Sample records for terrestrial carbon stocks

  1. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

  2. 1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

  3. Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse, and Zhu, Zhiliang, 2010, Public review draft; A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration

  4. Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GTOS GTOS 55 Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Sampling and Data Submission Shashi Verma #12;(intentionally blank) #12;Terrestrial Carbon Observations: Protocols for Vegetation Forestry University, Bejing 100083, China 5 University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 6 Microsoft Research

  5. Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control, terrestrial carbon sequestration, temperature,on terrestrial carbon sequestration (Nemani et al 2003, Xiaodeposition and forest carbon sequestration Glob. Change

  6. DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  7. Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

  8. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    emissions from fossil-fuel com- bustion, Biogeosciences, 9,re- gional and national fossil-fuel CO 2 emissions, Carbontimes more carbon in fossil fuels than it emitted by burning

  9. China's terrestrial carbon balance: Contributions from multiple global change factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    China's terrestrial carbon balance: Contributions from multiple global change factors Hanqin Tian,1 to be investigated. China is important in determining the global carbon balance in terms of both carbon emission change) on net carbon balance in terrestrial ecosystems of China for the period 1961­2005 were modeled

  10. Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon Cycling in China Jingfeng Xiao droughts had significant effects on terrestrial carbon cycling in China, although future studies should Lafayette, Indiana @ Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China

  11. Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batavia Prairie and Agricultural Sites

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Matamala, Roser [ANL; Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry [ANL; Cook, David [ANL; Pekour, Mikhail [ANL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. [University of Illinois at Chicago

    Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

  12. Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Jingfeng

    RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

  13. Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration is critical for the success of any policies geared toward stabilizing. Ellsworth, A. Finzi, J. Lichter, and W. H. Schlesinger, Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration

  14. Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

  15. CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Andrew

    CO2 stabilization, climate change and the terrestrial carbon sink A N D R E W W H I T E , * M E L V, Hybrid v4.1, with a subdaily timestep, was driven by increasing CO2 and transient climate output from scenarios were used: (i) IS92a, giving 790 ppm CO2 by 2100, (ii) CO2 stabilization at 750 ppm by 2225

  16. Consequences of Considering Carbon/Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei P.

    A number of observational studies indicate that carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems in a world with an atmosphere richer in carbon dioxide and a warmer climate depends on the interactions between the carbon and ...

  17. Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions – through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels – to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

  18. Responses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    to a wide range of environmental variations. Photosynthesis is a nonlinear function of solar radiationResponses of terrestrial ecosystems and carbon budgets to current and future environmental

  19. Above-and Belowground Carbon Stocks in a Miombo Woodland Landscape of Mozambique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , fuel, medicine and construction materials to larger-scale carbon and water management services. More prompted increasing attention to the preservation of carbon stocks in tropical ecosystems. The development on knowledge of the magnitude of such carbon stocks. Indeed Houghton (2005) shows that knowledge of the car

  20. Terrestrial Carbon Management Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Terrestrial Carbon Management are organized as Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management, Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management, Carbon Loss Following Cultivation, Carbon Accumulation Following Afforestation, and Carbon Sources and Sinks Associated with U.S. Cropland Production.

  1. Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry tropical forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmore, Andrew J.

    Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry to changes in C inputs following deforestation. Soil C stocks were also reduced in pastures relative, tropical deforestation Received 4 October 2005; revised version received 24 February 2006; accepted 23

  2. Carbon Stocks and Projections on Public Forestlands in the United States, 19522040

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLES Carbon Stocks and Projections on Public Forestlands in the United States, 1952­2040 JAMES are publicly owned; they represent a substantial area of potential carbon sequestration in US for- ests inventoried than privately owned forests. Thus, less information is avail- able about their role as carbon

  3. Estimation of biomass and carbon stocks: the case of the Atlantic Forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S.E. 2008. Estimation of biomass and carbon stocks: the casein Amazonian forest biomass. Global Change Biol. 10:545-562R. 2004b. Increasing biomass in Amazonian forest plots.

  4. Modelling Urban scale Retrofit, Pathways to 2050 Low Carbon Residential Building Stock 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lannon, Simon; Georgakaki, Aliki; Macdonald, Stuart

    A bottom up engineering modelling approach has been used to investigate the pathways to 2050 low carbon residential building stock. The impact of housing retrofit, renewable technologies, occupant behaviour, and grid decarbonisation is measured at a...

  5. The significance of the erosion-induced terrestrial carbon sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berhe, A.A.; Harte, J.; Harden, J.W.; Torn, M.S.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential of soil carbon sequestration to mitigate theof soil movement on carbon sequestration in agriculturalEnhancement of carbon sequestration in US soils. BioScience.

  6. amazon carbon stocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: , suggested much larger estimates for tropical forest carbon sequestration in the Ama- zon BasinBGD 4, 99-123, 2007 Amazon carbon balanc J....

  7. active carbon stocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS Giurgiutiu, Victor...

  8. Terrestrial Carbon Inventory at the Savannah River Site, 1951 – 2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    US Forest Service - Annonymous,

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Power Point slide presentation/report on the terestrial carbon inventory at the Savannah River Site.

  9. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change H. DAMON MATTHEWS, ANDREW J. WEAVER, AND KATRIN J. MEISSNER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meissner, Katrin Juliane

    extensive research over the past several years, the uncertainty range on estimates of terrestrial carbonTerrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change H. DAMON MATTHEWS, ANDREW, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada (Manuscript received 18 June 2004, in final form 21 October 2004

  10. Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

  11. House Committee on Natural Resources The Future of Fossil Fuels: Geological and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Howard Herzog Principal Research Engineer Massachusetts Institute to the Technical Group of the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (see www.cslforum.org). Just two weeks ago, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss Carbon Dioxide (CO2) geological

  12. Continental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling 1982-1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Vipin

    ecosystem (tundra and boreal) sinks for atmospheric CO2. Key Words: carbon dioxide, ecosystems, remote "missing sink" for carbon dioxide emissions. Measured atmospheric CO2, 13 C, and O2/N2 distributionsContinental Scale Comparisons of Terrestrial Carbon Sinks Estimated from Satellite Data

  13. North American Carbon Program (NACP) Regional Interim Synthesis: Terrestrial Biospheric Model Intercomparision

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Michalak, Anna [University of Michigan; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Baker, Ian [Colorado State University, Fort Collins; Chen, Jing M. [University of Toronto; Davis, Kenneth [Pennsylvania State University; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Jain, Atul [University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Liu, Shuguang [United States Geological Survey, Center for Earth Resources Observation and Science (USGS EROS); Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Neilson, Ronald [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Poulter, Ben [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Potsdam, Germany; Tian, Hanqin [Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Tomelleri, Enrico [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Viovy, Nicolas [National Center for Scientific Research, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Xiao, Jingfeng [Purdue University; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding of carbon exchange between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere can be improved through direct observations and experiments, as well as through modeling activities. Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding to much larger terrestrial regions. Although models vary in their specific goals and approaches, their central role within carbon cycle science is to provide a better understanding of the mechanisms currently controlling carbon exchange. Recently, the North American Carbon Program (NACP) organized several interim-synthesis activities to evaluate and inter-compare models and observations at local to continental scales for the years 2000-2005. Here, we compare the results from the TBMs collected as part of the regional and continental interim-synthesis (RCIS) activities. The primary objective of this work is to synthesize and compare the 19 participating TBMs to assess current understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle in North America. Thus, the RCIS focuses on model simulations available from analyses that have been completed by ongoing NACP projects and other recently published studies. The TBM flux estimates are compared and evaluated over different spatial (1{sup o} x 1{sup o} and spatially aggregated to different regions) and temporal (monthly and annually) scales. The range in model estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP) for North America is much narrower than estimates of productivity or respiration, with estimates of NEP varying between -0.7 and 2.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, while gross primary productivity and heterotrophic respiration vary between 12.2 and 32.9 PgC yr{sup -1} and 5.6 and 13.2 PgC yr{sup -1}, respectively. The range in estimates from the models appears to be driven by a combination of factors, including the representation of photosynthesis, the source and of environmental driver data and the temporal variability of those data, as well as whether nutrient limitation is considered in soil carbon decomposition. The disagreement in current estimates of carbon flux across North America, including whether North America is a net biospheric carbon source or sink, highlights the need for further analysis through the use of model runs following a common simulation protocol, in order to isolate the influences of model formulation, structure, and assumptions on flux estimates.

  14. Proceedings of the 17th Central Hardwood Forest Conference GTR-NRS-P-78 (2011) 143 STATUS AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND POTENTIAL OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN WEST VIRGINIA Benktesh D. Sharma and Jingxin Wang1 Abstract.--Terrestrial ecosystem management offers cost-effective ways to enhance carbon (C) sequestration. This study utilized C stock and C sequestration in forest and agricultural lands, abandoned mine lands, and harvested wood

  15. CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing techniques. We developed a novel technique to remotely assess carbon dioxide exchange in maize using

  16. Terrestrial sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  17. Terrestrial sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charlie Byrer

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial sequestration is the enhancement of CO2 uptake by plants that grow on land and in freshwater and, importantly, the enhancement of carbon storage in soils where it may remain more permanently stored. Terrestrial sequestration provides an opportunity for low-cost CO2 emissions offsets.

  18. Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severinghaus, J.P.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

  19. North America's net terrestrial carbon exchange with the atmosphere 1990-2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Anthony W.; Andres, Robert; Davis, Kenneth J.; Hafer, M.; Hayes, Daniel J.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; de Jong, Bernardus; Kurz, Werner; McGuire, A. David; Vargas, Rodrigo; Wei, Yaxing; West, Tristram O.; Woodall, Chris W.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientific understanding of the global carbon cycle is required for developing national and international policy to mitigate fossil-fuel CO2 emissions by managing terrestrial carbon uptake. Toward that understanding and as a contribution to the REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes (RECCAP) project, this paper provides a synthesis of net land-atmosphere CO2 exchange for North America over the period (1990-2009). This synthesis is based on results from three different methods: atmospheric inversion, inventory-based methods and terrestrial biosphere modeling. All methods indicate that the North America land surface was a sink for atmospheric CO2, with a net transfer from atmosphere to land. Estimates ranged from -890 to -280 Tg C yr-1, where the atmospheric inversion estimate forms the lower bound of that range (a larger land-sink) and the inventory-based estimate the upper (a smaller land sink). Integrating across estimates, a “best” estimates (i.e., measures of central tendency) are -472 ± 281 Tg C yr-1 based on the mean and standard deviation of the distribution and -360 Tg C yr-1 (with an interquartile range of -496 to -337) based on the median. Considering both the fossil-fuel emissions source and the land sink, our analysis shows that North America was, however, a net contributor to the growth of CO2 in the atmosphere in the late 20th and early 21st century. The continent’s CO2 source to sink ratio for this time period was likely in the range of 4:1 to 3:1.

  20. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

  1. 150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

  2. A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

  3. Alaskan soil carbon stocks: Spatial variability and dependence on environmental factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, U.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    stocks, based on geospatial analysis of 472 soil profileset al. , 2011) and geospatial analysis to predict Alaska SOCConclusions Our geospatial analysis using SOC profile

  4. Analysis of alternative methods for estimating carbon stock in young tropical plantations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    .2%, supporting our hypothesis. # 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Carbon sequestration of these plantations to sequester carbon has received renewed interest, since carbon sequestration projects). A good estimate of carbon sequestration is essential to any project of this type. The rate of carbon

  5. Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Fang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Levis, Samuel

    2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fire is the primary terrestrial ecosystem disturbance agent on a global scale. It affects carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon to atmosphere directly and immediately from biomass burning (i.e., fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (i.e., fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment about the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire direct and indirect effects. This study is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with NCAR community land model CLM4.5 as the model platform. Results show that fire decreases net carbon gain of the global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 average across the 20th century, as a results of fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Fire generally decreases the average carbon gains of terrestrial ecosystems in post-fire regions, which are significant over tropical savannas and part of forests in North America and the east of Asia. The general decrease of carbon gains in post-fire regions is because fire direct and indirect effects have similar spatial patterns and the former (to decrease carbon gain) is generally stronger. Moreover, the effect of fire on net carbon balance significantly declines prior to ~1970 with trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire indirect effect and increases afterward with trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire direct effect.

  6. Indigenous livelihoods, slash-and-burn agriculture, and carbon stocks in Eastern Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    , and agricultural intensification. Based on soil and biomass carbon measurements, estimated annual sequestration aimed at sequestration of carbon in the community are likely to be rather unequally distributed within., 2001; FAO, 1996). Annual carbon (C) sequestration rates in tropical forest fallow are estimated

  7. Quantification of Salt Marsh Carbon Stocks: Integration of Remote Sensing Data and Techniques with Field Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulawardhana, Ranjani W

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    , however, primarily have focused on dry land ecosystems that extend over large areas and have not accounted for the relatively small and scattered, though highly carbon rich, ecosystems such as mangrove swamps and salt marshes. Using data from a Spartina...

  8. The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

  9. Natural migration rates of trees: Global terrestrial carbon cycle implications. Book chapter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A.M.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the forest-ecological processes which constrain the rate of response by forests to rapid future environmental change. It establishes a minimum response time by natural tree populations which invade alien landscapes and reach the status of a mature, closed canopy forest when maximum carbon storage is realized. It considers rare long-distance and frequent short-distance seed transport, seedling and tree establishment, sequential tree and stand maturation, and spread between newly established colonies.

  10. Economic and Physical Modeling of Land Use in GCAM 3.0 and an Application to Agricultural Productivity, Land, and Terrestrial Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick; Edmonds, James A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the impact of changes in agricultural productivity on global land use and terrestrial carbon using the new agriculture and land use modeling approach developed for Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) version 3.0. This approach models economic land use decisions with regional, physical, and technological specificity while maintaining economic and physical integration with the rest of the GCAM model. Physical land characteristics and quantities are tracked explicitly, and crop production practices are modeled discretely to facilitate coupling with physical models. Economic land allocation is modeled with non-linear functions in a market equilibrium rather than through a constrained optimization. In this paper, we explore three scenarios of future agriculture productivity in all regions of the globe over this century, ranging from a high growth to a zero growth level. The higher productivity growth scenario leads to lower crop prices, increased production of crops in developing nations, preservation of global forested lands and lower terrestrial carbon emissions. The scenario with no productivity improvement results in higher crop prices, an expansion of crop production in the developed world, loss of forested lands globally, and higher terrestrial carbon emissions.

  11. Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

    2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO2 effect to diminish, with consequences for change in soil elevation.

  12. Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen C. Piper; Ralph F. Keeling

    2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

  13. Terrestrial Carbon Cycle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPoints of Contact Current

  14. Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

  15. atmospheric carbon dioxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the 21st century (IPCC 2001a). Management of vegetation and soils for terrestrial carbon sequestration or penalties associated with CO2 management. For terrestrial carbon...

  16. Stock Photos

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic Domain-WallStock-Photos Sign In

  17. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yields Project, CSIRO, Canberra, Australia, Davis, S. J. and3rd Edn. , Geoscience Australia, Canberra, Barrett, D. J. :Com- monwealth of Australia, Canberra, 2011. Andres, R. J. ,

  18. 2, 449483, 2006 Terrestrial carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A complex earth system model (atmosphere and ocean general circulation models, ocean biogeochemistry to reconstruct the course of atmospheric CO2. Brovkin et al. (2002) performed simulations with the earth system model of intermediate complexity CLIMBER, and Joos et al. (2004) performed5 simulations with the dynamic

  19. CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

  20. Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Biomass Energy Combustion (released in AEO2010)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions from the combustion of biomass to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in Annual Energy Outlook 2010. According to current international convention, carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

  1. Investing in Stocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jason; Polk, Wade

    2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    over- shoot or undershoot the stock?s true value, eventually, prices fol- low earnings. The potential profit from a stock investment is unlimited, while potential loss is limited to the amount of the investment. Stock prices (and thus the value of your...?re part of an industry that doesn?t currently interest investors. Value companies may not see much earnings growth at all, but they own various assets that make them attractive to some investors. These assets may include real estate, new products or a...

  2. FINAL REPORT: A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the GCC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keeling, R. F.; Piper, S. C.

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic composition. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. The program also included the development of methods for measuring radiocarbon content in the collected CO2 samples and carrying out radiocarbon measurements in collaboration with Tom Guilderson of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LLNL). The radiocarbon measurements can provide complementary information on carbon exchange rates with the land and oceans and emissions from fossil-fuel burning. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to establish estimates of the spatial and temporal variations in the net CO2 exchange with the atmosphere, the storage of carbon in the land and oceans, and variable isotopic discrimination of land plants.

  3. Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

  4. Analyzing Replacement Stock Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falconer, Lawrence; McGrann, James M.; Parker, John; Jones, Rodney

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Replacement management strategy involves comparing the values of the breeding stock you own with the value of potential replacements, and then choosing the investment with the highest expected worth. This publication discusses the application...

  5. Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennycook, Steve

    73 Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183. Blaine Metting2 The purpose of this chapter is to review terrestrial biological carbon sequestration Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA. #12;74 TERRESTRIAL BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEqUESTRATION

  6. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    properties. • Atmospheric Composition: aerosols and their precursors. • Ocean Surface: carbon dioxide,

  7. DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships.

  8. Terrestrial Water Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, Jay

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. E. Reilly, 2002: Flow and storage in groundwater systems.storage ..2013: Global ocean storage of anthropogenic carbon.

  9. Warming, eutrophication, and predator loss amplify subsidies between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palen, Wendy J.

    , Canada, Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada predators on the flux of biomass between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. We demonstrated that predatory., 2009), and also become detri- tus inputs that supply carbon and nitrogen to terrestrial plants (Gratton

  10. This Issue: Forest Carbon Stocks and Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    24 Biomass Use and Feedstock Issues section 5 S27 Wood­Fossil Fuel Substitution Effects section 6 S35

  11. Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walton, D.W.H.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

  12. Groundwater and Terrestrial Water Storage, 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodell, M; Chambers, D P; Famiglietti, J S

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biomass burning occurs in all vegetated terrestrial central Europe, andEurope in Table 2.6 and F ig . 2.67. Climatological global biomass

  13. SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Solar-Terrestrial Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Solar-Terrestrial Interactions from the charged particles that reach the planet steadily as part of the solar wind and the much it will be deflected into a circular or spiral path by the Lorentz Force. Most charged particles in the solar wind

  14. CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

  15. Blue carbon storage potential of marine carbonate deposits Project reference IAP/13/50. Please quote this reference when applying.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    IAPETUS Blue carbon storage potential of marine carbonate deposits Project reference IAP/13 Henrik Stahl, Scottish Association for Marine Science Key Words 1. Blue carbon 2. Carbonate 3. Coralline is referred to as `blue carbon' to differentiate it from terrestrial carbon stores. Known blue carbon sinks

  16. Gasoline Stock Charts

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot) Year Jan2009 Canada

  17. THE CARBON-LAND MODEL INTERCOMPARISON PROJECT (C-LAMP): A PROTOTYPE FOR COUPLED BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While a number of terrestrial and ocean carbon models

  18. NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

  19. Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

  20. 4, 21112145, 2007 Enhanced carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    are generally low in productivity and carbon (C) storage. We report, however, large increases in C sequestration . Carbon sequestration following afforestation was associated with increased N use efficiency as reflected of terrestrial ecosystems that leads to increased carbon (C) sequestration. One of those means is afforestation

  1. anthropogenic carbon gosac: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere Environmental Sciences and Ecology...

  2. (Preview Draft) Chapter 3. Stocks and Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    the state over time. It will take some time for the flows to have their effect on the stocks, so the stocks(Preview Draft) Chapter 3. Stocks and Flows: The Building Blocks of System Dynamics Models The best way to construct a model is to start with the stocks, add the flows and then use converters to explain

  3. Investors' horizon and stock prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsa, Sahar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation consists of three essays on the relation between investors' trading horizon and stock prices. The first chapter explores the theoretical relation between the horizon of traders and the negative externality ...

  4. Study of dissolved organic matter in peatlands: molecular characterisation of a dynamic carbon reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ridley, Luke McDonald

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Northern peatlands represent a significant carbon reservoir, containing approximately a third of the terrestrial carbon pool. The stability of these carbon stores is poorly understood, and processes of accumulation and ...

  5. October 2004 / Vol. 54 No. 10 BioScience 895 Rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    of the 21st century (IPCC 2001a). Management of vegetation and soils for terrestrial carbon sequestration or penalties associated with CO2 management. For terrestrial carbon sequestration to be useful, it must for evalu- ating all aspects of a carbon sequestration practice. Here we outline a complete and integrated

  6. Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

    2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on “Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep Subsurface” was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundation’s Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

  7. Regional carbon dynamics in monsoon Asia and its implications for the global carbon cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuire, A. David

    Regional carbon dynamics in monsoon Asia and its implications for the global carbon cycle Hanqin of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China c The Ecosystems Center, Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, MA 02543 Accepted 25 July 2002 Abstract Data on three major determinants of the carbon storage in terrestrial

  8. Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Postdoctoral Appointment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "seeks to improve the representation of terrestrial ecosystem processes in Earth system models thereby, improving the quality of climate model projections and providing the...

  9. U.S. Refinery Stocks

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial and InstitutionalArea: U.S. East Coast (PADD 1)

  10. Stocks of Crude Oil, Commercial

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal StocksProvedFeet)Thousand Cubic7.Cubic Foot)inState Heating Weekly

  11. Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pu, Shi

    Automatic building modeling from terrestrial laser scanning Shi Pu International Institute for Geo hard to recover 3D building structures from 2D image. Recent studies ([2] [6]) show that laser scanning imagery, airborne and terrestrial laser scanning give explicit 3D information, which enables the rapid

  12. Methodology for assessing coastal change using terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Michael J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Michelangelo Project: 3D Scanning of Large Statues,” Proc.for terrestrial laser scanning of long cliff sections inPress). Terrestrial laser scanning based structural damage

  13. Methodology for assessing coastal change using terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsen, Michael James

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for terrestrial laser scanning of long cliff sections inPress). Terrestrial laser scanning based structural damageresolution 3d laser scanning to slope stability studies. ”

  14. Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications...

  15. Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

  16. STOCK ASSESSMENT OF THE BLUE CRAB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STOCK ASSESSMENT OF THE BLUE CRAB IN CHESAPEAKE BAY 2011 #12;2011 Stock assessment for blue crab in Chesapeake Bay iii Executive Summary The blue crab (Callinectes sapidus) is an icon for the Chesapeake Bay region. The commercial fisheries for blue crab in the Bay remain one of the most valuable fishery sectors

  17. DELINEATION OF TILEFISH, LOPHOLATILUS CHAMAELEONTICEPS, STOCKS ALONG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . It was suggested that Mid- Atlantic Bight populations be treated as a separate stock and, as a working hypothesis, that South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico populations be considered as a second stock. Tilefish, Lopholatilus chamaeleonticeps, are dis- tributed from southern Nova Scotia (Leim 1960; Markle et al. 1980) south to off Surinam

  18. A quantum mechanical model for the relationship between stock price and stock ownership

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liviu-Adrian Cotfas

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The trade of a fixed stock can be regarded as the basic process that measures its momentary price. The stock price is exactly known only at the time of sale when the stock is between traders, that is, only in the case when the owner is unknown. We show that the stock price can be better described by a function indicating at any moment of time the probabilities for the possible values of price if a transaction takes place. This more general description contains partial information on the stock price, but it also contains partial information on the stock owner. By following the analogy with quantum mechanics, we assume that the time evolution of the function describing the stock price can be described by a Schrodinger type equation.

  19. Earth and Terrestrial Planet Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Seth A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth and composition of Earth is a direct consequence of planet formation throughout the Solar System. We discuss the known history of the Solar System, the proposed stages of growth and how the early stages of planet formation may be dominated by pebble growth processes. Pebbles are small bodies whose strong interactions with the nebula gas lead to remarkable new accretion mechanisms for the formation of planetesimals and the growth of planetary embryos. Many of the popular models for the later stages of planet formation are presented. The classical models with the giant planets on fixed orbits are not consistent with the known history of the Solar System, fail to create a high Earth/Mars mass ratio, and, in many cases, are also internally inconsistent. The successful Grand Tack model creates a small Mars, a wet Earth, a realistic asteroid belt and the mass-orbit structure of the terrestrial planets. In the Grand Tack scenario, growth curves for Earth most closely match a Weibull model. The feeding zon...

  20. Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wind Energy Division, Risř National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark,

  1. The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel for terrestrial carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production. For P. strobus, above- ground plant carbon harvest for biofuel would result in no net carbon sequestration as declines in soil carbon offset plant

  2. Privacy for the Stock Market Giovanni Di Crescenzo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    clients who intend to purchase or sell shares of a particular stock, and a server, taking carePrivacy for the Stock Market Giovanni Di Crescenzo Telcordia Technologies Inc. 445 South Street Stock Market op- erations, such as buying or selling shares of a certain stock, in a private way, which

  3. Material Stock Requests -SH Version Date: June 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Material Stock Requests - SH Version Date: June 2013 #12;Training Guide Material Stock Requests injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall be responsible to take all Stock Requests - SH Page iii Table of Contents Material Stock Requests - SH

  4. Macroalgal distribution at Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Jill Christie

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the reef community, macroalgae have been increasing in abundance on the reefs surrounding Lee Stocking Island (LSI), Bahamas. Macroalgal patches prevent coral recruitment and growth, thereby restructuring the reef. In such cases, coral and algal...

  5. Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braswell, B.H. Jr.

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

  6. Detecting Stock Market Fluctuation from Stock Network Structure Variation Jing Liu, Chi K. Tse and Keqing He

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    period and takes a simple winner-take-all approach for establishing connections between stocks), and the window moves along the time scale. Thus, effectively, we are taking snapshots of the network of stocksDetecting Stock Market Fluctuation from Stock Network Structure Variation Jing Liu, Chi K. Tse

  7. Sensitivity of Global Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to Hydrologic States Simulated by the Community Land Model Using Two Runoff Parameterizations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei, Huimin; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Dawen; Shi, Xiaoying; Mao, Jiafu; Hayes, Daniel J.; Schwalm, C.; Wei, Yaxing; Liu, Shishi

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial water and carbon cycles interact strongly at various spatio-temporal scales. To elucidate how hydrologic processes may influence carbon cycle processes, differences in terrestrial carbon cycle simulations induced by structural differences in two runoff generation schemes were investigated using the Community Land Model 4 (CLM4). Simulations were performed with runoff generation using the default TOPMODEL-based and the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model approaches under the same experimental protocol. The comparisons showed that differences in the simulated gross primary production (GPP) are mainly attributed to differences in the simulated leaf area index (LAI) rather than soil moisture availability. More specifically, differences in runoff simulations can influence LAI through changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and their seasonality that affect the onset of the growing season and the subsequent dynamic feedbacks between terrestrial water, energy, and carbon cycles. As a result of a relative difference of 36% in global mean total runoff between the two models and subsequent changes in soil moisture, soil temperature, and LAI, the simulated global mean GPP differs by 20.4%. However, the relative difference in the global mean net ecosystem exchange between the two models is small (2.1%) due to competing effects on total mean ecosystem respiration and other fluxes, although large regional differences can still be found. Our study highlights the significant interactions among the water, energy, and carbon cycles and the need for reducing uncertainty in the hydrologic parameterization of land surface models to better constrain carbon cycle modeling.

  8. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global carbon cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to changing climatic conditions. Inmore »this review, we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils, and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this organic carbon to permafrost thaw under a warming climate. Overall, frozen conditions and cryopedogenic processes, such as cryoturbation, have slowed decomposition and enhanced the sequestration of organic carbon in permafrost-affected soils over millennial timescales. Due to the low temperatures, the organic matter in permafrost soils is often less humified than in more temperate soils, making some portion of this stored organic carbon relatively vulnerable to mineralization upon thawing of permafrost.« less

  9. Strain Storage Typically, mycobacteria can be stored as lyophilized stocks, agar slants, or frozen stocks.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strain Storage Typically, mycobacteria can be stored as lyophilized stocks, agar slants, or frozen stocks. Since lyophilization is not a cost-effective product storage alternative for virulent M. tuberculosis and agar slants can take up considerable BSL3 storage space, the best alternative for strain

  10. Behavior of carbon isotopes during the hyperfiltration of calcium carbonate solutions through calcium bentonites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinz, David William

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the stock solution's COB(aq) concentration. This is interpreted as conversion of bicarbonate to CO7(aq) along or within the membrane, with subsequent transport of the C02~a ~ through the membrane. The carbon isotopic ratio of the throughput solution... was initially heavier than the stock solution for the 200 ml/hr runs. The 20 ml/hr runs displayed essentially no fractionation of the throughput solution. For all runs, diffusion is isotopically fractionating bicarbonate in the concentration polarization...

  11. Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper published in the August, 2005 issue of Canadian Journal of Forest Research, scientists

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper carbon sequestration by an estimated 0.35Gt carbon/year. This represents ca. 4% of global carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This work is supported by research funded through the Carbon Sequestration Program

  12. CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon Composites(T300 & SWB): Crush Resistance, Bend StrengthCARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

  13. The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Behaviour ofIodine in the Terrestrial Environment. An Investigation of the Possible Roskilde, Denmark Febtuary 1990 #12;1 Risř-M-2851 THE BEHAVIOUR OF IODINE IN THE TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT influence the migration behaviour of iodine in the terrestrial environment. It is stated that the organic

  14. R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schnitzer, Stefan

    R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests Geertje for carbon storage and sequestration. Lianas reduce tree growth, survival, and leaf productivity; however liana carbon stocks are unlikely to compensate for liana-induced losses in net carbon sequestration

  15. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

    2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

  16. Emotion Regulation: Taking Stock and Moving Forward James J. Gross

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Emotion Regulation: Taking Stock and Moving Forward James J. Gross Stanford University The field). In this article, I take stock of the field and consider how it might be moved forward. I do this by asking

  17. Rangeland Drought Management for Texans: Stocking Rate and Grazing Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Charles R.; Carpenter, Bruce B.

    2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication explains how stocking rates and grazing management decisions can help a ranch survive a drought. To deal with drought, a rancher must monitor forage supply and demand; use a conservative stocking rate and keep it flexible...

  18. Mining Distribution Change in Stock Order Streams Xiaoyan Liu#1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Rui

    by employing a natural Poisson distribution assumption about the nature of stock order streams. We establish that an oil company has found a new oil source, they will submit large numbers of orders to buy the stocks

  19. Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Curtis; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Torn, Margaret S.

    2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and biomass burning are the dominant contributors to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and global warming. Many approaches to mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions are being pursued, and among the most promising are terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. Recent advances in ecology and microbial biology offer promising new possibilities for enhancing terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. A workshop was held October 29, 2007, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration (BECS). The workshop participants (approximately 30 scientists from California, Illinois, Oregon, Montana, and New Mexico) developed a prioritized list of research needed to make progress in the development of biological enhancements to improve terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. The workshop participants also identified a number of areas of supporting science that are critical to making progress in the fundamental research areas. The purpose of this position paper is to summarize and elaborate upon the findings of the workshop. The paper considers terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration separately. First, we present a summary in outline form of the research roadmaps for terrestrial and geologic BECS. This outline is elaborated upon in the narrative sections that follow. The narrative sections start with the focused research priorities in each area followed by critical supporting science for biological enhancements as prioritized during the workshop. Finally, Table 1 summarizes the potential significance or 'materiality' of advances in these areas for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

  20. STOCK ASSESSMENT PRINCIPLES AND TERMS appendix 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    assessment is a report that often includes an estimation of the amount or abundance of the resource to determine what ac- tions are needed to promote the best use of our living marine resources. Stock assessment with commercial and recreational catch data to assess the resource base. The final critical data comes from

  1. Realized Stock Volatility 2.1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    Chapter 2 Realized Stock Volatility 2.1 Introduction Financial market volatility is indispensable for asset and derivative pricing, asset allocation, and risk management. As volatility is not a directly is to calculate the daily volatility from the sample variance of intraday returns, the `realized' volatility

  2. The Information in Option Volume for Future Stock Prices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrieli, John

    that option trading volume contains information about future stock prices. Taking advantage of a unique dataThe Information in Option Volume for Future Stock Prices Jun Pan MIT Sloan School of Management set, we construct put-call ratios from option volume initiated by buyers to open new positions. Stocks

  3. Two Stock-Trading Agents: Market Making and Technical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stone, Peter

    Two Stock-Trading Agents: Market Making and Technical Analysis Yi Feng, Ronggang Yu, Peter Stone://www.cs.utexas.edu/~{fengyi,ryu,pstone} Abstract. Evolving information technologies have brought computa- tional power and real-time facilities into the stock market. Automated stock trading draws much interest from both the #12;elds of computer sci- ence

  4. Does Trend Following Work on Stocks? November, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearns, Michael

    for corporate actions1 . Delisted2 companies were included to account for survivorship bias3 . Realistic. 2. Delisted: When the stock of a company is removed from a stock exchange. Reasons for delisting exchange. 3. Survivorship bias: A phenomenon where poorly performing stocks, having been delisted

  5. Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chambers, Jeff

    Hurricane Katrina's Carbon Footprint on U.S. Gulf Coast Forests Jeffrey Q. Chambers,1 * Jeremy I carbon sink is an increase in disturbance frequency and intensity (4), which transfers bio- mass from and lower biomass stocks (5). Here, we quantify hurricane Katrina's carbon impact on Gulf Coast forests

  6. Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    LETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from and heterotrophic respira- tion, that determines whether an ecosystem is sequestering carbon or releasing

  7. ORIGINAL PAPER Estimation of tree biomass, carbon pool and net primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    et al. 2008). Determination of carbon sequestration potential in terrestrial ecosystems throughORIGINAL PAPER Estimation of tree biomass, carbon pool and net primary production of an old Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract & Background The data on carbon pool and biomass distribution

  8. Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pielke, Roger A.

    recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide of the surface energy budget can affect the local, regional, and global climate. Given the goal of mitigatingClimate Policy 3 (2003) 149­157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon management

  9. Organic Carbon Cycling in East China Sea Shelf Sediments: Linkages with Hypoxia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinxin

    2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Changjiang River provides the main source of sediment and terrestrial derived organic carbon (OC) to the Changjiang large delta-front estuary (LDE) in the East China Sea (ECS). This study analyzed bulk OC, biomarkers including lignin and plant...

  10. A stock water solar heating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nydahl, J.; Carlson, B.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the progress in the development of an inexpensive but rugged solar system to heat stock water. Insulation encased in fiber reinforced concrete is the main structural component for the collector and the partition between the unheated stock tank and the heated section. A fully wetted, drain-back collector was designed to produce a high optical efficiency and to permit its water passage to be opened for cleaning. A unique double-glazed design is used in which the inner glazing is a film with a large thermal expansion coefficient. This causes a significant drop in the stagnation temperatures since a single glazed configuration is approached at high temperatures. The collector and the partially covered insulated tank prevented freezing, and held the average water temperature at 6.4 C (44 F) during the day while the mean daily ambient temperature was {minus}5.4 C (22 F) over a nine day test.

  11. WSDOT highway maintenance: environmental compliance for protected terrestrial species

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O’Brien, Tracie; Carey, Marion; Forrester, Bret

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the WSDOT Highway Maintenance: Environmental Complianceand the Highway Maintenance Manual for Terrestrial Species.to impacts from routine maintenance activities. In response

  12. accumulating terrestrial plant: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Keith Green, Megan Murphy, Jenna Pathways for Terrestrial Vertebrates. In Carlton, J., G. Ruiz, and R. Mack (Eds.), Invasive species: vectors and management strategies (pp....

  13. Terrestrial applications of the heatpipe power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houts, M.G.; Poston, D.I.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A terrestrial reactor that uses the same design approach as the Heatpipe Power System (HPS) may have applications both on earth and on other planetary surfaces. The baseline HPS is a potential, near-term, low-cost space fission power system. The system will be composed of independent modules, and all components operate within the existing database. The HPS has relatively few system integration issues; thus, the successful development of a module is a significant step toward verifying system feasibility and performance estimates. A prototypic, refractory-metal HPS module is being fabricated, and testing is scheduled to begin in November 1996. A successful test will provide high confidence that the HPS can achieve its predicted performance. An HPS incorporating superalloys will be better suited for some terrestrial or planetary applications. Fabrication and testing of a superalloy HPS module should be less challenging than that of the refractory metal module. A superalloy HPS core capable of delivering > 100 kWt to a power conversion subsystem could be fabricated for about $500k (unfueled). Tests of the core with electric heat (used to simulate heat from fission) could demonstrate normal and off-normal operation of the core, including the effects of heatpipe failure. A power conversion system also could be coupled to the core to demonstrate full system operation.

  14. adult stocking density: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    examines how firm-level corporate expenditure represented by R&D, capital expenditure (CAPEX) and selling, general and administrative (SGA) costs responds to stock price...

  15. athens stock exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    examines how firm-level corporate expenditure represented by R&D, capital expenditure (CAPEX) and selling, general and administrative (SGA) costs responds to stock price...

  16. Forecast Correlation Coefficient Matrix of Stock Returns in Portfolio Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Feng

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DTE FE OKE QEP XEL AEP DUK TEG POM SCG CNP EIX NEE PCG SRET Services Utilities TEG SCG Consumer Discretionary Stocks

  17. Search Business News, Stocks, Funds, Companies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    To capture the carbon dioxide generated by coal plants, chemical companies like Dow Chemical Co. and energy in Business » Search All NYTimes.com Energy & Environment WORLD U.S. N.Y. / REGION BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY SCIENCE's Revival May Combat Climate Change Build a Better Carbon Trap and ... And Now, Climate Bill's Supporters

  18. Constructing a database of terrestrial radiocarbon measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trumbore, Susan; Torn, Margaret; Smith, Lydia

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    towers that measures carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energymodels to energy exchange mod- els, scaling up tower dataand Energy Fluxes With Optical Measurements FLUXNET and Remote Sensing Open Workshop: Towards Upscaling Flux Information From Towers

  19. Carbon Issues Task Force Report for the Idaho Strategic Energy Alliance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Travis L. Mcling

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Carbon Issues Task Force has the responsibility to evaluate emissions reduction and carbon offset credit options, geologic carbon sequestration and carbon capture, terrestrial carbon sequestration on forest lands, and terrestrial carbon sequestration on agricultural lands. They have worked diligently to identify ways in which Idaho can position itself to benefit from potential carbon-related federal legislation, including identifying opportunities for Idaho to engage in carbon sequestration efforts, barriers to development of these options, and ways in which these barriers can be overcome. These are the experts to which we will turn when faced with federal greenhouse gas-related legislation and how we should best react to protect and provide for Idaho’s interests. Note that the conclusions and recommended options in this report are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather form a starting point for an informed dialogue regarding the way-forward in developing Idaho energy resources.

  20. LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    , flying robots, micro-air vehicles, robot communication, autonomous robot networks. #12;2 1. TERRESTRIAL1 LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS Arvin Agah vehicles, next generation robotic platforms, platform mechanics and materials, winterization of robotic

  1. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  2. China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Information, Agenda, and Abstracts June 26-28, 2013, Kunming, China #12;Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Kunming, China June 26-28, 2013 Information, Agenda

  3. Slide 1 (of 42) Observations of Terrestrial Planet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumway, John

    formation epoch and occurrence rate of rocky terrestrial planets around solar- and intermediate- mass Observatory/Lynette Cook Zuckerman et al. (2008) #12;Slide 6 (of 42) What does Terrestrial mean 42) HD 15407A Gemini Observatory/Lynette Cook Melis et al. 2010, ApJ Letters #12;Slide 16 (of 42

  4. Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

    Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

  5. Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

  6. anadromous fish stocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anadromous fish stocks First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Estimating Stock Composition of...

  7. Assessment of the eel stock in Sweden, spring 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impacts dominating in different areas. For the yellow eel fishery on the West Coast, the assessment in fishing mortality will lead to a recovery of the West Coast stock to the best possible status given-evaluation of the Swedish Eel Management Plan Willem Dekker #12;Assessment of the eel stock in Sweden, spring 2012 First

  8. Elementary My Dear Warren A Fifth-Grade Stock Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lega, Joceline

    using real world data. · First 2 weeks: Coke vs. Pepsi. · Second 2 weeks: Simulated the purchase on the market at a higher price and make money. Stock Market in Plain English #12;The Pepsi/Coke Challenge This week, each day you will look up and graph the stock prices for two companies: Pepsi and Coke. #12

  9. Material Stock Requests 9.1 BRFHS and BRFHM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Material Stock Requests 9.1 BRFHS and BRFHM Version Date: January 2014 #12;Training Guide BRFHS injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall be responsible to take all and BRFHM Page iii Table of Contents Material_Stock_Requests_9_1_BRFHS

  10. Material Stock Requests 9.1 Version Date: April 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Material Stock Requests 9.1 HCSD Version Date: April 2013 Revision Date: April 2013 #12;Training be responsible to take all appropriate fail-safe, backup, redundancy and other measures to ensure the safe use Guide HCSD Page iii Table of Contents Material Stock Requests HCSD

  11. Describing Spatial Relations using Informal Semantics Kristin Stock1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Describing Spatial Relations using Informal Semantics Kristin Stock1 1 University of Nottingham, NG7 2RD, Nottingham Tel. +44(0)787 299 3270 Email: kristin.stock@nottingham.ac.uk Web address: http, people tend to think in terms of informal semantics. Informal semantics take the form of cognitive models

  12. THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. II. MIGRATION SIMULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter-Bond, Jade C. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052 (Australia); O'Brien, David P. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 East Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Raymond, Sean N., E-mail: j.bond@unsw.edu.au [Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l'Univers, Universite de Bordeaux, 2 rue de l'Observatoire, BP 89, F-33271 Floirac Cedex (France)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior work has found that a variety of terrestrial planetary compositions are expected to occur within known extrasolar planetary systems. However, such studies ignored the effects of giant planet migration, which is thought to be very common in extrasolar systems. Here we present calculations of the compositions of terrestrial planets that formed in dynamical simulations incorporating varying degrees of giant planet migration. We used chemical equilibrium models of the solid material present in the disks of five known planetary host stars: the Sun, GJ 777, HD4203, HD19994, and HD213240. Giant planet migration has a strong effect on the compositions of simulated terrestrial planets as the migration results in large-scale mixing between terrestrial planet building blocks that condensed at a range of temperatures. This mixing acts to (1) increase the typical abundance of Mg-rich silicates in the terrestrial planets' feeding zones and thus increase the frequency of planets with Earth-like compositions compared with simulations with static giant planet orbits, and (2) drastically increase the efficiency of the delivery of hydrous phases (water and serpentine) to terrestrial planets and thus produce waterworlds and/or wet Earths. Our results demonstrate that although a wide variety of terrestrial planet compositions can still be produced, planets with Earth-like compositions should be common within extrasolar planetary systems.

  13. Land Use Change Effects on Forest Carbon Cycling Throughout the Southern United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and deforestation on carbon cycling in forest floor and soil from 1900 to 2050 throughout 13 states in the southern because afforestation causes a gradual gain in carbon stocks for many decades, while deforestation causes Tg C, and deforestation caused emission of 49 Tg C. However, the net effect of land use change

  14. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

  15. Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    Filling holes in regional carbon budgets: Predicting peat depth in a north temperate lake district] Peat deposits contain on the order of 1/6 of the Earth's terrestrial fixed carbon (C), but uncertainty in peat depth precludes precise estimates of peat C storage. To assess peat C in the Northern Highlands

  16. Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

  17. Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    University and the director of the Stanford GPS Laboratory. 1. INTRODUCTION The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Alternative Positioning Navigation & Timing (APNT) program is developing and examining1 Hybrid APNT: Terrestrial Radionavigation to Support Future Aviation Needs Sherman Lo, Yu

  18. Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote sensing of terrestrial tropospheric aerosols from aircraft and satellites M I Mishchenko1 instruments suitable for aerosol remote sensing and give examples of aerosol retrievals obtained forcing directly by absorbing and reflecting sunlight, thereby cooling or heating the atmosphere

  19. Chemical sensing and imaging in microfluidic pore network structures relevant to natural carbon cycling and industrial carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong; Wilkins, Michael J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy and climate change represent significant factors in global security. Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, while global in scope, are influenced by pore-scale phenomena in the subsurface. We are developing tools to visualize and investigate processes in pore network microfluidic structures with transparent covers as representations of normally-opaque porous media. In situ fluorescent oxygen sensing methods and fluorescent cellulosic materials are being used to investigate processes related to terrestrial carbon cycling involving cellulytic respiring microorganisms. These structures also enable visualization of water displacement from pore spaces by hydrophobic fluids, including carbon dioxide, in studies related to carbon sequestration.

  20. Super-slime! The impact of changing environment on aquatic biofilm carbon cycling Susan Waldron & Vernon Phoenix (Geographical and Earth Sciences, GES, University of Glasgow)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    Super-slime! The impact of changing environment on aquatic biofilm carbon cycling Susan Waldron is a crucial environment in which to consider the fate of exported terrestrial carbon in the aquatic system. To a large extent the fate of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) may be controlled by reprocessing within

  1. Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, Warren [USDA Forest Service] [USDA Forest Service

    2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance.

  2. Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S., Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly E. Law

    2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance.

  3. Tidal heating in multilayered terrestrial exoplanets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henning, Wade G.; Hurford, Terry, E-mail: wade.g.henning@nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The internal pattern and overall magnitude of tidal heating for spin-synchronous terrestrial exoplanets from 1 to 2.5 R{sub E} is investigated using a propagator matrix method for a variety of layer structures. Particular attention is paid to ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths, where a significant ice mantle is modeled to rest atop an iron-silicate core, and may or may not contain a liquid water ocean. We find multilayer modeling often increases tidal dissipation relative to a homogeneous model, across multiple orbital periods, due to the ability to include smaller volume low viscosity regions, and the added flexure allowed by liquid layers. Gradations in parameters with depth are explored, such as allowed by the Preliminary Earth Reference Model. For ice-silicate hybrid worlds, dramatically greater dissipation is possible beyond the case of a silicate mantle only, allowing non-negligible tidal activity to extend to greater orbital periods than previously predicted. Surface patterns of tidal heating are found to potentially be useful for distinguishing internal structure. The influence of ice mantle depth and water ocean size and position are shown for a range of forcing frequencies. Rates of orbital circularization are found to be 10-100 times faster than standard predictions for Earth-analog planets when interiors are moderately warmer than the modern Earth, as well as for a diverse range of ice-silicate hybrid super-Earths. Circularization rates are shown to be significantly longer for planets with layers equivalent to an ocean-free modern Earth, as well as for planets with high fractions of either ice or silicate melting.

  4. 2/1/2012 Page 1 of 8 Comparing the Stock Market and Iowa Land Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    in the stock market have resurrected a perennial question. Which is a better investment--the stock market the better investment, this paper compares and contrasts the returns to farmland and the stock market since returns. Owning land has an unavoidable annual ownership cost not associated with stocks. Property taxes

  5. 4/20/2011 Page 1 of 8 Comparing the Stock Market and Iowa Land Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    in the stock market have resurrected a perennial question. Which is a better investment--the stock market investment, this paper compares and contrasts the returns to farmland and the stock market since 1960. Owning land has an unavoidable annual ownership cost not associated with stocks. Property taxes must

  6. Identifying Patterns in Geospatial Natural Language Kristin Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    Identifying Patterns in Geospatial Natural Language Kristin Stock Nottingham Geospatial Institute University of Nottingham Abstract The automated interpretation of geospatial be suitable as an approach to the representation of geospatial natural language that supports

  7. Corporate governance and long-term stock returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorman, Theodore Clark

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Extant literature finds that long-term abnormal stock returns are generated by a strategy based on corporate governance index values (Gompers, Ishii, and Metrick 2003). The result is inconsistent with efficient markets and suggests that information...

  8. Forecasting Volatility in Stock Market Using GARCH Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Xiaorong

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Forecasting volatility has held the attention of academics and practitioners all over the world. The objective for this master's thesis is to predict the volatility in stock market by using generalized autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity(GARCH...

  9. The informational feedback effect of stock prices on corporate disclosure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Luo, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies whether managers use investor information they learn from the stock market when making forward-looking disclosures. Using annual management earnings forecasts from 1996 to 2010, I find that the association ...

  10. iSTOCK PHOTO Oklahoma State University's innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    iSTOCK PHOTO FALL 2013 52 Oklahoma State University's innovation in geothermal production at Oklahoma State University into a new application." "This innovative use of technology will be distributed

  11. Locke, Stock, and Peril: Natural Property Rights, Pollution, Peter Railton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    1 Locke, Stock, and Peril: Natural Property Rights, Pollution, and Risk* Peter Railton INTRODUCTION rightfully take it from him or hinder him in his enjoyment of it. His right entitles him to exclude others

  12. The effect of the currency movements on stock markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zohrabyan, Tatevik

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uncovers the relationship between stock markets and exchange rates in seven countries by employing stable aggregate currency (SAC) for the period of 1973- 2004. Ordinary Least Squares (OLS) regression, time series methods, and directed...

  13. Taking Stock of Our Situation: Pricing and Randomness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Dianne P.

    Taking Stock of Our Situation: Pricing and Randomness Dianne P. O'Leary1 Many fascinating study is a supplement to Scientific Computing with Case Studies, Dianne P. O'Leary, SIAM Press

  14. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  15. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

  16. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop (see attached agenda). The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO2 concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. A third Partnership meeting has been planned for August 04 in Idaho Falls; a preliminary agenda is attached.

  17. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

  18. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Extra-Solar Planetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond

    2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial planets form in a series of dynamical steps from the solid component of circumstellar disks. First, km-sized planetesimals form likely via a combination of sticky collisions, turbulent concentration of solids, and gravitational collapse from micron-sized dust grains in the thin disk midplane. Second, planetesimals coalesce to form Moon- to Mars-sized protoplanets, also called "planetary embryos". Finally, full-sized terrestrial planets accrete from protoplanets and planetesimals. This final stage of accretion lasts about 10-100 Myr and is strongly affected by gravitational perturbations from any gas giant planets, which are constrained to form more quickly, during the 1-10 Myr lifetime of the gaseous component of the disk. It is during this final stage that the bulk compositions and volatile (e.g., water) contents of terrestrial planets are set, depending on their feeding zones and the amount of radial mixing that occurs. The main factors that influence terrestrial planet formation are the mass and surface density profile of the disk, and the perturbations from giant planets and binary companions if they exist. Simple accretion models predicts that low-mass stars should form small, dry planets in their habitable zones. The migration of a giant planet through a disk of rocky bodies does not completely impede terrestrial planet growth. Rather, "hot Jupiter" systems are likely to also contain exterior, very water-rich Earth-like planets, and also "hot Earths", very close-in rocky planets. Roughly one third of the known systems of extra-solar (giant) planets could allow a terrestrial planet to form in the habitable zone.

  19. Increase of Carbon Cycle Feedback with Climate Sensitivity: Results from a coupled Climate and Carbon Cycle Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Govindasamy, B; Thompson, S; Mirin, A; Wickett, M; Caldeira, K; Delire, C

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling studies have shown that the feedback between global warming and the carbon cycle, in particular the terrestrial carbon cycle, could accelerate climate change and result in larger warming. In this paper, we investigate the sensitivity of this feedback for year-2100 global warming in the range of 0 K to 8 K. Differing climate sensitivities to increased CO{sub 2} content are imposed on the carbon cycle models for the same emissions. Emissions from the SRES A2 scenario are used. We use a fully-coupled climate and carbon cycle model, the INtegrated Climate and CArbon model (INCCA) the NCAR/DOE Parallel Coupled Model coupled to the IBIS terrestrial biosphere model and a modified-OCMIP ocean biogeochemistry model. In our model, for scenarios with year-2100 global warming increasing from 0 to 8 K, land uptake decreases from 47% to 29% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. Due to competing effects, ocean uptake (16%) shows almost no change at all. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration increases were 48% higher in the run with 8 K global climate warming than in the case with no warming. Our results indicate that carbon cycle amplification of climate warming will be greater if there is higher climate sensitivity to increased atmospheric CO{sub 2} content; the carbon cycle feedback factor increases from 1.13 to 1.48 when global warming increases from 3.2 to 8 K.

  20. Managing the cost of emissions for durable, carbon-containing products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirley, Kevin [Appalachian State University; Marland, Eric [Appalachian State University; Cantrell, Jenna [Appalachian State University; Marland, Gregg [ORNL

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We recognize that carbon-containing products do not decay and release CO2 to the atmosphere instantaneously, but release that carbon over extended periods of time. For an initial production of a stock of carbon-containing product, we can treat the release as a probability distribution covering the time over which that release occurs. The probability distribution that models the carbon release predicts the amount of carbon that is released as a function of time. The use of a probability distribution in accounting for the release of carbon to the atmosphere realizes a fundamental shift from the idea that all carbon-containing products contribute to a single pool that decays in proportion to the size of the stock. Viewing the release of carbon as a continuous probabilistic process introduces some theoretical opportunities not available in the former paradigm by taking advantage of other fields where the use of probability distributions has been prevalent for many decades. In particular, theories developed in the life insurance industry can guide the development of pricing and payment structures for dealing with the costs associated with the oxidation and release of carbon. These costs can arise from a number of proposed policies (cap and trade, carbon tax, social cost of carbon, etc), but in the end they all result in there being a cost to releasing carbon to the atmosphere. If there is a cost to the emitter for CO2 emissions, payment for that cost will depend on both when the emissions actually occur and how payment is made. Here we outline some of the pricing and payment structures that are possible which result from analogous theories in the life insurance industry. This development not only provides useful constructs for valuing sequestered carbon, but highlights additional motivations for employing a probability distribution approach to unify accounting methodologies for stocks of carbon containing products.

  1. Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Eutrophication: impacts of excess nutrient inputs on freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems enrichment, or eutrophication, can lead to highly undesirable changes in ecosystem structure and function eutrophication in freshwater, marine, and terrestrial ecosystems. We present two brief case studies (one

  2. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  3. CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eviner, Valerie

    -1-- 0-- +1-- -1-- 0-- +1-- CHAPTER TWELVE Effects of Pathogens on Terrestrial Ecosystem Function. A more limited set of studies suggests that pathogens can alter a wide range of ecosystem functions in terres- trial systems; however, we are lacking a framework to predict the type and magnitude of ecosystem

  4. Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mcdonough, William F.

    Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal model

  5. Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Threats from Climate Change to Terrestrial Vertebrate Hotspots in Europe Luigi Maiorano1 to extreme climates. Our results outline that the Mediterranean basin represents both an important hotspot change projected to occur over the coming decades, especially in the Mediterranean bioregion, posing

  6. Current and Future Carbon Budgets of Tropical Rain Forest: A Cross Scale Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberbauer, S. F.

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to make a first assessment of the major carbon stocks and fluxes and their climatic determinants in a lowland neotropical rain forest, the La Selva Biological Station, Costa Rica. Our research design was based on the concurrent use of several of the best available approaches, so that data could be cross-validated. A major focus of our effort was to combine meteorological studies of whole-forest carbon exchange (eddy flux), with parallel independent measurements of key components of the forest carbon budget. The eddy flux system operated from February 1998 to February 2001. To obtain field data that could be scaled up to the landscape level, we monitored carbon stocks, net primary productivity components including tree growth and mortality, litterfall, woody debris production, root biomass, and soil respiration in a series of replicated plots stratified across the major environmental gradients of the forest. A second major focus of this project was on the stocks and changes of carbon in the soil. We used isotope studies and intensive monitoring to investigate soil organic stocks and the climate-driven variation of soil respiration down the soil profile, in a set of six 4m deep soil shafts stratified across the landscape. We measured short term tree growth, climate responses of sap flow, and phenology in a suite of ten canopy trees to develop individual models of tree growth to daytime weather variables.

  7. Centennial black carbon turnover observed in a Russia steppe soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammes, K.; Torn, M.S.; Lapenas, A.G.; Schmidt, M.W.I.

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Black carbon (BC), from incomplete combustion of fuels and biomass, has been considered highly recalcitrant and a substantial sink for carbon dioxide. Recent studies have shown that BC can be degraded in soils. We use two soils with very low spatial variability sampled 100 years apart in a Russian steppe preserve to generate the first whole-profile estimate of BC stocks and turnover in the field. Quantities of fire residues in soil changed significantly over a century. Black carbon stock was 2.5 kg m{sup -2}, or about 7-10% of total organic C in 1900. With cessation of biomass burning, BC stocks decreased 25% over a century, which translates into a centennial soil BC turnover (293 years best estimate; range 182-541 years), much faster than so-called inert or passive carbon in ecosystem models. The turnover time presented here is for loss by all processes, namely decomposition, leaching, and erosion, although the latter two were probably insignificant in this case. Notably, at both time points, the peak BC stock was below 30 cm, a depth interval, which is not typically accounted for. Also, the quality of the fire residues changed with time, as indicated by the use benzene poly carboxylic acids (BPCA) as molecular markers. The proportions of less-condensed (and thus more easily degradable) BC structures decreased, whereas the highly condensed (and more recalcitrant) BC structures survived unchanged over the 100-year period. Our results show that BC cannot be assumed chemically recalcitrant in all soils, and other explanations for very old soil carbon are needed.

  8. Radio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    . Introduction 1.1. TGF Theory Overview [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bright bursts of gamma raysRadio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1 and Steven A. Cummer2 Received frequency (RF) emissions by terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) is developed. These radio emissions, which

  9. Measurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    the discovery of short bursts of gamma rays originating from Earth, called terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFsMeasurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray associated with 26 terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) recorded by the RHESSI satellite over the Caribbean

  10. Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder" Mission.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semi-Immersive Space Mission Design and Visualization: Case Study of the "Terrestrial Planet Finder of Technology Pasadena, CA 91125 Abstract This paper addresses visualization issues of the Terrestrial Planet the visualization of the Terrestrial Planet Finder Mission (TPF) as a case study to identify and analyze

  11. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Kinematic Surface Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by Terrestrial Laser Scanning Hans-Martin ZOGG*, David GRIMM* ETH Zurich, Switzerland Abstract This paper presents terrestrial laser scanning with emphasis on kinematic surface analysis. Besides an overview of terrestrial laser scanning in general, the 2D-laser scanner SICK LMS200-30106 is introduced as well

  12. Global meta-analysis of tuna and billfish stocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    reference points · Price data (in progress) #12;Catch #12;Catch #12;Biomass 54% #12;Stock status by ocean predatory fish biomass today is only about 10% of pre-industrial levels." 2003 "Current biomass ranges among species from 36 to 91% of the biomass predicted in the absence of fishing..." #12;· How badly overfished

  13. analogous fish stocks: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    analogous fish stocks First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 A cross-ecosystem comparison of...

  14. Atlantic Striped Bass: Stock Status and the Recreational Fishery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    seaboard." ABSTRACT-The sTriped bass. Morone saxatilis. has 10nR been a prized SpOrT fish for anRlers alonAtlantic Striped Bass: Stock Status and the Recreational Fishery R. ANNE RICHARDS and DAVID G. DEUEL Introduction The striped bass, Marone saxatilis, is one of the premier sportfishes along the U

  15. Market Maker Inventories and Stock Prices Terrence Hendershott

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearns, Michael

    in intraday trading and price formation.2 This paper examines the relationship between closing market makerMarket Maker Inventories and Stock Prices Terrence Hendershott U.C. Berkeley Mark S. Seasholes U prices follow naturally from inventory models. Liquidity suppliers and market markers profit from

  16. October 7, 2002 Order Imbalance and Individual Stock Returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearns, Michael

    , there are at least two reasons why order imbalances can provide additional power beyond trading activity measures evidence consistent with these implications. We also find that imbalance-based trading strategies yield sta has been devoted to exploring the relation between stock price movements and trading activity, where

  17. Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the US Commercial Building Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards a Very Low Energy Building Stock: Modeling the US Commercial Building Sector to Support and continuing development of a model of time varying energy consumption in the US commercial building stock targeting very low future energy consumption in the building stock. Model use has highlighted the scale

  18. Stock Take Summary 2009 A Review of Progress Against the Manchester 2015 Strategic Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heil, Matthias

    Stock Take Summary 2009 A Review of Progress Against the Manchester 2015 Strategic Plan #12;The 2009 Stock Take Report provides a detailed appraisal of progress against the nine Strategic Goals of the University's performance over the previous 12 months. In relation to accountability, each Stock Take Report

  19. Day Trading: Making and Taking Liquidity and Manipulation on the National Stock Exchange of India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Xiaodong

    Day Trading: Making and Taking Liquidity and Manipulation on the National Stock Exchange of India that virtually all of the stock exchanges in the world are electronic limit order books. Even the New York Stock a description of liquidity making and taking, without testing any proper models of the activities. This seems

  20. On the relationship between world oil prices and GCC stock markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the relationship between world oil prices and GCC stock markets Mohamed El Hedi Arouri Associate ABSTRACT We provide comprehensive evidence on the relationship between oil prices and stock mar- kets,version1-7Mar2013 #12;2 1. Introduction The causal relationship between oil prices and stock markets has

  1. Valuing Stocks Copyright 2014 Pearson Education, Inc. All rights reserved. 9-2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schubart, Christoph

    the cash flows are risky, we must discount them at the equity cost of capital. #12;Copyright ©2014 Pearson of future dividends and growth rate in dividends, and the sensitivity of the stock price to estimates to calculate the value of stock in a company with leverage. 10.Use comparable firm multiples to estimate stock

  2. Study of the impact of stochasticity on fish stock using a state space model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchesne, Thierry

    Study of the impact of stochasticity on fish stock using a state space model Thierry Duchesne and fish stock CRM, Oct. 19, 2007 1 / 23 #12;Summary Outline 1 Introduction 2 Equilibrium conditions 3 Stochastic Surplus Production Model 4 Estimation of the fish stock from data 5 Example: Georges Bank Haddock

  3. Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation and control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bravo de la Parra, Rafael

    Dynamics of a fishery on two fishing zones with fish stock dependent migrations: aggregation a specific stock-effort dynamic model. The stock corresponds to two fish populations growing and moving between two fishing zones, on which they are harvested by two different fleets. The effort represents

  4. 2/27/2013 Page 1 of 8 Comparing the Stock Market and Iowa Land Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duffy, Michael D.

    is to examine the question; Which is a better investment--the stock market or farmland? Iowa farmland values provided the better investment, this paper compares and contrasts the returns to farmland and the stock is yearly returns. Owning land has an unavoidable annual ownership cost not associated with stocks. Property

  5. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

  6. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  7. Model-data Fusion Approaches for Retrospective and Predictive Assessment of the Pan-Arctic Scale Permafrost Carbon Feedback to Global Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    representation of the Arctic system carbon cycle in Earth System Modeling frameworks. This proposed study of permafrost carbon processes in terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to operate within coupled Earth system modeling frameworks. PROJECT SIGNIFICANCE This work will provide a critical bridge between the abundant

  8. Effect of feed levels and stocking density on growth and survival of Penaeus vannamei and Penaeus stylirostris stocked in pond cages

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luszczynski, Jack Roman

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECT OF FEED LEVELS AND STOCKING DENSITY ON GROWTH AND SURVIVAL OF F *I. ARD F ~tl' t STOCKED IN POND CAGES A thesis by JACK ROMAN LUSZCZYNSKI Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Major subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences EFFECT OF FEED LEVELS AND STOCKING DENSITY ON GROWTH AND nnnvlvAL QF pena ua v n m ' AFD p ~tl 'o t STOCKED IN POND CAGES A Thesis by JACK ROMAN...

  9. Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) Flight Baseline Concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Marie; Shaklan, S; Kasting, J; Traub, W; Alexander, J; Angel, R; Blaurock, C; Brown, M; Brown, R; Burrows, C; Clampin, M; Cohen, E; Content, D; Dewell, L; Dumont, P; Egerman, R; Ferguson, H; Ford, V; Greene, J; Guyon, O; Hammel, H; Heap, S; Ho, T; Horner, S; Hunyadi, S; Irish, S; Jackson, C; Kasdin, J; Kissil, A; Krim, M; Kuchner, M; Kwack, E; Lillie, C; Lin, D; Liu, A; Marchen, L; Marley, M; Meadows, V; Mosier, G; Mouroulis, P; Noecker, M; Ohl, R; Oppenheimer, B; Pitman, J; Ridgway, S; Sabatke, E; Seager, S; Shao, M; Smith, A; Soummer, R; Stapelfeldt, K; Tenerell, D; Trauger, J; Vanderbei, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph (TPF-C) mission presented here is an existence proof for a flagship-class internal coronagraph space mission capable of detecting and characterizing Earth-like planets and planetary systems at visible wavelengths around nearby stars, using an existing launch vehicle. TPF-C will use spectroscopy to measure key properties of exoplanets including the presence of atmospheric water or oxygen, powerful signatures in the search for habitable worlds.

  10. Leptogenesis, neutrinoless double beta decay and terrestrial CP violation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Rodejohann

    2001-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Leptogenesis in left-right symmetric theories is studied. The usual see-saw mechanism is modified by the presence of a left-handed Higgs triplet. A simple connection between the properties of the light left-handed and heavy right-handed neutrinos is found. Predictions of this scenario for neutrinoless double beta decay and terrestrial CP violation in long-baseline experiments are given. These observables can in principle distinguish different realizations of the model.

  11. Influence of massive planet scattering on nascent terrestrial planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitri Veras; Philip J. Armitage

    2005-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In most extrasolar planetary systems, the present orbits of known giant planets admit the existence of stable terrestrial planets. Those same giant planets, however, have typically eccentric orbits that hint at violent early dynamics less benign for low mass planet formation. Under the assumption that massive planet eccentricities are the end point of gravitational scattering in multiple planet systems, we study the evolution of the building blocks of terrestrial planets during the scattering process. We find that typically, evolutionary sequences that result in a moderately eccentric giant planet orbiting at a ~ 2.5 AU eject over 95% of the material initially present within the habitable zone. Crossing orbits largely trigger the ejection, and leave the surviving material with a wide dispersion in semi-major axis, eccentricity and inclination. Based on these results, we predict that radial velocity follow-up of terrestrial planet systems found by Kepler will find that these are anti-correlated with the presence of eccentric giant planets orbiting at a few AU.

  12. On the Survival of Short-Period Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemary A. Mardling; D. N. C. Lin

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The currently feasible method of detection of Earth-mass planets is transit photometry, with detection probability decreasing with a planet's distance from the star. The existence or otherwise of short-period terrestrial planets will tell us much about the planet formation process, and such planets are likely to be detected first if they exist. Tidal forces are intense for short-period planets, and result in decay of the orbit on a timescale which depends on properties of the star as long as the orbit is circular. However, if an eccentric companion planet exists, orbital eccentricity ($e_i$) is induced and the decay timescale depends on properties of the short-period planet, reducing by a factor of order $10^5 e_i^2$ if it is terrestrial. Here we examine the influence companion planets have on the tidal and dynamical evolution of short-period planets with terrestrial structure, and show that the relativistic potential of the star is fundamental to their survival.

  13. Ris-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risř-PhD-Report Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon in a heathland under future climatic conditions Merete Bang Selsted Risř-PhD-63(EN) July 2010 #12;Author: Merete Bang Selsted Title: Ecosystem environmental factors have separately and in combination effect on ecosystem processes. Terrestrial ecosystems

  14. A validation of heat and carbon fluxes from highresolution land surface and regional models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Andrea, Fabio

    ) or regional climate models (RCMs) [Alessandri et al., 2007; Steiner et al., 2009]. [3., 2006; Alessandri et al., 2007; Jarlan et al., 2008; Steiner et al., 2009]. However, the SVAT models models do not account for the role of terrestrial vegetation in the carbon cycle variability [Alessandri

  15. Differential Supply of Autochthonous Organic Carbon and Nitrogen to the Microbial Loop in the Delaware Estuary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as terrestrial organic C supply, inorganic N speciation and concentrations, and extracellular release% of organic carbon (C) produced through primary production is used to fuel bacterial production (Ducklow 2000 is fueled by a combination of autochthonous and allochthonous DOM. Differen- tiating between the two sources

  16. Evaluation of Continental and Site Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Simulations with North American Flux Tower Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    extracts of photosynthesis (GPP), total respiration (Re) and NEE (net ecosystem exchange) at annual. The models range from -50% to +50% of the observations, and are centered near a bias of zero. The Can. 1st order, w/N 1st order 1st order, w/N zero order 1st order, w/N 1st order, w/N zero order VEGAS2

  17. Forest biomes are major reserves for terrestrial carbon, and major components of global primary productivity.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malhi, Yadvinder

    that encompasses land-use change processes such as forest regrowth resulting from abandon- ment of agricultural & Hall 1998), the sink is thought to be largely in the world's forests, which are large reservoirs

  18. Author's personal copy Carbon-14 in tree rings and other terrestrial samples in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    plant. The maximal calculated normalized 14 C release of 11 TBq GWe Ŕ1 yearŔ1 and the maximal effective). In the 1950s, when many atmospheric nuclear weapon tests took place, the 14 C concentration in air rose very carefully in estimating their local and global effect on the individual effective dose

  19. Stocking and Management Recommendations for Texas Farm Ponds.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For example, what size pond is to be stocked? Generally, ponds less than one acre receive different recommendations than larger ponds. The extent of water surface fluctuations, degree of expected fishing pressure and the muddiness of the water are a few... balance between bass and forage. Spawning devices may be installed to encourage reproduction of catfish. Expect most or all of the reproduction to be removed by bass, particularly in clear ponds. In muddy or turbid ponds, more catfish will avoid bass...

  20. Taking stock of renewables: NREL teaches farm and ranch appliations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsh, M.G. [NREL, Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL workshop leaders find a receptive audience for renewable energy technologies among farmers and ranchers. As an exhibitor/participant in Denver`s National Western Stock Show, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) of Golden, Colorado sponsored an educational workshop to demonstrate applications of solar and wind energy on the farm and ranch, offering a very non-traditional energy approach to people who pride themselves in tradition. This article describes solar and wind energy applications to farms and ranches.

  1. BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

  2. Carbon Fiber

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  3. Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

  4. Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  5. Alaskan soil carbon stocks: Spatial variability and dependence on environmental factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishra, U.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soil wetness in Earth System Models may lead to largeand testing of Earth System Model (ESMs). Several recentsoil wetness in Earth System Models (Lawrence & Slater,

  6. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

  7. Capturing carbon | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon Released: October 02, 2011 New technology enables molecular-level insight into carbon sequestration Carbon sequestration is a potential solution for reducing greenhouse...

  8. UPDATING THE FREIGHT TRUCK STOCK ADJUSTMENT MODEL: 1997 VEHICLE INVENTORY AND USE SURVEY DATA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.C.

    2000-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energy Information Administration's (EIA's) National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) Freight Truck Stock Adjustment Model (FTSAM) was created in 1995 relying heavily on input data from the 1992 Economic Census, Truck Inventory and Use Survey (TIUS). The FTSAM is part of the NEMS Transportation Sector Model, which provides baseline energy projections and analyzes the impacts of various technology scenarios on consumption, efficiency, and carbon emissions. The base data for the FTSAM can be updated every five years as new Economic Census information is released. Because of expertise in using the TIUS database, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) was asked to assist the EIA when the new Economic Census data were available. ORNL provided the necessary base data from the 1997 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS) and other sources to update the FTSAM. The next Economic Census will be in the year 2002. When those data become available, the EIA will again want to update the FTSAM using the VIUS. This report, which details the methodology of estimating and extracting data from the 1997 VIUS Microdata File, should be used as a guide for generating the data from the next VIUS so that the new data will be as compatible as possible with the data in the model.

  9. Carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delnick, F.M.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

  10. The Human Carbon Budget: An Estimate of the Spatial Distribution of Metabolic Carbon Consumption and Release in the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Singh, Nagendra [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide is taken up by agricultural crops and released soon after during the consumption of agricultural commodities. The global net impact of this process on carbon flux to the atmosphere is negligible, but impact on the spatial distribution of carbon dioxide uptake and release across regions and continents is significant. To estimate the consumption and release of carbon by humans over the landscape, we developed a carbon budget for humans in the United States. The budget was derived from food commodity intake data for the US and from algorithms representing the metabolic processing of carbon by humans. Data on consumption, respiration, and waste of carbon by humans were distributed over the US using geospatial population data with a resolution of approximately 450 x 450 m. The average adult in the US contains about 21 kg C and consumes about 67 kg C yr-1 which is balanced by the annual release of about 59 kg C as expired CO2, 7 kg C as feces and urine, and less than 1 kg C as flatus, sweat, and aromatic compounds. In 2000, an estimated 17.2 Tg C were consumed by the US population and 15.2 Tg C were expired to the atmosphere as CO2. Historically, carbon stock in the US human population has increased between 1790-2006 from 0.06 Tg to 5.37 Tg. Displacement and release of total harvested carbon per capita in the US is nearly 12% of per capita fossil fuel emissions. Humans are using, storing, and transporting carbon about the Earth s surface. Inclusion of these carbon dynamics in regional carbon budgets can improve our understanding of carbon sources and sinks.

  11. Standing crop dynamics under simulated short-duration grazing at four stocking rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Casco, Jose Francisco

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    temperature (4 C ) for the years 1981 and 1982 and the 30-year average for the period 1951-1982, from Easterwood Airport, College Station, Texas. 17 Table 3. Grazing cycles, dates, days grazed, number of animals used, and average weight for a simulated... variable occurred when stocking rate increased. c) No changes in the mean response variable occurred across grazing cycles. LITERATURE REVIEW Stocking Rate and Animal Relationships Stocking rate has been defined as the accumulative forage demand per...

  12. Terrestrial Planet Formation in Disks with Varying Surface Density Profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Thomas Quinn; Jonathan I. Lunine

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ``minimum-mass solar nebula'' (MMSN) model estimates the surface density distribution of the protoplanetary disk by assuming the planets to have formed in situ. However, significant radial migration of the giant planets likely occurred in the Solar system, implying a distortion in the values derived by the MMSN method. The true density profiles of protoplanetary disks is therefore uncertain. Here we present results of simulations of late-stage terrestrial accretion, each starting from a disk of planetary embryos. We assume a power-law surface density profile that varies with heliocentric distance r as r^-alpha, and vary alpha between 1/2 and 5/2 (alpha = 3/2 for the MMSN model). We find that for steeper profiles (higher values of alpha), the terrestrial planets (i) are more numerous, (ii) form more quickly, (iii) form closer to the star, (iv) are more massive, (v) have higher iron contents, and (vi) have lower water contents. However, the possibility of forming potentially habitable planets does not appear to vary strongly with alpha.

  13. Terrestrial habitat mapping of the Oak Ridge Reservation: 1996 Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington-Allen, R.A.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is in the process of remediating historical contamination on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Two key components are ecological risk assessment and monitoring. In 1994 a strategy was developed and a specific program was initiated to implement the strategy for the terrestrial biota of the entire ORR. This document details results of the first task: development of a habitat map and habitat models for key species of interest. During the last 50 years ORR has been a relatively protected island of plant and animal habitats in a region of rapidly expanding urbanization. A preliminary biodiversity assessment of the ORR by the Nature Conservancy in 1995 noted 272 occurrences of significant plant and animal species and communities. Field surveys of threatened and endangered species show that the ORR contains 20 rare plant species, 4 of which are on the state list of endangered species. The rest are either on the state list of threatened species or listed as being of special concern. The ORR provides habitat for some 60 reptilian and amphibian species; more than 120 species of terrestrial birds; 32 species of waterfowl, wading birds, and shorebirds; and about 40 mammalian species. The ORR is both a refuge for rare species and a reservoir of recruitment for surrounding environments and wildlife management areas. Cedar barrens, river bluffs, and wetlands have been identified as the habitat for most rare vascular plant species on the ORR.

  14. Carbon microtubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

  15. Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

  16. The Application of Trend Following Strategies in Stock Market Trading Simon Fong, Jackie Tai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, Chi Chiu "Simon"

    to be accurately analyzed [2]. The bubble burst of dot-com stocks by the hype of "new digital economy" is one

  17. Taxes Versus Quantities for a Stock Pollutant with Endogenous Abatement Costs and Asymmetric Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry; Zhang, Jiangfeng

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pollution stocks and environmental damages; there we ignoreabatement costs and environmental damages associated withLearning about Environmental Damage,” Jour- nal of

  18. Cushing, Oklahoma Stocks of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at CommercialDecadeReservesYear21CompanyS Light DutyDecade0

  19. U.S. Prices, Sales Volumes & Stocks

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional UsersDecadeYearThousandW W W W W

  20. U.S. Total Natural Gas Plant Stocks

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at Commercial and InstitutionalArea: U.S. EastArea:Area:Area: U.S.

  1. Stocks of Total Crude Oil and Petroleum Products (Including SPR)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14 Dec-14TableConference |6: "Regulating31,947,078

  2. Table 2. U.S. Biodiesel production, sales, and stocks

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total Delivered Residential EnergyTotalU.S. Biodiesel

  3. Carbon Storage Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Sequestration Partnership MSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana State University MVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring,...

  4. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. For

  5. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cycle plants, possibly with carbon capture and storage (CCS)natural gas plant with carbon capture and storage technology

  6. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas plant with carbon capture and storage technology werewith carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, to replace

  7. Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 CarbonFix Standard (CFS) 28 Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) 28 Forest Carbon Standard (FCS) 28

  8. Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Jeremy N.

    that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure, 1963; Gribbin, 1971]. Alternatively, magnetic storms might induce eddy electric currents in rocks along

  9. Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial microbial processes in the terrestrial subsurface. Previous geochemical studies suggested that sulfide environment in shallow sediments (5 m), and produces acidic waters (pH 3.8) that are rich in sulfate (28 m

  10. Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

  11. Heat partitioning in terrestrial planets during core formation by negative diapirism H. Samuel a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evonuk, Martha

    in terrestrial planets. We model the dynamic evolution of an iron diapir, sinking through a solid silicate proto experiments. This model can be applied to determine the heat distribution within terrestrial planets-like planets by conversion of potential into thermal energy via viscous heating (Rubie et al., 2007; Solomon

  12. To What Extent Does Terrestrial Life ``Follow The Water''? Eriita G. Jones and Charles H. Lineweaver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lineweaver, Charles H.

    uninhabited, we present empirical pressure-temperature (P-T ) phase diagrams of water, Earth, and terrestrial. This potentially uninhabited terrestrial liquid water includes (i) hot and deep regions of Earth where some combination of high temperature (T > 1228C) and restrictions on pore space, nu- trients, and energy

  13. Thompson March 2003 -1STEREO -Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson ­ March 2003 - 1STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR STEREO Science Center (SSC) William T. Thompson STEREO Science Center Code 682, NASA-Goddard (William.T.Thompson@gsfc.nasa.gov 301-286-2040) #12;Thompson ­ March 2003 - 2STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission

  14. Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES satellite sensor2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    1 Quantifying global terrestrial methanol emissions using1 observations from the TES Figure S1. December-January-Febuary (DJF, top) and June-July-August (JJA, bottom) biogenic3 methanol 1 Figure S4. Regions employed for quantifying terrestrial methanol fluxes (red) and for2

  15. App D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Restoration, Management 83 2.4.6 Compatibility of Wetland Management and Stream Management 84 2 2.5.5 Protection, Restoration, Management 103 2.5.6 Compatibility of Pond Management and StreamApp D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of Terrestrial Habitats

  16. An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark

    An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark Williamson Working Paper 83 #12;An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark for long time period simulations and large ensemble studies in Earth system models of intermediate

  17. Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    ; published 18 April 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed fromSource altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders Wei Xu,1 Sebastien. Pasko (2012), Source altitudes of terres- trial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders, Geophys

  18. The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zimmermann, Niklaus E.

    Research The future of terrestrial mammals in the Mediterranean basin under climate change Luigi climate change model outputs for two climate scenarios. Overall, a substantial number of Mediterranean in climate. For 181 terrestrial mammals (68% of all Mediterranean mammals), we used an ensemble forecasting

  19. Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena: Katabatic winds and boundary layer convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Elements of comparison between Martian and terrestrial mesoscale meteorological phenomena Keywords: Mesoscale meteorology Katabatic winds Boundary layer convection Comparative planetology a b s t r a c t Terrestrial and Martian atmospheres are both characterised by a large variety of mesoscale

  20. Web search queries can predict stock market volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordino, Ilaria; Caldarelli, Guido; Cristelli, Matthieu; Ukkonen, Antti; Weber, Ingmar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We live in a computerized and networked society where many of our actions leave a digital trace and affect other people's actions. This has lead to the emergence of a new data-driven research field: mathematical methods of computer science, statistical physics and sociometry provide insights on a wide range of disciplines ranging from social science to human mobility. A recent important discovery is that query volumes (i.e., the number of requests submitted by users to search engines on the www) can be used to track and, in some cases, to anticipate the dynamics of social phenomena. Successful exemples include unemployment levels, car and home sales, and epidemics spreading. Few recent works applied this approach to stock prices and market sentiment. However, it remains unclear if trends in financial markets can be anticipated by the collective wisdom of on-line users on the web. Here we show that trading volumes of stocks traded in NASDAQ-100 are correlated with the volumes of queries related to the same sto...

  1. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

    2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

  2. On the dynamics and thermodynamics of terrestrial planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patton, Regan L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for terrestrial planets, inclusive of viscous fluid behavior and featuring finite normal stress differences, is developed. This work offers new insights for the interpretation of planetary survey data. Evolution equations for poloidal and toroidal motions include gradients of density, viscosity, and two normal stress moduli. The poloidal field exhibits gradients in the cubic dilation, which couple non-isotropic pressures to the combined deformation field. In contrast, the toroidal field exhibits vorticity gradients with magnitudes proportional to the natural time. This holds even in the absence of material gradients. Consequently, viscosity gradients are not required to drive toroidal motions. The toroidal field is governed by an inhomogeneous diharmonic equation, exhibiting dynamic shear localization. The strain-energy density for this model, as a function of temperature, is found via thermodynamics. Assuming heat transfer with characteristic diffusivity, a radial model parameterized by thermomechani...

  3. System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

  4. Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

  5. Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

    1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

  6. Building the Santa Fe Artificial Stock Market Blake LeBaron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Building the Santa Fe Artificial Stock Market Blake LeBaron Brandeis University June 2002 Abstract This short summary presents an insider's look at the construction of the Santa Fe artificial stock of the directions that researchers have been taking is the use of agent-based financial markets. These "bottom- up

  7. Currency Depreciation and Korean Stock Market Performance during the Asian Financial Crisis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    market volatility can reflect changes in money supply and oil prices (Engle and Rodrigues, 1989Currency Depreciation and Korean Stock Market Performance during the Asian Financial Crisis Wen the volatility of the Korean stock and foreign exchange markets during the 1997 Asian financial crisis

  8. K.Stock et al. Creating a corpus of geospatial language

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    K.Stock et al. Creating a corpus of geospatial language Kristin Stock* , Robert C Pasley, Zoe Gardner, Paul Brindley, Jeremy Morley and Claudia Cialone Nottingham Geospatial Institute, University, examples of geospatial language are usually collected from the personal knowledge of researchers

  9. World gold prices and stock returns in China: insights for hedging and diversification strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    make use of several multivariate GARCH models (CCC-, DCC-, BEKK-, diagonal BEKK-, and VAR-GARCH exposures can be effectively hedged in portfolios of stocks over time. Finally, we show that the VAR-GARCH model performs better than the other multivariate GARCH models. Keywords: Stock markets, gold prices

  10. Agent-based modelling of stock markets using existing order book data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Mark

    is highly problematic, because such infrequent, rapid intra-day move- ments denote one of the largest market primarily for stock market sim- ulation with a focus on longer time frames than intra-day behaviour. A keyAgent-based modelling of stock markets using existing order book data Efstathios Panayi1 , Mark

  11. Legal insider trading and stock market reaction: Evidence from the Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    2007/67 Legal insider trading and stock market reaction: Evidence from the Netherlands Nihat Aktas and stock market reaction: Evidence from the Netherlands Nihat AKTAS1, Eric DE BODT2 , Jan DE SMEDT3, Europlace Institute of Finance. E-mail: nihat.aktas@uclouvain.be 2 ESA, Université de Lille 2, France; CORE

  12. Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

  13. Differential utilization of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon by aquatic insects of two shrub-steppe desert spring-streams: A stable carbon isotope analysis and critique of the method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mize, A.L. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether the carbon supporting stream food webs comes principally from terrestrial sources or is produced within the stream. Lacking data to resolve the allochthonous/autochthonous issue with any finality, stream ecologists have alternately postulated that stream carbon was principally autochthonous or principally allochthonous. Others argued that autochthonous and allochthonous carbon resources cannot be separated and that the allochthonous/autochthonous dependence issue is unresolvable. Many investigators have seized upon stable carbon isotopes technology as the tool to resolve the controversy. Unfortunately most investigators have conceded that the results are rarely quantitative and that the qualitative relationships are ambiguous. This study points out the fallacies of trying to conjure single isotopic values for either allochthonous or autochthonous carbon. It suggests that stable carbon isotope technology is not reliable in establishing specific consumer/food source relations and that it is not suitable for assessing allochthonous/autochthonous carbon dependence in freshwater streams.

  14. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Miguel Calmon

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  15. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between October 1st and December 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  16. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2007. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1--carbon inventory advancements; Task 2--emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3--baseline method development; Task 4--third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5--new project feasibility studies; and Task 6--development of new project software screening tool.

  17. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  18. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Neil Sampson; Miguel Calmon

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  19. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  20. Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

  1. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the Management ofThe Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries.Carbon accounting and carbon footprint - more than just

  2. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance, June 24-26, 2008 Kinematic Surface Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Analysis by Terrestrial Laser Scanning Hans-Martin Zogg* David Grimm* ETH Zurich, Switzerland [zogg, grimm]@geod.baug.ethz.ch Abstract This paper presents terrestrial laser scanning with emphasis on kinematic surface analysis. Besides an overview of terrestrial laser scanning in general, the 2D-laser scanner SICK LMS200

  3. Terrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium acceleration of electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasko, Victor

    . Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating fromTerrestrial gamma ray flashes with energies up to 100 MeV produced by nonequilibrium accelerationV) of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs). This analysis provides the first direct evidence that TGFs are produced

  4. Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other Alcohols into Fungible Gasoline, Jet, and Diesel Fuel Blend Stocks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Novel Vertimass Catalyst for Conversion of Ethanol and Other Alcohols into Fungible Gasoline, Jet, and Diesel Fuel Blend Stocks

  5. Adaptation policies to increase terrestrial ecosystem resilience: potential utility of a multicriteria approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Bremond, Ariane; Engle, Nathan L.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is rapidly undermining terrestrial ecosystem resilience and capacity to continue providing their services to the benefit of humanity and nature. Because of the importance of terrestrial ecosystems to human well-being and supporting services, decision makers throughout the world are busy creating policy responses that secure multiple development and conservation objectives- including that of supporting terrestrial ecosystem resilience in the context of climate change. This article aims to advance analyses on climate policy evaluation and planning in the area of terrestrial ecosystem resilience by discussing adaptation policy options within the ecology-economy-social nexus. The paper evaluates these decisions in the realm of terrestrial ecosystem resilience and evaluates the utility of a set of criteria, indicators, and assessment methods, proposed by a new conceptual multi-criteria framework for pro-development climate policy and planning developed by the United Nations Environment Programme. Potential applications of a multicriteria approach to climate policy vis-A -vis terrestrial ecosystems are then explored through two hypothetical case study examples. The paper closes with a brief discussion of the utility of the multi-criteria approach in the context of other climate policy evaluation approaches, considers lessons learned as a result efforts to evaluate climate policy in the realm of terrestrial ecosystems, and reiterates the role of ecosystem resilience in creating sound policies and actions that support the integration of climate change and development goals.

  6. EMPLOYEE STOCK OPTIONS INCENTIVE EFFECTS: A CPT-BASED MODEL Hamza BAHAJI, DRM Finance,Universit de Paris Dauphine, France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    employee behaviour in terms of risk taking. Most of the theoretical literature on stock options relies to predict stock options as part of the compensation contract. Several quantitative studies taking placeEMPLOYEE STOCK OPTIONS INCENTIVE EFFECTS: A CPT-BASED MODEL Hamza BAHAJI, DRM Finance,Université de

  7. Abstract In this paper we present a multi-agent based model of a simulated stock market within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    , rather than taking real data from the real world markets, build the artificial stock markets fromAbstract ­ In this paper we present a multi-agent based model of a simulated stock market within which active stock traders are modelled as heterogeneous adaptive artificial agents. We employ

  8. Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) All stock must be properly secured in the lathe chuck or mounted prior to the machining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

    or mounted prior to the machining process taking place. Use the correct sized clamp or vise for the stockStandard Operating Procedure (SOP) ­ Lathe · All stock must be properly secured in the lathe chuck the spindle work has the cup center imbedded; tail, stock and tool rests are securely clamped

  9. Winner-Take-All Correlation-Based Complex Networks for Modeling Stock Market and Degree-Based Indexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tse, Chi K. "Michael"

    Winner-Take-All Correlation-Based Complex Networks for Modeling Stock Market and Degree are constructed to study corre- lations between the closing prices for all US stocks that were traded from July 1, 2005 to August 30, 2007. The nodes are the stocks, and the connections are determined by cross

  10. On the shortterm influence of oil price changes on stock markets in GCC countries: linear and nonlinear analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the short-run relationships between oil prices and GCC stock markets. Since GCC countries are major world relatively little work done on the relationships between oil price variations and stock markets) shows a significant relationship between oil price changes and stock markets in Greece. Basher

  11. PHYSICAL REVIEW E 84, 046112 (2011) Financial factor influence on scaling and memory of trading volume in stock market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of price returns [31­33] for different stock markets have been widely studied. It should be noted October 2011) We study the daily trading volume volatility of 17 197 stocks in the US stock markets during price and trading volume have been studied for decades as a prerequisite to developing effective

  12. Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian McPherson

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

  13. Mycorrhizal fungi mediation of terrestrial ecosystem responses to global change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Jacqueline E.

    . Plants often shift carbon allocation belowground and the activities of mycorrhizal associates responding to global change is not well understood. We emphasize the need for more research in this emerging scientific disciplines and society. Ş 2014 Elsevier Ltd and The British Mycological Society. * Corresponding

  14. Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Atul Jain

    2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

  15. The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, P.N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Geologic carbon sequestration is the injection of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} into deep geologic formations where the CO{sub 2} is intended to remain indefinitely. If successfully implemented, geologic carbon sequestration will have little or no impact on terrestrial ecosystems aside from the mitigation of climate change. However, failure of a geologic carbon sequestration site, such as large-scale leakage of CO{sub 2} into a potable groundwater aquifer, could cause impacts that would require costly remediation measures. Governments are attempting to develop regulations for permitting geologic carbon sequestration sites to ensure their safety and effectiveness. At present, these regulations focus largely on decreasing the probability of failure. In this paper we propose that regulations for the siting of early geologic carbon sequestration projects should emphasize limiting the consequences of failure because consequences are easier to quantify than failure probability.

  16. Photophysics of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samsonidze, Georgii G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

  17. Soil carbon sensitivity to temperature and carbon use efficiency compared across microbial-ecosystem models of varying complexity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jianwei [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma; Wang, Gangsheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Allison, Steven D. [University of California, Irvine] [University of California, Irvine; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Yiqi [University of Oklahoma] [University of Oklahoma

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global ecosystem models may require microbial components to accurately predict feedbacks between climate warming and soil decomposition, but it is unclear what parameters and levels of complexity are ideal for scaling up to the globe. Here we conducted a model comparison using a conventional model with first-order decay and three microbial models of increasing complexity that simulate short- to long-term soil carbon dynamics. We focused on soil carbon responses to microbial carbon use efficiency (CUE) and temperature. Three scenarios were implemented in all models: constant CUE (held at 0.31), varied CUE ( 0.016 C 1), and 50 % acclimated CUE ( 0.008 C 1). Whereas the conventional model always showed soil carbon losses with increasing temperature, the microbial models each predicted a temperature threshold above which warming led to soil carbon gain. The location of this threshold depended on CUE scenario, with higher temperature thresholds under the acclimated and constant scenarios. This result suggests that the temperature sensitivity of CUE and the structure of the soil carbon model together regulate the long-term soil carbon response to warming. Equilibrium soil carbon stocks predicted by the microbial models were much less sensitive to changing inputs compared to the conventional model. Although many soil carbon dynamics were similar across microbial models, the most complex model showed less pronounced oscillations. Thus, adding model complexity (i.e. including enzyme pools) could improve the mechanistic representation of soil carbon dynamics during the transient phase in certain ecosystems. This study suggests that model structure and CUE parameterization should be carefully evaluated when scaling up microbial models to ecosystems and the globe.

  18. USING ANT COMMUNITIES FOR RAPID ASSESSMENT OF TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEM HEALTH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wike, L; Doug Martin, D; Michael Paller, M; Eric Nelson, E

    2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecosystem health with its near infinite number of variables is difficult to measure, and there are many opinions as to which variables are most important, most easily measured, and most robust, Bioassessment avoids the controversy of choosing which physical and chemical parameters to measure because it uses responses of a community of organisms that integrate all aspects of the system in question. A variety of bioassessment methods have been successfully applied to aquatic ecosystems using fish and macroinvertebrate communities. Terrestrial biotic index methods are less developed than those for aquatic systems and we are seeking to address this problem here. This study had as its objective to examine the baseline differences in ant communities at different seral stages from clear cut back to mature pine plantation as a precursor to developing a bioassessment protocol. Comparative sampling was conducted at four seral stages; clearcut, 5 year, 15 year and mature pine plantation stands. Soil and vegetation data were collected at each site. All ants collected were preserved in 70% ethyl alcohol and identified to genus. Analysis of the ant data indicates that ants respond strongly to the habitat changes that accompany ecological succession in managed pine forests and that individual genera as well as ant community structure can be used as an indicator of successional change. Ants exhibited relatively high diversity in both early and mature seral stages. High ant diversity in the mature seral stages was likely related to conditions on the forest floor which favored litter dwelling and cool climate specialists.

  19. Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    #12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

  20. Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

  1. The rule of the stock distribution with large bell in blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Yuncai [Shoudu Iron and Steel Co., Beijing (China)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes in detail, starting from the basic equation of materials falling from a two bell furnace top system, how a number of mathematical expressions which govern the stock distribution of the throat were derived. An analysis was then made by applying these equations on topics, such as stockline levels, charging sequences, stock grain size, large bell angle and batch weight. This demonstrates that a reasonable two bells top charging system and practice could be established theoretically. Furthermore, character numbers for stock distribution, such as E{sub B} and D{sub K}, were developed for a possible computer application.

  2. Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redman, Cory

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Debbie J. Thomas Frances Gelwick Head of Department, J. Rick Giardino May 2012 Major Subject: Geology iii ABSTRACT Utilizing Vertebrates to Understand the Factors that Influence Terrestrial Ecosystem Structure. (May...

  3. Studies of plume condensation contamination upon surfaces of the Terrestrial Planet Finder spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pigeon, Timothy David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, one which involves a single spacecraft, and another comprised of a five craft formation. In addition, there are several propulsion options ...

  4. A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Qianlai.

    We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

  5. Atmospheric photochemistry, surface features, and potential biosignature gases of terrestrial exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The endeavor to characterize terrestrial exoplanets warrants the study of chemistry in their atmospheres. Here I present a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry-thermochemistry model developed from the ground up for ...

  6. Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subin, Zachary Marc

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    remote ocean temperatures to respond, while a terrestrial cooling,summer cooling at 850 hPa. Significant remote changescooling due to a change in ocean circulation would imply a compensating remote

  7. PHOTOCHEMISTRY IN TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANET ATMOSPHERES. I. PHOTOCHEMISTRY MODEL AND BENCHMARK CASES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu

    We present a comprehensive photochemistry model for exploration of the chemical composition of terrestrial exoplanet atmospheres. The photochemistry model is designed from the ground up to have the capacity to treat all ...

  8. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  9. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Carbon Fiber Technology Facility is relevant in proving the scale- up of low-cost carbon fiber precursor materials and advanced manufacturing technologies * Significant...

  10. Motivating carbon dioxide | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Motivating carbon dioxide Motivating carbon dioxide Released: April 17, 2013 Scientists show what it takes to get the potential fuel feedstock to a reactive spot on a model...

  11. Technical Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Zoe Kant; Patrick Gonzalez

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy participated in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project was 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration'. The objectives of the project were to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Final Technical Report discusses the results of the six tasks that The Nature Conservancy undertook to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between July 1st 2001 and July 10th 2008. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. The project occurred in two phases. The first was a focused exploration of specific carbon measurement and monitoring methodologies and pre-selected carbon sequestration opportunities. The second was a more systematic and comprehensive approach to compare various competing measurement and monitoring methodologies, and assessment of a variety of carbon sequestration opportunities in order to find those that are the lowest cost with the greatest combined carbon and other environmental benefits. In the first phase we worked in the U.S., Brazil, Belize, Bolivia, Peru, and Chile to develop and refine specific carbon inventory methods, pioneering a new remote-sensing method for cost-effectively measuring and monitoring terrestrial carbon sequestration and system for developing carbon baselines for both avoided deforestation and afforestation/reforestation projects. We evaluated the costs and carbon benefits of a number of specific terrestrial carbon sequestration activities throughout the U.S., including reforestation of abandoned mined lands in southwest Virginia, grassland restoration in Arizona and Indiana, and reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. The most cost-effective U.S. terrestrial sequestration opportunity we found through these studies was reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. In Phase II we conducted a more systematic assessment and comparison of several different measurement and monitoring approaches in the Northern Cascades of California, and a broad 11-state Northeast regional assessment, rather than pre-selected and targeted, analysis of terrestrial sequestration costs and benefits. Work was carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA. Partners include the Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, The Sampson Group, Programme for Belize, Society for Wildlife Conservation (SPVS), Universidad Austral de Chile, Michael Lefsky, Colorado State University, UC Berkeley, the Carnegie Institution of Washington, ProNaturaleza, Ohio State University, Stephen F. Austin University, Geographical Modeling Services, Inc., WestWater, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Century Ecosystem Services, Mirant Corporation, General Motors, American Electric Power, Salt River Project, Applied Energy Systems, KeySpan, NiSource, and PSEG. This project, 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration', has resulted in over 50 presentations and reports, available publicly through the Department of Energy or by visiting the links listed in Appendix 1. More

  12. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Smit, Berend

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  13. Effect of the terrestrial magnetic field on direct-current measurements in underground pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhala, R.M.; Dikmarova, L.P.; Kornienko, V.Yu.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the secondary field of an underground pipeline, magnetized by the terrestrial magnetic field, on noncontacting measurements of direct current flowing in it is discussed. The systematic errors of three known measurement methods are compared. A method based on the measurement of the difference between the field components parallel to the terrestrial field component orthogonal to the pipline is identified as the most accurate. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  14. An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

  15. Novel Applications of Dielectric Elastomer Actuators L. Christopher Stocking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    , solar power could replace all other forms of power production. Replacing the power produced by coal, oil and gas power-generation facilities with solar- produced power would reduce global carbon emissions by making solar power more efficient and cost-effective. Why? Simple calculations show that, even after

  16. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  17. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  18. Multispectral Machine Vision for Improved Undercarriage Inspection of Railroad Rolling Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahuja, Narendra

    Multispectral Machine Vision for Improved Undercarriage Inspection of Railroad Rolling Stock Railroad Engineering Program - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering *Computer Vision monitoring, safety, electrical, component 1. INTRODUCTION Current practices for inspection of railroad

  19. A Modern View of Joseph's Policy: food stocks as financial assets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Irma; Berck, Peter

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the less developed country (LDC) undertakes. This is theestimate of the risk to the LDC of buffer stock holding, andbe welfare improving for an LDC to hold a grain stockpile.

  20. Automated Methods for Interpreting Geospatial Natural Language Dr Kristin Stock, Nottingham Geospatial Institute, University of Nottingham

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stock, Kristin

    NaturalGeo Automated Methods for Interpreting Geospatial Natural Language Dr Kristin Stock, Nottingham Geospatial Institute, University of Nottingham 2012-2014 What is geospatial natural language diagrams best match 2000 geospatial natural language expressions. The results will populate our

  1. More than just a school : an exploration in tractable neighborhood building stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevermer, John Alton

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortages in land and resources are stiffling new construction and forcing the pursuit of alternate means to satisfy society's space needs within the existing building stock. Most existing buildings were not designed for ...

  2. Limited attention and the earnings announcement returns of past stock market winners

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aboody, David; Lehavy, Reuven; Trueman, Brett

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    beginning in 1971, the top percentile of stocks in terms ofalmost double that of our top percentile as a whole. 3 Thethan that of our top percentile sample. 4 We examine whether

  3. Technology Offer Cell factory for R-mandelate biosynthesis from feed-stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , fermentative procedure. The biocatalytic process starts from feed-stock. No use of petrol derived chemicals and deprotection) and/or use of highly toxic chemicals (Cyanide) synthesis and work-up; use of petrol derived

  4. Rangeland Risk Management for Texans: Using Forage Harvest Efficiency to Determine Stocking Rate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanselka, C. Wayne; White, Larry D.; Holechek, Jerry L.

    2002-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Grazing pressure determines both animal performance and the long-term health of the rangeland. Moderate grazing ensures that rangeland is properly stocked for the amount of forage available. Knowing how to estimate grazing ...

  5. Disaster debris management and recovery of housing stock in San Francisco, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saiyed, Zahraa Nazim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the potential effects of a 7.2 magnitude earthquake in San Francisco City, particularly the implications on San Francisco's residential housing stock and impacts on the construction and demolition ...

  6. Approach for the Improvement of Energy Performance of a Stock of Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Bouillon, J.; Crozier, L.; Guyot, G.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the work performed by CSTB, ADEME and the Ministry of equipment in France to improve the energy performance of the ministry stock of buildings: 7 millions square meters, 10 000 buildings, wide range of different buildings...

  7. Computerising gentlemen: the automation of the London Stock Exchange, c. 1945-1995 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardo-Guerra, Juan Pablo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation concerns the development of market information technologies in the London Stock Exchange, c. 1945-1992. Based on archival research in London, Cambridge and Edinburgh, and 20 semistructured interviews ...

  8. AbstractStock-rebuilding time iso pleths relate constant levels of fishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    519 Abstract­Stock-rebuilding time iso pleths relate constant levels of fishing mortality (F. Iso pleths calculated in previous studies by deterministic models approximate median, rather than mean

  9. Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.H.; Bernard, S.; Andersen, G.L.; Chen, W.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between plants and microbes are an integral part of our terrestrial ecosystem. Microbe-plant interactions are being applied in many areas. In this review, we present recent reports of applications in the areas of plant-growth promotion, biocontrol, bioactive compound and biomaterial production, remediation and carbon sequestration. Challenges, limitations and future outlook for each field are discussed.

  10. On interrelations of recurrences and connectivity trends between stock indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goswami, B; Marwan, N; Kurths, J

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial data has been extensively studied for correlations using Pearson's cross-correlation coefficient {\\rho} as the point of departure. We employ an estimator based on recurrence plots --- the Correlation of Probability of Recurrence (CPR) --- to analyze connections between nine stock indices spread worldwide. We suggest a slight modification of the CPR approach in order to get more robust results. We examine trends in CPR for an approximately 19-month window moved along the time series and compare them to {\\rho}. Binning CPR into three levels of connectedness: strong, moderate and weak, we extract the trends in number of connections in each bin over time. We also look at the behavior of CPR during the Dot-Com bubble by shifting the time series to align their peaks. CPR mainly uncovers that the markets move in and out of periods of strong connectivity erratically, instead of moving monotonously towards increasing global connectivity. This is in contrast to {\\rho}, which gives a picture of ever increasing...

  11. On interrelations of recurrences and connectivity trends between stock indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Goswami; G. Ambika; N. Marwan; J. Kurths

    2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Financial data has been extensively studied for correlations using Pearson's cross-correlation coefficient {\\rho} as the point of departure. We employ an estimator based on recurrence plots --- the Correlation of Probability of Recurrence (CPR) --- to analyze connections between nine stock indices spread worldwide. We suggest a slight modification of the CPR approach in order to get more robust results. We examine trends in CPR for an approximately 19-month window moved along the time series and compare them to {\\rho}. Binning CPR into three levels of connectedness: strong, moderate and weak, we extract the trends in number of connections in each bin over time. We also look at the behavior of CPR during the Dot-Com bubble by shifting the time series to align their peaks. CPR mainly uncovers that the markets move in and out of periods of strong connectivity erratically, instead of moving monotonously towards increasing global connectivity. This is in contrast to {\\rho}, which gives a picture of ever increasing correlation. CPR also exhibits that time shifted markets have high connectivity around the Dot-Com bubble of 2000. We stress on the importance of significance testing in interpreting measures applied to field data. CPR is more robust to significance testing. It has the additional advantages of being robust to noise, and reliable for short time series lengths and low frequency of sampling. Further, it is more sensitive to changes than {\\rho} as it captures correlations between the essential dynamics of the underlying systems.

  12. Improving the thermal performance of the US residential window stock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Eto, J.H.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Windows have typically been the least efficient thermal component in the residential envelope, but technology advances over the past decade have helped to dramatically improve the energy efficiency of window products. While the thermal performance of these advanced technology windows can be easily characterized for a particular building application, few precise estimates exist of their aggregate impact on national or regional energy use. Policy-makers, utilities, researchers and the fenestration industry must better understand these products` ultimate conservation potential in order to determine the value of developing new products and initiating programs to accelerate their market acceptance. This paper presents a method to estimate the conservation potential of advanced window technologies, combining elements of two well-known modeling paradigms: supply curves of conserved energy and residential end-use forecasting. The unique features include: detailed descriptions of the housing stock by region and vintage, state-of-the-art thermal descriptions of window technologies, and incorporation of market effects to calculate achievable conservation potential and timing. We demonstrate the methodology by comparing, for all new houses built between 1990 and 2010, the conservation potential of very efficient, high R-value ``superwindows`` in the North Central federal region and spectrally-selective low-emissivity (moderate Revalue and solar transmittance) windows in California.

  13. The effects of stocking density on two Tilapia species raised in an intensive culture system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson-Arzapalo, Anne

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS'OF STOCKING DENSITY ON TWO TILAPIA SPECIES RAISED IN AN INTENSIVE CULTURE SYSTEM A Thesis by ANNE HENDERSON-ARZAPALO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December l979 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Science THE EFFECTS OF STOCKING DENSITY ON TWO TILAPIA SPECIES RAISED IN AN INTENSIVE CULTURE SYSTEM A Thesis by ANNE HENDERSON-ARZAPALO Approved as to style...

  14. Educational buildings stocks refurbishment, a double opportunity: massive energy savings, education of youngsters about sustainable development 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couillaud, N.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Educational buildings stocks refurbishment, a double opportunity: massive energy savings, education of youngsters about sustainable development Nicolas COUILLAUD, research engineer at CSTB, France Phone +33 1 61 44 80 53, Email: nicolas....couillaud@cstb.fr The market of new buildings is limited because the rate of renewal of buildings stock is lower than 1% per year. In order to meet the objective of reduction by 4 of energy consumptions in 2050, the improvement of the energy efficiency of existing buildings...

  15. Research Summary Carbon Additionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of muchResearch Summary Carbon Additionality Additionality is widely considered to be a core aspect controversy in national carbon accounting, international regulatory frameworks and carbon markets. A review

  16. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, R.J.

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

  17. Carbon Monoxide Environmental Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Workgroup on Carbon Monoxide Surveillance Formed in April 2005 Membership: EPHT grantees Academic

  18. The Woodland Carbon Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

  19. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  20. Land Use and Ecosystems Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Land Use and Ecosystems information includes Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Data Sets, data sets from Africa and Asia, the Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dataset, and much more.

  1. Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Ben Poulter; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. Work is being carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA.

  2. The significance of the erosion-induced terrestrial carbonsink

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berhe, A.A.; Harte, J.; Harden, J.W.; Torn, M.S.

    2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimating carbon (C) balance in erosional and depositionallandscapes is complicated by the effects of soil redistribution on bothnet primary productivity (NPP) and decomposition. Recent studies arecontradictory as to whether soil erosion does or does not constitute a Csink. Here we clarify the conceptual basis for how erosion can constitutea C sink. Specifically, the criterion for an erosional C sink is thatdynamic replacement of eroded C, and reduced decomposition rates indepositional sites, must together more than compensate for erosionallosses. This criterion is in fact met in many erosional settings, andthus erosion and deposition can make a net positive contribution to Csequestration. We show that, in a cultivated Mississippi watershed and acoastal California watershed, the magnitude of the erosion-induced C sinkis likely to be on the order of 1 percent of NPP and 16 percent of erodedC. Although soil erosion has serious environmental impacts, the annualerosion-induced C sink offsets up to 10 percent of the global fossil fuelemissions of carbon dioxide for 2005.

  3. Terrestrial Background Reduction in RPM Systems by Direct Internal Shielding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Sean M.; Ashbaker, Eric D.; Schweppe, John E.

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray detection systems that are close to the earth or other sources of background radiation often require shielding, especially when trying to detect a relatively weak source. One particular case of interest that we address in this paper is that encountered by the Radiation Portal Monitors (RPMs) systems placed at border-crossing Ports of Entry (POE). These RPM systems are used to screen for illicit radiological materials, and they are often placed in situations where terrestrial background is large. In such environments, it is desirable to consider simple physical modifications that could be implemented to reduce the effects from background radiation without affecting the flow of traffic and the normal operation of the portal. Simple modifications include adding additional shielding to the environment, either inside or outside the apparatus. Previous work [2] has shown the utility of some of these shielding configurations for increasing the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of gross-counting RPMs. Because the total cost for purchasing and installing RPM systems can be quite expensive, in the range of hundreds of thousands of dollars for each cargo-screening installation, these shielding variations may offer increases in detection capability for relatively small cost. Several modifications are considered here in regard to their real-world applicability, and are meant to give a general idea of the effectiveness of the schemes used to reduce background for both gross-counting and spectroscopic detectors. These scenarios are modeled via the Monte-Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code package [1] for ease of altering shielding configurations, as well as enacting unusual scenarios prior to prototyping in the field. The objective of this paper is to provide results representative of real modifications that could enhance the sensitivity of this, as well as the next generation of radiation detectors. The models used in this work were designed to provide the most general results for an RPM. These results are therefore presented as general guidance on what shielding configurations will be the most valuable for a generalized RPM, considered in light of their economic and geometric possibility in the real world.

  4. Predicting Planets in Known Extra-Solar Planetary Systems III: Forming Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Nathan A. Kaib

    2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent results have shown that many of the known extrasolar planetary systems contain regions which are stable for both Earth-mass and Saturn-mass planets. Here we simulate the formation of terrestrial planets in four planetary systems -- 55 Cancri, HD 38529, HD 37124, and HD 74156 -- under the assumption that these systems of giant planets are complete and that their orbits are well-determined. Assuming the giant planets formed and migrated quickly, then terrestrial planets may form from a second generation of planetesimals. In each case, Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos are placed in between the giant planets and evolved for 100 Myr. We find that planets form relatively easily in 55 Cnc, with masses up to 0.6 Earth masses and in some cases substantial water contents and orbits in the habitable zone. HD 38529 is likely to support an asteroid belt but no terrestrial planets of significant mass. No terrestrial planets form in HD 37124 and HD 74156, although in some cases 1-2 lone embryos survive for 100 Myr. If migration occurred later, depleting the planetesimal disk, then massive terrestrial planets are unlikely to form in any of these systems.

  5. Pre-Shot Simulations of Far-Field Ground Motions for the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Explosions at the Climax Stock, Nevada National Security Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, A J; Wagoner, J; Petersson, N A; Sjogreen, B

    2010-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) will involve a series of explosions in various geologic and emplacement conditions to validate numerical simulation methods to predict behavior of seismic wave excitation and propagation for nuclear test monitoring. The first SPE's currently underway involve explosions in the Climax Stock (granitic geology) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Detailed geologic data and published material properties for the major lithologic units of the NNSS and surrounding region were used to build three-dimensional models for seismic wave propagation simulations. The geologic structure near the SPE shot point is quite varied including granitic, carbonate, tuff and alluvium lithologies. We performed preliminary ground motion simulations for a near-source domain covering 8 km x 8 km at the surface centered on the shot point to investigate various source and propagation effects using WPP, LLNL's anelastic seismic wave finite difference code. Simulations indicate that variations in wave propagation properties of the sub-surface will generate strongly path-dependent response once the energy has left the relatively small granitic geology of the near-surface Climax Stock near the SPE shot point. Rough topography to the north and west of SPE shot point causes additional complexity in the signals including energy on the transverse components. Waves propagate much faster through the granitic and carbonate formations and slower through the tuff and alluvium. Synthetic seismograms for a pure explosion source in a 3D geologic structure show large amplitudes on transverse component. For paths to the south sampling the granite, tuff and alluvium lithologies transverse component amplitudes are as high as 50% of that on the vertical and radial components.

  6. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon cycling to improve climate modeling and carbon...

  7. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Tapan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

  8. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  9. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  10. Survival of Terrestrial Planets in the Presence of Giant Planet Migration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avi M. Mandell; Steinn Sigurdsson

    2003-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of ``Hot Jupiters'', Jovian mass planets with very short orbital periods orbiting nearby main sequence stars, has been proposed to be primarily due to the orbital migration of planets formed in orbits initially much further from the parent star. The migration of giant planets would have profound effects on the evolution of inner terrestrial planets in these systems, and previous analyses have assumed that no terrestrial planets survive after migration has occurred. We present numerical simulations showing that a significant fraction of terrestrial planets could survive the migration process, eventually returning to circular orbits relatively close to their original positions. A fraction of the final orbits are in the Habitable Zone, suggesting that planetary systems with close-in giant planets are viable targets for searches for Earth-like habitable planets around other stars.

  11. Metal accumulation in terrestrial pulmonates at a lead/zinc smelter site in Arnoldstein, Austria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabitsch, W.B. [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)] [Univ. of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently,the suitability of terrestrial gastropods was reviewed as quantitative indicator organisms for environmental metal pollution. The peculiar metal accumulation capabilities in molluscs have been known in detail for decades, but {open_quotes}only few data are available for terrestrial pulmonates{close_quotes}. Furthermore, data are restricted to only a few species, and despite similarities in metabolic pathways, species-specific properties in metal-budget strategies exist. Information concerning the potential range of metal burden in these animals form the field are, therefore, of ecophysical relevance. Snails satisfy a basic demand as quantitative indicators of the bioavailable fraction of terrestrial metal pollution. In this study concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper and zinc were measured in tissues of 4 species of snails collected in the vicinity of a lead/zinc smelter with a long history of pollution. 23 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Taking stock of Saddam's fiery legacy in Kuwait

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, M.

    1991-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Six months after Saddam Hussein's torching of more than 700 Kuwaiti oil wells, health officials, meteorologists, and environmental experts convened during mid-August in Cambridge, Massachusetts, to assess the impact of the fires. The soot cloud produced by the fires hasn't produced a nuclear winter, nor are the carbon dioxide and other gases released going to have an appreciable effect on global warming, although regional weather changes are possible. So far adverse health effects from the heavy pall of pollution caused by the fires have been surprisingly mild. This isn't to say that premature deaths will not occur, but many scientists had feared much worse. Nevertheless, all researchers concede that the data for this particular conclusion are still preliminary, and they expressed concerns that health problems may worsen in the coming months. Most of the health effects are expected in a region blanketed by a plume of smoke 800 to 1,000 kilometers long. The average concentrations of the primary pollutants it contains, carbon-based particles and sulfur dioxide, are similar to those in any large urban center. Still, the oil fires increase the pollution burden on Kuwait, which already had a problem with particulates in the air, and some epidemiologists expect that the extra pollutants will take their toll.

  13. Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

  14. SCALE-UP OF CARBON /CARBON BIPOLAR PLATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates · Project Objectives ­ Build and demonstrate a pilot facility#12;SCALE-UP OF CARBON /CARBON BIPOLAR PLATES Quarterly Report to the Department of Energy, May 19 #12;DOE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates · Phase I ­ Technology Development

  15. ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    1 ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh Bren hall 3422, suh: Homework (1 for each week @10%): 40% Personal carbon account (report): 30% Final exam: 30% Course schedule Week 1: Introduction to carbon footprint and carbon account - Background: carbon awareness, major

  16. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  17. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  18. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  19. Carbon Footprint Towson University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fath, Brian D.

    Carbon Footprint Towson University GHG Inventory for Educational Institutes Getting Starting.TM The Carbon Footprint 8 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 1. Scope I-Direct Emissions works.TM The Carbon Footprint 10 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 3. Scope III

  20. Dynamics of metal-silicate separation in a terrestrial magma Tobias Hoink, Jorg Schmalzl, and Ulrich Hansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalzl, Jörg

    Dynamics of metal-silicate separation in a terrestrial magma ocean Tobias Ho¨ink, Jo¨rg Schmalzl-48149 Mu¨nster, Germany (hoeink@earth.uni-muenster.de) [1] In a terrestrial magma ocean, the metal-silicate the separation of metal droplets from the liquid silicate, occurs on a characteristic timescale, which

  1. Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars coordinating the logistics and resupply of far-flung planetary bases. A number of logistics methods have been terrestrial logistics methods were tested in the context of (analog) planetary exploration. A comprehensive

  2. Manufacture of finely divided carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.G.

    1980-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Finely divided carbon is manufactured by a process producing a gaseous stream containing carbon monoxide by reacting coal and air in a slagging ash gasifier, separating carbon monoxide from the gaseous mixture, and disproportionating the carbon monoxide to produce finely divided carbon and carbon dioxide, the latter of which is recycled to the gasifier.

  3. SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Roundtable (CAPR) GEO Forest Monitoring SymposiumGEO Forest Monitoring)Amazon Initiative Consortium (IA) #12;Carbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Carbon for Poverty Reduction

  4. Formation of Carbon Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

  5. Proposal type: Postdoctoral Descriptive title: Formulating the next generation of models of the terrestrial carbon cycle in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sahotra

    ;Implications to Construction of Satellite Climate Data Record · Well characterize the errors of satellite-A ATMS NOAA6-14 NOAA15-19 Suomi NPP MetOp-A/B FY

  6. Characteristics of broadband lightning emissions associated with terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    . Introduction [2] Brief (typically bursts of gamma rays with mean energies of 2 MeV originating from the Earth's atmosphere, referred to as terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs), have been observed by the Burst et al., 2010; Briggs et al., 2010]. With spectra typically harder than cosmic gamma ray bursts

  7. Clay mineral variations in Holocene terrestrial sediments from the Indus Basin Anwar Alizai a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clift, Peter

    Clay mineral variations in Holocene terrestrial sediments from the Indus Basin Anwar Alizai a 23 February 2012 Keywords: XRD Clay mineralogy Monsoon Himalaya Indus Delta Floodplain Fluvial processes Large rivers We employed X-ray diffraction methods to quantify clay mineral assemblages

  8. Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En-vironmental Data Service, National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En- vironmental Data Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric.... ....Norman Doelling has been named manager of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Sea Grant Program as an energy source, conversion of waste water and sewage sludge into a resource, and others.... ....Hatchery

  9. Data Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Ming

    Data Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman A procedure is developed to incorporate equality constraints in Kalman filters, including the Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and is referred to as the Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter (CEnKF). The constraint

  10. Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Nico M.

    3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

  11. Frontiers in Contaminant Speciation and Reactivity in Terrestrial Environments: The Role of Synchrotron Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    science. To delineate reaction mechanisms of contaminant reactions on soil minerals and in soils attenuation processes, speciation of metal(loid)s in heterogeneous soilslbiosolids/plants, and mineral/microbe/contaminant226 Frontiers in Contaminant Speciation and Reactivity in Terrestrial Environments: The Role

  12. On the formation of terrestrial planets in hot-Jupiter systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martyn J. Fogg; Richard P. Nelson

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a series of calculations aimed at examining how an inner system of planetesimals/protoplanets, undergoing terrestrial planet formation, evolves under the influence of a giant planet undergoing inward type II migration through the region bounded between 5 - 0.1 AU. We find that > 60% of the solids disk survives by being scattered by the giant planet into external orbits. Planetesimals are scattered outward almost as efficiently as protoplanets, resulting in the regeneration of a solids disk where dynamical friction is strong and terrestrial planet formation is able to resume. A simulation extended for a few Myr after the migration of the giant planet halted at 0.1 AU, resulted in an apparently stable planet of ~ 2 Earth masses forming in the habitable zone. Migration-induced mixing of volatile-rich material from beyond the `snowline' into the inner disk regions means that terrestrial planets that form there are likely to be water-rich. We predict that hot--Jupiter systems are likely to harbor water-rich terrestrial planets in their habitable zones. These planets may be detected by future planet search missions.

  13. Maternal Transfer of Contaminants and Reduced Reproductive Success of Southern Toads (Bufo [Anaxyrus] terrestris) Exposed to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    ) residing in two locations: (1) an active coal combustion waste (CCW) disposal basin and adjacent 40-ha (Gastrophryne carolinensis) collected from a coal ash settling basin accumulated and transferred selenium (Se [Anaxyrus] terrestris) Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste Brian S. Metts,, * Kurt A. Buhlmann, Tracey D

  14. Volume estimates of trees with complex architecture from terrestrial laser scanning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefsky, Michael

    consuming and can require destructive sampling. In this study we used a terrestrial lidar sensor; data was analyzed on the basis of branch size and the sampling pattern of the sensor. Two hundred and fifty. 2, 023521 (14 May 2008) © 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers [DOI: 10

  15. Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond, Massachusetts (USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Hydrogen isotopic variability in leaf waxes among terrestrial and aquatic plants around Blood Pond interpretation of the hydrogen isotope ratios of plant leaf waxes extracted from sediments requires a thor- ough at a single site to determine how leaf wax hydro- gen isotope (D/H) ratios differ in different plant types

  16. VISION-BASED TECHNIQUES FOR REFRACTION ANALYSIS IN APPLICATIONS OF TERRESTRIAL GEODESY Philipp FLACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    levelling ABSTRACT: Imaging sensors are increasingly spread in geodetic instruments, because they enable the evaluation of digital image data for the determination of direction and height. Beyond this, the analysis aufzuzeigen. 1. INTRODUCTION Due to automation of tasks in terrestrial geodesy, image sensors and vision

  17. UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    UNL Microgravity: Team Fast Project: Lunar soil is much different from terrestrial soil, consisting of a large percentage of very fine particles. Lunar soil also contains very irregular and jagged particles formed from the sintering together of broked grains during micro-meteorite bombardment. NASA has soil

  18. Small reductions in forest cover weaken terrestrial-aquatic linkages in headwater streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosemond, Amy Daum

    assessed the impacts of deforestation on the energy base of headwater food webs in seven headwater streams. Standing crop of coarse particulate organic matter (CPOM) declined with deforestation at large scales (i.e. catchment deforestation and riparian deforestation at the entire stream network scale). Terrestrial plant

  19. Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowling, Sharon A.

    Greening the terrestrial biosphere: simulated feedbacks on atmospheric heat and energy circulation on atmospheric exchange of heat and moisture. Our CONTROL simulation had a mean global net primary production (NPP) of 56.3 GtCyr-1 which is half that of our scenario value of 115.1 GtCyr-1 . LAI and latent energy

  20. TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Laurel

    TERRESTRIAL ROCK VARNISH: A KEY TO UNDERSTANDING THE SURFACE COMPOSITION OF MARS. J. G. Ward1 , L produces a strong spectral band contrast. This also gives varnish its shiny appearance. On Earth rock varnish may have a microbial origin [3]. Clays are transported from an external source and deposited

  1. Population genetic structure reveals terrestrial affinities for a headwater stream insect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blouin, Michael S.

    ). Recent studies (e.g. McGlashan, Hughes & Bunn, 2001; Wishart & Hughes, 2003; Huey, Hughes & Baker, 2006 Blackwell Publishing Ltd 1 #12;terrestrial among-drainage dispersal even less likely (Hughes et al., 1999, 2003; Wishart & Hughes, 2001, 2003; Monaghan et al., 2002; Schultheis, Weight & Hendricks, 2002

  2. Historical Reconstruction of Terrestrial Organic Matter Inputs to Fiordland, NZ Over the Last ~500 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Richard

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................ 92 OMfossil ....................................................................................... 96 Source Reconstruction: Marine, Terrestrial, Fossil ................... 99 Conclusion...) demonstrates that in peat and 9 soil-poor environments, the BIT Index does not provide similar estimates of %OMterr in Northern Hemisphere fjords as 8, 13C, and C/N analysis. Additionally, it has been shown that the soil and marine GDGTs may vary...

  3. Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, William A.

    Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

  4. Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon Accepted 14 January 2010 Available online 20 January 2010 A B S T R A C T Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes (buckypaper) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) paper

  5. Essays on Forecasting and Hedging Models in the Oil Market and Causality Analysis in the Korean Stock Market 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hankyeung

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    on the forecasting models for crude oil prices and the hedging models for gasoline prices, and to study the change in the contemporaneous causal relationship between investors' activities and stock price movements in the Korean stock market. In the first essay...

  6. Oil Prices, Stock Markets and Portfolio Investment: Evidence from Sector Analysis in Europe over the Last Decade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    the dynamic relationship between oil price variations and stock markets. The pioneering paper by Jones model with GARCH effects to American monthly data and shows a significant relationship between oil priceOil Prices, Stock Markets and Portfolio Investment: Evidence from Sector Analysis in Europe over

  7. Volume 29, Issue 2 On the short-term influence of oil price changes on stock markets in gcc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Rouen & LEO Abstract This paper examines the short-run relationships between oil prices and GCC stock on the relationships between oil price variations and stock markets, as underlined by Basher and Sadorsky (2006. For instance, using a VAR model, Papapetrou (2001) shows a significant relationship between oil price changes

  8. Essays on Forecasting and Hedging Models in the Oil Market and Causality Analysis in the Korean Stock Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Hankyeung

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    on the forecasting models for crude oil prices and the hedging models for gasoline prices, and to study the change in the contemporaneous causal relationship between investors' activities and stock price movements in the Korean stock market. In the first essay...

  9. Stock Assessment of Columbia River Anadromous Salmonids : Final Report, Volume I, Chinook, Coho, Chum and Sockeye Salmon Summaries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Philip J.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose was to identify and characterize the wild and hatchery stocks of salmon and steelhead in the Columbia River Basin on the basis of currently available information. This report provides a comprehensive compilation of data on the status and life histories of Columbia Basin salmonid stocks.

  10. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  11. Zero-Inventory Conditions For a Two-Part-Type Make-to-Stock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veatch, Michael H.

    Zero-Inventory Conditions For a Two-Part-Type Make-to-Stock Production System Michael H. Veatch finished goods inventory; un- met demand is backordered. The control policy determines which part type and sufficient conditions are found for a zero-inventory pol- icy to be optimal. This result indicates

  12. The Visualization of Large Database in Stock Market Li Lin, Longbing Cao, Chengqi Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Longbing

    and global trend with fish- eye technology. Second, for the result graph, there are many parameters, so we; Fish-eye view; Local details; Global trends; Dimension reducing 1. Introduction In stock market another problem for a trading system. In the paper, we have resolved the two problems with fish- eye

  13. Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (2007) 847869 Modeling obsolete computer stock under regional

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resources, Conservation and Recycling 51 (2007) 847­869 Modeling obsolete computer stock under and recycling systems using GIS, and demonstrate the potential economic benefits from diverting electronic buildings. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Computer recycling; Product inventory

  14. The Conditional Relationship between Risk and Return in Iran's Stock Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia

    in Iran by estimating the relationship between various sources of risk -- market risk, oil price risk returns are influenced by unexpected fluctuations in macroeconomic variables such as oil prices, exchangeThe Conditional Relationship between Risk and Return in Iran's Stock Market Mahdieh Rezagholizadeh

  15. FEMA: Family Basic Disaster Supplies There are six basics you should stock in your home

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Xiao

    the containers with dishwashing soap and water, and rinse completely so there is no residual soap. Follow the bottles with dishwashing soap and water, and rinse completely so #12;there is no residual soapFEMA: Family Basic Disaster Supplies There are six basics you should stock in your home: Water

  16. DIGITAL HYDROACOUSTIC DATA-PROCESSING SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION TO PACIFIC HAKE STOCK ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIGITAL HYDROACOUSTIC DATA-PROCESSING SYSTEM AND ITS APPLICATION TO PACIFIC HAKE STOCK ASSESSMENT IN PORT SUSAN,WASHINGTONI RICHARD E. THORNE2 ABSTRACT A digital hydroacoustic data-processing system be eliminated by suitable digital circuitry. Con- sequently, a digital processing system was de- signed

  17. Stock-Take of Electric Vehicle Interface with Electricity and Smart

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toohey, Darin W.

    Stock-Take of Electric Vehicle Interface with Electricity and Smart Grids across APEC Economies-01.6 group.com m 6 m or #12;Assessment of August 2012 Electric Vehicle Connectivity Conditions in APEC Executive Summary Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) are part of a new wave of clean vehicles

  18. Effects of supplemental stocking on eastern wild turkey restoration in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feuerbacher, Charles Kirk

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 107 radio-marked eastern wild turkeys (Meleagris 11 v ) was initially or supplementally released from 1994-96 on 5 different study areas to determine the effectiveness of supplemental stocking in the Post Oak Savannah of Texas. An attempt...

  19. Whether for aesthetics or for fishing pleasure, most pond owners are interested in stocking and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Elizabeth W.

    combination of fishes in Pennsylvania ponds. Either smallmouth or largemouth bass are suitable although ponds. Bass offer excellent sport fishing opportunities, while bluegills provide a food base for bass and good fishing for youngsters. When stocking these fish together, bass should be one year older than

  20. Advanced Largemouth Bass Production and Stock Contribution to Small South Dakota Impoundment Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thanks to Blue Dog State Fish Hatchery for providing the largemouth bass fingerlings usedAdvanced Largemouth Bass Production and Stock Contribution to Small South Dakota Impoundment with me on the bioenergetics portion of this project. I thank the many South Dakota Game, Fish

  1. Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    Scaling and memory of intraday volatility return intervals in stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1 Kazuko interval between price volatilities that are above a certain threshold q for 31 intraday data sets Yamasaki,1,2 Shlomo Havlin,1,3 and H. Eugene Stanley1 1 Center for Polymer Studies and Department

  2. Indication of multiscaling in the volatility return intervals of stock markets Fengzhong Wang,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    of financial markets has long been a focus of economics and econophysics research 1­9 . Study- ing recently, some related studies on financial markets, such as escape time 30 , exit time 31,32 , first and nonlinear features 36 . Recent studies 37­39 of stock markets show that the distribution of activ- ity

  3. Assessment of environmental correlates with the distribution of fish stocks using a spatially explicit model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, Allan R.

    Assessment of environmental correlates with the distribution of fish stocks using a spatially-mail: msundermeyer@umassd.edu phone: (508) 999-8812 fax: (508) 910-6371 Running title: Assessing environmental;INTRODUCTION We present here a method for assessing the explanatory skill of environmental correlates

  4. The Effects of Incomplete Information in Stochastic Common-Stock Harvesting Games

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gideon, Rudy A.

    the initial fish stock (or "recruitment") divides into two streams, each one accessible to harvest by just one of the two competing fishing fleets. The fleets simultaneously harvest down their streams, achieving net-property games. Keywords: stochastic harvesting game, asymmetric information, fish wars, bioeconomic competition

  5. Market impact and trading profile of hidden orders in stock markets Esteban Moro,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market impact and trading profile of hidden orders in stock markets Esteban Moro,1,2 Javier Vicente of trading orders. We are specifically interested in large trading orders that are executed incrementally, as a given order is executed, the impact grows in time according to a power law; after the order is finished

  6. Market impact and trading protocols of hidden orders in stock markets Esteban Moro,1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Market impact and trading protocols of hidden orders in stock markets Esteban Moro,1, 2 Javier study the market impact of trading orders. We are specifically interested in large trading orders, as a given order is executed, the impact grows in time according to a power-law; after the order is finished

  7. CONTRIBUTION OF THE NET PLANKTON AND NANNOPLANKTON TO THE STANDING STOCKS AND PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONTRIBUTION OF THE NET PLANKTON AND NANNOPLANKTON TO THE STANDING STOCKS AND PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY IN MONTEREY BAY, CALIFORNIA DURING THE UPWELLING SEASON DAVID L. GARRISON' ABSTRACT Net plankton by net plankton. Both fractions showed seasonal changes: the net plankton concentrations increased

  8. Stock No. Description Units Price BOT-415 Plastic Bottles 4L ea $7.64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Stock No. Description Units Price BOT-415 Plastic Bottles 4L ea $7.64 BOT-416 Safety Bottle Carrier Red ea $49.26 BOT-417 Safety Bottle Carrier BLK ea $49.26 DET-245 Acetone d 10X1G pack $15.52 DET-250

  9. Stock No. Description Units Price BOT-415 Plastic Bottles 4L ea $7.09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, T. Daniel

    Stock No. Description Units Price BOT-415 Plastic Bottles 4L ea $7.09 BOT-416 Safety Bottle Carrier Red ea $47.79 BOT-417 Safety Bottle Carrier BLK ea $47.79 DET-245 Acetone d 10X1G pack $14.16 DET

  10. Barriers to reducing energy demand in existing building stock -a perspective based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carletta, Jean

    Barriers to reducing energy demand in existing building stock - a perspective based on observation another radiator." #12;Typical End User Training #12;Demand Side Problem #12;Workman Mis(?)conceptions "If, interviews, probes, home inspections intervention - management committees, "message of the month", magazine

  11. bush i police soviet percent mecham stock dukakis think shot gorbachev year keating market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blei, David M.

    dont man president rate senators index jackson people arrested summit last lincoln stocks president production office shares george thats officers mikhail department years jones bentsen see death nato months reagan got wounded foreign new made big told says men visit inflation senate prices state am officer

  12. July 28, 2000 Taxes and Quotas for a Stock Pollutant with Multiplicative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry S.

    for a non-negligible period. For these pollutants, the environmental damage at a point in time depends of information can occur regardless of whether environmental damages are associated with flows or stocks.4. All these papers conclude that (i) a steeper marginal environmental damage curve, or a flatter

  13. Heterogeneous capital stocks and the optimal timing for CO2 abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    June 2006 Abstract Some recent research suggests benefits to a delayed CO2 emission reduction strategy delay may be small. A delayed start for CO2 emission reductions, which accelerates reduction in laterHeterogeneous capital stocks and the optimal timing for CO2 abatement Mark Jaccard *, Nic Rivers

  14. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for literally 100s of years even if all the CO2 emissions from the region's large point sources were stored there, an unlikely scenario under any set of national carbon emission mitigation strategies. The terrestrial sequestration opportunities in the region have the biophysical potential to sequester up to 20% of annual emissions from the region's large point sources of CO2. This report describes the assumptions made and methods employed to arrive at the results leading to these conclusions. It also describes the results of analyses of regulatory issues in the region affecting the potential for deployment of sequestration technologies. Finally, it describes the public outreach and education efforts carried out in Phase I including the creation of a web site dedicated to the MRCSP at www.mrcsp.org.

  15. The temporal dynamics of terrestrial organic matter transfer to the oceans : initial assessment and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drenzek, Nicholas J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis employs compound-specific stable carbon and radiocarbon isotopic analysis of organic biomarkers to (a) resolve petrogenic from pre-aged vascular plant organic carbon (OC) in continental margin sediments, (b) ...

  16. Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Wilber Sabido; Ellen Hawes; Jenny Henman; Miguel Calmon; Michael Ebinger

    2004-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The research described in this report occurred between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2003. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: remote sensing for carbon analysis; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  17. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation...

  18. Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

  19. Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

  20. Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Dana S.

    Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions Dana S. Balser D. Anish Roshi (Raman (Agnes Scott College) #12;Carbon RRLs Carbon Radio Recombination Lines (RRLs) NGC 2024 (Orion B) IC 1795 (W3) Palmer et al. (1967) #12;Carbon RRLs Photodissociation Regions (PDRs) Hollenbach & Tielens (1997

  1. Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert1 on climate can be characterized by a single statistic, called Cumulative Carbon. This is the aggregate amount of carbon emitted in the form of carbon dioxide by activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation

  2. Pyrolytic carbon electrodes Lithographically Defined Porous Carbon Electrodes**

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Pyrolytic carbon electrodes Lithographically Defined Porous Carbon Electrodes** D. Bruce Burckel Polsky* The special nature of the CŔC bond can lead to various polymorphic forms of carbon such as graphite, glassy-carbon, fullerenes (such as buckyballs), carbon nanotubes, and diamond. Electrodes made

  3. Phytosequestration: Carbon biosequestration by plants and the prospects of genetic engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansson, C.; Wullschleger, S.D.; Kalluri, U.C.; Tuskan, G.A.

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Photosynthetic assimilation of atmospheric carbon dioxide by land plants offers the underpinnings for terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration. A proportion of the C captured in plant biomass is partitioned to roots, where it enters the pools of soil organic C and soil inorganic C and can be sequestered for millennia. Bioenergy crops serve the dual role of providing biofuel that offsets fossil-fuel greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and sequestering C in the soil through extensive root systems. Carbon captured in plant biomass can also contribute to C sequestration through the deliberate addition of biochar to soil, wood burial, or the use of durable plant products. Increasing our understanding of plant, microbial, and soil biology, and harnessing the benefits of traditional genetics and genetic engineering, will help us fully realize the GHG mitigation potential of phytosequestration.

  4. Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale: An EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess, Nancy J.; Brown, Gordon E.; Plata, Charity

    2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale workshop, an EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel meeting held in February 2013, attendees discussed critical biogeochemical processes that regulate carbon cycling in soil. The meeting attendees determined that as a national scientific user facility, EMSL can provide the tools and expertise needed to elucidate the molecular foundation that underlies mechanistic descriptions of biogeochemical processes that control carbon allocation and fluxes at the terrestrial/atmospheric interface in landscape and regional climate models. Consequently, the workshop's goal was to identify the science gaps that hinder either development of mechanistic description of critical processes or their accurate representation in climate models. In part, this report offers recommendations for future EMSL activities in this research area. The workshop was co-chaired by Dr. Nancy Hess (EMSL) and Dr. Gordon Brown (Stanford University).

  5. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  6. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  7. Soil moisture surpasses elevated CO2 and temperature as a control on soil carbon dynamics in a multi-factor climate change experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Classen, Aimee T [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some single-factor experiments suggest that elevated CO2 concentrations can increase soil carbon, but few experiments have examined the effects of interacting environmental factors on soil carbon dynamics. We undertook studies of soil carbon and nitrogen in a multi-factor (CO2 x temperature x soil moisture) climate change experiment on a constructed old-field ecosystem. After four growing seasons, elevated CO2 had no measurable effect on carbon and nitrogen concentrations in whole soil, particulate organic matter (POM), and mineral-associated organic matter (MOM). Analysis of stable carbon isotopes, under elevated CO2, indicated between 14 and 19% new soil carbon under two different watering treatments with as much as 48% new carbon in POM. Despite significant belowground inputs of new organic matter, soil carbon concentrations and stocks in POM declined over four years under soil moisture conditions that corresponded to prevailing precipitation inputs (1,300 mm yr-1). Changes over time in soil carbon and nitrogen under a drought treatment (approximately 20% lower soil water content) were not statistically significant. Reduced soil moisture lowered soil CO2 efflux and slowed soil carbon cycling in the POM pool. In this experiment, soil moisture (produced by different watering treatments) was more important than elevated CO2 and temperature as a control on soil carbon dynamics.

  8. Activated Carbon Injection

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

  9. Carbon Fiber SMC

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    confidential, or otherwise restricted information. ACC932 Materials and Processes Technology Development Carbon Fiber SMC 5-20-09 Charles Knakal USCAR C. S. Wang General Motors...

  10. Activated Carbon Injection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

  11. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

    2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  12. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conventional and alternative precursors to carbon fiber Advance high-volume composite design and manufacturing capabilities Transition technology to industry partners...

  13. EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Bhringer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Böhringer Jared C. Carbone Thomas F. Rutherford Revised: August 2013 Abstract Embodied carbon tariffs tax the direct and indirect carbon emissions embodied in trade -- an idea popularized by countries seeking to extend the reach of domestic carbon regu- lations. We

  14. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the ManagementJ. van Houtum. 2011. E?ect of carbon emission regulations onStreamlined Enterprise Carbon Footprinting. Environmental

  15. Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

    2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

  16. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pearce, D. 2003. The Social Cost Of Carbon And Its PolicyR.S.J. 2008. The Social Cost of Carbon: Trends, Outliers and

  17. Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

  18. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

  19. Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of offsetting the University's carbon footprint, promoting biodiversity and establishing easily maintained Carbon Park Environmental Impact Assessment A B.E.S.T. Project By, Adam Bond 2011 #12; Bishop's University Carbon Park

  20. First Proof of Ferromagnetic Carbon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Proof of Ferromagnetic Carbon First Proof of Ferromagnetic Carbon Print Wednesday, 25 July 2007 00:00 Although it has long been suspected that carbon belongs on the short list of...

  1. The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther Kletetschka b,c,d

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kletetschka, Gunther

    The influence of terrestrial processes on meteorite magnetic records Tomas Kohout a,b,*, Gunther-mail address: kohout@natur.cuni.cz (T. Kohout). URL: http://www.volny.cz/tomkohout/meteo/. www

  2. Efficacy of Low and High Complexity Vegetation Treatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmquist, Jeffrey G; Schmidt-Gengenbach, Jutta; Demetry, Athena

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wetland types—than was observed between any restoration treatment andDual treatment was added to enhance restoration of wetlandTreatments for Reestablishing Terrestrial Arthropod Assemblages during Montane Wetland

  3. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, Stephen E. (Pinole, CA); Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses.

  4. Fly ash carbon passivation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

    2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

  5. Predictions for the correlation between giant and terrestrial extrasolar planets in dynamically evolved systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitri Veras; Philip J. Armitage

    2006-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The large eccentricities of many giant extrasolar planets may represent the endpoint of gravitational scattering in initially more crowded systems. If so, the early evolution of the giant planets is likely to be more restrictive of terrestrial planet formation than would be inferred from the current, dynamically quiescent, configurations. Here, we study statistically the extent of the anti-correlation between giant planets and terrestrial planets expected in a scattering model. We use marginally stable systems of three giant planets, with a realistic range of planetary masses, as a simple model for the initial conditions prior to scattering, and show that after scattering the surviving planets reproduce well the known extrasolar planet eccentricities beyond a > 0.5 AU. By tracking the minimum periastron values of all planets during the evolution, we derive the distribution of orbital radii across which strong perturbations (from crossing orbits) are likely to affect low mass planet formation. We find that scattering affects inner planet formation at orbital separations less than 50% of the final periastron distance of the innermost massive planet in approximately 30% of the realizations, and can occasionally influence planet formation at orbital separations less than 20% of the final periastron distance of the innermost massive planet. The domain of influence of the scattering massive planets increases as the mass differential between the massive planets decreases. Observational study of the correlation between massive and terrestrial extrasolar planets in the same system has the potential to constrain the origin of planetary eccentricity.

  6. Observable Consequences of Planet Formation Models in Systems with Close-in Terrestrial Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sean N. Raymond; Rory Barnes; Avi M. Mandell

    2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    To date, two planetary systems have been discovered with close-in, terrestrial-mass planets (planet; 4) formation from material being shepherded by moving secular resonances during dispersal of the protoplanetary disk; 5) tidal circularization of eccentric terrestrial planets with close-in perihelion distances; and 6) photo-evaporative mass loss of a close-in giant planet. Models 1-4 have been validated in previous work. We show that tidal circularization can form hot Earths, but only for relatively massive planets (> 5 Earth masses) with very close-in perihelion distances (planets of less than about 70 Earth masses, photo-evaporation can remove the planet's envelope and leave behind the solid core on a Gyr timescale, but only for planets inside 0.025-0.05 AU. Using two quantities that are observable by current and upcoming missions, we show that these models each produce unique signatures, and can be observationally distinguished. These observables are the planetary system architecture (detectable with radial velocities, transits and transit-timing) and the bulk composition of transiting close-in terrestrial planets (measured by transits via the planet's radius).

  7. Photochemistry in Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres II: H2S and SO2 Photochemistry in Anoxic Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Renyu; Bains, William

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sulfur gases are common components in the volcanic and biological emission on Earth, and are expected to be important input gases for atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets. We study the atmospheric composition and the spectra of terrestrial exoplanets with sulfur compounds (i.e., H2S and SO2) emitted from their surfaces. We use a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry model and radiative transfer model to investigate the sulfur chemistry in atmospheres ranging from reducing to oxidizing. The most important finding is that both H2S and SO2 are chemically short-lived in virtually all types of atmospheres on terrestrial exoplanets, based on models of H2, N2, and CO2 atmospheres. This implies that direct detection of surface sulfur emission is unlikely, as their surface emission rates need to be extremely high (>1000 times Earth's volcanic sulfur emission) for these gases to build up to a detectable level. We also find that sulfur compounds emitted from the surface lead to photochemical formation of element...

  8. CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA: REPORT TO THE LEGISLATURE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) studies that we used, including Cameron Downey

  9. THE APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR COST-EFFECTIVE CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research projects is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: advanced videography testing; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  10. APPLICATION AND DEVELOPMENT OF APPROPRIATE TOOLS AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR COST-EFFECTIVE CARBON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Patrick Gonzalez; Brad Kreps; Gilberto Tiepolo

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas impacts. The research described in this report occurred between July 1, 2002 and June 30, 2003. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: advanced videography testing; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

  11. Declining Volatility, a General Property of Disparate Systems: From Fossils, to Stocks, to the Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieberman, Bruce S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There may be structural principles pertaining to the general behavior of systems that lead to similarities in a variety of different contexts. Classic examples include the descriptive power of fractals, the importance of surface area to volume constraints, the universality of entropy in systems, and mathematical rules of growth and form. Documenting such overarching principles may represent a rejoinder to the Neodarwinian synthesis that emphasizes adaptation and competition. Instead, these principles could indicate the importance of constraint and structure on form and evolution. Here we document a potential example of a phenomenon suggesting congruent behavior of very different systems. We focus on the notion that universally there has been a tendency for more volatile entities to disappear from systems such that the net volatility in these systems tends to decline. We specifically focus on origination and extinction rates in the marine animal fossil record, the performance of stocks in the stock market, and...

  12. Window-Related Energy Consumption in the US Residential andCommercial Building Stock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Apte, Joshua; Arasteh, Dariush

    2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple spreadsheet-based tool for estimating window-related energy consumption in the United States. Using available data on the properties of the installed US window stock, we estimate that windows are responsible for 2.15 quadrillion Btu (Quads) of heating energy consumption and 1.48 Quads of cooling energy consumption annually. We develop estimates of average U-factor and SHGC for current window sales. We estimate that a complete replacement of the installed window stock with these products would result in energy savings of approximately 1.2 quads. We demonstrate that future window technologies offer energy savings potentials of up to 3.9 Quads.

  13. Whither Goeth the Stock Market? The Dow Jones Industrial average rose back above its September 11th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    the adequacy of current accounting standards. The financial-market bubble burst, however, well before September. For example, during the final phases of the recent high-tech, dot-com stock market boom, the market value

  14. 32 IEEE power & energy magazine July/August 20061540-7977/06/$20.002006 IEEE PHOTO DISC, DIGITAL STOCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

    STOCK #12;S SOUTH AMERICA IS LOOKING FOR WAYS TO HARMONIZE POWER SUPPLY expansion with growing;Decisions on the sector reform model did not take into account explicitly any environmental restrictions

  15. Making electrocompetent cells 1. Streak out desired strain from frozen stock and incubate overnight (include drug if

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segall, Anca

    Making electrocompetent cells 1. Streak out desired strain from frozen stock and incubate overnight ml of media (include drug if present). 4. Shake/incubate until an OD600 of 0.5 is reached (this takes

  16. Annual Stock Assessment - CWT [Coded Wire Tag program] (USFWS), Annual Report 2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pastor, Stephen M. [U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Columbia River Fisheries Program Office

    2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1989 the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) began funding the evaluation of production groups of juvenile anadromous fish not being coded-wire tagged for other programs. These groups were the 'Missing Production Groups'. Production fish released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) without representative coded-wire tags during the 1980s are indicated as blank spaces on the survival graphs in this report. This program is now referred to as 'Annual Stock Assessment - CWT'. The objectives of the 'Annual Stock Assessment' program are to: (1) estimate the total survival of each production group, (2) estimate the contribution of each production group to fisheries, and (3) prepare an annual report for USFWS hatcheries in the Columbia River basin. Coded-wire tag recovery information will be used to evaluate the relative success of individual brood stocks. This information can also be used by salmon harvest managers to develop plans to allow the harvest of excess hatchery fish while protecting threatened, endangered, or other stocks of concern. All fish release information, including marked/unmarked ratios, is reported to the Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission (PSMFC). Fish recovered in the various fisheries or at the hatcheries are sampled to recover coded-wire tags. This recovery information is also reported to PSMFC. This report has been prepared annually starting with the report labeled 'Annual Report 1994'. Although the current report has the title 'Annual Report 2007', it was written in fall of 2008 using data available from RMIS that same year, and submitted as final in January 2009. The main objective of the report is to evaluate survival of groups which have been tagged under this ongoing project.

  17. Essays on A Rational Expectations Model of Dividend Policy and Stock Returns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nam, Changwoo

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 77 III Size and Value Factors and the Size-BE=ME Portfolios : : : : : : : 78 IV Logit Regressions of Propensities of Payouts: Dividend Payment and Stock Repurchase, 1962 to 2009 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 79 V Statistics for Measures... : : : : : : : : : : : : : 94 11 Time-Varying VMG and Value Spread in Quarterly Frequency : : : : 95 12 Expected Returns on 10 Portfolios Formed on BE=ME and Mar- ket Size : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 96 13 Solow Residual and Dividend...

  18. Stocking rate and weight gain with three forages utilized in sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia Jurado, Andres

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) (Member) August 1977 ABSTRACT STOCKING RATE AND WEIGHT GAIN WITH THREE FORAGES UTILIZED IN SEQUENCE (August 1977) Andres Garcia, Ing. Zoot. Univ. Aut. de Chihuahua (Mexico) Chairman of Advisory Committee g T. CD Cartwright Twenty seven steers were... and the pas- ture areas were not as large as would have been desired. This was the first grazing trial conducted at this center on the recently deforested land and somewhat newly estab- lished pastures. There was an immediate need to generate some animal...

  19. Internet chat, disagreement, retail trading, and stock returns around earnings announcements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koch, Paul D.; Berkman, Henk

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    several days. This return pattern does not seem to be related to the accounting information in the earnings announcements, or to changes in risk associated with the announcement. The price pattern is similar in up and down markets, and shows up in each... captures all relevant information contained in transactions data regarding the association between trading activity and absolute price changes in a sample of NASD stocks. On the other hand, Chan and Fong (2000) find that the number of trades does...

  20. Standing Stocks and Faunal Zonation of Deep-Sea Benthos: Patterns and Predictions across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Chih-Lin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    constructed from 24 oceanographic institutions worldwide within the Census of Marine Life (CoML) field projects. The machine-learning algorithm, Random Forests, was employed to model and predict seafloor standing stocks from surface primary production... variables: Decadal mean and standard deviation (S.D.) of monthly net primary production (NPP) models (cbpm, vgpm), and the data inputs for the NPP models (Behrenfeld & Falkowski 1997, Westberry et al. 2008) including chlorophyll concentration (chl), sea...

  1. Educational buildings stocks refurbishment, a double opportunity: massive energy savings, education of youngsters about sustainable development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Couillaud, N.

    Educational buildings stocks refurbishment, a double opportunity: massive energy savings, education of youngsters about sustainable development Nicolas COUILLAUD, research engineer at CSTB, France Phone +33 1 61 44 80 53, Email: nicolas... the sustainability of the whole building performance during the operation phase. For that, we developed dedicated toolbox for educational sector. This toolbox addresses several actors as local authority, engineering department and energy manager. The objective...

  2. Carbon Cycling and Biosequestration Integrating Biology and Climate Through Systems Science Report from the March 2008 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graber, J.; Amthor, J.; Dahlman, R.; Drell, D.; Weatherwax, S.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most daunting challenges facing science in the 21st Century is to predict how Earth's ecosystems will respond to global climate change. The global carbon cycle plays a central role in regulating atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels and thus Earth's climate, but our basic understanding of the myriad of tightly interlinked biological processes that drive the global carbon cycle remains limited at best. Whether terrestrial and ocean ecosystems will capture, store, or release carbon is highly dependent on how changing climate conditions affect processes performed by the organisms that form Earth's biosphere. Advancing our knowledge of biological components of the global carbon cycle is thus crucial to predicting potential climate change impacts, assessing the viability of climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies, and informing relevant policy decisions. Global carbon cycling is dominated by the paired biological processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Photosynthetic plants and microbes of Earth's land-masses and oceans use solar energy to transform atmospheric CO{sub 2} into organic carbon. The majority of this organic carbon is rapidly consumed by plants or microbial decomposers for respiration and returned to the atmosphere as CO{sub 2}. Coupling between the two processes results in a near equilibrium between photosynthesis and respiration at the global scale, but some fraction of organic carbon also remains in stabilized forms such as biomass, soil, and deep ocean sediments. This process, known as carbon biosequestration, temporarily removes carbon from active cycling and has thus far absorbed a substantial fraction of anthropogenic carbon emissions.

  3. advanced carbon-carbon composites: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: CARBON-CARBON...

  4. Application of martensitic, modified martensitic and duplex stainless steel bar stock for completion equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhavsar, R.B. [CAMCO Products and Services, Houston, TX (United States); Montani, R. [Foroni, S.p.A., Colombo (Italy)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Martensitic and duplex stainless steel tubing are commonly used for oil and gas applications containing CO{sub 2}. Completion equipment manufacturing requires use of solid round bar or heavy wall hollows. Material properties for this stock are not identical in all cases. Material properties as well as corrosion characteristics are discussed for 13Cr, 13Cr-5Ni-2Mo and 25Cr alloys. Corrosion testing of modified or Enhanced 13Cr solid bar stock, UNS S41425 and other compositions in H{sub 2}S-Cl{sup {minus}} and pH is reported in coupled and uncoupled condition. Corrosion testing of various super duplex bar stock at various H{sub 2}S-chlorides and temperature in CO{sub 2} environment is reported. Impact value requirements, welding issues and special consideration required for these alloys for completion equipment is discussed. Modified 13Cr and Super Duplex Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) are readily available, however, availability of completion equipment raw material compatible with these OCTG is limited.

  5. Resource recovery from urban stock, the example of cadmium and tellurium from thin film module recycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, F.-G., E-mail: franz-georg.simon@bam.de [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.3 Contaminant Transfer and Environmental Technologies, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Holm, O.; Berger, W. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Division 4.3 Contaminant Transfer and Environmental Technologies, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: ? The semiconductor layer on thin-film photovoltaic modules can be removed from the glass-plate by vacuum blast cleaning. ? The separation of blasting agent and semiconductor can be performed using flotation with a valuable yield of 55%. ? PV modules are a promising source for the recovery of tellurium in the future. - Abstract: Raw material supply is essential for all industrial activities. The use of secondary raw material gains more importance since ore grade in primary production is decreasing. Meanwhile urban stock contains considerable amounts of various elements. Photovoltaic (PV) generating systems are part of the urban stock and recycling technologies for PV thin film modules with CdTe as semiconductor are needed because cadmium could cause hazardous environmental impact and tellurium is a scarce element where future supply might be constrained. The paper describes a sequence of mechanical processing techniques for end-of-life PV thin film modules consisting of sandblasting and flotation. Separation of the semiconductor material from the glass surface was possible, however, enrichment and yield of valuables in the flotation step were non-satisfying. Nevertheless, recovery of valuable metals from urban stock is a viable method for the extension of the availability of limited natural resources.

  6. An economic analysis of alternative stocking rate adjustment strategies for short duration grazing systems in the Texas Rolling Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riechers, Robin Keith

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    production parameters (weaning weight 20 and percent calves weaned) are altered based on the decisions made. Stocking or destocking of livestock above the normal culling practices is recorded. Price variation is included in the model through a random... of alternative stocking rate strategies for short duration grazing systems in the Eastern portion of the Texas Rolling plains is performed . The analysis is based on a model which emulates the annual decision-making process of a rancher. The model includes...

  7. Decision-Making Aid Tool for the Evaluation and Improvement of the Energy Performance of Stock of Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joutey, H. A.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Lahrech, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the most adapted one to develop each functionality of the decision- making aid tool for the evaluation and improvement of the energy performance of stock of buildings. Existing methods The Table 1 [1] & [4] shows a brief comparison between... buildings and distribute whole consumptions on end uses. Figure 3 shows the process used to validate the Benchmarking method. Simulations will be carried out with the SIMBAD Toolbox according to the stock data to evaluate energy consumptions...

  8. Decision-Making Aid Tool for the Evaluation and Improvement of the Energy Performance of Stock of Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joutey, H. A.; Vaezi-Nejad, H.; Lahrech, R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the most adapted one to develop each functionality of the decision- making aid tool for the evaluation and improvement of the energy performance of stock of buildings. Existing methods The Table 1 [1] & [4] shows a brief comparison between... the development of a tool. This tool is intended for building professionals, particularly managers, to help them manage their building stock and improve energy performance. Several studies based on simulation and benchmarking methods have been carried out...

  9. Review and model-based analysis of factors influencing soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. A simple, multi-compartment model was developed to predict soil carbon sequestration beneath switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) plantations in the southeastern United States. Soil carbon sequestration is an important component of sustainable switchgrass production for bioenergy because soil organic matter promotes water retention, nutrient supply, and soil properties that minimize erosion. A literature review was included for the purpose of model parameterization and five model-based experiments were conducted to predict how changes in environment (temperature) or crop management (cultivar, fertilization, and harvest efficiency) might affect soil carbon storage and nitrogen losses. Predictions of soil carbon sequestration were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the ratio of belowground to aboveground biomass production, and temperature. Predictions of ecosystem nitrogen loss were most sensitive to changes in annual biomass production, the soil C/N ratio, and nitrogen remobilization efficiency (i.e., nitrogen cycling within the plant). Model-based experiments indicated that 1) soil carbon sequestration can be highly site specific depending on initial soil carbon stocks, temperature, and the amount of annual nitrogen fertilization, 2) response curves describing switchgrass yield as a function of annual nitrogen fertilization were important to model predictions, 3) plant improvements leading to greater belowground partitioning of biomass could increase soil carbon sequestration, 4) improvements in harvest efficiency have no indicated effects on soil carbon and nitrogen, but improve cumulative biomass yield, and 5) plant improvements that reduce organic matter decomposition rates could also increase soil carbon sequestration, even though the latter may not be consistent with desired improvements in plant tissue chemistry to maximize yields of cellulosic ethanol.

  10. Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

    1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

  11. Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration Robert B. Jackson,1 * Esteban G. Farley,1 David C. le Maitre,5 Bruce A. McCarl,6 Brian C. Murray7 Carbon sequestration strategies plantations feature prominently among tools for carbon sequestration (1­8). Plantations typi- cally combine

  12. Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert* Abstract statistic, called cumulative carbon. This statistic is the aggregate amount ofcarbon emitted in theform such activitiespersist.In thispaper the conceptis usedto addressthe question offair allocation of carbon emissions

  13. International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Kumar Vaibhav

    International Conference on Carbon Nanotechnology: Potential and Challenges (Carbon 10) 15 - 17th Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube (CNT) about two decades ago, research related to its of Materials and Process Engineering Kanpur Chapter hosted the `International Conference on Carbon

  14. Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arneth, A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P.R. , High sensitivity of peat decomposition to climatea recent high-latitude peat profile: Stor Amyran, northernpromotes carbon loss from peat bogs. Proceedings of the

  15. IMPACCT: Carbon Capture Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: IMPACCT’s 15 projects seek to develop technologies for existing coal-fired power plants that will lower the cost of carbon capture. Short for “Innovative Materials and Processes for Advanced Carbon Capture Technologies,” the IMPACCT Project is geared toward minimizing the cost of removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plant exhaust by developing materials and processes that have never before been considered for this application. Retrofitting coal-fired power plants to capture the CO2 they produce would enable greenhouse gas reductions without forcing these plants to close, shifting away from the inexpensive and abundant U.S. coal supply.

  16. Black Carbon’s Properties and Role in the Environment: A Comprehensive Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shrestha, Gyami

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon has a high carbon sequestration potential due to itsin soil can lead to sustainable carbon sequestration.process takes carbon sequestration from afforestation a step

  17. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  18. GETTING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    GETTING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE TECHNOLOGIES TO MARKET BREAKING THE DEADLOCK Report of a Science: Carbon Capture and Storage © OECD/IEA 2009, fig. 1, p. 6 Figures 2 and 3 reprinted with permission from `UK Carbon storage and capture, where is it?' by Stuart Haszeldine, Professor of Carbon Capture

  19. Research Report Forests and carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , baseline, carbon, climate change mitigation, forestry, quality assurance, sequestration. FCRP013/FCResearch Report Forests and carbon: a review of additionality #12;#12;Forests and carbon: a review. ISBN 978-0-85538-816-4 Valatin, G. (2011). Forests and carbon: a review of additionality. Forestry

  20. 4, 1367, 2007 Modelling carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon overconsumption and extracellular POC formation M. Schartau et carbon overconsumption and the formation of extracellular particulate organic carbon M. Schartau1 , A Correspondence to: M. Schartau (markus.schartau@gkss.de) 13 #12;BGD 4, 13­67, 2007 Modelling carbon

  1. ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO); Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

  2. Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealth’s utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

  3. Extrasolar Carbon Planets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marc J. Kuchner; S. Seager

    2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that some extrasolar planets planets and low-mass white dwarf planets are especially good candidate members of this new class of planets, but these objects could also conceivably form around stars like the Sun. This planet-formation pathway requires only a factor of two local enhancement of the protoplanetary disk's C/O ratio above solar, a condition that pileups of carbonaceous grains may create in ordinary protoplanetary disks. Hot, Neptune-mass carbon planets should show a significant paucity of water vapor in their spectra compared to hot planets with solar abundances. Cooler, less massive carbon planets may show hydrocarbon-rich spectra and tar-covered surfaces. The high sublimation temperatures of diamond, SiC, and other carbon compounds could protect these planets from carbon depletion at high temperatures.

  4. Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also...

  5. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

  6. Activated carbon aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanzawa, Y.; Kaneko, K. [Chiba Univ. (Japan)] [Chiba Univ. (Japan); Pekala, R.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Dresselhaus, M.S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Activated carbon aerogels were obtained from the CO{sub 2} activation of the carbon aerogels. The adsorption isotherms of nitrogen on activated carbon aerogels at 77 K were measured and analyzed by the high-resolution {alpha}{sub s} plot to evaluate their porosities. The {alpha}{sub s} plot showed an upward deviation from linearity below {alpha}{sub s} = 0.5, suggesting that the presence of micropores becomes more predominant with the extent of the activation. Activation increased noticeably the pore volume and the surface area (the maximum value: 2600 m{sup 2}.g{sup -1}) without change of the basic network structure of primary particles. Activated carbon aerogels had a bimodal pore size distribution of uniform micropores and mesopores. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  7. ATK - Supersonic Carbon Capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castrogiovanni, Anthony (ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO) [ACEnT Laboratories, President and CEO; Calayag, Bon (ATK, Program Manager) [ATK, Program Manager

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ATK and ACEnt Laboratories, with the help of ARPA-E funding, have taken an aerospace problem, supersonic condensation, and turned it into a viable clean energy solution for carbon capture.

  8. Lead carbonate scintillator materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Derenzo, S.E.; Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved radiation detectors containing lead carbonate or basic lead carbonate as the scintillator element are disclosed. Both of these scintillators have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is superior to other known scintillator materials. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in medical uses. 3 figures.

  9. Carbon dioxide removal process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Richard W.; Da Costa, Andre R.; Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A process and apparatus for separating carbon dioxide from gas, especially natural gas, that also contains C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons. The invention uses two or three membrane separation steps, optionally in conjunction with cooling/condensation under pressure, to yield a lighter, sweeter product natural gas stream, and/or a carbon dioxide stream of reinjection quality and/or a natural gas liquids (NGL) stream.

  10. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  11. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Swank; William Windes; D.C. Haggard; David Rohrbaugh; Karen Moore

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The newly completed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Lab-C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. This laboratory was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project to support graphite research and development activities. The CCL is designed to characterize and test carbon-based materials such as graphite, carbon-carbon composites, and silicon-carbide composite materials. The laboratory is fully prepared to measure material properties for nonirradiated carbon-based materials. Plans to establish the laboratory as a radiological facility within the next year are definitive. This laboratory will be modified to accommodate irradiated materials, after which it can be used to perform material property measurements on both irradiated and nonirradiated carbon-based material. Instruments, fixtures, and methods are in place for preirradiation measurements of bulk density, thermal diffusivity, coefficient of thermal expansion, elastic modulus, Young’s modulus, Shear modulus, Poisson ratio, and electrical resistivity. The measurement protocol consists of functional validation, calibration, and automated data acquisition.

  12. Linear and Bayesian Planet Detection Algorithms for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Jeremy Kasdin; Isabelle Braems

    2006-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Current plans call for the first Terrestrial Planet Finder mission, TPF-C, to be a monolithic space telescope with a coronagraph for achieving high contrast. The coronagraph removes the diffracted starlight allowing the nearby planet to be detected. In this paper, we present a model of the planet measurement and noise statistics. We utilize this model to develop two planet detection algorithms, one based on matched filtering of the PSF and one using Bayesian techniques. These models are used to formulate integration time estimates for a planet detection with desired small probabilities of false alarms and missed detections.

  13. Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

  14. Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wanlass, M.W.

    1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-junction solar cell is described having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of ''pinning'' the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14[+-]0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap. 7 figures.

  15. Distribution of terrestrial age and petrologic type of meteorites from western Libya

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jull, A.J.T.; Donahue, D.J. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (USA)); Wlotzka, F.; Palme, H. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie, Mainz (West Germany))

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A group of 54 meteorites have been recovered from Daraj, Western Libya. After assessment of pairing of samples, using petrologic criteria, {sup 14}C terrestrial ages were obtained on 13 samples selected from 9 different fall events. Eleven of the ages range from 3,500 to 7,600 years, with only two samples having ages in excess of 10,000 years. The cut-off in ages may be related to the timing of climatic changes in the Hammadah al Hamra.

  16. Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

  17. Carbon emissions and sequestration in forests: Case studies from seven developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makundi, W.; Sathaye, J. (eds.) (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)); Fearnside, P.M. (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia (INPA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Departmento de Ecologia)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deforestation in Brazilian Amazonia in 1990 was releasing approximately 281--282 X 10{sup 6} metric tons (MT) of carbon on conversion to a landscape of agriculture, productive pasture, degraded pasture, secondary forest and regenerated forest in the proportions corresponding to the equilibrium condition implied by current land-use patterns. Emissions are expressed as committed carbon,'' or the carbon released over a period of years as the carbon stock in each hectare deforested approaches a new equilibrium in the landscape that replaces the original forest. To the extent that deforestation rates have remained constant, current releases from the areas deforested in previous years will be equal to the future releases from the areas being cleared now. Considering the quantities of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrous oxide, NO{sub x} and non-methane hydrocarbons released raises the impact by 22--37%. The relative impact on the greenhouse effect of each gas is based on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) calculations over a 20-year time period (including indirect effects). The six gases considered have a combined global warming impact equivalent to 343 to 386 million MT of C0{sub 2}-equivalent carbon, depending on assumptions regarding the release of methane and other gases from the various sources such as burning and termites. These emissions represent 7--8 times the 50 million MT annual carbon release from Brazil's use of fossil fuels, but bring little benefit to the country. Stopping deforestation in Brazil would prevent as much greenhouse emission as tripling the fuel efficiency of all the automobiles in the world. The relatively cheap measures needed to contain deforestation, together with the many complementary benefits of doing so, make this the first priority for funds intended to slow global warming.

  18. WESTCARB Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (known as WESTCARB) was established in Fall 2003. It is one of seven research partnerships co-funded by DOE to characterize regional carbon sequestration opportunities and conduct pilot-scale validation tests. The California Energy Commission manages WESTCARB and is a major co-funder. WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas, NATCARB

  19. Global Biogeochemistry Models and Global Carbon Cycle Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C; Caldeira, K; Guilderson, T; Cameron-Smith, P; Govindasamy, B; Swanston, C; Wickett, M; Mirin, A; Bader, D

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The climate modeling community has long envisioned an evolution from physical climate models to ''earth system'' models that include the effects of biology and chemistry, particularly those processes related to the global carbon cycle. The widely reproduced Box 3, Figure 1 from the 2001 IPCC Scientific Assessment schematically describes that evolution. The community generally accepts the premise that understanding and predicting global and regional climate change requires the inclusion of carbon cycle processes in models to fully simulate the feedbacks between the climate system and the carbon cycle. Moreover, models will ultimately be employed to predict atmospheric concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases as a function of anthropogenic and natural processes, such as industrial emissions, terrestrial carbon fixation, sequestration, land use patterns, etc. Nevertheless, the development of coupled climate-carbon models with demonstrable quantitative skill will require a significant amount of effort and time to understand and validate their behavior at both the process level and as integrated systems. It is important to consider objectively whether the currently proposed strategies to develop and validate earth system models are optimal, or even sufficient, and whether alternative strategies should be pursued. Carbon-climate models are going to be complex, with the carbon cycle strongly interacting with many other components. Off-line process validation will be insufficient. As was found in coupled atmosphere-ocean GCMs, feedbacks between model components can amplify small errors and uncertainties in one process to produce large biases in the simulated climate. The persistent tropical western Pacific Ocean ''double ITCZ'' and upper troposphere ''cold pole'' problems are examples. Finding and fixing similar types of problems in coupled carbon-climate models especially will be difficult, given the lack of observations required for diagnosis and validation of biogeochemical processes.

  20. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.