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1

Terrestrial Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management Influence of Agricultural Management on Soil Organic Carbon: A Compendium and Assessment of Canadian Studies (VandenBygaart et al., Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) Soil Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (West and Post, Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management

2

Management Opportunities for Enhancing Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Sinks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for mitigating increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations through the use of terrestrial biological carbon (C) sequestration is substantial. Here, we estimate the amount of C being sequestered by natural processes at global, North American, and national US scales. We present and quantify, where possible, the potential for deliberate human actions through forestry, agriculture, and use of biomass-based fuels to augment these natural sinks. Carbon sequestration may potentially be achieved through some of these activities but at the expense of substantial changes in land-use management. Some practices (eg reduced tillage, improved silviculture, woody bioenergy crops) are already being implemented because of their economic benefits and associated ecosystem services. Given their cumulative greenhouse-gas impacts, other strategies (eg the use of biochar and cellulosic bioenergy crops) require further evaluation to determine whether widespread implementation is warranted.

Post, W. M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, Tristram O.; Liebig, Mark A.; King, Anthony W.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Integrated Estimates of Global Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the contribution of terrestrial carbon sequestration to international climate change mitigation requires integration across scientific and disciplinary boundaries. As part of a scenario analysis for the US Climate Change Technology Program, measurements and geographic data were used to develop terrestrial carbon sequestration estimates for agricultural soil carbon, reforestation and pasture management. These estimates were then applied in the MiniCAM integrated assessment model to evaluate mitigation strategies within policy and technology scenarios aimed at achieving atmospheric CO2 stabilization by 2100. Adoption of terrestrial sequestration practices is based on competition for land and economic markets for carbon. Terrestrial sequestration reach a peak combined rate of 0.5 to 0.7 Gt carbon yr-1 in mid-century with contributions from agricultural soil (0.21 Gt carbon yr-1), reforestation (0.31 Gt carbon yr-1) and pasture (0.15 Gt carbon yr-1). Sequestration rates vary over time period and with different technology and policy scenarios. The combined contribution of terrestrial sequestration over the next century ranges from 31 to 41 GtC. The contribution of terrestrial sequestration to mitigation is highest early in the century, reaching up to 20% of total carbon mitigation. This analysis provides insight into the behavior of terrestrial carbon mitigation options in the presence and absence of climate change mitigation policies.

Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There is considerable...

5

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration November 6-7, 2001 Lexington, Kentucky Robert Addington AEI Incorporated 2000 Ashland Drive Ashland, KY 41101 Phone: 606-928-3433 Email: crystalj@aeiresources.com Jim Amonette MSIN K8-96 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: 509-3765565 Email: jim.amonette@pnl.gov Patrick Angel Area Office Manager U.S. Department of Interior Office of Surface Mining P.O. Box 1048 London, KY 40741 Phone: 606-878-6440 Email: pangel@osmre.gov Hugh Archer Commissioner Kentucky Dept of Natural Resources 663 Teton Trail Frankfort, KY 40601 Phone: 502-564-2184 Email: hugh.archer@mail.state.ky.us Victor Badaker Mining Engineering Dept. University of Kentucky MML Bldg. Lexington, KY 40546 Phone: 859-257-3818

6

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage (CCS) "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. Best Practices for Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide details the most suitable operational approaches and techniques for terrestrial sequestration, a carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation strategy capable of removing CO2 already in the air. Consequently, terrestrial sequestration, which uses photosynthesis - part of the natural carbon cycle - to create

7

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

8

Parallel Computing for Terrestrial Ecosystem Carbon Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial ecosystems are a primary component of research on global environmental change. Observational and modeling research on terrestrial ecosystems at the global scale, however, has lagged behind their counterparts for oceanic and atmospheric systems, largely because the unique challenges associated with the tremendous diversity and complexity of terrestrial ecosystems. There are 8 major types of terrestrial ecosystem: tropical rain forest, savannas, deserts, temperate grassland, deciduous forest, coniferous forest, tundra, and chaparral. The carbon cycle is an important mechanism in the coupling of terrestrial ecosystems with climate through biological fluxes of CO{sub 2}. The influence of terrestrial ecosystems on atmospheric CO{sub 2} can be modeled via several means at different timescales. Important processes include plant dynamics, change in land use, as well as ecosystem biogeography. Over the past several decades, many terrestrial ecosystem models (see the 'Model developments' section) have been developed to understand the interactions between terrestrial carbon storage and CO{sub 2} concentration in the atmosphere, as well as the consequences of these interactions. Early TECMs generally adapted simple box-flow exchange models, in which photosynthetic CO{sub 2} uptake and respiratory CO{sub 2} release are simulated in an empirical manner with a small number of vegetation and soil carbon pools. Demands on kinds and amount of information required from global TECMs have grown. Recently, along with the rapid development of parallel computing, spatially explicit TECMs with detailed process based representations of carbon dynamics become attractive, because those models can readily incorporate a variety of additional ecosystem processes (such as dispersal, establishment, growth, mortality etc.) and environmental factors (such as landscape position, pest populations, disturbances, resource manipulations, etc.), and provide information to frame policy options for climate change impact analysis.

Wang, Dali [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Berry, Michael [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When ...

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

NETL: Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration A "Hands-On" Workshop for the Appalachian Coal & Electric Utilities Industries Table of Contents Disclaimer General Conference Information Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

11

Terrestrial carbon cycle dynamics under recent and future climate change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When forced by historical emissions of CO 2 from fossil fuels and land-use change, the coupled climatecarbon cycle model accurately reproduces historical atmospheric CO 2 trends, as well as terrestrial and oceanic uptake for the past two decades. Under six twenty-first-century CO 2 emissions scenarios, both terrestrial and oceanic carbon sinks continue to increase, though terrestrial uptake slows in the latter half of the century. Climatecarbon cycle feedbacks are isolated by comparing a coupled model run with a run where climate and the carbon cycle are uncoupled. The modeled positive feedback between the carbon cycle and climate is found to be relatively small, resulting in an increase in simulated CO 2 of 60 ppmv at the year 2100. Including non-CO 2 greenhouse gas forcing and increasing the models climate sensitivity increase the effect of this feedback to 140 ppmv. The UVic model does not, however, simulate a switch from a terrestrial carbon sink to a source during the twenty-first century, as earlier studies have suggested. This can be explained by a lack of substantial reductions in simulated vegetation productivity due to climate changes. 1.

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin; J. Meissner

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

What is the Potential for Carbon Sequestration by the Terrestrial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What is the Potential for Carbon Sequestration by the Terrestrial Biosphere? Roger C. Dahlman 1 , Gary K. Jacobs 2 , and F. Blaine Metting, Jr. 2 This paper highlights some of...

13

Water-Use Efficiency of the Terrestrial Biosphere: A Model Analysis Focusing on Interactions between the Global Carbon and Water Cycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon and water cycles are intimately coupled in terrestrial ecosystems, and water-use efficiency (WUE; carbon gain at the expense of unit water loss) is one of the key parameters of ecohydrology and ecosystem management. In this study, the ...

Akihiko Ito; Motoko Inatomi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon Cycling in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Midlatitude regions experienced frequent droughts during the twentieth century, but their impacts on terrestrial carbon balance are unclear. This paper presents a century-scale study of drought effects on the carbon balance of terrestrial ...

Jingfeng Xiao; Qianlai Zhuang; Eryuan Liang; Xuemei Shao; A. David McGuire; Aaron Moody; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration - Science for Enhancement and Implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is time to re-evaluate all available options that might not be permanent yet have the potential to buy time, bridging to a future when new energy system technologies and a transformed energy infrastructure can fully address the climate challenge. Terrestrial sequestration is one option large enough to make a contribution in the coming decades using proven land management methods and with the possibility that new technologies could significantly enhance the opportunity. Here we review progress on key scientific, economic, and social issues; postulate the extent to which new technologies might significantly enhance terrestrial sequestration potential; and address remaining research needs.

Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Amonette, James [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL; Izaurralde, Dr. R. Cesar [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Jastrow, Julie D [ORNL; Lal, Dr. Rattan [Ohio State University; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; McCarl, Bruce [Texas A& M University; Thomson, Dr. Allison [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Metting, F. Blaine [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the relationships between climate and carbon exchange by terrestrial ecosystems is critical to predict future levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide because of the potential accelerating effects of positive climate carbon cycle feedbacks. However, directly observed relationships between climate and terrestrial CO2 exchange with the atmosphere across biomes and continents are lacking. Here we present data describing the relationships between net ecosystem exchange of carbon (NEE) and climate factors as measured using the eddy covariance method at 125 unique sites in various ecosystems over six continents with a total of 559 site-years. We find that NEE observed at eddy covariance sites is (1) a strong function of mean annual temperature at mid- and high-latitudes, (2) a strong function of dryness at mid- and low-latitudes, and (3) a function of both temperature and dryness around the mid-latitudinal belt (45 N). The sensitivity of NEE to mean annual temperature breaks down at ~ 16 C (a threshold value of mean annual temperature), above which no further increase of CO2 uptake with temperature was observed and dryness influence overrules temperature influence.

Ricciuto, Daniel M [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Consequences of Considering Carbon/Nitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A number of observational studies indicate that carbon sequestration by terrestrial ecosystems in a world with an atmosphere richer in carbon dioxide and a warmer climate depends on the interactions between the carbon and ...

Sokolov, Andrei P.

18

RMOTC - Testing - Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Management Carbon Management Ten Sleep Time Structure, 2nd Wall Creek Formation at RMOTC Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC has the field setting, infrastructure, and expertise to play an important role in carbon management testing, demonstration, and research. The unique combination of a publicly-owned and DOE-operated oil field,

19

Consequences of Considering CarbonNitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of carbonnitrogen dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems on the interaction between the carbon cycle and climate is studied using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM). Numerical ...

Andrei P. Sokolov; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo; Benjamin S. Felzer; C. Adam Schlosser; Timothy W. Cronin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Microfluidic Analysis for Carbon Management.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis focuses on applying microfluidic techniques to analyze two carbon management methods; underground carbon sequestration and enhanced oil recovery. The small scale nature of (more)

Sell, Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Estimating the Seasonal Carbon Source-Sink Geography of a Natural, Steady-State Terrestrial Biosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The seasonal dynamics of biospheric-carbon sources and sinks represents a needed input to global atmospheric CO2 studies and models. For the terrestrial biosphere, initial monthly estimates of overall metabolism and net biosphere-atmosphere ...

Elgene O. Box

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Terrestrial Carbon Sinks for the United States Predicted from MODIS Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous United States ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Alfredo Huete; Vanessa Genovese

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes of Terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes of Terrestrial Ecosystems in the Western. Sleeter Chapter 9 of Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Ecosystems.L., Hawbaker, T.J., and Sleeter, B.M., 2012, Projected future carbon storage and greenhouse gas fluxes

Fleskes, Joe

24

The significance of the erosion-induced terrestrial carbon sink  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential of soil carbon sequestration to mitigate theof soil movement on carbon sequestration in agriculturalEnhancement of carbon sequestration in US soils. BioScience.

Berhe, A.A.; Harte, J.; Harden, J.W.; Torn, M.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R&D Progress  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Ecosystems: Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R&D Progress Gary K. Jacobs (jacobsgk@ornl.gov, 865-576-0567) Oak Ridge National Laboratory PO Box 2008, MS-6035 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Roger C. Dahlman (roger.dahlman@science.doe.gov, 301-903-4951) Office of Science/Biological and Environmental Research U. S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 F. Blaine Metting, Jr. (blaine.metting@pnl.gov, 509-375-2607) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 902 Battelle Blvd. PO Box 999, P7-54 Richland, WA 99352 Introduction Sequestration of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is a low-cost option that may be available in the near-term to mitigate increasing atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, while providing additional benefits. Storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems can be achieved through maintenance of

26

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Title Carbon Sequestration Risks and Risk Management Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2008 Authors Price, Phillip N.,...

27

Greenstone Carbon Management Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Greenstone Carbon Management Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Greenstone Carbon Management Ltd. Place London,...

28

Terrestrial Carbon Inventory at the Savannah River Site, 1951 2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Power Point slide presentation/report on the terestrial carbon inventory at the Savannah River Site.

US Forest Service - Annonymous,

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Carbon Management Initiative Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI) Background The ICMI project is part of a larger program called Carbon Capture Simulation and Storage Initiative (C2S2I). The C2S2I has a goal of expanding the DOE's focus on Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) for advanced coal power systems and other applications, including the use of petroleum coke as a feedstock for the industrial sector. The American Recovery and Re-Investment Act (ARRA)-funded

30

Time Scales of Terrestrial Carbon Response Related to Land-Use Application: Implications for Initializing an Earth System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamic vegetation and carbon cycling component, LM3V, of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) prototype Earth system model (ESM2.1), has been designed to simulate the effects of land use on terrestrial carbon pools, including ...

Lori T. Sentman; Elena Shevliakova; Ronald J. Stouffer; Sergey Malyshev

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R and D Progress  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sequestration of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is a low-cost option that may be available in the near-term to mitigate increasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, while providing additional benefits. Storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems can be achieved through maintenance of standing aboveground biomass, utilization of aboveground biomass in long-lived products, or protection of carbon (organic and inorganic) compounds present in soils. There are potential co-benefits from efforts to sequester carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. For example, long-lived valuable products (wood) are produced, erosion would be reduced, soil productivity could be improved through increased capacity to retain water and nutrients, and marginal lands could be improved and riparian ecosystems restored. Another unique feature of the terrestrial sequestration option is that it is the only option that is ''reversible'' should it become desirable or permissible. For example, forests that are created are thus investments which could be harvested should CO{sub 2} emissions be reduced in other ways to acceptable levels 50-100 years from now.

Jacobs, G.K.

2001-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Genetic and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems G.A. Tuskan (tuskanga@ornl.gov; 865-576-8141) S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) A.W. King (kingaw@ornl.gov; 865-576-3436) T.J. Tschaplinski (tschaplinstj@ornl.gov; 865-574-4597) L.E. Gunter (gunterle@ornl.gov; 865-574-4020) A.M. Silletti (sillettia@ornl.gov; 865-574-5397) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 M. Davis (Mark_Davis@nrel.gov; 303-384-6140) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3322 Introduction Carbon sequestration in terrestrial vegetation and soils is a poorly understood process, but ultimately represents a summation of biological activities including the initial incorporation of

34

Evaluation of Biases in JRA-25/JCDAS Precipitation and Their Impact on the Global Terrestrial Carbon Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates a modeled precipitation field and examines how its bias affects the modeling of the regional and global terrestrial carbon cycle. Spatial and temporal variations in precipitation produced by the Japanese 25-yr reanalysis (JRA-...

Makoto Saito; Akihiko Ito; Shamil Maksyutov

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Carbon management in assembly manufacturing logistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the IBM Carbon Analyzer Tool, a software solution that models and quantifies carbon emissions and explores ways to reduce emissions through advanced analytics. The tool is designed to manage carbon emissions associated with ...

K. Sourirajan; P. Centonze; M. E. Helander; K. Katircioglu; M. Ben-Hamida; C. Boucher

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This symposium will pave the way to accomplish an efficient use of energy and manage ... such as establish carbon footprints and life cycle analysis; develop carbon ... develop carbon credits and offsets for mandatory & voluntary markets, etc.

37

Argonne Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Data from Batvia Prairie and Agricultural Sites  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide fluxes and stocks in terrestrial ecosystems are key measurements needed to constrain quantification of regional carbon sinks and sources and the mechanisms controlling them. This information is required to produce a sound carbon budget for North America. This project examines CO2 and energy fluxes from agricultural land and from restored tallgrass prairie to compare their carbon sequestration potentials. The study integrates eddy covariance measurements with biometric measurements of plant and soil carbon stocks for two systems in northeastern Illinois: 1) long-term cultivated land in corn-soybean rotation with conventional tillage, and 2) a 15 year-old restored prairie that represents a long-term application of CRP conversion of cultivated land to native vegetation. The study contributes to the North American Carbon Program (NACP) by providing information on the magnitude and distribution of carbon stocks and the processes that control carbon dynamics in cultivated and CRP-restored land in the Midwest. The prairie site has been functioning since October 2004 and the agricultural site since July 2005. (From http://www.atmos.anl.gov/ FERMI/index.html)

Matamala, Roser [ANL; Jastrow, Julie D.; Lesht, Barry [ANL; Cook, David [ANL; Pekour, Mikhail [ANL; Gonzalez-Meler, Miquel A. [University of Illinois at Chicago

38

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing techniques. We developed a novel technique to remotely assess carbon dioxide exchange in maize using

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

39

A Brief Review of the Application of 14C in Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Studies  

SciTech Connect

An over-arching goal of the DOE TCP program is to understand the mechanistic controls over the fate, transport, and residence time of carbon in the terrestrial biosphere. Many of the modern process and modeling studies focus on seasonal to interannual variability. However, much of the carbon on the landscape and in soils is in separate reservoirs with turnover times that are multi-decadal to millennial. It is the controls on these longer term pools or reservoirs that is a critical unknown in the face of rising GHGs and climate change and uncertainties of the terrestrial biosphere as a future global sink or source of atmospheric CO{sub 2} [eg., Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Govindasamy et al., 2005; Thompson et al., 2004]. Radiocarbon measurements, in combination with other data, can provide insight into, and constraints on, terrestrial carbon cycling. Radiocarbon (t{sub 1/2} 5730yrs) is produced naturally in the stratosphere when secondary neutrons generated by cosmic rays collide with {sup 14}N atoms [Libby 1946; Arnold and Libby, 1949]. Upon formation, {sup 14}C is rapidly oxidized to CO and then to CO{sub 2}, and is incorporated into the carbon cycle. Due to anthropogenic activities, the amount of {sup 14}C in the atmosphere doubled in the mid/late 1950s and early 1960s from its preindustrial value of {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio of 1.18 x 10{sup -12} [eg., Nydal and Lovseth, 1983]. Following the atmospheric weapons test ban in 1963, the {sup 14}C/{sup 12}C ratio, has decreased due to the net isotopic exchange between the ocean and terrestrial biosphere [eg., Levin and Hessheimer, 2000] and a dilution effect due to the burning of {sup 14}C-free fossil fuel carbon, the 'Suess Effect' [Suess, 1955]. In the carbon cycle literature, radiocarbon measurements are generally reported as {Delta}{sup 14}C, which includes a correction for mass dependent fractionation [Stuiver and Polach, 1977]. In the context of carbon cycle studies radiocarbon measurements can be used to determine the 'age' and rate of change of carbon stocks or as a biogeochemical tracer to elucidate processes and pathways. It is this dual nature that can be exploited across scales in space (individual plant, plot or research site, ecosystem, regional, and global) and time (days to millennia). For example, across regional scales, {Delta}{sup 14}C measurements of atmosphere CO{sub 2} can be used to attribute carbon dioxide to sources (e.g., respiration vs. fossil fuel emissions) or sinks ( e.g,. photosynthesis), which cannot be readily inferred from concentration, net flux measurements, or {delta}{sup 13}CO{sub 2} [eg. Graven et al., 2009; Levin and Hessheimer, 2000; Turnbull et al., 2007]. At smaller scales, similar analyses can be used to elucidate the source, and 'age' of the below ground component undergoing heterotrophic respiration. Net (biome or ecosystem) uptake of carbon is the difference of two large fluxes: photosynthesis and respiration. Carbon fixation by photosynthesis is, to a large extent, a single process with theoretical underpinnings. On the other-hand, net ecosystem or biome respiration integrates microbial (heterotrophic) and plant (autotrophic) respiration. Eddy covariance methods can be used to estimate bulk CO{sub 2} fluxes but they cannot discriminate the process nor the source of the respired CO{sub 2}. It is these processes that are parameterized in predictive models and contribute to the uncertainty in the climate forcing effect of the carbon cycle in the future [Friedlingstein et al., 2006; Heimann and Reichstein, 2008].

Guilderson, T; Mcfarlane, K

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

Asia Carbon Emission Management India Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Emission Management India Pvt Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Asia Carbon Emission Management India Pvt Ltd Place Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Zip 600 034 Sector Carbon...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Studies of the terrestrial O{sub 2} and carbon cycles in sand dune gases and in biosphere 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular oxygen in the atmosphere is coupled tightly to the terrestrial carbon cycle by the processes of photosynthesis, respiration, and burning. This dissertation examines different aspects of this coupling in four chapters. Chapter 1 explores the feasibility of using air from sand dunes to reconstruct atmospheric O{sub 2} composition centuries ago. Such a record would reveal changes in the mass of the terrestrial biosphere, after correction for known fossil fuel combustion, and constrain the fate of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}.

Severinghaus, J.P.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Carbon Management and Carbon Dioxide Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Gas Stream Component Analysis Techniques and Strategies for Carbon Capture Systems from Oxy-Fuel Combustion (An Overview).

43

BSCSP Terrestrial Factsheet 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Terrestrial Sequestration 1 FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership...

44

Grid-BGC: A Grid-Enabled Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Modeling System, Euro-Par 2005  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. Grid-BGC is a Grid-enabled terrestrial biogeochemical cycle simulator collaboratively developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Colorado (CU) with funding from NASA. The primary objective of the project is to utilize Globus Grid technology to integrate inexpensive commodity cluster computational resources at CU with the mass storage system at NCAR while hiding the logistics of data transfer and job submission from the scientists. We describe a typical process for simulating the terrestrial carbon cycle, present our solution architecture and software design, and describe our implementation experiences with Grid technology on our systems. By design the Grid-BGC software framework is extensible in that it can utilize other grid-accessible computational resources and can be readily applied to other climate simulation problems which have similar workflows. Overall, this project demonstrates an end-to-end system which leverages Grid technologies to harness distributed resources across organizational boundaries to achieve a cost-effective solution to a computeintensive problem. 1

Jason Cope; Craig Hartsough; Peter Thornton; Henry M. Tufo; Nathan Wilhelmi; Matthew Woitaszek

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

NETL: Turbine Projects - Carbon Management (FutureGen)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Management (FutureGen) Turbine Projects Carbon Management (FutureGen) Hydrogen Turbines new solicitation in FY05 DataFact Sheets...

46

The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Study of the Abundance and 13C/12C Ratio of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide to Advance the Scientific Understanding of Terrestrial Processes Regulating the Global Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of our research program, consistent with the goals of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program and funded by the terrestrial carbon processes (TCP) program of DOE, has been to improve understanding of changes in the distribution and cycling of carbon among the active land, ocean and atmosphere reservoirs, with particular emphasis on terrestrial ecosystems. Our approach is to systematically measure atmospheric CO2 to produce time series data essential to reveal temporal and spatial patterns. Additional measurements of the 13C/12C isotopic ratio of CO2 provide a basis for distinguishing organic and inorganic processes. To pursue the significance of these patterns further, our research also involved interpretations of the observations by models, measurements of inorganic carbon in sea water, and of CO2 in air near growing land plants.

Stephen C. Piper

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Recent Climate-Driven Increases in Vegetation Productivity for the Western Arctic: Evidence of an Acceleration of the Northern Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Northern ecosystems contain much of the global reservoir of terrestrial carbon that is potentially reactive in the context of near-term climate change. Annual variability and recent trends in vegetation productivity across Alaska and northwest ...

J. S. Kimball; M. Zhao; A. D. McGuire; F. A. Heinsch; J. Clein; M. Calef; W. M. Jolly; S. Kang; S. E. Euskirchen; K. C. McDonald; S. W. Running

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Carbon Management Plan www.nottingham.ac.uk/sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Management Plan 2010-2020 www.nottingham.ac.uk/sustainability #12;1 Carbon Management Plan 2010-2020 Contents Introduction 2 UK Carbon Policy 3 University Carbon Baselines 4 Recent Performance Trends and KPIs 5 University Targets 8 Strategic Themes 9 Carbon Saving Projects 12 2010-2012 Projects 13

Li, Jingpeng

50

Grid-BGC: a grid-enabled terrestrial carbon cycle modeling system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Grid-BGC is a Grid-enabled terrestrial biogeochemical cycle simulator collaboratively developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and the University of Colorado (CU) with funding from NASA. The primary objective of the project is ...

Jason Cope; Craig Hartsough; Peter Thornton; Henry Tufo; Nathan Wilhelmi; Matthew Woitaszek

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Carbon Balance and Management BioMed Central Editorial Welcome to Carbon Balance and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. We are pleased to announce the launch of Carbon Balance and Management, a new online open access journal published by BioMed Central. Carbon Balance and Management Carbon Balance and Management is a new open access, peer-reviewed online journal that encompasses all aspects of research aimed at developing a comprehensive, policyrelevant understanding of the global carbon cycle [1]. Advancement in the union of the two issues indicted by the journal's title will be a very important element of future global economic and societal development. We must develop predictive and observational capabilities to determine how carbon systems are changing now and how they will be changing in the future, and we must

Robert Dickinson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application, Website Website: nrs.fs.fed.us/carbon/tools/ Cost: Free Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Screenshot References: Carbon Tools[1] Logo: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting "Accurate estimates of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon

53

Variability in Terrestrial Carbon Sinks over Two Decades. Part III: South America, Africa, and Asia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seventeen years (198298) of net carbon flux predictions for Southern Hemisphere continents have been analyzed, based on a simulation model using satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover. The NASA Carnegie Ames Stanford Approach (CASA) ...

C. Potter; S. Klooster; P. Tan; M. Steinbach; V. Kumar; V. Genovese

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Terrestrial carbon cycle - climate relations in eight CMIP5 earth system models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Eight Earth System Models from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are evaluated, focusing on both the net carbon dioxide flux and its components, and their relation with climatic variables (temperature, precipitation and soil ...

Pu Shao; Xubin Zeng; Koichi Sakaguchi; Russell K. Monson; Xiaodong Zeng

55

Variability in Terrestrial Carbon Sinks over Two Decades. Part I: North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seventeen years (198298) of net carbon flux predictions from a simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover have been analyzed. The NASACASA model was driven by vegetation cover properties derived from the ...

C. Potter; S. Klooster; P. Tan; M. Steinbach; V. Kumar; V. Genovese

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Managing Commercial Tree Species for Timber Production and Carbon Sequestration: Management Guidelines and Financial Returns  

SciTech Connect

A carbon credit market is developing in the United States. Information is needed by buyers and sellers of carbon credits so that the market functions equitably and efficiently. Analyses have been conducted to determine the optimal forest management regime to employ for each of the major commercial tree species so that profitability of timber production only or the combination of timber production and carbon sequestration is maximized. Because the potential of a forest ecosystem to sequester carbon depends on the tree species, site quality and management regimes utilized, analyses have determined how to optimize carbon sequestration by determining how to optimally manage each species, given a range of site qualities, discount rates, prices of carbon credits and other economic variables. The effects of a carbon credit market on the method and profitability of forest management, the cost of sequestering carbon, the amount of carbon that can be sequestered, and the amount of timber products produced has been determined.

Gary D. Kronrad

2006-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

57

Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

58

Terrestrial Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program Capture and Storage of Carbon in Terrestrial Ecosystems Background Clean, affordable energy is essential for U.S. prosperity and security in the 21st century. More than half of the electricity currently generated in the United States comes from coal-fired boilers, and there is little indication that this percentage will diminish through 2020 and beyond. In addition, the use of coal for electricity generation is projected to more than double in developing nations by 2020. This ever growing demand for fossil-fuel-based power and the consequential rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentrations requires innovative methods to capture and store CO 2 . Terrestrial ecosystems, which include both soil and vegetation, are widely recognized

59

Carbon Dioxide Management - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Phase Stability in Gasification Carbon Feedstock Slags ... industrial coal/petcoke feedstock blends in simulated gasifier environments. ... sludge mineralization of calcium and invent a core device for multi-level jet carbonation.

60

A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO2 effect to diminish, with consequences for change in soil elevation.

J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

62

Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO2 effect to diminish, with consequences for change in soil elevation.

J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

63

Thermal Management Using Carbon Nanotubes - Energy Innovation ...  

Patent 7,763,353: Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites Methods and apparatus are described for ...

64

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Methane Olefins H 2 CO CO 2 Olefins ethylene + propylene + C 4 -ene + benzene Water pump off Water pump on Fully reformed local pump diesel Equilibrium...

65

Upcoming Carbon Management Legislations: Impacts and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Gas Stream Component Analysis Techniques and Strategies for Carbon Capture Systems from Oxy-Fuel Combustion (An Overview).

66

Study of the Role of Terrestrial Processes in the Carbon Cycle Based on Measurements of the Abundance and Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this project was to continue research to develop carbon cycle relationships related to the land biosphere based on remote measurements of atmospheric CO2 concentration and its isotopic ratios 13C/12C, 18O/16O, and 14C/12C. The project continued time-series observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide and isotopic composition begun by Charles D. Keeling at remote sites, including Mauna Loa, the South Pole, and eight other sites. Using models of varying complexity, the concentration and isotopic measurements were used to study long-term change in the interhemispheric gradients in CO2 and 13C/12C to assess the magnitude and evolution of the northern terrestrial carbon sink, to study the increase in amplitude of the seasonal cycle of CO2, to use isotopic data to refine constraints on large scale changes in isotopic fractionation which may be related to changes in stomatal conductance, and to motivate improvements in terrestrial carbon cycle models. The original proposal called for a continuation of the new time series of 14C measurements but subsequent descoping to meet budgetary constraints required termination of measurements in 2007.

Stephen C. Piper; Ralph F. Keeling

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Role of Technologies in Carbon Management Strategies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

α α β β Corporate Research Energy and Global Change CHCRC.G BE/jn 1 5/31/01 Fo.-No. 137 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington DC, May 15-17, 2001 The Role of Technologies in Carbon The Role of Technologies in Carbon Management Strategies Management Strategies Baldur Eliasson ABB Corporate Research Baden-Daettwil, Switzerland First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington DC, May 15-17, 2001 α β β Corporate Research Energy and Global Change CHCRC.G BE/jn 2 5/31/01 Fo.-No. 137 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington DC, May 15-17, 2001 Contents Contents s Introduction s Global Warming and the Kyoto Protocol s New Energy Technologies for a New Century s Conclusions α β β Corporate Research Energy and Global Change CHCRC.G BE/jn

68

Carbon Management for a Coal/Biomass to Liquids Plant in Northeast...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon ManageMent for a CoalbioMass to liquids Plant in northeast ohio Background This project involves the development of a carbon management plan for a proposed coal and biomass...

69

Carbon Supply From Changes in Management of Forest, Range, and Agricultural Lands of California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

70

Grassland Management and Conversion into Grassland: Effects on Soil Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Grassland Soil Carbon Grassland Soil Carbon Grassland Management and Conversion into Grassland: Effects on Soil Carbon DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.005 Ecological Applications 11(2): 343-355 (2001) R. Conant, K. Paustian, and E. Elliot Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorada State University Fort Collins, Colorado, USA Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory logo Sponsor: US Environmental Protection Agency, Ruminant Livestock Efficiency Program Abstract Grasslands are heavily relied upon for food and forage production. A key component for sustaining production in grassland ecosystems is the maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM), which can be strongly influenced by management. Many management techniques intended to increase forage production may potentially increase SOM, thus sequestering atmospheric

71

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Title Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Ryan H. Wiser, Amol Phadke, and Charles A. Goldman Pagination 28 Date Published 03/2009 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords carbon emissions, electric utilities, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, power system planning Abstract Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demandside resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers

72

Novel Ash Beneficiation Processes for Managing Unburned Carbon and Ammonia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes new fly ash beneficiation concepts for managing deleterious effects of unburned carbon and ammonia contamination associated with low nitrogen oxides (low-NOx) combustion systems. The report contains technical data, scientific discussion, and a description of ongoing development and scale-up activities.

2002-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

73

Waste management activities and carbon emissions in Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes research into waste management activities and carbon emissions from territories in sub-Saharan Africa with the main objective of quantifying emission reductions (ERs) that can be gained through viable improvements to waste management in Africa. It demonstrates that data on waste and carbon emissions is poor and generally inadequate for prediction models. The paper shows that the amount of waste produced and its composition are linked to national Gross Domestic Product (GDP). Waste production per person is around half that in developed countries with a mean around 230 kg/hd/yr. Sub-Saharan territories produce waste with a biogenic carbon content of around 56% (+/-25%), which is approximately 40% greater than developed countries. This waste is disposed in uncontrolled dumps that produce large amounts of methane gas. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from waste will rise with increasing urbanization and can only be controlled through funding mechanisms from developed countries.

Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.za [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Description, calibration and sensitivity analysis of the local ecosystem submodel of a global model of carbon and nitrogen cycling and the water balance in the terrestrial biosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a geographically-distributed ecosystem model for the carbon, nitrogen, and water dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere TERRA. The local ecosystem model of TERRA consists of coupled, modified versions of TEM and DAYTRANS. The ecosystem model in each grid cell calculates water fluxes of evaporation, transpiration, and runoff; carbon fluxes of gross primary productivity, litterfall, and plant and soil respiration; and nitrogen fluxes of vegetation uptake, litterfall, mineralization, immobilization, and system loss. The state variables are soil water content; carbon in live vegetation; carbon in soil; nitrogen in live vegetation; organic nitrogen in soil and fitter; available inorganic nitrogen aggregating nitrites, nitrates, and ammonia; and a variable for allocation. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics are calibrated to specific sites in 17 vegetation types. Eight parameters are determined during calibration for each of the 17 vegetation types. At calibration, the annual average values of carbon in vegetation C, show site differences that derive from the vegetation-type specific parameters and intersite variation in climate and soils. From calibration, we recover the average C{sub v} of forests, woodlands, savannas, grasslands, shrublands, and tundra that were used to develop the model initially. The timing of the phases of the annual variation is driven by temperature and light in the high latitude and moist temperate zones. The dry temperate zones are driven by temperature, precipitation, and light. In the tropics, precipitation is the key variable in annual variation. The seasonal responses are even more clearly demonstrated in net primary production and show the same controlling factors.

Kercher, J.R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Chambers, J.Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

SWP.terrestrial.factsheet0919  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail William O'Dowd NETL William.odowd@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name Terrestrial Sequestration Programs - Regional Terrestrial and Local Terrestrial Sequestration (Combined With Enhanced Coalbed Methane Sequestration) Test Location Entire Region (Regional Program); San Juan Basin (Local Pilot Test) Amount and Source of CO 2

76

Environmental review of options for managing radioactively contaminated carbon steel  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to develop a strategy for the management of radioactively contaminated carbon steel (RCCS). Currently, most of this material either is placed in special containers and disposed of by shallow land burial in facilities designed for low-level radioactive waste (LLW) or is stored indefinitely pending sufficient funding to support alternative disposition. The growing amount of RCCS with which DOE will have to deal in the foreseeable future, coupled with the continued need to protect the human and natural environment, has led the Department to evaluate other approaches for managing this material. This environmental review (ER) describes the options that could be used for RCCS management and examines the potential environmental consequences of implementing each. Because much of the analysis underlying this document is available from previous studies, wherever possible the ER relies on incorporating the conclusions of those studies as summaries or by reference.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models Saif Benjaafar1, we illustrate how carbon emission concerns could be integrated into operational decision-making with regard to procurement, production, and inventory management. We show how, by associating carbon emission

Benjaafar, Saifallah

78

Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System R. Dahowski (bob.dahowski@battelle.org; 509-372-4574) J. Dooley (dooleyj@battelle.org; 202-646-7810) D. Brown (daryl.brown@pnl.gov; 509-372-4366) Battelle/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 A. Mizoguchi (akiyoshi.mizoguchi@jp.mitsubishicorp.com; 81-3-3210-7211) M. Shiozaki (mai.shiozaki@jp.mitsubishicorp.com; 81-3-3210-9543) 6-3 Marunouchi 2-Chome Chiyoda-ku Mitsubishi Corporation Tokyo 100-8086 Japan Introduction Addressing the threat posed by climate change represents one of the most pressing challenges facing humanity. It is also a challenge that will ultimately require profound changes in the way

79

NETL: News Release - DOE Advances Oxycombustion for Carbon Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 17, 2005 November 17, 2005 DOE Advances Oxycombustion for Carbon Management Promising Carbon Capture Technology Moves Closer to Commercialization WASHINGTON, DC-The Department of Energy has selected two projects to demonstrate "oxycombustion" - a promising carbon capture technology - in existing coal-fired power plants. The projects, valued at nearly $10 million, are expected to help expedite the timeline for commercialization of oxycombustion technology through slip stream or pilot plant testing. In an oxycombustion-based power plant, oxygen rather than air is used to combust a fuel resulting in a highly pure carbon dioxide (CO2) exhaust that can be captured at relatively low-cost and sequestered. No commercial oxygen combustion power plants are operating today, due mainly to the high cost of producing oxygen. Significant reduction in the cost of oxygen compared to today's best cryogenic technology is a key requirement to making the oxycombustion power plant a viable future option. The two projects selected by DOE show promise for reducing those costs when compared to existing CO2 capture systems.

80

Carbon Sequestration - A Natural Resource Management and Research & Development Agency Point of View  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

-- -- A Natural Resource Management and Research & Development Agency Point of View Jim Reaves Staff Director USDA Forest Service R&D Vegetation Management and Protection Research Forests and carbon management § The USDA Forest Service is a research and resource management agency § Carbon is the foundation of forest productivity and sustainability § Carbon sequestration is an additional outcome of good forest management and utilization Forests and carbon sequestration n Forests and forest products are important CO 2 sinks n Carbon sinks offer a potentially significant low-cost opportunity to address carbon sequestration n Feedstocks for bioenergy production provide both clean energy and fossil fuel offsets Trends in forest and agriculture carbon sequestration -342 -12 -7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Management of water extracted from carbon sequestration projects  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the past decade, frequent discussions and debates have centered on the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). For sequestration to have a reasonably positive impact on atmospheric carbon levels, the anticipated volume of CO{sub 2} that would need to be injected is very large (many millions of tons per year). Many stakeholders have expressed concern about elevated formation pressure following the extended injection of CO{sub 2}. The injected CO{sub 2} plume could potentially extend for many kilometers from the injection well. If not properly managed and monitored, the increased formation pressure could stimulate new fractures or enlarge existing natural cracks or faults, so the CO{sub 2} or the brine pushed ahead of the plume could migrate vertically. One possible tool for management of formation pressure would be to extract water already residing in the formation where CO{sub 2} is being stored. The concept is that by removing water from the receiving formations (referred to as 'extracted water' to distinguish it from 'oil and gas produced water'), the pressure gradients caused by injection could be reduced, and additional pore space could be freed up to sequester CO{sub 2}. Such water extraction would occur away from the CO{sub 2} plume to avoid extracting a portion of the sequestered CO{sub 2} along with the formation water. While water extraction would not be a mandatory component of large-scale carbon storage programs, it could provide many benefits, such as reduction of pressure, increased space for CO{sub 2} storage, and potentially, 'plume steering.' Argonne National Laboratory is developing information for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to evaluate management of extracted water. If water is extracted from geological formations designated to receive injected CO{sub 2} for sequestration, the project operator will need to identify methods for managing very large volumes of water most of which will contain large quantities of salt and other dissolved minerals. Produced water from oil and gas production also typically contains large quantities of dissolved solids. Therefore, many of the same practices that are established and used for managing produced water also may be applicable for extracted water. This report describes the probable composition of the extracted water that is removed from the formations, options for managing the extracted water, the pros and cons of those options, and some opportunities for beneficial use of the water. Following the introductory material in Chapter 1, the report is divided into chapters covering the following topics: (Chapter 2) examines the formations that are likely candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration and provides a general evaluation of the geochemical characteristics of the formations; (Chapter 3) makes some preliminary estimates of the volume of water that could be extracted; (Chapter 4) provides a qualitative review of many potential technologies and practices for managing extracted water and for each technology or management practice, pros and cons are provided; (Chapter 5) explores the potential costs of water management; and (Chapter 6) presents the conclusions.

Harto, C. B.; Veil, J. A. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

82

NETL: Utilization Projects - Managing High-Carbon Ash  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Managing High-Carbon Ash Managing High-Carbon Ash Task 1: Effect of Coal Quality The objective of this task is to assess if fuel selection is an important factor determining ash quality. Work on this task will involve each of the three participating organizations. Ash samples from three coals will be generated under identical firing conditions in the pilot furnace at the University of Utah, and the matching ash and coal samples sent to Brown. Additional matching sets of coal and ash will be obtained from commercial-scale firing at Southern Company. The ashes will be characterized for LOI and surfactant adsorption activity under standard conditions and trends with fuel type identified. At the same time, chars will be prepared from the matching coal set under standard conditions in a laboratory furnace and also characterized for surfactant adsorptivity. A variety of standard conditions may need to be explored. The combined data set will be analyzed to determine cross correlations between ash behavior, standard laboratory char behavior, and parent coal properties. Our goal is to be able to anticipate ash behavior either (a) from coal properties directly, or (b) from the properties of chars made by a simple laboratory procedure. Either could be the basis for a coal quality index -- one based on fuel properties and the other based on a simple screening test.

83

Carbonate fuel cell system with integrated carbon dioxide/thermal management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Upon successful completion of Phase 1, the Phase 2 activities were initiated in July 1994 to define the stack design and system requirements for a commercial-scale burnerless carbonate fuel cell stack with an integrated carbon dioxide management system. The major goals of this program are to define the stack design and the system requirements of the integrated design. The approach taken was to maximize the similarities of this stack with ERC`s proven baseline stack design and power plant system. Recent accomplishments include a detailed stack design which retains all the essential elements of the baseline stack as well as the power plant system designs. All the auxiliary hardware and external flow patterns remain unchanged, only the internal flow configurations are modified.

Paetsch, L.; Ding, J.; Hunt, J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While fossil fuel emissions are calculated with relatively high precision, understanding the fate of those emissions with respect to sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems requires data and methods that can reduce uncertainties in the diagnosis of land-based CO2 sinks. The wide range in the land surface flux estimates is related to a number of factors, but most generally because of the different methodologies used to develop estimates of carbon stocks and flux, and the uncertainties inherent in each approach. The alternative approaches to estimating continental scale carbon fluxes that we explored here can be broadly classified as applying a top-down or bottom-up perspective. Top-down approaches calculate land-atmosphere carbon fluxes based on atmospheric budgets and inverse modeling. Bottom-up approaches rely primarily on measurements of carbon stock changes (the inventory approach) or on spatially distributed simulations of carbon stocks and/or fluxes using process-based modeling (the forward modelapproach).

Hayes, D. J.; Turner, D. P.; Stinson, Graham; McGuire, A. David; Wei, Yaxing; West, Tristram O.; Heath, L.; deJong, B.; McConkey, Brian; Birdsey, Richard A.; Kurz, Werner; Jacobson, Andy; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Pan, Y.; Post, W. M.; Cook, R. B.

2012-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Integrated plant nutrient management on diversified cropping system in aqua-terrestrial ecosystem for yield potentiality, quality and rural sustainability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agronomic Management of Wetland Crops, published by Kalyanion these aquatic beneficial crops for obtaining higherof aquatic food and non-food crops in neglected way ( Puste,

PUSTE, ANANDAMOY DR.; DE, PRALAY ER.; MAITY, TAPAN KUMAR DR.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

Evans, Paul

87

Terrestrial Ecology | Biosciences Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Ecology BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne Terrestrial...

88

Terrestrial ecosystems and climatic change  

SciTech Connect

The structure and function of terrestrial ecosystems depend on climate, and in turn, ecosystems influence atmospheric composition and climate. A comprehensive, global model of terrestrial ecosystem dynamics is needed. A hierarchical approach appears advisable given currently available concepts, data, and formalisms. The organization of models can be based on the temporal scales involved. A rapidly responding model describes the processes associated with photosynthesis, including carbon, moisture, and heat exchange with the atmosphere. An intermediate model handles subannual variations that are closely associated with allocation and seasonal changes in productivity and decomposition. A slow response model describes plant growth and succession with associated element cycling over decades and centuries. These three levels of terrestrial models are linked through common specifications of environmental conditions and constrain each other. 58 refs.

Emanuel, W.R. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Schimel, D.S. (Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (USA). Natural Resources Ecology Lab.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Carbon Balance and Management BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantifying the effectiveness of climate change mitigation through forest plantations and carbon sequestration with an integrated land-use model

Jelle G Van Minnen; Bart J Strengers; Bas Eickhout; Rob J Swart; Rik Leemans

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Carbon Balance and Management BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Climatic regions as an indicator of forest coarse and fine woody debris carbon stocks in the United States

Christopher W Woodall; Greg C Liknes; Christopher W Woodall; Greg C Liknes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

The private sector's capacity to manage climate risks and finance carbon neutral energy infrastructure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation examines the financial aspects of climate change relating to the private sector's capacity to manage climate risks and finance carbon neutral energy infrastructure. The dissertation examines (a) potential ...

Hart, Craig A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE OCTOBER 21-23, 2013 Hilton Alexandria Old Town Alexandria, Virginia Page 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE OCTOBER 21-23, 2013· Hilton Alexandria Old Town· Alexandria University Abstract Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) projects are subject to monitoring and verification) on Mt. Simon sandstone (USA) #12;CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY CONFERENCE OCTOBER 21-23, 2013· Hilton

Mohaghegh, Shahab

93

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- National Carbon Co - NY 48  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Carbon Co - NY 48 Carbon Co - NY 48 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NATIONAL CARBON CO (NY.48) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.48-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.48-2 Site Operations: Produced graphite for the MED/AEC. NY.48-1 NY.48-2 NY.48-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote - No indication that radioactive material was used on the site NY.48-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to NATIONAL CARBON CO NY.48-1 - AEC Letter; Crenshaw to National Carbon Company (Attn.:

94

Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

ENHANCING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND RECLAMATION OF DEGRADED LANDS WITH FOSSIL-FUEL COMBUSTION BYPRODUCTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

represents an opportunity to couple carbon sequestration with the utilization of fossil fuel #12;and energy of fossil energy byproducts to stimulate carbon sequestration in those terrestrial ecosystems. GOALS C sequestration through optimal utilization of fossil energy byproducts and management of degraded

96

Measuring and Monitoring Plans for Baseline Development and Estimation of Carbon Benefits for Change in Forest Management in Two Reg ions: Changing from Clearcut to Group Selection Harvests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has teamed with the California Energy Commission to study the potential of terrestrial carbon sequestration market opportunities in California. The three reports in this series cover 1) the baseline of changes in carbon stocks on forest, range, and agricultural lands in California for the decade of the 1990s (1011586); 2) the quantity and cost of carbon storage opportunities for forests, rangelands, and agricultural lands in California (1005465); and 3) the relative biomass carbon storage potential ...

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ontario feedlot operators' willingness to accept carbon credit revenue for adopting management practices that reduce greenhouse gas emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Canadian agricultural sector was recognised as a potential seller of carbon offset credits in the domestic emission trading system. A number of beneficial management (more)

Hristeva, Polina.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Carbon emissions reduction strategies in Africa from improved waste management: A review  

SciTech Connect

The paper summarises a literature review into waste management practices across Africa as part of a study to assess methods to reduce carbon emissions. Research shows that the average organic content for urban Municipal Solid Waste in Africa is around 56% and its degradation is a major contributor to greenhouse gas emissions. The paper concludes that the most practical and economic way to manage waste in the majority of urban communities in Africa and therefore reduce carbon emissions is to separate waste at collection points to remove dry recyclables by door to door collection, compost the remaining biogenic carbon waste in windrows, using the maturated compost as a substitute fertilizer and dispose the remaining fossil carbon waste in controlled landfills.

Couth, R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa); Trois, C., E-mail: troisc@ukzn.ac.z [University of KwaZulu-Natal, CRECHE, School of Civil Engineering, Survey and Construction, Durban 4041 (South Africa)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Development of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System (GIS) for the United States  

SciTech Connect

In this project a Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) for the US was developed. The GIS stored, integrated, and manipulated information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS was used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. This report documents the key deliverables from the project: (1) Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) Documentation; (2) Stationary CO{sub 2} Source Database; (3) Regulatory Data for CCS in United States; (4) CO{sub 2} Capture Cost Estimation; (5) CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity Tools; (6) CO{sub 2} Injection Cost Modeling; (7) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport Cost Estimation; (8) CO{sub 2} Source-Sink Matching Algorithm; and (9) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport and Cost Model.

Howard Herzog; Holly Javedan

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Carbonate fuel cell endurance: Hardware corrosion and electrolyte management status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Endurance tests of carbonate fuel cell stacks (up to 10,000 hours) have shown that hardware corrosion and electrolyte losses can be reasonably controlled by proper material selection and cell design. Corrosion of stainless steel current collector hardware, nickel clad bipolar plate and aluminized wet seal show rates within acceptable limits. Electrolyte loss rate to current collector surface has been minimized by reducing exposed current collector surface area. Electrolyte evaporation loss appears tolerable. Electrolyte redistribution has been restrained by proper design of manifold seals.

Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Farooque, M.; Maru, H.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Carbonate fuel cell endurance: Hardware corrosion and electrolyte management status  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Endurance tests of carbonate fuel cell stacks (up to 10,000 hours) have shown that hardware corrosion and electrolyte losses can be reasonably controlled by proper material selection and cell design. Corrosion of stainless steel current collector hardware, nickel clad bipolar plate and aluminized wet seal show rates within acceptable limits. Electrolyte loss rate to current collector surface has been minimized by reducing exposed current collector surface area. Electrolyte evaporation loss appears tolerable. Electrolyte redistribution has been restrained by proper design of manifold seals.

Yuh, C.; Johnsen, R.; Farooque, M.; Maru, H.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Data Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management Data Management Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

103

AN INTEGRATED MODELING FRAMEWORK FOR CARBON MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGIES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} capture and storage (CCS) is gaining widespread interest as a potential method to control greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel sources, especially electric power plants. Commercial applications of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies are found in a number of industrial process operations worldwide. Many of these capture technologies also are applicable to fossil fuel power plants, although applications to large-scale power generation remain to be demonstrated. This report describes the development of a generalized modeling framework to assess alternative CO{sub 2} capture and storage options in the context of multi-pollutant control requirements for fossil fuel power plants. The focus of the report is on post-combustion CO{sub 2} capture using amine-based absorption systems at pulverized coal-fired plants, which are the most prevalent technology used for power generation today. The modeling framework builds on the previously developed Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM). The expanded version with carbon sequestration is designated as IECM-cs. The expanded modeling capability also includes natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plants and integrated coal gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems as well as pulverized coal (PC) plants. This report presents details of the performance and cost models developed for an amine-based CO{sub 2} capture system, representing the baseline of current commercial technology. The key uncertainties and variability in process design, performance and cost parameters which influence the overall cost of carbon mitigation also are characterized. The new performance and cost models for CO{sub 2} capture systems have been integrated into the IECM-cs, along with models to estimate CO{sub 2} transport and storage costs. The CO{sub 2} control system also interacts with other emission control technologies such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems for SO{sub 2} control. The integrated model is applied to study the feasibility and cost of carbon capture and sequestration at both new and existing PC plants as well as new NGCC plants. The cost of CO{sub 2} avoidance using amine-based CO{sub 2} capture technology is found to be sensitive to assumptions about the reference plant design and operation, as well as assumptions about the CO{sub 2} capture system design. The case studies also reveal multi-pollutant interactions and potential tradeoffs in the capture of CO{sub 2}, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3}. The potential for targeted R&D to reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture also is explored using the IECM-cs in conjunction with expert elicitations regarding potential improvements in key performance and cost parameters of amine-based systems. The results indicate that the performance of amine-based CO{sub 2} capture systems can be improved significantly, and the cost of CO{sub 2} capture reduced substantially over the next decade or two, via innovations such as new or improved sorbents with lower regeneration heat requirements, and improvements in power plant heat integration to reduce the (currently large) energy penalty of CO{sub 2} capture. Future work will explore in more detail a broader set of advanced technology options to lower the costs of CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Volume 2 of this report presents a detailed User's Manual for the IECM-cs computer model as a companion to the technical documentation in Volume 1.

Anand B. Rao; Edward S. Rubin; Michael B. Berkenpas

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Baseline Carbon Storage, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse-Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Baseline Carbon Storage, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Terrestrial Ecosystems, and Benjamin M. Sleeter Chapter 5 of Baseline and Projected Future Carbon Storage and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes, carbon sequestration, and greenhouse-gas fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of the Western United States

Fleskes, Joe

105

The Effect of Terrestrial Photosynthesis Down Regulation on the Twentieth-Century Carbon Budget Simulated with the CCCma Earth System Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulation of atmosphericlandocean CO2 exchange for the 18502000 period offers the possibility of testing and calibrating the carbon budget in earth system models by comparing the simulated changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and in ...

V. K. Arora; G. J. Boer; J. R. Christian; C. L. Curry; K. L. Denman; K. Zahariev; G. M. Flato; J. F. Scinocca; W. J. Merryfield; W. G. Lee

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Reconciling estimates of the contemporary North American carbon balance among terrestrial biosphere models, atmospheric inversions and a new approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange from inventory-based data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop an approach for estimating net ecosystem exchange (NEE) using inventory-based information over North America (NA) for a recent 7-year period (ca. 2000 2006). The approach notably retains information on the spatial distribution of NEE, or the vertical exchange between land and atmosphere of all non-fossil fuel sources and sinks of CO2, while accounting for lateral transfers of forest and crop products as well as their eventual emissions. The total NEE estimate of a 327 252 TgC yr1 sink for NA was driven primarily by CO2 uptake in the Forest Lands sector (248 TgC yr1), largely in the Northwest and Southeast regions of the US, and in the Crop Lands sector (297 TgC yr1), predominantly in the Midwest US states. These sinks are counteracted by the carbon source estimated for the Other Lands sector (+218 TgC yr1), where much of the forest and crop products are assumed to be returned to the atmosphere (through livestock and human consumption). The ecosystems of Mexico are estimated tobe a small net source (+18 TgC yr1) due to land use change between 1993 and 2002. We compare these inventorybased estimates with results from a suite of terrestrial biosphere and atmospheric inversion models, where the mean continental-scale NEE estimate for each ensemble is 511 TgC yr1 and 931 TgC yr1, respectively. In the modeling approaches, all sectors, including Other Lands, were generally estimated to be a carbon sink, driven in part by assumed CO2 fertilization and/or lack of consideration of carbon sources from disturbances and product emissions. Additional fluxes not measured by the inventories, although highly uncertain, could add an additional 239 TgC yr1 to the inventory-based NA sink estimate, thus suggesting some convergence with the modeling approaches.

Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL; Turner, David P [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Stinson, Graham [Pacific Forestry Centre, Canadian Forest Service; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska; Wei, Yaxing [ORNL; West, Tristram O. [Joint Global Change Research Institute, PNNL; Heath, Linda S. [USDA Forest Service; De Jong, Bernardus [ECOSUR; McConkey, Brian G. [Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada; Birdsey, Richard A. [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Kurz, Werner [Canadian Forest Service; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Huntzinger, Deborah [University of Michigan; Pan, Yude [U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Energy Management: Best Practice Approach in a Carbon Constrained World  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industry today is facing the perfect storm of Energy. Recently, oil prices have topped the $100.00 per barrel level with no indication that they will be stabilizing anytime soon. This is exacerbated by the political instability in the Middle East and around the world and the increasing demand for oil and related products by global manufacturers and end users especially in the Far East. Since Hurricane Katrina, natural gas prices have been extremely volatile with prices peaking at greater than $16.00 per mmBtu in select markets. Over the last five years natural gas prices have more than tripled putting an extreme burden on energy intensive manufacturing companies. Sustainability issues are being raised as U.S. manufacturers are paying higher prices for natural gas than nearly all their global competitors. Most industry expansion and greenfield projects are shifting to lower cost markets where feedstocks are more competitively priced. Natural gas prices have moderated significantly since their post-Katrina highs in 2005. However, industry still faces upward pricing pressures relating to increases in demand for natural gas, global competition and impending legislation calling for greenhouse gas reductions. All of which will significantly affect industry and the economy. Industry will continue to be at the mercy of Mother Nature concerning Tropical storms and exceptionally cold winter weather. On the immediate horizon, new restrictive greenhouse gas legislation is being developed. It is highly probable that new legislation addressing greenhouse gas emission standards will be enacted. Experts are calling for the first wave of legislation as early as 2009. Pressures are coming from environmentalists, public opinion and industry, all concerned about global warning. It is not a question if more restrictive greenhouse gas and carbon reduction laws will be passed but when. This new legislation will be aimed at the power generation suppliers, industrial manufactures and the consumer markets. The primary focus on power generation will directed towards coal fired generation operations. Another initiative currently underway that will impact industry and create a greater sense of urgency in addressing energy conservation practices by industrial manufacturers involves the Department of Energys efforts to develop an ISO (International Organization of Standardization) standard for energy efficiency. It is clear without a shadow of a doubt that every effort should be taken now to reduce energy consumption by industrial manufactures. It is realistic to expect however, that during this crisis, the perfect storm of energy, that there is opportunity for industry to prosper. What should industry do?

Spates, C. N.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Latest Estimates Latest Estimates Atmos CO2 Level 397.31 ppm Fossil CO2 Emissions 9,167 MMT Carbon Global Temp Anomaly +0.56°C / +1.01°F Global Sea Level Rise +2.9 ± 0.4 mm/y Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) is the primary climate-change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). CDIAC is located at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and includes the World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases. CDIAC's data holdings include estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and land-use changes; records of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active trace gases; carbon cycle and terrestrial carbon management datasets and analyses; and

109

INDUSTRIAL CARBON MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE (ICMI) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Doug Straub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

INDUSTRIAL CARBON MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE (ICMI) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Doug Straub INDUSTRIAL CARBON MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE (ICMI) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Doug Straub Name Project Role Affiliation University Project Title Lew is, James P PI WVU Haycock , Barry John Post Doc WVU Ranasingha, Oshadha Grad Student WVU Senty, Tess R Grad Student WVU Jordan, Kenneth D PI Pitt Thakur, Anshuman Grad Student Pitt Natesakhaw at, Sittichai PI Pitt Heterogeneous Catalysis of Photoactive Materials Kitchin, John PI CMU Curnan, Matthew Grad Student CMU Veser, Goetz PI Pitt Bhavsar, Saurabh Grad Student Pitt Greve, David W PI CMU Gao, Fan Post Doc CMU ARRA-Computational Support Sorbents and Catalysts of Photoactive Materials Computational Support Sorbents and Catalysts of Photoactive Materials ICMI Support for Oxygen Carrier Interaction Studies ICMI Support for Oxygen Carrier Interaction Studies

110

DEVELOPMENT OF A CARBON MANAGEMENT GEOGRAPHIC INFORMATION SYSTEM (GIS) FOR THE UNITED STATES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lab for Energy and Environment (LFEE) at MIT is developing a Geographic Information System (GIS) for carbon management. The GIS will store, integrate, and manipulate information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS can be used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. In the first year of this three year project, we focused on two tasks: (1) specifying the system design--defining in detail the GIS data requirements, the types of analyses that can be conducted, and the forms of output we will produce, as well as designing the computer architecture of the GIS and (2) creating the ''core'' datasets--identifying data sources and converting them into a form accessible by the GIS.

Howard J. Herzog

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A Perspective on the Potential Role of Geologic Options in a National Carbon Management Strategy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Perspective On The Potential Role Of Geologic Options Perspective On The Potential Role Of Geologic Options In A National Carbon Management Strategy David A. Beecy (David.Beecy@hq.doe.gov; 301-903-2787) U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Systems 19901 Germantown Rd., FE-23, Building GTN Germantown, MD 20874 Vello A. Kuuskraa (vkuuskraa@adv-res.com; 703-528-8420) Advanced Resources International, Inc. 1110 N. Glebe, Suite 600 Arlington, VA 22201 Charles Schmidt (Charles.Schmidt@netl.doe.gov; 412-386-6090) U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technical Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Abstract. Carbon sequestration is the critical "third-option" for addressing greenhouse gas emissions, along with increased energy efficiency and expanded use of low-carbon fuels.

112

Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

113

Coreless Terrestrial Exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Differentiation in terrestrial planets is expected to include the formation of a metallic iron core. We predict the existence of terrestrial planets that have differentiated but have no metallic core--planets that are effectively a giant silicate mantle. We discuss two paths to forming a coreless terrestrial planet, whereby the oxidation state during planetary accretion and solidification will determine the size or existence of any metallic core. Under this hypothesis, any metallic iron in the bulk accreting material is oxidized by water, binding the iron in the form of iron oxide into the silicate minerals of the planetary mantle. The existence of such silicate planets has consequences for interpreting the compositions and interior density structures of exoplanets based on their mass and radius measurements.

L. Elkins-Tanton; S. Seager

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

114

DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada August 19, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs). The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership , a collaboration of over 80 U.S. and Canadian stakeholders, conducted the field test at sites in the Prairie Pothole Region, extending from central Iowa into Northern Alberta,

115

Technical Report: Investigation of Carbon Cycle Processes within a Managed Landscape: An Ecosystem Manipulation and Isotope Tracer Approach  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research is to provide a better scientific understanding of carbon cycle processes within an agricultural landscape characteristic of the Upper Midwest. This project recognizes the need to study processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales to reduce uncertainty in ecosystem and landscape-scale carbon budgets to provide a sound basis for shaping future policy related to carbon management. Specifically, this project has attempted to answer the following questions: 1. Would the use of cover crops result in a shift from carbon neutral to significant carbon gain in corn-soybean rotation ecosystems of the Upper Midwest? 2. Can stable carbon isotope analyses be used to partition ecosystem respiration into its autotrophic and heterotrophic components? 3. Can this partitioning be used to better understand the fate of crop residues to project changes in the soil carbon reservoir? 4. Are agricultural ecosystems of the Upper Midwest carbon neutral, sinks, or sources? Can the proposed measurement and modeling framework help address landscape-scale carbon budget uncertainties and help guide future carbon management policy?

Griffis, Timothy J; Baker, John M; Billmark, Kaycie

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

The Tension between Fire Risk and Carbon Storage: Evaluating U.S. Carbon and Fire Management Strategies through Ecosystem Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fire risk and carbon storage are related environmental issues because fire reduction results in carbon storage through the buildup of woody vegetation, and stored carbon is a fuel for fires. The sustainability of the U.S. carbon sink and the ...

C. M. Girod; G. C. Hurtt; S. Frolking; J. D. Aber; A. W. King

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in natural gas prices induced by carbon regulations isnatural gas commodity prices may increase or decrease under carbon regulations,and natural gas price assumptions. Carbon regulations may

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in natural gas prices induced by carbon regulations isnatural gas commodity prices may increase or decrease under carbon regulations,and natural gas price assumptions. Carbon regulations may

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Predicting Agricultural Management Influence on Long-Term Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics: Implications for Biofuel Production  

SciTech Connect

Long-term field experiments (LTE) are ideal for predicting the influence of agricultural management on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics and examining biofuel crop residue removal policy questions. Our objectives were (i) to simulate SOC dynamics in LTE soils under various climates, crop rotations, fertilizer or organic amendments, and crop residue managements using the CQESTR model and (ii) to predict the potential of no-tillage (NT) management to maintain SOC stocks while removing crop residue. Classical LTEs at Champaign, IL (1876), Columbia, MO (1888), Lethbridge, AB (1911), Breton, AB (1930), and Pendleton, OR (1931) were selected for their documented history of management practice and periodic soil organic matter (SOM) measurements. Management practices ranged from monoculture to 2- or 3-yr crop rotations, manure, no fertilizer or fertilizer additions, and crop residue returned, burned, or harvested. Measured and CQESTR predicted SOC stocks under diverse agronomic practices, mean annual temperature (2.1 19 C), precipitation (402 973 mm), and SOC (5.89 33.58 g SOC kg 1) at the LTE sites were significantly related (r 2 = 0.94, n = 186, P < 0.0001) with a slope not significantly different than 1. The simulation results indicated that the quantities of crop residue that can be sustainably harvested without jeopardizing SOC stocks were influenced by initial SOC stocks, crop rotation intensity, tillage practices, crop yield, and climate. Manure or a cover crop/intensified crop rotation under NT are options to mitigate loss of crop residue C, as using fertilizer alone is insufficient to overcome residue removal impact on SOC stocks

Gollany, H. T. [USDA ARS; Rickman, R. W. [USDA ARS; Albrecht, S. L. [USDA ARS; Liang, Y. [University of Arkansas; Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Machado, S. [Oregon State University, Corvallis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Total Ecosystem Approach to Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7RWDO(FRV\VWHP$SSURDFKWR 7RWDO(FRV\VWHP$SSURDFKWR 7HUUHVWULDO&DUERQ 6HTXHVWUDWLRQ Coal Industry Perspective November 6, 2001 685)$&(0,1,1* * Surface mining is the preferred mining method - Cheaper - Employees are above ground - More coal is recovered - Less preparation (washing) required * Prior to 1977 overburden (soil) was left loose (uncompacted) - Many disturbed areas have supported growth of new forest with growth rates greater than adjacent undisturbed lands 685)$&(0,1($&72) * Act Required Mine Operators to take steps to reclaim mined lands. - Post Reclamation Bond - Return Land to Approximate Original Contour * Mining Companies routinely made the surface smooth by making multiple passes over the surface compacting soils 5(&/$,0('0,1(/$1'327(17,$/

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121

Carbon Sequestration and Its Impacts on Forest Management in the Northeast Developed for the North East State Foresters Association  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Disclaimer: This is not a position paper. It is intended to provide a factual basis for interested people in the NEFA region to discuss the carbon sequestration issue. Issues Discussions about forests and their relevance to the carbon sequestration issue are in their infancy. Definitions are varied, standards are not yet set, science is incomplete, and much deliberation ensues about fundamental components of the issue. As a result, the current debates are highly politicized and it is not even clear forum issues are to be worked on. Some debates are happening at the state legislative level, others within the Congress, while others still occur in international settings. Until some of the fundamental definitions and standards are set, there will be substantial politics associated with this issue. This paper attempts to separate current conjecture with fact, thereby allowing the reader to understand how best to begin discussions on the subject. NEFAs Interest in Carbon Sequestration NEFA is most interested in encouraging better stewardship of the forests of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont and New York. In that regard, the interest in carbon sequestration is focused on the role forests might play in the sequestering of carbon through forest management activities. Providing information to landowners and policy makers about which forest management activities sequester the most carbon is an important service to the landowners and society. NEFA will continue to keep current on the rapidly evolving carbon sequestration field in order to play this important role.

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Capturing and sequestering carbon by enhancing the natural carbon cycle: Prelimary identification of basic science needs and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes proceedings and conclusions of a US DOE workshop. The purpose of the workshop was to identify the underlying research needed to answer the following questions: (1) Can the natural carbon cycle be used to aid in stabilizing or decreasing atmospheric CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} by: (a) Increasing carbon capture; (b) Preventing carbon from returning to the atmosphere through intermediate (<100 years) to long-term sequestration (> 100 years)?; and (2) What kind of ecosystem management practices could be used to achieve this? Three working groups were formed to discuss the terrestrial biosphere, oceans, and methane. Basic research needs identified included fundamental understanding of carbon cycling and storage in soils, influence of climate change and anthropogenic emissions on the carbon cycle, and carbon capture and sequestration in oceans. 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Benson, S.M.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Terrestrial Trading Recent Publications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In t ro du ct i o n This Newsletter is created by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and represents a summary of carbon sequestration news covering the past month. Readers are referred to the actual article(s) for complete information. It is produced by the National Energy Technology Laboratory to provide information on recent activities and publications related to carbon sequestration. It covers domestic, international, public sector, and private sector news. Hi g h l i g h t s Wh at s In s i d e? Sequestration in the News

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle The Carbon Cycle The global carbon cycle involves the carbon in and exchanging between the earth's atmosphere, fossil fuels, the oceans, and the vegetation and soils of the earth's terrestrial ecosystems. image Each year, the world's terrestrial ecosystems withdraw carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and add it again through respiration and decay. A more detailed look at the global carbon cycle for the 1990s is shown below. The main annual fluxes in GtC yr-1 are: pre-industrial "natural" fluxes in black and "anthropogenic" fluxes in red (modified from Sarmiento and Gruber, 2006, with changes in pool sizes from Sabine et al., 2004a). The net terrestrial loss of -39 GtC is inferred from cumulative fossil fuel emissions minus atmospheric increase minus ocean storage. The loss of

125

Dr. Yeqiao (Y.Q.) Wang Professor in Terrestrial Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Dr. Yeqiao (Y.Q.) Wang Professor in Terrestrial Remote Sensing Department of Natural Resources://www.ltrs.uri.edu ________________________________________________________________________ Research Interests My research interests and teaching responsibilities are in terrestrial remote sensing. M.Sc., Natural Resources Management & Engineering: Univ. of Connecticut, 1992. M.Sc., Remote Sensing

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

126

Information management for global environmental change, including the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The issue of global change is international in scope. A body of international organizations oversees the worldwide coordination of research and policy initiatives. In the US the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) was established in November of 1993 to provide coordination of science, space, and technology policies throughout the federal government. NSTC is organized into nine proposed committees. The Committee on Environmental and Natural Resources (CERN) oversees the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). As part of the USGCRP, the US Department of Energy`s Global Change Research Program aims to improve the understanding of Earth systems and to strengthen the scientific basis for the evaluation of policy and government action in response to potential global environmental changes. This paper examines the information and data management roles of several international and national programs, including Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) global change information programs. An emphasis will be placed on the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which also serves as the World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases.

Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment August 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Aquatic and terrestrial environments are dynamic systems where coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological processes define the complex interactions that drive the biogeochemical cycling of water and the major and minor elements. Therefore, a thorough understanding of these complex interactions is critical for predicting the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, heavy metals, radionuclides, and other contaminants; managing water quality; and understanding the interactions between

128

Evaluation of Different Soil Carbon Determination Methods  

SciTech Connect

Determining soil carbon (C) with high precision is an essential requisite for the success of the terrestrial C sequestration program. The informed choice of management practices for different terrestrial ecosystems rests upon accurately measuring the potential for C sequestration. Numerous methods are available for assessing soil C. Chemical analysis of field-collected samples using a dry combustion method is regarded as the standard method. However, conventional sampling of soil and their subsequent chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. Furthermore, these methods are not sufficiently sensitive to identify small changes over time in response to alterations inmanagement practices or changes in land use. Presently, several different in situ analytic methods are being developed purportedly offering increased accuracy, precision and cost-effectiveness over traditional ex situ methods. We consider that, at this stage, a comparative discussion of different soil C determination methods will improve the understanding needed to develop a standard protocol.

Chatterjee, Dr Amitava [Ohio State University; Lal, Dr R [Ohio State University; Wielopolski, Dr L [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Ebinger, Dr Michael H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Managing the cost of emissions for durable, carbon-containing products  

SciTech Connect

We recognize that carbon-containing products do not decay and release CO2 to the atmosphere instantaneously, but release that carbon over extended periods of time. For an initial production of a stock of carbon-containing product, we can treat the release as a probability distribution covering the time over which that release occurs. The probability distribution that models the carbon release predicts the amount of carbon that is released as a function of time. The use of a probability distribution in accounting for the release of carbon to the atmosphere realizes a fundamental shift from the idea that all carbon-containing products contribute to a single pool that decays in proportion to the size of the stock. Viewing the release of carbon as a continuous probabilistic process introduces some theoretical opportunities not available in the former paradigm by taking advantage of other fields where the use of probability distributions has been prevalent for many decades. In particular, theories developed in the life insurance industry can guide the development of pricing and payment structures for dealing with the costs associated with the oxidation and release of carbon. These costs can arise from a number of proposed policies (cap and trade, carbon tax, social cost of carbon, etc), but in the end they all result in there being a cost to releasing carbon to the atmosphere. If there is a cost to the emitter for CO2 emissions, payment for that cost will depend on both when the emissions actually occur and how payment is made. Here we outline some of the pricing and payment structures that are possible which result from analogous theories in the life insurance industry. This development not only provides useful constructs for valuing sequestered carbon, but highlights additional motivations for employing a probability distribution approach to unify accounting methodologies for stocks of carbon containing products.

Shirley, Kevin [Appalachian State University; Marland, Eric [Appalachian State University; Cantrell, Jenna [Appalachian State University; Marland, Gregg [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Carbon Footprint and Carbon Deficit Analysis of Iron and Steel ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management. Presentation Title ... Study on Capture, Recovery and Utilization of Carbon Dioxide.

131

CARBON MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES FOR U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATION CAPACITY: A VINTAGE-BASED APPROACH  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the stock of fossil-fired power generation capacity in the United States within the context of climate change. At present, there are over 1,337 fossil-fired power generating units of at least 100 MW in capacity, that began operating between the early 1940s and today. Together these units provide some 453 GW of electric power. Launching a national program to accelerate the early retirement of this stock or tearing them down and undertaking near-term brownfield redevelopment with advanced power cycle technologies as a means of addressing their greenhouse gas emissions will not be a sensible option for all of these units. Considering a conservative 40-year operating life, there are over 667 existing fossil-fired power plants, representing a capacity of over 291 GW, that have at least a decades worth of productive life remaining. This paper draws upon specialized tools developed by Battelle to analyze the characteristics of this subset of U.S. power generation assets and explore the relationships between plant type, location, emissions, and vintage. It examines the use of retrofit carbon capture technologies, considering criteria such as the proximity of these power plants to geologic reservoirs, to assess the potential that geologic sequestration of CO2 offers these plants for managing their emissions. The average costs for retrofitting these plants and sequestering their CO2 into nearby geologic reservoirs are presented. A discussion of a set of planned U.S. fossil-fired power projects within this context is also included.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A Brief Overview of Carbon Sequestration Economics and Policy. Environmental Management 33(4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the past dozen years there has been a growing interest in the possibility of mitigating the global warming effects of carbon dioxide by increasing the carbon stocks of biomass and soils. The earliest economics studies examined the costs of capturing and storing carbon in forest ecosystems (for a review of these studies see Richards and Stokes 2000). Over time, the potential for cost-effectively storing carbon on agricultural lands has also emerged as a focus of research (Lal et al. 1998; Antle et al. 2002). Through the course of the research on carbon sequestration and policy two themes have emerged. First, because of the nature of the analyses it has been difficult to compare the results of the many studies that report estimates of the cost of carbon sequestration in terms of dollars per ton. Second, it appears that it will be more difficult to implement a market-based large-scale carbon sequestration program than many had imagined. These two issues have led to significant confusion in the discussions of carbon sequestration economics and policy. In fact, the two issues are intertwined. It is impossible to meaningfully model the costs of a carbon-sequestration program absent a careful description of how the program would be implemented. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of the issues and challenges involved

Kenneth R. Richards

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Martian Windchill in Terrestrial Terms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With an average temperature of ?63 C and winter lows of ?120 C, Mars sounds far too cold for humans. However, thermometer readings from Mars are highly misleading to Terrestrials who base their expectations of thermal comfort on their experience in ...

Randall Osczevski

135

Carbon dynamics following landscape fire: influence of burn severity, climate, and stand history in the Metolius Watershed, Oregon.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fire is a fundamental disturbance that drives terrestrial and atmospheric carbon dynamics. Previous studies have quantified fire effects on carbon cycling from local to global (more)

[No author

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects on load growth, natural gas prices, and fossil plantA change in natural gas prices induced by carbon regulationscosts under multiple gas price forecasts; however, only four

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects on load growth, natural gas prices, and fossil plantA change in natural gas prices induced by carbon regulationscosts under multiple gas price forecasts; however, only four

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

DOE Carbon Sequestration Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Program Charles E. Schmidt Carbon Sequestration Product Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory David J. Beecy Director, Office of Environmental Systems...

139

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

140

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Coal-Combustion and Biomass-Pyrolysis Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov Heino Beckert Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 MS C04 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov 04/2008 Carbon Sequestration Enhancing carbon SEquEStration and rEclamation of dEgradEd landS with coal-combuStion and biomaSS-PyrolySiS ProductS Background Terrestrial sequestration of carbon can occur by three mechanisms, all of which first require "capture" or fixation of atmospheric carbon by photosynthesis into plant tissues. If captured by herbaceous plants, much of the carbon is quickly

142

Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in Annual Grasslands: Effects of Management and Potential for Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Regional patterns in carbon cycling across the Greatand J. Kadyszewski. 2004. Carbon supply from changes inof annual grassland carbon cycling to the quantity and

Ryals, Rebecca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in natural gas prices induced by carbon regulations affectswith natural gas prices, the effect of carbon regulations onnatural gas may increase or decrease under carbon regulations,

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21 Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GREAT LAKES CARBON CORP. ( IL.21 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 333 North Michigan Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.21-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.21-1 Site Operations: Facility performed a limited amount of nuclear fuel fabrication in the 1950s. Facility also developed graphite production under an AEC contract. IL.21-1 IL.21-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities performed IL.21-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes IL.21-3 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium IL.21-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes IL.21-3

145

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Union Carbide and Carbon Co - TN 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Carbide and Carbon Co - TN 10 Carbide and Carbon Co - TN 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Union Carbide and Carbon Co (TN.10) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 5 FUSRAP considered sites for which records are available that provide a reasonably complete historical account of their operations and relationship, if any, with MED/AEC operations. However, additional analyses of these historical records, and more recent documentation of decisions concerning the authority and other considerations related to the elimination of these sites from further consideration under FUSRAP is warranted. These analyses will provide the

146

Stabilization Wedges and the Management of Global Carbon for the Next 50 Years  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than 40 years after receiving a Ph.D. in physics, I am still working on problems where conservation laws matter. In particular, for the problems I work on now, the conservation of the carbon atom matters. I will tell the saga of an annual flow of 8 billion tons of carbon associated with the global extraction of fossil fuels from underground. Until recently, it was taken for granted that virtually all of this carbon will move within weeks through engines of various kinds and then into the atmosphere. For compelling environmental reasons, I and many others are challenging this complacent view, asking whether the carbon might wisely be directed elsewhere. To frame this and similar discussions, Steve Pacala and I introduced the 'stabilization wedge' in 2004 as a useful unit for discussing climate stabilization. Updating the definition, a wedge is the reduction of CO2 emissions by one billion tons of carbon per year in 2057, achieved by any strategy generated as a result of deliberate attention to global carbon. Each strategy uses already commercialized technology, generally at much larger scale than today. Implementing seven wedges should enable the world to achieve the interim goal of emitting no more CO2 globally in 2057 than today. This would place humanity, approximately, on a path to stabilizing CO2 at less than double the pre-industrial concentration, and it would put those at the helm in the following 50 years in a position to drive CO2 emissions to a net of zero in the following 50 years. Arguably, the tasks of the two half-centuries are comparably difficult.

Socolow, Robert (Princeton University)

2007-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

147

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combined heat and power (CHP) generation. Natural gas is apower generation without carbon capture and storage (CCS) and about $3/MWh to the cost of natural gas-power plants would apply to coal-fired baseload generation (not just natural gas-

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combined heat and power (CHP) generation. Natural gas is apower generation without carbon capture and storage (CCS) and about $3/MWh to the cost of natural gas-power plants would apply to coal-fired baseload generation (not just natural gas-

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Managing the Cost, Energy Consumption, and Carbon Footprint of Internet Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enough to be useful even in the absence of brown energy caps, different electricity prices, or green ser- vice and realistic data on energy and carbon offset prices (gathered from various sources distribution based on hourly electricity prices to reduce the energy cost of Internet services [3]. We

Martonosi, Margaret

150

MCNP ESTIMATE OF THE SAMPLED VOLUME IN A NON-DESTRUCTIVE IN SITU SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS.  

SciTech Connect

Global warming, promoted by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission into the atmosphere, is partially mitigated by the photosynthesis processes of the terrestrial echo systems that act as atmospheric CO{sub 2} scrubbers and sequester carbon in soil. Switching from till to no till soils management practices in agriculture further augments this process. Carbon sequestration is also advanced by putting forward a carbon ''credit'' system whereby these can be traded between CO{sub 2} producers and sequesters. Implementation of carbon ''credit'' trade will be further promulgated by recent development of a non-destructive in situ carbon monitoring system based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Volumes and depth distributions defined by the 0.1, 1.0, 10, 50, and 90 percent neutron isofluxes, from a point source located at either 5 or 30 cm above the surface, were estimated using Monte Carlo calculations.

WIELOPOLSKI, L.; DIOSZEGI, I.; MITRA, S.

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

151

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

152

Scott M. Kaufman US Project Manager The Carbon Trust Brooklyn, NY January 2009 -present  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using SimaPro software; waste data collection and analysis; waste treatment technologies; political and direction for research. Crafted strategy for data collection and analysis from waste management partners aspects of fieldwork, including operation of front-end loader for composting, truck loading, and potting

153

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California, Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Denning, C. B. A Low Carbon Fuel Standard for California227-241. E4Tech. 2007. Carbon Reporting under the Renewablepatterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial

Sperling, Daniel; Farrell, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

A Low-Carbon Fuel Standard for California Part 2: Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Denning, C. B. A Low Carbon Fuel Standard for California227-241. E4Tech. 2007. Carbon Reporting under the Renewablepatterns and mechanisms of carbon exchange by terrestrial

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the second performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed this quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. To date, there has been little research on soil carbon on rangelands, and since rangeland constitutes a major land use in the Big Sky region, this is important in achieving a better understanding of terrestrial sinks. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. Progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations. A series of meetings held during the second quarter have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. Finally, the education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan and process which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. While we are still working on the public website, we have made many presentations to stakeholders and policy makers, connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmentally-friendly energy production. In addition, we have laid plans for integration of our outreach efforts with the students, especially at the tribal colleges and at the universities involved in our partnership. This includes collaboration with the film and media arts departments at MSU, with outreach effort

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

EMSL: Science: Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems logo Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains. The Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme focuses on the dynamics of nutrients, metabolites, and contaminants at biogeochemical interfaces in heterogeneous environments across multiple scales. By providing a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical and microbial processes in soils and the subsurface, and linking those processes via pore-scale hydrological models, EMSL can improve strategies for sustainable solutions to contaminant attenuation, remediation and biogeochemical

157

The Network Packing Problem in Terrestrial Broadcasting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of terrestrial video broadcasting, digital technology most likely will re- ... digital broadcasting has been carried out by the Italian Communications...

158

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial-Oct09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Test Name Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons NA Source...

159

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Field Test Name PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons NA Source...

160

Carbon Cycle Uncertainty Increases Climate Change Risks and Mitigation Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Projections of greenhouse gas concentrations over the twenty-first century generally rely on two optimistic, but questionable, assumptions about the carbon cycle: 1) that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations will enhance terrestrial carbon ...

Paul A. T. Higgins; John Harte

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Tenure-Track Position in Climate Change Science Terrestrial Biogeochemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change. For example, a candidate may focus on connections between soil- and vegetation-related greenhouse gas emissions or carbon sequestration with changes in land use, cover and management. This "open

Angenent, Lars T.

162

Technology Manager, Carbon Capture/Advanced Combustion Strategic Center for Coal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed therein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof. DOE/NETL Advanced Carbon Dioxide Capture R&D Program Accomplishments

Capture R& d Program; Shailesh D. Vora; Jared P. Ciferno; Office Of Coal; Power R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Possible climates on terrestrial exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What kind of environment may exist on terrestrial planets around other stars? In spite of the lack of direct observations, it may not be premature to speculate on exoplanetary climates, for instance to optimize future telescopic observations, or to assess the probability of habitable worlds. To first order, climate primarily depends on 1) The atmospheric composition and the volatile inventory; 2) The incident stellar flux; 3) The tidal evolution of the planetary spin, which can notably lock a planet with a permanent night side. The atmospheric composition and mass depends on complex processes which are difficult to model: origins of volatile, atmospheric escape, geochemistry, photochemistry. We discuss physical constraints which can help us to speculate on the possible type of atmosphere, depending on the planet size, its final distance for its star and the star type. Assuming that the atmosphere is known, the possible climates can be explored using Global Climate Models analogous to the ones developed to sim...

Forget, Francois

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts during the first performance period fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first Partnership meeting the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Complementary to the efforts on evaluation of sources and sinks is the development of the Big Sky Partnership Carbon Cyberinfrastructure (BSP-CC) and a GIS Road Map for the Partnership. These efforts will put in place a map-based integrated information management system for our Partnership, with transferability to the national carbon sequestration effort. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but other policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long term viability. A series of meetings held in November and December, 2003, have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding the implementation of a market-based setting for soil C credits. These include the impact of existing local, state, and federal permitting issues for terrestrial based carbon sequestration projects, consistency of final protocols and planning standards with national requirements, and alignments of carbon sequestration projects with existing federal and state cost-share programs. Finally, the education and outreach efforts during this performance period have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The primary goal of this plan is to increase awareness, understanding, and public acceptance of sequestration efforts and build support for a constituent based network which includes the initial Big Sky Partnership and other local and regional businesses and entities.

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

165

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Carbon Estates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keywords Energy Benchmarking; Retrofitting Simulation; Energy Management; Carbon Management ValidationTesting Methodology: Dutch methodology NEN 2916:1998 (Energy...

166

Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

what'S inSide? what'S inSide? Sequestration in the News Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean Trading Recent Publications Events Subscription Information hiGhliGhtS Fossil Energy Techline, "Climate Technology: DOE Readies First Big U.S. Projects in CO 2 Capture and Storage. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing Phase III proposals for large-scale geologic sequestration projects in support of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The program, which was formed in 2003 to research the best approaches to capture and permanently store the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), will enter its next phase in October with announcements of Phase III deployment projects. The new stage of the Regional Partnerships' work will follow as a logical extension of work

167

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy:...

168

Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B v + B d ) C T = Total carbon B v = biomass contained indevelopment through carbon sequestration: experiences in2000) Rural livelihoods and carbon management, IIED Natural

Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

170

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase II Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Darin Damiani, U.S. Department of Energy, Darin.Damiani@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons N/A Source Atmospheric CO 2 Ducks Unlimited, Inc. U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) North Dakota State University

171

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y. Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the ManagementJ. van Houtum. 2011. E?ect of carbon emission regulations onStreamlined Enterprise Carbon Footprinting. Environmental

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Research Report Forests and carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Report Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management #12;#12;Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management Gregory Valatin Forestry Commission: Edinburgh-0-85538-815-7 Valatin, G. (2010). Forests and carbon: valuation, discounting and risk management. Forestry Commission

174

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University ofLaboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of

Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The significance of the erosion-induced terrestrial carbon sink  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Report from the Soil and Water Conservation Society.Ankeny (IA): Soil and Water Conservation Society. 4. BerheRL. 2004. Soil and Water Conservation for Productivity and

Berhe, A.A.; Harte, J.; Harden, J.W.; Torn, M.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

NETL: News Release - DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestrati...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

their sequestration efforts and save time, effort, and funds. All best-practices manuals, as well as other CCS documents and reference materials, can be found on NETL's...

178

DOE Terrestrial Ecosystem and Carbon Cycle Science Team Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1:45 PM Comments about Replication and Statistical Uncertainty - Steve Long 2:00 PM Crop Responses to Elevated CO2 - Bruce Kimball 2:20 PM The FACE Network - Bob NowakStan...

179

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

avoided carbon costs of energy efficiency and the reducedto acquire all cost-effective energy efficiency, andacquire all cost-effective energy efficiency and renewable

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

each incorporating one of three gas price forecasts (low,developed these three gas price forecasts based, in part, onthe highest carbon and gas prices, under the explicit

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

carbon management environmental  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shelby TBA N/A 7 10/11/2010 Wind Energy & Microhydro Background Larissa Korach and Antonio Love, CARES Undergraduate Researchers Section 1.4.2 Resource Assessments: Micro-Hydro Section 1.4.3 Resource Assessments

Liley, David

182

Carbon dioxide and climate: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography with abstracts presents 394 citations retrieved from the Energy Data Base of the Department of Energy Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The citations cover all aspects of the climatic effects of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. These include carbon cycling, temperature effects, carbon dioxide control technologies, paleoclimatology, carbon dioxide sources and sinks, mathematical models, energy policies, greenhouse effect, and the role of the oceans and terrestrial forests.

Ringe, A.C. (ed.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tillage and Crop Rotation Tillage and Crop Rotation Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.002 PDF file Full text Soil Science Society of America Journal 66:1930-1946 (2002) CSITE image Tristram O. West and Wilfred M. Post DOE Center for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6290 U.S.A. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Abstract Global map Changes in agricultural management can potentially increase the accumulation rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), thereby sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. This study was conducted to quantify potential soil

184

Measurement of carbon for carbon sequestration and site monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2 to 6 degree C increase in global temperature by 2050 has been predicted due to the production of greenhouse gases that is directly linked to human activities. This has encouraged an increase in the international efforts on ways to reduce anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases particularly carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as evidence for the link between atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate change has been established. Suggestion that soils and vegetation could be managed to increase their uptake and storage of CO{sub 2}, and thus become 'land carbon sinks' is an incentive for scientists to undertake the ability to measure and quantify the carbon in soils and vegetation to establish base-line quantities present at this time. The verification of the permanence of these carbon sinks has raised some concern regarding the accuracy of their long-term existence. Out of the total percentage of carbon that is potentially sequestered in the terrestrial land mass, only 25% of that is sequestered above ground and almost 75% is hypothesized to be sequestered underground. Soil is composed of solids, liquids, and gases which is similar to a three-phase system. The gross chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) consists of 65% humic substances that are amorphous, dark-colored, complex, polyelectrolyte-like materials that range in molecular weight from a few hundred to several thousand Daltons. The very complex structure of humic and fulvic acid makes it difficult to obtain a spectral signature for all soils in general. The humic acids of different soils have been observed to have polymeric structure, appearing as rings, chains and clusters as seen in electron microscope observations. The humification processes of the soils will decide the sizes of their macromolecules that range from 60-500 angstroms. The percentage of the humus that occurs in the light brown soils is much lower than the humus present in dark brown soils. The humus of forest soils is characterized by a high content of fulvic acids while the humus of peat and grassland soils is high in humic acids. Similarly it is well known that the amount of carbon present in forest soils is lower than the amount present in grassland soils.

Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Global terrestrial biogeochemistry: Perturbations, interactions, and time scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global biogeochemical processes are being perturbed by human activity, principally that which is associated with industrial activity and expansion of urban and agricultural complexes. Perturbations have manifested themselves at least since the beginning of the 19th Century, and include emissions of CO{sub 2} and other pollutants from fossil fuel combustion, agricultural emissions of reactive nitrogen, and direct disruption of ecosystem function through land conversion. These perturbations yield local impacts, but there are also global consequences that are the sum of local-scale influences. Several approaches to understanding the global-scale implications of chemical perturbations to the Earth system are discussed. The lifetime of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere is an important concept for understanding the current and future commitment to an altered atmospheric heat budget. The importance of the terrestrial biogeochemistry relative to the lifetime of excess CO{sub 2} is demonstrated using dynamic, aggregated models of the global carbon cycle.

Braswell, B.H. Jr.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Carbon Cycle Uncertainty Increases Climate Change Risks and Mitigation Challenges PAUL A. T. HIGGINS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Cycle Uncertainty Increases Climate Change Risks and Mitigation Challenges PAUL A. T about the carbon cycle: 1) that elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations will enhance terrestrial carbon that carbon cycle uncertainty is considerably larger than currently recognized and that plausible carbon cycle

Kammen, Daniel M.

187

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial-Oct09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Field Validation Test Terrestrial Field Validation Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase II Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Andrea McNemar, U.S. Department of Energy, andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons N/A Source Atmospheric CO 2 Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Ducks Unlimited, Inc. U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center North Dakota State University Summary of Field Test Site and Operations:

188

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Terrestrial applications of bifacial photovoltaic solar panels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bifacial Photovoltaic solar cells (so-called transparent bifacial photovoltaic solar cells) offer additional absorption by rear side, which is a significant advantage over ordinary Photovoltaic solar cells. A range of experiments have been done on bifacial ... Keywords: absorption, panels, photovoltaic, solar cells, terrestrial

P. Ooshaksaraei; R. Zulkifli; S. H. Zaidi; M. Alghoul; A. Zaharim; K. Sopian

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research has indicated that, depending upon driver and passenger characteristics, passengers can have either a positive or negative influence upon driver behaviour. In conclusion to a recent study investigating the roles that passengers can play to influence, positively and negatively, driver behaviour, Regan and Mitsopoulos (2001) recommended, among other things, that the principles of Crew Resource Management (CRM) training may increase passengers ability to positively influence driver behaviour and also drivers ability to accept constructive feedback. The present study investigated the potential application of CRM training within young driver training in the Australian Capital Territory (ACT). This involved a literature review, an analysis of the differences between the driving and aviation domains, an analysis of the team-based activities and the knowledge, skills and attitudes required during driving to perform those activities, consultation with CRM experts from the aviation and medicine domains and the conduct of six focus groups involving young learner drivers, provisional licence drivers and course teachers. The findings indicate that CRM training as part of young driver training in the ACT is a viable concept to pursue. The application of CRM training within young driver training has potential to significantly enhance the positive and reduce the negative effects of passengers on young driver behaviour, and thus the safety of young drivers and passengers alike. The outcomes of this study formed the basis for a set of recommendations for the development of a young driver CRM training program in the ACT.

Young Drivers; Eve Mitsopoulos; Michael Regan; Janet Anderson; Paul Salmon; Jessica Edquist; Ii Report Documentation Page

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

192

Bio-char sequestration in terrestrial ecosystemsa review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The application of bio-char (charcoal or biomass-derived black carbon (C)) to soil is proposed as a novel approach to establish a significant, long-term, sink for atmospheric carbon dioxide in terrestrial ecosystems. Apart from positive effects in both reducing emissions and increasing the sequestration of greenhouse gases, the production of bio-char and its application to soil will deliver immediate benefits through improved soil fertility and increased crop production. Conversion of biomass C to bio-char C leads to sequestration of about 50 % of the initial C compared to the low amounts retained after burning (3%) and biological decomposition (bio-char is highly dependent on the type of feedstock, but is not significantly affected by the pyrolysis temperature (within 350500 ? C common for pyrolysis). Existing slash-andburn systems cause significant degradation of soil and release of greenhouse gases and opportunies may exist to enhance this system by conversion to slash-and-char systems. Our global analysis revealed that up to 12 % of the total anthropogenic C emissions by land use change (0.21 Pg C) can be off-set annually in soil, if slash-and-burn is replaced by slash-and-char. Agricultural and forestry wastes such as forest residues, mill residues, field crop residues, or urban wastes add a conservatively estimated

Johannes Lehmann; John Gaunt; Marco Rondon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Method for identifying anomalous terrestrial heat flows  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for locating and mapping the magnitude and extent of terrestrial heat-flow anomalies from 5 to 50 times average with a tenfold improved sensitivity over orthodox applications of aerial temperature-sensing surveys as used for geothermal reconnaissance. The method remotely senses surface temperature anomalies such as occur from geothermal resources or oxidizing ore bodies by: measuring the spectral, spatial, statistical, thermal, and temporal features characterizing infrared radiation emitted by natural terrestrial surfaces; deriving from these measurements the true surface temperature with uncertainties as small as 0.05 to 0.5 K; removing effects related to natural temperature variations of topographic, hydrologic, or meteoric origin, the surface composition, detector noise, and atmospheric conditions; factoring out the ambient normal-surface temperature for non-thermally enhanced areas surveyed under otherwise identical environmental conditions; distinguishing significant residual temperature enhancements characteristic of anomalous heat flows and mapping the extent and magnitude of anomalous heat flows where they occur.

Del Grande, Nancy Kerr (San Leandro, CA)

1977-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

194

Daymet Follow-On Proposal: Data Management Plan R.B. Cook, M...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Management Plan was part of the NASA ROSES 2012 Proposal Daymet Follow-On: Surface Weather Data with Uncertainty Quantification for Terrestrial Ecosystem Process Models...

195

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP (MRCSP) MANAGING CLIMATE CHANGE AND SECURING A FUTURE FOR THE MIDWEST'S INDUSTRIAL BASE  

SciTech Connect

This is the third semiannual report for Phase I of the Midwest Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The project consists of nine tasks to be conducted over a two-year period that started in October 2003. The makeup of the MRCSP and objectives are described. Progress on each of the active Tasks is also described and where possible, for those Tasks at some point of completion, a summary of results is presented.

David Ball; Robert Burns; Judith Bradbury; Bob Dahowski; Casie Davidson; James Dooley; Neeraj Gupta; Rattan Lal; Larry Wickstrom

2005-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

196

Carbon Capital Markets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capital Markets Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1J 8DY Sector Carbon Product London-based fund manager and trader specialising in the carbon and clean energy markets....

197

The Confusing Allure of Combined Heat and Power: The Financial Attraction and Management Challenge of Reducing Energy Spend and Resulting Carbon Emissions Through Onsite Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sixty-one percent of global executives surveyed by McKinsey & Co. (in 2008) expect the issues associated with climate change to boost profitsif managed well. What these executives recognize is that new regulations, higher energy costs, and increased scrutiny by private gate-keepers (such as Wal-Mart) offer an opportunity to identify and implement more efficient practices in commercial and industrial environments. One of the most impactful solutions for the industrial sectorfrom the perspective of reducing energy spending and energy-related carbon emissionsis combined heat and power ("CHP"), sometimes referred to as cogeneration. However, the results of CHP deployment to date have been mixedlargely because companies do not fully appreciate the challenges of maintaining and operating a CHP system, optimizing its performance, and taking full advantage of the many benefits it offers. Despite these challenges, the slogan for CHP should perhaps be: "CHP, now more than ever".

Davis, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

199

Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. The public concern for continued delivery of these ecosystem services is increasing; with private landowners of the plateau region affecting the delivery of these services. A geographic information systems spatial analysis was conducted for Bandera and Kerr counties, with two components being: (1) biophysical and (2) landowner interest. Together these resulted in an overarching map depicting the optimal locations to allocate government assistance to landowners for managing their property to support three ecosystem services: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration.In April 2003, a mail survey of selected landowners was conducted to determine their opinions regarding ecosystem services and cost-share programs (Olenick et al. 2005). In July 2004, a supplemental survey of respondents to the first survey was conducted to follow-up on a few questions answered incorrectly and to focus on landowner opinions regarding cost-share assistance programs and land management activities. Overall, it appeared that five year performance contracts were the most chosen contract type for respondents of all property sizes, earning mid/high annual incomes, and for all length of ownership time periods. Based on our findings, the publicly-funded assistance programs that should be allocated to the optimal ecosystem service locations are five and ten year performance contracts based on property size, length of ownership, and income level categories. The spatial and statistical analysis results were successful, in that optimal locations and types of cost share programs were identified for each ecosystem service in order to prioritize the allocation of limited public resources. The patches of ecosystem target areas within the final target area map can be used as land management demonstration sites to reveal to surrounding landowners the benefits of participating in publicly funded cost-share assistance programs. However, the study has been limited by the generality of the GIS statewide wildlife data.

Davis, Amber Marie

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Plan - Data Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Plan Plan Data Management for Data Providers Click an arrow to follow the data management path of a data set from planning to curation. plan Overview plan Plan manage Manage archive Archive curation DAAC Curation Data Management Overview Plan Manage Archive DAAC Curation Related Links DAAC Help Best Practices PDF Workshops DataONE ESIP Data Management Plans NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program now requires that each proposal include a Data Management Plan (DMP) of up to two pages. A DMP for a proposal is a brief document that outlines what you will do with your data during and after your research, to ensure your data will be safe, documented, and accessible now and in the future. A DMP - developed early and used throughout the research project - will increase research efficiency by making the data understandable and usable in the future and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genome sequencing. Principal Investigators: Wen-Tso Liu, University of Illinois Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer...

202

Advanced Stirling conversion systems for terrestrial applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) is developing heat engines for terrestrial Solar distributed Heat Receivers. SNLA has identified the Stirling to be one of the most promising candidates for the terrestrial applications. The free-piston Stirling engine (FPSE) has the potential to meet the DOE goals for both performance and cost. Free-piston Stirling activities which are directed toward a dynamic power source for the space application are being conducted. Space power system requirements include high efficiency, very long life, high reliability and low vibration. The FPSE has the potential for future high power space conversion systems, either solar or nuclear powered. Generic free-piston technology is currently being developed for use with a residential heat pump under an Interagency Agreement. Also, an overview is presented of proposed conceptual designs for the Advanced Stirling Conversion System (ASCS) using a free-piston Stirling engine and a liquid metal heat pipe receiver. Power extraction includes both a linear alternator and hydraulic output capable of delivering approximately 25 kW of electrical power to the electric utility grid. Target cost of the engine/alternator is 300 dollars per kilowatt at a manufacturing rate of 10,000 units per year. The design life of the ASCS is 60,000 h (30 y) with an engine overhaul at 40,000 h (20 y). Also discussed are the key features and characteristics of the ASCS conceptual designs.

Shaltens, R.K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil fuel combustion, deforestation, and biomass burning are the dominant contributors to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) concentrations and global warming. Many approaches to mitigating CO{sub 2} emissions are being pursued, and among the most promising are terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. Recent advances in ecology and microbial biology offer promising new possibilities for enhancing terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. A workshop was held October 29, 2007, at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) on Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration (BECS). The workshop participants (approximately 30 scientists from California, Illinois, Oregon, Montana, and New Mexico) developed a prioritized list of research needed to make progress in the development of biological enhancements to improve terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration. The workshop participants also identified a number of areas of supporting science that are critical to making progress in the fundamental research areas. The purpose of this position paper is to summarize and elaborate upon the findings of the workshop. The paper considers terrestrial and geologic carbon sequestration separately. First, we present a summary in outline form of the research roadmaps for terrestrial and geologic BECS. This outline is elaborated upon in the narrative sections that follow. The narrative sections start with the focused research priorities in each area followed by critical supporting science for biological enhancements as prioritized during the workshop. Finally, Table 1 summarizes the potential significance or 'materiality' of advances in these areas for reducing net greenhouse gas emissions.

Oldenburg, Curtis; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Torn, Margaret S.

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

204

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealths utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

205

NPP and the Global Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Global Carbon Cycle the Global Carbon Cycle Introduction Photosynthetic carbon fixation comprises a major component of the global carbon cycle. Data on net primary productivity (NPP) may be sparse, but a consistent NPP data set may be used to calibrate, parameterize and evaluate models of terrestrial carbon cycling, as well as for validation of remote sensing data and other applications (identifying trends, investigating biogeochemical processes, etc.). It is also useful to place such data within the context of carbon cycling and carbon storage worldwide. For example: How much carbon exists in the biosphere, and where exactly is it stored? How much is in fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas), and how large are current fossil-fuel emissions? How much is in living biomass (plants/ animals/ humans)?

206

Predicting and Evaluating the Effectiveness of Ocean Carbon Sequestration by Direct Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the ocean is a potentially effective carbon sequestration strategy. Therefore, we want to understand the effectiveness of oceanic injection and develop the appropriate analytic framework to allow us to compare the effectiveness of this strategy with other carbon management options. Here, after a brief review of direct oceanic injection, we estimate the effectiveness of ocean carbon sequestration using one dimensional and three dimensional ocean models. We discuss a new measure of effectiveness of carbon sequestration in a leaky reservoir, which we denote sequestration potential. The sequestration potential is the fraction of global warning cost avoided by sequestration in a reservoir. We show how these measures apply to permanent sequestration and sequestration in leaky reservoirs, such as the oceans, terrestrial biosphere, and some geologic formations. Under the assumptions of a constant cost of carbon emission and a 4% discount rate, injecting 900 m deep in the ocean avoids {approx}90% of the global warming cost associated with atmospheric emission; an injection 1700 m deep would avoid > 99 % of the global warming cost. Hence, for discount rates in the range commonly used by commercial enterprises, oceanic direct injection may be nearly as economically effective as permanent sequestration at avoiding global warming costs.

Caldeira, K; Herzog, H J; Wickett, M E

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

207

China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Information, Agenda, and Abstracts June 26-28, 2013, Kunming, China #12;Symposium: China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs Kunming, China June 26-28, 2013 Information, Agenda

Ahmad, Sajjad

208

Quality assessment of GPS reprocessed terrestrial reference frame  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The International GNSS Service (IGS) contributes to the construction of the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF) by submitting time series of station positions and Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP). For the first time, its submission to the ... Keywords: GNSS, Geocenter motion, Loading, Systematic errors, Terrestrial reference frames

Xavier Collilieux; Laurent Mtivier; Zuheir Altamimi; Tonie Dam; Jim Ray

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set Final Report NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005 May 3, 2001 Richard J. Olson and Jonathan M. O. Scurlock Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6407 This project, "Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set", is a coordinated, international effort to compile global estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) for parameterization, calibration, and validation of NPP models. The project (NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005) was funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Office of Earth Science, Terrestrial Ecology Program under Interagency Agreement number 2013-M164-A1, under

210

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de Energías Renovables (CER), United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Webinar, Training materials References: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model[1] Logo: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Webinar Video SMARTSwebinar.JPG Announcement " Monday, December 6, 2010 11-12 a.m. Golden, CO 1-2 p.m., Washington, D.C. 3-4 p.m., Santiago, Chile

211

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Carbon sCanning system Background Vegetation and soils serve as carbon storage sinks for the approximately 2 billion tons of carbon absorbed annually by the global biosphere. While global warming is promoted by anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere, it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration in the terrestrial ecosystem. However, a better understanding and monitoring of the underground carbon processes is necessary for evaluating various strategies for terrestrial carbon sequestration and quantification of the carbon stores for carbon credits. Description Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a multi-elemental scanning instrument for determining carbon analysis in soil. The method is based on inelastic

212

The Effects of Different Climate Input Datasets on Simulated Carbon Dynamics in the Western Arctic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the Western Arctic Linkage Experiment (WALE), simulations of carbon dynamics in the western Arctic (WALE region) were conducted during two recent decades by driving the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) with three alternative climate ...

Joy Clein; A. David McGuire; Eugenie S. Euskirchen; Monika Calef

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Responses of primary production and total carbon storage to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The authors used the terrestrial ecosystem model (TEM, version 4.0) to estimate global responses of annual net primary production (NPP) and total carbon storage to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2, driven by the ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Kicklighter, David W.; Melillo, Jerry M.; McGuire, A. David.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

214

Regional Workshop on Opportunities and Priorities for Low Carbon...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Region Inside the Low Carbon Green Growth: Innovations in Green Energy Supply Demand Side Energy Efficiency Solutions: A Low Hanging Fruit Managing the Technology for Low Carbon...

215

Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets formerly New Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

London-based carbon markets division of New Energy Finance which provides analysis, price forecasting, consultancy and risk management services relating to carbon. References...

216

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System Background Earth generates and emits an enormous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmos- phere from its deep energy resources, its near-surface processes, and biotic activi- ties. Although anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions increase global warming, global warming is also alleviated by human activities in sequestering carbon into the terrestrial ecosystem and injecting carbon dioxide deep into geological formations,

217

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect

Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

218

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 18, 2011 January 18, 2011 DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. January 11, 2011 New Roadmap Updates Status of DOE Carbon Capture and Storage RD&D Efforts An overview of research, development, and demonstration efforts to supply cost-effective, advanced carbon capture and storage technologies for coal-based power systems is the focus of a new roadmap published by the U.S. Department of Energy. January 5, 2011 DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage Washington, DC - The most promising methods for assessing potential carbon

219

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geological Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ROSE MURPHY Carbon Storage: The Roles of Government and Industry in Risk Management ro s e m ur phy an d m a r k jac c a rd Carbon dioxide capture and storage (ccs) offers the promise that humanity can continue

220

Carbon Sequestration 101  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R&D Overview R&D Overview Office of Fossil Energy Justin "Judd" R. Swift Asst. Secretary for International Affairs Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2 nd U.S/China CO 2 Emission Control Science & Technology Symposium May 28-29, 2008 Hangzhou, China Office of Fossil Energy Technological Carbon Management Options Improve Efficiency Sequester Carbon  Renewables  Nuclear  Fuel Switching  Demand Side  Supply Side  Capture & Store  Enhance Natural Sinks Reduce Carbon Intensity All options needed to:  Affordably meet energy demand  Address environmental objectives Office of Fossil Energy DOE's Sequestration Program Structure Infrastructure Regional Carbon Sequestration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Carbon Sequestration - Public Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Public Meeting Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Public Meeting May 18, 2004 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Scott Klara Carbon Sequestration Technology Manager Carbon Sequestration Program Overview * What is Carbon Sequestration * The Fossil Energy Situation * Greenhouse Gas Implications * Pathways to Greenhouse Gas Stabilization * Sequestration Program Overview * Program Requirements & Structure * Regional Partnerships * FutureGen * Sources of Information What is Carbon Sequestration? Capture can occur: * at the point of emission * when absorbed from air Storage locations include: * underground reservoirs * dissolved in deep oceans * converted to solid materials * trees, grasses, soils, or algae Capture and storage of CO 2 and other Greenhouse Gases that

222

BNL | Carbon Cycle Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding of the impacts of global change on managed and unmanaged ecosystems and improve knowledge of possible global change mitigation approaches. The group has three main focus areas. FACE Climate Change Experimental Facility Design and Management The CCS&T group is an internationally recognized leader in the development of Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) research facilities. We are interested in the design and management of manipulative experiments that examine the effects of carbon dioxide, ozone, other atmospheric pollutants, temperature and precipitation on natural and managed ecosystems. FACE Plant Physiology and High Throughput Biochemical Phenotyping At FACE facilities we have studied the mechanisms that underlie the

223

Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

STOCK AND DISTRIBUTION OF TOTAL AND CORN-DERIVED SOIL ORGANIC CARBON IN AGGREGATE AND PRIMARY PARTICLE FRACTIONS FOR DIFFERENT LAND USE AND SOIL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land use, soil management, and cropping systems affect stock, distribution, and residence time of soil organic carbon (SOC). Therefore, SOC stock and its depth distribution and association with primary and secondary particles were assessed in long-term experiments at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds near Coshocton, Ohio, through *13C techniques. These measurements were made for five land use and soil management treatments: (1) secondary forest, (2) meadow converted from no-till (NT) corn since 1988, (3) continuous NT corn since 1970, (4) continuous NT corn-soybean in rotation with ryegrass since 1984, and (5) conventional plow till (PT) corn since 1984. Soil samples to 70-cm depth were obtained in 2002 in all treatments. Significant differences in soil properties were observed among land use treatments for 0 to 5-cm depth. The SOC concentration (g C kg*1 of soil) in the 0 to 5-cm layer was 44.0 in forest, 24.0 in meadow, 26.1 in NT corn, 19.5 in NT corn-soybean, and 11.1 i n PT corn. The fraction of total C in corn residue converted to SOC was 11.9% for NT corn, 10.6% for NT corn-soybean, and 8.3% for PT corn. The proportion of SOC derived from corn residue was 96% for NT corn in the 0 to 5-cm layer, and it decreased gradually with depth and was 50% in PT corn. The mean SOC sequestration rate on conversion from PT to NT was 280 kg C ha*1 y*1. The SOC concentration decreased with reduction in aggregate size, and macro-aggregates contained 15 to 35% more SOC concentration than microaggregates. In comparison with forest, the magnitude of SOC depletion in the 0 to 30-cm layer was 15.5 Mg C/ha (24.0%) in meadow, 12.7 Mg C/ha (19.8%) in NT corn, 17.3 Mg C/ha (26.8%) in NT corn-soybean, and 23.3 Mg C/ha (35.1%) in PT corn. The SOC had a long turnover time when located deeper in the subsoil.

Puget, P; Lal, Rattan; Izaurralde, R Cesar C.; Post, M; Owens, Lloyd

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

TERMOD 2; an interactive code for analysing intake of radionuclides by man through terrestrial pathways  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TERMOD 2; an interactive code for analysing intake of radionuclides by man through terrestrial pathways

Zach, R

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Minesoils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The SOC dynamics in soil macro and micro-aggregate fractions and its effect on long-term carbon (C) sequestration are discussed. Introduction Carbon (C) management in the next...

227

Geologic Carbon Sequestration Science and Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Assessment for Deployment S. Julio Friedmann Carbon Management Program APL Global Security Principle Directorate, LLNL http:co2.llnl.gov friedmann2@llnl.gov...

228

Soil Organic Carbon Change Monitored Over Large Areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils account for the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C); thus, they are critically important in determining global C cycle dynamics. In North America, conversion of native prairies to agricultural land use over 150 years ago released 30-50% of the soil organic carbon (SOC). Improved agricultural practices have the capacity to recover much of this SOC, storing it in biomass and soil and thereby removing billions of tons of atmospheric CO2. These practices involve increasing C inputs to soil (e.g., by crop rotations, increased use of higher biomass crops, perennial crops) and decreased losses (e.g., reduced tillage intensity) [Janzen et al., 1998; Lal et al., 2003; Smith et al., 2007]. Managing agricultural soils to increase SOC storage is a significant, immediately available, low-cost option for mitigating CO2 emissions, with a technical potential to offset as much as 800 Tg CO2/yr in the US (~13% of US CO2 emissions) [Lal et al., 2003] and 5000 Tg CO2/yr globally (~17% of global CO2 emissions) [Smith et al., 2007].

Brown, David J.; Hunt, E. Raymond; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Paustian, Keith H.; Rice, Charles W.; West, Tristram O.; Schumaker, Bonny L.

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

229

Managing Carbon: Energy, Economy, Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Education Specialist ANWR P.O. Box 100 Austwell, Texas 77950 tonya_stenson@fws.gov 361

Balint, Peter J.

230

Past and Future Effects of Ozone on Net Primary Production and Carbon Sequestration Using a Global Biogeochemical Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exposure of plants to ozone inhibits photosynthesis and therefore reduces vegetation production and carbon sequestration. Simulations with the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) for the historical period (1860-1995) show ...

Felzer, Benjamin Seth.

231

Modeling and Scaling Coupled Energy, Water, and Carbon Fluxes Based on Remote Sensing: An Application to Canadas Landmass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Land surface models (LSMs) need to be coupled with atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) to adequately simulate the exchanges of energy, water, and carbon between the atmosphere and terrestrial surfaces. The heterogeneity of the land ...

Baozhang Chen; Jing M. Chen; Gang Mo; Chiu-Wai Yuen; Hank Margolis; Kaz Higuchi; Douglas Chan

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Carbon Issues Task Force Report for the Idaho Strategic Energy Alliance  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Issues Task Force has the responsibility to evaluate emissions reduction and carbon offset credit options, geologic carbon sequestration and carbon capture, terrestrial carbon sequestration on forest lands, and terrestrial carbon sequestration on agricultural lands. They have worked diligently to identify ways in which Idaho can position itself to benefit from potential carbon-related federal legislation, including identifying opportunities for Idaho to engage in carbon sequestration efforts, barriers to development of these options, and ways in which these barriers can be overcome. These are the experts to which we will turn when faced with federal greenhouse gas-related legislation and how we should best react to protect and provide for Idahos interests. Note that the conclusions and recommended options in this report are not intended to be exhaustive, but rather form a starting point for an informed dialogue regarding the way-forward in developing Idaho energy resources.

Travis L. Mcling

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting Development Phase Field Tests Pittsburgh, PA October 5, 2010 Presented by: Gerald R. Hill, Ph.D. Senior Technical Advisor Southern States Energy Board Acknowledgements  This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.  Cost share and research support provided by SECARB/SSEB Carbon Management Partners Through innovations in energy and environmental policies, programs and technologies, the Southern States Energy Board enhances economic development and the quality of life in the South. - SSEB Mission Statement SSEB Carbon Management Program  Established 2003  Characterizing Southeast Region

234

The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP)  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the Phase I research conducted by the Midwest regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP). The Phase I effort began in October 2003 and the project period ended on September 31, 2005. The MRCSP is a public/private partnership led by Battelle with the mission of identifying the technical, economic, and social issues associated with implementation of carbon sequestration technologies in its seven state geographic region (Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia) and identifying viable pathways for their deployment. It is one of seven partnerships that together span most of the U.S. and parts of Canada that comprise the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Regional Carbon Sequestration Program led by DOE's national Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The MRCSP Phase I research was carried out under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-03NT41981. The total value of Phase I was $3,513,513 of which the DOE share was $2,410,967 or 68.62%. The remainder of the cost share was provided in varying amounts by the rest of the 38 members of MRCSP's Phase I project. The next largest cost sharing participant to DOE in Phase I was the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Air Quality Development Authority (OCDO). OCDO's contribution was $100,000 and was contributed under Grant Agreement No. CDO/D-02-17. In this report, the MRCSP's research shows that the seven state MRCSP region is a major contributor to the U. S. economy and also to total emissions of CO2, the most significant of the greenhouse gases thought to contribute to global climate change. But, the research has also shown that the region has substantial resources for sequestering carbon, both in deep geological reservoirs (geological sequestration) and through improved agricultural and land management practices (terrestrial sequestration). Geological reservoirs, especially deep saline reservoirs, offer the potential to permanently store CO2 for literally 100s of years even if all the CO2 emissions from the region's large point sources were stored there, an unlikely scenario under any set of national carbon emission mitigation strategies. The terrestrial sequestration opportunities in the region have the biophysical potential to sequester up to 20% of annual emissions from the region's large point sources of CO2. This report describes the assumptions made and methods employed to arrive at the results leading to these conclusions. It also describes the results of analyses of regulatory issues in the region affecting the potential for deployment of sequestration technologies. Finally, it describes the public outreach and education efforts carried out in Phase I including the creation of a web site dedicated to the MRCSP at www.mrcsp.org.

James J. Dooley; Robert Dahowski; Casie Davidson

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Development and application of the EPIC model for carbon cycle, greenhouse-gas mitigation, and biofuel studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This chapter provides a comprehensive review of the EPIC model in relation to carbon cycle, greenhouse-gas mitigation, and biofuel applications. From its original capabilities and purpose (i.e., quantify the impacts or erosion on soil productivity), the EPIC model has evolved into a comprehensive terrestrial ecosystem model for simulating with more or less process-level detail many ecosystem processes such as weather, hydrology, plant growth and development, carbon cycle (including erosion), nutrient cycling, greenhouse-gas emissions, and the most complete set of manipulations that can be implemented on a parcel of land (e.g. tillage, harvest, fertilization, irrigation, drainage, liming, burning, pesticide application). The chapter also provides details and examples of the latest efforts in model development such as the coupled carbon-nitrogen model, a microbial denitrification model with feedback to the carbon decomposition model, updates on calculation of ecosystem carbon balances, and carbon emissions from fossil fuels. The chapter has included examples of applications of the EPIC model in soil carbon sequestration, net ecosystem carbon balance, and biofuel studies. Finally, the chapter provides the reader with an update on upcoming improvements in EPIC such as the additions of modules for simulating biochar amendments, sorption of soluble C in subsoil horizons, nitrification including the release of N2O, and the formation and consumption of methane in soils. Completion of these model development activities will render an EPIC model with one of the most complete representation of biogeochemical processes and capable of simulating the dynamic feedback of soils to climate and management in terms not only of transient processes (e.g., soil water content, heterotrophic respiration, N2O emissions) but also of fundamental soil properties (e.g. soil depth, soil organic matter, soil bulk density, water limits).

Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Mcgill, William B.; Williams, J.R.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

NETL: Carbon Storage - Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing SECARB efforts can be found on their website. The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), represents a 13-State region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB is comprised of over 100 participants representing Federal and State governments, industry, academia, and non-profit organizations. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and

237

Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration Offset Programs: Strengths, Difficulties, and Suggestions for Their Potential Use in AB 32's Cap and Trade Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

harms involved in agricultural soil carbon sequestration.land-management/soil-carbon- sequestration/en/ (last visitedet al. , Soil Carbon Sequestration Fundamentals , O HIO S

Bernadett, Lauren

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Carbon Jungle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jungle Jungle Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Jungle Place El Segundo, California Zip 90246 Sector Carbon Product Carbon Jungle's mission is to decrease CO2 in the atmosphere by planting and managing tree plantations, increasing awareness of the facts behind increased CO2 in the atmosphere, and giving companies a means to participate in carbon credit trading. References Carbon Jungle[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Jungle is a company located in El Segundo, California . References ↑ "Carbon Jungle" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Jungle&oldid=343237" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

239

WSDOT highway maintenance: environmental compliance for protected terrestrial species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in figure 3. Maintenance Activity Best Management PracticesOlympic Region Maintenance Program on management recommen-If a maintenance activity is not exempt, Best Management

OBrien, Tracie; Carey, Marion; Forrester, Bret

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush

Rollins, Andrew M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in permafrost regions September 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint One of the greatest environmental challenges of the 21st century lies in predicting the impacts of anthropogenic activities on Earth's carbon cycle. Soil is a significant component of the carbon cycle, because it contains at least two-thirds of the world's terrestrial carbon and more than twice as much carbon as the atmosphere. Although soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks were built over millennial time scales, they are susceptible to a far more rapid release back to the atmosphere due to climatic and land use change. If environmental perturbations negatively impact the processes regulating the storage of SOC, significant amounts of this carbon could be decomposed

242

Survey of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation 1995 annual progress report  

SciTech Connect

This progress report discusses surveys of protected terrestrial vertebrates on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) from October 1994 through September 1995. These surveys are important to help avoid or minimize potential impacts of projects on the ORR to species listed as threatened, endangered, or in need of management by the US Fish and Wildlife Service and the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency. Currently, there are 69 species of federally or state-listed terrestrial vertebrates that may occur in Tennessee. Not all of these are expected to occur on the ORR, nor do resources permit comprehensive sampling for all of them over the entire ORR. To effectively organize sampling efforts, listed animal species that might be present were targeted using a prioritization system based on historical and recent sightings, species distributions, literature reviews, and personal communications. Sampling was conducted during the time of the year when each targeted species would most likely be encountered. Several trapping and surveying methods were used, including pitfall traps, Sherman traps, seining, artificial covers, and cave and avian surveys.

Vail, E.R.; Mitchell, J.M.; Webb, J.W.; King, A.L.; Hamlett, P.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

244

Chemical sensing and imaging in microfluidic pore network structures relevant to natural carbon cycling and industrial carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Energy and climate change represent significant factors in global security. Atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, while global in scope, are influenced by pore-scale phenomena in the subsurface. We are developing tools to visualize and investigate processes in pore network microfluidic structures with transparent covers as representations of normally-opaque porous media. In situ fluorescent oxygen sensing methods and fluorescent cellulosic materials are being used to investigate processes related to terrestrial carbon cycling involving cellulytic respiring microorganisms. These structures also enable visualization of water displacement from pore spaces by hydrophobic fluids, including carbon dioxide, in studies related to carbon sequestration.

Grate, Jay W.; Zhang, Changyong; Wilkins, Michael J.; Warner, Marvin G.; Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Oostrom, Martinus

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

245

Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S., Final Report  

SciTech Connect

As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance.

Beverly E. Law

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

246

Intermediate long-lived nuclear waste management: an ...  

management: an integrated ... Nuclear Energy Division / Department of Physico-Chemistry. ... CIMETAL Project Air carbonation phenomenology Transport ...

247

INCCA: Integrated Climate and Carbon  

SciTech Connect

The INCCA (Integrated Climate and Carbon) initiative will develop and apply the ability to simulate the fate and climate impact of fossil fuel-derived carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and aerosols on a global scale. Coupled climate and carbon cycle modeling like that proposed for INCCA is required to understand and predict the future environmental impacts of fossil fuel burning. At present, atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations are prescribed, not simulated, in large climate models. Credible simulations of the entire climate system, however, need to predict time-evolving atmospheric greenhouse forcing using anthropogenic emissions as the fundamental input. Predicting atmospheric COS concentrations represents a substantial scientific advance because there are large natural sources and sinks of carbon that are likely to change as a result of climate change. Both terrestrial (e.g., vegetation on land) and oceanic components of the carbon cycle are known to be sensitive to climate change. Estimates of the amount of man-made CO{sub 2} that will accumulate in the atmosphere depend on understanding the carbon cycle. For this reason, models that use CO{sub 2} emissions, not prescribed atmospheric concentrations, as fundamental inputs are required to directly address greenhouse-related questions of interest to policymakers. INCCA is uniquely positioned to make rapid progress in this high-priority area of global change modeling and prediction because we can leverage previous and ongoing LLNL developments, and use existing component models that are well-developed and published. The need for a vastly improved carbon dioxide prediction capability is appreciated by the DOE. As the US Accelerated Climate Prediction Initiative (ACPI) progresses, we expect the DOE will emphasize the carbon cycle as the next major department-level earth science focus. INCCA will position LLNL for substantial additional funding as this new focus is realized. In the limited time since our LDRD funding was first received (1 November 2000) we have made good progress in acquisition and testing of component models, applications of the terrestrial biosphere model, enhancements to the ocean carbon cycle model and development of the fossil fuel aerosol model.

Thompson, S L

2001-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

248

CARBON TETRACHLORIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about carbon tetrachloride.

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Anthropogenic impacts on global storage and emissions of mercury from terrestrial soils: Insights from a new global  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We develop a mechanistic global model of soil mercury storage and emissions that ties the lifetime of mercury in soils to the lifetime of the organic carbon pools it is associated with. We explore the implications of considering terrestrial mercury cycling in the framework of soil carbon cycling and suggest possible avenues of future research to test our assumptions and constrain this type of model. In our simulation, input of mercury to soil is by atmospheric deposition, in part through leaf uptake and subsequent litter fall, and is moderated by surface photoreduction and revolatilization. Once bound to organic carbon, mercury is transferred along a succession of short?lived to long?lived carbon pools and is ultimately reemitted by respiration of these pools. We examine the legacy of anthropogenic influence on global mercury storage and emissions and estimate that storage of mercury in organic soils has increased by ?20 % since preindustrial times, while soil emissions have increased by a factor of 3 (2900 Mg yr ?1 versus 1000 Mg yr ?1). At steady state, mercury accumulates in the most recalcitrant soil carbon pools and has an overall lifetime against respiration of 630 years. However, the impact of anthropogenic emissions since preindustrial times has been concentrated in more labile pools, so that the mean lifetime of present?day anthropogenic mercury in all pools is ?80 years. Our analysis suggests that reductions in anthropogenic emissions would lead to immediate and large reductions in secondary soil mercury emissions.

Nicole V Smith?downey; Elsie M. Sunderl; Daniel J. Jacob

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Radio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction 1.1. TGF Theory Overview [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bright bursts of gamma raysRadio emissions from terrestrial gamma-ray flashes Joseph R. Dwyer1 and Steven A. Cummer2 Received frequency (RF) emissions by terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) is developed. These radio emissions, which

Cummer, Steven A.

251

NETL: Carbon Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) Programmatic Points of Contact Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Coordinator Carbon Storage...

252

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are people doing now to manage CO2? What are people doing now to manage CO2? SECARB's injection operations at the Mississippi test site in Escatawpa, Mississippi SECARB's injection operations at the Mississippi test site in Escatawpa, Mississippi. A combined portfolio of carbon management options is being implemented to reduce current emission levels associated with energy production while enhancing energy security and building the technologies and knowledge base for export to other countries faced with reducing emissions. The U.S. portfolio includes: (1) use fuels with reduced carbon intensity - renewables, nuclear, and natural gas; (2) adopt more efficient technologies on both the energy demand and supply sides; and (3) use carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. CCS is a viable emission management option

253

NREL: Awards and Honors - Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar  

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Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Developers: Dr. Jerry Olson, Dr. Sarah Kurtz, Dr. Daniel Friedman, Alan Kibbler, and Charlene Karmer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Dr. Richard King, Jim Ermer, Dmitri D. Krut, Hector Cotal, Peter Colter, Hojun Yoon, Nassar Karam, and Gregory S. Glenn, Spectrolab, Inc. The triple-junction solar cell - or TJ solar cell - generates a lot of energy from just a very little amount of material. How much energy? A 1-cm2 cell can generate as much as 35 W of power and produce as much as 86.3 kWh of electricity during a typical year under a Phoenix, AZ sun. This means that 100 to 150 of these cells could produce enough electricity to power the typical American household. This cell can do this, first, because it

254

WESTCARB Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

WESTCARB is characterizing the extent and capacity of geologic formations capable of storing CO2, known as sinks. Results are entered into a geographic information system (GIS) database, along with the location of major CO2-emitting point sources in each of the six WESTCARB states, enabling researchers and the public to gauge the proximity of candidate CO2 storage sites to emission sources and the feasibility of linking them via pipelines. Specifically, the WESTCARB GIS database (also known as the carbon atlas) stores layers of geologic information about potential underground storage sites, such as porosity and nearby fault-lines and aquifers. Researchers use these data, along with interpreted geophysical data and available oil and gas well logs to estimate the region's potential geologic storage capacity. The database also depicts existing pipeline routes and rights-of-way and lands that could be off-limits, which can aid the development of a regional carbon management strategy. The WESTCARB Carbon Atlas, which is accessible to the public, provides a resource for public discourse on practical solutions for regional CO2 management. A key WESTCARB partner, the Utah Automated Geographic Reference Center, has developed data serving procedures to enable the WESTCARB Carbon Atlas to be integrated with those from other regional partnerships, thereby supporting the U.S. Department of Energy's national carbon atlas (NATCARB). (Acknowledgement to the WESTCARB web site at http://www.westcarb.org/index.htm)

255

TERRESTRIAL, HABITABLE-ZONE EXOPLANET FREQUENCY FROM KEPLER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Data from Kepler's first 136 days of operation are analyzed to determine the distribution of exoplanets with respect to radius, period, and host-star spectral type. The analysis is extrapolated to estimate the percentage of terrestrial, habitable-zone (HZ) exoplanets. The Kepler census is assumed to be complete for bright stars (magnitude 0.5 Earth radius and periods <42 days. It is also assumed that the size distribution of planets is independent of orbital period and that there are no hidden biases in the data. Six significant statistical results are found: there is a paucity of small planet detections around faint target stars, probably an instrumental effect; the frequency of mid-size planet detections is independent of whether the host star is bright or faint; there are significantly fewer planets detected with periods <3 days, compared to longer periods, almost certainly an astrophysical effect; the frequency of all planets in the population with periods <42 days is 29%, broken down as terrestrials 9%, ice giants 18%, and gas giants 3%; the population has a planet frequency with respect to period which follows a power-law relation dN/dP {approx} P{sup {beta}-1}, with {beta} {approx_equal} 0.71 {+-} 0.08; and an extrapolation to longer periods gives the frequency of terrestrial planets in the HZs of FGK stars as {eta}{sub Circled-Plus} {approx_equal} (34 {+-} 14)%. Thus about one-third of FGK stars are predicted to have at least one terrestrial, HZ planet.

Traub, Wesley A., E-mail: wtraub@jpl.nasa.gov [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Credits in Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities K. Thomas Klasson and Brian H. Davison Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6226 Presentation First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington, DC "The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." * Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 1 Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities

257

Carbon Capture and Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SECARB's SECARB's Mississippi SalineTest Site: A Field Project Update Robert C. Trautz (rtrautz@epri.com) Electric Power Research Institute Senior Project Manager DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Annual Review Meeting October 6-8, 2008 Pittsburgh, PA 2 1. Introduction 2. Well Drilling & Completion 3. Reservoir Characterization 4. CO 2 Injection Operations 5. Monitoring and Verification Outline 3 Key Organizations and Acknowledgments SOUTHERN STATES ENERGY BOARD Dr. Gerald (Jerry) R. Hill OTHER FIELD PROJECTS AND SUPPORTING ACTIVITIES * Advanced Resources * Alabama Geological Survey/ SCS * Gulf Coast Carbon Center (TXBEG) * EPRI * Virginia Tech University * Mississippi State University * Others Richard Esposito MISSISSIPPI POWER CO. Rick Berry Richard (Dick) Rhudy Robert (Rob) Trautz

258

ARM - Field Campaign - Aircraft Carbon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAircraft Carbon govCampaignsAircraft Carbon Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aircraft Carbon 2006.07.01 - 2008.09.30 Lead Scientist : Margaret Torn For data sets, see below. Description Airborne trace-gas measurements at ARM-SGP provided valuable data for addressing carbon-cycle questions highlighted by the US Climate Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program. A set of carbon-cycle instruments and sample collection systems were added to an ARM-managed aircraft at ARM-SGP user facility. A separate (in-place) grant covered the cost of developing the instrument systems, analyzing the data, and ingesting all data to the ARM data archives. In the short-term (~1 y) we had two priorities. The first was to acquire

259

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

260

ENERGY STAR Update: ENERGY STAR Low Carbon IT Campaign Kicks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon IT Campaign Kicks Off 2013 with Organizations Pledging to Power Manage 360,000 Computers The ENERGY STAR Low Carbon IT (LCIT) Campaign, a nationwide effort to assist and...

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261

Steam Generator Management Program: PWR Steam Generator Tube Wear - Alloy 690/Foreign Objects, Alloy 600/Carbon Steel, Alloy 690/Car bon Steel Support  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wear at tube support plates and wear resulting from foreign objects (FOs) can damage tubes in replacement steam generators. To date, however, limited data have been available on wear rates for Alloy 690 tubing. Under the Steam Generator Management Program, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has sponsored a series of experiments to determine the wear coefficients between combinations of Alloy 690 steam generator tube material and relevant support and FO materials. This report describes the test ...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Climate impacts of bioenergy: Inclusion of carbon cycle and albedo dynamics in life cycle impact assessment  

SciTech Connect

Life cycle assessment (LCA) can be an invaluable tool for the structured environmental impact assessment of bioenergy product systems. However, the methodology's static temporal and spatial scope combined with its restriction to emission-based metrics in life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) inhibits its effectiveness at assessing climate change impacts that stem from dynamic land surface-atmosphere interactions inherent to all biomass-based product systems. In this paper, we focus on two dynamic issues related to anthropogenic land use that can significantly influence the climate impacts of bioenergy systems: i) temporary changes to the terrestrial carbon cycle; and ii) temporary changes in land surface albedo-and illustrate how they can be integrated within the LCA framework. In the context of active land use management for bioenergy, we discuss these dynamics and their relevancy and outline the methodological steps that would be required to derive case-specific biogenic CO{sub 2} and albedo change characterization factors for inclusion in LCIA. We demonstrate our concepts and metrics with application to a case study of transportation biofuel sourced from managed boreal forest biomass in northern Europe. We derive GWP indices for three land management cases of varying site productivities to illustrate the importance and need to consider case- or region-specific characterization factors for bioenergy product systems. Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed metrics are discussed. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A method for including temporary surface albedo and carbon cycle changes in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA) is elaborated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Concepts are applied to a single bioenergy case whereby a range of feedstock productivities are shown to influence results. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results imply that case- and site-specific characterization factors can be essential for a more informed impact assessment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uncertainties and limitations of the proposed methodologies are elaborated.

Bright, Ryan M., E-mail: ryan.m.bright@ntnu.no; Cherubini, Francesco; Stromman, Anders H.

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Energy Balance and Carbon Dioxide Flux in Conventional and No-Till Maize Fields in Lesotho, Southern Africa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The capacity of soils to sequester carbon is currently of scientific interest because soil management impacts carbon dioxide flux and can mitigate the effects (more)

Bruns, Wendy Anne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of April 1, 2005-September 30, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. While Phase 2 planning is well under way, the content of this report focuses exclusively on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period. Progress during this period was focused in the three areas: geological carbon storage capacity in New Mexico, terrestrial sequestration capacity for the project area, and the Integrated Assessment Model efforts. The geologic storage capacity of New Mexico was analyzed and Blanco Mesaverde (which extends into Colorado) and Basin Dakota Pools were chosen as top two choices for the further analysis for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the system dynamics model preliminary analysis. Terrestrial sequestration capacity analysis showed that the four states analyzed thus far (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah) have relatively limited potential to sequester carbon in terrestrial systems, mainly due to the aridity of these areas, but the large land area offered could make up for the limited capacity per hectare. Best opportunities were thought to be in eastern Colorado/New Mexico. The Integrated Assessment team expanded the initial test case model to include all New Mexico sinks and sources in a new, revised prototype model in 2005. The allocation mechanism, or ''String of Pearls'' concept, utilizes potential pipeline routes as the links between all combinations of the source to various sinks. This technique lays the groundwork for future, additional ''String of Pearls'' analyses throughout the SW Partnership and other regions as well.

Brian McPherson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Carbon Isotopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

267

Carbon Balance and Management BioMed Central Commentary The Anthropocene, global change and sleeping giants: where on Earth are we going?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The "climate problem " has come to the fore in public policy debates over the last year or so. The continuing high temperatures, the spate of intense tropical cyclones and deepening droughts in some parts of the world have focused attention on the issue of defining "dangerous climate change " [1]. This is often conceptualised as an upper limit to the rise in global mean temperature, for example, 2C above pre-industrial levels, which in turn leads to a back calculation of the permissible concentration of CO 2 in the atmosphere and then to the trajectories of the corresponding maximum anthropogenic carbon emissions. Although a very important exercise, this approach to defining dangerous climate change can itself be dangerous, in particular because it often ignores the systemic

Will Steffen; Will Steffen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. Edmonds, J.J. Dooley, and S.H. Kim Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute THE ROADMAP * Greenhouse gas emissions may not control themselves. * Climate policy may happen.--There are smart and dumb ways to proceed. The smart ways involve getting both the policy and the technology right--the GTSP. * There are no silver bullets--Expanding the set of options to include carbon capture and sequestration can help limit the cost of any ceiling on CO 2 concentrations. * Managing greenhouse emissions means managing carbon. * Carbon can be captured, transported, and sequestered in many ways.

269

Electrically Addressable Carbon Nanofibers on (Non)Insulating ...  

Addressable Carbon Nanofibers on (Non)Insulating Substrates ... Field emission from a large area of VACNF with nanoscale tips - MIT. 6 Managed by UT-Battelle

270

Carbon impact of proposed hydroelectric dams in Chilean Patagonia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The concern for and awareness of climate change is growing, and the world needs to react quickly and efficiently to manage the carbon intensity of (more)

Mar, Laura E. (Laura Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Regional partnerships lead US carbon sequestration efforts  

SciTech Connect

During the sixth annual conference on carbon capture and sequestration, 7-10 May 2007, a snapshot was given of progress on characterization efforts and field validation tests being carried out through the Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Initiative. The initiative is built on the recognition that geographical differences in fossil fuel/energy use and CO{sub 2} storage sinks across North America will dictate approaches to carbon sequestration. The first characterization phase (2003-2005) identified regional opportunities and developed frameworks to validate and deploy technologies. The validation phase (2005-2009) includes 10 enhanced oil recovery/enhanced gas recovery field tests in progress in Alberta and six US states and is applying lessons learned from these operations to sequestration in unmineable coal seams. Storage in saline formations are the focus of 10 field tests, and terrestrial sequestration will be studied in 11 other projects. 1 tab., 3 photos.

NONE

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During this quarter a general forest monitoring program was conducted to measure treatment effects on above ground and below ground carbon C and Nitrogen (N) pools for the tree planting areas. Detailed studies to address specific questions pertaining to Carbon cycling was initiated with the development of plots to examine the influence of mycorrhizae, spoil chemical and mineralogical properties, and use of amendment on forest establishment and carbon sequestration. Efforts continued during this period to examine decomposition and heterotrophic respiration on C cycling in the reforestation plots. Projected climate change resulting from elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide has given rise to various strategies to sequester carbon in various terrestrial ecosystems. Reclaimed surface mine soils present one such potential carbon sink where traditional reclamation objectives can complement carbon sequestration. New plantings required the modification and design and installation on monitoring equipment. Maintenance and data monitoring on past and present installations are a continuing operation. The Department of Mining Engineering continued the collection of penetration resistance, penetration depth, and bulk density on both old and new treatment areas. Data processing and analysis is in process for these variables. Project scientists and graduate students continue to present results at scientific meetings, tours and field days presentations of the research areas are being conducted on a request basis.

Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

2005-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

273

AN EXPLORATORY STUDY OF THE TERRESTRIAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL SILICON CYCLE AT A FORESTED WATERSHED IN NORTHERN VERMONT .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The importance of the global silicon cycle is becoming increasingly recognized because of its role in the consumption of atmospheric CO2. However, the terrestrial component (more)

Garvin, Christopher J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Characterization of extrasolar terrestrial planets from diurnal photometric variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of massive planets orbiting nearby stars has become almost routine, but current techniques are as yet unable to detect terrestrial planets with masses comparable to the Earth's. Future space-based observatories to detect Earth-like planets are being planned. Terrestrial planets orbiting in the habitable zones of stars-where planetary surface conditions are compatible with the presence of liquid water-are of enormous interest because they might have global environments similar to Earth's and even harbor life. The light scattered by such a planet will vary in intensity and colour as the planet rotates; the resulting light curve will contain information about the planet's properties. Here we report a model that predicts features that should be discernible in light curves obtained by low-precision photometry. For extrasolar planets similar to Earth we expect daily flux variations up to hundreds of percent, depending sensitively on ice and cloud cover. Qualitative changes in surface or climate generate significant changes in the predicted light curves. This work suggests that the meteorological variability and the rotation period of an Earth-like planet could be derived from photometric observations. Other properties such as the composition of the surface (e.g., ocean versus land fraction), climate indicators (for example ice and cloud cover), and perhaps even signatures of Earth-like plant life could be constrained or possibly, with further study, even uniquely determined.

E. B. Ford; S. Seager; E. L. Turner

2001-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

275

Improving radiological assessment of doses to man from terrestrial ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NKS B-programme EcoDoses project started in 2003 as a collaboration between all the Nordic countries. The aim of the project is to improve the radiological assessments of doses to man from terrestrial ecosystems. The first part, conducted in 2003, has focussed on an extensive collation and review of both published and unpublished data from all the Nordic countries for the nuclear weapons fallout period and the post-Chernobyl period. This included data on radionuclides in air filters, precipitation, soil samples, milk and reindeer. Based on this, an improved model for estimating radioactive fallout based on precipitation data during the nuclear weapons fallout period has been developed. Effective ecological half- lives for 137Cs and 90Sr in milk have been calculated for the nuclear weapons fallout period. For reindeer the ecological half- lives for 137Cs have been calculated for both the nuclear weapons fallout period and the post-Chernobyl period. The data were also used to compare modelling results with observed concentrations. This was done at a workshop where the radioecological food-and-dose module in the ARGOS decision support system was used to predict transfer of deposited radionuclides to foodstuffs and subsequent radiation doses to man. The work conducted the first year is presented in this report and gives interesting, new results relevant for terrestrial radioecology. Key words Nuclear weapons fallout, deposition modelling, food chain modelling, ecological half-lives in reindeer and milk NKS-98

Pohjoismainen Ydinturvallisuustutkimus; Edited Tone; D. Bergan; Astrid Lil

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Imaging the Earth's Interior: the Angular Distribution of Terrestrial Neutrinos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decays of radionuclides throughout the Earth's interior produce geothermal heat, but also are a source of antineutrinos. The (angle-integrated) geoneutrino flux places an integral constraint on the terrestrial radionuclide distribution. In this paper, we calculate the angular distribution of geoneutrinos, which opens a window on the differential radionuclide distribution. We develop the general formalism for the neutrino angular distribution, and we present the inverse transformation which recovers the terrestrial radioisotope distribution given a measurement of the neutrino angular distribution. Thus, geoneutrinos not only allow a means to image the Earth's interior, but offering a direct measure of the radioactive Earth, both (1) revealing the Earth's inner structure as probed by radionuclides, and (2) allowing for a complete determination of the radioactive heat generation as a function of radius. We present the geoneutrino angular distribution for the favored Earth model which has been used to calculate geoneutrino flux. In this model the neutrino generation is dominated by decays in the Earth's mantle and crust; this leads to a very ``peripheral'' angular distribution, in which 2/3 of the neutrinos come from angles > 60 degrees away from the downward vertical. We note the possibility of that the Earth's core contains potassium; different geophysical predictions lead to strongly varying, and hence distinguishable, central intensities (< 30 degrees from the downward vertical). Other uncertainties in the models, and prospects for observation of the geoneutrino angular distribution, are briefly discussed. We conclude by urging the development and construction of antineutrino experiments with angular sensitivity. (Abstract abridged.)

Brian D. Fields; Kathrin A. Hochmuth

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon Nanotubes. Sponsored by: TMS Electronic, Magnetic and Photonic Materials Division Date and Time: Sunday, February 13, 2005 ~ 8:30 am-5:00 pm

278

Carbon Nanomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 12, 2012 ... The graphene film was spin-coated using carbon nanotubes to form the cathode of the field emission device. A phosphor coated graphene-PET...

279

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board, represents a 13-state region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, eastern Texas, and Virginia and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB comprises more than 100 participants representing Federal and state governments, industry, academia, and nonprofit organizations. The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and infrastructure to conduct field tests of carbon storage technologies and to

280

Using Ant Communities For Rapid Assessment Of Terrestrial Ecosystem Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement of ecosystem health is a very important but often difficult and sometimes fractious topic for applied ecologists. It is important because it can provide information about effects of various external influences like chemical, nuclear, and physical disturbance, and invasive species. Ecosystem health is also a measure of the rate or trajectory of degradation or recovery of systems that are currently suffering impact or those where restoration or remediation have taken place. Further, ecosystem health is the single best indicator of the quality of long term environmental stewardship because it not only provides a baseline condition, but also the means for future comparison and evaluation. Ecosystem health is difficult to measure because there are a nearly infinite number of variables and uncertainty as to which suites of variables are truly indicative of ecosystem condition. It would be impossible and prohibitively expensive to measure all those variables, or even all the ones that were certain to be valid indicators. Measurement of ecosystem health can also be a fractious topic for applied ecologists because there are a myriad of opinions as to which variables are the most important, most easily measured, most robust, and so forth. What is required is an integrative means of evaluating ecosystem health. All ecosystems are dynamic and undergo change either stochastically, intrinsically, or in response to external influences. The basic assumption about change induced by exogenous antropogenic influences is that it is directional and measurable. Historically measurements of surrogate parameters have been used in an attempt to quantify these changes, for example extensive water chemistry data in aquatic systems. This was the case until the 1980's when the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI) (Karr et al. 1986), was developed. This system collects an array of metrics and fish community data within a stream ecosystem and develops a score or rating for the relative health of the ecosystem. The IBI, though originally for Midwestern streams, has been successfully adapted to other ecoregions and taxa (macroinvertebrates, Lombard and Goldstein, 2004) and has become an important tool for scientists and regulatory agencies alike in determining health of stream ecosystems. The IBI is a specific type of a larger group of methods and procedures referred to as Rapid Bioassessment (RBA). These protocols have the advantage of directly measuring the organisms affected by system perturbations, thus providing an integrated evaluation of system health because the organisms themselves integrate all aspects of their environment and its condition. In addition to the IBI, the RBA concept has also been applied to seep wetlands (Paller et al. 2005) and terrestrial systems (O'Connell et al. 1998, Kremen et al. 1993, Rodriguez et al. 1998, Rosenberg et al. 1986). Terrestrial RBA methods have lagged somewhat behind those for aquatic systems because terrestrial systems are less distinctly defined and seem to have a less universal distribution of an all-inclusive taxon, such as fish in the IBI, upon which to base an RBA. In the last decade, primarily in Australia, extensive development of an RBA using ant communities has shown great promise. Ants have the same advantage for terrestrial RBAs that fish do for aquatic systems in that they are an essential and ubiquitous component of virtually all terrestrial ecosystems. They occupy a broad range of niches, functional groups, and trophic levels and they possess one very important characteristic that makes them ideal for RBA because, similar to the fishes, there is a wide range of tolerance to conditions within the larger taxa. Within ant communities there are certain groups, genera, or species that may be very robust and abundant under even the harshest impacts. There are also taxa that are very sensitive to disturbance and change and their presence or absence is also indicative of the local conditions. Also, as with the aquatic RBAs using macroinvertebrates, ants have a wide variety of functional foragi

Wike, L

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Low Carbon World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon World Low Carbon World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: LowCarbonWorld Agency/Company /Organization: LowCarbonEconomy Partner: United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: www.lowcarboneconomy.com/Low_Carbon_World/Data/Home LowCarbonWorld Screenshot References: LowCarbonWorld[1] Background The idea behind this project was conceived at the 2008 United Nations Conference of Parties (COP14) event in Poznan (Poland). By listening to many speeches by energy ministers from numerous countries in the high level segment of the event, Toddington Harper Managing Director of The Low Carbon Economy Ltd (TLCE) became aware of the depth of valuable information being

282

Power Manage Computers to Save Up to $50 Per Computer Annually...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IT Campaign > Power Manage Computers Put Your Computers to Sleep Save up to 50 per Computer Annually Low carbon IT campaign spotlight What is computer power management? Computer...

283

Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

26507 304-285-4133 dawn.deel@netl.doe.gov Darrell Paul Project Manager Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Project Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 614-424-5890...

284

Thermodynamic Phase Stability in Gasification Carbon Feedstock ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conference Tools for 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition ... Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management ... Abstract Scope, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle for power production is considered a clean ... of Differently Heat Treated Steels in CCS Environment with Supercritical CO2.

285

NETL: Carbon Storage - Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSLF Carbon Storage Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum CSLF Logo The Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF) is a voluntary climate initiative of industrially developed and...

286

NETL: News Release - Terrestial Carbon Sequestration Test Underway at  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestial Carbon Sequestration Test Underway at Reclaimed Mine Site Terrestial Carbon Sequestration Test Underway at Reclaimed Mine Site DOE, TVA, EPRI Team to Use Coal Products to Enhance Nature's "Biological CO2 Scrubber" at Test Site in Kentucky DRAKESBORO, KY - The U.S. Department of Energy has joined forces with the Tennessee Valley Authority and the Electric Power Research Institute to demonstrate what might be termed a "grassroots" approach to sequestering carbon dioxide. The new project will use coal combustion byproducts to enhance the storage of carbon in vegetation and soils. - Photo - TVA's Paradise Power Plant - The new terrestrial carbon sequestration project will be sited on reclaimed mine land next to the Paradise Fossil Plant, TVA's second largest power plant. A surface mine reclamation project at the 2,558-megawatt TVA-owned Paradise

287

NETL: Carbon Storage - Regional Partnership Validation Phase (Phase II)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Validation Phase focuses on validating the most promising regional opportunities to deploy CCS technologies by building upon the accomplishments of the Characterization Phase. Two different CO2 storage approaches are being pursued in this phase: geologic and terrestrial carbon storage. The Validation Phase includes 20 geologic and 11 terrestrial CO2 storage projects. Efforts are being conducted to: Validate and refine current reservoir simulations for CO2 storage projects. Collect physical data to confirm CO2 storage potential and injectivity estimates. Demonstrate the effectiveness of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) technologies. Develop guidelines for well completion, operations, and abandonment.

288

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a coevolving naturalcultural system. Suitable ecosystem attributes can be achieved by managing human maintenance that protects the riparian corridor. · Manage recreational use to protect riparian values Creek and the Warm Springs River during runoff periods. · Road systems and upland management practices

289

Satellite-Based Modeling of the Carbon Fluxes in Mature Black Spruce Forests in Alaska: A Synthesis of the Eddy Covariance Data and Satellite Remote Sensing Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scaling up of observed point data to estimate regional carbon fluxes is an important issue in the context of the global terrestrial carbon cycle. In this study, the authors proposed a new model to scale up the eddy covariance data to estimate ...

Masahito Ueyama; Yoshinobu Harazono; Kazuhito Ichii

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

EIA - AEO2010 - Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention [76], carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time [77]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

291

Soil organic carbon A Western Australian perspective Soil organic carbon A Western Australian perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sequestering carbon in soils is being investigated worldwide as a way to remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and provide land managers with extra income from the sale of carbon offsets or credits. In theory, the opportunity exists for farmers and other land managers to be paid via voluntary trades or carbon trading schemes to implement land management changes that sequester soil carbon, with additional benefits gained in improving the biological, chemical and physical health of their soils. The concept of increasing soil organic carbon is very attractive because it seemingly provides a win-win situation in which farmers earn extra income for removing greenhouse gas emissions from the atmosphere while simultaneously lifting the productivity of arable soils. But how realistic is this concept and what opportunities and risks does it present to farmers? Soil organic carbon is part of the global carbon cycle The soil can either represent an enormous source or sink of carbon with more carbon contained in the soil than in the worlds vegetation and atmosphere combined. Soil organic carbon represents a critical component

Janet Paterson; Dr. Fran Hoyle; Department Of Agriculture

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

WATCH: Current Knowledge of the Terrestrial Global Water Cycle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water-related impacts are among the most important consequences of increasing greenhouse gas concentrations. Changes in the global water cycle will also impact the carbon and nutrient cycles and vegetation patterns. There is already some evidence ...

Richard Harding; Martin Best; Eleanor Blyth; Stefan Hagemann; Pavel Kabat; Lena M. Tallaksen; Tanya Warnaars; David Wiberg; Graham P. Weedon; Henny van Lanen; Fulco Ludwig; Ingjerd Haddeland

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The interspecific biomassdensity relationship for terrestrial plants: where do clonal red seaweeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interspecific biomass±density relationship for terrestrial plants: where do clonal red seaweeds (or ramet, for clonal plants) density is negatively related to stand biomass. Stand biomass and ramet biomass was higher than average values expected from the terrestrial interspecific biomass

Scrosati, Ricardo

294

Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

Pasko, Victor

295

Terrestrial lidar and hyperspectral data fusion products for geological outcrop analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Close-range hyperspectral imaging is an emerging technique for remotely mapping mineral content and distributions in inaccessible geological outcrop surfaces, allowing subtle chemical variations to be identified with high resolution and accuracy. Terrestrial ... Keywords: Ground-based, Integration, Surface modelling, Terrestrial laser scanning, Virtual outcrop models, Visualisation

Simon J. Buckley, Tobias H. Kurz, John A. Howell, Danilo Schneider

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Externally Occulted Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph: Simulations and Sensitivities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multitude of coronagraphic techniques for the space-based direct detection and characterization of exo-solar terrestrial planets are actively being pursued by the astronomical community. Typical coronagraphs have internal shaped focal plane and/or pupil plane occulting masks which block and/or diffract starlight thereby increasing the planet's contrast with respect to its parent star. Past studies have shown that any internal technique is limited by the ability to sense and control amplitude, phase (wavefront) and polarization to exquisite levels - necessitating stressing optical requirements. An alternative and promising technique is to place a starshade, i.e. external occulter, at some distance in front of the telescope. This starshade suppresses most of the starlight before entering the telescope - relaxing optical requirements to that of a more conventional telescope. While an old technique it has been recently been advanced by the recognition that circularly symmetric graded apodizers can be well appro...

Lyon, Richard G; Lo, Amy; Cash, Webster; Starkman, Glenn D; Vanderbei, Robert J; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Copi, Craig J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

298

System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Microbial ecology of terrestrial Antarctica: Are microbial systems at risk from human activities?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many of the ecological systems found in continental Antarctica are comprised entirely of microbial species. Concerns have arisen that these microbial systems might be at risk either directly through the actions of humans or indirectly through increased competition from introduced species. Although protection of native biota is covered by the Protocol on Environmental Protection to the Antarctic Treaty, strict measures for preventing the introduction on non-native species or for protecting microbial habitats may be impractical. This report summarizes the research conducted to date on microbial ecosystems in continental Antarctica and discusses the need for protecting these ecosystems. The focus is on communities inhabiting soil and rock surfaces in non-coastal areas of continental Antarctica. Although current polices regarding waste management and other operations in Antarctic research stations serve to reduce the introduction on non- native microbial species, importation cannot be eliminated entirely. Increased awareness of microbial habitats by field personnel and protection of certain unique habitats from physical destruction by humans may be necessary. At present, small-scale impacts from human activities are occurring in certain areas both in terms of introduced species and destruction of habitat. On a large scale, however, it is questionable whether the introduction of non-native microbial species to terrestrial Antarctica merits concern.

White, G.J.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Carbon sequestration research and development  

SciTech Connect

Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

SEW ECOREGION/SUBBASIN MANAGEMENT PLAN TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH, MONITORING AND EVALUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 228 West Main St., MS-CH-17, Goldendale, WA 98620; (509) 773-5703; DaveM@co.klickitat.wa.us Joe Zendt at Grand Coulie/Chief Joe Black-capped chickadee Parus atricopillus HEP Species used in the loss Centrocercus urophasianus Use at Grand Coulie/Chief Joe Lesser scaup Aytha affinis HEP Species used in the loss

302

App D_Terrestrial Tech App.doc 1 Protection, Restoration, and Management of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Indicators of Wetland Ecological Condition and Sustainability 98 2.5 Focal Habitat: Perennial Ponds) ................................................................................................ 25 Table 7. Focal habitat types and threats associated with Willamette subbasin Priority Conservation Table 25. Relative amount of possibly suitable habitat in the PCAs plus public lands, by species

303

NETL: Carbon Storage - West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WESTCARB WESTCARB Carbon Storage West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing WESTCARB efforts can be found on their website. The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is led by the California Energy Commission and represents a coalition of more than 90 organizations from state and provincial resource management and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and research institutions; colleges and universities; conservation non-profits; oil and gas companies; power companies; pipeline companies; trade associations; vendors and service firms; and consultants. The partners are engaged in several aspects of WESTCARB projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects on the west coast of North America. WESTCARB

304

The Carbon Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Print E-mail U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program The U.S. Carbon Cycle Science Program, in consultation with the Carbon Cycle...

305

Increasing access to the carbon market ENERGY, CLIMATE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· workshops; Knowledge and information management;· Research, policy analysis, and market surveil-· lanceIncreasing access to the carbon market ENERGY, CLIMATE AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT 2008 #12;2 World is growing in parallel. With a dynamic carbon market under constant development, the Energy and Carbon Fi

306

Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry FAPC Food Process Engineer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

172-1 Carbon Strategy for the Food Industry Tim Bowser FAPC Food Process Engineer FAPC-172 Robert M and Natural Resources Introduction Carbon strategy is a term that refers to a systematic plan of action for managing carbon consumption and emissions related to food manufacturing and distribution activities

Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

307

Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world? Speakers: Dr. Malcolm Wilson Chief Executive in Exploration Geophysics Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary Theme Leader for Secure Carbon Storage, Carbon Management Canada Don Wharton Vice-President, Sustainable Development TransAlta Corporation

Calgary, University of

308

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3MS Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-934 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M...

309

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs AN L-9213 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

310

Management Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs Environment and Waste Management Programs ANL-949 Surveillance of Site A and Plot M Report...

311

NETL: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Plenary Session Industry Focus Panel Discussion Session 1A. Geologic Sequestration I - Overview Session 1B. Capture & Separation I - Industrial Efforts Session 1C. Modeling I - Case Studies & Deployment Session 2A. Geologic Sequestration II - EOR/EGR Session 2B. Capture & Separation II - Improved Processes Session 2C. Modeling II - Economics Poster Presentations International Panel Discussion Session 3A. Geologic Sequestration III - Enhanced Coalbed Methane Session 3B. Capture & Separation III - Adsorption Studies Session 3C. Terrestrial Sequestration I - Ecosystem Behavior Session 4A. Geologic Sequestration IV - Saline Aquifers Session 4B. Capture & Separation IV - Power Systems Concepts

312

Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets formerly New Energy Finance  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formerly New Energy Finance formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets (formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group) Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC2A 1PQ Sector Carbon, Services Product London-based carbon markets division of New Energy Finance which provides analysis, price forecasting, consultancy and risk management services relating to carbon. References Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets (formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets (formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group) is a company located in London, United Kingdom .

313

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and...

314

Externally Occulted Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph: Simulations and Sensitivities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multitude of coronagraphic techniques for the space-based direct detection and characterization of exo-solar terrestrial planets are actively being pursued by the astronomical community. Typical coronagraphs have internal shaped focal plane and/or pupil plane occulting masks which block and/or diffract starlight thereby increasing the planet's contrast with respect to its parent star. Past studies have shown that any internal technique is limited by the ability to sense and control amplitude, phase (wavefront) and polarization to exquisite levels - necessitating stressing optical requirements. An alternative and promising technique is to place a starshade, i.e. external occulter, at some distance in front of the telescope. This starshade suppresses most of the starlight before entering the telescope - relaxing optical requirements to that of a more conventional telescope. While an old technique it has been recently been advanced by the recognition that circularly symmetric graded apodizers can be well approximated by shaped binary occulting masks. Indeed optimal shapes have been designed that can achieve smaller inner working angles than conventional coronagraphs and yet have high effective throughput allowing smaller aperture telescopes to achieve the same coronagraphic resolution and similar sensitivity as larger ones. Herein we report on our ongoing modeling, simulation and optimization of external occulters and show sensitivity results with respect to number and shape errors of petals, spectral passband, accuracy of Fresnel propagation, and show results for both filled and segmented aperture telescopes and discuss acquisition and sensing of the occulter's location relative to the telescope.

Richard G. Lyon; Sally Heap; Amy Lo; Webster Cash; Glenn D. Starkman; Robert J. Vanderbei; N. Jeremy Kasdin; Craig J. Copi

2007-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

Carbon supercapacitors  

SciTech Connect

Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

Delnick, F.M.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Carbon particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Carbon microtubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

318

Inferring Changes in Terrestrial Water Storage Using ERA-40 Reanalysis Data: The Mississippi River Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial water storage is an essential part of the hydrological cycle, encompassing crucial elements of the climate system, such as soil moisture, groundwater, snow, and land ice. On a regional scale, it is however not a readily measured ...

Sonia I. Seneviratne; Pedro Viterbo; Daniel Lthi; Christoph Schr

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Remote Sensing of Terrestrial and Submerged Aquatic Vegetation in Fire Island National Seashore Satellite Remote Sensing Data in FIIS Vegetation Mapping The vegetation communities and spatial patterns necessary. #12;Hyperspectral Remote Sensing in Seagrass Habitat Mapping Recent development of hyperspectral

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

320

Atmospheric photochemistry, surface features, and potential biosignature gases of terrestrial exoplanets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The endeavor to characterize terrestrial exoplanets warrants the study of chemistry in their atmospheres. Here I present a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry-thermochemistry model developed from the ground up for ...

Hu, Renyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Studies of plume condensation contamination upon surfaces of the Terrestrial Planet Finder spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are two competing concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, one which involves a single spacecraft, and another comprised of a five craft formation. In addition, there are several propulsion options ...

Pigeon, Timothy David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Dynamic Response of Terrestrial Hydrological Cycles and Plant Water Stress to Climate Change in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rising atmospheric CO2 concentration CO2 and climate change are expected to have a major effect on terrestrial ecosystem hydrological cycles and plant water stress in the coming decades. The present study investigates the potential responses of ...

Fulu Tao; Zhao Zhang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Illinois power station with coal-fueled oxy- combustion * Utilize existing 200 MWe steam turbine & Meredosia plant infrastructure * Pipeline CO 2 30 miles to sequestration...

324

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Static, Fatigue, DT, Corrosion * Spec Development * Part Fab and Destructive Testing * Market Contract Pricing * Production Preparation * Environmental Effects * Loading ...

325

Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It will cover various technological aspects of sustainable energy ecosystems, ... energy sources, including renewable energy sources such as solar, wind,...

326

Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It will cover various technological aspects of sustainable energy eco-systems and ... Novel LiF-Na2CO3-K2CO3 Molten Salt for Solar Energy Storage Application.

327

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sulfur Removal Particula te Removal Ash Coal STEAM CYCLE CO 2 Capture Process* ID Fan Air CO 2 2,215 psia 661 MWgross 550 MWnet CO 2 Comp. Flue Gas CO 2 To Storage Low Pressure...

328

Carbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

today. The UK Climate Change Act (2008) sets legally binding targets to reduce greenhouse gas emissions of Buildings Directive4 as well as through taxation e.g. landfill tax associated with CRC EES and the Climate operational cost increases as opposed to delivering reductions in revenue expenditure (see also Section 4

Chittka, Lars

329

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

development cost % influence on final cost Data for new aircraft engine development. Percentage of total development cost and percentage influence on the final cost. Cost breakdown...

330

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Design, Integration & Design, Integration & Optimization Geo Richards, Focus Area Leader, Energy System Dynamics Office of Research & Development ‹#› The role of design and simulation on products 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Legacy engine Engine 1 Engine 2 Engine 3 - plan Number of rig tests NOx emission (% of new standard) ~ 100,000 CPU Days Relative Computational Time 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 % development cost % influence on final cost Data for new aircraft engine development. Percentage of total development cost and percentage influence on the final cost. Cost breakdown in four main development categories: design, materials, labor, and burden (overhead). Four engine development programs, showing the number of rig tests needed for development, the NOx emission of the final engine, and a

331

Primary productivity control of simulated carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. Geophys  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] Positive feedbacks between the terrestrial carbon cycle and climate represent an outstanding area of uncertainty in simulations of future climate change. Coupled climatecarbon cycle models have simulated widely divergent feedback magnitudes, and attempts to explain model differences have had only limited success. In this study, we demonstrate that the response of vegetation primary productivity to climate changes is a critical controlling factor in determining the strength of simulated carbon cycle-climate feedbacks. This conclusion sheds new light on coupled climate-carbon cycle model results, and highlights the need for improved model representation of photosynthesis processes so as to better constrain future projections of climate change. Citation: Matthews, H. D.,

H. Damon Matthews; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver; Barbara J. Hawkins; M. Eby; A. J. Weaver; B. J. Hawkins

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Carbon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Sector Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCarbon&oldid271960" Categories: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

333

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 CarbonFix Standard (CFS) 28 Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) 28 Forest Carbon Standard (FCS) 28

334

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Kevin o'Brien Principal Investigator SRI International Materials Research Laboratory 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, AK 94025 650-859-3528 kevin.obrien@sri.com Fabrication and Scale-Up oF polybenzimidazole - baSed membrane SyStem For pre - combUStion captUre oF carbon dioxide Background In order to effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a gasification plant, there must be an economically viable method for removing the CO 2 from other gases. While CO 2 separation technologies currently exist, their effectiveness is limited. Amine-based separation technologies work only at low temperatures, while pressure-swing absorption and cryogenic distillation consume significantly

335

Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

336

The Impact of Biofuel and Greenhouse Gas Policies on Land Management, Agricultural Production, and Environmental Quality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation explores the combined effects of biofuel mandates and terrestrial greenhouse gas GHG mitigation incentives on land use, management intensity, commodity markets, welfare, and the full costs of GHG abatement through conceptual and empirical modeling. First, a simple conceptual model of land allocation and management is used to illustrate how bioenergy policies and GHG mitigation incentives could influence market prices, shift the land supply between alternative uses, alter management intensity, and boost equilibrium commodity prices. Later a major empirical modeling section uses the U.S. Forest and Agricultural Sector Optimization Model with Greenhouse Gases (FASOMGHG) to simulate land use and production responses to various biofuel and climate policy scenarios. Simulations are performed to assess the effects of imposing biofuel mandates in the U.S. consistent with the Renewable Fuels Standard of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (RFS2). Simulations are run for several climate mitigation policy scenarios (with varying GHG (CO2) prices and eligibility restrictions for GHG offset activities) with and without conservation land recultivation. Important simulation outputs include time trajectories for land use, GHG emissions and mitigation, commodity prices, production, net exports, sectoral economic welfare, and shifts in management practices and intensity. Direct and indirect consequences of RFS2 and carbon policy are highlighted, including regional production shifts that can influence water consumption and nutrient use in regions already plagued by water scarcity and quality concerns. Results suggest that the potential magnitude of climate mitigation on commodity markets and exports is substantially higher than under biofuel expansion in isolation, raising concerns of international leakage and stimulating the Food vs. Carbon debate. Finally, a reduced-form dynamic emissions trading model of the U.S. economy is developed using simulation output from FASOMGHG and the National Energy Modeling System to test the effect of biofuel mandate expansion and domestic offset eligibility restrictions on total economy-wide GHG abatement costs. Findings are that while the RFS2 raises the marginal costs of offsets, full abatement costs depend on a number of policy factors. GHG payment incentives for forest management and non-CO2 agricultural offsets can increase full abatement costs by more than 20%.

Baker, Justin Scott

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use management practices to the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) that result in greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions and salable carbon credits. Goals Terrestrial Field Validation Test *...

339

Performance Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Performance Management. ... If you are unable to access these PDF files, please contact the Office of Workforce Management.

2013-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Neil Sampson; Miguel Calmon

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Miguel Calmon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2007. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1--carbon inventory advancements; Task 2--emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3--baseline method development; Task 4--third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5--new project feasibility studies; and Task 6--development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between October 1st and December 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fire disturbance effects on regional carbon cycling in a sub-humid woodland.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fire disturbance affects many ecosystem processes, especially carbon (C) cycling. In addition, fire is routinely used as a management tool in wildland ecosystems. In this (more)

Yao, Jian, 1984-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

Brian McPherson

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Soil Organic Carbon Change Monitored Over Large Areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soils account for the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C) and thus are critically important in determining global cycle dynamics. In North America, conversion of native prairies to agriculture over the past 150 years released 30- 50% of soil organic carbon (SOC) stores [Mann, 1986]. Improved agricultural practices could recover much of this SOC, storing it in biomass and soil and thereby sequestering billions of tons of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). These practices involve increasing C inputs to soil (e.g., through crop rotation, higher biomass crops, and perennial crops) and decreasing losses (e.g., through reduced tillage intensity) [Janzen et al., 1998; Lal et al., 2003; Smith et al., 2007].

Brown, David J.; Hunt, E. Raymond; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Paustian, Keith H.; Rice, Charles W.; Schumaker, Bonny L.; West, Tristram O.

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nanostructuring of Microporous Carbons with Carbon Nanotubes for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Nanostructuring of Microporous Carbons with Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Carbon Dioxide Capture. Author(s), Stephen C. Hawkins, ...

350

and Implications for the Global Carbon Cycle Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

North America is currently a net source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, contributing to the global buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and associated changes in the earths climate. In 2003, North America emitted nearly two billion metric tons of carbon to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide. North Americas fossil fuel emissions in 2003 (1856 million metric tons of carbon 10 % with 95 % certainty) were 27 % of global emissions. Approximately 85 % of those emissions were from the United States, 9 % from Canada and 6 % from Mexico. The conversion of fossil fuels to energy (primarily electricity) is the single largest contributor, accounting for approximately 42 % of North American fossil emissions in 2003. Transportation is the second largest, accounting for 31 % of total emissions. There are also globally important carbon sinks in North America. In 2003, growing vegetation in North America removed approximately 530 million tons of carbon per year ( 50%) from the atmosphere and stored it as plant material and soil organic matter. This land sink is equivalent to approximately 30 % of the fossil fuel emissions from North America. The imbalance between the fossil fuel source and the sink on land is a net release to the atmosphere of 1335 million metric tons of carbon per year ( 25%). Approximately 50 % of North Americas terrestrial sink is due to the regrowth of forests in the United

Lisa Dilling (co-lead; David M. Fairman; Richard A. Houghton; Gregg H. Marl; Adam Z. Rose; Thomas J. Wilbanks

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Design and implementation of a CO{sub 2} flood utilizing advanced reservoir characterization and horizontal injection wells in a shallow shelf carbonate approaching waterflood depletion: Project management/evaluation plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objectives of the Management/Evaluation Plan are: (1) clarify management structure, task responsibilities and schedules, and (2) to be used as a basis for judging the Project Evaluation Report submitted as a part of the continuation application. The components addressed in the report are: management structure; project staff organization; management procedure; quality assurance plan; ES and H plan and environmental compliance reporting; task WBS and logic flow diagram; list and schedule of planned deliverables; diagram of existing facilities; industry interaction; and evaluation of technical and economic feasibility.

Hallenbeck, L.D.; Harpole, K.J.; Gerard, M.G.

1995-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

352

Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: implications for soil carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate ({ge}53 {micro}m) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 {micro}m). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Carbon Steels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Corrosion rates of carbon steel at various locations...Vancouver Island, BC, Canada Rural marine 13 0.5 Detroit, MI Industrial 14.5 0.57 Fort Amidor Pier, CZ Marine 14.5 0.57 Morenci, MI Urban 19.5 0.77 Potter County, PA Rural 20 0.8 Waterbury, CT Industrial 22.8 0.89 State College, PA Rural 23 0.9 Montreal, QC, Canada Urban 23 0.9 Durham, NH Rural 28 1.1...

354

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of published data and implications for climate forcing Title Aerosol organic carbon to black carbon ratios: Analysis of...

355

ASM Asset Management DTVM SA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Management DTVM SA Management DTVM SA Jump to: navigation, search Name ASM Asset Management DTVM SA Place Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Zip 22640-100 Sector Carbon, Services Product Brazilian fund manager. It provides a range of financial services, including carbon finance and derivatives for both carbon project developers and investors. References ASM Asset Management DTVM SA[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. ASM Asset Management DTVM SA is a company located in Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil . References ↑ "ASM Asset Management DTVM SA" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=ASM_Asset_Management_DTVM_SA&oldid=34236

356

Low Cost Carbon Fiber.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief Background The automotive industry has long been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able to achieve requisite levels of strength and stiffness with significantly less overall vehicle weight. These potential large reductions in vehicle weight, in turn, afford the

357

Carbon Disclosure Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Disclosure Project Disclosure Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Disclosure Project Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC1R 0NE Product A secretariat for 143 institutional investors with USD 20 trn under management, it aims to encourage the development of a common emissions measurement methodology and to facilitate its integration into general investment analysis. References Carbon Disclosure Project[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Disclosure Project is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Carbon Disclosure Project" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Disclosure_Project&oldid=343232

358

Managing time  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Professionals overwhelmed with information glut can find hope from new insights about time management.

Peter J. Denning

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Thermophysical Properties of Carbon Dioxide and CO2-Rich Mixtures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions; and will help maintain the nation's leader- ship in the export of gas turbine equipment. In this NETL-managed project, the National Institute of...

360

Carbon impact of proposed hydroelectric dams in Chilean Patagonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concern for and awareness of climate change is growing, and the world needs to react quickly and efficiently to manage the carbon intensity of the global energy industry. Making smart decisions about energy technology ...

Mar, Laura E. (Laura Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The consequences of failure should be considered in siting geologic carbon sequestration projects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is the injection of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} into deep geologic formations where the CO{sub 2} is intended to remain indefinitely. If successfully implemented, geologic carbon sequestration will have little or no impact on terrestrial ecosystems aside from the mitigation of climate change. However, failure of a geologic carbon sequestration site, such as large-scale leakage of CO{sub 2} into a potable groundwater aquifer, could cause impacts that would require costly remediation measures. Governments are attempting to develop regulations for permitting geologic carbon sequestration sites to ensure their safety and effectiveness. At present, these regulations focus largely on decreasing the probability of failure. In this paper we propose that regulations for the siting of early geologic carbon sequestration projects should emphasize limiting the consequences of failure because consequences are easier to quantify than failure probability.

Price, P.N.; Oldenburg, C.M.

2009-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

362

Potential multiple steady-states in the long-term carbon cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelers of the long term carbon cycle in Earth history have previously assumed there is only one stable climatic steady state. Here we investigate the possibility of multiple steady states. We find them in Abiotic World, lacking any biotic influence, resulting from possible variations in planetary albedo in different temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxide level regimes, with the same weathering forcing balancing a volcanic source to the atmosphere, ocean pool. In Plant World modeling relevant to the Phanerozoic, we include the additional effects of biotic enhancement of weathering on land, organic carbon burial, oxidation of reduced organic carbon in terrestrial sediments and the variation of biotic productivity with temperature, finding a second stable steady state appearing between twenty and fifty degrees C. The very warm early Triassic climate may be the prime candidate for an upper temperature steady state. Given our results, the anthropogenic driven rise of atmospheric carbon dioxide could potentially...

Tennenbaum, Stephen; Schwartzman, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Evaluating the Carbon Cycle of a Coupled Atmosphere-Biosphere Model  

SciTech Connect

We investigate how well a coupled biosphere-atmosphere model, CCM3-IBIS, can simulate the functioning of the terrestrial biosphere and the carbon cycling through it. The simulated climate is compared to observations, while the vegetation cover and the carbon cycle are compared to an offline version of the biosphere model IBIS forced with observed climatic variables. The simulated climate presents some local biases that strongly affect the vegetation (e.g., a misrepresentation of the African monsoon). Compared to the offline model, the coupled model simulates well the globally averaged carbon fluxes and vegetation pools. The zonal mean carbon fluxes and the zonal mean seasonal cycle are also well represented except between 0{sup o} and 20{sup o}N due to the misrepresentation of the African monsoon. These results suggest that, despite regional biases in climate and ecosystem simulations, this coupled atmosphere-biosphere model can be used to explore geographic and temporal variations in the global carbon cycle.

Delire, C; Foley, J A; Thompson, S

2002-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

364

Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Biomass Energy Combustion (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention, carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

365

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Terrestrial and Water Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

A large number of studies and models were established to explain the fission products (FP) behavior within terrestrial and water ecosystems, but a number of behaviors were non understandable, which always attributed to unknown reasons. According to DAB hypothesis, almost all fission products behaviors in terrestrial and water ecosystems could be interpreted in a wide coincidence. The gab between former models predictions, and field behavior of fission products after accidents like Chernobyl have been explained. DAB represents a tool to reduce radio-phobia as well as radiation protection expenses. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Terrestrial origin of SNC meteorites and 30 Myr extinctions' shower source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strong strengthening of material under high confining pressure and jet nature of outflow from impact craters permit to show meteoroid impacts of >=10E6 Mt TNT equivalent are capable of ejecting rocks up to ~1 km in size from the Earth into space. That permits one to propose the terrestrial origin of some NEA's and SNC meteorites. It is shown the isotopic anomalies of nitrogen, argon and xenon can be related with terrestrial mantle samples. The same applies to the oxygen isotope shifts if one recalls the known manifestations of the kinetic effects of isotopic fractionation.

E. M. Drobyshevski

2002-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

367

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Carbon Storage 2011 Carbon Storage Project Portfolio Table of Contents CARBON STORAGE OVERVIEW Carbon Storage Program Contacts [PDF-26KB] Carbon Storage Projects National Map [PDF-169KB] State Projects Summary Table [PDF-39KB] Carbon Storage Program Structure [PDF-181KB] Selected Carbon Sequestration Program Papers and Publications The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Beneficial Uses of Carbon Dioxide (2011) [PDF-3.3MB] Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology Carbon Capture and Sequestration: The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Efforts to Characterize Opportunities for Deep Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Resources (2011) [PDF-445KB]

368

Photophysics of carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

Samsonidze, Georgii G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Gateway Pages to Carbon Dioxide Data Modern records and ice core records back 2000 years 800,000 year records from ice cores Other...

370

Technical Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy participated in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project was 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration'. The objectives of the project were to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Final Technical Report discusses the results of the six tasks that The Nature Conservancy undertook to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between July 1st 2001 and July 10th 2008. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. The project occurred in two phases. The first was a focused exploration of specific carbon measurement and monitoring methodologies and pre-selected carbon sequestration opportunities. The second was a more systematic and comprehensive approach to compare various competing measurement and monitoring methodologies, and assessment of a variety of carbon sequestration opportunities in order to find those that are the lowest cost with the greatest combined carbon and other environmental benefits. In the first phase we worked in the U.S., Brazil, Belize, Bolivia, Peru, and Chile to develop and refine specific carbon inventory methods, pioneering a new remote-sensing method for cost-effectively measuring and monitoring terrestrial carbon sequestration and system for developing carbon baselines for both avoided deforestation and afforestation/reforestation projects. We evaluated the costs and carbon benefits of a number of specific terrestrial carbon sequestration activities throughout the U.S., including reforestation of abandoned mined lands in southwest Virginia, grassland restoration in Arizona and Indiana, and reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. The most cost-effective U.S. terrestrial sequestration opportunity we found through these studies was reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. In Phase II we conducted a more systematic assessment and comparison of several different measurement and monitoring approaches in the Northern Cascades of California, and a broad 11-state Northeast regional assessment, rather than pre-selected and targeted, analysis of terrestrial sequestration costs and benefits. Work was carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA. Partners include the Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, The Sampson Group, Programme for Belize, Society for Wildlife Conservation (SPVS), Universidad Austral de Chile, Michael Lefsky, Colorado State University, UC Berkeley, the Carnegie Institution of Washington, ProNaturaleza, Ohio State University, Stephen F. Austin University, Geographical Modeling Services, Inc., WestWater, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Century Ecosystem Services, Mirant Corporation, General Motors, American Electric Power, Salt River Project, Applied Energy Systems, KeySpan, NiSource, and PSEG. This project, 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration', has resulted in over 50 presentations and reports, available publicly through the Department of Energy or by visiting the links listed in Appendix 1. More

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Zoe Kant; Patrick Gonzalez

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

371

Technical Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The Nature Conservancy participated in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project was 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration'. The objectives of the project were to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Final Technical Report discusses the results of the six tasks that The Nature Conservancy undertook to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between July 1st 2001 and July 10th 2008. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. The project occurred in two phases. The first was a focused exploration of specific carbon measurement and monitoring methodologies and pre-selected carbon sequestration opportunities. The second was a more systematic and comprehensive approach to compare various competing measurement and monitoring methodologies, and assessment of a variety of carbon sequestration opportunities in order to find those that are the lowest cost with the greatest combined carbon and other environmental benefits. In the first phase we worked in the U.S., Brazil, Belize, Bolivia, Peru, and Chile to develop and refine specific carbon inventory methods, pioneering a new remote-sensing method for cost-effectively measuring and monitoring terrestrial carbon sequestration and system for developing carbon baselines for both avoided deforestation and afforestation/reforestation projects. We evaluated the costs and carbon benefits of a number of specific terrestrial carbon sequestration activities throughout the U.S., including reforestation of abandoned mined lands in southwest Virginia, grassland restoration in Arizona and Indiana, and reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. The most cost-effective U.S. terrestrial sequestration opportunity we found through these studies was reforestation in the Mississippi Alluvial Delta. In Phase II we conducted a more systematic assessment and comparison of several different measurement and monitoring approaches in the Northern Cascades of California, and a broad 11-state Northeast regional assessment, rather than pre-selected and targeted, analysis of terrestrial sequestration costs and benefits. Work was carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA. Partners include the Winrock International Institute for Agricultural Development, The Sampson Group, Programme for Belize, Society for Wildlife Conservation (SPVS), Universidad Austral de Chile, Michael Lefsky, Colorado State University, UC Berkeley, the Carnegie Institution of Washington, ProNaturaleza, Ohio State University, Stephen F. Austin University, Geographical Modeling Services, Inc., WestWater, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Century Ecosystem Services, Mirant Corporation, General Motors, American Electric Power, Salt River Project, Applied Energy Systems, KeySpan, NiSource, and PSEG. This project, 'Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration', has resulted in over 50 presentations and reports, available publicly through the Department of Energy or by visiting the links listed in Appendix 1. More

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Zoe Kant; Patrick Gonzalez

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

372

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites, Methods of Making Carbon ...  

This technology describes methods to fabricate supercapacitors using aligned carbon nanotubes that are decorated with metal oxide or nitride ...

374

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

376

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July of group schemes 8 2.6 Monitoring 9 2.7 Carbon statements and reporting 9 2.8 Woodland Carbon Code trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon

377

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.1 July.6 Monitoring 8 2.7 Carbon statements and reporting 8 2.8 Woodland Carbon Code trademark 9 3. Carbon sequestration 10 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 10 3.2 Carbon baseline 10 3.3 Carbon leakage 11 3.4 Project

378

Developing microbe-plant interactions for applications in plant-growth promotion and disease control, production of useful compounds, remediation, and carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Interactions between plants and microbes are an integral part of our terrestrial ecosystem. Microbe-plant interactions are being applied in many areas. In this review, we present recent reports of applications in the areas of plant-growth promotion, biocontrol, bioactive compound and biomaterial production, remediation and carbon sequestration. Challenges, limitations and future outlook for each field are discussed.

Wu, C.H.; Bernard, S.; Andersen, G.L.; Chen, W.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Terrestrial laser scanning for measuring the solid wood volume, including branches, of adult standing trees in the forest environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates the potential of terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) to assess the solid wood volume (i.e., stem and branch diameters of more than 7cm) of adult standing trees in the forest environment. The solid wood volume of 42 trees of different ... Keywords: 3D tree modelling, Forestry, LiDAR, Terrestrial laser scanning, Wood volume

Mathieu Dassot; AurLie Colin; Philippe Santenoise; Meriem Fournier; ThiRy Constant

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Prototype Near-Field/GIS Model for Sequestered-CO2 Risk Characterization and Management  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detecting unmapped abandoned wells thus remains a major carbon sequestration (CS) technology gap. Many (>10{sup 5}) abandoned wells are thought to lie in potential sequestration sites. For such wells, risk analysis to date has focused on aggregate long-term future impacts of seepage at rates < or << {approx}1 g m{sup 2} d{sup -1} on storage goals as sequestered plumes encroach upon wells with assumed distributions of seal ineffectiveness (Oldenburg and Unger, 2003; Saripali et al. 2003; Celia, 2005). However, unmapped abandoned wells include an unknown number without any effective seal at all, venting through which may dominate CO{sub 2}-loss scenarios. A model of such a well is Crystal Geyser (CG), a prospective oil well abandoned in the 1930s with no barrier installed after it encountered a natural CO{sub 2} reservoir rather than oil (Baer and Rigby, 1978; Rinehart, 1980). CG demonstrates how an unimpeded conduit to the surface now regularly vents from 10{sup 3} to >10{sup 4} kg of CO{sub 2} gas to the terrestrial surface (Figure 1). Unique field data recently gathered from Crystal Geyser (CG) in Utah (Gouveia et al. 2005) confirm that, although resulting surface CO{sub 2} concentrations resulting from CG-like eruptions would likely be safe in general, they could accumulate to pose lethal hazards under relatively rare meteorological and topographic (MT) conditions. This source of foreseeable risk needs to be managed if carbon sequestration is to be publicly accepted. To address this concern, we used CG field data to estimate the source term for a prototype model that identifies zones at relatively highly elevated risk for sequestered-CO{sub 2} casualties. Such a model could be applied both to design and comply with future regulatory requirements to survey high-risk zones in each proposed sequestration site for improperly sealed wells.

Bogen, K T; Homann, S G; Gouveia, F J; Neher, L A

2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Management Responsibilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

382

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Composite carbon foam electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

384

Global Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exxon Mobil Corporation has undertaken voluntary actions to continuously improve energy efficiency in our operations for many years. From 1973 to 1999, we improved the energy efficiency of our refineries and chemical plants by over 35 percent - saving the cumulative equivalent of 1.8 billion barrels of oil and reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 200 million tonnes. In 2000, we redoubled our efforts with deployment of our Global Energy Management System (GEMS), which utilizes international best practices and benchmarking to identify energy efficiencies at each of our refineries and chemical plants. Thus far, we have identified opportunities to improve the energy efficiency of these facilities by an additional 15 to 20 percent. At full implementation, savings are expected to total $500 million to $1 billion per year, with an associated reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of about 10 million tonnes per year - roughly equivalent to removing 1.5 million cars from the world's roads.

Eidt, B. D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

A Modeling Study of the ENSO Influence on the Terrestrial Energy Profile in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of the El NioSouthern Oscillation (ENSO) on the terrestrial energy profile over North America is studied using a 15-yr model simulation. A large-area basin scale (LABs) land surface model is driven using the European Centre for ...

Ji Chen; Praveen Kumar

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal Combustion Waste  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Elevated Trace Element Concentrations in Southern Toads, Bufo terrestris, Exposed to Coal, and behavioral abnormalities in amphibians to coal combustion wastes (coal ash). Few studies, however, have determined trace element concentrations in amphibians exposed to coal ash. In the current study we compare

Hopkins, William A.

387

A COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS: INTERPLANETARY ASPECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for high-resolution solar wind data and to the National Space Science Data Center (NASAA COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS, with peak value of -16 nT. In this paper the interplanetary aspects of these two solar

388

BGP-S: a protocol for terrestrial and satellite network integration in network layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accomplish network layer integration of terrestrial and satellite IP networks, special exterior gateway protocols are needed. In this work, a new exterior gateway protocol called Border Gateway Protocol-Satellite version (BGP-S) is introduced that ... Keywords: BGP-4, IP-based routing, exterior gateway protocol, satellite networks

Eylem Ekici; Chao Chen

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Impacts of Environmental Nanoparticles on Chemical, Biological and Hydrological Processes in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

This chapter provides insights on nanoparticle (NP) influence or control on the extent and timescales of single or coupled physical, chemical, biological and hydrological reactions and processes that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. Examples taken from the literature that show how terrestrial NPs may determine the fate of the aqueous and sorbed (adsorbed or precipitated) chemical species of nutrients and contaminants, are also included in this chapter. Specifically, in the first section, chapter objectives, term definitions and discussions on size-dependent properties, the origin and occurrence of NP in terrestrial ecosystems and NP toxicity, are included. In the second section, the topic of the binary interactions of NPs of different sizes, shapes, concentrations and ages with the soil solution chemical species is covered, focusing on NP formation, stability, aggregation, ability to serve as sorbents, or surface-mediated precipitation catalysts, or electron donors and acceptors. In the third section, aspects of the interactions in the ternary systems composed of environmental NP, nutrient/contaminant chemical species, and the soil/sediment matrix are discussed, focusing on the inhibitory and catalytic effects of environmental NP on nutrient/contaminant advective mobility and mass transfer, adsorption and desorption, dissolution and precipitation and redox reactions that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. These three review sections are followed by a short summary of future research needs and directions, the acknowledgements, the list of the references, and the figures.

Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Supervised identification and reconstruction of near-planar geological surfaces from terrestrial laser scanning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Terrestrial laser scanning is an effective method for digitally capturing outcrops, enabling them to be visualized, analyzed, and revisited in an office environment without the limitations of fieldwork (such as time constraints, weather conditions, outcrop ... Keywords: Bedding, Fractures, LIDAR, Moment of inertia analysis, Outcrop characterization, Segmentation

D. GarcA-SellS; O. Falivene; P. ArbuS; O. Gratacos; S. Tavani; J. A. MuOz

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TQ2. Global Biomass Burning What is the impact of global biomass burning on the terrestrial and land use. MODIS active fire detections 2000-2006 for Southern California 2001-2004 mean annual burned (bottom), expressed as fraction of grid cell that burns each year. From Giglio et al. (2005), Atmos. Chem

Christian, Eric

392

Monitoring Precipitation over the Arctic Terrestrial Drainage System: Data Requirements, Shortcomings, and Applications of Atmospheric Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effort is under way aimed at historical analysis and monitoring of the pan-Arctic terrestrial drainage system. A key element is the provision of gridded precipitation time series that can be readily updated. This has proven to be a daunting ...

Mark C. Serreze; Martyn P. Clark; David H. Bromwich

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Management Energy Management Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation Notices & Rules Guidance Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting Energy Management Guidance The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance on Federal

394

Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the labs total carbon footprint.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

395

Modeling Plot-Level Biomass and Volume Using Airborne and Terrestrial Lidar Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United States Forest Service (USFS) Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program provides a diverse selection of data used to assess the status of the nations forested areas using sample locations dispersed throughout the country. Airborne, and more recently, terrestrial lidar (light detection and ranging) systems are capable of producing accurate measurements of individual tree dimensions and also possess the ability to characterize three-dimensional vertical forest structure. This study investigates the potential of airborne and terrestrial scanning lidar systems for modeling forest volume and aboveground biomass on FIA subplots in the Malheur National Forest, eastern Oregon. A methodology for the creation of five airborne lidar metric sets (four point cloud-based and one individual tree based) and four terrestrial lidar metric sets (three height-based and one distance-based) is presented. Metrics were compared to estimates of subplot aboveground biomass and gross volume derived from FIA data using national and regional allometric equations respectively. Simple linear regression models from the airborne lidar data accounted for 15 percent of the variability in subplot biomass and 14 percent of the variability in subplot volume, while multiple linear regression models increased these amounts to 29 percent and 25 percent, respectively. When subplot estimates of biophysical parameters were scaled to the plot-level and compared with plot-level lidar metrics, simple linear regression models were able to account for 60 percent of the variability in biomass and 71 percent of the variation in volume. Terrestrial lidar metrics produced moderate results with simple linear regression models accounting for 41 percent of the variability in biomass and 46 percent of the variability in volume, with multiple linear regression models accounting for 71 percent and 84 percent, respectively. Results show that: (1) larger plot sizes help to mitigate errors and produce better models; and (2) a combination of height-based and distance-based terrestrial lidar metrics has the potential to estimate biomass and volume on FIA subplots.

Sheridan, Ryan D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Renewal of Collaborative Research: Economically Viable Forest Harvesting Practices That Increase Carbon Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Forests provide wildlife habitat, water and air purification, climate moderation, and timber and nontimber products. Concern about climate change has put forests in the limelight as sinks of atmospheric carbon. The C stored in the global vegetation, mostly in forests, is nearly equivalent to the amount present in atmospheric CO{sub 2}. Both voluntary and government-mandated carbon trading markets are being developed and debated, some of which include C sequestration resulting from forest management as a possible tradeable commodity. However, uncertainties regarding sources of variation in sequestration rates, validation, and leakage remain significant challenges for devising strategies to include forest management in C markets. Hence, the need for scientifically-based information on C sequestration by forest management has never been greater. The consequences of forest management on the US carbon budget are large, because about two-thirds of the {approx}300 million hectare US forest resource is classified as 'commercial forest.' In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the atmosphere. However, forest management practices could be designed to meet the multiple goals of providing wood and paper products, creating economic returns from natural resources, while sequestering C from the atmosphere. The shelterwood harvest strategy, which removes about 30% of the basal area of the overstory trees in each of three successive harvests spread out over thirty years as part of a stand rotation of 60-100 years, may improve net C sequestration compared to clear-cutting because: (1) the average C stored on the land surface over a rotation increases, (2) harvesting only overstory trees means that a larger fraction of the harvested logs can be used for long-lived sawtimber products, compared to more pulp resulting from clearcutting, (3) the shelterwood cut encourages growth of subcanopy trees by opening up the forest canopy to increasing light penetration. Decomposition of onsite harvest slash and of wastes created during timber processing releases CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere, thus offsetting some of the C sequestered in vegetation. Decomposition of soil C and dead roots may also be temporarily stimulated by increased light penetration and warming of the forest floor. Quantification of these processes and their net effect is needed. We began studying C sequestration in a planned shelterwood harvest at the Howland Forest in central Maine in 2000. The harvest took place in 2002 by the International Paper Corporation, who assisted us to track the fates of harvest products (Scott et al., 2004, Environmental Management 33: S9-S22). Here we present the results of intensive on-site studies of the decay of harvest slash, soil respiration, growth of the remaining trees, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO{sub 2} during the first six years following the harvest. These results are combined with calculations of C in persisting off-site harvest products to estimate the net C consequences to date of this commercial shelterwood harvest operation. Tower-based eddy covariance is an ideal method for this study, as it integrates all C fluxes in and out of the forest over a large 'footprint' area and can reveal how the net C flux, as well as gross primary productivity and respiration, change following harvest. Because the size of this experiment precludes large-scale replication, we are use a paired-airshed approach, similar to classic large-scale paired watershed experiments. Measurements of biomass and C fluxes in control and treatment stands were compared during a pre-treatment calibration period, and then divergence from pre-treatment relationships between the two sites measured after the harvest treatment. Forests store carbon (C) as they accumulate biomass. Many forests are also commercial sources of timber and wood fiber. In most C accounting budgets, forest harvesting is usually considered to cause a net release of C from the terrestrial biosphere to the at

Davidson, E.A.; Dail, D.B., Hollinger, D.; Scott, N.; Richardson, A.

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

397

Mexico-Low-Carbon Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Low-Carbon Development Mexico-Low-Carbon Development Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Name Mexico-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Biomass, Industry, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country Mexico Central America References Low Carbon Development for Mexico[1] Abstract The Mexico study involves the preparation of a comprehensive package comprising: a low carbon strategy; the identification of priority sectors for carbon abatement; pre-feasibility level analysis of specific investment options; a country specific Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) curve; identification of implementation barriers and necessary policy responses; and a prioritized list of potent...

398

The Woodland Carbon Code  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

399

Mechanomutable Carbon Nanotube Arrays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Polymer Nanocomposites. Presentation Title, Mechanomutable Carbon...

400

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain Dr., Austin, TX 78731)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

Lagow, R.J.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein.

Lagow, Richard J. (6204 Shadow Mountain Dr., Austin, TX 78731)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Effects of Serial Dependence and Large-Scale Tropospheric Circulation on Midlatitude North American Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear regression was used to relate modes of tropospheric circulation variability to estimates of gross ecosystem production (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (ER) measured at 14 midlatitude North American eddy covariance (EC) towers. The North ...

Robbie A. Hember; Peter M. Lafleur

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

House Committee on Natural Resources The Future of Fossil Fuels: Geological and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

get a handle on the coal problem, nothing else matters." Similar sentiments motivated me and my at a large industrial source, such as a coal-fired power plant. By capture, it is meant isolating the CO2-authors on the just released MIT report on The Future of Coal (see www.mit.edu/coal). I am also a US delegate

405

Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. Work is being carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Ben Poulter; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

406

The AmeriFlux Data Activity and Data System: An Evolving Collection of Data Management Techniques, Tools, Products and Services  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), USA has provided scientific data management support for the U.S. Department of Energy and international climate change science since 1982. Over this period, climate change science has expanded from research focusing on basic understanding of geochemical cycles, particularly the carbon cycle, to integrated research addressing climate change impacts, vulnerability, adaptation, and mitigation. Interests in climate change data and information worldwide have grown remarkably and, as a result, so have demands and expectations for CDIAC s data systems. To meet the growing demands, CDIAC s strategy has been to design flexible data systems using proven technologies blended with new, evolving technologies and standards. CDIAC development teams are multidisciplinary and include computer science and information technology expertise, but also scientific expertise necessary to address data quality and documentation issues and to identify data products and system capabilities needed by climate change scientists. CDIAC has learned there is rarely a single commercial tool or product readily available to satisfy long-term scientific data system requirements (i.e., one size does not fit all and the breadth and diversity of environmental data are often too complex for easy use with commercial products) and typically deploys a variety of tools and data products in an effort to provide credible data freely to users worldwide. Like many scientific data management applications, CDIAC s data systems are highly customized to satisfy specific scientific usage requirements (e.g., developing data products specific for model use) but are also designed to be flexible and interoperable to take advantage of new software engineering techniques, standards (e.g., metadata standards) and tools and to support future Earth system data efforts (e.g., ocean acidification). CDIAC has provided data management support for numerous long-term measurement projects crucial to climate change science. One current example is the AmeriFlux measurement network. AmeriFlux provides continuous measurements from forests, grasslands, wetlands, and croplands in North, Central, and South America and offers important insight about carbon cycling in terrestrial ecosystems. We share our approaches in satisfying the challenges of delivering AmeriFlux data worldwide to benefit others with similar challenges handling climate change data, further heighten awareness and use of an outstanding ecological data resource, and highlight expanded software engineering applications being used for climate change measurement data.

Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Krassovski, Misha B [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prediction of the substantial biologically mediated carbon flows in a rapidly changing and acidifying ocean requires model simulations informed by observations of key carbon cycle processes on the appropriate space and time scales. From 2000 to 2004, the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP) supported the development of the first low-cost fully-autonomous ocean profiling Carbon Explorers that demonstrated that year-round real-time observations of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration and sedimentation could be achieved in the world's ocean. NOPP also initiated the development of a sensor for particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) suitable for operational deployment across all oceanographic platforms. As a result, PIC profile characterization that once required shipboard sample collection and shipboard or shore based laboratory analysis, is now possible to full ocean depth in real time using a 0.2W sensor operating at 24 Hz. NOPP developments further spawned US DOE support to develop the Carbon Flux Explorer, a free-vehicle capable of following hourly variations of particulate inorganic and organic carbon sedimentation from near surface to kilometer depths for seasons to years and capable of relaying contemporaneous observations via satellite. We have demonstrated the feasibility of real time - low cost carbon observations which are of fundamental value to carbon prediction and when further developed, will lead to a fully enhanced global carbon observatory capable of real time assessment of the ocean carbon sink, a needed constraint for assessment of carbon management policies on a global scale.

Bishop, James K.B.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Sequestration: The fixation of atmospheric carbon dioxide in a carbon sink through biological or physical processes. Carbon Sink: ...

409

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Science & Innovation Carbon Capture and Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration...

410

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron Microscopy of Carbon Nanotube Composites. Summary: Carbon nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs ...

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Estimated Annual Net Change in Soil Carbon per US County  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimated Annual Net Change in Soil Carbon per US County These data represent the estimated net change (Megagram per year) in soil carbon due to changes in the crop type and tillage intensity. Estimated accumulation of soil carbon under Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)lands is included in these estimates. Negative values represent a net flux from the atmosphere to the soil; positive values represent a net flux from the soil to the atmosphere. As such, soil carbon sequestration is represented here as a negative value. The method of analysis is based on empirical relationshipsbetween land management and soil carbon. The method for modeling land management and estimating soil carbonchange, used to generate these data, is described in the following publication:

412

ESMAP-Indonesia-Low Carbon Development Options Study | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Development Options Study Low Carbon Development Options Study Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-ESMAP Low Carbon Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Partner United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www-wds.worldbank.org/e Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References World Bank, ESMAP - Low Carbon Growth Country Studies - Getting Started[1] Overview "The Indonesia's study aimed to evaluate and develop strategic options to mitigate climate change without compromising the country's development

413

Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Country Studies Program Country Studies Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Industry, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.esmap.org/esmap/ Country Poland, Republic of Macedonia UN Region Northern Europe References ESMAP-Macedonia-Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program[1] References ↑ "ESMAP-Macedonia-Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Low_Carbon_Growth_Country_Studies_Program&oldid=576259"

414

Requirements Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Earth: Weather, Carbon Cycle ... energy, dark matter, planets around other suns 5 ... Total Cost Plus Fee $51,959 $49,001 $65,680 $49,001 $38,146 ...

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

415

Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Computerized Computerized Maintenance Management Systems to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

416

Michael Heine, SGL Group - The Carbon Company, Carbon Fibers...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Fibers in Lightweight Systems for Wind Energy and Automotive Applications: Availability and Challenges for the Future Michael Heine, SGL Group - The Carbon Company, Carbon...

417

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Developmen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction...

418

Carbon Ion Pump for Carbon Dioxide Removal  

coal fired power plants; oil or gas fired power plants; cement production; bio-fuel combustion; Separation of carbon dioxide from other combustion ...

419

Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

420

Data Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documentation and Quality Assurance for Data Sharing and Archival Now that you have planned your project and data management, collected data, integrated imagery, or generated model...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

-1 -1 CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT (Revised October 19, 2011) WHAT ARE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT? 1. To ensure contractors establish, document, and maintain adequate purchasing systems. 2. To ensure contractors flow down contract requirements to subcontractors. WHY IS SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT IMPORTANT? In many Department prime contracts a significant portion of the obligated dollars is spent on subcontract work. Due to the absence of a direct contractual relationship with the subcontractor, the Department must rely on the prime contractor to manage subcontract work. Subcontractors perform significant work efforts at sites and are an integral part of the site's success. Prime

422

Reservation Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reservation Management The ORR is home to three major facility complexes: the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP), the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Y-12...

423

Management Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to global waste vitrification and related programs Serve as a technical platform for DOE reviews Environmental Management Leadership Team Responsible for identifying or...

424

Management Plan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Management Plan (SSMP) to be submitted to Congress after the April 2010 release of the Nuclear Posture Review Report. It is aligned with the President's National Security Strategy...

425

The temporal dynamics of terrestrial organic matter transfer to the oceans : initial assessment and application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis employs compound-specific stable carbon and radiocarbon isotopic analysis of organic biomarkers to (a) resolve petrogenic from pre-aged vascular plant organic carbon (OC) in continental margin sediments, (b) ...

Drenzek, Nicholas J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Metallic carbon materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel metallic forms of planar carbon are described, as well as methods of designing and making them. Nonhexagonal arrangements of carbon are introduced into a graphite carbon network essentially without destroying the planar structure. Specifically a form of carbon comprising primarily pentagons and heptagons, and having a large density of states at the Fermi level is described. Other arrangements of pentagons and heptagons that include some hexagons, and structures incorporating squares and octagons are additionally disclosed. Reducing the bond angle symmetry associated with a hexagonal arrangement of carbons increases the likelihood that the carbon material will have a metallic electron structure.

Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA); Crespi, Vincent Henry (Darien, IL); Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng (Berkeley, CA); Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

428

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Jackson, Brian; Greenberg, Richard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Review of world experience and properties of materials for encapsulation of terrestrial photovoltaic arrays. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Available information defining the state of the art of encapsulation materials and processes for terrestrial photovoltaic devices and related applications were collected and analyzed. Based on criteria of properties, processability, availability, and cost, candidate materials were identified which have potential for use in encapsulation systems for low-cost, long-life terrestrial photovoltaic arrays manufactured by automated, high-volume processes. The criteria for consideration of the encapsulation systems were based on the goals for arrays with a lifetime of over 20 years high reliability, an efficiency greater than 10 percent, a total array price less than $500/kW, and a production capacity of 5 x 10/sup 5/ kW/yr. (WDM)

Carmichael, D.C.; Gaines, G.B.; Sliemers, F.A.; Kistler, C.W.; Igou, R.D.

1976-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

430

NETL: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RCSP Carbon Storage Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded cooperative agreements to seven Regional Carbon Sequestration...

431

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Constraining the Radii of Neutron Stars with Terrestrial Nuclear Laboratory Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron star radii are primarily determined by the pressure of isospin asymmetric matter which is proportional to the slope of the nuclear symmetry energy. Available terrestrial laboratory data on the isospin diffusion in heavy-ion reactions at intermediate energies constrain the slope of the symmetry energy. Using this constraint, we show that the radius (radiation radius) of a 1.4 solar mass neutron star is between 11.5 (14.4) and 13.6 (16.3) km.

Bao-An Li; Andrew W. Steiner

2005-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

433

A new UV-A/B protecting pigment in the terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune  

SciTech Connect

A new ultraviolet (UV)-A/B absorbing pigment with maxima at 312 and 330 nanometers from the cosmopolitan terrestrial cyanobacterium Nostoc commune is described. The pigment is found in high amounts (up to 10% of dry weight) in colonies grown under solar UV radiation but only in low concentrations in laboratory cultures illuminated by artificial light without UV. Its experimental induction by UV as well as its capacity to efficiently protect Nostoc against UV radiation is reported.

Scherer, S.; Chen, T.W.; Boeger, P. (Universitaet Konstanz (West Germany))

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Single-junction solar cells with the optimum band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A single-junction solar cell having the ideal band gap for terrestrial concentrator applications. Computer modeling studies of single-junction solar cells have shown that the presence of absorption bands in the direct spectrum has the effect of "pinning" the optimum band gap for a wide range of operating conditions at a value of 1.14.+-.0.02 eV. Efficiencies exceeding 30% may be possible at high concentration ratios for devices with the ideal band gap.

Wanlass, Mark W. (Golden, CO)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

TERRESTRIAL PLANET FORMATION THROUGH ACCRETION OF SUBLIMATING ICY PLANETESIMALS IN A COLD NEBULA  

SciTech Connect

Most of the theories of the solar system formation stand on the assumption that the formation of planetesimals occurs in a transparent (i.e., optically thin) nebula, in which H{sub 2}O ice is unstable at the formation region of the terrestrial planet due to direct stellar irradiation. However, in the astronomical context, it is confirmed by both observations and numerical models that protoplanetary disks are initially opaque (i.e., optically thick) owing to floating small dust particles, and the interior of the disk is colder than the transparent disk. If planetesimals are formed in the opaque cold nebula, they should be mainly composed of H{sub 2}O ice, even at the formation region of terrestrial planets. Abundant icy material would help the formation of planetesimals through enhancement of the dust amount. Icy planetesimals start sublimation when the protoplanetary disk gets transparent through clearance of small dust particles. Here, we investigated the consequence of such icy planetesimal formation through numerical simulations of the competition between the sublimation and accretion of icy planetesimals. It was shown that various types of planets ranging from rocky planets to water-ball planets can be formed inside the location of the snow line of a transparent disk depending on the disk mass and the time evolution of disk transparency. We found size-dependent water content of icy planetesimals, which suggests potential difference in the redox state between meteorites and terrestrial planets at the same distance from the central star.

Machida, Ryosuke [Current address: Fixstars Corporation, 1-11-1 Ohsaki, Shinagawa-ku, Tokyo 141-0032 (Japan); Abe, Yutaka, E-mail: mach@eps.s.u-tokyo.ac.j [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

2010-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

The Role of Carbon Capture and Storage in a Lower Carbon World  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

role of Carbon Capture and Storage in a role of Carbon Capture and Storage in a Lower Carbon World Past Compliance model Regulations determine 'acceptability' of risks, Our performance judged by regulators view of compliance, Industry focused upon cost and pace of new regulations, Managed as a License to Operate issue, Current Reputation model 'Acceptability' of risk set by our own expectations, Responsible care determined by opinion formers, Our focus is upon investing in our Corporate Reputation, Success recognised by governments, NGOs and suppliers. Future Customer model BP fuels our customers economic and social growth, while allowing them to invest in their own environment through us, Our offer is to help Customers manage their environmental impact, The environment becomes an integral part of individual customer

438

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

DEACTIVATION MANAGEMENT  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT The purpose here is to provide information for specific aspects of project management that apply to deactivation. Overall management of deactivation projects should use a traditional project management approach, and as such is not addressed. The following specific topics are based on lessons learned during deactivation of DOE facilities.  The Deactivation Mission  The Stabilization/Deactivation "Customer"  Project Approach for a Complex Facility  Establishing the Overall End-State  Viewing Deactivation in Two Phases  Early Decisions  Early Deactivation Tasks  Facility-Specific Commitments  Hazard Reduction  Detailed End-Points  Set Up Method and Criteria  Post-Deactivation S&M Plan

440

Representation of Terrestrial Hydrology and Large-Scale Drought of the Continental United States from the North American Regional Reanalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The North American Regional Reanalysis (NARR) is a state-of-the-art landatmosphere reanalysis product that provides improved representation of the terrestrial hydrologic cycle compared to previous global reanalyses, having the potential to ...

Justin Sheffield; Ben Livneh; Eric F. Wood

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Net primary production of terrestrial ecosystems in China and its equilibrium response to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) was used to estimate net primary production (NPP) in China for contemporary climate and NPP responses to elevated CO? and climate changes projected by three atmospheric ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; Pan, Yude.; McGuire, A. David.; Helfrich III, J.V.K.

442

Current Issues in Terrestrial Solar Radiation Instrumentation for Energy, Climate and Space Applications Preprint prepared for New RAD '99  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reductions of uncertainty in terrestrial solar radiation measurements are needed to validate the Earth's radiation balance derived from satellite data. Characterization of solar energy resources for renewable technologies requires greater time and spatial resolution for economical technology deployment. Solar radiation measurement research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses calibrations, operational characteristics, and corrections for terrestrial solar radiation measurements. We describe progress in measurements of broadband diffuse-sky radiation, and characterization of field instrument thermal offsets and spectral irradiance. The need and prospects for absolute references for diffuse and long-wave terrestrial solar radiation measurements are discussed. Reductions in uncertainty of broadband irradiance measurements from tens of watts per square meter to a few (one to two) watts per square meter are reported, which reduce time and labor to quantify and identify trends in artificial optical radiation sources, terrestrial solar radiation, and the Earth's radiation budget.

Stoffel, T. L.; Reda, I.; Myers, D. R.; Renne, D.; Wilcox, S. W.; Treadwell, J.

1999-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

443

Quantifying Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perturbations to the carbon cycle could constitute large feedbacks on future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. This paper demonstrates how carbon cycle feedback can be expressed in formally similar ways to climate feedback, ...

J. M. Gregory; C. D. Jones; P. Cadule; P. Friedlingstein

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist.

Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

445

NETL: Carbon Storage Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-571KB has been posted. 08.27.2013 Publications August 2013 Carbon Storage Newsletter PDF-1.1MB has been posted. 08.15.2013 News Ancient...

446

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

447

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award August 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A film about carbon sequestration produced with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received a 2009 Gold Aurora Award in the documentary category for nature/environment. Titled Out of the Air - Into the Soil: Land Practices That Reduce Atmospheric Carbon Levels, the documentary discusses the effects that proper landscape management can have on carbon absorption. Documentaries such as this are an important tool in educating the public on steps being taken to mitigate climate change. Co-produced by Prairie Public Broadcasting, Fargo, N.D., and the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, which is led by the University of North

448

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award August 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A film about carbon sequestration produced with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received a 2009 Gold Aurora Award in the documentary category for nature/environment. Titled Out of the Air - Into the Soil: Land Practices That Reduce Atmospheric Carbon Levels, the documentary discusses the effects that proper landscape management can have on carbon absorption. Documentaries such as this are an important tool in educating the public on steps being taken to mitigate climate change. Co-produced by Prairie Public Broadcasting, Fargo, N.D., and the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, which is led by the University of North

449

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQ Information Portal - Additional Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Additional Resources Additional Resources Where can I get additional information? Links to Other Major Internal and External Resources on Carbon Storage Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies - Program at MIT that conducts research into technologies to capture, utilize, and store CO2 from large stationary sources CO2 Capture Project - International effort that addresses carbon emissions reduction in a manner that will contribute to an environmentally acceptable and competitively priced continuous energy supply for the world Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Global climate-change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy; managed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Mitigation Initiative - Joint project of Princeton University, BP, and Ford Motor Company to find solutions to greenhouse gas and global warming problem

450

Carbon Fibers and Carbon Nanotubes - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 17, 2010 ... Polymer Nanocomposites: Carbon Fibers and Carbon Nanotubes Sponsored by: The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society Program...

451

Carbon Dioxide Compression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. C opyright 2009 Carbon Dioxide Compression DOE EPRI NIST ... Greenhouse gas sequestration Page 5. 5 C opyright 2009 ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

452

Carbon Mitigation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... sustainable technologies such as CO 2 capture and sequestration (CCS ... property diagnostic tools (under realistic conditions for carbon capture from ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

453

Big Sky Carbon Atlas  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

(Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership, Big Sky [BSCSP; ,

454

Electrocatalysts on Carbon Nanoparticles  

Carbon nanostructures offer extremely high surface areas and so are attractive candidates to support dispersed catalysts. These nanostructures, ...

455

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

land-use changes. When biofuel production increases, land ison carbon releases. If biofuel production does not result in

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z