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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Terrestrial Carbon Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management Influence of Agricultural Management on Soil Organic Carbon: A Compendium and Assessment of Canadian Studies (VandenBygaart et al., Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada) Soil Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (West and Post, Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Potential for Carbon Sequestration in European Soils: Preliminary Estimates for Five Scenarios Using Results from Long-Term Experiments (Smith et al., University of Aberdeen, United Kingdom) Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management

2

Terrestrial Carbon Management Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC products are indexed and searchable through a customized interface powered by ORNL's Mercury search engine. Products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, and models and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most data sets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Collections under the broad heading of Terrestrial Carbon Management are organized as Carbon Accumulation with Cropland Management, Carbon Accumulation with Grassland Management, Carbon Loss Following Cultivation, Carbon Accumulation Following Afforestation, and Carbon Sources and Sinks Associated with U.S. Cropland Production.

3

1, 167193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title Page Biogeosciences Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences The carbon budget.janssens@ua.ac.be) 167 #12;BGD 1, 167­193, 2004 Terrestrial carbon budget at country-scale I. A. Janssens et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

4

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration November 6-7, 2001 Lexington, Kentucky Robert Addington AEI Incorporated 2000 Ashland Drive Ashland, KY 41101 Phone: 606-928-3433 Email: crystalj@aeiresources.com Jim Amonette MSIN K8-96 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: 509-3765565 Email: jim.amonette@pnl.gov Patrick Angel Area Office Manager U.S. Department of Interior Office of Surface Mining P.O. Box 1048 London, KY 40741 Phone: 606-878-6440 Email: pangel@osmre.gov Hugh Archer Commissioner Kentucky Dept of Natural Resources 663 Teton Trail Frankfort, KY 40601 Phone: 502-564-2184 Email: hugh.archer@mail.state.ky.us Victor Badaker Mining Engineering Dept. University of Kentucky MML Bldg. Lexington, KY 40546 Phone: 859-257-3818

5

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control, terrestrial carbon sequestration, temperature,on terrestrial carbon sequestration (Nemani et al 2003, Xiaodeposition and forest carbon sequestration Glob. Change

Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage (CCS) "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. Best Practices for Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide details the most suitable operational approaches and techniques for terrestrial sequestration, a carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation strategy capable of removing CO2 already in the air. Consequently, terrestrial sequestration, which uses photosynthesis - part of the natural carbon cycle - to create

7

Definition, Capabilities, and Components of a Terrestrial Carbon Monitoring System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research efforts for effectively and consistently monitoring terrestrial carbon are increasing in number. As such, there is a need to define carbon monitoring and how it relates to carbon cycle science and carbon management. There is also a need to identify intended capabilities of a carbon monitoring system and what system components are needed to develop the capabilities. This paper is intended to promote discussion on what capabilities are needed in a carbon monitoring system based on requirements for different areas of carbon-related research and, ultimately, for carbon management. While many methods exist to quantify different components of the carbon cycle, research is needed on how these methods can be coupled or integrated to obtain carbon stock and flux estimates regularly and at a resolution that enables attribution of carbon dynamics to respective sources. As society faces sustainability and climate change conerns, carbon management activities implemented to reduce carbon emissions or increase carbon stocks will become increasingly important. Carbon management requires moderate to high resolution monitoring. Therefore, if monitoring is intended to help inform management decisions, management priorities should be considered prior to development of a monitoring system.

West, Tristram O.; Brown, Molly E.; Duran, Riley M.; Ogle, Stephen; Moss, Richard H.

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

8

Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

9

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Dynamics under Recent and Future Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The behavior of the terrestrial carbon cycle under historical and future climate change is examined using the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model, now coupled to a dynamic terrestrial vegetation and global carbon cycle model. When ...

H. Damon Matthews; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Peatland geoengineering: an alternative approach to terrestrial carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...alternative approach to terrestrial carbon sequestration Christopher Freeman Nathalie...studies suggest that peatland carbon sequestration is due to the inhibitory...peatland geoengineering|carbon sequestration|phenolic compounds|inhibition...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

CARBONATE STABLE ISOTOPES | Terrestrial Teeth and Bones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Teeth and bones of fossil vertebrates can preserve a record of Quaternary terrestrial environments in the form of isotopic compositions of carbon (13C/12C), nitrogen (15N/14N), and oxygen (18O/16O). These isotopic signatures in teeth and bones have yielded valuable information on the extent of savanna environments under tropical climates, on the ancient levels of aridity, on the spread of dense forests at the beginning of the Holocene, and on the paleodiet of hominids and their associated fauna.

H. Bocherens; D.G. Drucker

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

CARBONATE STABLE ISOTOPES | Terrestrial Teeth and Bones  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Teeth and bones of fossil vertebrates can preserve a record of Quaternary terrestrial environments in the form of the isotopic compositions of carbon (13C/12C), nitrogen (15N/14N), and oxygen (18O/16O). These isotopic signatures in teeth and bones have yielded valuable information on the extent of savanna environments under tropical climates, on the ancient levels of aridity, on the spread of dense forests at the beginning of the Holocene, and on the paleodiet of Hominids and their associated fauna.

H. Bocherens; D.G. Drucker

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NETL: Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration A "Hands-On" Workshop for the Appalachian Coal & Electric Utilities Industries Table of Contents Disclaimer General Conference Information Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

14

Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems on the Tibetan Plateau during the 20th tundra to evergreen tropics. Its soils are dominated by permafrost and are rich in organic carbon. Its, the carbon dynamics of the Tibetan Plateau have not been well quantified under changes of climate and per

Xiao, Jingfeng

15

Water-Use Efficiency of the Terrestrial Biosphere: A Model Analysis Focusing on Interactions between the Global Carbon and Water Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon and water cycles are intimately coupled in terrestrial ecosystems, and water-use efficiency (WUE; carbon gain at the expense of unit water loss) is one of the key parameters of ecohydrology and ecosystem management. In this study, the ...

Akihiko Ito; Motoko Inatomi

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Twentieth-Century Droughts and Their Impacts on Terrestrial Carbon Cycling in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Midlatitude regions experienced frequent droughts during the twentieth century, but their impacts on terrestrial carbon balance are unclear. This paper presents a century-scale study of drought effects on the carbon balance of terrestrial ...

Jingfeng Xiao; Qianlai Zhuang; Eryuan Liang; Xuemei Shao; A. David McGuire; Aaron Moody; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

18

Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration is critical for the success of any policies geared toward stabilizing. Ellsworth, A. Finzi, J. Lichter, and W. H. Schlesinger, Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration

DeLucia, Evan H.

19

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Simple Biosphere/Carnegie-Ames-Stanford Approach terrestrial carbon cycle model Kevin and physical processes to test our understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle and to predict ecosystem biomass and carbon fluxes. We combine the photosynthesis and biophysical calculations in the Simple

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

20

RMOTC - Testing - Carbon Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Management Carbon Management Ten Sleep Time Structure, 2nd Wall Creek Formation at RMOTC Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. RMOTC has the field setting, infrastructure, and expertise to play an important role in carbon management testing, demonstration, and research. The unique combination of a publicly-owned and DOE-operated oil field,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Consequences of Considering CarbonNitrogen Interactions on the Feedbacks between Climate and the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The impact of carbonnitrogen dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems on the interaction between the carbon cycle and climate is studied using an earth system model of intermediate complexity, the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM). Numerical ...

Andrei P. Sokolov; David W. Kicklighter; Jerry M. Melillo; Benjamin S. Felzer; C. Adam Schlosser; Timothy W. Cronin

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Terrestrial Carbon Sinks for the United States Predicted from MODIS Satellite Data and Ecosystem Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) was used to estimate monthly carbon fluxes in terrestrial ecosystems of the conterminous United States ...

Christopher Potter; Steven Klooster; Alfredo Huete; Vanessa Genovese

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Thermal Management Using Carbon Nanotubes - Energy Innovation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Management Using Carbon Nanotubes Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes...

24

Protecting terrestrial ecosystems and the climate through a global carbon market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a global carbon market Robert Bonnie Melissa...Washington, DC 20009, USA Protecting terrestrial...through a carbon market 1861 0 400 800 1200 1600 USA China Russia Japan...US Department of Energy (1999). ural...typically have market values for the...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Industrial Carbon Management Initiative Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI) Background The ICMI project is part of a larger program called Carbon Capture Simulation and Storage Initiative (C2S2I). The C2S2I has a goal of expanding the DOE's focus on Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) for advanced coal power systems and other applications, including the use of petroleum coke as a feedstock for the industrial sector. The American Recovery and Re-Investment Act (ARRA)-funded

26

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R&D Progress  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Ecosystems: Terrestrial Ecosystems: A Status Report on R&D Progress Gary K. Jacobs (jacobsgk@ornl.gov, 865-576-0567) Oak Ridge National Laboratory PO Box 2008, MS-6035 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 Roger C. Dahlman (roger.dahlman@science.doe.gov, 301-903-4951) Office of Science/Biological and Environmental Research U. S. Department of Energy 19901 Germantown Road Germantown, MD 20874-1290 F. Blaine Metting, Jr. (blaine.metting@pnl.gov, 509-375-2607) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 902 Battelle Blvd. PO Box 999, P7-54 Richland, WA 99352 Introduction Sequestration of carbon in terrestrial ecosystems is a low-cost option that may be available in the near-term to mitigate increasing atmospheric CO 2 concentrations, while providing additional benefits. Storing carbon in terrestrial ecosystems can be achieved through maintenance of

27

Climate control of terrestrial carbon exchange across biomes and continents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project modelprojects are supported by the European Commission Directorate General XII Environment, Climate

Yi, C.; Ricciuota, D.; Goulden, M. L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Terrestrial Carbon Inventory at the Savannah River Site, 1951 2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Power Point slide presentation/report on the terestrial carbon inventory at the Savannah River Site.

US Forest Service - Annonymous,

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Economics of geological sequestration and carbon management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this carbon-constrained world, carbon management options for climate change mitigation are becoming increasingly important, especially in China, one of the largest energy consuming and (more)

Su, Hui, 1976-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Greenstone Carbon Management Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

London-based specialist carbon solutions provider to measure, manage and mitigate their carbon emissions and realise business and financial benefits. References: Greenstone...

32

Genetic and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems G.A. Tuskan (tuskanga@ornl.gov; 865-576-8141) S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) A.W. King (kingaw@ornl.gov; 865-576-3436) T.J. Tschaplinski (tschaplinstj@ornl.gov; 865-574-4597) L.E. Gunter (gunterle@ornl.gov; 865-574-4020) A.M. Silletti (sillettia@ornl.gov; 865-574-5397) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 M. Davis (Mark_Davis@nrel.gov; 303-384-6140) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3322 Introduction Carbon sequestration in terrestrial vegetation and soils is a poorly understood process, but ultimately represents a summation of biological activities including the initial incorporation of

33

University of Glasgow Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan working with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon vision 11 2.3 Strategic themes 12 Targets and objectives 13 3 Emissions Baseline and Projections. Professor Anton Muscatelli, Principal Foreword from the Carbon Trust Cutting carbon emissions as partUniversity of Glasgow Carbon Management Programme Carbon Management Plan working with Page 1 Carbon

Mottram, Nigel

34

Carbon Management working with the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: UoR42 Energy centre 82 Appendix C29: UoR43 Fume cupboard control 83 Appendix C30: UoR44 Solar PV achievement towards target 29 5. Carbon Management Plan Financing 32 5.1 Assumptions 32 5.2 Benefits / savings ­ quantified and un-quantified 33 5.3 Additional resources 33 5.4 Financial costs and sources of funding 34 6

Reading, University of

35

House Committee on Natural Resources The Future of Fossil Fuels: Geological and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Howard Herzog Principal Research Engineer Massachusetts Institute to the Technical Group of the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (see www.cslforum.org). Just two weeks ago, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss Carbon Dioxide (CO2) geological

36

Evaluation of Biases in JRA-25/JCDAS Precipitation and Their Impact on the Global Terrestrial Carbon Balance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study evaluates a modeled precipitation field and examines how its bias affects the modeling of the regional and global terrestrial carbon cycle. Spatial and temporal variations in precipitation produced by the Japanese 25-yr reanalysis (JRA-...

Makoto Saito; Akihiko Ito; Shamil Maksyutov

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALMIT Remote-Sensing Research Relating to Carbon Sequestration There is considerable interest in assessing the magnitude of carbon sources and sinks in terrestrial ecosystems using remote sensing techniques. We developed a novel technique to remotely assess carbon dioxide exchange in maize using

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

38

Sandia National Laboratories: Carbon Management Systems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Systems Models Publications Questions WECSsim Model The Water, Energy and Carbon Sequestration Model (WECSsim): A Collaborative Systems Model The Water, Energy and...

39

Ozone Abundance in a Nitrogen-Carbon Dioxide Dominated Terrestrial Paleoatmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the ozone distribution for a model terrestrial paleoatmosphere in which the present oxygen abundance is largely replaced by carbon dioxide, which we argue is a reasonable working assumption. In principle, the presence of carbon dioxide might supplement the ozone shield as compared with models based on nitrogen without high carbon dioxide abundance so that early life need not have been as UV-resistant as often assumed. An extrasolar planet with a high-CO2 atmosphere might contain enough O3 to be a source of false positive biomarkers. We find that the globally averaged O3 column density can be the same, or nearly four times higher (depending upon the O2 partial pressure) when CO2 is used in place of N2 as the replacement component for lowered O2 in a 1-atm terrestrial planet with solar radiation. The effect is important for making quantitative deductions from future data, but does not invalidate the use of O3 as a biomarker for free oxygen. These results make prospects for detection of extrasolar planetary O3 absorption somewhat better than before.

B. C. Thomas; A. L. Melott; L. D. Martin; C. H. Jackman

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ozone Abundance in a Nitrogen-Carbon Dioxide Dominated Terrestrial Paleoatmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We compute the ozone distribution for a model terrestrial paleoatmosphere in which the present oxygen abundance is largely replaced by carbon dioxide, which we argue is a reasonable working assumption. In principle, the presence of carbon dioxide might supplement the ozone shield as compared with models based on nitrogen without high carbon dioxide abundance so that early life need not have been as UV-resistant as often assumed. An extrasolar planet with a high-CO2 atmosphere might contain enough O3 to be a source of false positive biomarkers. We find that the globally averaged O3 column density can be the same, or nearly four times higher (depending upon the O2 partial pressure) when CO2 is used in place of N2 as the replacement component for lowered O2 in a 1-atm terrestrial planet with solar radiation. The effect is important for making quantitative deductions from future data, but does not invalidate the use of O3 as a biomarker for free oxygen. These results make prospects for detection of extrasolar pla...

Thomas, B C; Martin, L D; Jackman, C H

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the build decision for carbon capture and sequestrationTenth Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration.be managed early on. Carbon capture technology is water-,

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

43

Carbon Management Plan 1. Executive summary 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of energy intensive buildings have been constructed, whilst at the same time disposals have concentrated. Background and context 16 4. Carbon management strategy 18 5. Carbon emissions baseline and projections 22 6 Plan interventions 55 Appendix B: Possible future actions 76 #12;4 #12;5 1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Foreword

Haase, Markus

44

Assessment of carbon stores in tree biomass for two management scenarios inRussia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate quantification of terrestrial carbon storage and its change is of key importance to improved understanding of global carbon dynamics. Forest management influences carbon sequestration and release patterns, and gap models are well suited for evaluating carbon storage. An individual-based gap model of forest dynamics, FAREAST, is applied across Russia to estimate aboveground carbon storage under management scenarios. Current biomass from inventoried forests across Russia is compared to model-based estimates and potential levels of biomass are estimated for a set of simplified forestry practices. Current carbon storage in eastern Russia was lower than for the northwest and south, and lower than model estimates likely due to high rates of disturbance. Model-derived carbon storage in all regions was not significantly different between the simulated 'current' and hypothetical 'even-aged' management strategies using rotations of 150 and 210 years. Simulations allowing natural maturation and harvest after 150 years show a significant increase in aboveground carbon in all regions. However, it is unlikely that forests would be left unharvested to 150 years of age to attain this condition. These applications indicate the value of stand simulators, applied over broad regions such as Russia, as tools to evaluate the effect of management regimes on aboveground carbon storage.

Jacquelyn K Shuman; Herman H Shugart; Olga N Krankina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Industrial Carbon Management Initiative (ICMI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Initiative (ICMI) Background The ICMI project is part of a larger program called Carbon Capture Simulation and Storage Initiative (C2S2I). The C2S2I has a goal of...

46

150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

Niyogi, Dev

47

Recent Climate-Driven Increases in Vegetation Productivity for the Western Arctic: Evidence of an Acceleration of the Northern Terrestrial Carbon Cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Northern ecosystems contain much of the global reservoir of terrestrial carbon that is potentially reactive in the context of near-term climate change. Annual variability and recent trends in vegetation productivity across Alaska and northwest ...

J. S. Kimball; M. Zhao; A. D. McGuire; F. A. Heinsch; J. Clein; M. Calef; W. M. Jolly; S. Kang; S. E. Euskirchen; K. C. McDonald; S. W. Running

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Carbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the College's energy efficiency and use of resources by integrating sustainability with corporate strategiesCarbon Management and Implementation Plan 1. Background Energy security and the increasing concentration of greenhouse gases which contribute to climate change are one of the biggest challenges facing us

Chittka, Lars

49

The North American Carbon Program Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project Part 1: Overview and experimental design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) have become an integral tool for extrapolating local observations and understanding of land-atmosphere carbon exchange to larger regions. The North American Carbon Program (NACP) Multi-scale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP) is a formal model intercomparison and evaluation effort focused on improving the diagnosis and attribution of carbon exchange at regional and global scales. MsTMIP builds upon current and past synthesis activities, and has a unique framework designed to isolate, interpret, and inform understanding of how model structural differences impact estimates of carbon uptake and release. Here we provide an overview of the MsTMIP effort and describe how the MsTMIP experimental design enables the assessment and quantification of TBM structural uncertainty. Model structure refers to the types of processes considered (e.g. nutrient cycling, disturbance, lateral transport of carbon), and how these processes are represented (e.g. photosynthetic formulation, temperature sensitivity, respiration) in the models. By prescribing a common experimental protocol with standard spin-up procedures and driver data sets, we isolate any biases and variability in TBM estimates of regional and global carbon budgets resulting from differences in the models themselves (i.e. model structure) and model-specific parameter values. An initial intercomparison of model structural differences is represented using hierarchical cluster diagrams (a.k.a. dendrograms), which highlight similarities and differences in how models account for carbon cycle, vegetation, energy, and nitrogen cycle dynamics. We show that, despite the standardized protocol used to derive initial conditions, models show a high degree of variation for GPP, total living biomass, and total soil carbon, underscoring the influence of differences in model structure and parameterization on model estimates.

Huntzinger, D.N. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Schwalm, C. [Northern Arizona University] [Northern Arizona University; Michalak, A.M [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford] [Carnegie Institution for Science, Stanford; Schaefer, K. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; King, A.W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Wei, Y. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jacobson, A. [National Snow and Ice Data Center] [National Snow and Ice Data Center; Liu, S. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Cook, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Post, W.M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Berthier, G. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Hayes, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Huang, M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ito, A. [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan] [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; Lei, H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)] [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Lu, C. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Mao, J. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Peng, C.H. [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences] [University of Quebec at Montreal, Institute of Environment Sciences; Peng, S. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Poulter, B. [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE)] [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environnement (LSCE); Riccuito, D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Shi, X. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Tian, H. [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.] [International Center for Climate and Global Change Research and School of Forestry and Wildlife Sci.; Wang, W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field] [National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Ames Research Center, Moffett Field; Zeng, N. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhao, F. [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Zhu, Q. [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University] [Laboratory for Ecological Forecasting and Northwest Agriculture and Forestry University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Managing carbon in a multiple use world: The implications of land-use decision context for carbon, Boulder, 80309-0488, United States 1. Introduction Carbon management through changes in land, 2010). Human land-use change is the second largest contributor of increasing carbon dioxide

Neff, Jason

51

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Tools for Forest Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United States Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications, Training materials, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application, Website Website: nrs.fs.fed.us/carbon/tools/ Cost: Free Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting Screenshot References: Carbon Tools[1] Logo: Tools for Carbon Inventory, Management, and Reporting "Accurate estimates of carbon in forests are crucial for forest carbon

52

Enhanced terrestrial carbon uptake in the Northern High Latitudes in the 21st century from the Coupled Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Coupled Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project model projections H A I F E N G Q I A N *, R E Carbon Cycle Climate Model Intercomparison Project. Our analysis suggests that the NHL will be a carbon the intense warming there enhances SOM decomposition, soil organic carbon (SOC) storage continues to increase

Zeng, Ning

53

Multi-temporal Terrestrial Lidar for Estimating Individual Tree Dimensions and Biomass Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accurate measures of forest structural parameters are essential to forest inventory and growth models, managing wildfires, and modeling of carbon cycle. Terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) provides accurate understory information rapidly through non...

Srinivasan, Shruthi

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

54

Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fire is the primary terrestrial ecosystem disturbance agent on a global scale. It affects carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon to atmosphere directly and immediately from biomass burning (i.e., fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (i.e., fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment about the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire direct and indirect effects. This study is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with NCAR community land model CLM4.5 as the model platform. Results show that fire decreases net carbon gain of the global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 average across the 20th century, as a results of fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Fire generally decreases the average carbon gains of terrestrial ecosystems in post-fire regions, which are significant over tropical savannas and part of forests in North America and the east of Asia. The general decrease of carbon gains in post-fire regions is because fire direct and indirect effects have similar spatial patterns and the former (to decrease carbon gain) is generally stronger. Moreover, the effect of fire on net carbon balance significantly declines prior to ~1970 with trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire indirect effect and increases afterward with trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire direct effect.

Li, Fang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Levis, Samuel

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Uncertainty of ConcentrationTerrestrial Carbon Feedback in Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon uptake by land and ocean as a biogeochemical response to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration is called concentrationcarbon feedback and is one of the carbon cycle feedbacks of the global climate. This feedback can have a major impact ...

Tomohiro Hajima; Kaoru Tachiiri; Akihiko Ito; Michio Kawamiya

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Optimal forest management for carbon sequestration and biodiversity maintenance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Managing planted forests for carbon sequestration and biodiversity maintenance has become increasingly important in times of rapid climate change and the loss of biodiversity worldwide. (more)

Nghiem, Thi Hong Nhung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Thermal Management Using Graphene and Carbon-Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation investigates the application of graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for thermal management of high-power batteries and interconnects. The research is focused on three (more)

Goli, Pradyumna

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Bridging Political Expectations and Scientific Limitations in Climate Risk Management On the Uncertain Effects of International Carbon Sink Policies*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite great advances in carbon cycle research during the past decade the climatic impact of terrestrial ecosystems is still highly uncertain. Although contemporary studies suggest that the terrestrial biosphere...

Eva Lvbrand

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Carbon Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Cycle Carbon Cycle Latest Global Carbon Budget Estimates Including CDIAC Estimates Terrestrial Carbon Management Data Sets and Analyses Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Mass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature (2012) Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass (δ 13C) of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude (2012) AmeriFlux - Terrestrial Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements Estimates of Monthly CO2 Emissions and Associated 13C/12C Values

60

Variability in Terrestrial Carbon Sinks over Two Decades. Part I: North America  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seventeen years (198298) of net carbon flux predictions from a simulation model based on satellite observations of monthly vegetation cover have been analyzed. The NASACASA model was driven by vegetation cover properties derived from the ...

C. Potter; S. Klooster; P. Tan; M. Steinbach; V. Kumar; V. Genovese

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Terrestrial Carbon Cycle: Climate Relations in Eight CMIP5 Earth System Models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Eight Earth System Models from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) are evaluated, focusing on both the net carbon dioxide flux and its components and their relation with climatic variables (temperature, precipitation, and ...

Pu Shao; Xubin Zeng; Koichi Sakaguchi; Russell K. Monson; Xiaodong Zeng

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Natural migration rates of trees: Global terrestrial carbon cycle implications. Book chapter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paper discusses the forest-ecological processes which constrain the rate of response by forests to rapid future environmental change. It establishes a minimum response time by natural tree populations which invade alien landscapes and reach the status of a mature, closed canopy forest when maximum carbon storage is realized. It considers rare long-distance and frequent short-distance seed transport, seedling and tree establishment, sequential tree and stand maturation, and spread between newly established colonies.

Solomon, A.M.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

New directions in management strategy evaluation through cross-fertilization between fisheries science and terrestrial conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...conservation and fisheries management could gain from applying the approach in this new context...framework for evaluating management strategies as established...considered how to extend the approach to conservation science through three topical...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The Role of Technologies in Carbon Management Strategies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

α α β β Corporate Research Energy and Global Change CHCRC.G BE/jn 1 5/31/01 Fo.-No. 137 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington DC, May 15-17, 2001 The Role of Technologies in Carbon The Role of Technologies in Carbon Management Strategies Management Strategies Baldur Eliasson ABB Corporate Research Baden-Daettwil, Switzerland First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington DC, May 15-17, 2001 α β β Corporate Research Energy and Global Change CHCRC.G BE/jn 2 5/31/01 Fo.-No. 137 First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington DC, May 15-17, 2001 Contents Contents s Introduction s Global Warming and the Kyoto Protocol s New Energy Technologies for a New Century s Conclusions α β β Corporate Research Energy and Global Change CHCRC.G BE/jn

65

Potential for terrestrial disposal of carbon dioxide in the U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many scientists are concerned about the possibility of global climate change of the continuing buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Capture and permanent disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) would help alleviate this potential problem. Abandoned oil and natural gas reservoirs and deep aquifers were investigated as potential disposal sites for CO{sub 2}. Currently abandoned oil and gas reservoirs could hold approximately 2.9 Gt of CO{sub 2}. Since the annual CO{sub 2} emissions from utility power plants is 2 Gt, these reservoirs would be filled in less than 1.5 years. The volume corresponding to ultimate reserves of oil and gas would hold roughly 100 Gt of CO{sub 2}. Therefore, the ultimate capacity for CO{sub 2} storage is approximately 50 years. Over half of the CO{sub 2} is emitted east of the Mississippi River, and most of the potential disposal sites are west of the Mississippi. Because of the high cost of transporting CO{sub 2} by pipeline over long distances, only a small fraction of the reservoir capacity would be useful. The capacity of deep aquifers for CO{sub 2} disposal is highly uncertain. A rough estimate for the US, derived from global estimates, is 5--500 Gt of CO{sub 2}. Problems associated with each method of disposal are discussed.

Winter, E.M. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Bergman, P.D. [USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Terrestrial Sequestration Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program TerresTrial sequesTraTion Program Capture and Storage of Carbon in Terrestrial Ecosystems Background Clean, affordable energy is essential for U.S. prosperity and security in the 21st century. More than half of the electricity currently generated in the United States comes from coal-fired boilers, and there is little indication that this percentage will diminish through 2020 and beyond. In addition, the use of coal for electricity generation is projected to more than double in developing nations by 2020. This ever growing demand for fossil-fuel-based power and the consequential rise in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) concentrations requires innovative methods to capture and store CO 2 . Terrestrial ecosystems, which include both soil and vegetation, are widely recognized

67

A global analysis of soil microbial biomass carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus in terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Soil microbes play a pivotal role in regulating land-atmosphere interactions; the soil microbial biomass carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and C:N:P stoichiometry are important regulators for soil biogeochemical processes; however, the current knowledge on magnitude, stoichiometry, storage, and spatial distribution of global soil microbial biomass C, N, and P is limited. In this study, 3087 pairs of data points were retrieved from 281 published papers and further used to summarize the magnitudes and stoichiometries of C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass at global- and biome-levels. Finally, global stock and spatial distribution of microbial biomass C and N in 0-30 cm and 0-100 cm soil profiles were estimated. The results show that C, N, and P in soils and soil microbial biomass vary substantially across biomes; the fractions of soil nutrient C, N, and P in soil microbial biomass are 1.6% in a 95% confidence interval of (1.5%-1.6%), 2.9% in a 95% confidence interval of (2.8%-3.0%), and 4.4% in a 95% confidence interval of (3.9%-5.0%), respectively. The best estimates of C:N:P stoichiometries for soil nutrients and soil microbial biomass are 153:11:1, and 47:6:1, respectively, at global scale, and they vary in a wide range among biomes. Vertical distribution of soil microbial biomass follows the distribution of roots up to 1 m depth. The global stock of soil microbial biomass C and N were estimated to be 15.2 Pg C and 2.3 Pg N in the 0-30 cm soil profiles, and 21.2 Pg C and 3.2 Pg N in the 0-100 cm soil profiles. We did not estimate P in soil microbial biomass due to data shortage and insignificant correlation with soil total P and climate variables. The spatial patterns of soil microbial biomass C and N were consistent with those of soil organic C and total N, i.e. high density in northern high latitude, and low density in low latitudes and southern hemisphere.

Xu, Xiaofeng [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Final Report on "Rising CO2 and Long-term Carbon Storage in Terrestrial Ecosystems: An Empirical Carbon Budget Validation"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary goal of this report is to report the results of Grant DE-FG02-97ER62458, which began in 1997 as Grant DOE-98-59-MP-4 funded through the TECO program. However, this project has a longer history because DOE also funded this study from its inception in 1985 through 1997. The original grant was focused on plant responses to elevated CO2 in an intact ecosystem, while the latter grant was focused on belowground responses. Here we summarize the major findings across the 25 years this study has operated, and note that the experiment will continue to run through 2020 with NSF support. The major conclusions of the study to date are: (1 Elevated CO2 stimulated plant productivity in the C3 plant community by ~30% during the 25 year study. The magnitude of the increase in productivity varied interannually and was sometime absent altogether. There is some evidence of down-regulation at the ecosystem level across the 25 year record that may be due to interactions with other factors such as sea-level rise or long-term changes in N supply; (2) Elevated CO2 stimulated C4 productivity by <10%, perhaps due to more efficient water use, but C3 plants at elevated CO2 did not displace C4 plants as predicted; (3) Increased primary production caused a general stimulation of microbial processes, but there were both increases and decreases in activity depending on the specific organisms considered. An increase in methanogenesis and methane emissions implies elevated CO2 may amplify radiative forcing in the case of wetland ecosystems; (4) Elevated CO2 stimulated soil carbon sequestration in the form of an increase in elevation. The increase in elevation is 50-100% of the increase in net ecosystem production caused by elevated CO2 (still under analysis). The increase in soil elevation suggests the elevated CO2 may have a positive outcome for the ability of coastal wetlands to persist despite accelerated sea level rise; (5) Crossing elevated CO2 with elevated N causes the elevated CO2 effect to diminish, with consequences for change in soil elevation.

J. Patrick Megonigal; Bert G. Drake

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

69

Grassland Management and Conversion into Grassland: Effects on Soil Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Grassland Soil Carbon Grassland Soil Carbon Grassland Management and Conversion into Grassland: Effects on Soil Carbon DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.005 Ecological Applications 11(2): 343-355 (2001) R. Conant, K. Paustian, and E. Elliot Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory Colorada State University Fort Collins, Colorado, USA Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory logo Sponsor: US Environmental Protection Agency, Ruminant Livestock Efficiency Program Abstract Grasslands are heavily relied upon for food and forage production. A key component for sustaining production in grassland ecosystems is the maintenance of soil organic matter (SOM), which can be strongly influenced by management. Many management techniques intended to increase forage production may potentially increase SOM, thus sequestering atmospheric

70

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Title Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2009 Authors Barbose, Galen L., Ryan H. Wiser, Amol Phadke, and Charles A. Goldman Pagination 28 Date Published 03/2009 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords carbon emissions, electric utilities, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, power system planning Abstract Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demandside resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers

71

Influence of Dynamic Land Use and Land Cover Change on Simulated Global Terrestrial Carbon and Nitrogen Cycles, Climate-carbon Cycle Feedbacks, and Interactions with Rising CO2 and Anthropogenic Nitrogen Deposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous work has demonstrated the sensitivity of terrestrial net carbon exchange to disturbance history and land use patterns at the scale of individual sites or regions. Here we show the influence of land use and land cover dynamics over the historical period 1850-present on global-scale carbon, nutrient, water, and energy fluxes. We also explore the spatial and temporal details of interactions among land use and disturbance history, rising atmospheric carbon dioxide consentation, and increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. Our simulations show that these interactions are significant, and that their importance grows over time, expressed as a fraction of the independent forcing terms. We conclude with an analysis of the influence of these interactions on the sign and magnitude of global climate-carbon cycle feedbacks.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Hurtt, George C [University of Hew Hampshire

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

New Technical Risk Management Development for Carbon Capture Process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The basic CCSI objective of accelerating technology development and commercial deployment of carbon capture technologies through the extensive use of numerical simulation introduces a degree of unfamiliarity and novelty that potentially increases both of the traditional risk elements. In order to secure investor confidence and successfully accelerate the marketability of carbon capture technologies, it is critical that risk management decision tools be developed in parallel with numerical simulation capabilities and uncertainty quantification efforts. The focus of this paper is on the development of a technical risk model that incorporates the specific technology maturity development (level).

Engel, David W.; Letellier, Bruce; Edwards, Brian; Leclaire, Rene; Jones, Edward

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

Terrestrial Magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE present activity of the department of terrestrial magnetism of the Carnegie Institution of Washington and the largeness of its future aims are alike ... a progress report which he contributes to the latest (March) number of Terrestrial Magnetism. The department, which has lately entered on its eleventh year, has under construetion ...

C. CHREE

1914-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

74

Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Footprint and the Management of Supply Chains: Insights from Simple Models Saif Benjaafar1, we illustrate how carbon emission concerns could be integrated into operational decision-making with regard to procurement, production, and inventory management. We show how, by associating carbon emission

Benjaafar, Saifallah

75

Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System R. Dahowski (bob.dahowski@battelle.org; 509-372-4574) J. Dooley (dooleyj@battelle.org; 202-646-7810) D. Brown (daryl.brown@pnl.gov; 509-372-4366) Battelle/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 A. Mizoguchi (akiyoshi.mizoguchi@jp.mitsubishicorp.com; 81-3-3210-7211) M. Shiozaki (mai.shiozaki@jp.mitsubishicorp.com; 81-3-3210-9543) 6-3 Marunouchi 2-Chome Chiyoda-ku Mitsubishi Corporation Tokyo 100-8086 Japan Introduction Addressing the threat posed by climate change represents one of the most pressing challenges facing humanity. It is also a challenge that will ultimately require profound changes in the way

76

Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States. The GIS system contains information (e.g., fuel type, location, vintage, ownership, rated capacity) on all fossil-fired generation capacity in the Untied States with a rated capacity of at least 100 MW. There are also data on other CO2 sources (i.e., natural domes, gas processing plants, etc.) and associated pipelines currently serving enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. Data on current and prospective CO2 EOR projects include location, operator, reservoir and oil characteristics, production, and CO2 source. The system also contains information on priority deep saline aquifers and coal bed methane basins with potential for sequestering CO2. The GIS application not only enables data storage, flexible map making, and visualization capabilities, but also facilitates the spatial analyses required to solve complex linking of CO2 sources with appropriate and cost-effective sinks. A variety of screening criteria (spatial, geophysical, and economic) can be employed to identify sources and sinks most likely amenable to deployment of carbon capture and sequestration systems. The system is easily updateable, allowing it to stay on the leading edge of capture and sequestration technology as well as the ever-changing business landscape. Our paper and presentation will describe the development of this GIS and demonstrate its uses for carbon management analysis.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; Brown, Daryl R.; Mizoguchi, Akiyoshi; Shiozaki, Mai

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

77

NETL: News Release - DOE Advances Oxycombustion for Carbon Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 17, 2005 November 17, 2005 DOE Advances Oxycombustion for Carbon Management Promising Carbon Capture Technology Moves Closer to Commercialization WASHINGTON, DC-The Department of Energy has selected two projects to demonstrate "oxycombustion" - a promising carbon capture technology - in existing coal-fired power plants. The projects, valued at nearly $10 million, are expected to help expedite the timeline for commercialization of oxycombustion technology through slip stream or pilot plant testing. In an oxycombustion-based power plant, oxygen rather than air is used to combust a fuel resulting in a highly pure carbon dioxide (CO2) exhaust that can be captured at relatively low-cost and sequestered. No commercial oxygen combustion power plants are operating today, due mainly to the high cost of producing oxygen. Significant reduction in the cost of oxygen compared to today's best cryogenic technology is a key requirement to making the oxycombustion power plant a viable future option. The two projects selected by DOE show promise for reducing those costs when compared to existing CO2 capture systems.

78

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

2003-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

79

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. During this fourth project period we completed the characterization of ozone-treated carbon surfaces and wrote a comprehensive report on the mechanism through which ozone suppresses the adsorption of concrete surfactants.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

80

Carbon Sequestration - A Natural Resource Management and Research & Development Agency Point of View  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-- -- A Natural Resource Management and Research & Development Agency Point of View Jim Reaves Staff Director USDA Forest Service R&D Vegetation Management and Protection Research Forests and carbon management § The USDA Forest Service is a research and resource management agency § Carbon is the foundation of forest productivity and sustainability § Carbon sequestration is an additional outcome of good forest management and utilization Forests and carbon sequestration n Forests and forest products are important CO 2 sinks n Carbon sinks offer a potentially significant low-cost opportunity to address carbon sequestration n Feedstocks for bioenergy production provide both clean energy and fossil fuel offsets Trends in forest and agriculture carbon sequestration -342 -12 -7

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

SWP.terrestrial.factsheet0919  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST FACTSHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail William O'Dowd NETL William.odowd@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Reid Grigg / Brian McPherson NMT reid@prrc.nmt.edu / brian@nmt.edu Field Test Information: Field Test Name Terrestrial Sequestration Programs - Regional Terrestrial and Local Terrestrial Sequestration (Combined With Enhanced Coalbed Methane Sequestration) Test Location Entire Region (Regional Program); San Juan Basin (Local Pilot Test) Amount and Source of CO 2

82

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equation 2 5 Carbon capture technology requires for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration." the additional carbon capture system (1.24 assuming

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NETL: Utilization Projects - Managing High-Carbon Ash  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Managing High-Carbon Ash Managing High-Carbon Ash Task 1: Effect of Coal Quality The objective of this task is to assess if fuel selection is an important factor determining ash quality. Work on this task will involve each of the three participating organizations. Ash samples from three coals will be generated under identical firing conditions in the pilot furnace at the University of Utah, and the matching ash and coal samples sent to Brown. Additional matching sets of coal and ash will be obtained from commercial-scale firing at Southern Company. The ashes will be characterized for LOI and surfactant adsorption activity under standard conditions and trends with fuel type identified. At the same time, chars will be prepared from the matching coal set under standard conditions in a laboratory furnace and also characterized for surfactant adsorptivity. A variety of standard conditions may need to be explored. The combined data set will be analyzed to determine cross correlations between ash behavior, standard laboratory char behavior, and parent coal properties. Our goal is to be able to anticipate ash behavior either (a) from coal properties directly, or (b) from the properties of chars made by a simple laboratory procedure. Either could be the basis for a coal quality index -- one based on fuel properties and the other based on a simple screening test.

84

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present project is to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific research issues to be addressed include: the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity; and the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This data will provide scientific and engineering support of the ongoing process development activities. This first project period, experiments were carried out to better understand the fundamental nature of the ozonation effect on ash. Carbon surfaces were characterized by surfactant adsorption, and by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy before and after oxidation, both by air at 440 C and by ozone at room temperature. The results strongly suggest that the beneficial effect of ozonation is in large part due to chemical modification of the carbon surfaces.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth

2001-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the projections, reducing the carbon intensity of theprojections use renewable energy as a means of reducing the carbon intensity

Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Geology Billion Gallons per Year Brine Use Sequence Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage Carbon Dioxide Coal-?

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Terrestrial Magnetism*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A similar investigation of the effect of the moon's action on terrestrial magnetism requires a series of observations made at much less distant intervals than the monthly ones ... heat, from the central body of our system, or merely having its own inherent magnetism modified by solar action, then we must choose as our unit the lunation, or ...

1873-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

88

Terrestrial Magnetism*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... IN bringing before you this evening, gentlemen, the subject of terrestrial magnetism, it is not my intention to attempt to present you with an exhaustive paper ... clearly as I am able, what is the actual condition of our knowledge respecting the magnetism of the globe, and what the nature of its complex variations, without, however, ...

1873-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

89

What is the optimal heather moorland management regime for carbon sequestration?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the optimal heather moorland management regime for carbon sequestration? Supervisors: Prof, the Muirburn Code has no evidence base with regard to carbon sequestration. Given the increased concern use moorland carbon sequestration to offset emissions, it is essential that the most appropriate land

Guo, Zaoyang

90

The Effect of Land Use and Its Management Practices on Plant Nutrient Availability and Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on soil degradation on both physical and chemical property of soil as well as on soil carbon sequestration availability and soil carbon sequestration in Bezawit Sub- Watershed, near Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. More The Effect of Land Use and Its Management Practices on Plant Nutrient Availability and Carbon

Walter, M.Todd

91

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government and HEFCE climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NTU Carbon Management Statement 2010 Nottingham Trent University fully supports government the following absolute carbon reduction target aligned to higher education sector target: · At least a 48% reduction in scope 1 and 2 carbon emissions from 2005/6 to 2020/21 NTU is currently completing actions from

Evans, Paul

92

China Needs Forest Management Rather Than Reforestation for Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last decade, both the U.S. and China implemented forestry carbon sequestration programs to reduce the carbon print. ...

Guanglei Gao; Guodong Ding; Haiyan Wang; Yintong Zang; Wenjun Liang

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

Carbon sequestration and carbon management policy effects on production agriculture in the Texas High Plains.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Increased concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere, especially of carbon dioxide, has led to attempts to implement carbon policies in order to limit and (more)

Zivkovic, Sanja

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

STRATEGIES AND TECHNOLOGY FOR MANAGING HIGH-CARBON ASH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the present project was to identify and assess strategies and solutions for the management of industry problems related to carbon in ash. Specific issues addressed included: (1) the effect of parent fuel selection on ash properties and adsorptivity, including a first ever examination of the air entrainment behavior of ashes from alternative (non-coal) fuels; (2) the effect of various low-NOx firing modes on ash properties and adsorptivity based on pilot-plant studies; and (3) the kinetics and mechanism of ash ozonation. This laboratory data has provided scientific and engineering support and underpinning for parallel process development activities. The development work on the ash ozonation process has now transitioned into a scale-up and commercialization project involving a multi-industry team and scheduled to begin in 2004. This report describes and documents the laboratory and pilot-scale work in the above three areas done at Brown University and the University of Utah during this three-year project.

Robert Hurt; Eric Suuberg; John Veranth; Xu Chen; Indrek Kulaots

2004-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

95

November 2012 Key Performance Indicator (KPI): Carbon Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

provided. The carbon emissions are calculated using Carbon Trust conversion factors, as used in NTU's EMS statistics, to convert energy consumption data. The totals are calculated using electricity, gas and district

Evans, Paul

96

Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maritime and Continental Antarctic terrestrial ecosystems are considered in the context of environmental impacts - habitat destruction, alien introductions, and pollution. Four types of pollution are considered: nutrients, radionuclides, inert materials, and noxious chemicals. Their ability to recover from perturbation is discussed in the light of present scientific knowledge, and the methods used to control impacts are reviewed. It is concluded that techniques of waste disposal are still inadequate, adequate training in environmental and conservation principles for Antarctic personnel in many countries is lacking, and scientific investigations may be a much more serious threat than tourism to the integrity of these ecosystems. Some priorities crucial to future management are suggested.

Walton, D.W.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brine management or extracted water management infrastructure or where nearby fresh water resources need to be carefully monitored for later contamination.

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The private sector's capacity to manage climate risks and finance carbon neutral energy infrastructure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation examines the financial aspects of climate change relating to the private sector's capacity to manage climate risks and finance carbon neutral energy infrastructure. The dissertation examines (a) potential ...

Hart, Craig A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Relative role of changes in CO? and climate to equilibrium responses of net primary production and carbon storage of the terrestrial biosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a partial factorial model experiment, we used the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) to assess the relative roles of changes in CO2, temperature, precipitation and cloudiness in equilibrium responses of ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; McGuire, A. David.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

100

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal Bed Methane. US DOE, NETL. Ventyx, 2012. Velocity SuiteCarbon Sequestration. NETL. Earles, M.J. , Halog, A. , 2011.

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Carbon Foam Thermal Management Materials for Electronic Packaging...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Propulsion Materials R&D Annual Progress Report Environmental Effects on Power Electronic Devices Low Cost Carbon Fiber from Renewable Resources...

102

Thermal conversion of municipal solid waste via hydrothermal carbonization: Comparison of carbonization products to products from current waste management techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HTC converts wastes into value-added resources. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization integrates majority of carbon into solid-phase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Carbonization results in a hydrochar with high energy density. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Using hydrochar as an energy source may be beneficial. - Abstract: Hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) is a novel thermal conversion process that may be a viable means for managing solid waste streams while minimizing greenhouse gas production and producing residual material with intrinsic value. HTC is a wet, relatively low temperature (180-350 Degree-Sign C) thermal conversion process that has been shown to convert biomass to a carbonaceous residue referred to as hydrochar. Results from batch experiments indicate HTC of representative waste materials is feasible, and results in the majority of carbon (45-75% of the initially present carbon) remaining within the hydrochar. Gas production during the batch experiments suggests that longer reaction periods may be desirable to maximize the production of energy-favorable products. If using the hydrochar for applications in which the carbon will remain stored, results suggest that the gaseous products from HTC result in fewer g CO{sub 2}-equivalent emissions than the gases associated with landfilling, composting, and incineration. When considering the use of hydrochar as a solid fuel, more energy can be derived from the hydrochar than from the gases resulting from waste degradation during landfilling and anaerobic digestion, and from incineration of food waste. Carbon emissions resulting from the use of the hydrochar as a fuel source are smaller than those associated with incineration, suggesting HTC may serve as an environmentally beneficial alternative to incineration. The type and extent of environmental benefits derived from HTC will be dependent on hydrochar use/the purpose for HTC (e.g., energy generation or carbon storage).

Lu Xiaowei; Jordan, Beth [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Berge, Nicole D., E-mail: berge@cec.sc.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of South Carolina, 300 Main Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- National Carbon Co - NY 48  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Carbon Co - NY 48 Carbon Co - NY 48 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: NATIONAL CARBON CO (NY.48) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.48-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.48-2 Site Operations: Produced graphite for the MED/AEC. NY.48-1 NY.48-2 NY.48-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for residual radioactive contamination considered remote - No indication that radioactive material was used on the site NY.48-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: No Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to NATIONAL CARBON CO NY.48-1 - AEC Letter; Crenshaw to National Carbon Company (Attn.:

104

Asia Carbon Emission Management India Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The company is an Indian subsidiary of Asia Carbon Global and it acts as a PDD consultant for CDM projects. Coordinates: 13.06397, 80.24311 Show Map Loading map......

105

CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

106

Development of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System (GIS) for the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this project a Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) for the US was developed. The GIS stored, integrated, and manipulated information relating to the components of carbon management systems. Additionally, the GIS was used to interpret and analyze the effect of developing these systems. This report documents the key deliverables from the project: (1) Carbon Management Geographical Information System (GIS) Documentation; (2) Stationary CO{sub 2} Source Database; (3) Regulatory Data for CCS in United States; (4) CO{sub 2} Capture Cost Estimation; (5) CO{sub 2} Storage Capacity Tools; (6) CO{sub 2} Injection Cost Modeling; (7) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport Cost Estimation; (8) CO{sub 2} Source-Sink Matching Algorithm; and (9) CO{sub 2} Pipeline Transport and Cost Model.

Howard Herzog; Holly Javedan

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulating terrestrial plant Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

search results for: accumulating terrestrial plant Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A Primer on the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle: What We Don't Know, But Should Summary: primary...

108

Driving down corporate carbon emissions through sustainable property management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

portfolios, with buildings being responsible for some 45% of the UK's overall greenhouse gas emissions organisations are facing increasing cost challenges and pressure to reduce their carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions" provides an holistic approach to maximising cost savings, reducing energy consumption and improving

109

Understanding Sequestration as a Means of Carbon Management Howard Herzog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and is a measure of fuel combustion and cement production (5.5 standard of living, BTU/GDP is energy GtC/yr) and changes in land-use, commonly consumption per unit of GDP and is a measure of referred/cement emissions had risen to CO2 emitted per unit of energy consumed and is a 6.1 GtC/yr. measure of carbon

110

Technology and information management for low-carbon building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All buildings worldwide combined use 40% of the global energy and are responsible for one third of global energy-related greenhouse gas(GHG) emissions. The majority of GHG emissions of buildings come from fossil fuel energy in several stages of the life cycle of the building; 80%90% of GHG emissions of buildings are emitted in the operations stage; 10%20% GHG emissions are from embodied energy and carbon emissions related to construction stage. The greatest potential for low-hanging fruit in cost effective quick deep GHG reduction and mitigation is found in the construction industry. With currently available and proven technologies reductions in energy consumption on both new and existing buildings are estimated to achieve 30%80%. When costs of implementing energy reduction technologies are offset by energy savings there is potential for a net profit over the life span of the building. Much has been done to study energy reductions define GHG emissions and develop metrics and protocols for measuring and reporting carbon emissions. This paper addresses the How. How energy consumption of a house was reduced almost 70%. How CO2 emission was reduced 44%. How embodied GHG emissions of the house were measured and certified carbon neutral. How USGBC LEED for Homes platinum certification was attained. How actual savings from energy reductions are able to pay back up-front cost of implementing technologies and begin earning a profit in fifteen years. How reducing electric consumption has the greatest impact in reducing energy costs and reducing CO2 emissions compared to propane and #2 fuel oil. How earning LEED points provided a surprise benefit of mitigating overall GHG emissions by earning carbon offsets. How these achievements and findings were accomplished in the reconstruction of one home.

Frank Dalene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Economic Screening of Geologic Sequestration Options in the United States with a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing a carbon management strategy is a formidable task for nations as well as individual companies. It is often difficult to understand what options are available, let alone determine which may be optimal. In response to the need for a better understanding of complex carbon management options, Battelle has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) model with economic screening capability focused on carbon capture and geologic sequestration opportunities in the United States. This paper describes the development of this GIS-based economic screening model and demonstrates its use for carbon management analysis.

Dahowski, Robert T. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dooley, James J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Brown, Daryl R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephan, Alex J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Badie I. Morsi

2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

112

Data Management | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Data Management Data Management Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

113

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Latest Estimates Latest Estimates Atmos CO2 Level 397.31 ppm Fossil CO2 Emissions 9,167 MMT Carbon Global Temp Anomaly +0.56°C / +1.01°F Global Sea Level Rise +2.9 ± 0.4 mm/y Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) is the primary climate-change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). CDIAC is located at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and includes the World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases. CDIAC's data holdings include estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and land-use changes; records of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active trace gases; carbon cycle and terrestrial carbon management datasets and analyses; and

114

INDUSTRIAL CARBON MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE (ICMI) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Doug Straub  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

INDUSTRIAL CARBON MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE (ICMI) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Doug Straub INDUSTRIAL CARBON MANAGEMENT INITIATIVE (ICMI) NETL Team Technical Coordinator: Doug Straub Name Project Role Affiliation University Project Title Lew is, James P PI WVU Haycock , Barry John Post Doc WVU Ranasingha, Oshadha Grad Student WVU Senty, Tess R Grad Student WVU Jordan, Kenneth D PI Pitt Thakur, Anshuman Grad Student Pitt Natesakhaw at, Sittichai PI Pitt Heterogeneous Catalysis of Photoactive Materials Kitchin, John PI CMU Curnan, Matthew Grad Student CMU Veser, Goetz PI Pitt Bhavsar, Saurabh Grad Student Pitt Greve, David W PI CMU Gao, Fan Post Doc CMU ARRA-Computational Support Sorbents and Catalysts of Photoactive Materials Computational Support Sorbents and Catalysts of Photoactive Materials ICMI Support for Oxygen Carrier Interaction Studies ICMI Support for Oxygen Carrier Interaction Studies

115

A Perspective on the Potential Role of Geologic Options in a National Carbon Management Strategy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Perspective On The Potential Role Of Geologic Options Perspective On The Potential Role Of Geologic Options In A National Carbon Management Strategy David A. Beecy (David.Beecy@hq.doe.gov; 301-903-2787) U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Systems 19901 Germantown Rd., FE-23, Building GTN Germantown, MD 20874 Vello A. Kuuskraa (vkuuskraa@adv-res.com; 703-528-8420) Advanced Resources International, Inc. 1110 N. Glebe, Suite 600 Arlington, VA 22201 Charles Schmidt (Charles.Schmidt@netl.doe.gov; 412-386-6090) U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technical Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Abstract. Carbon sequestration is the critical "third-option" for addressing greenhouse gas emissions, along with increased energy efficiency and expanded use of low-carbon fuels.

116

The Effect of Terrestrial Photosynthesis Down Regulation on the Twentieth-Century Carbon Budget Simulated with the CCCma Earth System Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The simulation of atmosphericlandocean CO2 exchange for the 18502000 period offers the possibility of testing and calibrating the carbon budget in earth system models by comparing the simulated changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and in ...

V. K. Arora; G. J. Boer; J. R. Christian; C. L. Curry; K. L. Denman; K. Zahariev; G. M. Flato; J. F. Scinocca; W. J. Merryfield; W. G. Lee

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Terrestrial biogeochemical feedbacks in the climate system: from past to future  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The terrestrial biosphere plays a major role in the regulation of atmospheric composition, and hence climate, through multiple interlinked biogeochemical cycles (BGC). Ice-core and other palaeoenvironmental records show a fast response of vegetation cover and exchanges with the atmosphere to past climate change, although the phasing of these responses reflects spatial patterning and complex interactions between individual biospheric feedbacks. Modern observations show a similar responsiveness of terrestrial biogeochemical cycles to anthropogenically-forced climate changes and air pollution, with equally complex feedbacks. For future conditions, although carbon cycle-climate interactions have been a major focus, other BGC feedbacks could be as important in modulating climate changes. The additional radiative forcing from terrestrial BGC feedbacks other than those conventionally attributed to the carbon cycle is in the range of 0.6 to 1.6 Wm{sup -2}; all taken together we estimate a possible maximum of around 3 Wm{sup -2} towards the end of the 21st century. There are large uncertainties associated with these estimates but, given that the majority of BGC feedbacks result in a positive forcing because of the fundamental link between metabolic stimulation and increasing temperature, improved quantification of these feedbacks and their incorporation in earth system models is necessary in order to develop coherent plans to manage ecosystems for climate mitigation.

Arneth, A.; Harrison, S. P.; Zaehle, S.; Tsigaridis, K; Menon, S; Bartlein, P.J.; Feichter, J; Korhola, A; Kulmala, M; O'Donnell, D; Schurgers, G; Sorvari, S; Vesala, T

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

118

DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada August 19, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs). The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership , a collaboration of over 80 U.S. and Canadian stakeholders, conducted the field test at sites in the Prairie Pothole Region, extending from central Iowa into Northern Alberta,

119

Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

73 Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183. Blaine Metting2 The purpose of this chapter is to review terrestrial biological carbon sequestration Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA. #12;74 TERRESTRIAL BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEqUESTRATION

Pennycook, Steve

120

Treatise on Terrestrial Magnetism  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and from which the writer also attempts to deduce some of the other phenomena of magnetism. There seems to us to be some ambiguity in the writer's method of ... , to arrive at laws, that we may hope to form a theory of terrestrial magnetism, than from making an hypothesis,and then attempting to apply it to facts. ...

J. S.

1872-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

On Terrestrial Magnetism.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1843-1850 research-article On Terrestrial Magnetism. William A. Norton The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Abstracts of the Papers Communicated to the Royal Society of London. www.jstor.org

1843-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

SOLAR ACTIVITY AND TERRESTRIAL DISTURBANCES  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

SOLAR ACTIVITY AND TERRESTRIAL DISTURBANCES Donald H. Menzel HARVARD COLLEGE OBSERVATORY SOLAR ACTIVITY AND TERRESTRIAL DISTURBANCES* BY...OBSERVATORY Scientists have long recognized that solar activity is somehow responsible for, or...

Donald H. Menzel

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Total Ecosystem Approach to Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7RWDO(FRV\VWHP$SSURDFKWR 7RWDO(FRV\VWHP$SSURDFKWR 7HUUHVWULDO&DUERQ 6HTXHVWUDWLRQ Coal Industry Perspective November 6, 2001 685)$&(0,1,1* * Surface mining is the preferred mining method - Cheaper - Employees are above ground - More coal is recovered - Less preparation (washing) required * Prior to 1977 overburden (soil) was left loose (uncompacted) - Many disturbed areas have supported growth of new forest with growth rates greater than adjacent undisturbed lands 685)$&(0,1($&72) * Act Required Mine Operators to take steps to reclaim mined lands. - Post Reclamation Bond - Return Land to Approximate Original Contour * Mining Companies routinely made the surface smooth by making multiple passes over the surface compacting soils 5(&/$,0('0,1(/$1'327(17,$/

124

The Carbon Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle The Carbon Cycle The global carbon cycle involves the carbon in and exchanging between the earth's atmosphere, fossil fuels, the oceans, and the vegetation and soils of the earth's terrestrial ecosystems. image Each year, the world's terrestrial ecosystems withdraw carbon from the atmosphere through photosynthesis and add it again through respiration and decay. A more detailed look at the global carbon cycle for the 1990s is shown below. The main annual fluxes in GtC yr-1 are: pre-industrial "natural" fluxes in black and "anthropogenic" fluxes in red (modified from Sarmiento and Gruber, 2006, with changes in pool sizes from Sabine et al., 2004a). The net terrestrial loss of -39 GtC is inferred from cumulative fossil fuel emissions minus atmospheric increase minus ocean storage. The loss of

125

Digital Outcrop Models: Applications of Terrestrial Scanning Lidar Technology in Stratigraphic Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...passive sensors. All but the most extreme atmospheric and lighting conditions will have little effect on terrestrial lidar...Changes, Cycles, and Reservoirs on Carbonate Platforms in Greenhouse and Ice-house Worlds: SEPM, Short Course no. 35, 147...

J.A. Bellian; C. Kerans; D.C. Jennette

126

SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Solar-Terrestrial Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOLAR PHYSICS AND TERRESTRIAL EFFECTS Chapter 4 Chapter 4 Solar-Terrestrial Interactions from the charged particles that reach the planet steadily as part of the solar wind and the much it will be deflected into a circular or spiral path by the Lorentz Force. Most charged particles in the solar wind

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

127

Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Science Computing, Environment & Life Sciences Energy Engineering & Systems Analysis Photon Sciences Physical Sciences & Engineering Energy Frontier Research Centers Science Highlights Postdoctoral Researchers Phosphate influences cycling of iron and carbon in the environment August 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Aquatic and terrestrial environments are dynamic systems where coupled microbiological, geochemical, and hydrological processes define the complex interactions that drive the biogeochemical cycling of water and the major and minor elements. Therefore, a thorough understanding of these complex interactions is critical for predicting the biogeochemical cycling of carbon, nutrients, heavy metals, radionuclides, and other contaminants; managing water quality; and understanding the interactions between

128

Litter-Carbon Dynamics: The Importance of Decomposition, Accretion, and Sequestration in Understanding Ecosystem Carbon Cycling.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The atmospheric CO2 concentration has been increasing since the industrial revolution. A proposed mitigation strategy is sequestering carbon (C) in terrestrial ecosystems, either in plant (more)

Kochsiek, Amy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Managing the cost of emissions for durable, carbon-containing products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We recognize that carbon-containing products do not decay and release CO2 to the atmosphere instantaneously, but release that carbon over extended periods of time. For an initial production of a stock of carbon-containing product, we can treat the release as a probability distribution covering the time over which that release occurs. The probability distribution that models the carbon release predicts the amount of carbon that is released as a function of time. The use of a probability distribution in accounting for the release of carbon to the atmosphere realizes a fundamental shift from the idea that all carbon-containing products contribute to a single pool that decays in proportion to the size of the stock. Viewing the release of carbon as a continuous probabilistic process introduces some theoretical opportunities not available in the former paradigm by taking advantage of other fields where the use of probability distributions has been prevalent for many decades. In particular, theories developed in the life insurance industry can guide the development of pricing and payment structures for dealing with the costs associated with the oxidation and release of carbon. These costs can arise from a number of proposed policies (cap and trade, carbon tax, social cost of carbon, etc), but in the end they all result in there being a cost to releasing carbon to the atmosphere. If there is a cost to the emitter for CO2 emissions, payment for that cost will depend on both when the emissions actually occur and how payment is made. Here we outline some of the pricing and payment structures that are possible which result from analogous theories in the life insurance industry. This development not only provides useful constructs for valuing sequestered carbon, but highlights additional motivations for employing a probability distribution approach to unify accounting methodologies for stocks of carbon containing products.

Shirley, Kevin [Appalachian State University; Marland, Eric [Appalachian State University; Cantrell, Jenna [Appalachian State University; Marland, Gregg [ORNL

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fuel cells for extraterrestrial and terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fuel cell is a nineteenth century invention and a twentieth century technology development. Due to the high power and energy density, high efficiency, reliability, and production of pure water, hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell systems have no competition as auxiliary power sources for space vehicles. The alkaline fuel cell system is a well developed and proven technology for this application. The solid polymer electrolyte system may be its future competitor. The energy crisis of 1973 stimulated research, development and demonstration of the phosphoric acid, molten carbonate, solid oxide and solid polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems using natural gas, petroleum or coal derived hydrogen (and carbon monoxide for the high temperature systems) for terrestrial applications. The direct methanol-air fuel cell is still an electrochemist's dream. Though considerable technological advances have been made, the present price of crude oil, and the high capital costs and limited lifetime of fuel cell systems impede their terrestrial applications in the developed countries. Conversely, the potential for lower capital costs of labor intensive manufacturing processes and the relatively higher fossil fuel prices make these systems more attractive for such applications in the developing countries. 11 refs.

Srinivasan, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

132

Carbon for Farmers: Assessing the Potential for Soil Carbon Sequestration in the Old Peanut Basin of Senegal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration in soil organic matter of degraded Sahelian ... could play a significant role in the global carbon (C) uptake through terrestrial sinks while,...in situ soil and biomass carbon

Petra Tschakert

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

THE CARBON-LAND MODEL INTERCOMPARISON PROJECT (C-LAMP): A PROTOTYPE FOR COUPLED BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE MODEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

often referred to as Earth System Models (ESMs). While a number of terrestrial and ocean carbon models

Hoffman, Forrest M.

134

Three essays on private landowners' response to incentives for carbon sequestration through forest management and afforestation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation consists of three essays on private landowners' response to incentives for carbon sequestration in forests. The first essay examines private landowner response to (more)

Kim, Taeyoung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Relative importance of multiple factors on terrestrial loading of DOC to Arctic river networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial carbon dynamics influence the contribution of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to river networks in addition to controlling carbon fluxes between the land surface and the atmosphere. In this study, we use a biogeochemical process model to simulate the lateral transfer of DOC from land to the Arctic Ocean via riverine transport. We estimate that the pan-arctic watershed has contributed, on average, 32 Tg C/yr of DOC to the Arctic Ocean over the 20th century with most coming from the extensive area of boreal deciduous needle-leaved forests and forested wetlands in Eurasian watersheds. We also estimate that the rate of terrestrial DOC loading has been increasing by 0.037 Tg C/yr2 over the 20th century primarily as a result of increases in air temperatures and precipitation. These increases have been partially compensated by decreases in terrestrial DOC loading caused by wildfires. Other environmental factors (CO2 fertilization, ozone pollution, atmospheric nitrogen deposition, timber harvest, agriculture) are estimated to have relatively small effects on terrestrial DOC loading to arctic rivers. The effects of the various environmental factors on terrestrial carbon dynamics have both compensated and enhanced concurrent effects on hydrology to influence terrestrial DOC loading. Future increases in riverine DOC concentrations and export may occur from warming-induced increases in terrestrial DOC production associated with enhanced microbial metabolism and the exposure of additional organic matter from permafrost degradation along with decreases in water yield associated with warming-induced increases in evapotranspiration. Improvements in simulating terrestrial DOC loading to pan-arctic rivers in the future will require better information on the spatial distribution of precipitation and its temporal trends, carbon dynamics of larch-dominated ecosystems in eastern Siberia, and the role of industrial organic effluents on carbon budgets of rivers in western Russia.

Kicklighter, David W. [Ecosystem Center, The] [Ecosystem Center, The; Hayes, Daniel J [ORNL] [ORNL; Mcclelland, James W [University of Texas] [University of Texas; Peterson, Bruce [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory; Mcguire, David [University of Alaska] [University of Alaska; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory] [Marine Biological Laboratory

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Essential Terrestrial Variable data workflows for distributed water resources modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses a prototype infrastructure, HydroTerre, that provides researchers, educators and resource managers with seamless access to geospatial/geotemporal data for supporting physics-based numerical models. The prototype defines the supporting ... Keywords: Data workflow, Distributed hydrologic model, Essential Terrestrial Variables, Geographic information systems, HydroTerre, PIHM, Web services

Lorne Leonard; Christopher J. Duffy

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Using NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-use transitions and their inherent uncertainty. Our plan for managing these datasets includes quality assessmentUsing NASA Remote Sensing Data to Reduce Uncertainty of Land-Use Transitions in Global Carbon-Climate Models: Data Management Plan L. Chini, G.C. Hurtt, M. Hansen, and P. Potapov Department of Geography

138

Terrestrial Ecosystems extend from uplands to wetlands, which form the interface between terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This field of study provides students with an understanding of ecological restoration, particularly as it relates to restoring and managing the kinds of ecosystems found, restoration, consulting and education pertaining to a wide range of forest ecosystems in the governmental

Edwards, Paul N.

139

Soil warming, carbonnitrogen interactions, and forest carbon budgets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmosphereoceanland earth system models to accurately simulate land...atmosphereoceanland earth system models by comparing terrestrial carbon...atmosphereoceanland earth system models (44...

Jerry M. Melillo; Sarah Butler; Jennifer Johnson; Jacqueline Mohan; Paul Steudler; Heidi Lux; Elizabeth Burrows; Francis Bowles; Rose Smith; Lindsay Scott; Chelsea Vario; Troy Hill; Andrew Burton; Yu-Mei Zhou; Jim Tang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes of the air-sea system. The perturbation, dIc, includes carbon emissions and changes in the terrestrial), Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes, Global

Follows, Mick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fired power generation without carbon capture and storage (CCS) and about $3/MWh to the cost of natural gas-power plants would apply to coal-fired baseload generation (not just natural gas-

Barbose, Galen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fired power generation without carbon capture and storage (CCS) and about $3/MWh to the cost of natural gas-power plants would apply to coal-fired baseload generation (not just natural gas-

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Coal-Combustion and Biomass-Pyrolysis Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov Heino Beckert Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 MS C04 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov 04/2008 Carbon Sequestration Enhancing carbon SEquEStration and rEclamation of dEgradEd landS with coal-combuStion and biomaSS-PyrolySiS ProductS Background Terrestrial sequestration of carbon can occur by three mechanisms, all of which first require "capture" or fixation of atmospheric carbon by photosynthesis into plant tissues. If captured by herbaceous plants, much of the carbon is quickly

144

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning:Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. Assuch, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

145

Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in Utility Resource Planning: Current Practices in the Western United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns about global climate change have substantially increased the likelihood that future policy will seek to minimize carbon dioxide emissions. As such, even today, electric utilities are making resource planning and investment decisions that consider the possible implications of these future carbon regulations. In this article, we examine the manner in which utilities assess the financial risks associated with future carbon regulations within their long-term resource plans. We base our analysis on a review of the most recent resource plans filed by fifteen electric utilities in the Western United States. Virtually all of these utilities made some effort to quantitatively evaluate the potential cost of future carbon regulations when analyzing alternate supply- and demand-side resource options for meeting customer load. Even without Federal climate regulation in the U.S., the prospect of that regulation is already having an impact on utility decision-making and resource choices. That said, the methods and assumptions used by utilities to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of that analysis on their choice of a particular resource strategy, vary considerably, revealing a number of opportunities for analytic improvement. Though our review focuses on a subset of U.S. electric utilities, this work holds implications for all electric utilities and energy policymakers who are seeking to minimize the compliance costs associated with future carbon regulations.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

146

Global Change and the Terrestrial Biosphere (449th Brookhaven Lecture)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the Industrial Revolution, the increased use of fossil fuels has resulted in a dramatic and unprecedented rise in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. Most scientists agree that increasing levels of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases have raised Earth's temperature and, without a reduction in emissions, will continue to do so. Terrestrial ecosystems sustain life on Earth through the production of food, fuel, fiber, clean air, and naturally purified water. But how will agriculture and ecosystems be affected by global change? Rogers will describe the impact of projected climate change on the terrestrial biosphere and explain why plants are not just passive respondents to global change, but play an important role in determining the rate of change.

Rogers, Alistair (Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department) [Ph.D., Environmental Sciences Department

2009-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effect of cropland management and slope position on soil organic carbon pool at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil organic matter is strongly related to soil type, landscape morphology, and soil and crop management practices. Therefore, long-term (1536-years) effects of six cropland management systems on soil organic carbon (SOC) pool in 030cm depth were studied for the period of 19391999 at the North Appalachian Experimental Watersheds (pool ranged from 24.5Mgha?1 in the 32-years moldboard tillage corn (Zea mays L.)wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)meadowmeadow rotation with straight row farming and annual application of fertilizer (N:P:K=5:9:17) of 56112kgha?1 and cattle (Bos taurus) manure of 9Mgha?1 as the prevalent system (MTR-P) to 65.5Mgha?1 in the 36-years no tillage continuous corn with contour row farming and annual application of 170225kgNha?1 and appropriate amounts of P and K, and 611Mgha?1 of cattle manure as the improved system (NTC-M). The difference in SOC pool among management systems ranged from 2.4 to 41Mgha?1 and was greater than 25Mgha?1 between NTC-M and the other five management systems. The difference in the SOC pool of NTC-M and that of no tillage continuous corn (NTC) were 1621Mgha?1 higher at the lower slope position than at the middle and upper slope positions. The effect of slope positions on SOC pools of the other management systems was significantly less (water conservation farming on SOC pool were accumulative. The NTC-M treatment with application of NPK fertilizer, lime, and cattle manure is an effective cropland management system for SOC sequestration.

Y Hao; R Lal; L.B Owens; R.C Izaurralde; W.M Post; D.L Hothem

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Union Carbide and Carbon Co - TN 10  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Carbide and Carbon Co - TN 10 Carbide and Carbon Co - TN 10 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Union Carbide and Carbon Co (TN.10) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: This site is one of a group of 5 FUSRAP considered sites for which records are available that provide a reasonably complete historical account of their operations and relationship, if any, with MED/AEC operations. However, additional analyses of these historical records, and more recent documentation of decisions concerning the authority and other considerations related to the elimination of these sites from further consideration under FUSRAP is warranted. These analyses will provide the

149

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21 Great Lakes Carbon Corp - IL 21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: GREAT LAKES CARBON CORP. ( IL.21 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: 333 North Michigan Avenue , Chicago , Illinois IL.21-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 IL.21-1 Site Operations: Facility performed a limited amount of nuclear fuel fabrication in the 1950s. Facility also developed graphite production under an AEC contract. IL.21-1 IL.21-3 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination considered remote due to limited scope of activities performed IL.21-1 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes IL.21-3 Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium, Thorium IL.21-3 Radiological Survey(s): Yes IL.21-3

150

Carbon Capture and Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is the long-term isolation of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through physical, chemical, biological, or engineered processes. This includes a range of approaches including soil carbon sequestration (e.g., through no-till farming), terrestrial biomass sequestration (e.g., through planting forests), direct ocean injection of CO{sub 2} either onto the deep seafloor or into the intermediate depths, injection into deep geological formations, or even direct conversion of CO{sub 2} to carbonate minerals. Some of these approaches are considered geoengineering (see the appropriate chapter herein). All are considered in the 2005 special report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC 2005). Of the range of options available, geological carbon sequestration (GCS) appears to be the most actionable and economic option for major greenhouse gas reduction in the next 10-30 years. The basis for this interest includes several factors: (1) The potential capacities are large based on initial estimates. Formal estimates for global storage potential vary substantially, but are likely to be between 800 and 3300 Gt of C (3000 and 10,000 Gt of CO{sub 2}), with significant capacity located reasonably near large point sources of the CO{sub 2}. (2) GCS can begin operations with demonstrated technology. Carbon dioxide has been separated from large point sources for nearly 100 years, and has been injected underground for over 30 years (below). (3) Testing of GCS at intermediate scale is feasible. In the US, Canada, and many industrial countries, large CO{sub 2} sources like power plants and refineries lie near prospective storage sites. These plants could be retrofit today and injection begun (while bearing in mind scientific uncertainties and unknowns). Indeed, some have, and three projects described here provide a great deal of information on the operational needs and field implementation of CCS. Part of this interest comes from several key documents written in the last three years that provide information on the status, economics, technology, and impact of CCS. These are cited throughout this text and identified as key references at the end of this manuscript. When coupled with improvements in energy efficiency, renewable energy supplies, and nuclear power, CCS help dramatically reduce current and future emissions (US CCTP 2005, MIT 2007). If CCS is not available as a carbon management option, it will be much more difficult and much more expensive to stabilize atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions. Recent estimates put the cost of carbon abatement without CCS to be 30-80% higher that if CCS were to be available (Edmonds et al. 2004).

Friedmann, S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

151

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Carbon Capital | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sector: Carbon Product: Manages a carbon fund specialised in forestry projects References: Carbon Capital1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon...

153

Scott M. Kaufman US Project Manager The Carbon Trust Brooklyn, NY January 2009 -present  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Helped design and install small-scale composting units at institutions in NYC. Taught 7 week course partner cities. Manager, Manhattan Compost Program NYC Dept. of Sanitation / The New York Botanical

154

2, 183201, 2005 Global terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1997). According to Watts (2000) and Kettle et al. (2002) total global sources and sinks are balancedBGD 2, 183­201, 2005 Global terrestrial COS sink strength L. Sandoval-Soto et al. Title Page Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Biogeosciences Global uptake of carbonyl sulfide (COS

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

155

PROPULSION AND ENERGY Terrestrial energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROPULSION AND ENERGY Terrestrial energy On the morning of Monday, August 29, Hurri- cane Katrina dependence we all have on power and energy systems. Nine major oil re- fineries in Louisiana and Mississippi- trial energy community is the question of why alternative energy sources, such as coal, solar, wind

Aggarwal, Suresh K.

156

Carbon sequestration in reclaimed manganese mine land at Gumgaon, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon emission is supposed to be the strongest factor for global warming. Removing atmospheric carbon and storing it in the terrestrial biosphere is one of the cost-effective options, to compensate greenhouse...

Asha A. Juwarkar; K. L. Mehrotraa; Rajani Nair

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Managing the Cost, Energy Consumption, and Carbon Footprint of Internet Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or "green" energy. This paper introduces a general, optimization-based framework for enabling multi-data-center services to manage their brown en- ergy consumption and leverage green energy, while respecting their SLAs. "green" or renewable energy.) We argue that placing caps on the brown energy consumption of data centers

Bianchini, Ricardo

158

Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling the Deep Terrestrial Biosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in the deep terrestrial biosphere is driven by interest in novel biodiversity and metabolisms, biogeochemical cycling, and the impact of human activities on this ecosystem. As this interest continues to grow, it is important to ensure that when subsurface investigations are proposed, materials recovered from the subsurface are sampled and preserved in an appropriate manner to limit contamination and ensure preservation of accurate microbial, geochemical, and mineralogical signatures. On February 20th, 2014, a workshop on Trends and Future Challenges in Sampling The Deep Subsurface was coordinated in Columbus, Ohio by The Ohio State University and West Virginia University faculty, and sponsored by The Ohio State University and the Sloan Foundations Deep Carbon Observatory. The workshop aims were to identify and develop best practices for the collection, preservation, and analysis of terrestrial deep rock samples. This document summarizes the information shared during this workshop.

Wilkins, Michael J.; Daly, Rebecca; Mouser, Paula J.; Trexler, Ryan; Sharma, Shihka; Cole, David R.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Biddle , Jennifer F.; Denis, Elizabeth; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kieft, Thomas L.; Onstott, T. C.; Peterson, Lee; Pfiffner, Susan M.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Schrenk, Matthew O.

2014-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

159

Use of terrestrial toxicity tests for Superfund site assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most risk assessment efforts that evaluate risk from hazardous waste sites have focused on potential human health effects. Concern for potential ecological risk has become a prominent factor in these assessments. The potential impact on all components of ecological systems at risk (including the human component) has prompted the regulatory community to take a more comprehensive approach to risk assessments, incorporating terrestrial toxicity testing. Terrestrial toxicity testing ultimately strengthens the overall risk assessment since responses of feral animals in their natural habitats have important implications in human health. Many biological indicators of stress in animals can be extrapolated to human health as well. Reliance on terrestrial toxicity testing for hazardous waste sites provides both a priori toxicity tests of single chemicals (generally conducted in a laboratory setting), or site-specific testing of extant contamination. Using bioassays of toxicity of environmental samples or in situ testing. Appropriate toxicity tests with representative chemicals and chemical bioavailability, on appropriate species will greatly enhance the information gained and widen mitigation options. Risk managers will be better able to integrate and evaluate toxicity information for the entire system at risk, including the human component. The authors present several matrices that relate chemical action, anticipated toxic effects, and possible terrestrial effects that can be used to provide more comprehensive and ecologically realistic risk assessments at hazardous waste sites.

Williams, B.A.; Kapustka, L.A.; Fairbrother, A. [Ecological Planning and Toxicology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

160

Pacific Northwest rangeland carbon sequestration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This paper models the supply curve of carbon sequestration on Pacific Northwest rangelands. Rangeland managers have the ability to sequester carbon in agricultural soils by (more)

Wiggins, Seth T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Carbon Capital: The Political Ecology of Carbon Forestry and Development in Chiapas, Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B v + B d ) C T = Total carbon B v = biomass contained indevelopment through carbon sequestration: experiences in2000) Rural livelihoods and carbon management, IIED Natural

Osborne, Tracey Muttoo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Basic refractory and slag management for petcoke carbon feedstock in gasifiers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure provides methods of operating a slagging gasifier using a carbon feedstock having a relatively high V.sub.2O.sub.5 to SiO.sub.2 ratio, such as petcoke. The disclosure generates a combined chemical composition in the feed mixture having less than 25 wt. % SiO.sub.2, greater than 20 wt. % V.sub.2O.sub.5, and greater than 20 wt. % CaO. The method takes advantage of a novel recognition that increased levels of SiO.sub.2 tend to decrease dissolution of the V.sub.2O.sub.3 which forms under the reducing conditions of the gasifier, and utilizes the CaO additive to establish a chemical phase equilibria comprised of lower melting compounds. The method further provides for control based on the presence of Al.sub.2O.sub.3 and FeO, and provides for a total combined chemical composition of greater than about 5 wt. % MgO for use with refractory linings comprised of MgO based refractory brick.

Kwong, Kyei-Sing; Bennett, James P; Nakano, Jinichiro

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

163

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric carbon isotope Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of terrestrial ecosystems to rising Summary: to rising concentrations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2 ), and the resulting global changes,are still... from the...

164

Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

EMSL: Science: Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems logo Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains. The Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme focuses on the dynamics of nutrients, metabolites, and contaminants at biogeochemical interfaces in heterogeneous environments across multiple scales. By providing a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical and microbial processes in soils and the subsurface, and linking those processes via pore-scale hydrological models, EMSL can improve strategies for sustainable solutions to contaminant attenuation, remediation and biogeochemical

167

Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Y. Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the ManagementJ. van Houtum. 2011. E?ect of carbon emission regulations onStreamlined Enterprise Carbon Footprinting. Environmental

Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Pemberton et al: ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA, INVADES MIAMI ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Southeast Asia, southern China to the Ryuku Islands south of Japan. It also extends into cooler areas in this process. If you encounter plants, please send us photos or #12;Pemberton et al: ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHIDPemberton et al: ALIEN TERRESTRIAL ORCHID, EULOPHIA GRAMINEA, INVADES MIAMI 183 ALIEN TERRESTRIAL

Koptur, Suzanne

169

Assessment of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from Scottish transitional waters Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(6), 959970 (2002) EGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from of terrigenous organic carbon input to the total organic carbon in sediments from Scottish transitional waters This paper addresses the assessment of terrestrially derived organic carbon in sediments from two Scottish

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

170

Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

what'S inSide? what'S inSide? Sequestration in the News Announcements Science Policy Geology Technology Terrestrial/Ocean Trading Recent Publications Events Subscription Information hiGhliGhtS Fossil Energy Techline, "Climate Technology: DOE Readies First Big U.S. Projects in CO 2 Capture and Storage. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is currently reviewing Phase III proposals for large-scale geologic sequestration projects in support of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program. The program, which was formed in 2003 to research the best approaches to capture and permanently store the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), will enter its next phase in October with announcements of Phase III deployment projects. The new stage of the Regional Partnerships' work will follow as a logical extension of work

171

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

management  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

5%2A en Management and Budget http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusouroperationsmanagementandbudget

P...

174

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Climate Change and Ecosystem Response Recorded in Lake Sediments and Related Deposits Reconstruction of past terrestrial climate and ecosystem response relies on...

175

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications Thermoelectrics: From Space Power Systems to Terrestrial Waste Heat Recovery Applications...

176

Estimation of net carbon sequestration potential of citrus under different management systems using the life cycle approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A study was conducted to determine the net carbon sequestration potential of citrus to mitigate climate change. Perennial crops such as citrus have the potential (more)

Bwalya, jackson Mwamba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 4. Table 5. Table 6. Utility Resource Plans Included2 Carbon Emission Price Projections in Utility11 Utility Approaches to Incorporating Energy Efficiency

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Melson et 01. Carbon Balance and Management 2011, 6:2 http://www.cbmjournal.com/content/6/112 CARBON BALANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and conversion factors that can be plausibly justified as locally applicable to calculate the carbon store from expressed as biomass using density conversion factors) to some easily measured tree dimension obtained from and conversion factors. Each source contributes to uncertainty about the live-tree C estimate (uncertainty

Fried, Jeremy S.

179

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tillage and Crop Rotation Tillage and Crop Rotation Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.002 PDF file Full text Soil Science Society of America Journal 66:1930-1946 (2002) CSITE image Tristram O. West and Wilfred M. Post DOE Center for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6290 U.S.A. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Abstract Global map Changes in agricultural management can potentially increase the accumulation rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), thereby sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. This study was conducted to quantify potential soil

180

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase II Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Darin Damiani, U.S. Department of Energy, Darin.Damiani@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name PCOR Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons N/A Source Atmospheric CO 2 Ducks Unlimited, Inc. U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) North Dakota State University

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

6 Management Plan Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enhance the fish and wildlife populations and the aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems that exist within for restoration of fish and wildlife habitat and populations which form the bulk of the management plan is derived or the inventory. The assessment and inventory are designed and may be used to guide restoration and management

182

Possible climates on terrestrial exoplanets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nascent planet (and possibly into the comets or asteroids colliding with the planet...lost to space because of the impacts of comets or asteroids. If the gravity is low enough...Evidence for calcium carbonate at the phoenix landing site. Science 325, 61-64. 33 Morris...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon intensity of utilities preferred resource portfolios to EIAs projectionscarbon intensity of the utilities preferred portfolios and EIAs projectioncarbon intensity of the set of utility preferred portfolios and EIAs projections

Barbose, Galen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Terrestrial nitrogencarbon cycle interactions at the global scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...N. Depending on whether the radiative forcing in Earth system models is prescribed (RCP-type forcing) or calculated...accounted for interactively in the next generation of Earth system models designed for long-term studies of biogeochemical-climate...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Reading the Tea Leaves: How Utilities in the West Are Managing Carbon Regulatory Risk in their Resource Plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long economic lifetime and development lead-time of many electric infrastructure investments requires that utility resource planning consider potential costs and risks over a lengthy time horizon. One long-term -- and potentially far-reaching -- risk currently facing the electricity industry is the uncertain cost of future carbon dioxide (CO2) regulations. Recognizing the importance of this issue, many utilities (sometimes spurred by state regulatory requirements) are beginning to actively assess carbon regulatory risk within their resource planning processes, and to evaluate options for mitigating that risk. However, given the relatively recent emergence of this issue and the rapidly changing political landscape, methods and assumptions used to analyze carbon regulatory risk, and the impact of this analysis on the selection of a preferred resource portfolio, vary considerably across utilities. In this study, we examine the treatment of carbon regulatory risk in utility resource planning, through a comparison of the most-recent resource plans filed by fifteen investor-owned and publicly-owned utilities in the Western U.S. Together, these utilities account for approximately 60percent of retail electricity sales in the West, and cover nine of eleven Western states. This report has two related elements. First, we compare and assess utilities' approaches to addressing key analytical issues that arise when considering the risk of future carbon regulations. Second, we summarize the composition and carbon intensity of the preferred resource portfolios selected by these fifteen utilities and compare them to potential CO2 emission benchmark levels.

Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Phadke, Amol; Goldman, Charles

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy, DOE. U.S. DOE NETL (2006). Carbon Sequestrationincreased soil 1-10 Pg C/yr (NETL Rev. 8.1 CS Terrestrial CSData sources: US DOE NETL 2006; Righelato and Spracklen

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

188

West, T.O., and W.M. Post. 2002. Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (http://cdiac.ornl.gov/programs/CSEQ/terrestrial/westpost2002/westpost2002.html). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Depa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak 41 27 32 24 1968 Arg01 Cordoba Argentina -32.42 -62.05 900 17 Marcos Juarez silty loam 10 65 25 17 1975 Arg02 Balcarce Argentina -37.45 -58.18 870 13.7 #10 #65 #25 1984 Arg03 Buenos Aires Argentina -37

189

*** How PAN based Carbon Fibers are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

*** How PAN based Carbon Fibers are Manufactured *** How Carbon Fiber Material Properties are Achieved *** Carbon Fiber Markets/Applications CarbonFiber AerospaceEngineeringGuestLecture: Friday as a Business Development Manager for Amoco's carbon fiber business unit (manufacturers of T-300 carbon fiber

Hu, Hui

190

Preindustrial-Control and Twentieth-Century Carbon Cycle Experiments with the Earth System Model CESM1(BGC)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Version 1 of the Community Earth System Model, in the configuration where its full carbon cycle is enabled, is introduced and documented. In this configuration, the terrestrial biogeochemical model, which includes carbonnitrogen dynamics and is ...

Keith Lindsay; Gordon B. Bonan; Scott C. Doney; Forrest M. Hoffman; David M. Lawrence; Matthew C. Long; Natalie M. Mahowald; J. Keith Moore; James T. Randerson; Peter E. Thornton

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel for terrestrial carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production. For P. strobus, above- ground plant carbon harvest for biofuel would result in no net carbon sequestration as declines in soil carbon offset plant

Weiblen, George D

192

West, T.O., and W.M. Post. 2002. Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis (http://cdiac.ornl.gov/programs/CSEQ/terrestrial/westpost2002/westpost2002.html). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Depa  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak/a 1989 15-30 15 1.11 KY01 CT corn 0 1975 0-5 5 1.33 KY01 CT corn 0 1975 5-15 10 1.24 KY01 CT corn 0 1975 15-30 15 0.68 KY01 CT corn 0 1980 0-5 5 1.25 KY01 CT corn 0 1980 5-15 10 1.38 KY01 CT corn 0 1980 15

193

Sustainable Management of Carbon, Nutrients, and Agrichemicals through Cycling of Bioresources fom Bioenergy and Livestock Production and Municipalities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy and Livestock Production and Municipalities Bioenergy and livestock industries and municipalities offer bioresources for sustained crop productivity and environmental quality. In the emerging bioenergy and a potential source of carbon· credits for bioenergy systems. Incorporation of the char by-product in soil can

194

Microsoft Word - BB-Terrestrial-Oct09  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestrial Field Validation Test Terrestrial Field Validation Test 1 FACT SHEET FOR PARTNERSHIP FIELD VALIDATION TEST Partnership Name Plains CO 2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership - Phase II Contacts: DOE/NETL Project Mgr. Name Organization E-Mail Andrea McNemar, U.S. Department of Energy, andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Principal Investigator Edward Steadman Field Test Information: Field Test Name Terrestrial Field Validation Test Test Location North Dakota, South Dakota, Minnesota, Montana, Iowa Amount and Source of CO 2 Tons N/A Source Atmospheric CO 2 Field Test Partners (Primary Sponsors) Ducks Unlimited, Inc. U.S. Geological Survey Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center North Dakota State University Summary of Field Test Site and Operations:

195

Nanobiocatalysts for Carbon Capture, Sequestration and Valorisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The approaches being pursued for carbon management includes: (i) increased efficiency of ... energy conversion, (ii) usage of low-carbon or carbon-free energy sources, and (iii) capturing and sequestering anthrop...

Sadhana Rayalu; Renu Yadav; Snehal Wanjari; Chandan Prabhu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Carbon Capital Markets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Product: London-based fund manager and trader specialising in the carbon and clean energy markets. References: Carbon Capital Markets1 This article is a stub. You can help...

197

NETL: Carbon Storage - Reference Shelf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf Carbon Storage Reference Shelf Below are links to Carbon Storage Program documents and reference materials. Each of the 10 categories has a variety of documents posted for easy access to current information - just click on the category link to view all related materials. RSS Icon Subscribe to the Carbon Storage RSS Feed. Carbon Storage Collage 2012 Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas IV Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap Public Outreach and Education for Carbon Storage Projects Carbon Storage Technology Program Plan Carbon Storage Newsletter Archive Impact of the Marcellus Shale Gas Play on Current and Future CCS Activities Site Screening, Selection, and Initial Characterization for Storage of CO2 in Deep Geologic Formations Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations

198

Net carbon flux from agriculture: Carbon emissions, carbon sequestration, crop yield, and land-use change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There is a potential to sequester carbon in soil by changing agricultural management practices. ... fossil-fuel use, agricultural inputs, and the carbon emissions associated with fossil fuels and other ... with f...

Tristram O. West; Gregg Marland

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Seaweeds and halophytes to remove carbon from the atmosphere  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The utility industry and other interested parties have investigated strategies to mitigate the buildup of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. One option that has been considered is the planting of trees on a massive scale to absorb carbon through photosynthesis. A dilemma of using tree plantations, however, is that they might occupy land that will be needed for food production or other needs for an expected doubling of human population in the tropical regions. We evaluated seaweeds and salt-tolerant terrestrial plants (halophytes) to be grown on the coastal shelves and salt deserts of the world as possible alternatives to tree plantations. An estimated 1.3 {times} 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of continental shelf and 1.3 {times} 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of salt desert may be usable for seaweed and halophyte plantations. The production rates of managed seaweed and halophyte plantings are similar to managed tree plantations. Seaweeds and halophytes could conceivably absorb 10--20% of annual fossil fuel carbon emissions through biomass production, similar to estimates made for tree plantations. Present costs of halophyte biomass production are similar to costs of tree biomass production, whereas seaweed biomass is much more expensive to produce using existing technologies. Storage of seaweed carbon might be accomplished by allowing it to enter the sediment detritus chain whereas halophyte carbon might be sequestered in the soil, or used as biomass fuel. As has been concluded for reforestation, these saline biomass crops could at best help delay rather than solve the carbon dioxide build-up problem. 1 fig., 13 tabs.

Glenn, E.P.; Kent, K.J.; Thompson, T.L.; Frye, R.J. (Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Environmental Research Lab.)

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Origin of first cells at terrestrial, anoxic geothermal fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...terrestrial geothermal fields are conducive...solar light as an energy source and a...terrestrial geothermal fields are conducive...solar light as an energy source and selective...M.), EU COST CM0902 Action (A.Y...diverse kinds of energy, including...terrestrial, anoxic geothermal fields. | All...

Armen Y. Mulkidjanian; Andrew Yu. Bychkov; Daria V. Dibrova; Michael Y. Galperin; Eugene V. Koonin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper published in the August, 2005 issue of Canadian Journal of Forest Research, scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper carbon sequestration by an estimated 0.35Gt carbon/year. This represents ca. 4% of global carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This work is supported by research funded through the Carbon Sequestration Program

202

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealths utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for...

203

NPP and the Global Carbon Cycle  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Global Carbon Cycle the Global Carbon Cycle Introduction Photosynthetic carbon fixation comprises a major component of the global carbon cycle. Data on net primary productivity (NPP) may be sparse, but a consistent NPP data set may be used to calibrate, parameterize and evaluate models of terrestrial carbon cycling, as well as for validation of remote sensing data and other applications (identifying trends, investigating biogeochemical processes, etc.). It is also useful to place such data within the context of carbon cycling and carbon storage worldwide. For example: How much carbon exists in the biosphere, and where exactly is it stored? How much is in fossil fuels (coal, oil, gas), and how large are current fossil-fuel emissions? How much is in living biomass (plants/ animals/ humans)?

204

Plan - Data Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Plan Plan Data Management for Data Providers Click an arrow to follow the data management path of a data set from planning to curation. plan Overview plan Plan manage Manage archive Archive curation DAAC Curation Data Management Overview Plan Manage Archive DAAC Curation Related Links DAAC Help Best Practices PDF Workshops DataONE ESIP Data Management Plans NASA's Terrestrial Ecology Program now requires that each proposal include a Data Management Plan (DMP) of up to two pages. A DMP for a proposal is a brief document that outlines what you will do with your data during and after your research, to ensure your data will be safe, documented, and accessible now and in the future. A DMP - developed early and used throughout the research project - will increase research efficiency by making the data understandable and usable in the future and

205

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Continuous, non-invasive, in-Field soil Carbon sCanning system Background Vegetation and soils serve as carbon storage sinks for the approximately 2 billion tons of carbon absorbed annually by the global biosphere. While global warming is promoted by anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions into the atmosphere, it is partially mitigated by carbon sequestration in the terrestrial ecosystem. However, a better understanding and monitoring of the underground carbon processes is necessary for evaluating various strategies for terrestrial carbon sequestration and quantification of the carbon stores for carbon credits. Description Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has developed a multi-elemental scanning instrument for determining carbon analysis in soil. The method is based on inelastic

206

Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, such as temperature anomalies, on NEE and carbon sequestration of ecosystems at interannual timescales have beenLETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from

Cai, Long

207

Biogeographic variation in evergreen conifer needle longevity and impacts on boreal forest carbon cycle projections  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...positive carbon feedback to future warming using earth system models (28). Empirical observations have found that needle...patterns have not been accounted for by any of the earth system models that were used for estimating the sensitivity of terrestrial...

Peter B. Reich; Roy L. Rich; Xingjie Lu; Ying-Ping Wang; Jacek Oleksyn

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Responses of primary production and total carbon storage to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The authors used the terrestrial ecosystem model (TEM, version 4.0) to estimate global responses of annual net primary production (NPP) and total carbon storage to changes in climate and atmospheric CO2, driven by the ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Kicklighter, David W.; Melillo, Jerry M.; McGuire, A. David.; Stone, Peter H.; Sokolov, Andrei P.

209

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Continuous, Non-Invasive, In-Field Soil Carbon Scanning System Background Earth generates and emits an enormous amount of carbon dioxide into the atmos- phere from its deep energy resources, its near-surface processes, and biotic activi- ties. Although anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions increase global warming, global warming is also alleviated by human activities in sequestering carbon into the terrestrial ecosystem and injecting carbon dioxide deep into geological formations,

210

Carbon Sequestration - Public Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Public Meeting Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Public Meeting May 18, 2004 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Scott Klara Carbon Sequestration Technology Manager Carbon Sequestration Program Overview * What is Carbon Sequestration * The Fossil Energy Situation * Greenhouse Gas Implications * Pathways to Greenhouse Gas Stabilization * Sequestration Program Overview * Program Requirements & Structure * Regional Partnerships * FutureGen * Sources of Information What is Carbon Sequestration? Capture can occur: * at the point of emission * when absorbed from air Storage locations include: * underground reservoirs * dissolved in deep oceans * converted to solid materials * trees, grasses, soils, or algae Capture and storage of CO 2 and other Greenhouse Gases that

211

Carbon Sequestration 101  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R&D Overview R&D Overview Office of Fossil Energy Justin "Judd" R. Swift Asst. Secretary for International Affairs Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2 nd U.S/China CO 2 Emission Control Science & Technology Symposium May 28-29, 2008 Hangzhou, China Office of Fossil Energy Technological Carbon Management Options Improve Efficiency Sequester Carbon  Renewables  Nuclear  Fuel Switching  Demand Side  Supply Side  Capture & Store  Enhance Natural Sinks Reduce Carbon Intensity All options needed to:  Affordably meet energy demand  Address environmental objectives Office of Fossil Energy DOE's Sequestration Program Structure Infrastructure Regional Carbon Sequestration

212

FE Carbon Capture and Storage News | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

January 18, 2011 January 18, 2011 DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. January 11, 2011 New Roadmap Updates Status of DOE Carbon Capture and Storage RD&D Efforts An overview of research, development, and demonstration efforts to supply cost-effective, advanced carbon capture and storage technologies for coal-based power systems is the focus of a new roadmap published by the U.S. Department of Energy. January 5, 2011 DOE Best Practices Manual Focuses on Site Selection for CO2 Storage Washington, DC - The most promising methods for assessing potential carbon

213

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

214

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

BNL | Carbon Cycle Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding The Carbon Cycle Science & Technology Group aims to increase understanding of the impacts of global change on managed and unmanaged ecosystems and improve knowledge of possible global change mitigation approaches. The group has three main focus areas. FACE Climate Change Experimental Facility Design and Management The CCS&T group is an internationally recognized leader in the development of Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) research facilities. We are interested in the design and management of manipulative experiments that examine the effects of carbon dioxide, ozone, other atmospheric pollutants, temperature and precipitation on natural and managed ecosystems. FACE Plant Physiology and High Throughput Biochemical Phenotyping At FACE facilities we have studied the mechanisms that underlie the

217

carbon storage rd index | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

With Us About Us Contacts Fact Sheet Research Team Members Key Contacts Carbon Storage Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a key component of the U.S. carbon management...

218

Carbon Sequestered, Carbon Displaced and the Kyoto Context  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The integrated system that embraces forest management, forest products, and land-use change impacts the global carbon cycle - and hence the net emission of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide - in four fundamental ways. Carbon is stored in living and dead biomass, carbon is stored in wood products and landfills, forest products substitute in the market place for products made from other materials, and forest harvests can be used wholly or partially to displace fossil fuels in the energy sector. Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change would result in the creation of international markets for carbon dioxide emissions credits, but the current Kyoto text does not treat all carbon identically. We have developed a carbon accounting model, GORCAM, to examine a variety of scenarios for land management and the production of forest products. In this paper we explore, for two simple scenarios of forest management, the carbon flows that occur and how these might be accounted for under the Kyoto text. The Kyoto protocol raises questions about what activities can result in emissions credits, which carbon reservoirs will be counted, who will receive the credits, and how much credit will be available? The Kyoto Protocol would sometimes give credits for carbon sequestered, but it would always give credits when fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are displaced.

Marland, G.; Schlamadinger, B.

1999-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, flying robots, micro-air vehicles, robot communication, autonomous robot networks. #12;2 1. TERRESTRIAL1 LOCOMOTION (TERRESTRIAL AND AERIAL) AND COMMUNICATION OF AUTONOMOUS ROBOT NETWORKS Arvin Agah This report focuses on locomotion and communication aspects of mobile robot networks for harsh polar

Kansas, University of

220

Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global priorities for biodiversity conservation are only as robust as the data used to identify them of freshwater biodiversity patterns. Given that many conservation priorities are currently driven by terrestrialLETTER Concordance of freshwater and terrestrial biodiversity Robin Abell1 , Michele Thieme1

Vermont, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Terrestrial gamma ray flash production by active lightning leader channels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terrestrial gamma ray flash production by active lightning leader channels B. E. Carlson,1 N. G 28 October 2010. [1] The production of terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs) requires a seed energetic electron source and a strong electric field. Lightning leaders naturally provide seed electrons by cold

Bergen, Universitetet i

222

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set Final Report NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005 May 3, 2001 Richard J. Olson and Jonathan M. O. Scurlock Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6407 This project, "Generation of a Consistent Terrestrial Net Primary Production Data Set", is a coordinated, international effort to compile global estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity (NPP) for parameterization, calibration, and validation of NPP models. The project (NASA Reference Number TE/99-0005) was funded by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Office of Earth Science, Terrestrial Ecology Program under Interagency Agreement number 2013-M164-A1, under

223

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de Energías Renovables (CER), United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Webinar, Training materials References: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model[1] Logo: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Webinar Video SMARTSwebinar.JPG Announcement " Monday, December 6, 2010 11-12 a.m. Golden, CO 1-2 p.m., Washington, D.C. 3-4 p.m., Santiago, Chile

224

Solar magnetic fields and terrestrial climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar irradiance is considered one of the main natural factors affecting terrestrial climate, and its variations are included in most numerical models estimating the effects of natural versus anthropogenic factors for climate change. Solar wind causing geomagnetic disturbances is another solar activity agent whose role in climate change is not yet fully estimated but is a subject of intense research. For the purposes of climate modeling, it is essential to evaluate both the past and the future variations of solar irradiance and geomagnetic activity which are ultimately due to the variations of solar magnetic fields. Direct measurements of solar magnetic fields are available for a limited period, but can be reconstructed from geomagnetic activity records. Here we present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance based on geomagnetic data, and a forecast of the future irradiance and geomagnetic activity relevant for the expected climate change.

Georgieva, Katya; Kirov, Boian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting Development Phase Field Tests Pittsburgh, PA October 5, 2010 Presented by: Gerald R. Hill, Ph.D. Senior Technical Advisor Southern States Energy Board Acknowledgements  This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.  Cost share and research support provided by SECARB/SSEB Carbon Management Partners Through innovations in energy and environmental policies, programs and technologies, the Southern States Energy Board enhances economic development and the quality of life in the South. - SSEB Mission Statement SSEB Carbon Management Program  Established 2003  Characterizing Southeast Region

226

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the early 1950s, the Savannah River Site (SRS) released over 50 radionuclides into the environment while producing nuclear defense materials. These releases directly exposed aquatic and terrestrial biota to ionizing radiation from surface water, soil, and sediment, and also indirectly by the ingestion of items in the food chain. As part of new missions to develop waste management strategies and identify cost-effective environmental restoration options, knowledge concerning the uptake and distribution of these radionuclides is essential. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at SRS.

Friday, G.P.; Cummins, C.L.; Schwartzman, A.L.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

Forest Carbon ? Sustaining an Important Climate Service  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Drought * Invasives GROWTH RATE * Forest Type * Site * Age * Management Drivers of Forest Carbon Sequestration Changing Forests...Enduring Values Changing Forests...Enduring Values...

228

NETL: Carbon Storage - Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing SECARB efforts can be found on their website. The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), represents a 13-State region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB is comprised of over 100 participants representing Federal and State governments, industry, academia, and non-profit organizations. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and

229

Carbon Jungle | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jungle Jungle Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Jungle Place El Segundo, California Zip 90246 Sector Carbon Product Carbon Jungle's mission is to decrease CO2 in the atmosphere by planting and managing tree plantations, increasing awareness of the facts behind increased CO2 in the atmosphere, and giving companies a means to participate in carbon credit trading. References Carbon Jungle[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Jungle is a company located in El Segundo, California . References ↑ "Carbon Jungle" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Jungle&oldid=343237" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

230

Carbon Sequestration in Organic Farming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic farming has been developed as a new mode of farming vs. conventional farming. Evidence showed that organic farming management can well maintain the soil carbon up to 23 times higher in organic matter ...

Raymond Liu; Jianming M. Xu; C. Edward Clapp

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Isotope powered stirling generator for terrestrial applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling ENgine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to data: (a) a development model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995. {copyright} 1995 {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C. [Battelle, Paific Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Ross, B.A. [Stirling Technology Company, 2952 George Washington Way, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

Carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leaver and Howard Dalton Carbon sequestration Rattan Lal * * ( lal.1...and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric...and biomass burning. 3. Carbon sequestration Emission rates from fossil...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration refers to a portfolio of activities for ... capture, separation and storage or reuse of carbon or CO2. Carbon sequestration technologies encompass both the prevention of CO2 emissions into ...

Robert L. Kane MS; Daniel E. Klein MBA

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Background gamma terrestrial dose rate in Nigerian functional coal mines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......444-448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental...TERRESTRIAL DOSE RATE IN NIGERIAN MINES N d Aerial ropeway Figure 2. Surface background...444 448 (2003). 12. Nakaoka, A., Fukushima, M. and Shinji, T. Environmental......

C. E. Mokobia; F. A. Balogun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

X-ray emission from the terrestrial magnetosheath  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] X-rays are generated throughout the terrestrial magnetosheath as a consequence of charge transfer collisions between heavy solar wind ions and geocoronal neutrals. The solar wind ions resulting from these collisions ...

Robertson, Ina Picket; Cravens, Thomas Edward

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

237

Global organization of terrestrial plantnutrient interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...needed guidance for efforts underway to incorporate N and P dynamics within the terrestrial component of coupled earth system models (13). Inclusion of explicit mechanisms of plantnutrient interactions will better enable these models to simulate...

Lars O. Hedin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Public resource allocation for programs aimed at managing woody plants on the Edwards Plateau: water yield, wildlife habitat, and carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Edwards Plateau is the drainage area for the Edwards Aquifer, which provides water to over 2.2 million people. The plateau also provides other ecosystem services, such as wildlife habitat and the sequestration of atmospheric carbon dioxide...

Davis, Amber Marie

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

239

Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in Challenges for improving estimates of soil organic carbon stored in permafrost regions September 30, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint One of the greatest environmental challenges of the 21st century lies in predicting the impacts of anthropogenic activities on Earth's carbon cycle. Soil is a significant component of the carbon cycle, because it contains at least two-thirds of the world's terrestrial carbon and more than twice as much carbon as the atmosphere. Although soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks were built over millennial time scales, they are susceptible to a far more rapid release back to the atmosphere due to climatic and land use change. If environmental perturbations negatively impact the processes regulating the storage of SOC, significant amounts of this carbon could be decomposed

240

The lifetime of excess atmospheric carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution human activity has significantly altered biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. The uncertainties of future climate change rests partly on issues of physical-climate system dynamics and their representation in general circulation models. However understanding the carbon cycle is a key to comprehending the changing terrestrial biosphere and to developing a reasonable range of future concentrations of greenhouse gases. The authors look at correction of model uncertainties in the examination of the lifetime of carbon dioxide. The two difficulties analysed are as follows: (1) most model-derived estimates of the relaxation of the concentration of CO2 reveal a function which is not always well approximated by weighted sums of exponentials; (2) the function c(t) is quite sensitive to assumptions about the terrestrial biosphere and the relaxation experiment. 51 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Moore, B. III; Braswell, B.H. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Regulatory Issues Controlling Carbon Capture and Storage B.S. Environmental Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regulatory Issues Controlling Carbon Capture and Storage by Adam Smith B.S. Environmental Science and Astronautics #12;2 Regulatory Issues Controlling Carbon Capture and Storage by Adam Smith Submitted, terrestrial CO2 sequestration, and geologic CO2 capture and storage (CCS) are the major efforts underway

242

Interhemispheric transport of carbon dioxide by ocean circulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... negate the need to invoke a terrestrial sink of this sort. The Atlantic Ocean's conveyor circulation4 is the most likely candidate for interhemispheric CO2 transport because it carries to the ... the upper Atlantic carried less dissolved carbon than this southward-flowing deep

Wallace S. Broecker; Tsung-Hung Peng

1992-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiatives review meeting. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 32 papers were presented at the review meeting in sessions entitled: updates on regional characterization activities; CO{sub 2} sequestration with EOR; CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline formations I and II; and terrestrial carbon sequestration field projects. In addition are five introductory papers. These are all available on the website in slide/overview/viewgraph form.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

Jeffrey Long

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

245

Pan-Arctic landatmospheric fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide in response to climate change over the 21st century  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future changes of pan-Arctic landatmospheric methane (CH[subscript 4]) and carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) depend on how terrestrial ecosystems respond to warming climate. Here, we used a coupled hydrologybiogeochemistry ...

Zhu, Xudong

246

Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance.

Cohen, Warren [USDA Forest Service] [USDA Forest Service

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

247

LOW Mg/Si PLANETARY HOST STARS AND THEIR Mg-DEPLETED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Simulations have shown that a diverse range of extrasolar terrestrial planet bulk compositions are likely to exist based on the observed variations in host star elemental abundances. Based on recent studies, it is expected that a significant proportion of host stars may have Mg/Si ratios below 1. Here we examine this previously neglected group of systems. Planets simulated as forming within these systems are found to be Mg-depleted (compared to Earth), consisting of silicate species such as pyroxene and various feldspars. Planetary carbon abundances also vary in accordance with the host star C/O ratio. The predicted abundances are in keeping with observations of polluted white dwarfs, lending validity to this approach. Further studies are required to determine the full planetary impacts of the bulk compositions predicted here.

Carter-Bond, Jade C.; O'Brien, David P. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Delgado Mena, Elisa; Israelian, Garik; Gonzalez Hernandez, Jonay I. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Santos, Nuno C., E-mail: j.bond@unsw.edu.au [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

What are people doing now to manage CO2? What are people doing now to manage CO2? SECARB's injection operations at the Mississippi test site in Escatawpa, Mississippi SECARB's injection operations at the Mississippi test site in Escatawpa, Mississippi. A combined portfolio of carbon management options is being implemented to reduce current emission levels associated with energy production while enhancing energy security and building the technologies and knowledge base for export to other countries faced with reducing emissions. The U.S. portfolio includes: (1) use fuels with reduced carbon intensity - renewables, nuclear, and natural gas; (2) adopt more efficient technologies on both the energy demand and supply sides; and (3) use carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. CCS is a viable emission management option

249

Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Credits in Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities K. Thomas Klasson and Brian H. Davison Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6226 Presentation First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington, DC "The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." * Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 1 Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities

250

Carbon Storage in Young Growth Coast Redwood Stands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

515 Carbon Storage in Young Growth Coast Redwood Stands Dryw A. Jones1 and Kevin L. O'Hara1 Abstract Carbon sequestration is an emerging forest management objective within California and around the dynamics of carbon sequestration and to accurately measure carbon storage is essential to insure successful

Standiford, Richard B.

251

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SECARB's SECARB's Mississippi SalineTest Site: A Field Project Update Robert C. Trautz (rtrautz@epri.com) Electric Power Research Institute Senior Project Manager DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Annual Review Meeting October 6-8, 2008 Pittsburgh, PA 2 1. Introduction 2. Well Drilling & Completion 3. Reservoir Characterization 4. CO 2 Injection Operations 5. Monitoring and Verification Outline 3 Key Organizations and Acknowledgments SOUTHERN STATES ENERGY BOARD Dr. Gerald (Jerry) R. Hill OTHER FIELD PROJECTS AND SUPPORTING ACTIVITIES * Advanced Resources * Alabama Geological Survey/ SCS * Gulf Coast Carbon Center (TXBEG) * EPRI * Virginia Tech University * Mississippi State University * Others Richard Esposito MISSISSIPPI POWER CO. Rick Berry Richard (Dick) Rhudy Robert (Rob) Trautz

252

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Agricultural Carbon Mitigation in Europe Smith P, Powlson DS, Smith JU, Falloon P, and Coleman K. 2000. Meeting Europe's climate change commitments: Quantitative estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation by agriculture. Global Climate Change 6:525-539. Abstract Under the Kyoto Protocol, the European Union is committed to a reduction in CO2 emissions to 92% of baseline (1990) levels during the first commitment period (2008-2012). The Kyoto Protocol allows carbon emissions to be offset by demonstrable removal of carbon from the atmosphere. Thus, land-use / land-management change and forestry activities that are shown to reduce atmospheric CO2 levels can be included in the Kyoto targets. These activities include afforestation, reforestation and deforestation (article

253

ARM - Field Campaign - Aircraft Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govCampaignsAircraft Carbon govCampaignsAircraft Carbon Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Aircraft Carbon 2006.07.01 - 2008.09.30 Lead Scientist : Margaret Torn For data sets, see below. Description Airborne trace-gas measurements at ARM-SGP provided valuable data for addressing carbon-cycle questions highlighted by the US Climate Change Research Program and the North American Carbon Program. A set of carbon-cycle instruments and sample collection systems were added to an ARM-managed aircraft at ARM-SGP user facility. A separate (in-place) grant covered the cost of developing the instrument systems, analyzing the data, and ingesting all data to the ARM data archives. In the short-term (~1 y) we had two priorities. The first was to acquire

254

Carbon Conference  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Conference ... The Fourth Hienninl Conference on Carbon will be held at the University of Buffalo, June 15 to 19. ... The Pittsburgh Section's coal technology group will meet in the conference room at Mellon Institute, Pittsburgh, June ... ...

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity: Characterization and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity and long-term sustainability of geologic carbon sequestration sites depends upon the ability on geologic carbon sequestration site monitoring. The management framework and costs will be similar

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

256

Management Plan Management Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; and 5) consistency with the Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. In addition, the management plan Plan, Management Plan Page MP­ 1 #12;Management Plan water quality standards, instream flows, privateManagement Plan Management Plan "Management and restoration programs for native salmonids have

257

TERRESTRIAL GAMMA-RAY FLASH PRODUCTION BY LIGHTNING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TERRESTRIAL GAMMA-RAY FLASH PRODUCTION BY LIGHTNING A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are brief flashes of gamma-rays originating in the Earth's atmosphere) that extends from below 25 keV to above 20 MeV. When good lightning data exists, TGFs are closely associated

258

Lunar and terrestrial planet formation in the Grand Tack scenario  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...c for each simulated Solar System in that suite...terrestrial planets in the Solar System. The sub-panels are arranged the same...simulations. The sub-panels are arranged the same...populations for each simulated Solar System. We only have...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal modelEstimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce

Mcdonough, William F.

260

Meeting Report for Symposium on "China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meeting Report for Symposium on "China-US Collaborative Research on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal on Life in Terrestrial Geothermal Springs" was organized collaboratively by the NSF-funded Tengchong PIRE

Ahmad, Sajjad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Characteristics of broadband lightning emissions associated with terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characteristics of broadband lightning emissions associated with terrestrial gamma ray flashes] To characterize lightning processes that produce terrestrial gamma ray flashes (TGFs), we have analyzed broadband (lightning magnetic fields for TGFs detected by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar

Cummer, Steven A.

262

Carbon Isotopes  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Atmospheric Trace Gases » Carbon Isotopes Carbon Isotopes Gateway Pages to Isotopes Data Modern Records of Carbon and Oxygen Isotopes in Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon-13 in Methane 800,000 Deuterium Record and Shorter Records of Various Isotopic Species from Ice Cores Carbon-13 13C in CO Measurements from Niwot Ridge, Colorado and Montana de Oro, California (Tyler) 13C in CO2 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (White and Vaughn) CSIRO GASLAB Flask Network (Allison, Francey, and Krummel) CSIRO in situ measurements at Cape Grim, Tasmania (Francey and Allison) Scripps Institution of Oceanography (Keeling et al.) 13C in CH4 NOAA/CMDL Flask Network (Miller and White) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Quay and Stutsman) Northern & Southern Hemisphere Sites (Stevens)

263

Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. Edmonds, J.J. Dooley, and S.H. Kim Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute THE ROADMAP * Greenhouse gas emissions may not control themselves. * Climate policy may happen.--There are smart and dumb ways to proceed. The smart ways involve getting both the policy and the technology right--the GTSP. * There are no silver bullets--Expanding the set of options to include carbon capture and sequestration can help limit the cost of any ceiling on CO 2 concentrations. * Managing greenhouse emissions means managing carbon. * Carbon can be captured, transported, and sequestered in many ways.

264

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of April 1, 2005-September 30, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. While Phase 2 planning is well under way, the content of this report focuses exclusively on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period. Progress during this period was focused in the three areas: geological carbon storage capacity in New Mexico, terrestrial sequestration capacity for the project area, and the Integrated Assessment Model efforts. The geologic storage capacity of New Mexico was analyzed and Blanco Mesaverde (which extends into Colorado) and Basin Dakota Pools were chosen as top two choices for the further analysis for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the system dynamics model preliminary analysis. Terrestrial sequestration capacity analysis showed that the four states analyzed thus far (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah) have relatively limited potential to sequester carbon in terrestrial systems, mainly due to the aridity of these areas, but the large land area offered could make up for the limited capacity per hectare. Best opportunities were thought to be in eastern Colorado/New Mexico. The Integrated Assessment team expanded the initial test case model to include all New Mexico sinks and sources in a new, revised prototype model in 2005. The allocation mechanism, or ''String of Pearls'' concept, utilizes potential pipeline routes as the links between all combinations of the source to various sinks. This technique lays the groundwork for future, additional ''String of Pearls'' analyses throughout the SW Partnership and other regions as well.

Brian McPherson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Burial of terrestrial organic matter in marine sediments: A re-assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Burial of terrestrial organic matter in marine sediments: A re-assessment David J. Burdige being buried in marine sediments may be of terrestrial origin, with the majority of this terrestrial organic matter (TOM) burial occurring in muddy, deltaic sediments. These calculations further suggest

Burdige, David

266

Impact of satellite based PAR on estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the satellite- based estimates of PAR for modelling terrestrial primary productivity. 1. Introduction The global energy is referred to as net primary production (NPP). For terrestrial ecosystems GPP and NPP are givenImpact of satellite based PAR on estimates of terrestrial net primary productivity RACHEL T. PINKER

Montana, University of

267

Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Insignificant solar-terrestrial triggering of earthquakes Jeffrey J. Love1 and Jeremy N. Thomas2 that solar-terrestrial interaction, as measured by sunspots, solar wind velocity, and geomagnetic activity by the corresponding rank of annual, monthly, and daily averages of the solar-terrestrial variables. We measure

Thomas, Jeremy N.

268

Carbon impact of proposed hydroelectric dams in Chilean Patagonia .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The concern for and awareness of climate change is growing, and the world needs to react quickly and efficiently to manage the carbon intensity of (more)

Mar, Laura E. (Laura Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Understanding carbon sequestration in north central Montana dryland wheat systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Agricultural management practices that reduce tillage and/or increase crop intensity have been shown to promote soil carbon sequestration in many regions of the Great Plains. (more)

Feddema, Ryan Patrick.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board, represents a 13-state region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, eastern Texas, and Virginia and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB comprises more than 100 participants representing Federal and state governments, industry, academia, and nonprofit organizations. The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and infrastructure to conduct field tests of carbon storage technologies and to

271

Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Carbon nanotubes have extraordinary mechanical, electrical, thermal andoptical properties. They are harder than diamond yet exible, have betterelectrical conductor than copper, but can also (more)

Fredriksson, Tore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Low Carbon World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon World Low Carbon World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: LowCarbonWorld Agency/Company /Organization: LowCarbonEconomy Partner: United Nations Environment Programme Sector: Energy, Land Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: www.lowcarboneconomy.com/Low_Carbon_World/Data/Home LowCarbonWorld Screenshot References: LowCarbonWorld[1] Background The idea behind this project was conceived at the 2008 United Nations Conference of Parties (COP14) event in Poznan (Poland). By listening to many speeches by energy ministers from numerous countries in the high level segment of the event, Toddington Harper Managing Director of The Low Carbon Economy Ltd (TLCE) became aware of the depth of valuable information being

273

Capturing carbon | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capturing carbon Capturing carbon New technology enables molecular-level insight into carbon sequestration Carbon sequestration is a potential solution for reducing greenhouse...

274

NREL: Awards and Honors - Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Triple-Junction Terrestrial Concentrator Solar Cell Developers: Dr. Jerry Olson, Dr. Sarah Kurtz, Dr. Daniel Friedman, Alan Kibbler, and Charlene Karmer, National Renewable Energy Laboratory; Dr. Richard King, Jim Ermer, Dmitri D. Krut, Hector Cotal, Peter Colter, Hojun Yoon, Nassar Karam, and Gregory S. Glenn, Spectrolab, Inc. The triple-junction solar cell - or TJ solar cell - generates a lot of energy from just a very little amount of material. How much energy? A 1-cm2 cell can generate as much as 35 W of power and produce as much as 86.3 kWh of electricity during a typical year under a Phoenix, AZ sun. This means that 100 to 150 of these cells could produce enough electricity to power the typical American household. This cell can do this, first, because it

275

Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

26507 304-285-4133 dawn.deel@netl.doe.gov Darrell Paul Project Manager Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Project Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 614-424-5890...

276

NETL: News Release - Terrestial Carbon Sequestration Test Underway at  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestial Carbon Sequestration Test Underway at Reclaimed Mine Site Terrestial Carbon Sequestration Test Underway at Reclaimed Mine Site DOE, TVA, EPRI Team to Use Coal Products to Enhance Nature's "Biological CO2 Scrubber" at Test Site in Kentucky DRAKESBORO, KY - The U.S. Department of Energy has joined forces with the Tennessee Valley Authority and the Electric Power Research Institute to demonstrate what might be termed a "grassroots" approach to sequestering carbon dioxide. The new project will use coal combustion byproducts to enhance the storage of carbon in vegetation and soils. - Photo - TVA's Paradise Power Plant - The new terrestrial carbon sequestration project will be sited on reclaimed mine land next to the Paradise Fossil Plant, TVA's second largest power plant. A surface mine reclamation project at the 2,558-megawatt TVA-owned Paradise

277

Hospitality Management Hospitality Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the global hospitality industry. Academic Offerings HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR HOSPITALITY AND FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT MINOR Students pursuing programs in other areas of study may choose a minor Lodging Management 3 HPM 309 Sports Arena Management 3 HPM 312* Cost Control in Food Services (Prereq

McConnell, Terry

278

EIA - AEO2010 - Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention [76], carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time [77]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

279

NETL: Carbon Storage - Regional Partnership Validation Phase (Phase II)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects Validation Phase (Phase II) Projects The Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSP) Validation Phase focuses on validating the most promising regional opportunities to deploy CCS technologies by building upon the accomplishments of the Characterization Phase. Two different CO2 storage approaches are being pursued in this phase: geologic and terrestrial carbon storage. The Validation Phase includes 20 geologic and 11 terrestrial CO2 storage projects. Efforts are being conducted to: Validate and refine current reservoir simulations for CO2 storage projects. Collect physical data to confirm CO2 storage potential and injectivity estimates. Demonstrate the effectiveness of monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA) technologies. Develop guidelines for well completion, operations, and abandonment.

280

Satellite-Based Modeling of the Carbon Fluxes in Mature Black Spruce Forests in Alaska: A Synthesis of the Eddy Covariance Data and Satellite Remote Sensing Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Scaling up of observed point data to estimate regional carbon fluxes is an important issue in the context of the global terrestrial carbon cycle. In this study, the authors proposed a new model to scale up the eddy covariance data to estimate ...

Masahito Ueyama; Yoshinobu Harazono; Kazuhito Ichii

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Model-data Fusion Approaches for Retrospective and Predictive Assessment of the Pan-Arctic Scale Permafrost Carbon Feedback to Global Climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

representation of the Arctic system carbon cycle in Earth System Modeling frameworks. This proposed study of permafrost carbon processes in terrestrial biogeochemistry models, to operate within coupled Earth system modeling frameworks. PROJECT SIGNIFICANCE This work will provide a critical bridge between the abundant

282

Radiological bioconcentration factors for aquatic, terrestrial, and wetland ecosystems at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a result of operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS), over 50 radionuclides have been released to the atmosphere and to onsite streams and seepage basins. Now, many of these radionuclides are available to aquatic and/or terrestrial organisms for uptake and cycling through the food chain. Knowledge about the uptake and cycling of these radionuclides is now crucial in evaluating waste management and clean-up alternatives for the site. Numerous studies have been conducted at the SRS over the past forty years to study the uptake and distribution of radionuclides in the Savannah River Site environment. In many instances, bioconcentration factors have been calculated to quantify the uptake of a radionuclide by an organism from the surrounding medium (i.e., soil or water). In the past, it has been common practice to use bioconcentration factors from the literature because site-specific data were not readily available. However, because of the variability of bioconcentration factors due to experimental or environmental conditions, site-specific data should be used when available. This report compiles and summarizes site-specific bioconcentration factors for selected radionuclides released at the Savannah River Site (SRS). An extensive literature search yielded site-specific bioconcentration factors for cesium, strontium, cobalt, plutonium, americium, curium, and tritium. These eight radionuclides have been the primary radionuclides studied at SRS because of their long half lives or because they are major contributors to radiological dose from exposure. For most radionuclides, it was determined that the site-specific bioconcentration factors were higher than those reported in literature. This report also summarizes some conditions that affect radionuclide bioavailability to and bioconcentration by aquatic and terrestrial organisms.

Cummins, C.L.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Protecting terrestrial ecosystems and the climate through a global carbon market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Parties meet periodically to establish a Convention work plan and to review wetland conservation efforts. Most importantly...geographic region. While a traditional command and control regulatory approach mandates particular emission reductions by...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Evaluation of Continental and Site Terrestrial Carbon Cycle Simulations with North American Flux Tower Observations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

extracts of photosynthesis (GPP), total respiration (Re) and NEE (net ecosystem exchange) at annual. The models range from -50% to +50% of the observations, and are centered near a bias of zero. The Can. 1st order, w/N 1st order 1st order, w/N zero order 1st order, w/N 1st order, w/N zero order VEGAS2

285

Carbon in the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere in the 21st century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rather than brake global warming. Keywords: climate change...and is a fingerprint of global human activity, a consequence of the combustion of coal, oil and gas that drives...dioxide increase is driving global warming, but there are other...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Early Public Impressions of Terrestrial Carbon Capture and Storage in a Coal-Intensive State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Multivariate analyses indicate that support for CCS is predicted by a belief that humankind contributes to climate change, a preference for increased use of renewable energy, and egalitarian and individualistic worldviews, while opposition to CCS is predicted by self-identified political conservatism and by selective attitudes regarding energy and climate change. ... (14, 15) Thus, knowledge of early impressions of CCS can help inform technology decisions by state regulatory bodies, community leaders, utilities, pipeline companies, investors in energy projects, and environmental organizations. ... On the other hand, trust in environmental groups leads to an ambiguous prediction since the major groups are split on CCS. ...

Sanya R. Carley; Rachel M. Krause; David C. Warren; John A. Rupp; John D. Graham

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

287

Carbon in the atmosphere and terrestrial biosphere in the 21st century  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...CO2 and forest biomass, coupled with...from fossil-fuel combustion and land-use...consequence of the combustion of coal, oil and...and build their biomass, and ultimately...fossil-fuel or biomass combustion (nitrogen oxides...

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Carbon dioxide emissions and net primary production of Russian terrestrial ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Determination of the C balance is of considerable importance when forecasting climate and environmental changes. Soil respiration and biological productivity of ecosystems (net primary production; NPP) are th...

V. N. Kudeyarov; I. N. Kurganova

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Enhanced transfer of terrestrially derived carbon to the atmosphere in a flooding event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

November 2012; revised 14 October 2012; accepted 21 November 2012. [1] Rising CO2 concentration the adjacent shelf contributed to northern Gulf shelf waters changing from a net sink to a net source of CO2 in the water can be exchanged with the atmosphere with approximately ~100 Tg of CO2 degassed from U.S. streams

Grossman, Ethan L.

290

Carbon sequestration research and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

A 3,800-million-year isotopic record of life from carbon in sedimentary rocks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... acid. Equilibrium fractionations that also discriminate in favour of a specific isotope are important in alternative pathways that use bicarbonate and are supposedly essential in inter- and intramolecular isotope exchange ... Once photoautotrophic organisms had learned to operate the CO2-fixing machine by means of light energy, we can assume that life processes attained partial control of the terrestrial carbon cycle. ...

Manfred Schidlowski

1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

NETL: Carbon Storage - West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WESTCARB WESTCARB Carbon Storage West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing WESTCARB efforts can be found on their website. The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is led by the California Energy Commission and represents a coalition of more than 90 organizations from state and provincial resource management and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and research institutions; colleges and universities; conservation non-profits; oil and gas companies; power companies; pipeline companies; trade associations; vendors and service firms; and consultants. The partners are engaged in several aspects of WESTCARB projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects on the west coast of North America. WESTCARB

293

Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Capturing Carbon Will it work to cool the world? Speakers: Dr. Malcolm Wilson Chief Executive in Exploration Geophysics Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary Theme Leader for Secure Carbon Storage, Carbon Management Canada Don Wharton Vice-President, Sustainable Development TransAlta Corporation

Calgary, University of

294

DEVELOPING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE Howard J Herzog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPING CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE 1 Howard J Herzog MIT Energy Initiative Massachusetts, it is unreasonable to expect carbon capture and storage (CCS) to be deployed on a large-scale without strong climate://www.management-thinking.org/content/developing-carbon-capture-and-storage #12;

295

Carbon Nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A broad review of the structure and properties of carbon nanotubes is presented. Particular emphasis is given to ... dimensional density of states predicted for single-wall nanotubes of small diameter. The eviden...

M. S. Dresselhaus; G. Dresselhaus

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Carbon Fiber  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

297

Carbon Fiber  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

McGetrick, Lee

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

298

Supporting Information Systematic assessment of terrestrial biogeochemistry in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass Inventories Fluxnet Figure S1. Conceptual diagram of observations available for testing carbon and land carbon fluxes when this information is combined with fossil fuel inventory time series. Isotope and continental-scale fluxes on timescales of years to decades. Biomass inventories are sparse but crucial

Hoffman, Forrest M.

299

Carbon Isotopic Studies of Assimilated and Ecosystem Respired CO2 in a Southeastern Pine Forest  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide is the major greenhouse gas responsible for global warming. Southeastern pine forests appear to be among the largest terrestrial sinks of carbon dioxide in the US. This collaborative study specifically addressed the isotopic signatures of the large fluxes of carbon taken up by photosynthesis and given off by respiration in this ecosystem. By measuring these isotopic signatures at the ecosystem level, we have provided data that will help to more accurately quantify the magnitude of carbon fluxes on the regional scale and how these fluxes vary in response to climatic parameters such as rainfall and air temperature. The focus of the MBL subcontract was to evaluate how processes operating at the physiological and ecosystem scales affects the resultant isotopic signature of plant waxes that are emitted as aerosols into the convective boundary layer. These wax aerosols provide a large-spatial scale integrative signal of isotopic discrimination of atmospheric carbon dioxide by terrestrial photosynthesis (Conte and Weber 2002). The ecosystem studies have greatly expanded of knowledge of wax biosynthetic controls on their isootpic signature The wax aerosol data products produced under this grant are directly applicable as input for global carbon modeling studies that use variations in the concentration and carbon isotopic composition of atmospheric carbon dioxide to quantify the magnitude and spatial and temporal patterns of carbon uptake on the global scale.

Maureen H. Conte

2008-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

300

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated robotic terrestrial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ornithopter Summary: are often unable to navigate, giving an advantage to a terrestrial robot. Flying also requires a large... amount of energy, and no robot can stay aloft...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Coupling Terrestrial and Atmospheric Water Dynamics to Improve Prediction in a Changing Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fluxes across the land surface directly influence predictions of ecological processes, atmospheric dynamics, and terrestrial hydrology. However, many simplifications are made in numerical models when considering ...

Lyon, Steve W.; Dominguez, Francina; Gochis, David J.; Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Castro, Christopher; Chow, Fotini K.; Fan, Ying; Fuka, Daniel; Hong, Yang; Kucera, Paul A.; Nesbitt, Stephen W.; Salzmann, Nadine; Schmidli, Juerg; Snyder, Peter K.; Teuling, Adriaam J.; Twine, Tracy E.; Levis, Samuel; Lundquist, Jessica D.; Salvucci, Guido D.; Sealy, Andrea M.; Walter, M. Todd

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets formerly New Energy Finance  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formerly New Energy Finance formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets (formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group) Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC2A 1PQ Sector Carbon, Services Product London-based carbon markets division of New Energy Finance which provides analysis, price forecasting, consultancy and risk management services relating to carbon. References Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets (formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Bloomberg New Energy Finance Carbon Markets (formerly New Energy Finance Carbon Markets Group) is a company located in London, United Kingdom .

303

NETL: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Plenary Session Industry Focus Panel Discussion Session 1A. Geologic Sequestration I - Overview Session 1B. Capture & Separation I - Industrial Efforts Session 1C. Modeling I - Case Studies & Deployment Session 2A. Geologic Sequestration II - EOR/EGR Session 2B. Capture & Separation II - Improved Processes Session 2C. Modeling II - Economics Poster Presentations International Panel Discussion Session 3A. Geologic Sequestration III - Enhanced Coalbed Methane Session 3B. Capture & Separation III - Adsorption Studies Session 3C. Terrestrial Sequestration I - Ecosystem Behavior Session 4A. Geologic Sequestration IV - Saline Aquifers Session 4B. Capture & Separation IV - Power Systems Concepts

304

Imaging the Earth's Interior: the Angular Distribution of Terrestrial Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decays of radionuclides throughout the Earth's interior produce geothermal heat, but also are a source of antineutrinos. The (angle-integrated) geoneutrino flux places an integral constraint on the terrestrial radionuclide distribution. In this paper, we calculate the angular distribution of geoneutrinos, which opens a window on the differential radionuclide distribution. We develop the general formalism for the neutrino angular distribution, and we present the inverse transformation which recovers the terrestrial radioisotope distribution given a measurement of the neutrino angular distribution. Thus, geoneutrinos not only allow a means to image the Earth's interior, but offering a direct measure of the radioactive Earth, both (1) revealing the Earth's inner structure as probed by radionuclides, and (2) allowing for a complete determination of the radioactive heat generation as a function of radius. We present the geoneutrino angular distribution for the favored Earth model which has been used to calculate geoneutrino flux. In this model the neutrino generation is dominated by decays in the Earth's mantle and crust; this leads to a very ``peripheral'' angular distribution, in which 2/3 of the neutrinos come from angles > 60 degrees away from the downward vertical. We note the possibility of that the Earth's core contains potassium; different geophysical predictions lead to strongly varying, and hence distinguishable, central intensities (< 30 degrees from the downward vertical). Other uncertainties in the models, and prospects for observation of the geoneutrino angular distribution, are briefly discussed. We conclude by urging the development and construction of antineutrino experiments with angular sensitivity. (Abstract abridged.)

Brian D. Fields; Kathrin A. Hochmuth

2004-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

305

WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct.1. Contracts were then put into place with twelve organizations which will carry out the technical work required to meet Partnership objectives.

Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Radiation and Chemical Risk Management | Argonne National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contaminated soil, military munitions disposal areas, and groundwater contaminated with carbon tetrachloride. Argonne's work in radiation and chemical risk management includes...

308

Delayed carbon sequestration and rising carbon prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We set out a dynamic model to investigate optimal time paths of emissions, carbon stocks and carbon sequestration by land conversion, allowing for non-instantaneous carbon sequestration. Previous research in a dy...

Alejandro Caparrs

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Compton scattering effects on the duration of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

; published 18 January 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are gamma-ray bursts detected from space) recently discovered by the gamma-ray burst monitor (GBM) aboard the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Introduction [2] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are bursts of high-energy photons originating from

Pasko, Victor

310

Data Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman Filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Southern Great Plains region of the United States, using the terrestrial water balance as the constraintData Assimilation for Estimating the Terrestrial Water Budget Using a Constrained Ensemble Kalman. The water balance was applied at the domain scale, and estimates of the water balance components

Pan, Ming

311

Alien Terrestrial Invertebrates of Europe Alain Roques, Wolfgang Rabitsch, Jean-Yves Rasplus,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 5 Alien Terrestrial Invertebrates of Europe Alain Roques, Wolfgang Rabitsch, Jean of animals and plants, no checklist of alien terrestrial inverte- brates was available in any of the European the existing lists were inherently difficult because they used different definitions of alien. Thus, estimat

Richner, Heinz

312

Lightning mapping observation of a terrestrial gammaray flash Gaopeng Lu,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Click Here for Full Article Lightning mapping observation of a terrestrial gammaray flash Gaopeng Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) related to a terrestrial gammaray flash (TGF) detected by RHESSI of a compact intracloud (IC) lightning flash between a negative charge region centered at about 8.5 km above

Cummer, Steven A.

313

Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Source altitudes of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders Wei Xu,1 Sebastien. Pasko (2012), Source altitudes of terres- trial gamma-ray flashes produced by lightning leaders, Geophys; published 18 April 2012. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are energetic photon bursts observed from

Pasko, Victor

314

Geolocation of terrestrial gamma-ray flash source lightning M. B. Cohen,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geolocation of terrestrial gamma-ray flash source lightning M. B. Cohen,1 U. S. Inan,1,2 R. K. Said-ray flash source lightning, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L02801, doi:10.1029/ 2009GL041753. 1. Introduction [2; published 22 January 2010. [1] Terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) are impulsive ($1 ms) but intense

Bergen, Universitetet i

315

Simultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Simultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from space N detection from space of a terrestrial3 gamma-ray flash (TGF) and the optical signal from lightning, TGF and optical emissions in an IC lightning flash has been identified.11 #12;3 1. Introduction12

?stgaard, Nikolai

316

Initial breakdown pulses in intracloud lightning flashes and their relation to terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initial breakdown pulses in intracloud lightning flashes and their relation to terrestrial gamma breakdown stage of 10 intracloud lightning flashes that may have produced terrestrial gamma ray flashes, and S. Xiong (2013), Initial breakdown pulses in intracloud lightning flashes and their relation

Cummer, Steven A.

317

A COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS: INTERPLANETARY ASPECTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A COMPARISON BETWEEN APRIL 1999 AND FEBRUARY 2000 SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL CONNECTION EVENTS, with peak value of -16 nT. In this paper the interplanetary aspects of these two solar-terrestrial connection events are analyzed and compared. Plasma and magnetic field data obtained from sensors on board

318

An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark Williamson Working Paper 83 #12;An efficient numerical terrestrial scheme (ENTS) for fast earth system modelling Mark for long time period simulations and large ensemble studies in Earth system models of intermediate

Williamson, Mark

319

SECTION 48 Table of Contents 48 Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Assessment Terrestrial ............................2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48-1 SECTION 48 ­ Table of Contents 48 Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Assessment ­ Terrestrial 48.2 Wildlife of the Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin.......................................................................................17 #12;48-2 48 Lake Rufus Woods Subbasin Assessment ­ Terrestrial 48.1 Focal Habitats: Current

320

Identifying biological monitoring tools to evaluate the chronic effects of chemical exposures in terrestrial plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When contamination of any habitat, such as a wetland impacted by heavy metals or a high desert disposal area impacted by chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides, is considered within an ecological risk assessment context, long-term land use goals should be included as part of the decision-making process, especially when remediation options are being considered for the site. If imminent threats to human health and the environment are highly unlikely, and environmental management and projected land use allow, remediation options and monitoring programs for a site should be developed that assure long-term habitat use, while continuing surveillance for evaluating potential chronic ecological effects. For example, at Milltown Reservoir wetlands on the Clark Fork River in western Montana the baseline ecological risk assessment suggested that no current adverse biological or ecological effects warranted extensive remediation at the site. But, given the land use goals currently anticipated for the wetland habitat and the hydroelectric facility located on the Clark Fork River, a program,should be developed that, in part, continues assessing plant communities and sublethal biological effects as cost-effective monitoring tools for evaluating long-term effects associated with metal-contaminated soils. Similarly, high desert sites that have been impacted by past disposal activities like that at Alkali Lake, Oregon, should be monitored using cost-effective methods that continue to monitor terrestrial plants as a field screening tool for evaluating soil and groundwater contaminated with chlorophenols and chlorophenoxy herbicides.

Linder, G. [ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Net carbon uptake has increased through warming-induced changes in temperate forest phenology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The timing of phenological events exerts a strong control over ecosystem function and leads to multiple feedbacks to the climate system1. Phenology is inherently sensitive to temperature (though the exact sensitivity is disputed2) and recent warming is reported to have led to earlier spring, later autumn3,4 and increased vegetation activity5,6. Such greening could be expected to enhance ecosystem carbon uptake7,8, though reports also suggest decreased uptake for boreal forests4,9. Here we assess changes in phenology of temperate forests over the eastern US during the past two decades, and quantify the resulting changes in forest carbon storage. We combine long-term ground observations of phenology, satellite indices, and ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide flux measurements, along with 18 terrestrial biosphere models. We observe a strong trend of earlier spring and later autumn. In contrast to previous suggestions4,9 we show that carbon uptake through photosynthesis increased considerably more than carbon release through respiration for both an earlier spring and later autumn. The terrestrial biosphere models tested misrepresent the temperature sensitivity of phenology, and thus the effect on carbon uptake. Our analysis of the temperature-phenology-carbon coupling suggests a current and possible future enhancement of forest carbon uptake due to changes in phenology. This constitutes a negative feedback to climate change, and is serving to slow the rate of warming.

Keenan, Trevor [Harvard University] [Harvard University; Gray, Josh [Boston University] [Boston University; Friedl, Mark [Boston University] [Boston University; Toomey, Michael [Harvard University] [Harvard University; Bohrer, Gil [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University; Hollinger, David [USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station] [USDA Forest Service, Northern Research Station; Munger, J. William [Harvard University] [Harvard University; OKeefe, John [Harvard Forest (Harvard University), Massachusetts] [Harvard Forest (Harvard University), Massachusetts; Hans, Schmid [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany] [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe, Germany; Wing, Ian [Boston University] [Boston University; Yang, Bai [ORNL] [ORNL; Richardson, Andrew D. [Harvard University] [Harvard University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Influence of embedded-carbon nanotubes on the thermal properties of copper matrix nanocomposites processed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-level mix- ing, exhibits CNTs homogeneously dispersed in the Cu matrix. Measured thermal conductivity: Metal matrix composites; Nanocomposite; Carbon and graphite; Thermal conductivity Carbon nanotubes (CNTs management applications, due to their extraordinarily low coefficient of thermal expan- sion (CTE) [1

Hong, Soon Hyung

323

Assessing the influence of the solar orbit on terrestrial biodiversity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The terrestrial fossil record shows a significant variation in the extinction and origination rates of species during the past half billion years. Numerous studies have claimed an association between this variation and the motion of the Sun around the Galaxy, invoking the modulation of cosmic rays, gamma rays and comet impact frequency as a cause of this biodiversity variation. However, some of these studies exhibit methodological problems, or were based on coarse assumptions (such as a strict periodicity of the solar orbit). Here we investigate this link in more detail, using a model of the Galaxy to reconstruct the solar orbit and thus a predictive model of the temporal variation of the extinction rate due to astronomical mechanisms. We compare these predictions as well as those of various reference models with paleontological data. Our approach involves Bayesian model comparison, which takes into account the uncertainties in the paleontological data as well as the distribution of solar orbits consistent wi...

Feng, F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes are short pulses of energetic radiation associated with thunderstorms and lightning. While the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on Fermi was designed to observe gamma-ray bursts, its large BGO detectors are excellent for observing TGFs. Using GBM, TGF pulses are seen to either be symmetrical or have faster rise time than fall times. Some TGFs are resolved into double, partially overlapping pulses. Using ground-based radio observations of lightning from the World Wide Lightning Location Network (WWLLN), TGFs and their associated lightning are found to be simultaneous to {approx_equal}40 {mu} s. The lightning locations are typically within 300 km of the sub-spacecraft point.

Briggs, Michael S. [CSPAR, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States)

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

325

System, method, and apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system, method, and/or apparatus for remote measurement of terrestrial biomass contained in vegetative elements, such as large tree boles or trunks present in an area of interest, are provided. The method includes providing an airborne VHF radar system in combination with a LiDAR system, overflying the area of interest while directing energy toward the area of interest, using the VHF radar system to collect backscatter data from the trees as a function of incidence angle and frequency, and determining a magnitude of the biomass from the backscatter data and data from the laser radar system for each radar resolution cell. A biomass map is generated showing the magnitude of the biomass of the vegetative elements as a function of location on the map by using each resolution cell as a unique location thereon. In certain preferred embodiments, a single frequency is used with a linear array antenna.

Johnson, Patrick W (Jefferson, MD)

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

326

The terrestrial ecosystem program for the Yucca Mountain Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has implemented a program to monitor and mitigate impacts associated with site Characterization Activities at Yucca Mountain on the environment. This program has a sound experimental and statistical base. Monitoring data has been collected for parts of the program since 1989. There have been numerous changes in the Terrestrial Ecosystems Program since 1989 that reflect changes in the design and locations of Site Characterization Activities. There have also been changes made in the mitigation techniques implemented to protect important environmental resources based on results from the research efforts at Yucca Mountain. These changes have strengthened DOE efforts to ensure protection of the environmental during Site Characterization. DOE,has developed and implemented an integrated environmental program that protects the biotic environment and will restore environmental quality at Yucca Mountain.

Ostler, W.K.; O`Farrell, T.P.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Comparative Analysis of Acidobacterial Genomic Fragments from Terrestrial and Aquatic Metagenomic Libraries, with Emphasis on Acidobacteria Subdivision 6  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Terrestrial and Aquatic Metagenomic Libraries...drivers of key ecosystem processes in terrestrial...5o45E), where an ecosystem restoration experiment was...Biodiversity and Ecosystem Development (6...recovered from aquatic environments...

Anna M. Kielak; Johannes A. van Veen; George A. Kowalchuk

2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

328

Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ahead, and identifying the carbon pools and other green house gas emissions sources and savings coveredCarbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 Carbon

329

Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater Regulation on Land --PlantsPlants WWipip= W= Wrr + W+ Waa --WWtt --WWss  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance in Terrestrial Plants Water Regulation on LandWater waters internal water WWrr =Roots=Roots WWaa = Air= Air WWtt = Transpiration= Transpiration WWss = Secretions= Secretions Water Regulation on Land - Plants Water Balance in Terrestrial PlantsWater Balance

Cochran-Stafira, D. Liane

330

Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Biomass Energy Combustion (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions from the combustion of biomass to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in Annual Energy Outlook 2010. According to current international convention, carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Management effects on labile organic carbon pools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is well documented that increases in soil organic matter (SOM) improve soil physical properties and increase the overall fertility and sustainability of the soil. Research in SOM storage has recently amplified following the proposal...

Kolodziej, Scott Michael

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

332

Carbon Management Technologies for Sustainable Coal Utilization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Design, Integration & Design, Integration & Optimization Geo Richards, Focus Area Leader, Energy System Dynamics Office of Research & Development ‹#› The role of design and simulation on products 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Legacy engine Engine 1 Engine 2 Engine 3 - plan Number of rig tests NOx emission (% of new standard) ~ 100,000 CPU Days Relative Computational Time 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 % development cost % influence on final cost Data for new aircraft engine development. Percentage of total development cost and percentage influence on the final cost. Cost breakdown in four main development categories: design, materials, labor, and burden (overhead). Four engine development programs, showing the number of rig tests needed for development, the NOx emission of the final engine, and a

333

Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Kevin o'Brien Principal Investigator SRI International Materials Research Laboratory 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, AK 94025 650-859-3528 kevin.obrien@sri.com Fabrication and Scale-Up oF polybenzimidazole - baSed membrane SyStem For pre - combUStion captUre oF carbon dioxide Background In order to effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a gasification plant, there must be an economically viable method for removing the CO 2 from other gases. While CO 2 separation technologies currently exist, their effectiveness is limited. Amine-based separation technologies work only at low temperatures, while pressure-swing absorption and cryogenic distillation consume significantly

334

Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

335

Implementing Ad Hoc to Terrestrial Network Gateways Jonathan McGee, Manish Karir, and John S. Baras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementing Ad Hoc to Terrestrial Network Gateways Jonathan McGee, Manish Karir, and John S. Baras we describe our experience of implementing a gateway between ad hoc and terrestrial routing protocols terrestrial network interface and MAODV on a wireless ad hoc network interface.Although we focus primarily

Baras, John S.

336

Global Emissions of Terpenoid VOCs from Terrestrial Vegetation in the Last Millennium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8 GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends of global isoprene emissions to be mostly affected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signicant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 15 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% 19 20 less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar We investigated the millennial variability of global BVOC emissions by using two independent numerical models: The Model of Emissions of Gases and Aerosols from Nature (MEGAN), for isoprene, monoterpene and sesquiterpene and Lund-Potsdam-Jena General Ecosystem Simulator (LPJ8GUESS), for isoprene and monoterpenes. We found the millennial trends ofglobal isoprene emissions to be mostly a*ected by land cover and atmospheric carbon dioxide changes, whereas monoterpene and sesquiterpene emission were dominated by temperature change. Isoprene emissions declined substantially in regions with large and rapid land cover change. In addition, isoprene emission sensitivity to drought proved to have signifcant short term global effects. By the end of the past millennium MEGAN isoprene emissions were 634 TgC yr-1 (13% and 19% less than during during 1750-1850 and 1000- 1200, respectively) and LPJ-GUESS emissions were 323 TgC yr-1 (15% and 16 17 20% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Monoterpene emissions were 89 TgC yr-1 (10% and 6% higher than during 1750-1850 and 18 1000-1200, respectively) in MEGAN, and 24 TgC yr-1 (2% higher and 5% less than during 1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively) in LPJ-GUESS. MEGAN sesquiterpene emissions were 36 TgC yr-1 (10% and 4% higher than during1750-1850 and 1000-1200, respectively). Although both models capture similar emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.emission trends, the magnitude of the emissions are different. This highlights the importance of building better constraints on VOC emissions from terrestrial vegetation.

Acosta Navarro, J. C.; Smolander, S.; Struthers, H.; Zorita, E.; Ekman, A. M.; Kaplan, J. O.; Guenther, Alex B.; Arneth, A.; Riipinen, I.

2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

337

Assessment Of Carbon Leakage In Multiple Carbon-Sink Projects: ACase Study In Jambi Province, Indonesia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rehabilitation of degraded forest land throughimplementation of carbon sink projects can increase terrestrial carbonstock. However, carbon emissions outside the project boundary, which iscommonly referred to as leakage, may reduce or negate the sequestrationbenefits. This study assessed leakage from carbon sink projects thatcould potentially be implemented in the study area comprised of elevensub-districts in the Batanghari District, Jambi Province, Sumatra,Indonesia. The study estimates the probability of a given land use/coverbeing converted into other uses/cover, by applying a logit model. Thepredictor variables were: proximity to the center of the land use area,distance to transportation channel (road or river), area of agriculturalland, unemployment (number of job seekers), job opportunities, populationdensity and income. Leakage was estimated by analyzing with and withoutcarbon sink projects scenarios. Most of the predictors were estimated asbeing significant in their contribution to land use cover change. Theresults of the analysis show that leakage in the study area can be largeenough to more than offset the project's carbon sequestration benefitsduring the period 2002-2012. However, leakage results are very sensitiveto changes of carbon density of the land uses in the study area. Byreducing C-density of lowland and hill forest by about 10 percent for thebaseline scenario, the leakage becomes positive. Further data collectionand refinement is therefore required. Nevertheless, this study hasdemonstrated that regional analysis is a useful approach to assessleakage.

Boer, Rizaldi; Wasrin, Upik R.; Hendri, Perdinan; Dasanto,Bambang D.; Makundi, Willy; Hero, Julius; Ridwan, M.; Masripatin, Nur

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

Weiblen, George D

339

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Neil Sampson; Miguel Calmon

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st , 2005 and June 30th, 2005. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Zoe Kant; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Gilberto Tiepolo; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Miguel Calmon

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Sandra Brown; Patrick Gonzalez; Brent Sohngen; Neil Sampson; Mark Anderson; Miguel Calmon; Sean Grimland; Ellen Hawes; Zoe Kant; Dan Morse; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Arlene Olivero; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Jon Winsten; Chris Zganjar

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between January 1st and March 31st 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Differential utilization of allochthonous and autochthonous carbon by aquatic insects of two shrub-steppe desert spring-streams: A stable carbon isotope analysis and critique of the method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to assess whether the carbon supporting stream food webs comes principally from terrestrial sources or is produced within the stream. Lacking data to resolve the allochthonous/autochthonous issue with any finality, stream ecologists have alternately postulated that stream carbon was principally autochthonous or principally allochthonous. Others argued that autochthonous and allochthonous carbon resources cannot be separated and that the allochthonous/autochthonous dependence issue is unresolvable. Many investigators have seized upon stable carbon isotopes technology as the tool to resolve the controversy. Unfortunately most investigators have conceded that the results are rarely quantitative and that the qualitative relationships are ambiguous. This study points out the fallacies of trying to conjure single isotopic values for either allochthonous or autochthonous carbon. It suggests that stable carbon isotope technology is not reliable in establishing specific consumer/food source relations and that it is not suitable for assessing allochthonous/autochthonous carbon dependence in freshwater streams.

Mize, A.L. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

Brian McPherson

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Low Cost Carbon Fiber.pub  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Production Carbon Fiber Manufacturing Cost Modeling Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies Research Brief Background The automotive industry has long been identified by carbon fiber manufacturers as a market with substantial growth potential. When manufactured with carbon fiber as opposed to traditional materials such as steel, automotive parts are able to achieve requisite levels of strength and stiffness with significantly less overall vehicle weight. These potential large reductions in vehicle weight, in turn, afford the

346

Carbon Disclosure Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Disclosure Project Disclosure Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Disclosure Project Place London, United Kingdom Zip EC1R 0NE Product A secretariat for 143 institutional investors with USD 20 trn under management, it aims to encourage the development of a common emissions measurement methodology and to facilitate its integration into general investment analysis. References Carbon Disclosure Project[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Carbon Disclosure Project is a company located in London, United Kingdom . References ↑ "Carbon Disclosure Project" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Carbon_Disclosure_Project&oldid=343232

347

Appendix 57 Predicted Distributions of Terrestrial Vertebrates Species  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to proceed without interference or are mimicked through management. Examples include: Wilderness Areas Environmental Concern (ACECs), some National Wildlife Refuges, The Nature Conservancy preserves. 2 An area that degrade the quality of existing natural communities, including suppression of natural disturbances

348

Carbon Fiber Consortium | Partnerships | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Fiber Consortium SHARE Carbon Fiber Consortium Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium The Oak Ridge Carbon Fiber Composites Consortium was established in 2011 to...

349

Terrestrial Water Relations & Climate ChangeTerrestrial Water Relations & Climate Change Jeffrey M Warren, Ph.D.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

warmermore frequent and longer lasting in a future warmer climate" "...precipitation intensity is projected Report "...very likely that heat waves will be more intense, more frequent and longer lasting in a future carbon gain. Leaf water loss Hubbard et al. 2001 #12;9 belowground processesbelowground processes

Gray, Matthew

350

Studies of plume condensation contamination upon surfaces of the Terrestrial Planet Finder spacecraft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are two competing concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission, one which involves a single spacecraft, and another comprised of a five craft formation. In addition, there are several propulsion options ...

Pigeon, Timothy David

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Using terrestrial laser scanner for estimating leaf areas of individual trees in a conifer forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method that applies the terrestrial laser scanning to estimate leaf areas of individual trees in a mature conifer forest is presented. It is based on the...Picea abies [L.] Karst.) stand located in southern Bav...

Peng Huang; Hans Pretzsch

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A Process-based Analysis of Methane Exchanges Between Alaskan Terrestrial Ecosystems and the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We developed and used a new version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to study how rates of methane (CH4) emissions and consumption in Alaskan soils have changed over the past century in response to observed changes ...

Zhuang, Qianlai.

353

Atmospheric photochemistry, surface features, and potential biosignature gases of terrestrial exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The endeavor to characterize terrestrial exoplanets warrants the study of chemistry in their atmospheres. Here I present a comprehensive one-dimensional photochemistry-thermochemistry model developed from the ground up for ...

Hu, Renyu, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

THE COMPOSITIONAL DIVERSITY OF EXTRASOLAR TERRESTRIAL PLANETS. I. IN SITU SIMULATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extrasolar planet host stars have been found to be enriched in key planet-building elements. These enrichments have the potential to drastically alter the composition of material available for terrestrial planet formation. Here, we report on the combination of dynamical models of late-stage terrestrial planet formation within known extrasolar planetary systems with chemical equilibrium models of the composition of solid material within the disk. This allows us to determine the bulk elemental composition of simulated extrasolar terrestrial planets. A wide variety of resulting planetary compositions are found, ranging from those that are essentially 'Earth like', containing metallic Fe and Mg silicates, to those that are dominated by graphite and SiC. This shows that a diverse range of terrestrial planets may exist within extrasolar planetary systems.

Bond, Jade C.; Lauretta, Dante S. [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, 1629 East University Boulevard, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); O'Brien, David P., E-mail: jbond@psi.ed [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Fort Lowell, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Carbon impact of proposed hydroelectric dams in Chilean Patagonia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The concern for and awareness of climate change is growing, and the world needs to react quickly and efficiently to manage the carbon intensity of the global energy industry. Making smart decisions about energy technology ...

Mar, Laura E. (Laura Elizabeth)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

Dr. Atul Jain

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

357

Modeling the Effects of Groundwater-fed Irrigation on Terrestrial Hydrology over the Conterminous United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Human alteration of the land surface hydrologic cycle is substantial. Recent studies suggest that local water management practices including groundwater pumping and irrigation could significantly alter the quantity and distribution of water in the terrestrial system, with potential impacts on weather and climate through land-atmosphere feedbacks. In this study, we incorporated a groundwater withdrawal scheme into the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4). To simulate the impact of irrigation realistically, we calibrated the CLM4 simulated irrigation amount against observations from agriculture census at the county scale over the conterminous United States (CONUS). The water used for irrigation was then removed from the surface runoff and groundwater aquifer according to a ratio determined from the county-level agricultural census data. Based on the simulations, the impact of groundwater withdrawals for irrigation on land surface and subsurface fluxes were investigated. Our results suggest that the impacts of irrigation on latent heat flux and potential recharge when water is withdrawn from surface water alone or from both surface and groundwater are comparable and local to the irrigation areas. However, when water is withdrawn from groundwater for irrigation, greater effects on the subsurface water balance were found, leading to significant depletion of groundwater storage in regions with low recharge rate and high groundwater exploitation rate. Our results underscore the importance of local hydrologic feedbacks in governing hydrologic response to anthropogenic change in CLM4 and the need to more realistically simulate the two-way interactions among surface water, groundwater, and atmosphere to better understand the impacts of groundwater pumping on irrigation efficiency and climate.

Leng, Guoyong; Huang, Maoyi; Tang, Qiuhong; Gao, Huilin; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Carbon Storage 2011 Carbon Storage Project Portfolio Table of Contents CARBON STORAGE OVERVIEW Carbon Storage Program Contacts [PDF-26KB] Carbon Storage Projects National Map [PDF-169KB] State Projects Summary Table [PDF-39KB] Carbon Storage Program Structure [PDF-181KB] Selected Carbon Sequestration Program Papers and Publications The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Beneficial Uses of Carbon Dioxide (2011) [PDF-3.3MB] Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology Carbon Capture and Sequestration: The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Efforts to Characterize Opportunities for Deep Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Resources (2011) [PDF-445KB]

359

ASM Asset Management DTVM SA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Management DTVM SA Management DTVM SA Jump to: navigation, search Name ASM Asset Management DTVM SA Place Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Zip 22640-100 Sector Carbon, Services Product Brazilian fund manager. It provides a range of financial services, including carbon finance and derivatives for both carbon project developers and investors. References ASM Asset Management DTVM SA[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. ASM Asset Management DTVM SA is a company located in Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil . References ↑ "ASM Asset Management DTVM SA" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=ASM_Asset_Management_DTVM_SA&oldid=34236

360

Program Managers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Managers Program Managers Enabling remarkable discoveries and tools that transform our understanding of energy and matter and advance national, economic, and energy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Implementation of Carbon Reduction in Capital Projects Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

means capping its total greenhouse gas emissions at 16,000 t/CO2 p.a. (see the College Carbon Management, construction and purchase of all College assets that consume energy related to Capital Projects regardless an obligation in its Strategic Plan to reduce its carbon emissions and is prepared to incur reasonable

Chittka, Lars

363

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

364

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

365

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

Smit, Berend

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

367

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Carbon dioxide emission reduction using molten carbonate fuel cell systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The contribution of the molten carbonate fuel cell system (MCFCs) to carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction in power application is analyzed. \\{MCFCs\\} can separate and concentrate CO2 emitted from traditional thermal power plants (PPs) without reducing the plant's overall energy efficiency. \\{MCFCs\\} can also be used by itself as an effective CO2 separator or concentrator by managing the anode gas stream to increase the heat utilization of the system. The CO2 separated and concentrated by \\{MCFCs\\} is most effectively captured by condensation. \\{MCFCs\\} is currently used as a CO2 separator only to a limited extent due to its high cost and relatively small scale operation. However, \\{MCFCs\\} will substantially contribute to reduce CO2 emissions in power generation applications in the near future.

Jung-Ho Wee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Conference Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish requirements and responsibilities with respect to managing conferences sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) or by DOE management and operating contractors and other contractors who perform work at DOE-owned or -leased facilities, including management and integration contractors and environmental restoration management contractors (when using funds that will be reimbursed by DOE). Cancels DOE N 110.3.

1999-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

370

Mexico-Low-Carbon Development | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-Low-Carbon Development Mexico-Low-Carbon Development Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Name Mexico-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Biomass, Industry, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country Mexico Central America References Low Carbon Development for Mexico[1] Abstract The Mexico study involves the preparation of a comprehensive package comprising: a low carbon strategy; the identification of priority sectors for carbon abatement; pre-feasibility level analysis of specific investment options; a country specific Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) curve; identification of implementation barriers and necessary policy responses; and a prioritized list of potent...

371

19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 19 19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the oceans are gaining sequestration programs emphasize storing carbon in soil organic matter in agri- cultural fields,in woody sequestration and management include the feasibil- ity and permanence of the carbon sequestered, the scale

Jackson, Robert B.

372

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

Post, Wilfred M.

373

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration

374

Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry tropical forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of grazing intensity on soil carbon stocks following deforestation of a Hawaiian dry carbon (SOC) along gradients of grazing intensity and elevation in pastures converted from dry tropical of forest-to-pasture conversion on soil carbon (C) stocks depend on a combination of climatic and management

Elmore, Andrew J.

375

Carbon Target Initial Concept for 20to2T5m  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Target Initial Concept for 20to2T5m (Updated) Van Graves January 30, 2014 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Carbon Target Initial Concept 30 Jan 2014 Geometry · From Ding's presentation Beam Dump for Carbon Target with IDS120h Configuration at 6.75 GeV (updated

McDonald, Kirk

376

Acetylenic carbon allotrope  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

Lagow, R.J.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

The Woodland Carbon Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

378

Mesoporous carbon materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

379

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

metallic nanotubes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Carbon2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical and ElectronicStructure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Ultrafast Nonlinear Spectroscopy of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2 Carbon Nanotubes Physical andElectronic Structure of Carbon Nanotubes . . . . . . . . . .Photophysics in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes . . . . .

Graham, Matthew Werden

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Technical Progress Report on Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Nature Conservancy is participating in a Cooperative Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to explore the compatibility of carbon sequestration in terrestrial ecosystems and the conservation of biodiversity. The title of the research project is ''Application and Development of Appropriate Tools and Technologies for Cost-Effective Carbon Sequestration''. The objectives of the project are to: (1) improve carbon offset estimates produced in both the planning and implementation phases of projects; (2) build valid and standardized approaches to estimate project carbon benefits at a reasonable cost; and (3) lay the groundwork for implementing cost-effective projects, providing new testing ground for biodiversity protection and restoration projects that store additional atmospheric carbon. This Technical Progress Report discusses preliminary results of the six specific tasks that The Nature Conservancy is undertaking to answer research needs while facilitating the development of real projects with measurable greenhouse gas reductions. The research described in this report occurred between April 1st and July 30th 2006. The specific tasks discussed include: Task 1: carbon inventory advancements; Task 2: emerging technologies for remote sensing of terrestrial carbon; Task 3: baseline method development; Task 4: third-party technical advisory panel meetings; Task 5: new project feasibility studies; and Task 6: development of new project software screening tool. Work is being carried out in Brazil, Belize, Chile, Peru and the USA.

Bill Stanley; Patrick Gonzalez; Sandra Brown; Jenny Henman; Ben Poulter; Sarah Woodhouse Murdock; Neil Sampson; Tim Pearson; Sarah Walker; Zoe Kant; Miguel Calmon; Gilberto Tiepolo

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

382

Continual Energy Management Dynamics| Energy Efficiency in U.S. Automotive Manufacturing Industry.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Managers at automotive manufacturers are seeking ways to reduce energy consumption, costs, carbon emissions, and waste from production processes. Researchers and practitioners perceive energy (more)

Onus, Cem O.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Estimated Annual Net Change in Soil Carbon per US County  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Estimated Annual Net Change in Soil Carbon per US County These data represent the estimated net change (Megagram per year) in soil carbon due to changes in the crop type and tillage intensity. Estimated accumulation of soil carbon under Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)lands is included in these estimates. Negative values represent a net flux from the atmosphere to the soil; positive values represent a net flux from the soil to the atmosphere. As such, soil carbon sequestration is represented here as a negative value. The method of analysis is based on empirical relationshipsbetween land management and soil carbon. The method for modeling land management and estimating soil carbonchange, used to generate these data, is described in the following publication:

384

ESMAP-Indonesia-Low Carbon Development Options Study | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Development Options Study Low Carbon Development Options Study Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-ESMAP Low Carbon Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Partner United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www-wds.worldbank.org/e Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References World Bank, ESMAP - Low Carbon Growth Country Studies - Getting Started[1] Overview "The Indonesia's study aimed to evaluate and develop strategic options to mitigate climate change without compromising the country's development

385

Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Country Studies Program Country Studies Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Industry, Transportation Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.esmap.org/esmap/ Country Poland, Republic of Macedonia UN Region Northern Europe References ESMAP-Macedonia-Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program[1] References ↑ "ESMAP-Macedonia-Low Carbon Growth Country Studies Program" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Low_Carbon_Growth_Country_Studies_Program&oldid=576259"

386

Current issues in terrestrial solar radiation instrumentation for energy, climate, and space applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uncertainty in terrestrial solar radiation measurements of a few watts per square metre (1 W/m2 to 2 W/m2) is needed to validate estimates of the Earth's radiation balance derived from satellite data. The characterization of solar energy resources for renewable energy technologies requires similar accuracy for economical technology deployment. Solar radiation measurement research at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory addresses calibrations, operational characteristics, and corrections for terrestrial solar radiation measurements. The characterization of field instrument geometric and thermal responses contributing to radiometric errors is described, together with correction schemes reducing the uncertainty of broadband irradiance measurements from tens of watts per square metre to a few (2 W/m2 to 5 W/m2). Such improvements in accuracy reduce the time and labour required for detecting and quantifying trends in terrestrial solar radiation and possible changes in the Earth's radiation budget.

T L Stoffel; I Reda; D R Myers; D Renne; S Wilcox; J Treadwell

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Integrating Remote Sensing, Field Observations, and Models to Understand Disturbance and Climate Effects on the Carbon Balance of the West Coast U.S.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GOAL: To develop and apply an approach to quantify and understand the regional carbon balance of the west coast states for the North American Carbon Program. OBJECTIVE: As an element of NACP research, the proposed investigation is a two pronged approach that derives and evaluates a regional carbon (C) budget for Oregon, Washington, and California. Objectives are (1) Use multiple data sources, including AmeriFlux data, inventories, and multispectral remote sensing data to investigate trends in carbon storage and exchanges of CO2 and water with variation in climate and disturbance history; (2) Develop and apply regional modeling that relies on these multiple data sources to reduce uncertainty in spatial estimates of carbon storage and NEP, and relative contributions of terrestrial ecosystems and anthropogenic emissions to atmospheric CO2 in the region; (3) Model terrestrial carbon processes across the region, using the Biome-BGC terrestrial ecosystem model, and an atmospheric inverse modeling approach to estimate variation in rate and timing of terrestrial uptake and feedbacks to the atmosphere in response to climate and disturbance. APPROACH: In performing the regional analysis, the research plan for the bottom-up approach uses a nested hierarchy of observations that include AmeriFlux data (i.e., net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from eddy covariance and associated biometric data), intermediate intensity inventories from an extended plot array partially developed from the PI's previous research, Forest Service FIA and CVS inventory data, time since disturbance, disturbance type, and cover type from Landsat developed in this study, and productivity estimates from MODIS algorithms. The BIOME-BGC model is used to integrate information from these sources and quantify C balance across the region. The inverse modeling approach assimilates flux data from AmeriFlux sites, high precision CO2 concentration data from AmeriFlux towers and four new calibrated CO2 sites, reanalysis meteorology and various remote sensing products to generate statewide estimates of biosphere carbon exchange from the atmospheric point of view.

B.E. Law; D. Turner; M. Goeckede

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Management Responsibilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Management Responsibilities Management Responsibilities Depleted UF6 Management Responsibilities DOE has responsibility for safe and efficient management of approximately 700,000 metric tons of depleted UF6. Organizational Responsibilities In the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for managing all the depleted uranium that has been generated by the government and has been declared surplus to national defense needs. In addition, as a result of two memoranda of agreement that have been signed between the DOE and USEC, the DOE has assumed management responsibility for approximately 145,000 metric tons of depleted UF6 that has been or will be generated by USEC. Any additional depleted UF6 that USEC generates will be USEC's responsibility to manage. DOE Management Responsibility

389

Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Management Energy Management Guidance to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Energy Management Guidance on AddThis.com... Requirements by Subject Requirements by Regulation Notices & Rules Guidance Facility Reporting Fleet Reporting Energy Management Guidance The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides guidance on Federal

390

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Full Document and Summary Versions...

391

Carbon International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kingdom Zip: NW1 8LH Sector: Carbon Product: London-based energy and communications agency specialising in low carbon energy and climate change. References: Carbon...

392

Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

Sarkar, Tapan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Terrestrial and Water Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large number of studies and models were established to explain the fission products (FP) behavior within terrestrial and water ecosystems, but a number of behaviors were non understandable, which always attributed to unknown reasons. According to DAB hypothesis, almost all fission products behaviors in terrestrial and water ecosystems could be interpreted in a wide coincidence. The gab between former models predictions, and field behavior of fission products after accidents like Chernobyl have been explained. DAB represents a tool to reduce radio-phobia as well as radiation protection expenses. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Carbonate Leaching of Uranium from Contaminated Soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Uranium (U) was successfully removed from contaminated soils from the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) site near Fernald, Ohio. ... The concentrations of uranium and other metals in the effluent were analyzed using a Varian Liberty 200 inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrophotometer (ICP-AES) or a kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (KPA). ... When 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was added prior to the carbonate solution, no increase in the removal of uranium was detected (data not shown) due to effervescence with heating, liberating carbon dioxide, and thus preventing uniform distribution of H2O2. ...

C. F. V. Mason; W. R. J. R. Turney; B. M. Thomson; N. Lu; P. A. Longmire; C. J. Chisholm-Brause

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Method of making carbon-carbon composites  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for making a carbon-carbon composite having a combination of high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizable woven cloth are covered with petroleum or coal tar pitch and pressed at a temperature a few degrees above the softening point of the pitch to form a green laminated composite. The green composite is restrained in a suitable fixture and heated slowly to carbonize the pitch binder. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnation step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3000.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced pressure for approximately one hundred and fifty (150) hours.

Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The Role of Carbon Capture and Storage in a Lower Carbon World  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

role of Carbon Capture and Storage in a role of Carbon Capture and Storage in a Lower Carbon World Past Compliance model Regulations determine 'acceptability' of risks, Our performance judged by regulators view of compliance, Industry focused upon cost and pace of new regulations, Managed as a License to Operate issue, Current Reputation model 'Acceptability' of risk set by our own expectations, Responsible care determined by opinion formers, Our focus is upon investing in our Corporate Reputation, Success recognised by governments, NGOs and suppliers. Future Customer model BP fuels our customers economic and social growth, while allowing them to invest in their own environment through us, Our offer is to help Customers manage their environmental impact, The environment becomes an integral part of individual customer

397

COMPARISON OF DSMS GENERATED FROM MINI UAV IMAGERY AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER IN A CULTURAL HERITAGE APPLICATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COMPARISON OF DSMS GENERATED FROM MINI UAV IMAGERY AND TERRESTRIAL LASER SCANNER IN A CULTURAL was recorded using a terrestrial laser scanner (Riegl LMS-Z420i) and a mini UAV-system (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle targets was used. As a product of the laser data a regular raster grid with point spacing of 5 cm

398

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 14, doi:10.1002/grl.50466, 2013 Simultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from space N. ?stgaard,1,2 T. Gjesteland,1,2 B. E from space of a terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) and the optical signal from lightning. By fortuitous, TGF, and optical emissions in an IC lightning flash has been identified. Citation: ?stgaard, N., T

Cummer, Steven A.

399

Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remote Terrestrial Sites as Operational/Logistics Analogs for Moon/Mars Bases: the Haughton Mars coordinating the logistics and resupply of far-flung planetary bases. A number of logistics methods have been terrestrial logistics methods were tested in the context of (analog) planetary exploration. A comprehensive

de Weck, Olivier L.

400

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award August 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A film about carbon sequestration produced with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received a 2009 Gold Aurora Award in the documentary category for nature/environment. Titled Out of the Air - Into the Soil: Land Practices That Reduce Atmospheric Carbon Levels, the documentary discusses the effects that proper landscape management can have on carbon absorption. Documentaries such as this are an important tool in educating the public on steps being taken to mitigate climate change. Co-produced by Prairie Public Broadcasting, Fargo, N.D., and the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, which is led by the University of North

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award August 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A film about carbon sequestration produced with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received a 2009 Gold Aurora Award in the documentary category for nature/environment. Titled Out of the Air - Into the Soil: Land Practices That Reduce Atmospheric Carbon Levels, the documentary discusses the effects that proper landscape management can have on carbon absorption. Documentaries such as this are an important tool in educating the public on steps being taken to mitigate climate change. Co-produced by Prairie Public Broadcasting, Fargo, N.D., and the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, which is led by the University of North

402

NETL: Carbon Storage FAQ Information Portal - Additional Resources  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additional Resources Additional Resources Where can I get additional information? Links to Other Major Internal and External Resources on Carbon Storage Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies - Program at MIT that conducts research into technologies to capture, utilize, and store CO2 from large stationary sources CO2 Capture Project - International effort that addresses carbon emissions reduction in a manner that will contribute to an environmentally acceptable and competitively priced continuous energy supply for the world Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center - Global climate-change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy; managed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory Carbon Mitigation Initiative - Joint project of Princeton University, BP, and Ford Motor Company to find solutions to greenhouse gas and global warming problem

403

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE MANAGEMENT OFFICE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE INVESTMENT MANAGEMENT OFFICE THE UNIVERSITY OF UTAH University of Utah | Investment Management Office Quarterly Summary The Endowment Pool had a positive first quarter (ending March gain from investments of $7.8 million. The Endowment Pool unit value of $100 has grown to $175 in 10

404

Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

Ren, Zhifeng (Newton, MA); Lin, Yuehe (Richland, WA); Yantasee, Wassana (Richland, WA); Liu, Guodong (Fargo, ND); Lu, Fang (Burlingame, CA); Tu, Yi (Camarillo, CA)

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

405

Quantifying Carbon Cycle Feedbacks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Perturbations to the carbon cycle could constitute large feedbacks on future changes in atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. This paper demonstrates how carbon cycle feedback can be expressed in formally similar ways to climate feedback, ...

J. M. Gregory; C. D. Jones; P. Cadule; P. Friedlingstein

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Supernova: Carbon detonation redux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A DECADE ago carbon detonation was all the rage among supernova theorists. The idea was that the characteristic burst ... wind.

J. Craig Wheeler

1983-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

408

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinetics Of Carbon Gasification ... The steamcarbon reaction, which is the essential reaction of the gasification processes of carbon-based feed stocks (e.g., coal and biomass), produces synthesis gas (H2 + CO), a synthetically flexible, environmentally benign energy source. ... Coal Gasification in CO2 and Steam:? Development of a Steam Injection Facility for High-Pressure Wire-Mesh Reactors ...

C. W. Zielke; Everett. Gorin

1957-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

How Carbon Capture Works  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Carbon capture, utilization and storage is a process that captures carbon dioxide emissions from sources like coal-fired power plants and either reuses or stores it so it will not enter the atmosphere. We'll break down the process step by step so you can learn how this technology can help us lower our carbon pollution.

410

Intro to Carbon Sequestration  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

Carbon Connections | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product: Carbon Connections links partner universities with industry encouraging knowledge exchange and developing innovative ideas. References: Carbon Connections1 This...

412

Improvements to a MODIS global terrestrial evapotranspiration algorithm Qiaozhen Mu , Maosheng Zhao, Steven W. Running  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

towers. The global annual total ET over the vegetated land surface is 62.8?103 km3 , agrees very wellImprovements to a MODIS global terrestrial evapotranspiration algorithm Qiaozhen Mu , Maosheng Zhao Vegetation cover fraction MODIS MODIS global evapotranspiration (ET) products by Mu et al. [Mu, Q., Heinsch

Montana, University of

413

Biological nitrogen fixation: rates, patterns and ecological controls in terrestrial ecosystems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Southwest Biological Science Center, Canyonlands Research...terrestrial BNF for a pre-industrial world by combining information...estimate is that pre-industrial N fixation was 58...Boyer, EW. 2004 Pre-industrial and contemporary fluxes...through rivers: a global assessment based on typology...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Aquatic and terrestrial invertebrate drift in southern Appalachian Mountain streams: implications for trout  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the southern Appalachians, ecotrophic coefficients and food conversion efficiencies. 3. Abundance and biomass invertebrate biomass was greater than aquatic larval biomass in the autumn. Drift rates of aquatic larval abundance and biomass were greatest at sunset. Inputs of terrestrial invertebrate biomass were greater than

Hutchens, John

415

Evidence for the respiration of ancient terrestrial organic C in northern temperate lakes and streams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...integral part of the landscape C storage/decomposition system...remainder of the water sample was pumped using a peristaltic pump through combusted...of biological substrates in seawater: Implications...current models of long-term C storage in terrestrial reservoirs...

S. Leigh McCallister; Paul A. del Giorgio

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

A Wearable Computer System with Augmented Reality to Support Terrestrial Navigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Wearable Computer System with Augmented Reality to Support Terrestrial Navigation Bruce Thomas1, Australia Salisbury, SA, Australia The Levels, SA, Australia Bruce.Thomas@UniSA.Edu.Au Abstract To date- stead of the computer being hand-held, it is attached to the user on a backpack or belt, as illustrated

Thomas, Bruce

417

Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En-vironmental Data Service, National  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar-Terrestrial Data Center, En- vironmental Data Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric-Milwaukee, will become director of the Great Lakes and Marine Waters Center at the University of Michigan on I July 1976, the University of Michigan reports. Before joining the UW faculty, Beeton was chiefof the En- vironmental

418

Measurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flashes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements and implications of the relationship between lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flashes Steven A. Cummer,1 Yuhu Zhai,1 Wenyi Hu,1 David M. Smith,2,3 Liliana I. Lopez,4,5 and Mark A. [1] We report observations and analysis of 30 kHz radio emissions (sferics) from lightning discharges

Cummer, Steven A.

419

AcceptedArticleSimultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AcceptedArticleSimultaneous observations of optical lightning and terrestrial gamma ray flash from pulses, TGF and optical emissions in an IC lightning flash has been identified. 7 University of Alabama occur during the initial phase of a normal polarity intracloud (IC) lightning flash, bringing negative

?stgaard, Nikolai

420

McCarl contribution to ED Document Terrestrial GHG Quantification and Accounting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

McCarl contribution to ED Document Terrestrial GHG Quantification and Accounting 1 Prices across.4.2.1 Current cost of a GHG offset................................................................ 13 1.4.2.2 Current offset equivalent of a GHG offset............................................ 14 1.4.2.3 Per unit

McCarl, Bruce A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Acta Protozool. (2006) 45: 407 -413 An Initial Account of the Terrestrial Protozoa of Ascension Island  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Acta Protozool. (2006) 45: 407 - 413 An Initial Account of the Terrestrial Protozoa of Ascension 2001, Finlay 2002, Dolan 2006, McArthur 2006). In this paper we present data on protozoa isolated from) or the Green Turtles Chelonia mydas (e.g. Broderick et al. 2006). The invertebrates have been shown to include

Brown, Richard

422

Critical remarks on the use of terrestrial moss (Hylocomium splendens and Pleurozium schreberi) for monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are widely used to monitor airborne heavy metal pollution, have been collected from eight catchments spread been used successfully to map and monitor airborne heavy metal pollution in northern European countries reserved. Keywords: Terrestrial moss; Environmental monitoring; Northern Europe; Airborne pollution; Heavy

Filzmoser, Peter

423

ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE STUDIES ERSC 358H Pollution Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1- ENVIRONMENTAL AND RESOURCE STUDIES ERSC 358H Pollution Ecology of Terrestrial Ecosystems Course:00 J 127 -Simcoe Building (first lecture September 11, 2008) Office Hours: Prior to the start of class will deal with a rather wide array of topics in the environmental sciences, with particular emphasis

Fox, Michael

424

Impacts of Environmental Nanoparticles on Chemical, Biological and Hydrological Processes in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This chapter provides insights on nanoparticle (NP) influence or control on the extent and timescales of single or coupled physical, chemical, biological and hydrological reactions and processes that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. Examples taken from the literature that show how terrestrial NPs may determine the fate of the aqueous and sorbed (adsorbed or precipitated) chemical species of nutrients and contaminants, are also included in this chapter. Specifically, in the first section, chapter objectives, term definitions and discussions on size-dependent properties, the origin and occurrence of NP in terrestrial ecosystems and NP toxicity, are included. In the second section, the topic of the binary interactions of NPs of different sizes, shapes, concentrations and ages with the soil solution chemical species is covered, focusing on NP formation, stability, aggregation, ability to serve as sorbents, or surface-mediated precipitation catalysts, or electron donors and acceptors. In the third section, aspects of the interactions in the ternary systems composed of environmental NP, nutrient/contaminant chemical species, and the soil/sediment matrix are discussed, focusing on the inhibitory and catalytic effects of environmental NP on nutrient/contaminant advective mobility and mass transfer, adsorption and desorption, dissolution and precipitation and redox reactions that occur in terrestrial ecosystems. These three review sections are followed by a short summary of future research needs and directions, the acknowledgements, the list of the references, and the figures.

Qafoku, Nikolla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from respiratory surfaces.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3477 Gas exchange in terrestrial environments comes at the cost of evaporative water loss from of gas exchange, both within and among species (Lighton, 1998; Shelton and Appel, 2001; Chown, 2002). The classical pattern is that of discontinuous gas exchange, or discontinuous gas-exchange cycles (DGC; Lighton

Franz, Nico M.

426

Can we measure terrestrial photosynthesis from space directly, using spectral reflectance and fluorescence?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Can we measure terrestrial photosynthesis from space directly, using spectral reflectance the changes in the xanthophyll cycle, which is closely coupled to photosynthesis. Several studies have shown of fluorescence, which is a directly related to the efficiency of photosynthesis. We discuss the state of the art

Jones, Peter JS

427

Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computerized Computerized Maintenance Management Systems to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Computerized Maintenance Management Systems on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance Federal Requirements Program Management

428

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LRRB Pavement Management Systems Pavement Management Systems Presented by: Michael Marti SRF for implementing and monitoring research results (RIC) #12;LRRB Pavement Management Systems LRRB Structure LRRB Current Pavement Management System Used ICON (Goodpointe) Year of Pavement Management System

Minnesota, University of

429

SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

-1 -1 CHAPTER 10 SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT (Revised October 19, 2011) WHAT ARE THE BASIC PRINCIPLES AND OBJECTIVES OF SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT? 1. To ensure contractors establish, document, and maintain adequate purchasing systems. 2. To ensure contractors flow down contract requirements to subcontractors. WHY IS SUBCONTRACT MANAGEMENT IMPORTANT? In many Department prime contracts a significant portion of the obligated dollars is spent on subcontract work. Due to the absence of a direct contractual relationship with the subcontractor, the Department must rely on the prime contractor to manage subcontract work. Subcontractors perform significant work efforts at sites and are an integral part of the site's success. Prime

430

Program Manager  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A successful candidate in this position will participate in a wide spectrum of program and project management activities involving systems engineering and integration support for Defense Programs...

431

Water Management  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Water Management This department applies multi-disciplinary science and technology-based modeling to assess complex environmental systems. It integrates ecology, anthropology, and...

432

Position Management  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order prescribes the policies, responsibilities, and procedures for position management within (DOE). Canceled by DOE N 1321.140. Cancels DOE 3510.1

1992-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

433

MANAGEMENT (MNG)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and recommendations is adequately implemented. (DOE Order 414.1A, Criterion 3; 10 CFR 830, Subpart A) Approach Record Review * Review the SWS issues management systems and...

434

Carbon in detonations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review three principal results from a five year study of carbon and its properties in detonations and discuss the implications of these results to the behavior of explosives. We first present a new determination of the carbon melt line from release wave velocity measurements in the shocked state. We then outline a colloidal theory of carbon clustering which from diffusion limited coagulation predicts a slow energy release rate for the carbon chemistry. Finally, we show the results from the examination of recovered soot. Here we see support for the colloid theory and find the diamond phase of carbon. The main theme of this paper is that the carbon in detonation products is in the form of a colloidal suspension of carbon clusters which grow through diffusion limited collisions. Even the final state is not bulk graphite or diamond, but is a collection of small, less than 100 /angstrom/A, diamond and graphitic clusters. 23 refs., 4 figs.

Johnson, J.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Lower Cost, Higher Performance Carbon Fiber  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David (Dave) Warren David (Dave) Warren Field Technical Manager Transportation Materials Research Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2009, M/S 8050 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8050 Phone: 865-574-9693 Fax: 865-574-0740 Email: WarrenCD@ORNL.GOV Lower Cost, Higher Performance Carbon Fiber 14 February 2011 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Presentation_name Questions for Today Materials How can the cost of carbon fiber suitable for higher performance applications (H 2 Storage) be developed? H 2 Storage requirements implies Aerospace grade fibers. Can we build off of work previously done for more modest structural applications? To accurately answer: We need to know the minimum performance and maximum cost requirements of the fiber not simply the properties of current fiber.

436

Carbon Opportunity Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Opportunity Group Opportunity Group Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Opportunity Group Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60606 Sector Carbon, Services Product Chicago-based firm that provides expertise in private equity investments, carbon asset development, financial risk management as well as advisory services. Coordinates 41.88415°, -87.632409° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.88415,"lon":-87.632409,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

437

Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pilots (Kentucky) Pilots (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 12, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name Carbon Capture Pilots (Kentucky) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Industry Recruitment/Support Affected Technologies Coal with CCS Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/carbon/Pages/default.aspx Summary Support for the Carbon Management Research Group (CMRG), a public/private partnership consisting of most of the Commonwealth's utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER), and the Department for Energy Development and Independence (DEDI),

438

NETL: 2008 Conference Proceedings - Regional Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Webinar with the American Waterworks Association - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Webinar with the American Waterworks Association December 8, 2008 Table of Contents Disclaimer Agenda [PDF-20KB] Presentations PRESENTATIONS Introductions of Webinar Participants Sarah Wade, Moderator, RCSP Public Outreach Working Group/ Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Brief Overview of AWWA and Their Interest, Roles/Responsibilities, Specific Concerns Cynthia Lane, AWWA Brief Overview of DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program [PDF-1.4MB] Dawn Deel, Project Manager, National Energy Technology Laboratory Ensuring Integrity of Geologic Sequestration: Integrated Application of Simulation, Risk Assessment, and MVA [PDF-1.5MB] Brian McPherson, Principal Investigator, Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP)

439

DEACTIVATION MANAGEMENT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MANAGEMENT MANAGEMENT The purpose here is to provide information for specific aspects of project management that apply to deactivation. Overall management of deactivation projects should use a traditional project management approach, and as such is not addressed. The following specific topics are based on lessons learned during deactivation of DOE facilities.  The Deactivation Mission  The Stabilization/Deactivation "Customer"  Project Approach for a Complex Facility  Establishing the Overall End-State  Viewing Deactivation in Two Phases  Early Decisions  Early Deactivation Tasks  Facility-Specific Commitments  Hazard Reduction  Detailed End-Points  Set Up Method and Criteria  Post-Deactivation S&M Plan

440

BachelorofManagement InternationalManagement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the official transcript (see Part 11 - Faculty of Management in the 2007/2008 Calendar). Program Planning Guide Management 3050/Political Science 3420 - Human Resource Management Management 3061 - Information Systems Environment Management 3640 - Cross-Cultural Management Practices Management 3660/Geography 3225 - Industrial

Seldin, Jonathan P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and the Global Carbon Cycle: The Key Uncertainties  

DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

The biogeochemical cycling of carbon between its sources and sinks determines the rate of increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. The observed increase in atmospheric CO{sub 2} content is less than the estimated release from fossil fuel consumption and deforestation. This discrepancy can be explained by interactions between the atmosphere and other global carbon reservoirs such as the oceans, and the terrestrial biosphere including soils. Undoubtedly, the oceans have been the most important sinks for CO{sub 2} produced by man. But, the physical, chemical, and biological processes of oceans are complex and, therefore, credible estimates of CO{sub 2} uptake can probably only come from mathematical models. Unfortunately, one- and two-dimensional ocean models do not allow for enough CO{sub 2} uptake to accurately account for known releases. Thus, they produce higher concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2} than was historically the case. More complex three-dimensional models, while currently being developed, may make better use of existing tracer data than do one- and two-dimensional models and will also incorporate climate feedback effects to provide a more realistic view of ocean dynamics and CO{sub 2} fluxes. The instability of current models to estimate accurately oceanic uptake of CO{sub 2} creates one of the key uncertainties in predictions of atmospheric CO{sub 2} increases and climate responses over the next 100 to 200 years.

Peng, T. H.; Post, W. M.; DeAngelis, D. L.; Dale, V. H.; Farrell, M. P.

1987-12-00T23:59:59.000Z

442

Potential of Silicon Carbide-Derived Carbon for Carbon Capture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential of Silicon Carbide-Derived Carbon for Carbon Capture ... In contrast to conventional carbons made from natural precursors, carbide derived carbons (CDCs),(8, 10-13) being synthesized from an inorganic source, have no polar functional groups and are composed of purely covalently bonded carbon. ...

S. K. Bhatia; T. X. Nguyen

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

443

Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

444

Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon RRLs Carbon RRLs towards Ultra-compact HII Regions Dana S. Balser D. Anish Roshi (Raman (Agnes Scott College) #12;Carbon RRLs Carbon Radio Recombination Lines (RRLs) NGC 2024 (Orion B) IC 1795 (W3) Palmer et al. (1967) #12;Carbon RRLs Photodissociation Regions (PDRs) Hollenbach & Tielens (1997

Balser, Dana S.

445

Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

No 52-2013 Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy industry halshs-00870689,version1-7Oct2013 #12;Would Border Carbon Adjustments prevent carbon leakage and heavy The efficiency of unilateral climate policies may be hampered by carbon leakage and competitiveness losses

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

446

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cumulative Carbon and Just Allocation of the Global Carbon Commons R.T. Pierrehumbert1 on climate can be characterized by a single statistic, called Cumulative Carbon. This is the aggregate amount of carbon emitted in the form of carbon dioxide by activities such as fossil fuel burning and deforestation

Pierrehumbert, Raymond

447

Carbon Emissions: Food Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Food Industry Food Industry Carbon Emissions in the Food Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 20) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 24.4 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 6.6% Total First Use of Energy: 1,193 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 5.5% Carbon Intensity: 20.44 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 24.4 Net Electricity 9.8 Natural Gas 9.1 Coal 4.2 All Other Sources 1.3 Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998

448

Carbon Emissions: Chemicals Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Chemicals Industry Chemicals Industry Carbon Emissions in the Chemicals Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 28) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 78.3 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 21.1% -- Nonfuel Emissions: 12.0 MMTC Total First Use of Energy: 5,328 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 24.6% Energy Sources Used As Feedstocks: 2,297 trillion Btu -- LPG: 1,365 trillion Btu -- Natural Gas: 674 trillion Btu Carbon Intensity: 14.70 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 78.3 Natural Gas 32.1

449

Carbon Emissions: Paper Industry  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paper Industry Paper Industry Carbon Emissions in the Paper Industry The Industry at a Glance, 1994 (SIC Code: 26) Total Energy-Related Emissions: 31.6 million metric tons of carbon (MMTC) -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 8.5% Total First Use of Energy: 2,665 trillion Btu -- Pct. of All Manufacturers: 12.3% -- Pct. Renewable Energy: 47.7% Carbon Intensity: 11.88 MMTC per quadrillion Btu Renewable Energy Sources (no net emissions): -- Pulping liquor: 882 trillion Btu -- Wood chips and bark: 389 trillion Btu Energy Information Administration, "1994 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey" and Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 Energy-Related Carbon Emissions, 1994 Source of Carbon Carbon Emissions (million metric tons) All Energy Sources 31.6 Net Electricity 11.0

450

NETL: Carbon Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storage Storage Technologies Carbon Storage (formerly referred to as the "Carbon Sequestration Program") Program Overview For quick navigation of NETL's Carbon Storage Program website, please click on the image. NETL's Carbon Storage Program Fossil fuels are considered the most dependable, cost-effective energy source in the world. The availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is essential for domestic and global prosperity and security well into the 21st century. However, a balance is needed between energy security and concerns over the impacts of concentrations of greenhouse gases (GHGs) in the atmosphere - particularly carbon dioxide (CO2). NETL's Carbon Storage Program is developing a technology portfolio of safe, cost-effective, commercial-scale CO2 capture, storage, and mitigation

451

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2012 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2009. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

452

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2013 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of δ 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2010. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric δ 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

453

Annual Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Global Stable Carbon Isotopic Signature  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 1 data Data image Documentation Contributors R.J. Andres, T.A. Boden, and G. Marland The 2011 revision of this database contains estimates of the annual, global mean value of del 13C of CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement manufacture for 1751-2008. These estimates of the carbon isotopic signature account for the changing mix of coal, petroleum, and natural gas being consumed and for the changing mix of petroleum from various producing areas with characteristic isotopic signatures. This time series of global fossil-fuel del 13C signature provides an additional constraint for balancing the sources and sinks of the global carbon cycle and complements the atmospheric del 13C measurements that are used to partition the uptake of fossil carbon emissions among the ocean, atmosphere, and terrestrial

454

Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale: An EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Belowground Carbon Cycling Processes at the Molecular Scale workshop, an EMSL Science Theme Advisory Panel meeting held in February 2013, attendees discussed critical biogeochemical processes that regulate carbon cycling in soil. The meeting attendees determined that as a national scientific user facility, EMSL can provide the tools and expertise needed to elucidate the molecular foundation that underlies mechanistic descriptions of biogeochemical processes that control carbon allocation and fluxes at the terrestrial/atmospheric interface in landscape and regional climate models. Consequently, the workshop's goal was to identify the science gaps that hinder either development of mechanistic description of critical processes or their accurate representation in climate models. In part, this report offers recommendations for future EMSL activities in this research area. The workshop was co-chaired by Dr. Nancy Hess (EMSL) and Dr. Gordon Brown (Stanford University).

Hess, Nancy J.; Brown, Gordon E.; Plata, Charity

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

455

Striving To Capture Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Striving To Capture Carbon ... Energy ministers from around the world met in Washington, D.C., for three days earlier this month to wrestle with how to reenergize efforts to cut carbon emissions from coal-fired power plants. ... Their solution, not surprisingly, is a rapid acceleration of R&D for technologies that capture and sequester underground carbon dioxide emitted by power plants, refineries, and industrial manufacturers that burn fossil fuels. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

Paraconductivity in carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the calculation of paraconductivity in carbon nanotubes above the superconducting transition temperature. The complex behavior of paraconductivity depending upon the tube radius, temperature, and magnetic field strength is analyzed. The results are qualitatively compared with recent experimental observations in carbon nanotubes of an inherent transition to the superconducting state and pronounced thermodynamic fluctuations above Tc. The application of our results to single-wall and multiwall carbon nanotubes as well as ropes of nanotubes is discussed.

D. V. Livanov and A. A. Varlamov

2002-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

457

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project June 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has signed a cooperative agreement with NRG Energy Inc. (NRG) for the Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project to design, construct, and operate a system that will capture and store approximately 400,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year. The project, which will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was selected under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a collaboration between the federal government and private industry working toward low-emission, coal-based power generation technology. The project team aims to demonstrate that post-combustion carbon capture

458

NETL: News Release - Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 12, 2006 September 12, 2006 Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins: Midwest Partnership Looks at Appalachian Basin for Safe Storage Sites Seismic Surveys to Determine Viability of Rock Formations for CO2 Storage WASHINGTON, DC - Tapping into rock formations at sites thousands of feet deep, a government-industry team is using seismic testing to help determine whether those sites can serve as reservoirs to safely store carbon dioxide (CO2), a major greenhouse gas. MORE INFO WATCH: NETL Project Manager Charlie Byrer discuss this important project Learn more about DOE's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership web site The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is sponsoring the tests in a program to develop carbon sequestration

459

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

460

Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization January 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A breakthrough carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) project in Texas has begun capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) and piping it to an oilfield for use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Read the project factsheet The project at Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facility in Port Arthur, Texas, is significant for demonstrating both the effectiveness and commercial viability of CCUS technology as an option in helping mitigate atmospheric CO2 emissions. Funded in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the project is managed by the U.S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Brazil-Low Carbon Growth Studies Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Brazil-Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Brazil-Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Partner United Kingdom Department for International Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Energy Efficiency, Forestry Topics Background analysis, GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country Brazil South America References World Bank, ESMAP - Low Carbon Growth Country Studies - Getting Started[1] Overview "Benefiting from a cooperative process with Brazilian authorities, the study covers four key areas with large potential for low-carbon options in

462

DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project DOE Signs Cooperative Agreement for Carbon Capture Project June 18, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy has signed a cooperative agreement with NRG Energy Inc. (NRG) for the Parish Post-Combustion CO2 Capture and Sequestration Project to design, construct, and operate a system that will capture and store approximately 400,000 tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) per year. The project, which will be managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, was selected under DOE's Clean Coal Power Initiative, a collaboration between the federal government and private industry working toward low-emission, coal-based power generation technology. The project team aims to demonstrate that post-combustion carbon capture

463

Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization Breakthrough Large-Scale Industrial Project Begins Carbon Capture and Utilization January 25, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A breakthrough carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) project in Texas has begun capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) and piping it to an oilfield for use in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Read the project factsheet The project at Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facility in Port Arthur, Texas, is significant for demonstrating both the effectiveness and commercial viability of CCUS technology as an option in helping mitigate atmospheric CO2 emissions. Funded in part through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the project is managed by the U.S.

464

ESMAP-Low-Carbon Development for Mexico | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development for Mexico Development for Mexico Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Mexico-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Name Mexico-ESMAP Low Carbon Growth Studies Program Agency/Company /Organization Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Biomass, Industry, Forestry Topics GHG inventory, Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://www.esmap.org/filez/pub Country Mexico Central America References Low Carbon Development for Mexico[1] Abstract The Mexico study involves the preparation of a comprehensive package comprising: a low carbon strategy; the identification of priority sectors for carbon abatement; pre-feasibility level analysis of specific investment options; a country specific Marginal Abatement Cost (MAC) curve; identification of implementation barriers and necessary policy responses; and a prioritized list of potent...

465

Low Carbon Society Vision 2050: India | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Low Carbon Society Vision 2050: India Low Carbon Society Vision 2050: India Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low Carbon Society Vision 2050: India Agency/Company /Organization: National Institute for Environmental Studies, Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad, Kyoto University, Mizuho Information & Research Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Topics: Background analysis, Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Lessons learned/best practices, Publications

466

NETL: Carbon Storage - Infrastructure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infrastructure Infrastructure Carbon Storage Infrastructure The Infrastructure Element of DOE's Carbon Storage Program is focused on research and development (R&D) initiatives to advance geologic CO2 storage toward commercialization. DOE determined early in the program's development that addressing CO2 mitigation on a regional level is the most effective way to address differences in geology, climate, population density, infrastructure, and socioeconomic development. This element includes the following efforts designed to support the development of regional infrastructure for carbon capture and storage (CCS). Click on Image to Navigate Infrastructure Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) - This

467

Activated Carbon Injection  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

468

Carbon Capture and Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shift to alternative energy sources, which have been introduced in Chap. 8 .... They are effective in air pollution control as well as carbon

Zhongchao Tan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Composites of Carbon Nanotubes.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The purpose of this research was to study various methods of incorporation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with polymers for producing electrically conductive polystyrene composites. (more)

Tchoul, Maxim N.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

471

Carbon Fiber SMC  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

110,000 ACC capital) in 2008 * 54,000 for 2009 Partners * Continental Structural Plastic (CSP), a Tier One supplier * Discounted compounding and molding * Zoltek, a carbon...

472

Carbon Fiber Technology Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- 4M AMO - 1.5M VTP - Remainder covered by carry- over and ARRA project contingency * Cost of carbon fiber * Technology scaling * Market development * Workforce development * Oak...

473

Activated Carbon Injection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

History of the Clean Air Act and how the injection of carbon into a coal power plant's flu smoke can reduce the amount of mercury in the smoke.

None

2014-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

474

Tidal Heating of Terrestrial Extra-Solar Planets and Implications for their Habitability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The tidal heating of hypothetical rocky (or terrestrial) extra-solar planets spans a wide range of values depending on stellar masses and initial orbits. Tidal heating may be sufficiently large (in many cases, in excess of radiogenic heating) and long-lived to drive plate tectonics, similar to the Earth's, which may enhance the planet's habitability. In other cases, excessive tidal heating may result in Io-like planets with violent volcanism, probably rendering them unsuitable for life. On water-rich planets, tidal heating may generate sub-surface oceans analogous to Europa's with similar prospects for habitability. Tidal heating may enhance the outgassing of volatiles, contributing to the formation and replenishment of a planet's atmosphere. To address these issues, we model the tidal heating and evolution of hypothetical extra-solar terrestrial planets. The results presented here constrain the orbital and physical properties required for planets to be habitable.

Brian Jackson; Rory Barnes; Richard Greenberg

2008-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

475

Management Overview  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Immobilization Research Immobilization Research Kurt Gerdes U.S. DOE, Office of Engineering and Technology John Vienna Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Environmental Management May 19, 2009 2009 Hanford - Idaho - Savannah River Technical Exchange 2 Objectives Perform research and development to advance the waste stabilization technology options by through closely- coupled theory, experimentation, and modeling Develop solutions for Hanford, Idaho, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge wastes challenges (along with facilitating management of future wastes) Environmental Management General Approach Balance between near-term incremental technology improvements and long-term transformational solutions Address the requirements for high risk waste streams - high-level tank waste (RPP, SRS)

476

SGL Carbon AG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon AG Jump to: navigation, search Name: SGL Carbon AG Place: Wiesbaden, Hessen, Germany Zip: 65203 Sector: Carbon Product: A Germany-based manufacturer of carbon-based...

477

Eon Masdar Integrated Carbon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Jump to: navigation, search Name: Eon Masdar Integrated Carbon Place: Germany Sector: Carbon Product: Germany-based carbon emission projects developer. References:...

478

EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Bhringer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Böhringer Jared C. Carbone Thomas F. Rutherford Revised: August 2013 Abstract Embodied carbon tariffs tax the direct and indirect carbon emissions embodied in trade -- an idea popularized by countries seeking to extend the reach of domestic carbon regu- lations. We

479

Isotopic power supplies for space and terrestrial systems: quality assurance by Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sandia National Laboratories participation in Quality Assurance (QA) programs for Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators which have been used in space and terrestrial systems over the past 15 years is summarized. Basic elements of the program are briefly described and recognition of assistance from other Sandia organizations is included. Descriptions of the various systems for which Sandia has had the QA responsibility are also presented. In addition, the outlook for Sandia participation in RTG programs for the next several years is noted.

Hannigan, R.L.; Harnar, R.R.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

A Comment on Tectonics and the Future of Life on Terrestrial Planets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is argued that the tight interconnection between biological, climatological, and geophysical factors in the history of the terrestrial biosphere can teach us something of wider importance regarding the general astrobiological evolution of planets in the Galactic habitable zone of the Milky Way. Motivated by a recent debate on the future of Earth's biosphere, we suggest an additional reason why the impact of plate tectonics on the biological evolution is significant on the global Galactic level.

Milan M. Cirkovic

2003-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "terrestrial carbon management" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

American Electric Power (AEP): Mountaineer Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration (WITHDRAWN AT CONCLUSION OF PHASE 1)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

American Electric Power (AEP): American Electric Power (AEP): Mountaineer Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration (WITHDRAWN AT CONCLUSION OF PHASE 1) Background A need exists to further develop carbon management technologies that capture and store or beneficially reuse carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) that would otherwise be emitted into the atmosphere from coal-based electric power generating facilities. Carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) technologies offer great potential for reducing CO

482

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership U.S Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships: Sharing Knowledge from Two Field Tests  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting November 15, 2011 Presented by: Gerald R. Hill, Ph.D. Senior Technical Advisor Southern States Energy Board Acknowledgements  This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.  Cost share and research support provided by SECARB/SSEB Carbon Management Partners.  CO 2 Capture Unit funded separately by Southern Company and partners. 2 Presentation Outline  Overview  Characterization Studies  Early Test - Cranfield, MS  Anthropogenic Test - Citronelle, AL - Capture Unit Status - Pipeline Status - Injection Well Status 3 SECARB Characterization: CO 2 Sources & Saline Reservoirs

483

Global Carbon Cycle, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Mitigation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The carbon cycle is one of the biogeochemical cycles and describes the movement of carbon, in its many forms, within the biosphere, atmosphere, oceans and geosphere. The global carbon cycle involves the earth...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Water vapour and hydrogen in the terrestrial-planet-forming region of a protoplanetary disk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Planetary systems, ours included, are formed in disks of dust and gas around young stars. Disks are an integral part of the star and planet formation process, and knowledge of the distribution and temperature of inner disk material is crucial for understanding terrestrial planet formation, giant planet migration, and accretion onto the central star. While the inner regions of protoplanetary disks in nearby star forming regions subtend only a few nano-radians, near-IR interferometry has recently enabled the spatial resolution of these terrestrial zones. Most observations have probed only dust, which typically dominates the near-IR emission. Here I report spectrally dispersed near-IR interferometric observations that probe gas (which dominates the mass and dynamics of the inner disk), in addition to dust, within one astronomical unit of the young star MWC 480. I resolve gas, including water vapor and atomic hydrogen, interior to the edge of the dust disk; this contrasts with results of previous spectrally dispersed interferometry observations. Interactions of this accreting gas with migrating planets may lead to short-period exoplanets like those detected around main-sequence stars. The observed water vapor is likely produced by the sublimation of migrating icy bodies, and provides a potential reservoir of water for terrestrial planets.

J. A. Eisner

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

485

Measurement of natural radioactivity and dose rate assessment of terrestrial gamma radiation in the soil of southern Punjab, Pakistan  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......terrestrial background radiation mainly due to these...assess the population radiation doses(4-9). However...data are available on naturally occuring and artificial radionulides...order to assess the radiation doses for the general......

I. Fatima; J. H. Zaidi; M. Arif; M. Daud; S. A. Ahmad; S. N. A. Tahir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Net primary production of terrestrial ecosystems in China and its equilibrium response to changes in climate and atmospheric CO? concentration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM, version 4.0) was used to estimate net primary production (NPP) in China for contemporary climate and NPP responses to elevated CO? and climate changes projected by three atmospheric ...

Xiao, Xiangming.; Melillo, Jerry M.; Kicklighter, David W.; Pan, Yude.; McGuire, A. David.; Helfrich III, J.V.K.

487

ALLIANCE MANAGEMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last two decades, production and manufacturing management has rapidly adopted a range of new concepts: manufacturing strategy, focused factory, just-in-time manufacturing, concurrent engineering, total ...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Stormwater Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management program must be developed that would meet the standard of reducing pollutants to the maximum extent practicable. Stormwater management programs for medium and large MS4s include measures to: ? Identify major outfalls and pollutant loadings... seeding: The vegetation used will be part of final landscaping, but during construction it prevents soil erosion. ? Mulching: Materials such as hay, grass, woodchips, gravel, or straw are placed on top of the soil to keep it from eroding. Structural...

Jaber, Fouad

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

489

New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage Wells New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage Wells June 7, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Best practices for managing wells used to store carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations are the focus of a publication just released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The newest manual in the Department's series on current best practices associated with carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities covers the planning, permitting, design, drilling, implementation, and decommissioning of CO2 storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research,

490

New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage Wells New DOE Best Practices Manual Features Top Strategies for Carbon Storage Wells June 7, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Best practices for managing wells used to store carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations are the focus of a publication just released by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The newest manual in the Department's series on current best practices associated with carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS), Carbon Storage Systems and Well Management Activities covers the planning, permitting, design, drilling, implementation, and decommissioning of CO2 storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research,

491

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and...

492

Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...nanotechnology II Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes Andras Kis 1 * Alex Zettl 2 3 * * Authors...important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties...characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Carbon monoxide absorbing liquid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present disclosure is directed to a carbon monoxide absorbing liquid containing a cuprous ion, hydrochloric acid and titanum trichloride. Titanium trichloride is effective in increasing the carbon monoxide absorption quantity. Furthermore, titanium trichloride remarkably increases the oxygen resistance. Therefore, this absorbing liquid can be used continuously and for a long time.

Arikawa, Y.; Horigome, S.; Kanehori, K.; Katsumoto, M.

1981-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

494

Fly ash carbon passivation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal method to passivate the carbon and/or other components in fly ash significantly decreases adsorption. The passivated carbon remains in the fly ash. Heating the fly ash to about 500 and 800 degrees C. under inert gas conditions sharply decreases the amount of surfactant adsorbed by the fly ash recovered after thermal treatment despite the fact that the carbon content remains in the fly ash. Using oxygen and inert gas mixtures, the present invention shows that a thermal treatment to about 500 degrees C. also sharply decreases the surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash even though most of the carbon remains intact. Also, thermal treatment to about 800 degrees C. under these same oxidative conditions shows a sharp decrease in surfactant adsorption of the recovered fly ash due to the fact that the carbon has been removed. This experiment simulates the various "carbon burnout" methods and is not a claim in this method. The present invention provides a thermal method of deactivating high carbon fly ash toward adsorption of AEAs while retaining the fly ash carbon. The fly ash can be used, for example, as a partial Portland cement replacement in air-entrained concrete, in conductive and other concretes, and for other applications.

La Count, Robert B; Baltrus, John P; Kern, Douglas G

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

495

Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. Avouris, in Carbon Nanotubes M. S. Dresselhaus, P.Physics of Carbon Nanotubes S. V. Rotkin, S. Subramoney,Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Philip G. Collins 1 and

Collins, Philip G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Carbon Sequestration: A Comparative Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration refers to the provision and safe storage of carbon dioxide that otherwise would be emitted to ... isolation, and final storage of the produced carbon dioxide, utilizing biological, chemical, ...

Christopher J. Koroneos; Dimitrios C. Rovas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P. Avouris, in Carbon Nanotubes M. S. Dresselhaus, P.in Applied Physics of Carbon Nanotubes S. V. Rotkin, S.Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes Philip G. Collins

Collins, Philip G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Carbon-free generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon-free generation Carbon-free generation Carbon-free central generation of electricity, either through fossil fuel combustion with carbon dioxide capture and storage or development of renewable sources such as solar, wind, and/or nuclear power, is key to our future energy portfolio. Brookhaven also provides tools and techniques for studying geological carbon dioxide sequestration and analyzing safety issues for nuclear systems. Our nation faces grand challenges: finding alternative and cleaner energy sources and improving efficiency to meet our exponentially growing energy needs. Researchers at Brookhaven National Laboratory are poised to meet these challenges with basic and applied research programs aimed at advancing the effective use of renewable energy through improved conversion,

499

2013 Global Carbon Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2013 Global Carbon Project 2013 Global Carbon Project DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/GCP_2013_V1.1 image 2013 Budget v1.1 (November 2013) image 2013 Budget v1.3 (December 2013, contains typographical corrections to 2011 Australia emissions from v1.1 and corrections to the 2011 Australia transfer and consumption emissions from v1.2) image image image image Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions to Reach 36 Billion Tonnes in 2013 Global emissions of carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels will reach 36 billion tonnes for the year 2013. "This is a level unprecedented in human history," says CSIRO's Dr Pep Canadell, Executive-Director of the Global Carbon Project (GCP) and co-author of a new report. Global emissions due to fossil fuel alone are set to grow this year at a slightly lower pace of 2.1% than the average 3.1% since 2000, reaching 36

500

Global Coastal Carbon Program Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

CDIAC provides data management support for the Global Coastal Carbon Data Project. The coastal regions data are very important for the understanding of carbon cycle on the continental margins. The Coastal Project data include the bottle (discrete) and surface (underway) carbon-related measurements from coastal research cruises, the data from time series cruises, and coastal moorings. The data from US East Coast, US West Coast, and European Coastal areas are available. CDIAC provides a map interface with vessel or platform names. Clicking on the name brings up information about the vessel or the scientific platform, the kinds of measurements collected and the timeframe, links to project pages, when available, and the links to the data files themselves.