectures are open to the public and free of charge. PAST LECTURES 2015 August Beyond Pluto:

  11. Bradbury Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bradbury Science Museum Bradbury Science Museum Providing a window into the history of LANL, its national security mission, and the broad range of exciting science and technology research programs undertaken to improve our nation's future. June 13, 2012 Young visitor shakes the hand of an Oppenheimer statue J. Robert Oppenheimer is a welcoming presence in the Bradbury Science Museum's History Gallery. Visitors go on to explore the Laboratory's beginnings during the Manhattan Project through

  12. Judicial Science School

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Judicial Science School Judicial Science School The goal of Los Alamos Judicial Science School is to provide judges with knowledge and experience that will enhance their ability to evaluate whether scientific arguments meet the threshold requirements of admissibility. Contacts NSEC Director David L. Clark (505) 665-0983 Email Engineering Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 665-0860 Email Executive Administrator Ellie Vigil (505) 667-2818 Email Judicial Science School Developed through close

  13. Earth, Space Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Earth, Space Sciences Earth, Space Sciences National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)» Earth and Environmental Sciences Division» Intelligence and Space Research» Earth Read caption + A team of scientists is working to understand how local changes in hydrology might bring about

  14. Bradbury Science Museum Association

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bradbury Science Museum Association 108 Central Park Square #208 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Dear Los Alamos National Laboratory Employee, member of the Los Alamos Community, or other friend of the Bradbury Science Museum, I am writing today to tell you about an exciting new opportunity! As of May 1, 2016, we are launching the Bradbury Science Museum Association (BSMA). Our purpose is to amplify the Bradbury Science Museum's (BSM) mission and visitor experience as its official nonprofit partner,

  15. Science of Signatures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science of Signatures Science of Signatures (SoS) The Lab's four Science Pillars harness our scientific capabilities for national security solutions. Contacts Pillar Champion Nancy Sauer Email Pillar Contact Gene Peterson Email Science of Signatures (SoS) Overview In its broadest and simplest sense, a "signature" is any information that is unique, recognizable, and useful. A handwritten mark as a means of demonstrating authenticity is a familiar example, as is the pattern variation

  16. Science-Driven Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science-Driven Network Requirements for ESnet Update to the 2002 Office of Science Networking Requirements Workshop Report February 21, 2006 1-1 Science-Driven Network Requirements for ESnet Update to the 2002 Office of Science Networking Requirements Workshop Report February 21, 2006 Contributors Paul Adams, LBNL (Advanced Light Source) Shane Canon, ORNL (NLCF) Steven Carter, ORNL (NLCF) Brent Draney, LBNL (NERSC) Martin Greenwald, MIT (Magnetic Fusion Energy) Jason Hodges, ORNL (Spallation

  17. Basic Energy Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Basic Energy Sciences Basic Energy Sciences Supporing research to understand, predict and ultimately control matter and energy at the electronic, atomic, and molecular levels. Get Expertise Toni Taylor (505) 665-0030 Email Quanxi Jia (505) 667-2716 Email David Morris (505) 665-6487 Email Claudia Mora (505) 665-7832 Email Research fosters fundamental scientific discoveries to meet energy, environmental, and national security challenges The DOE Office of Science's Basic Energy Sciences program

  18. Bradbury Science Museum Association

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Museum Association Introducing Bradbury Science Museum Association The Bradbury Science Museum Association is a separate, not-for-profit entity envisioned to enhance the educational work of the museum. Contact Us thumbnail of Bradbury Science Museum (505) 667-4444 Email We welcome the Bradbury Science Museum Association as our partner in education. Join the BSMA and recieve all the benefits it provides. The pdf application is here. There are also Sponsorship and Business Partnerships available.

  19. Computational Science and Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Science and Engineering NETL's Computational Science and Engineering competency consists of conducting applied scientific research and developing physics-based simulation models, methods, and tools to support the development and deployment of novel process and equipment designs. Research includes advanced computations to generate information beyond the reach of experiments alone by integrating experimental and computational sciences across different length and time scales. Specific

  20. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    strongly influenced by atmospheric dynamics as well as ecosystem and anthropogenic fluxes. ... mid-day is determined by both net ecosystem uptake and the growing boundary layer. ...

  1. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Spatially...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as controlling ecosystem-atmosphere CO2 exchange. Estimating spatially distributed ecosystem fluxes is important for ARM cloud modeling and for the North American Carbon Program. ...

  2. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accurate estimation of landscape-averaged ecosystem-atmosphere exchange hence suggests the ... Eddy covariance (EC) measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) and heat fluxes ...

  3. Threshold responses to interacting global changes in a California grassland ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Christopher; Cortinas, Susan

    2015-02-02

    Final Report for Threshold responses to interacting global changes in a California grassland ecosystem

  4. Science On Tap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science On Tap Science On Tap WHEN: Mar 19, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, NM 87544 CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Science on Tap March Event Description Science On Tap happens every third Thursday of the month, featuring a new topic each week. It begins with an informal 15-minute talk and is followed by a lively group discussion. This installment of "Science on Tap" will be held

  5. Science and Technology Day

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science and Technology Day Science and Technology Day February 24, 2015 Tuesday, Feb. 24 Berkeley Lab Building 50 Auditorium Attendance is open to anyone. Remote streaming is available at hosting.epresence.tv/lbl (Broadcast only) Time Title Speaker 8:15 Registration 8:55 Welcome Sudip Dosanjh, NERSC Director 9:00 The Year in Science at NERSC Richard Gerber, NERSC Senior Science Advisor 9:30 Science Keynote: Efficient modeling of laser-plasma accelerators using the ponderomotive-based code

  6. BES Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biocca, Alan; Carlson, Rich; Chen, Jackie; Cotter, Steve; Tierney, Brian; Dattoria, Vince; Davenport, Jim; Gaenko, Alexander; Kent, Paul; Lamm, Monica; Miller, Stephen; Mundy, Chris; Ndousse, Thomas; Pederson, Mark; Perazzo, Amedeo; Popescu, Razvan; Rouson, Damian; Sekine, Yukiko; Sumpter, Bobby; Dart, Eli; Wang, Cai-Zhuang -Z; Whitelam, Steve; Zurawski, Jason

    2011-02-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivityfor the US Department of Energy Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office ofScience programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years.

  7. Science DMZ at the University of Florida

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UF Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU ...

  8. Science DMZ Implemented at CU Boulder

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CU Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU ...

  9. Materials Science Research | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Research For photovoltaics and other energy applications, NREL's primary research in materials science includes the following core competencies. A photo of laser light rays going in various directions atop a corrugated metal substrate Materials Physics Through materials growth and characterization, we seek to understand and control fundamental electronic and optical processes in semiconductors. An image of multiple, interconnecting red and blue particles Electronic Structure Theory We

  10. Computational Materials Science | Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational Materials Science An image of interconnecting, sphere- and square-shaped particles that appears to be floating in space NREL's computational materials science capabilities span many research fields and interests. Electronic, Optical, and Transport Properties of Photovoltaic Materials Material properties and defect physics of Si, CdTe, III-V, CIGS, CZTS, and hybrid perovskite compounds Reconstruction of, and defect formation on, semiconductor surfaces Electronic and transport

  11. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco...

  12. Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science Synchrotron Radiation in Polymer Science March 30-April 2, 2012; San Francisco

  13. Neutron and Nuclear Science News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Recent news and events related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science News Nuclear and Materials Science Research at LANSCE Nuclear science observations and opportunities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Links Neutron and Nuclear Science News Media Links Profiles Events at LANSCE LAPIS (LANSCE Proposal Intake System

  14. Predicting long-term carbon sequestration in response to CO2 enrichment: How and why do current ecosystem models differ?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Anthony P.; Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Asao, Shinichi; Hickler, Thomas; Parton, William; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wang, Ying -Ping; Wårlind, David; Norby, Richard J.

    2015-04-27

    Large uncertainty exists in model projections of the land carbon (C) sink response to increasing atmospheric CO2. Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments lasting a decade or more have investigated ecosystem responses to a step change in atmospheric CO2 concentration. To interpret FACE results in the context of gradual increases in atmospheric CO2 over decades to centuries, we used a suite of seven models to simulate the Duke and Oak Ridge FACE experiments extended for 300 years of CO2 enrichment. We also determine key modeling assumptions that drive divergent projections of terrestrial C uptake and evaluate whether these assumptions can be constrained by experimental evidence. All models simulated increased terrestrial C pools resulting from CO2 enrichment, though there was substantial variability in quasi-equilibrium C sequestration and rates of change. In two of two models that assume that plant nitrogen (N) uptake is solely a function of soil N supply, the net primary production response to elevated CO2 became progressively N limited. In four of five models that assume that N uptake is a function of both soil N supply and plant N demand, elevated CO2 led to reduced ecosystem N losses and thus progressively relaxed nitrogen limitation. Many allocation assumptions resulted in increased wood allocation relative to leaves and roots which reduced the vegetation turnover rate and increased C sequestration. Additionally, self-thinning assumptions had a substantial impact on C sequestration in two models. As a result, accurate representation of N process dynamics (in particular N uptake), allocation, and forest self-thinning is key to minimizing uncertainty in projections of future C sequestration in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.

  15. National Security, Weapons Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Security, Weapons Science National Security, Weapons Science National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. CoMuEx» Explosives Center» Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is part of the DOE's stockpile stewardship

  16. ARM - NSA Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AlaskaNSA Science NSA Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Barrow Atqasuk Oliktok Point (AMF3) ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site NSA Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts NSA Science Scientific objectives for the NSA/AAO site are provided below: Provide the comprehensive data sets necessary to develop and test continually improved algorithms for GCMs to describe radiative transfer and cloud processes at high

  17. ARM - SGP Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science SGP Related Links Virtual Tour Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Summer Training SGP Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Science Overall Objectives The primary goal of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site is to produce data adequate to support significant

  18. ARM - Science Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Questions Related Links CLASIC Home AAF Home ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Post-Campaign CLASIC/CHAPS Special Session at AGU Annual Meeting, December 15-19 CLASIC Workshop, March 26-27 Data Sets Deployment Resources Measurement Platforms PNNL WRF-CuP Forecast Cloud Physics Lidar MODIS Airborne Simulator Data Mesonet Monitoring ARM Data Plots Experiment Planning CLASIC Proposal Abstract Science Questions Science and Implementation Plan (pdf) Measurement Platforms (pdf) CLASIC-Land

  19. ARM - Science Questions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Questions Related Links ISDAC Home AAF Home AVP Aircraft Instrumentation, October 14-16, 2008 ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Post-Campaign Data Sets Flight Summary Table (PDF, 440K) ISDAC Wiki Mission Summary Journal Deployment Resources NSA Site ARM Data Plots Quick Links Experiment Planning ISDAC Proposal Abstract Full Proposal (pdf, 1,735K) Science Questions Science Overview Document for ISDAC (pdf, 525K) ISDAC Flight Planning Document (PDF, 216K) Collaborations Logistics Measurements

  20. Information Sciences and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Information Sciences and Technology Information Sciences and Technology National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. Contact thumbnail of Business Development Executive Steve Stringer Business Development Executive Richard P. Feynman Center for Innovation (505) 660-2177 Email Los Alamos leverages advances in theory, algorithms,

  1. Home | ScienceCinema

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

    SCIENCECINEMA Toggle Navigation Home About ScienceCinema FAQ Contact Us ScienceCinema Database Searchable Videos Showcasing DOE Research Search DOE ScienceCinema for Multimedia Find + Fielded Search Audio Search × Fielded Search Title: Description/Abstract: Bibliographic Data: Author/Speaker: Name Name ORCID Media Type: All Audio Video Subject: Identifier Numbers: Media Source: All DOE CERN Research Org.: Sponsoring Org.: Publication Date: Publication Date Until to System Entry Date:

  2. Frontiers in Science Lectures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Frontiers in Science Lectures Frontiers in Science Lectures x Community Partnerships Office (505) 665-4400 The Frontiers in Science lecture series are a public service of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellows. Fellows are appointed by the Laboratory Director in recognition of sustained outstanding contributions and exceptional promise for continued professional achievement. All lectures are open to the public and free of charge. LATEST LECTURE Hacking Photosynthesis: Growing Plants to Power

  3. Science Briefs - 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Briefs - 2011 Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. The mineral "Terrywallaceite" "Terrywallaceite" now in official roster of known minerals The slender, needle-like metallic-black crystals of Terrywallaceite were found in the Julcani Mining District of Peru. - 6/8/11 submit Science Briefs - 2011 June Contact Us Communications Office (505) 667-7000 Fast Facts 2016 People Total employees: 10,500 Los

  4. Science Briefs - 2012

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Briefs - 2012 Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. AAAS elects four LANL scientists as Fellows The American Association for the Advancement of Science has

  5. Science satellites seek Santa

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science satellites seek Santa Science satellites seek Santa Los Alamos scientists will use two advanced science satellites to mark the course taken by the elfin traveler. December 16, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a

  6. Materials Science Applications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Materials Science Applications VASP VASP is a plane wave ab initio code for quantum mechanical molecular dynamics. It is highly scalable and shows very good parallel performance for a variety of chemical and materials science calculations. VASP is available to NERSC users who already have a VASP license. Read More » Quantum ESPRESSO/PWscf Quantum Espresso is an integrated suite of computer codes for electronic structure calculations and materials modeling at the nanoscale. It builds on

  7. Huffington Post Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Huffington Post Science Read about what other news sources are saying about Los Alamos science achievements. Making solar power more affordable Making solar power more affordable Although the goal of cheap, plentiful energy from the sun turns out to be a work in progress, not a settled achievement, recent research breakthroughs are helping to deliver on the promise of truly "cheap solar," with several surprising side benefits. - 8/30/16 Human-gorilla divergence may have

  8. Huffington Post Science - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science » 2016 Huffington Post Science - 2016 Read about what other news sources are saying about Los Alamos science achievements. Making solar power more affordable Making solar power more affordable Although the goal of cheap, plentiful energy from the sun turns out to be a work in progress, not a settled achievement, recent research breakthroughs are helping to deliver on the promise of truly "cheap solar," with several surprising side benefits. - 8/30/16 Human-gorilla divergence

  9. Biomolecular Science (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    A brief fact sheet about NREL Photobiology and Biomolecular Science. The research goal of NREL's Biomolecular Science is to enable cost-competitive advanced lignocellulosic biofuels production by understanding the science critical for overcoming biomass recalcitrance and developing new product and product intermediate pathways. NREL's Photobiology focuses on understanding the capture of solar energy in photosynthetic systems and its use in converting carbon dioxide and water directly into hydrogen and advanced biofuels.

  10. Science On Tap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science On Tap Science On Tap WHEN: Apr 16, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544, USA CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Science On Tap Presenters Aditya Mohite and Wanyi Nie Event Description Science On Tap happens every third Thursday of the month, featuring a new topic each week. It begins with an informal 15-minute talk and is followed by a lively group discussion. This

  11. Science On Tap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science On Tap Science On Tap WHEN: Feb 19, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, NM 87544 CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Science on Tap February Event Description Science On Tap happens every third Thursday of the month. It begins with an informal 15-minute talk followed by a lively group discussion. This week, Harshini Mukundan of Physical Chemistry and Applied Spectroscopy at Los Alamos

  12. Science On Tap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science On Tap Science On Tap WHEN: Nov 19, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, NM 87544 USA SPEAKER: Ray Newell, Quantum Encryption CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Science On Tap Event Description Science On Tap happens every third Thursday of the month, featuring a new topic each week. It begins with an informal 15-minute talk and is followed by a lively group discussion. Quantum Cryptography:

  13. Science on Tap

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January » Science on Tap Science on Tap WHEN: Jan 15, 2015 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked The Wine Room, 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Science on Tap January Event Description Sara Del Valle of Energy and Infrastructure Analysis (DSA-4) talks about her and her team's research into using Wikipedia to monitor and forecast diseases around the globe. Science on Tap is a project of the Los Alamos Creative

  14. Science on Tap - Plasmas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on Tap - Plasmas Science on Tap - Plasmas WHEN: Apr 21, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Science on tap Event Description Science On Tap happens every third Thursday of the month, featuring a new topic each week. It begins with an informal 15-minute talk and is followed by a lively group discussion. Observing the stuff of stars (and

  15. ScienceFest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Show your passion for innovation with a creative talk July 22, 2014 Presentations sought for TechRev Day at Los Alamos ScienceFest LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 22, 2014-Organizers of Los Alamos ScienceFest, a weeklong celebration of science, are seeking innovative presentations from passionate people with a love of innovation. "TechRev Day, a ScienceFest event, will showcase a series of 15-minute presentations from students, educators, scientists, engineers, bloggers, inventors and other creative

  16. Radiation Effects Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Reasearch Facility Geomechanics and ... Twitter Google + Vimeo Newsletter Signup SlideShare Radiation Effects Sciences Home...

  17. Information Sciences and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    file systems Bioinformatics Infectious disease surveillance Climate change and energy security Smart grids Learn more about our Information Science and Technology capabilities

  18. Science at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC HPC Achievement Awards Share Your Research User Submitted Research Citations NERSC Citations Home » Science at NERSC Science at NERSC NERSC's core mission is to accelerate the pace of scientific discovery. NERSC and its nearly 6,000 users are are extremely active contributors to all fields of energy-related science in which computation and data analysis play a central role. NERSC is citied in about 1,500 refereed scientific publications per year. A complete list of science articles is at

  19. Top Science of 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Roadrunner firsts pave way for greener, faster supercomputing Top Science of 2013 Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research facilities allow us to develop solutions ...

  20. Fermilab | Science | Historic Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Navbar Toggle About Quick Info Science History Organization Photo and video gallery Diversity Education Safety Sustainability and environment Contact Newsroom Spotlight Press ...

  1. Fusion Energy Sciences Jobs

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    fesaboutjobs Below is a list of currently open federal employment opportunities in the Office of Science. Prospective applicants should follow the links to the formal position...

  2. Sandia Science & Technology Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories. More Info Liquid Common SS&TP welcomes Liquid Common Liquid Common is a digital marketing company now located in the Park. More Info Sandia Science & Technology...

  3. Geospatial Science Steering Committee

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Geospatial Science Steering Committee (GSSC) functions in an advisory role to the DOE national laboratories, major facilities, and to headquarters and field office elements to actively promote...

  4. Experimental Physical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in Physics, Chair ASM International, Board of Trustees Association for Iron & Steel Technology, Board of Directors National Science Foundation, Condensed Matter Physics, Program...

  5. About NIF & Photon Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NIF users include scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy national laboratories, worldwide fusion energy and high energy density science research centers, academia, and other ...

  6. Information Science & Technology Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ISTI Information Science & Technology Institute Providing connection to program management for capability needs, as well as IS&T integration and support for mission-critical...

  7. Science & Technology - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FAQs Visit Us Science Stockpile Stewardship National Security National Competitiveness Fusion and Ignition Experiments Fast Ignition Energy for the Future How to Make a Star How...

  8. Basic Energy Sciences Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Operations Office of Science Vacant Patricia Dehmer (A) Nuclear Physics Tim Hallman Advanced Scientific Computing Research Steve Binkley Nuclear Energy Pete Lyons Fossil Energy...

  9. Science and Suds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activities and dynamic speakers to engage kids, families and individuals interested in life-long learning in science, technology, engineering, art and math. For the full...

  10. Regional Science Bowl 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Doing Business Expand Doing Business Skip navigation links Community & Education Science Bowl 2015 High School Team Photos 2015 Middle School Team Photos Scholarships...

  11. Bradbury Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subject, big fun with NanoDays at Bradbury Science Museum March 18, 2013 LOS ALAMOS, N. M., March 15, 2013-The tiny, strange world of nanoscale science is a big subject at the Bradbury Science Museum these days, as the organization celebrates NanoDays 2013. NanoDays is a national campaign, engaging people of all ages in learning about the emerging field of nanoscale science and engineering. The Bradbury marks NanoDays 2013 with interactive demonstrations and activities on the museum floor on

  12. High School Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High School Science Bowl High School Science Bowl WHEN: Feb 07, 2015 8:00 AM - 4:00 PM WHERE: Highland High School 4700 Coal Ave SE, Albuquerque, USA CATEGORY: Community INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description The Science Bowl is a Jeopardy-like event for high school and middle school students who have a strong interest in mathematics and science. The competition is in the form of a round robin in the morning and double elimination after lunch. Teams consist of four students and one optional

  13. National Science Bowl Finals

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-01

    National Science Bowl finals and awards at the National Building Museum in Washington D.C. Monday 5/3/2010

  14. CASL - Science Council

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    but may assess due to the importance of multi-physics integration and structural mechanics Physics Integration (PHI) and Advanced Modeling Applications (AMA). The Science...

  15. Earth and Environmental Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EES Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Sustainable energy, climate impacts, nuclear threat detection, and environmental management are primary focus areas of earth and...

  16. BER Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alapaty, Kiran; Allen, Ben; Bell, Greg; Benton, David; Brettin, Tom; Canon, Shane; Dart, Eli; Cotter, Steve; Crivelli, Silvia; Carlson, Rich; Dattoria, Vince; Desai, Narayan; Egan, Richard; Tierney, Brian; Goodwin, Ken; Gregurick, Susan; Hicks, Susan; Johnston, Bill; de Jong, Bert; Kleese van Dam, Kerstin; Livny, Miron; Markowitz, Victor; McGraw, Jim; McCord, Raymond; Oehmen, Chris; Regimbal, Kevin; Shipman, Galen; Strand, Gary; Flick, Jeff; Turnbull, Susan; Williams, Dean; Zurawski, Jason

    2010-11-01

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2010 ESnet and the Office of Biological and Environmental Research, of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the science programs funded by BER. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized and described in more detail in the case studies and the Findings section. A number of common themes emerged from the case studies and workshop discussions. One is that BER science, like many other disciplines, is becoming more and more distributed and collaborative in nature. Another common theme is that data set sizes are exploding. Climate Science in particular is on the verge of needing to manage exabytes of data, and Genomics is on the verge of a huge paradigm shift in the number of sites with sequencers and the amount of sequencer data being generated.

  17. Applied Computer Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 Applied Computer Science Innovative co-design of applications, algorithms, and architectures in order to enable scientific simulations at extreme scale Leadership Group Leader ...

  18. Energy, information science, and systems science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallace, Terry C; Mercer - Smith, Janet A

    2011-02-01

    This presentation will discuss global trends in population, energy consumption, temperature changes, carbon dioxide emissions, and energy security programs at Los Alamos National Laboratory. LANL's capabilities support vital national security missions and plans for the future. LANL science supports the energy security focus areas of impacts of Energy Demand Growth, Sustainable Nuclear Energy, and Concepts and Materials for Clean Energy. The innovation pipeline at LANL spans discovery research through technology maturation and deployment. The Lab's climate science capabilities address major issues. Examples of modeling and simulation for the Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model (COSIM) and interactions of turbine wind blades and turbulence will be given.

  19. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  20. 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies and market dynamics shaping the current U.S. smart grid landscape The Cleantech Group www.cleantech.com Principal Authors Greg Neichin David Cheng Contributing Authors Sheeraz Haji Josh Gould Debjit Mukerji David Hague 2 Table of Contents Page I. Introduction .............................................................................. 3 In-Depth Market Analysis II. Advanced Metering

  1. 2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2010 U.S. Smart Grid Vendor Ecosystem Report on the companies and market dynamics shaping the current U.S. smart grid landscape The Cleantech Group www.cleantech.com Principal Authors Greg Neichin David Cheng Contributing Authors Sheeraz Haji Josh Gould Debjit Mukerji David Hague 2 Table of Contents Page I. Introduction .............................................................................. 3 In-Depth Market Analysis II. Advanced Metering

  2. Simulation of hydrologic influences on wetland ecosystem succession. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pompilio, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    This research focuses on the development of a simulation model to determine the affects of hydrological influences on a wetland ecosystem. The model allows perturbations to the inputs of various wetland data which in turn, influences the successional development of the ecosystem. This research consisted of converting a grassland ecosystem model to one which simulates wetland conditions. The critical factor in determining the success of wetland creation is the hydrology of the system. There are four of the areas of the original model which are affected by the hydrology. The model measures the health or success of the ecosystem through the measurement of the systems gross plant production, the respiration and the net primary production of biomass. Altering the auxiliary variables of water level and the rate of flow through the system explicitly details the affects hydrologic influences on those production rates. Ten case tests depicting exogenous perturbations of the hydrology were run to identify these affects. Although the tests dealt with the fluctuation of water through the system, any one of the auxiliary variables in the model could be changed to reflect site specific data. Productivity, Hazardous material management, Hazardous material pharmacy.

  3. A new way to study the changing Arctic ecosystem

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Hubbard, Susan

    2013-05-29

    Berkeley Lab scientists Susan Hubbard and Margaret Torn discuss the proposed Next Generation Ecosystem Experiment, which is designed to answer one of the most urgent questions facing researchers today: How will a changing climate impact the Arctic, and how will this in turn impact the planet's climate? More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2011/09/14/alaska-climate-change/

  4. Science DMZ Implemented at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Science Engagement Move your data Programs & Workshops Science Requirements Reviews Case Studies OSCARS Case Studies Science DMZ Case Studies Science DMZ @ UF Science DMZ @ CU Science DMZ @ Penn & VTTI Science DMZ @ NOAA Science DMZ @ NERSC Science DMZ @ ALS Multi-facility Workflow Case Study Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside US) 1 800-333-7638 (Inside US) 1 510-486-7600 (Globally) 1 510-486-7607 (Globally) Report Network Problems: trouble@es.net Provide Web

  5. The Olympics of science knowledge at PPPL's NJ Regional Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Olympics of science knowledge at PPPL's NJ Regional Science Bowl By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe March 3, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook The J Droids, a science ...

  6. SCIENCE ON SATURDAY- "The Large Hadron Collider: big science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 5, 2013, 9:30am Science On Saturday MBG Auditorium SCIENCE ON SATURDAY- "The Large Hadron Collider: big science for big questions" Professor James Olsen Department of ...

  7. 2010 DOE National Science Bowl® Photos - Science Academy of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Science Academy of South Texas National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni ...

  8. 2011 National Science Bowl Photos | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    1 National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni ...

  9. 2010 National Science Bowl Photos | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    0 National Science Bowl Photos National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni ...

  10. Past National Science Bowl Winners | U.S. DOE Office of Science...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Winners National Science Bowl (NSB) NSB Home About National Science Bowl Contacts Regional Science Bowl Coordinators National Science Bowl FAQ's Alumni Past National Science Bowl ...

  11. Using a Regional Cluster of AmeriFlux Sites in Central California to Advance Our Knowledge on Decadal-Scale Ecosystem-Atmosphere Carbon Dioxide Exchange

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldocchi, Dennis

    2015-03-24

    Continuous eddy convariance measurements of carbon dioxide, water vapor and heat were measured continuously between an oak savanna and an annual grassland in California over a 4 year period. These systems serve as representative sites for biomes in Mediterranean climates and experience much seasonal and inter-annual variability in temperature and precipitation. These sites hence serve as natural laboratories for how whole ecosystem will respond to warmer and drier conditions. The savanna proved to be a moderate sink of carbon, taking up about 150 gC m-2y-1 compared to the annual grassland, which tended to be carbon neutral and often a source during drier years. But this carbon sink by the savanna came at a cost. This ecosystem used about 100 mm more water per year than the grassland. And because the savanna was darker and rougher its air temperature was about 0.5 C warmer. In addition to our flux measurements, we collected vast amounts of ancillary data to interpret the site and fluxes, making this site a key site for model validation and parameterization. Datasets consist of terrestrial and airborne lidar for determining canopy structure, ground penetrating radar data on root distribution, phenology cameras monitoring leaf area index and its seasonality, predawn water potential, soil moisture, stem diameter and physiological capacity of photosynthesis.

  12. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Science & Technology Sustainable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation Fuels | Department of Energy Science & Technology Sustainable Transportation Fuels BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Science & Technology Sustainable Transportation Fuels BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Science & Technology Sustainable Transportation Fuels This infographic was created by students from Sun Valley High School in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Virtual Science

  13. Science Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Highlights Fusion Energy Sciences (FES) FES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of FES Funding Opportunities Fusion Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (FESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Fusion Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-24/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-4941 F: (301) 903-8584 E: Email Us More Information » Science Highlights Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Filter

  14. Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Awards | National Nuclear...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    University Partnerships Academic Alliances Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Awards Stewardship Science Academic Alliances ...

  15. BioenergizeME Virtual Science Fair: Science & Technology Sustainable...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Science & Technology Sustainable Transportation Fuels This infographic was created by ... in Aston, PA, as part of the U.S. Department of Energy-BioenergizeME Virtual Science

  16. DOE Science Showcase - Neutron Science Research from DOE Databases...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Neutron Science Research from DOE Databases Additional neutron science research in DOE Databases Information Bridge Neutron scattering research was pioneered in 1946 by ORNL's ...

  17. ESnet's Science DMZ Breaks Down Barriers, Speeds up Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ESnet's Science DMZ Breaks Down Barriers, Speeds up Science News & Publications ESnet News Media & Press Publications and Presentations Galleries ESnet Awards and Honors Contact Us...

  18. Warp Speed and Lightsabers: Energy Science Fiction vs Energy Science |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Warp Speed and Lightsabers: Energy Science Fiction vs Energy Science Warp Speed and Lightsabers: Energy Science Fiction vs Energy Science March 7, 2014 - 2:20pm Addthis Science fiction has envisioned many ways that mankind might be able to explore distant galaxies, like the spiral galaxy M106 pictured here, but what is science fiction and what could one day be science fact? | Photo Credit: NASA. Science fiction has envisioned many ways that mankind might be able to

  19. Neutron and Nuclear Science News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Recent news and events related to neutron and nuclear science at LANSCE. Neutron and Nuclear Science News Links Neutron and Nuclear Science News Media Links Profiles Events at LANSCE

  20. Brookhaven Women in Science Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Johanna Levelt Sengers

    2010-09-01

    Sponsored by Brookhaven Women in Science (BWIS), Johanna Levelt Sengers, Scientist Emeritus at the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST), presents a talk titled "The World's Science Academies Address the Under-Representation of Women in Science and Technology."

  1. Open Science Grid at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Open Science Grid Open Science Grid at NERSC NERSC provides computing to Open Science Grid (OSG) users through a special allocation. OSG Users must submit an OSG new user request ...

  2. UNEP MOOC Disasters and Ecosystems: Resilience in a Changing Climate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    In 2014, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), through its Global Universities Partnership on Environment for Sustainability (GUPES), and Cologne University of Applied Sciences (CUAS),...

  3. Computing and Computational Sciences Directorate - Divisions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CCSD Divisions Computational Sciences and Engineering Computer Sciences and Mathematics Information Technolgoy Services Joint Institute for Computational Sciences National Center for Computational Sciences

  4. Science on Tap - Earthquakes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on Tap - Earthquakes Science on Tap - Earthquakes WHEN: Jan 21, 2016 5:30 PM - Feb 12, 2015 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA SPEAKER: Paul Johnson - Los Alamos National Laboratory CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Science on Tap happens every third Thursday of the month, featuring a new topic each time. It begins with an informal 15 minute talk and is followed by

  5. ScienceFest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ScienceFest ScienceFest WHEN: Jul 13, 2016 8:00 PM - Jul 17, 2016 5:00 PM WHERE: Downtown Los Alamos CONTACT: Rose Evans (505) 661-4860 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Lots of fun and excitement for all ages The mission: The mission of Los Alamos ScienceFest is to celebrate the scientific heritage and excellence of our community by showcasing cultural actives for people of all ages. Goals: Festival producers and partners along with corporate sponsors hope to:

  6. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2005-11-01

    The Brookhaven Computational Science Center brings together researchers in biology, chemistry, physics, and medicine with applied mathematicians and computer scientists to exploit the remarkable opportunities for scientific discovery which have been enabled by modern computers. These opportunities are especially great in computational biology and nanoscience, but extend throughout science and technology and include, for example, nuclear and high energy physics, astrophysics, materials and chemical science, sustainable energy, environment, and homeland security. To achieve our goals we have established a close alliance with applied mathematicians and computer scientists at Stony Brook and Columbia Universities.

  7. Bradbury Science Museum celebrates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    celebrates its 50th anniversary December 9, 2013 Public reception scheduled Dec. 11 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Dec. 9, 2013-This year has been one of milestones for Los Alamos National Laboratory, including for its Bradbury Science Museum. To mark the museum's 50th anniversary, the museum will host a reception open to the public from 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 11. "For 50 years, the Bradbury Science Museum's mission has been to foster enthusiasm and support for science and engineering, and a better

  8. Science on Tap - Robotics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on Tap - Robotics Science on Tap - Robotics WHEN: Sep 15, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Ave, Los Alamos, NM 87544, USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Join us on the third Thursday of each month at 5:30 at the UnQuarked Wine Room in Los Alamos. The event is open to those of all ages. A short presentation is followed by lively discussion. Join in the fun! Through a robot's eyes...and

  9. Regional Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January » Regional Science Bowl Regional Science Bowl WHEN: Jan 23, 2016 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM WHERE: Highland High School 4700 Coal SE, Albuquerque, NM CONTACT: Janelle Vigil-Maestas (505) 665-4329 CATEGORY: Community INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Five teams from Northern New Mexico area schools are among 16 participating in the middle school Regional Science Bowl competition. Northern area teams participating are from Los Alamos, Española, Cuba and Santa Fe. The winning team at this

  10. ARM - ARM Science Team Meetings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govScienceARM Science Team Meetings Science Team Meetings 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 ARM Science Team Meetings Poster sessions were key components of the ARM Science Team Meetings through the years. Former ARM Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman (center, dark pants) spent many hours participating in these sessions. Poster sessions were key components of the ARM Science Team Meetings through the years. Former ARM Chief Scientist Tom Ackerman

  11. Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship (SULI) program encourages undergraduate students to pursue science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) careers by providing research...

  12. APS Science | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science APS Science features articles on Advanced Photon Source research and engineering highlights that are written for the interested public as well as the synchrotron x-ray,...

  13. 2014 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Email 2014 Science of Signatures Program Agenda 2014 Projects and Teams 2014 Science of Signatures Speakers and Presentations LDRD Penta Chart Template ER Proposal Template...

  14. 2015 Science of Signatures Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science of Signatures Program Agenda (PDF) 2015 Projects and Teams 2015 Science of Signatures Speakers and Presentations LDRD Penta Chart Template (PDF) ER Proposal Template (PDF)...

  15. Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CCS Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Computational physics, computer science, applied mathematics, statistics and the integration of large data streams are central ...

  16. ORISE: Center for Science Education

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Education as a national resource for featuring proven approaches and programs that can help make science, technology, engineering and mathematics education more effective. ...

  17. Persistence of soil organic matter as an ecosystem property

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, M.W.; Torn, M. S.; Abiven, S.; Dittmar, T.; Guggenberger, G.; Janssens, I.A.; Kleber, M.; Kgel-Knabner, I.; Lehmann, J.; Manning, D.A.C.; Nannipieri, P.; Rasse, D.P.; Weiner, S.; Trumbore, S.E.

    2011-08-15

    Globally, soil organic matter (SOM) contains more than three times as much carbon as either the atmosphere or terrestrial vegetation. Yet it remains largely unknown why some SOM persists for millennia whereas other SOM decomposes readilyand this limits our ability to predict how soils will respond to climate change. Recent analytical and experimental advances have demonstrated that molecular structure alone does not control SOM stability: in fact, environmental and biological controls predominate. Here we propose ways to include this understanding in a new generation of experiments and soil carbon models, thereby improving predictions of the SOM response to global warming.

  18. Science & Technology - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    august Science & Technology - 2014 August First Multi-bunch ... for the first time the generation of two nearly-identical ... emission, fuel motion, and mix levels in the hot-spot at ...

  19. It Starts with Science...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Secretary Chu sits down with a journalism student at Carnegie Mellon's Education City campus in Qatar to discuss the value of science in education and what attracted him to the study of Physics.

  20. Western Nuclear Science Alliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Reese; George Miller; Stephen Frantz; Denis Beller; Denis Beller; Ed Morse; Melinda Krahenbuhl; Bob Flocchini; Jim Elliston

    2010-12-07

    The primary objective of the INIE program is to strengthen nuclear science and engineering programs at the member institutions and to address the long term goal of the University Reactor Infrastructure and Education Assistance Program.

  1. It Starts with Science...

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Chu, Steven

    2013-05-29

    Secretary Chu sits down with a journalism student at Carnegie Mellon's Education City campus in Qatar to discuss the value of science in education and what attracted him to the study of Physics.

  2. Help | ScienceCinema

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    video files. Users can then easily access the precise point in the video where the word was spoken. There are two search options within ScienceCinema, the default "Audio...

  3. Fermilab Science Education Office

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Off or Not Supported in Your Browser. You can still access all of the content on the Education Server about Science Education, but turn on JavaScript to enable all this site's...

  4. ARM Science Meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Meeting to be some bias in the data. While it is premature to draw conclusions on the basis of such a limited data set, several comments regarding this variability and bias ...

  5. ARM - AMF Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 AMF Science Locale: Anywhere in the World The purpose of an ARM...

  6. NP Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Rotman, Lauren; Tierney, Brian

    2011-08-26

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science (SC), the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. To support SC programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In August 2011, ESnet and the Office of Nuclear Physics (NP), of the DOE SC, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by NP. The requirements identified at the workshop are summarized in the Findings section, and are described in more detail in the body of the report.

  7. Science & Technology - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Technology - 2016 February NIF Optics Damage Repair is 2015 Top Technology Pick ... of what takes place when NIF's 192 laser beams enter the pencil eraser-sized gold ...

  8. Bradbury Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Astronomy days lectures begin July 8 at Bradbury Science Museum July 2, 2008 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 2, 2008-A series of six evening lectures that focus on astronomy and the...

  9. About Science Bowl

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Volunteers - Sign Up About Science Bowl Curriculum and Activities How to Build a Motor The Great Marble Drop How to Build a Turbine How to Build a Tower Classroom...

  10. Applied Science/Techniques

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Applied ScienceTechniques Print The ALS is an excellent incubator of new scientific techniques and instrumentation. Many of the technical advances that make the ALS a world-class...

  11. Science & Technology - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science & Technology - 2015 March Developing Algorithms for Laser-based 3D Metal Printing ... In order to print a 3D part using the SLM process, the user must enter data into the ...

  12. Science & Technology - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    example is the use of betatron x-ray radiation for research in the growing field of high energy density (HED) science on extremely short time and length scales (energy density is...

  13. Top Science of 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ChemCam to see if Mars can support life, manned missions Top Science of 2013 Our strong interdisciplinary teaming and unique research facilities allow us to develop solutions to ...

  14. PHYSICAL SCIENCES, Physics Phase

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SCIENCES, Physics Phase competition in trisected superconducting dome I. M. Vishik, 1, 2 M Hashimoto, 3 R.-H. He, 4 W. S. Lee, 1, 2 F. Schmitt, 1, 2 D. H. Lu, 3 R. G. Moore, 1...

  15. Science, Technology & Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Alan Bishop selected to lead LANL Science, Technology & Engineering directorate August 17, 2012 LOS ALAMOS, NEW MEXICO, August 17, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory Director Charles McMillan announced today that after a yearlong, nationwide search, Alan Bishop has been selected to be the Laboratory's next Principal Associate Director for Science, Technology, and Engineering (PADSTE). Bishop has been acting in that role - 2 - since Aug. 29, 2011.Over the course of a distinguished 30-year

  16. Materials Science | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science Materials Science The unique internal construction of the gas-filled panels developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California are as effective barriers to heat as its pink fibrous counterparts with less material in less space. <a href="http://energy.gov/articles/berkeley-labs-gas-filled-insulation-rivals-fiber-buildings-sector">Learn more about this cost-effective, energy-efficient insulation</a>. The unique internal construction of the

  17. Science & Technology - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    technology / 2016 / july Science & Technology - 2016 July 3D Printing Could Revolutionize Laser Development Three-month Turnaround for a New NIF Diagnostic Talk about being responsive to the needs of your customers. The NIF & Photon Science team developed and deployed a complex new diagnostic for NIF's radiation-effects source development program in just three months, from concept to execution. The diagnostic, dubbed Sentinel because of its resemblance to the squid-like

  18. Science | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Argonne Research Library supports the scientific and technical research of the employees of Argonne National Laboratory. While the library is not open to the public, we do make our catalog available for searching. Women in Science and Technology (WIST) aims to promote the success of women in scientific and technical positions at Argonne. Science The best and brightest minds come to Argonne to make scientific discoveries and technological innovations that improve the quality of life

  19. LASSO* - Science Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LASSO* - Science Requirements *LES ARM Symbiotic Simulation and Observation (LASSO) workflow Andy Vogelmann 1 , William I Gustafson Jr 2 Zhijin Li 3,4 , Xiaoping Cheng 3 , Satoshi Endo 1 , Tami Toto 1 , and Heng Xiao 2 1 Brookhaven National Laboratory 2 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 3 University of California Los Angeles 4 NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory And TONS of people from the rest of ARM! LASSO Webpage: http://www.arm.gov/science/themes/lasso LASSO e-mail list sign up:

  20. ARM - Other Science Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SitesOther Science Resources Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Other Science Resources AIMS Education Foundation This website offers tools, activities, and information "designed by teachers for teachers." AIMS activities and curricula are extensively field tested and

  1. ARM - Science Project Ideas

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TeachersScience Project Ideas Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Science Project Ideas Do changes in air pressure affect the weather? What is the relationship between air pressure and temperature? Monitor the weather forecast data from the web to find the answer. How does the

  2. ORISE: Science Education Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Education Publications ORISE reports track U.S. scientific workforce trends The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has published several reports that analyze labor trends, assess classroom technologies and examine other characteristics essential for enhancing America's global competitiveness. The following publications are available as PDF files. To view them, you will need the free Adobe Reader plug-in. Nuclear Engineering Nuclear Engineering Enrollments and Degrees

  3. Alliance for Science

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EM’s Jud Lilly explains the nuclear fuel cycle to a group of students participating in the recent Sixth Annual Science Alliance at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant site in southern Ohio. A record 1,255 high school juniors attended and participated in interactive demonstrations designed to match their interests with potential careers related to science, technology, engineering and math. Students also learned about post-secondary educational requirements for those careers and regional universities that offer the necessary curricula.

  4. Imaging sciences workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candy, J.V.

    1994-11-15

    This workshop on the Imaging Sciences sponsored by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory contains short abstracts/articles submitted by speakers. The topic areas covered include the following: Astronomical Imaging; biomedical imaging; vision/image display; imaging hardware; imaging software; Acoustic/oceanic imaging; microwave/acoustic imaging; computed tomography; physical imaging; imaging algorithms. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3, 2015 Dr. Doon L. Gibbs Laboratory Director Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC Brookhaven National Laboratory 40 Brookhaven Avenue Upton, New York 11973-5000 WCO-2015-02 Dear Dr. Gibbs: The Office of Enterprise Assessments' Office of Enforcement completed its investigation into the facts and circumstances associated with the meteorological tower electrical shock event that occurred at the Brookhaven National Laboratory on November 12, 2014. Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC (BSA) documented

  6. Accelerator Science | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Accelerator Science Jefferson Lab is recognized as a world leader in accelerator science. This expertise comes from the planning, building, maintaining and operating of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) - the lab's particle accelerator. CEBAF is based on superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) technology. It produces a stream of charged electrons that scientists use to probe the nucleus of the atom. CEBAF was the first large-scale application of SRF technology in the world,

  7. Bradbury Science Museum participates

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    participates in Blue Star Museums program May 21, 2015 Free admission for active duty military, their family members LOS ALAMOS, N.M., May 21, 2015-Los Alamos National Laboratory's Bradbury Science Museum is again partnering with the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families Foundation and the Department of Defense in the Blue Star Museums program to host active duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day, May 25, through Labor Day, Sept. 7. "The Bradbury Science

  8. Chemical Sciences Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling and Simulation in the Chemical Sciences Capabilities Modeling and simulation help us transform chemical data into meaningful information: * Develop remote-sensors that detect nuclear materials * Perform large- or small-scaled process modeling * Simulate new chemicals with tailored properties for diverse applications * Analyze chemical reaction rates for complex modeling needs * Examine chemical-sciences data and modeling for nuclear forensics * Analyze high explosive data and perform

  9. Science @WIPP: Underground Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WIPP Underground Laboratory Double Beta Decay Dark Matter Biology Repository Science Renewable Energy Underground Laboratory The deep geologic repository at WIPP provides an ideal environment for experiments in many scientific disciplines, including particle astrophysics, waste repository science, mining technology, low radiation dose physics, fissile materials accountability and transparency, and deep geophysics. The designation of the Carlsbad Department of Energy office as a "field"

  10. Science Briefs - 2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Briefs - 2013 Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed Researchers concluded that only part of the recent temperature rise in the Southwest could be attributed to greenhouse gases. -

  11. Science Briefs - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Briefs - 2014 Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. Simulation of the cosmic web of the dark matter mass distribution. This region represents about 1/10,000 of the total simulation volume. First trillion particle cosmological simulation completed A team of astrophysicists and computer scientists has created high-resolution cyber images of our cosmos. - 1/8/15 Scanning electron micrograph (SEM) images of the

  12. Science on the Hill

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hill Science on the Hill Recent Los Alamos research and achievements featured in the Santa Fe New Mexican News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets Hot-cast perovskite solar cells show promise for creating more efficient and affordable solar panels, LEDs, and lasers. Image courtesy Los Alamos National Laboratory. Something new under the sun Recent research breakthroughs at Los Alamos National Laboratory are helping to deliver on the

  13. Computational Earth Science

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Computational Earth Science We develop and apply a range of high-performance computational methods and software tools to Earth science projects in support of environmental health, cleaner energy, and national security. Contact Us Group Leader Carl Gable Deputy Group Leader Gilles Bussod Email Profile pages header Search our Profile pages Hari Viswanathan inspects a microfluidic cell used to study the extraction of hydrocarbon fuels from a complex fracture network. EES-16's Subsurface Flow

  14. Science Research Connection

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Science Research Connection Science Research Connection (SRC) offers to the DOE community research information integrated from various OSTI databases, including both unclassified/unlimited and statutorily controlled information. SRC requires either IP authentication and/or registration and access is free of charge. If you are a DOE Federal or DOE Contractor employee and wish to register for an SRC account, please accept the access agreement below and then select the register link. Access Notice

  15. Consequences of natural upwelling in oligotrophic marine ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, J J

    1980-03-01

    One of the major environmental consequences of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plans may be the artificial upwelling of nutrients to the surface waters of oligotrophic ecosystems. Within a 10 km/sup 2/ area, OTEC plants of 1000 MWe total capacity could upwell the same amount of nutrients as occurs naturally off Peru each day. The biological response to possible eutrophication by OTEC plants may not be similar to that within coastal upwelling ecosystems, however. Upwelling in offshore oceanic systems does not lead to increased primary production despite high nutrient content of the euphotic zone. Continuous grazing may not allow phytoplankton blooms to develop in oceanic upwelling systems to the proposed OTEC sites. At present this is a hypothesis to be tested before full evaluation of OTEC induced upwelling can be made.

  16. Hell and High Water: Practice-Relevant Adaptation Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moss, Richard H.; Meehl, G.; Lemos, Maria Carmen; Smith, J. B.; Arnold, J. R.; Arnott, J. C.; Behar, D.; Brasseur, Guy P.; Broomell, S. B.; Busalacchi, Antonio; Dessai, S.; Ebi, Kristie L.; Edmonds, James A.; Furlow, J.; Goddard, L.; Hartmann, Holly; Hurrell, Jim; Katzenberger, J. W.; Liverman, D. M.; Mote, Phil; Moser, S. C.; Kumar, A.; Pulwarty, Roger; Seyller, E. A.; Turner, B.L.; Washington, Warren M.; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-11-08

    Recent extreme weather such as Hurricane Sandy and the 2012 drought demonstrate the vulnerability of the United States to climate extremes in the present and point to the potential for increased future damages under a changing climate. They also provide lessons for reducing harm and realizing any potential benefits. Preparedness measures also referred to as adaptation can cost-effectively increase resilience today and in the future. The upfront costs will be more than offset by reductions in property damage, lives and livelihoods lost, and expensive post-disaster recovery processes. While others have addressed use of science for adaptation in specific sectors including biodiversity (Heller and Zavaleta, 2009) and freshwater ecosystem management (Wilby et al., 2010), or by simply taking a more pragmatic approach to adaptation under uncertainty (Hallegatte, 2009), here the authors make the case that a new, comprehensive approach is needed to create and use science to inform adaptations with applicable and sound knowledge (Kerr et al., 2011).

  17. Molecular Science Research Center annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics group is studying chemical kinetics and reactions dynamics of terrestrial and atmospheric processes as well as the chemistry of complex waste forms and waste storage media. Staff are using new laser systems and surface-mapping techniques in combination with molecular clusters that mimic adsorbate/surface interactions. The Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics group is determining biomolecular structure/function relationships for processes the control the biological transformation of contaminants and the health effects of toxic substances. The Materials and Interfaces program is generating information needed to design and synthesize advanced materials for the analysis and separation of mixed chemical waste, the long-term storage of concentrated hazardous materials, and the development of chemical sensors for environmental monitoring of various organic and inorganic species. The Theory, Modeling, and Simulation group is developing detailed molecular-level descriptions of the chemical, physical, and biological processes in natural and contaminated systems. Researchers are using the full spectrum of computational techniques. The Computer and Information Sciences group is developing new approaches to handle vast amounts of data and to perform calculations for complex natural systems. The EMSL will contain a high-performance computing facility, ancillary computing laboratories, and high-speed data acquisition systems for all major research instruments.

  18. Genomic Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Genomic Science Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Genomic Science DOE Bioenergy Research Centers Bioimaging Technology DOE Joint Genome Institute Structural Biology Radiochemistry & Imaging Instrumentation Radiobiology: Low Dose Radiation Research DOE Human Subjects Protection Program Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Facilities

  19. The Crucibles Science Club Wins Colorado Science Bowl - News Releases |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NREL The Crucibles Science Club Wins Colorado Science Bowl Team Heads to Washington D.C. to Challenge Students from Across the USA for National Title January 31, 2009 Photo of the winning team at the Colorado Science Bowl. The Crucibles Science Club (team one) was the winner of this year's Colorado Science Bowl and heads to Washington D.C. in April to compete for the national title. Students from The Crucibles Science Club in Denver won the Colorado High School Science Bowl today. In the

  20. ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    They have the proper homogeneous and independent-column limits and have been coded in FORTRAN for fast flux calculations, including both solar and terrestrial radiation. This new...

  1. Laboratory, Valles Caldera sponsor environmental science event

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to teach students about watershed hydrology, water quality, wildlife radio telemetry, plant ecology, aquatic and terrestrial invertebrate biology, fish sampling, and Jemez...

  2. Science on the Hill: Fragile life underfoot has big impact on desert

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fragile life underfoot has big impact on desert Fragile life underfoot has big impact on desert Anyone who spends time in the high-desert landscape of Northern New Mexico has come across biological soil crusts, or biocrusts. This fragile crust fills a pivotal ecosystem niche. However, its survival is being challenged by threats from climate change and man-made disturbance. June 13, 2016 Science on the Hill: Fragile life underfoot has big impact on desert For years, space scientists thought the

  3. Space Coast Science Education Alliance Science Bowl for Middle School

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Students | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) Space Coast Science Education Alliance Science Bowl for Middle School Students National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About Regional Competitions Rules, Forms, and Resources High School Regionals Middle School Regionals National Finals Volunteers Key Dates Frequently Asked Questions News Media Contact Us WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC

  4. Science Headlines | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Headlines News News Home Featured Articles Science Headlines 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 Science Highlights Presentations & Testimony News Archives Communications and Public Affairs Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 Science Headlines Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page 09.02.16User Facility SLAC and Stanford Team Finds a Tough New Catalyst

  5. Catalysis Science | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Catalysis Science Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, & Biosciences (CSGB) Division CSGB Home About Research Areas Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) DOE Energy Innovation Hubs Reports and Activities Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES Home Research Areas Catalysis Science Print Text Size: A A A FeedbackShare Page Notice: NOVEMBER 16, 2015 is the Catalysis Science target date for submission of proposals to be considered for funding within fiscal year 2016. Proposals

  6. Science Highlights | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Highlights Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: Email Us More Information » Science Highlights Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Filter within BES

  7. Extreme Science (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajo-Franklin, Caroline; Klein, Spencer; Minor, Andrew; Torok, Tamas

    2012-02-27

    On Feb. 27, 2012 at the Berkeley Repertory Theatre, four Berkeley Lab scientists presented talks related to extreme science - and what it means to you. Topics include: Neutrino hunting in Antarctica. Learn why Spencer Klein goes to the ends of the Earth to search for these ghostly particles. From Chernobyl to Central Asia, Tamas Torok travels the globe to study microbial diversity in extreme environments. Andrew Minor uses the world's most advanced electron microscopes to explore materials at ultrahigh stresses and in harsh environments. And microbes that talk to computers? Caroline Ajo-Franklin is pioneering cellular-electrical connections that could help transform sunlight into fuel.

  8. NIF & Photon Science Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    management NIF & Photon Science Management The management team for the NIF & Photon Science Principal Directorate supports the directorate's key mission areas: Stockpile Stewardship, national security applications, NIF Discovery Science, laser-based directed energy and related laser and optical technologies, and advanced photon technologies. Directorate Programs Jeff Wisoff Principal Associate Director NIF & Photon Science Jeff Atherton Principal Deputy Principal Associate Director

  9. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DAVENPORT, J.

    2006-11-01

    Computational Science is an integral component of Brookhaven's multi science mission, and is a reflection of the increased role of computation across all of science. Brookhaven currently has major efforts in data storage and analysis for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the ATLAS detector at CERN, and in quantum chromodynamics. The Laboratory is host for the QCDOC machines (quantum chromodynamics on a chip), 10 teraflop/s computers which boast 12,288 processors each. There are two here, one for the Riken/BNL Research Center and the other supported by DOE for the US Lattice Gauge Community and other scientific users. A 100 teraflop/s supercomputer will be installed at Brookhaven in the coming year, managed jointly by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, and funded by a grant from New York State. This machine will be used for computational science across Brookhaven's entire research program, and also by researchers at Stony Brook and across New York State. With Stony Brook, Brookhaven has formed the New York Center for Computational Science (NYCCS) as a focal point for interdisciplinary computational science, which is closely linked to Brookhaven's Computational Science Center (CSC). The CSC has established a strong program in computational science, with an emphasis on nanoscale electronic structure and molecular dynamics, accelerator design, computational fluid dynamics, medical imaging, parallel computing and numerical algorithms. We have been an active participant in DOES SciDAC program (Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing). We are also planning a major expansion in computational biology in keeping with Laboratory initiatives. Additional laboratory initiatives with a dependence on a high level of computation include the development of hydrodynamics models for the interpretation of RHIC data, computational models for the atmospheric transport of aerosols, and models for combustion and for energy utilization. The CSC was formed to bring together

  10. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W.

    1994-01-01

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  11. NIF & Photon Science News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    nifps_news NIF & Photon Science News × Subscribe to our News Alerts * Your Email Address: * Preferred Format: HTML Text Subscribe August 24, 2016 Tweet Spotlight on: Discovery Science A Big Week for NIF Discovery Science During the week of July 31 to Aug. 4, five groups of NIF users worked with LLNL researchers to carry out a successful NIF Discovery Science shot week. The teams conducted 13 experiments in five separate basic high energy density (HED) science experimental campaigns in five

  12. Materials Science / Data Technology Nexus

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Materials Science / Data Technology Nexus Materials Science / Data Technology Nexus: IMS mini-symposium This one day mini-symposium is aligned with the CINT 2016 User Meeting, September 19 - 20 thumbnail of Contact Institute Director Dr. Alexander V. Balatsky Institute for Materials Science (505) 665-0077 Email Deputy Director Dr. Jennifer S. Martinez Institute for Materials Science (505) 665-0045 Email Deputy Director Dr. Nathan A. Mara Institute for Materials Science (505) 667 8665 Email

  13. Evaluating Cumulative Ecosystem Response to Restoration Projects in the Lower Columbia River and Estuary, 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Gary E.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.; Borde, Amy B.; Bryson, Amanda J.; Cameron, April; Coleman, Andre M.; Corbett, C.; Dawley, Earl M.; Ebberts, Blaine D.; Kauffman, Ronald; Roegner, G. Curtis; Russell, Micah T.; Silva, April; Skalski, John R.; Thom, Ronald M.; Vavrinec, John; Woodruff, Dana L.; Zimmerman, Shon A.

    2010-10-26

    This is the sixth annual report of a seven-year project (2004 through 2010) to evaluate the cumulative effects of habitat restoration actions in the lower Columbia River and estuary (LCRE). The project, called the Cumulative Effects Study, is being conducted for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (USACE) by the Marine Sciences Laboratory of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), the Pt. Adams Biological Field Station of the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), the Columbia River Estuary Study Taskforce (CREST), and the University of Washington. The goal of the Cumulative Effects Study is to develop a methodology to evaluate the cumulative effects of multiple habitat restoration projects intended to benefit ecosystems supporting juvenile salmonids in the 235-km-long LCRE. Literature review in 2004 revealed no existing methods for such an evaluation and suggested that cumulative effects could be additive or synergistic. From 2005 through 2009, annual field research involved intensive, comparative studies paired by habitat type (tidal swamp versus marsh), trajectory (restoration versus reference site), and restoration action (tidegate replacement vs. culvert replacement vs. dike breach).

  14. National Science Bowl 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Science Bowl 2013 National Science Bowl 2013 Addthis National Science Bowl 2013 1 of 16 National Science Bowl 2013 The 2013 National Science Bowl started off at the 4H Center,...

  15. Water, law, science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2007-10-17

    In a world with water resources severely impacted bytechnology, science must actively contribute to water law. To this end,this paper is an earth scientist s attempt to comprehend essentialelements of water law, and to examine their connections to science.Science and law share a common logical framework of starting with apriori prescribed tenets, and drawing consistent inferences. In science,observationally established physical laws constitute the tenets, while inlaw, they stem from social values. The foundations of modern water law inEurope and the New World were formulated nearly two thousand years ago byRoman jurists who were inspired by Greek philosophy of reason.Recognizing that vital natural elements such as water, air, and the seawere governed by immutable natural laws, they reasoned that theseelements belonged to all humans, and therefore cannot be owned as privateproperty. Legally, such public property was to be governed by jusgentium, the law of all people or the law of all nations. In contrast,jus civile or civil law governed private property. Remarkably, jusgentium continues to be relevant in our contemporary society in whichscience plays a pivotal role in exploiting vital resources common to all.This paper examines the historical roots of modern water law, followstheir evolution through the centuries, and examines how the spirit ofscience inherent in jus gentium is profoundly influencing evolving waterand environmental laws in Europe, the United States and elsewhere. In atechnological world, scientific knowledge has to lie at the core of waterlaw. Yet, science cannot formulate law. It is hoped that a philosophicalunderstanding of the relationships between science and law willcontribute to their constructively coming together in the service ofsociety.

  16. Sandia National Labs: Physical, Chemical and Nano Sciences Center (PCNSC):

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Departments Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Energy Sciences Small Science Cluster Business Office News Partnering Research Departments Radiation, Nano Materials, & Interface Sciences Radiation and Solid Interactions Nanomaterials Sciences Surface and Interface Sciences Semiconductor & Optical Sciences Semiconductor Material and Device Sciences Advanced Materials Sciences Lasers, Optics, and Remote Sensing Energy Sciences CINT User Program CINT Science Small Science

  17. Science on Tap - Isotopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on Tap - Isotopes Science on Tap - Isotopes WHEN: Jun 16, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Short presentation followed by lively interaction on the topic at hand. While isotopes are chemical elements (think periodic table), their varying numbers of neutrons mean they can be used in lots of different way. Join us

  18. Science on Tap - Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on Tap - Matter Science on Tap - Matter WHEN: Feb 18, 2016 5:30 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: UnQuarked Wine Room 145 Central Park Square, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 USA SPEAKER: Jack Shlachter CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description Mark your calendars for this event held every third Thursday from 5:30 to 7 p.m. A short presentation is followed by a lively discussion on a different subject each month. What's the Matter with Matter?

  19. Science on Tap - Robotics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science on Tap - Robotics At the Bradbury Latest Issue:September 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Science on Tap - Robotics September 15 at 5:30 p.m. at UnQuarked in Los Alamos These events are open to everyone regardless of age! Through a robot's eyes...and arms Imagine it's a dark night and a delivery truck wants to go through the Lab's access portal in our main technical area. The driver's obvious nervousness raises a red flag for the guard on duty. She asks the driver to pull off to the

  20. Science and Society Colloquium

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  1. Science@WIPP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At the dawn of discovery ... Science@WIPP The deep geologic repository at WIPP is more than a place to dispose of transuranic (TRU) waste – it’s also a science laboratory. Following the designation of the Department of Energy’s Carlsbad office as a field office in 2000, numerous universities and research institutions across the nation sought to take advantage of WIPP’s strong safety culture, open door policy, and extremely low levels of natural background radiation in the underground. It’s

  2. Materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holden, T.M.

    1995-10-01

    The science-based stockpile stewardship program emphasizes a better understanding of how complex components function through advanced computer calculations. Many of the problem areas are in the behavior of materials making up the equipment. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) can contribute to solving these problems by providing diagnostic tools to examine parts noninvasively and by providing the experimental tools to understand material behavior in terms of both the atomic structure and the microstructure. Advanced computer codes need experimental information on material behavior in response to stress, temperature, and pressure as input, and they need benchmarking experiments to test the model predictions for the finished part.

  3. GNU Science Library (GSL)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    GNU Science Library (GSL) GNU Science Library (GSL) Description GSL, a numerical library for C and C++ programmers, is available on Hopper, Edison, and Carver, and PDSF. How to Access GSL You must use the module utility to access the library on all machines at NERSC. To load: module load gsl To see what environment variables are defined by the library: module show gsl Using GSL on Cori and Edison On Cori or Edison if you want to use the gcc compiler and GSL you must swap the modulefiles for the

  4. JLF Science Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    science publications JLF Science Publications 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2003-06 Title Author Source High-Intensity laser-accelerated ion beam produced from cryogenic micro-jet target M. Gauthier et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 11D827 High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV range J. F. Seely et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 87, 11E305 High Power Dynamic Polarization Control Using Plasma Photonics D. Turnbull et

  5. Bradbury Science Museum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Former Laboratory scientist discusses his perspective on the Cold War in 70th anniversary talk November 7, 2013 Next-to-last presentation in yearlong series at Bradbury Science Museum LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Nov. 7, 2013-John C. Hopkins, former associate director for Los Alamos National Laboratory's nuclear weapons program, will give his perspective on the Laboratory during the Cold War years in the next 70th anniversary lecture at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 13 at the Bradbury Science Museum. "I believe that

  6. Science Briefs - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Briefs - 2015 Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. January» February» March» April» May» June» July» August» September» October» November» December» Artist's depiction of the late Pleistocene landscape with some of the megaherbivores that became extinct. Impact of mammalian megaherbivores on global methane examined Examining the past consequences of large herbivore loss yields insights into contemporary

  7. Science Briefs - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Briefs - 2016 Read in detail about specific Los Alamos science achievements, and the honors our scientists are accruing. August» July» June» May» April» March» February» January» Elizabeth Kelly Kelly named Fellow of the American Statistical Association The American Statistical Association (ASA) has honored Elizabeth Kelly with the title of Fellow. - 8/2/16 Beverly Aikin, left, and Ellen Cerreta Aikin and Cerreta named as ASM Fellows ASM International named Beverly Aikin and

  8. Semiconductor Science and Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lighting ReSeaRch & development at Sandia national laboRatoRieS The bridge to a new way of lighting the world ssls.sandia.gov Initiates decades-long investment into compound semiconductor science and technology, eventually establishing its Center for Compound Semiconductor Science and Technology 1 9 7 7 Begins investing in gallium nitride (GaN) materials, physics, and device capabilities 1 9 9 5 Launches its Grand Challenge Laboratory Directed Research and Development Project, "A

  9. DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships.

  10. Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bowl® Champion | Department of Energy Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl® Champion Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology National Science Bowl® Champion May 2, 2005 - 12:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- "The Incompleteness Theorem" was the answer to a question on mathematics that today clinched the 2005 National Science Bowl® championship for the Thomas Jefferson High School for Science & Technology team from

  11. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES. I. PHOTOCHEMISTRY MODEL AND BENCHMARK CASES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu Renyu; Seager, Sara; Bains, William

    2012-12-20

    We present a comprehensive photochemistry model for exploration of the chemical composition of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. The photochemistry model is designed from the ground up to have the capacity to treat all types of terrestrial planet atmospheres, ranging from oxidizing through reducing, which makes the code suitable for applications for the wide range of anticipated terrestrial exoplanet compositions. The one-dimensional chemical transport model treats up to 800 chemical reactions, photochemical processes, dry and wet deposition, surface emission, and thermal escape of O, H, C, N, and S bearing species, as well as formation and deposition of elemental sulfur and sulfuric acid aerosols. We validate the model by computing the atmospheric composition of current Earth and Mars and find agreement with observations of major trace gases in Earth's and Mars' atmospheres. We simulate several plausible atmospheric scenarios of terrestrial exoplanets and choose three benchmark cases for atmospheres from reducing to oxidizing. The most interesting finding is that atomic hydrogen is always a more abundant reactive radical than the hydroxyl radical in anoxic atmospheres. Whether atomic hydrogen is the most important removal path for a molecule of interest also depends on the relevant reaction rates. We also find that volcanic carbon compounds (i.e., CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}) are chemically long-lived and tend to be well mixed in both reducing and oxidizing atmospheres, and their dry deposition velocities to the surface control the atmospheric oxidation states. Furthermore, we revisit whether photochemically produced oxygen can cause false positives for detecting oxygenic photosynthesis, and find that in 1 bar CO{sub 2}-rich atmospheres oxygen and ozone may build up to levels that have conventionally been accepted as signatures of life, if there is no surface emission of reducing gases. The atmospheric scenarios presented in this paper can serve as the benchmark

  12. ASCR Science Network Requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dart, Eli; Tierney, Brian

    2009-08-24

    The Energy Sciences Network (ESnet) is the primary provider of network connectivity for the US Department of Energy Office of Science, the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States. In support of the Office of Science programs, ESnet regularly updates and refreshes its understanding of the networking requirements of the instruments, facilities, scientists, and science programs that it serves. This focus has helped ESnet to be a highly successful enabler of scientific discovery for over 20 years. In April 2009 ESnet and the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR), of the DOE Office of Science, organized a workshop to characterize the networking requirements of the programs funded by ASCR. The ASCR facilities anticipate significant increases in wide area bandwidth utilization, driven largely by the increased capabilities of computational resources and the wide scope of collaboration that is a hallmark of modern science. Many scientists move data sets between facilities for analysis, and in some cases (for example the Earth System Grid and the Open Science Grid), data distribution is an essential component of the use of ASCR facilities by scientists. Due to the projected growth in wide area data transfer needs, the ASCR supercomputer centers all expect to deploy and use 100 Gigabit per second networking technology for wide area connectivity as soon as that deployment is financially feasible. In addition to the network connectivity that ESnet provides, the ESnet Collaboration Services (ECS) are critical to several science communities. ESnet identity and trust services, such as the DOEGrids certificate authority, are widely used both by the supercomputer centers and by collaborations such as Open Science Grid (OSG) and the Earth System Grid (ESG). Ease of use is a key determinant of the scientific utility of network-based services. Therefore, a key enabling aspect for scientists beneficial use of high

  13. Within- and among-population level differences in response to chronic copper exposure in southern toads, Anaxyrus terrestris

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Within- and among-population level differences in response to chronic copper exposure in southern toads, Anaxyrus terrestris Stacey L. Lance * , R. Wesley Flynn, Matthew R. Erickson 1 , David E. Scott Savannah River Ecology Laboratory, University of Georgia, P.O. Drawer E, Aiken, SC 29802, USA a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 5 September 2012 Received in revised form 29 January 2013 Accepted 5 February 2013 Keywords: Anaxyrus (Bufo) terrestris Amphibian Copper Ecotoxicology Metal

  14. Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severinghaus, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

  15. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore » plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N

  16. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces between plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration

  17. Southeastern Science Policy Colloquium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphries, F.

    1995-06-22

    This conference covers four main topics: (1) Southeastern Labor Market and its Impact on Corporate/Industry Development; (2) New Issues for Science and Technology in the Year 2000 and Beyond; (3) The Role of Academia in Developing the Labor Force of the Southeast; and (4) K-12 Education: Challenges for the 21st Century.

  18. Los Alamos ScienceFest

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos ScienceFest Los Alamos ScienceFest WHEN: Jul 16, 2015 12:00 AM - Jul 18, 2015 6:00 PM WHERE: Los Alamos, New Mexico CONTACT: Jessica Privette 505 667-0375 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login Los Alamos ScienceFest July 16-18, 2015 Event Description A 3-day science festival running July 16-18, 2015 Bradbury Events @ Los Alamos ScienceFest Join us during Los Alamos ScienceFest!-a 3-day festival of interactive demonstrations, hands-on activities and dynamic speakers meant to

  19. Taking Science to School: NRC Recommendations for K-8 Science...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Taking Science to School: NRC Recommendations for K-8 Science Back to the OSTI News Listing for 2006 (AIP Bulletin) Based on the most recent research on learning and cognitive ...

  20. Students Sharpen Science and Math Skills at Middle School Science...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Students Sharpen Science and Math Skills at Middle School Science Bowl March 8, 2004 Golden, Colo. - The buzzer has sounded, the clock is ticking and all eyes are on you-what is ...