National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for terrain slope greater

  1. Bipedal Robotic Walking on Flat-Ground, Up-Slope and Rough Terrain with Human-Inspired Hybrid Zero Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadubettu Yadukumar, Shishir 1986-

    2012-12-10

    The thesis shows how to achieve bipedal robotic walking on flat-ground, up-slope and rough terrain by using Human-Inspired control. We begin by considering human walking data and find outputs (or virtual constraints) that, when calculated from...

  2. Urbanizing terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romanos, Christoforos

    2008-01-01

    Urban "sprawl"in the East Attica area of Athens has dramatically changed the former rural economy in a manner consistent with the urbanizing terrain's underlying properties: agricultural subdivisions, existing centres, ...

  3. Placement of Traffic Barriers on Roadside and Median Slopes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferdous, Md Rubiat

    2011-08-08

    terrains are investigated using numerical simulations. A procedure is developed that provide guidance for their placement on roadside and median slopes. The research approach consists of nonlinear finite element analyses and multi-rigid-body dynamic...

  4. Subsurface water flow simulated for hill slopes with spatially dependent soil hydraulic characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, M.L.; Luxmoore, R.J.; DeAngelis, R.; Ward, R.C.; Yeh, G.T.

    1987-08-01

    Water flow through hill slopes consisting of five soil layers, with varying spatial dependence in hydraulic characteristics in the lateral plane was simulated by solving Richards' equation in three dimensions under varying rainfall intensities and for two complexities of terrain. By concepts of similar media the variability in soil hydraulic characteristics was expressed by a single dimensionless parameter, the scaling factor ..cap alpha... The moments of log normally distributed ..cap alpha.. were set as: Mean = 1.0 and standard deviation = 1.0. Four cases of spatial dependence of ..cap alpha.. in the lateral plane were selected for simulation, using exponential variogram functions ranging in spatial structure from random (no spatial dependence) to large dependence (large correlation lengths). The simulations showed that the rates of subsurface flow from the 30/sup 0/ hillslope, during and following rainfall, were significantly enhanced with an increase in spatial dependence. Subsurface drainage was also increased with increases in rainfall intensity and slop complexity. For hill slopes the relative effects of spatial dependence in soil hydraulic characteristics was smaller with 30/sup 0/ horizontal pitching than without pitching. Hill slopes with a random distribution of hydraulic characteristics provided greater opportunity for soil units with differing water capacities to interact than in cases with spatially correlated distributions. This greater interaction is associated with a greater lag in subsurface flow generation. These studies illustrate some of the expected effects of spatial dependence of soil hydraulic characteristics of the integrated hydrologic response of land areas.

  5. GIS Fundamentals Lesson 10: Terrain Analysis Lesson 10: Terrain Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, Christopher J.

    GIS Fundamentals Lesson 10: Terrain Analysis Lesson 10: Terrain Analyses What You'll Learn: Basic if needed. You should read chapter 11 in the GIS Fundamentals textbook before starting. Data are located processing, using the ArcGIS Hydrology tools. 1 #12;GIS Fundamentals Lesson 10: Terrain Analysis Project1

  6. Quasi-Steady Katabatic Winds on Slopes in Wide Valleys: Hydraulic Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    Quasi-Steady Katabatic Winds on Slopes in Wide Valleys: Hydraulic Theory and Observations M in the presence of weak synoptic winds. Because of the lateral constraints on the flow, Coriolis effects by sloping topography (Strobach 1991), as is the terrain of most urban areas of the world. Air circulation

  7. Terrainosaurus: realistic terrain synthesis using genetic algorithms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saunders, Ryan L.

    2007-04-25

    a new, design-by-example method for synthesizing terrain height fields. In this approach, the user designs the layout of the terrain by sketching out simple regions using a CAD-style interface, and specifies the desired terrain characteristics...

  8. Representing Terrain With Mathematical Operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    of the terrain's generation by digging channels in the surface. Given our current reliance on digital map data a series of parameters (including size and area of influence of the drill, as well as the density formation mimics physical phenomena associated with geological terrain formation (such as erosion, digging

  9. Gravitational slopes, geomorphology, and material strengths of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from OSIRIS observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groussin, O; Auger, A -T; Kührt, E; Gaskell, R; Capanna, C; Scholten, F; Preusker, F; Lamy, P; Hviid, S; Knollenberg, J; Keller, U; Huettig, C; Sierks, H; Barbieri, C; Rodrigo, R; Koschny, D; Rickman, H; Hearn, M F A; Agarwal, J; Barucci, M A; Bertaux, J -L; Bertini, I; Boudreault, S; Cremonese, G; Da Deppo, V; Davidsson, B; Debei, S; De Cecco, M; El-Maarry, M R; Fornasier, S; Fulle, M; Gutiérrez, P J; Güttler, C; Ip, W -H; Kramm, J -R; Küppers, M; Lazzarin, M; Lara, L M; Moreno, J J Lopez; Marchi, S; Marzari, F; Massironi, M; Michalik, H; Naletto, G; Oklay, N; Pommerol, A; Pajola, M; Thomas, N; Toth, I; Tubiana, C; Vincent, J -B

    2015-01-01

    We study the link between gravitational slopes and the surface morphology on the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and provide constraints on the mechanical properties of the cometary material. We computed the gravitational slopes for five regions on the nucleus that are representative of the different morphologies observed on the surface, using two shape models computed from OSIRIS images by the stereo-photoclinometry (SPC) and stereo-photogrammetry (SPG) techniques. We estimated the tensile, shear, and compressive strengths using different surface morphologies and mechanical considerations. The different regions show a similar general pattern in terms of the relation between gravitational slopes and terrain morphology: i) low-slope terrains (0-20 deg) are covered by a fine material and contain a few large ($>$10 m) and isolated boulders, ii) intermediate-slope terrains (20-45 deg) are mainly fallen consolidated materials and debris fields, with numerous intermediate-size boulders from $<$1 m to ...

  10. All-terrain vehicle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somerton-Rayner, M.

    1986-12-16

    This patent describes an all-terrain vehicle comprising: a chassis; four road wheel axles equally spaced along the chassis; suspension means mounting the axles on the chassis; wheels mounted adjacent both ends of each of the axles, the wheels on the foremost and the rearmost axles being steerably mounted; propulsion and driving means including a single internal combustion engine and gearbox, and first and second transfer boxes both coupled to be driven by the engine through the gearbox; the first transfer box driving the first and third axles and the second transfer box driving the second and fourth axles; means for driving in the alternative all four wheels and only the center two wheels; power-assisted steering gear means operatively connected to the steerably-mounted wheels of the foremost axle; and steering coupling means extending between the steerably-mounted wheels on the foremost and rearmost axles so dimensioned that upon steering of the front wheels, the rear wheels perform castoring constrained to a smaller turning angle and a lower rate of angular movement than the front wheels.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Stable Boundary Layer Turbulent Processes in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Skyllingstad

    2005-01-26

    Research was performed using a turbulence boundary layer model to study the behavior of cold, dense flows in regions of complex terrain. Results show that flows develop a balance between turbulent entrainment of warm ambient air and dense, cold air created by surface cooling. Flow depth and strength is a function of downslope distance, slope angle and angle changes, and the ambient air temperature.

  12. Modelling the "Pop" in Winter Terrain Park Jumps J. A. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at ski resorts have found that jumping generally poses a signif- icantly greater risk of spine and head found that jumping generally (whether in a terrain park or not) poses a significantly greater risk of the feature." The authors have since identified experimental errors in this work and an erratum has been

  13. The influence of forest clearing on landsliding is central to long-standing concern over the effects of timber harvesting on slope stability.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    the effects of timber harvesting on slope stability. Here we document a strong topographic control on shallow landsliding by combining unique ground-based landslide surveys in an intensively monitored study area in steep, convergent topography. In terrain predicted to be at low risk of slope failure, a random model

  14. The Inverting Effect of Curvature in Winter Terrain Park Jump Takeoffs J. A. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a significantly greater head/neck injury risk to resort patrons than normal skiing activities [1­4]. One intentionally, curvature in the takeoff can lead to involuntary inversion. In this work we lay out the basic a potential injury risk. A mitigating takeoff design criterion adopted by the US Terrain Park Council based

  15. FINAL REPORT CANYON AND SLOPE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Scott

    and the influence of canyons on slope cur- rents ; f) identification of communities which may be affected by oil and gas operations; and g) identification of measures for alleviating or eliminating the effects of oil

  16. Human estimation of slope, distance, and height of terrain in simulated lunar conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oravetz, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    As NASA's Vision for Space Exploration seeks to explore mountainous regions near the southern pole through frequent, long excursions, astronauts will require accurate navigational assistance. Current and future technology, ...

  17. North Slope (Wahluke Slope) expedited response action cleanup plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The purpose of this action is to mitigate any threat to public health and the environment from hazards on the North Slope and meet the expedited response action (ERA) objective of cleanup to a degree requiring no further action. The ERA may be the final remediation of the 100-I-3 Operable Unit. A No Action record of decision (ROD) may be issued after remediation completion. The US Department of Energy (DOE) currently owns or administers approximately 140 mi{sup 2} (about 90,000 acres) of land north and east of the Columbia River (referred to as the North Slope) that is part of the Hanford Site. The North Slope, also commonly known as the Wahluke Slope, was not used for plutonium production or support facilities; it was used for military air defense of the Hanford Site and vicinity. The North Slope contained seven antiaircraft gun emplacements and three Nike-Ajax missile positions. These military positions were vacated in 1960--1961 as the defense requirements at Hanford changed. They were demolished in 1974. Prior to government control in 1943, the North Slope was homesteaded. Since the initiation of this ERA in the summer of 1992, DOE signed the modified Hanford Federal Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) with the Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in which a milestone was set to complete remediation activities and a draft closeout report by October 1994. Remediation activities will make the North Slope area available for future non-DOE uses. Thirty-nine sites have undergone limited characterization to determine if significant environmental hazards exist. This plan documents the results of that characterization and evaluates the potential remediation alternatives.

  18. Creating Standards for Winter Terrain Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to engineering frame motivated creation of a 501c(3) non-profit, United States Terrain Park Council Dedicated fatalities (31 male, 6 female) mostly young J. Shealy (2000) Snowboard injury rate doubled during 1990-2000 from 3.37 to 6.97 per 1000 skier days Deaths: 50 (2007-2008) 39 (2008-2009) Compiled by California Ski

  19. Rock Slopes from Mechanics to Decision Making

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Einstein, Herbert H.

    Rock slope instabilities are discussed in the context of decision making for risk assessment and management. Hence, the state of the slope and possible failure mechanism need to be defined first. This is done with geometrical ...

  20. GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    GEOPHYSICS FOR SLOPE STABILITY ROBERT HACK Section Engineering Geology, Centre for Technical-mail: hack@itc.nl (Received 2 June, 2000; Accepted 4 September, 2000) Abstract. A pre-requisite in slope Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. #12;424 ROBERT HACK the slope material with, for example, manganese

  1. Seoul, South Korea -classification deteriorating slope stability -Robert Hack 1 SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    Seoul, South Korea - classification deteriorating slope stability - Robert Hack 1 SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION OF TIME DEPENDENT DETERIORATING SLOPES Seoul, Korea, 29 February 2008 Robert Hack Engineering) The Netherlands #12;Seoul, South Korea - classification deteriorating slope stability - Robert Hack 2 Jan van

  2. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Kathleen E. Duncan,in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities Authors: Kathleen E.

  3. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phadke, Amol

    2012-01-01

    Wind Power Development Parameter Criteria for Exclusion Terrain slope Greater than 20 percent Elevation Greater than 1,500 m Protected areas 100 percent Water

  4. HIGH FIELD Q-SLOPE AND THE BAKING EFFECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLAB

    2009-11-01

    The performance of SRF cavities made of bulk Nb at high fields (peak surface magnetic field greater than about 90 mT) is characterized by exponentially increasing RF losses (high-field Q-slope), in the absence of field emission, which are often mitigated by a low temperature (100-140 °C, 12-48h) baking. In this contribution, recent experimental results and phenomenological models to explain this effect will be briefly reviewed. New experimental results on the high-field Q-slope will be presented for cavities that had been heat treated at high temperature in the presence of a small partial pressure of nitrogen. Improvement of the cavity performances have been obtained, while surface analysis measurements on Nb samples treated with the cavities revealed significantly lower hydrogen concentration than for samples that followed standard cavity treatments.

  5. SHORT COMMUNICATION Dynamical analysis of winter terrain park jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this work is to show how a dynamical analysis can assess impact injury risks and inform safer terrain park frequently pose a hazard to patrons and may represent a significant liability risk to winter resorts. By performing a simple dynamic analysis of terrain park jumps, the relative risk to impact injuries for any

  6. Benthic Terrain Modeler: Interpreting the Bathymetric Environment Shaun Walbridge1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    that they can be used on any digital elevation data. The inclusion of easily customizable terrain classification, aspect, and rugosity from an input bathymetric data set. Additionally, terrain classification scripts allow users the freedom to create their own zone and structure classifications and define

  7. Vibration-based Terrain Classification Using Support Vector Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    Vibration-based Terrain Classification Using Support Vector Machines Christian Weiss, Holger Fr a method for terrain classification based on vibration induced in the vehicle's body. An accelerometer mounted on the vehicle measures the vibration perpendicular to the ground surface. We experimentally

  8. Representation of Terrain Data Using a Mathematical "Drill" Operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    Representation of Terrain Data Using a Mathematical "Drill" Operator Christopher S. Stuetzle1 and W and Franklin (RPI) Autocarto 2012 17 Sep 2012 6 / 24 #12;The Drill Operator v Then cut along an ever deeper Creates hydrography. 1 How can we fit a drill to a terrain location (pixel) p? 2 How can we represent

  9. Title: Digital Terrain Model of Southern Ontario Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Digital Terrain Model of Southern Ontario Data Creator / Copyright Owner: First Base/A Coverage Date(s): 2002 Updates: N/A Abstract: The Digital Terrain Model (DTM) of southern Ontario / UTM (17) Resolution: N/A Coordinates: N/A Index Map: N/A Keywords (Place): Ontario Keywords (Subject

  10. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States)] [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Dempsey, Gregg [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States)] [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States); Klemovich, Ron [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)] [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  11. Digital terrain modeling with the Chebyshev polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florinsky, I V

    2015-01-01

    Mathematical problems of digital terrain analysis include interpolation of digital elevation models (DEMs), DEM generalization and denoising, and computation of morphometric variables by calculation of partial derivatives of elevation. Traditionally, these procedures are based on numerical treatments of two-variable discrete functions of elevation. We developed a spectral analytical method and algorithm based on high-order orthogonal expansions using the Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind with the subsequent Fejer summation. The method and algorithm are intended for DEM analytical treatment, such as, DEM global approximation, denoising, and generalization as well as computation of morphometric variables by analytical calculation of partial derivatives. To test the method and algorithm, we used a DEM of the Northern Andes including 230,880 points (the elevation matrix 480 $\\times$ 481). DEMs were reconstructed with 480, 240, 120, 60, and 30 expansion coefficients. The first and second partial derivatives ...

  12. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton, Butler, Warren, and Clermont counties in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and...

  13. Wind profiles on the stoss slope of sand dunes: Implications for eolian sand transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, A.; Kocurek, G. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Starting with the work of R.A. Bagnold it has been recognized that the shear stress exerted by the wind on sand grains is the driving force for eolian sand transport. Calculation of accurate rates of sand transport is essential for prediction of migration rates of sand dunes in modern environments as well as reconstructing paleoclimates (wind speed and direction) from eolian deposits. Because a sand dune is a streamlined obstacle in the path of the wind, continuity necessitates that the flow field is compressed over the windward side of a dune and shear stress should progressively increase up the slope as the flow accelerates. However, airflow measurements over 14 dunes (at White Sands, New Mexico; Algodones, CA; and Padre Island, TX) show that compression of the flow field occurs very close to the surface and as a consequence, the overlying flow actually shows an overall decrease in shear stress up the slope. Measurements commonly collected in the overlying zone are not representative of the near-surface, sand-driving wind. Furthermore, near-surface compression of the flow field implies that a pressure gradient exists that would render the current transport models inappropriate for sloping surfaces that dominate natural sandy desert terrains.

  14. Park Profiler/Jump Analyzer Practical method for determining terrain park jump performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Terrain Park jump safety as a rider/resort partnership II. USTPC criteria: Quantifying best practices in terrain park jump design III. "Park Profiler" - practical tool to measure TP jump IV. "Jump Analyzer of flying ... but, as Icarus leaned the hard way, there are risks. #12;Terrain Park Jump Safety Terrain park

  15. Terrain sensing and estimation for dynamic outdoor mobile robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Christopher Charles

    2007-01-01

    In many applications, mobile robots are required to travel on outdoor terrain at high speed. Compared to traditional low-speed, laboratory-based robots, outdoor scenarios pose increased perception and mobility challenges ...

  16. Flow over Heated Terrain. Part II: Generation of Convective Precipitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.; Crook, N. Andrew

    2005-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that thunderstorms in the Rocky Mountain region have preferred areas in which to form. There has been some indication that these areas depend on the midtropospheric wind direction. A nonhydrostatic model with a terrain...

  17. Geostatistical Mapping of Mountain Precipitation Incorporating Autosearched Effects of Terrain and Climatic Characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    Geostatistical Mapping of Mountain Precipitation Incorporating Autosearched Effects of Terrain 2004, in final form 30 March 2005) ABSTRACT Hydrologic and ecologic studies in mountainous terrain mountain precipitation using only precipi- tation gauge data. The ASOADeK model considers both

  18. Parallel Implementation of a Vehicle-Tire-Terrain Interaction Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Negrut, Dan

    (VTTIM) · Three components o Vehicle o Tire o Terrain/Soil mechanics · Two interfaces o Vehicle support for ANCF `tire' 9 #12;Types of Soil Mechanics Models · Empirical Methods o WES numerics, Bekker of Tire Models · Rigid o Simple to implement in parallel o Only accurate if deformation of soil is much

  19. Towards a mathematics of terrain W. Randolph Franklin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    explicitly, and · enforces global consistencies. Why? To put compression and other ops on a logical is derivative of elevation, but · that amplifies errors, and · lossy compression has errors, so · maybe we want the geology) to deep (simulating every molecule). · One solution: Scooping. Carve terrain from a block using

  20. Greater Boston Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View New Pages RecentPlantMagma EnergyGoogleProgramsScienceGreater Boston

  1. The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mavroidis, Constantinos

    The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System Ajay Ummat, Constantinos in real-time while an astronaut is in the mission. All Terrain Bio-nano (ATB) gear system is one the current or any other future space suits. The proposed All Terrain Bio nano (ATB) gear is one such concept

  2. Are trout populations affected by reach-scale stream slope?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Reach-scale stream slope and the energy that it helps to gen- erate exert a dominant influenceAre trout populations affected by reach-scale stream slope? Daniel J. Isaak And Wayne A. Hubert Abstract: Reach-scale stream slope and the structure of associated physical habitats are thought to affect

  3. Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of Renewable Energy with Lower Integration Costs Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of Renewable...

  4. Wind Regimes in Complex Terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdwell, Kevin R [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    This research was designed to provide an understanding of physical wind mechanisms within the complex terrain of the Great Valley of Eastern Tennessee to assess the impacts of regional air flow with regard to synoptic and mesoscale weather changes, wind direction shifts, and air quality. Meteorological data from 2008 2009 were analyzed from 13 meteorological sites along with associated upper level data. Up to 15 ancillary sites were used for reference. Two-step complete linkage and K-means cluster analyses, synoptic weather studies, and ambient meteorological comparisons were performed to generate hourly wind classifications. These wind regimes revealed seasonal variations of underlying physical wind mechanisms (forced channeled, vertically coupled, pressure-driven, and thermally-driven winds). Synoptic and ambient meteorological analysis (mixing depth, pressure gradient, pressure gradient ratio, atmospheric and surface stability) suggested up to 93% accuracy for the clustered results. Probabilistic prediction schemes of wind flow and wind class change were developed through characterization of flow change data and wind class succession. Data analysis revealed that wind flow in the Great Valley was dominated by forced channeled winds (45 67%) and vertically coupled flow (22 38%). Down-valley pressure-driven and thermally-driven winds also played significant roles (0 17% and 2 20%, respectively), usually accompanied by convergent wind patterns (15 20%) and large wind direction shifts, especially in the Central/Upper Great Valley. The behavior of most wind regimes was associated with detectable pressure differences between the Lower and Upper Great Valley. Mixing depth and synoptic pressure gradients were significant contributors to wind pattern behavior. Up to 15 wind classes and 10 sub-classes were identified in the Central Great Valley with 67 joined classes for the Great Valley at-large. Two-thirds of Great Valley at-large flow was defined by 12 classes. Winds flowed on-axis only 40% of the time. The Great Smoky Mountains helped create down-valley pressure-driven winds, downslope mountain breezes, and divergent air flow. The Cumberland Mountains and Plateau were associated with wind speed reductions in the Central Great Valley, Emory Gap Flow, weak thermally-driven winds, and northwesterly down sloping. Ridge-and-valley terrain enhanced wind direction reversals, pressure-driven winds, as well as locally and regionally produced thermally-driven flow.

  5. North Slope action holds West Coast spotlight

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, H.M.

    1981-05-25

    The first oil from a North Slope reservoir outside Prudhoe Bay will begin flowing next year at rate of 80,000 bpd from Kuparuk field now under development by Atlantic Richfield Co. west of Prudhoe Bay. Just north of the Kuparuk development, Conoco Inc. has found a commercial reservoir in the Milne Point unit and will be drilling confirmation and delineation wells later this year and in 1982. Another area which very likely will be developed for production is located northeast of Prudhoe Bay, where Sohio Alaska Petroleum Co. has announced discoveries in 2 Sag Delta wells. In California's San Joaquin Valley, 3 Kern County fields - South Belridge, Elk Hills, and Lost Hills - are the sites of intensive drilling. Seven rigs are working in the Santa Barbara Channel, 3 of them developing known fields from permanent platforms.

  6. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    in Alaskan North Slope oil production facilities. Title:Profiling Despite oil production from several major16) was isolated from oil-production water and has optimal

  7. Atmospheric studies in complex terrain: a planning guide for future studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assist the US Department of Energy in Conducting its atmospheric studies in complex terrain (ASCOT0 by defining various complex terrain research systems and relating these options to specific landforms sites. This includes: (1) reviewing past meteorological and diffusion research on complex terrain; (2) relating specific terrain-induced airflow phenomena to specific landforms and time and space scales; (3) evaluating the technical difficulty of modeling and measuring terrain-induced airflow phenomena; and (4) avolving severdal research options and proposing candidate sites for continuing and expanding field and modeling work. To evolve research options using variable candidate sites, four areas were considered: site selection, terrain uniqueness and quantification, definition of research problems and research plans. 36 references, 111 figures, 20 tables.

  8. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

  9. The Effect of Slope in the Casimir Rack Gear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuliya Voronina; Petr Silaev

    2013-09-17

    The effect of slope for the rack gear in the massless scalar field model is considered. It appears, that the slope of profile surfaces can essentially change the value of normal Casimir force, whereas average value of tangential force remains almost unchanged. At the same time we observe essential shift of maximum and minimum tangential force positions.

  10. SLOPE DISTRIBUTIONS, THRESHOLD HILLSLOPES, AND STEADY-STATE TOPOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    SLOPE DISTRIBUTIONS, THRESHOLD HILLSLOPES, AND STEADY-STATE TOPOGRAPHY DAVID R. MONTGOMERY hillslopes, and steady-state topography. Plots of drainage area versus slope for these mountain ranges or exponential distributions in areas of active rock uplift and depositional topography, respectively. Local

  11. Comparison of TDR and Inclinometers for Slope Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    monitoring movement in soil and rock slopes and embankments as well as retrofitting deformed inclinometer of an expansive cement grout. When localized shear movements in rock or soil are sufficient to fracture the grout 2 involved installation of coaxial cable in the highwall slope of an oil sands mine. Details

  12. Sidewinding on Slopes Ross L. Hatton and Howie Choset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choset, Howie

    of the sidewinding pattern needed to maintain stability. Our theoretical results are supported by experiments to propel the robot over flat terrain or well-defined obstacles such as pipes, e.g. [1]­[5]. As these basic measurements taken on our snake robots. II. BACKGROUND Our analysis in this paper draws on prior research

  13. FOREST-AIR FLUXES OF CARBON, WATER AND ENERGY OVER NON-FLAT TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Xuhui

    FOREST-AIR FLUXES OF CARBON, WATER AND ENERGY OVER NON-FLAT TERRAIN XUHUI LEE and XINZHANG HU-air exchange of carbon, water, and energy was conducted at a mid-latitude, mixed forest on non-flat terrain to address this question, we conducted a field experiment on energy and carbon exchanges in a mixed forest

  14. Title: Digital Terrain Model of Southern Ontario: City of Toronto Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Digital Terrain Model of Southern Ontario: City of Toronto Data Creator / Copyright Owner Ontario is a topographic model of the earth's surface. The data files outline features such as: bridge: N/A Keywords (Place): Toronto, Ontario Keywords (Subject): Contours, Digital Terrain Models

  15. Stability of Passive Dynamic Walking on Uneven Terrain Katie Byl and Russ Tedrake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russ

    and MFPTs on uneven terrain. mh/m a (m) MFPT: std .5° MFPT: std 1.0° walker #1 2.0 .6 20 6 walker #2 0.3 .7 Institute of Technology email: katiebyl@mit.edu, russt@mit.edu, web: http terrain. Although deterministic definitions of stability do not apply, for sufficiently low levels

  16. A Realistic Framework for Delay-Tolerant Network Routing in Open Terrains with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Realistic Framework for Delay-Tolerant Network Routing in Open Terrains with Continuous Churn to classify routing protocols based on the difference in their behavior under churn. Keywords: Delay model churn in the network, by having these nodes enter the terrain as a Poisson process and exit

  17. Optimal Complete Terrain Coverage using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Anqi Xu, Chatavut Viriyasuthee, and Ioannis Rekleitis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Gregory

    Optimal Complete Terrain Coverage using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Anqi Xu, Chatavut Viriyasuthee an aerial vehicle. Ex- tensive experimental results in simulation validate the presented system, along. INTRODUCTION This paper presents a realization of an optimal terrain coverage algorithm for an Unmanned Aerial

  18. Free surface flows with large slopes: beyond lubrication theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snoeijer, J H

    2006-01-01

    The description of free surface flows can often be simplified to thin film (or lubrication) equations, when the slopes of the liquid-gas interface are small. Here we present a long wavelength theory that remains fully quantitative for steep interface slopes, by expanding about Stokes flow in a wedge. For small capillary numbers, the variations of the interface slope are slow and can be treated perturbatively. This geometry occurs naturally for flows with contact lines: we quantify the difference with ordinary lubrication theory through a numerical example and analytically recover the full Cox-Voinov asymptotic solution.

  19. Residential model for steep slopes : case study, Ajaltoun, Lebanon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abourached, Toufic

    1984-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to develop a residential model for steep slopes, in the mountain village of Ajaltoun. It is anticipated that this preliminary design would represent an alternative method for residential ...

  20. A Methodology for Evaluating Liquefaction Susceptibility in Shallow Sandy Slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buscarnera, Giuseppe

    This paper illustrates a modeling approach for evaluating the liquefaction susceptibility of shallow sandy slopes. The methodology is based on a theoretical framework for capturing undrained bifurcation in saturated granular ...

  1. Linear and nonlinear stratified spindown over sloping topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benthuysen, Jessica A

    2010-01-01

    In a stratified rotating fluid, frictionally driven circulations couple with the buoyancy field over sloping topography. Analytical and numerical methods are used to quantify the impact of this coupling on the vertical ...

  2. Uranium - thorium series study on Yucatan slope cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exner, Mary Elizabeth

    1972-01-01

    URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1972... Major Subject: Oceanography URANIUM ? THORIUM SERIES STUDY ON YUCATAN SLOPE CORES A Thesis by Mary Elizabeth Exner Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of ommittee) , 1 (Head of Department)' p (Member ) (Member) August, 1972 gg...

  3. Stratigraphic architecture and evolution of the continental slope system in offshore Hainan, northern South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    Stratigraphic architecture and evolution of the continental slope system in offshore Hainan the evolution of the stratigraphic architecture of two siliciclastic northern South China Sea continental slope structures, and slump deposits. The associated stratigraphic architecture in slope clinoforms is chaotic

  4. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    market barriers to greater investment in energy efficiency and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. CHP technology captures and reuses heat created during electricity...

  5. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  6. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  7. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    greater investment in energy efficiency and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies. CHP technology captures and reuses heat created during electricity production and other...

  8. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials Prepared by The National Council on Electricity Policy November 2009 NATIONAL COUNCIL...

  9. Clean Cities: Greater Lansing Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calnin has worked with the Clean Cities initiative since 2007, having supported the Detroit Area coalition as well as the Greater Lansing Area coalition. With a background that...

  10. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis in a municipal solid waste landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, L.; Batlle, F.

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: > A quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis method was proposed. > The proposed method is a good engineering tool for 3D slope stability analysis. > Factor of safety from 3D analysis is higher than from 2D analysis. > 3D analysis results are more sensitive to cohesion than 2D analysis. - Abstract: Limited space for accommodating the ever increasing mounds of municipal solid waste (MSW) demands the capacity of MSW landfill be maximized by building landfills to greater heights with steeper slopes. This situation has raised concerns regarding the stability of high MSW landfills. A hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis based on the finite element stress analysis was applied in a case study at a MSW landfill in north-east Spain. Potential slides can be assumed to be located within the waste mass due to the lack of weak foundation soils and geosynthetic membranes at the landfill base. The only triggering factor of deep-seated slope failure is the higher leachate level and the relatively high and steep slope in the front. The valley-shaped geometry and layered construction procedure at the site make three-dimensional slope stability analyses necessary for this landfill. In the finite element stress analysis, variations of leachate level during construction and continuous settlement of the landfill were taken into account. The 'equivalent' three-dimensional factor of safety (FoS) was computed from the individual result of the two-dimensional analysis for a series of evenly spaced cross sections within the potential sliding body. Results indicate that the hybrid method for quasi-three-dimensional slope stability analysis adopted in this paper is capable of locating roughly the spatial position of the potential sliding mass. This easy to manipulate method can serve as an engineering tool in the preliminary estimate of the FoS as well as the approximate position and extent of the potential sliding mass. The result that FoS obtained from three-dimensional analysis increases as much as 50% compared to that from two-dimensional analysis implies the significance of the three-dimensional effect for this study-case. Influences of shear parameters, time elapse after landfill closure, leachate level as well as unit weight of waste on FoS were also investigated in this paper. These sensitivity analyses serve as the guidelines of construction practices and operating procedures for the MSW landfill under study.

  11. Slope Error Measurement Tool for Solar Parabolic Trough Collectors: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stynes, J. K.; Ihas, B.

    2012-04-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed an optical measurement tool for parabolic solar collectors that measures the combined errors due to absorber misalignment and reflector slope error. The combined absorber alignment and reflector slope errors are measured using a digital camera to photograph the reflected image of the absorber in the collector. Previous work using the image of the reflection of the absorber finds the reflector slope errors from the reflection of the absorber and an independent measurement of the absorber location. The accuracy of the reflector slope error measurement is thus dependent on the accuracy of the absorber location measurement. By measuring the combined reflector-absorber errors, the uncertainty in the absorber location measurement is eliminated. The related performance merit, the intercept factor, depends on the combined effects of the absorber alignment and reflector slope errors. Measuring the combined effect provides a simpler measurement and a more accurate input to the intercept factor estimate. The minimal equipment and setup required for this measurement technique make it ideal for field measurements.

  12. Hazard avoidance for high-speed rough-terrain unmanned ground vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spenko, Matthew J. (Matthew Julius), 1976-

    2005-01-01

    High-speed unmanned ground vehicles have important applications in rough-terrain. In these applications unexpected and dangerous situations can occur that require rapid hazard avoidance maneuvers. At high speeds, there is ...

  13. Modelling of wind turbine wakes in complex terrain using computational fluid dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makridis, Alexandros

    2012-06-25

    This thesis focuses on modelling of wind turbine wakes when they are affected by real complex terrain features, such as hills and forests, and also examines the effect of the rotational momentum imparted to the downstream ...

  14. Design methods for cost-effective teams of mobile robots in uncertain terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaluk, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    Conducting planetary exploration missions with mobile robots is expensive, with costs ranging from hundreds of millions to billions of dollars. Developing reliable robots to work remotely on rough, uncertain terrain is ...

  15. Rough-terrain mobile robot planning and control with application to planetary exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iagnemma, Karl David

    2001-01-01

    Future planetary exploration missions will require mobile robots to perform difficult tasks in highly challenging terrain, with limited human supervision. Current motion planning and control algorithms are not well suited ...

  16. Mapping textures on 3d terrains: a hybrid cellular automata approach 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinvhal, Swapnil

    2007-04-25

    It is a time consuming task to generate textures for large 3D terrain surfaces in computer games, flight simulations and computer animations. This work explores the use of cellular automata in the automatic generation of ...

  17. Guidance and control using model predictive control for low altitude real-time terrain following flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lapp, Tiffany Rae, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a model predictive control based trajectory optimization method for Nap-of-the-Earth (NOE) flight. A NOE trajectory reference is generated over a subspace of the terrain. ...

  18. The design of a frame for an all terrain, lever propelled wheelchair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walton, John Michael

    2011-01-01

    This thesis outlines the process of designing a frame for the Leveraged Freedom Chair (LFC) Prime, an all-terrain levered powered wheelchair designed to improve the mobility of disabled individuals. This design allows for ...

  19. L2-Gain Optimization for Robust Bipedal Walking on Unknown Terrain Hongkai Dai and Russ Tedrake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tedrake, Russ

    control analysis and design methodologies without additional machinery. We attempt to provide that machinery here. In particular, we quantify the robustness of the system to terrain perturbations by defining

  20. Ph.D. Showcase: Measuring Terrain Distances Through Extracted Channel Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, W. Randolph

    of elevation data. This is a crucial step in better- ing the design and construction of levees and dams. (Fully An important characteristic of a terrain is the drainage, or channel, network, because hydraulic erosion

  1. Instrumentation for slope stability -- Experience from an urban area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flentje, P.; Chowdhury, R.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the monitoring of several existing landslides in an urban area near Wollongong in the state of New South Wales, Australia. A brief overview of topography and geology is given and reference is made to the types of slope movement, processes and causal factors. Often the slope movements are extremely slow and imperceptible to the eye, and catastrophic failures are quite infrequent. However, cumulative movements at these slower rates do, over time, cause considerable distress to structures and disrupt residential areas and transport routes. Inclinometers and piezometers have been installed at a number of locations and monitoring of these has been very useful. The performance of instrumentation at different sites is discussed in relation to the monitoring of slope movements and pore pressures. Interval rates of inclinometer shear displacement have been compared with various periods of cumulative rainfall to assess the relationships.

  2. Ultrawideband radar clutter measurements of forested terrain, 1991--1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, D.M.; Severtsen, R.H.; Prince, J.M.; Davis, K.C.; Collins, H.D.

    1993-06-01

    The ultrawideband (UWB) radar clutter measurements project was conducted to provide radar clutter data for new ultrawideband radar systems which are currently under development. A particular goal of this project is to determine if conventional narrow band clutter data may be extrapolated to the UWB case. This report documents measurements conducted in 1991 and additional measurements conducted in 1992. The original project consisted of clutter measurements of forested terrain in the Olympic National Forest near Sequim, WA. The impulse radar system used a 30 kW peak impulse source with a 2 Gigasample/second digitizer to form a UHF (300--1000 MHz) ultrawideband impulse radar system. Additional measurements were conducted in parallel using a Systems Planning Corporation (SPC) step-chirp radar system. This system utilized pulse widths of 1330 nanoseconds over a bandwidth of 300--1000 MHz to obtain similar resolution to the impulse system. Due to the slow digitizer data throughput in the impulse radar system, data collection rates were significantly higher using the step-chirp system. Additional forest clutter measurements were undertaken in 1992 to increase the amount of data available, and especially to increase the amount of data from the impulse radar system.

  3. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  4. Concentration of ozone in surface air over greater Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Widen, Donald Allen

    1966-01-01

    Surface ozone concentrations were measured in the Greater Boston area from November, 1964 to December, 1965. Ozone was monitored continuosly using a Mast microcoulombmetric sensor. A chromium trioxide filter was fitted to ...

  5. Great ranging associated with greater reproductive investment in mammals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontzer, Herman

    intake of Enet(J/day) acquires food energy at a constant rate B (J/m) and spends energy on travel at some rate C (J/m), it must travel sufficient distance, D (m/day), so that D (B­C) Enet. Perhaps surprisingly movement dis- tances to be energetically beneficial, since greater D will lead to greater Enet as long as B

  6. Alaska North Slope Tundra Travel Model and Validation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry R. Bader; Jacynthe Guimond

    2006-03-01

    The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR), Division of Mining, Land, and Water manages cross-country travel, typically associated with hydrocarbon exploration and development, on Alaska's arctic North Slope. This project is intended to provide natural resource managers with objective, quantitative data to assist decision making regarding opening of the tundra to cross-country travel. DNR designed standardized, controlled field trials, with baseline data, to investigate the relationships present between winter exploration vehicle treatments and the independent variables of ground hardness, snow depth, and snow slab thickness, as they relate to the dependent variables of active layer depth, soil moisture, and photosynthetically active radiation (a proxy for plant disturbance). Changes in the dependent variables were used as indicators of tundra disturbance. Two main tundra community types were studied: Coastal Plain (wet graminoid/moist sedge shrub) and Foothills (tussock). DNR constructed four models to address physical soil properties: two models for each main community type, one predicting change in depth of active layer and a second predicting change in soil moisture. DNR also investigated the limited potential management utility in using soil temperature, the amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by plants, and changes in microphotography as tools for the identification of disturbance in the field. DNR operated under the assumption that changes in the abiotic factors of active layer depth and soil moisture drive alteration in tundra vegetation structure and composition. Statistically significant differences in depth of active layer, soil moisture at a 15 cm depth, soil temperature at a 15 cm depth, and the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation were found among treatment cells and among treatment types. The models were unable to thoroughly investigate the interacting role between snow depth and disturbance due to a lack of variability in snow depth cover throughout the period of field experimentation. The amount of change in disturbance indicators was greater in the tundra communities of the Foothills than in those of the Coastal Plain. However the overall level of change in both community types was less than expected. In Coastal Plain communities, ground hardness and snow slab thickness were found to play an important role in change in active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. In the Foothills communities, snow cover had the most influence on active layer depth and soil moisture as a result of treatment. Once certain minimum thresholds for ground hardness, snow slab thickness, and snow depth were attained, it appeared that little or no additive effect was realized regarding increased resistance to disturbance in the tundra communities studied. DNR used the results of this modeling project to set a standard for maximum permissible disturbance of cross-country tundra travel, with the threshold set below the widely accepted standard of Low Disturbance levels (as determined by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service). DNR followed the modeling project with a validation study, which seemed to support the field trial conclusions and indicated that the standard set for maximum permissible disturbance exhibits a conservative bias in favor of environmental protection. Finally DNR established a quick and efficient tool for visual estimations of disturbance to determine when investment in field measurements is warranted. This Visual Assessment System (VAS) seemed to support the plot disturbance measurements taking during the modeling and validation phases of this project.

  7. Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll Cardús Landfill Li Yu UNIVERSIDAD POLITÉCNICA DE CATALUÑA April, 2007 GEOMODELS #12;Introduction to Coll Cardús landfill Prediction of settlement in Coll Cardús landfill 1) Settlement prediction by empirical method 2) Settlement prediction

  8. Stress distribution and development within geosynthetic-reinforced soil slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    September 2011, accepted 2 December 2011 ABSTRACT: Numerical methods combined with centrifuge tests are used is evaluated using finite element analysis. Advanced models and an integration algorithm are implemented by centrifuge tests of two GRS slopes with different backfill densities. Numerical results indicate that soil

  9. Juvenile Salmon Passage in Sloped-Baffled Culverts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thurman, David R.; Horner-Devine, Alex R.; Morrison, Ryan R.; Hotchkiss, Rollin H

    2007-01-01

    m (15’) apart at 42 l/s (1.5 cfs). Under this combination ofBaseline flow at 42 l/s (1.5 cfs), 1.14% culvert slope, 4.57increased to 85 l/s (3.0 cfs) for the same parameters the

  10. Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale Jean-Bernard Caron , Donald A and composition, ecological attributes, and environmental influences for the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale ecosystems further suggest the Burgess Shale community was probably highly dependent on immigration from

  11. PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with increasing populations and costs associated with urban growth--related to infrastructure, energy, operationPLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District by Andrew K. Doi B. A in urban areas around the globe, yet per capita water consumption continues to increase. Faced

  12. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  13. Fast Cryptography in Genus 2 (Two is Greater than One)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    Fast Cryptography in Genus 2 (Two is Greater than One) Joppe W. Bos1, Craig Costello1 , Huseyin techniques to realize genus 2 based cryptography, which includes fast formulas on the Kummer surface of the speed records for fast curve-based cryptography are for elliptic curves (cf. the ECRYPT online

  14. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  15. Relaxing competition through speculation: Committing to a negative supply slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holmberg, Pär; Willems, Bert

    2012-12-10

    . The main differences between our paper and the delegation literature is that we use financial contracts instead of delegation as the commitment device, 6 Downward sloping supply bids were allowed in the Nordic power exchange (Nord Pool) until it introduced... a new clearing algorithm on October 10, 2007 that could no longer handle them. Total supply of a firm consists of its supply in the power exchange plus its supply delivered directly to consumers with bilateral contracts. So if bilaterally contracted...

  16. North Slope Decision Support for Water Resource Planning and Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnabel, William; Brumbelow, Kelly

    2013-03-31

    The objective of this project was to enhance the water resource decision-making process with respect to oil and gas exploration/production activities on Alaska’s North Slope. To this end, a web-based software tool was developed to allow stakeholders to assemble, evaluate, and communicate relevant information between and amongst themselves. The software, termed North Slope Decision Support System (NSDSS), is a visually-referenced database that provides a platform for running complex natural system, planning, and optimization models. The NSDSS design was based upon community input garnered during a series of stakeholder workshops, and the end product software is freely available to all stakeholders via the project website. The tool now resides on servers hosted by the UAF Water and Environmental Research Center, and will remain accessible and free-of-charge for all interested stakeholders. The development of the tool fostered new advances in the area of data evaluation and decision support technologies, and the finished product is envisioned to enhance water resource planning activities on Alaska’s North Slope.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF SHALLOW VISCOUS OIL RESERVES IN NORTH SLOPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    North Slope of Alaska has huge oil deposits in heavy oil reservoirs such as Ugnu, West Sak and Shrader Bluff etc. The viscosity of the last two reservoir oils vary from {approx}30 cp to {approx}3000 cp and the amount in the range of 10-20 billion barrels. High oil viscosity and low formation strength impose problems to high recovery and well productivity. Water-alternate-gas injection processes can be effective for the lower viscosity end of these deposits in West Sak and Shrader Bluff. Several gas streams are available in the North Slope containing NGL and CO{sub 2} (a greenhouse gas). The goal of this research is to develop tools to find optimum solvent, injection schedule and well-architecture for a WAG process in North Slope shallow sand viscous oil reservoirs. In the last quarter, we have developed streamline generation and convection subroutines for miscible gas injection. The WAG injection algorithms are being developed. We formulated a four-phase relative permeability model based on two-phase relative permeabilities. The new relative permeability formulations are being incorporated into the simulator. Wettabilities and relative permeabilities are being measured. Plans for the next quarter includes modeling of WAG injection in streamline based simulation, relative permeability studies with cores, incorporation of complex well-architecture.

  18. Comparison of slope stability in two Brazilian municipal landfills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharabaghi, B. Singh, M.K.; Inkratas, C. Fleming, I.R. McBean, E.

    2008-07-01

    The implementation of landfill gas to energy (LFGTE) projects has greatly assisted in reducing the greenhouse gases and air pollutants, leading to an improved local air quality and reduced health risks. The majority of cities in developing countries still dispose of their municipal waste in uncontrolled 'open dumps.' Municipal solid waste landfill construction practices and operating procedures in these countries pose a challenge to implementation of LFGTE projects because of concern about damage to the gas collection infrastructure (horizontal headers and vertical wells) caused by minor, relatively shallow slumps and slides within the waste mass. While major slope failures can and have occurred, such failures in most cases have been shown to involve contributory factors or triggers such as high pore pressures, weak foundation soil or failure along weak geosynthetic interfaces. Many researchers who have studied waste mechanics propose that the shear strength of municipal waste is sufficient such that major deep-seated catastrophic failures under most circumstances require such contributory factors. Obviously, evaluation of such potential major failures requires expert analysis by geotechnical specialists with detailed site-specific information regarding foundation soils, interface shearing resistances and pore pressures both within the waste and in clayey barrier layers or foundation soils. The objective of this paper is to evaluate the potential use of very simple stability analyses which can be used to study the potential for slumps and slides within the waste mass and which may represent a significant constraint on construction and development of the landfill, on reclamation and closure and on the feasibility of a LFGTE project. The stability analyses rely on site-specific but simple estimates of the unit weight of waste and the pore pressure conditions and use 'generic' published shear strength envelopes for municipal waste. Application of the slope stability analysis method is presented in a case study of two Brazilian landfill sites; the Cruz das Almas Landfill in Maceio and the Muribeca Landfill in Recife. The Muribeca site has never recorded a slope failure and is much larger and better-maintained when compared to the Maceio site at which numerous minor slumps and slides have been observed. Conventional limit-equilibrium analysis was used to calculate factors of safety for stability of the landfill side slopes. Results indicate that the Muribeca site is more stable with computed factors of safety values in the range 1.6-2.4 compared with computed values ranging from 0.9 to 1.4 for the Maceio site at which slope failures have been known to occur. The results suggest that this approach may be useful as a screening-level tool when considering the feasibility of implementing LFGTE projects.

  19. Marine carbonate embayment system in an Eolian dune terrain, Permian Upper Minnelusa Formation, Rozet Area, Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Achauer, C.W.

    1987-05-01

    The eolian origin for Minnelusa sandstones has been stressed in numerous published articles. However, the dolomites that are interbedded with the eolian sandstones have received little attention. Isopach mapping of one of the dolomite units (Dolomite I) reflects a marine embayment system whose individual embayments range from 1/2 to 1 mi in width and trend primarily in a northwest direction. Consistently the embayment dolomites pinch out against the flanks of reworked, low relief, broad, eolian dune ridges. So far, 108 mi/sup 2/ of the Dolomite I marine embayment system have been mapped, but the overall extent of the system is undoubtedly much greater. Dolomite I is rarely cored, but cores from stratigraphically higher embayment dolomites in the upper Minnelusa show that these dolomites display the following, shoaling-upward sequence: (1) subtidal, sparingly fossiliferous dolomite; (2) intertidal, algal-laminated or brecciated or mud-cracked dolomite; and (3) very thin, supratidal, nodular anhydrite. The embayments, therefore, became the sites of marine sabkhas located between eolian dunes. Two main conclusions emerge from this study: (1) the juxtaposition of eolian sandstones and marine dolomites in a tectonically stable area suggests that eustatic sea level changes and a very arid climate were responsible for the marked environmental and lithologic changes observed in the upper Minnelusa, and (2) arid, coastal, evaporitic sabkhas bordered by eolian dunes are known from a number of modern and ancient cases, but marine carbonate embayments and associated evaporitic sabkhas that penetrate deeply into eolian sandstone terrains are rare.

  20. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  1. 358 Natural Areas Journal Volume 24 (4), 2004 Slope Correction of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abella, Scott R.

    are corrected for slope gradient, ecological field studies will underestimate basal area and density per unit-Dombois and Ellenberg 1974), or more commonly was not mentioned at all (e.g., Bonham 1989, Kent and Coker 1992). Slope

  2. Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos Lab to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace Los Alamos National Laboratory to perform slope-side cleanup near Smith's Marketplace The Lab is performing a...

  3. Immersed Boundary Methods for High-Resolution Simulation of Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow Over Complex Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Fotini Katopodes

    models, such as the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, are in- creasingly used for high facilitates explicit resolution of complex terrain, even urban terrain, in the WRF mesoscale model. First gradient boundary conditions. Specified diurnal heating in a valley, producing anabatic winds, is used

  4. 3D Analysis of Steep Slopes Subjected to Seismic Excitation S.S. Nadukuru1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    for the assessment of the factor of safety for slopes with predefined width of the failure mechanism is shown3D Analysis of Steep Slopes Subjected to Seismic Excitation S.S. Nadukuru1 , T. Martel1 , Student for the seismic excitation. A three-dimensional analysis of slopes is used here, based on the kinematic theorem

  5. DRAFT TECHNICAL GUIDANCE DOCUMENT ON STATIC AND SEISMIC SLOPE STABILITY FOR SOLID WASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stability of landfill slopes. Locating the critical cross- section is usually accomplished by analyzing two of landfill slopes. The two-dimensional cross-sections are usually analyzed using a limit equilibrium slope- and post-closure conditions (e.g., seismic events, settlement, and expansion). o Settlement caused

  6. Namur, Belgium -weathering deteriorating slope stability future -Robert Hack 1 WEATHERING DETERIORATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    Namur, Belgium - weathering deteriorating slope stability future - Robert Hack 1 WEATHERING DETERIORATING AND SLOPE STABILITY CLASSIFICATION FOR THE FUTURE Namur, Belgium, 12 June 2008 Robert Hack Geo #12;Namur, Belgium - weathering deteriorating slope stability future - Robert Hack 2 Jan van Goyen

  7. SVMs for Vibration-based Terrain Classification Christian Weiss, Matthias Stark, and Andreas Zell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zell, Andreas

    SVMs for Vibration-based Terrain Classification Christian Weiss, Matthias Stark, and Andreas Zell mobile robot traverses different types of ground surfaces, different types of vibrations are induced in the body of the robot. These vibrations can be used to learn a discrimination between different surfaces

  8. Using Immersive 3D Terrain Models For Fusion Of UAV Surveillance Imagery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scerri, Paul

    Using Immersive 3D Terrain Models For Fusion Of UAV Surveillance Imagery Sean Owens , Katia Sycara and Paul Scerri Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213, USA Teams of small and micro UAVs a single operator to utilize data from several UAVs and interact with the data in a more natural and less

  9. Horizontal structures in granulite terrains: A record of mountain building or mountain collapse?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Horizontal structures in granulite terrains: A record of mountain building or mountain collapse horizontal structures occurred during the metamorphic culmination and was followed by isobaric cooling that no significant erosional denudation fol- lowed the development of the horizontal structures and thus precludes

  10. Approximating the Visible Region of a Point on a Terrain Boaz Ben-Moshe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Moshe, Boaz

    enough; that is, whenever the difference between the sets of visible segments along the cross sections computes the (projections of the) visible por- tions of the cross section of T in this direc§ Abstract Given a terrain T and a point p on or above it, we wish to compute the region Rp that is visible

  11. Saving the soil: AgriLife units work to improve training terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Saving the soil AgriLife units work to improve training terrain Story by Melanie Orth txH2O | pg. 9 Heavy tanks and armored vehicles that have continually rolled over the 67,000-acre West Range at Fort Hood for the past 60 years have...

  12. An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex Terrains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    1 An Experimental Investigation on the Wake Interference of Wind Turbines Sited Over Complex, 50011 An experimental study was conducted to investigate the interferences of wind turbines sited over conducted in a large wind tunnel with of wind turbine models sited over a flat terrain (baseline case

  13. CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Britton B.

    CO2 transport over complex terrain Jielun Sun a,*, Sean P. Burns a , Anthony C. Delany a , Steven P; accepted 15 February 2007 Abstract CO2 transport processes relevant for estimating net ecosystem exchange investigated during a pilot experiment. We found that cold, moist, and CO2- rich air was transported downslope

  14. Autonomous Vision-based Landing and Terrain Mapping Using an MPC-controlled Unmanned Rotorcraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sastry, S. Shankar

    determines the best trajectory to cover large areas of terrain or to perform closer inspection of potential by tracking the refer- ence trajectory as computed by a real-time MPC-based op- timization. This trajectory. of Aerospace Engineering, Ko- rea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, South Korea: hcshim

  15. H.R.G.K. Hack. Slopes in rock. An overview of engineering geology in the Netherlands. pp. 111-119 SLOPES IN ROCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    H.R.G.K. Hack. Slopes in rock. An overview of engineering geology in the Netherlands. pp. 111-119 SLOPES IN ROCK H.R.G.K. Hack ITC (Int.Inst. for Aerospace Survey and Earth Sciences), Section Engineering 'the rock is hard' (normally meaning: do not bother with further study because 111 #12;H.R.G.K. Hack

  16. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duncan, Kathleen E.; Gieg, Lisa M.; Parisi, Victoria A.; Tanner, Ralph S.; Green Tringe, Susannah; Bristow, Jim; Suflita, Joseph M.

    2009-09-16

    Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines by microorganisms is a costly but poorly understood phenomenon, with standard treatment methods targeting mesophilic sulfatereducing bacteria. In assessing biocorrosion potential at an Alaskan North Slope oil field, we identified thermophilic hydrogen-using methanogens, syntrophic bacteria, peptideand amino acid-fermenting bacteria, iron reducers, sulfur/thiosulfate-reducing bacteria and sulfate-reducing archaea. These microbes can stimulate metal corrosion through production of organic acids, CO2, sulfur species, and via hydrogen oxidation and iron reduction, implicating many more types of organisms than are currently targeted. Micromolar quantities of putative anaerobic metabolites of C1-C4 n-alkanes in pipeline fluids were detected, implying that these low molecular weight hydrocarbons, routinely injected into reservoirs for oil recovery purposes, are biodegraded and provide biocorrosive microbial communities with an important source of nutrients.

  17. Natural gas hydrates on the North Slope of Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S.

    1991-01-01

    Gas hydrates are crystalline substances composed of water and gas, mainly methane, in which a solid-water lattice accommodates gas molecules in a cage-like structure, or clathrate. These substances often have been regarded as a potential (unconventional) source of natural gas. Significant quantities of naturally occurring gas hydrates have been detected in many regions of the Arctic including Siberia, the Mackenzie River Delta, and the North Slope of Alaska. On the North Slope, the methane-hydrate stability zone is areally extensive beneath most of the coastal plain province and has thicknesses as great as 1000 meters in the Prudhoe Bay area. Gas hydrates have been identified in 50 exploratory and production wells using well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were recovered in a core by ARCO Alaska and EXXON. Most of these gas hydrates occur in six laterally continuous Upper Cretaceous and lower Tertiary sandstone and conglomerate units; all these gas hydrates are geographically restricted to the area overlying the eastern part of the Kuparuk River Oil Field and the western part of the Prudhoe Bay Oil Field. The volume of gas within these gas hydrates is estimated to be about 1.0 {times} 10{sup 12} to 1.2 {times} 10{sup 12} cubic meters (37 to 44 trillion cubic feet), or about twice the volume of conventional gas in the Prudhoe Bay Field. Geochemical analyses of well samples suggest that the identified hydrates probably contain a mixture of deep-source thermogenic gas and shallow microbial gas that was either directly converted to gas hydrate or first concentrated in existing traps and later converted to gas hydrate. The thermogenic gas probably migrated from deeper reservoirs along the same faults thought to be migration pathways for the large volumes of shallow, heavy oil that occur in this area. 51 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Evaluation of Single-Doppler Radar Wind Retrievals in Flat and Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsom, Rob K.; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Yang, Qing; Shaw, William J.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2014-08-01

    The accuracy of winds derived from NEXRAD level II data is assessed by comparison with independent observations from 915 MHz radar wind profilers. The evaluation is carried out at two locations with very different terrain characteristics. One site is located in an area of complex terrain within the State Line Wind Energy Center in northeast Oregon. The other site is located in an area of flat terrain on the east-central Florida coast. The National Severe Storm Laboratory’s 2DVar algorithm is used to retrieve wind fields from the KPDT (Pendleton OR) and KMLB (Melbourne FL) NEXRAD radars. Comparisons between the 2DVar retrievals and the radar profilers were conducted over a period of about 6 months and at multiple height levels at each of the profiler sites. Wind speed correlations at most observation height levels fell in the range from 0.7 to 0.8, indicating that the retrieved winds followed temporal fluctuations in the profiler-observed winds reasonably well. The retrieved winds, however, consistently exhibited slow biases in the range of1 to 2 ms-1. Wind speed difference distributions were broad with standard deviations in the range from 3 to 4 ms-1. Results from the Florida site showed little change in the wind speed correlations and difference standard deviations with altitude between about 300 and 1400 m AGL. Over this same height range, results from the Oregon site showed a monotonic increase in the wind speed correlation and a monotonic decrease in the wind speed difference standard deviation with increasing altitude. The poorest overall agreement occurred at the lowest observable level (~300 m AGL) at the Oregon site, where the effects of the complex terrain were greatest.

  19. Constraining slope parameter of symmetry energy from nuclear structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inakura, T

    2015-01-01

    Four quantities deducible from nuclear structure experiments have been claimed to correlate to the slope parameter $L$ of the symmetry energy; the neutron skin thickness, the cross section of low-energy dipole (LED) mode, dipole polarizability $\\alpha_D$, and $\\alpha_D S_0$ (i.e. product of $\\alpha_D$ and the symmetry energy $S_0$). By the calculations in the Hartree-Fock plus random-phase approximation with various effective interactions, we compare the correlations between $L$ and these four quantities. The correlation derived from different interactions and the correlation from a class of interactions that are identical in the symmetric matter as well as in $S_0$ are simultaneously examined. These two types of correlations may behave differently, as exemplified in the correlation of $\\alpha_D$ to $L$. It is found that the neutron skin thickness and $\\alpha_DS_0$ correlate well to $L$, and therefore are suitable for narrowing down the value of $L$ via experiments. The LED emergence and upgrowth makes the $\\...

  20. Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Quantifying subaqueous slope stability during seismic shaking: Lake Lucerne as model for ocean failure initiation, and (iii) the quantitative assessment of subaqueous slope stability. Three detailed stable under static loading conditions (factor of safety of 1.5­2) failed along planar sliding surfaces

  1. Stability Charts for Uniform Slopes Radoslaw L. Michalowski, F.ASCE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalowski, Radoslaw L.

    that leads to a strict lower bound on stability number c/ H or an upper bound on the safety factor. Charts are presented for slopes subjected to pore water pressure and also for those exposed to seismic analysis; Limit states; Failures; Graphic methods. Introduction Stability assessments of earth slopes

  2. Water-related ecological impacts of rill erosion processes in Mediterranean-dry reclaimed slopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espigares, Tíscar

    water status and potential seed germination) and vegetation structure in five coal-mining reclaimed is maximized by different mechanisms: the reduction of water infiltration by surface crust formation and cross-slope surface roughness reduction, and the efficient evacuation of water flows from the slope by rill networks

  3. Evaluation of a CCD-based high resolution autocollimator for use as a slope sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    Evaluation of a CCD-based high resolution autocollimator for use as a slope sensor Rohan Isaac the focused beam profile to broaden and decrease its peak intensity Project: Evaluation of a compact CCD-based high resolution autocollimator with a small probe beam for potential use as a slope sensor Optics Group

  4. Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Estimation of wave run-up on smooth, impermeable slopes using the wave momentum flux parameter-examines existing wave run-up data for regular, irregular and solitary waves on smooth, impermeable plane slopes. A simple physical argument is used to derive a new wave run-up equation in terms of a dimensionless wave

  5. FURTHER STUDIES ON FISHWAY SLOPE AND ITS EFFECT ON RATE OF . PASSAGE OF SALMONIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that fishways with steeper slopes . pass fish equally as well as the presently accepted standard designs. Years slope shows equal fish- passing ability, fishway construction costs can be reduced. Scientists fishway. The water is supplied by two SOUl"ces a,nd con- trolled by a system of pipes and valves. Most of

  6. Numerical simulations of dense clouds on steep slopes: Application to powder-snow avalanches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saramito, Pierre

    Numerical simulations of dense clouds on steep slopes: Application to powder-snow avalanches results. The interest of the results for powder- snow avalanches is discussed, concluding that two. Introduction A powder-snow avalanche is a dense cloud of suspended snow particles moving down a steep slope

  7. Fast and accurate estimation of solar irradiance on Martian slopes Aymeric Spiga1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spiga, Aymeric

    Fast and accurate estimation of solar irradiance on Martian slopes Aymeric Spiga1 and Franc parameterization is proposed in this study to calculate, in a Mars-like dusty atmosphere, the solar irradiance better than 5 W.mÀ2 . Such a fast and accurate method to calculate solar irradiance on Martian slopes

  8. Response of the bottom boundary layer over a sloping shelf to variations in alongshore wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to a great extent by flows in the surface and bottom boundary layers (BBL). Wind forcing generates crossResponse of the bottom boundary layer over a sloping shelf to variations in alongshore wind A boundary layer over a sloping shelf to variations in alongshore wind, J. Geophys. Res., 110, C10S09, doi:10

  9. Signatures of slope failures and river-delta collapses in a perialpine lake (Lake Lucerne, Switzerland)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Signatures of slope failures and river-delta collapses in a perialpine lake (Lake Lucerne) which caused extensive slope failures in many parts of the lake. The second event in AD 1687 signatures of the two subaqueous mass movements that probably generated the observed tsunamis. Such mass

  10. On the seismic response of deep-seated rock slope instabilities --Insights from numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the seismic response of deep-seated rock slope instabilities -- Insights from numerical modeling 2015 Accepted 3 April 2015 Available online 15 April 2015 Keywords: Seismic landslide hazard Spectral component of seismic hazard in mountainous regions. While many seismic slope stability analysis methods

  11. Development of Alaska North Slope natural gas resources: A historical perspective and future potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lannom, D.A.; Ogbe, D.O.; Lawal, A.S.; Hatzignatiou, D.G. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a historical analysis of plans proposed by the private sector to develop and commercialize the natural gas resources found on the North Slope of Alaska. It evaluates current proposals to commercialize North Slope gas and discusses the potential economic benefits to be derived from gas commercialization. First, we describe the natural gas resources of the North Slope. Second, a resource-allocation optimization model is presented to evaluate quantitatively the options available for gas utilization. The model is applied to the North Slope to screen the various gas utilization alternatives and to recommend the economically feasible options. The optimal decision is a major gas (LNG) sale to the Pacific Rim countries. The LNG project involves conditioning natural gas on the North Slope and transporting the gas by pipeline from Prudhoe Bay to a tidewater port where it can be liquefied and shipped by tankers to the Pacific Rim markets.

  12. Exporting Alaskan North Slope crude oil: Benefits and costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy study examines the effects of lifting the current prohibitions against the export of Alaskan North Slope (ANS) crude. The study concludes that permitting exports would benefit the US economy. First, lifting the ban would expand the markets in which ANS oil can be sold, thereby increasing its value. ANS oil producers, the States of California and Alaska, and some of their local governments all would benefit from increased revenues. Permitting exports also would generate new economic activity and employment in California and Alaska. The study concludes that these economic benefits would be achieved without increasing gasoline prices (either in California or in the nation as a whole). Lifting the export ban could have important implications for US maritime interests. The Merchant Marine Act of 1970 (known as the Jones Act) requires all inter-coastal shipments to be carried on vessels that are US-owned, US-crewed, and US-built. By limiting the shipment of ANS crude to US ports only, the export ban creates jobs for the seafarers and the builders of Jones Act vessels. Because the Jones Act does not apply to exports, however, lifting the ban without also changing US maritime law would jeopardize the jobs associated with the current fleet of Jones Act tankers. Therefore the report analyzes selected economic impacts of several maritime policy alternatives, including: Maintaining current law, which allows foreign tankers to carry oil where export is allowed; requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on Jones Act vessels; and requiring exports of ANS crude to be carried on vessels that are US-owned and US-crewed, but not necessarily US-built. Under each of these options, lifting the export ban would generate economic benefits.

  13. Economics of Alaska North Slope gas utilization options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Doughty, T.C.; Hackworth, J.H.; North, W.B.; Robertson, E.P.

    1996-08-01

    The recoverable natural gas available for sale in the developed and known undeveloped fields on the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) total about 26 trillion cubic feet (TCF), including 22 TCF in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU) and 3 TCF in the undeveloped Point Thomson Unit (PTU). No significant commercial use has been made of this large natural gas resource because there are no facilities in place to transport this gas to current markets. To date the economics have not been favorable to support development of a gas transportation system. However, with the declining trend in ANS oil production, interest in development of this huge gas resource is rising, making it important for the U.S. Department of Energy, industry, and the State of Alaska to evaluate and assess the options for development of this vast gas resource. The purpose of this study was to assess whether gas-to-liquids (GTL) conversion technology would be an economic alternative for the development and sale of the large, remote, and currently unmarketable ANS natural gas resource, and to compare the long term economic impact of a GTL conversion option to that of the more frequently discussed natural gas pipeline/liquefied natural gas (LNG) option. The major components of the study are: an assessment of the ANS oil and gas resources; an analysis of conversion and transportation options; a review of natural gas, LNG, and selected oil product markets; and an economic analysis of the LNG and GTL gas sales options based on publicly available input needed for assumptions of the economic variables. Uncertainties in assumptions are evaluated by determining the sensitivity of project economics to changes in baseline economic variables.

  14. A case study of pipeline route selection and design through discontinuous permafrost terrain in northwestern Alberta

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiechnik, C.; Boivin, R.; Henderson, J.; Bowman, M.

    1996-12-31

    As the natural gas pipeline system in Western Canada expands northward, it traverses the discontinuous permafrost zone. As the ground temperature of the frozen soil in this zone is just below freezing, it can be expected that within the design life of a pipeline the permafrost adjacent to it will melt due to the disturbance of the insulating cover by construction activities. Differential settlement at the thawing frozen/unfrozen soil interfaces gives rise to pipeline strain. Based on the calculated settlement and resulting strain level, a cost effective mechanical or civil design solution can be selected to mitigate the differential settlement problem. Since these design solutions can be costly, it is desirable to combine them with a pipeline route that traverses the least amount of discontinuous permafrost terrain while minimizing the overall length of the pipeline. This paper will detail the framework utilized to select the routing for a package of pipeline projects in northwestern Alberta. It is believed that the increased front end effort will result in lower operating costs and an overall reduced life-cycle cost. This basic design methodology can be applied to any project that traverses discontinuous permafrost terrain.

  15. Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanical Behavior of a Fractured Porous Slope in Response to Free Water-Surface Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guglielmi, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanicalinstrumented for mesoscale hydraulic and mechanicalwords: Fracture; Rock slope; Mesoscale; In situ poroelastic

  16. Automated suppression of errors in LTP-II slope measurements with x-ray optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Zulfiqar

    2011-01-01

    slope measurements with x-ray optics Zulfiqar Ali, Curtis L.with state-of-the-art x-ray optics. Significant suppressionscanning, metrology of x-ray optics, deflectometry Abstract

  17. Engineering properties of Resedimented Ugnu Clay from the Alaskan North Slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Cullen A. (Cullen Albert)

    2010-01-01

    This research determined the engineering properties of laboratory Resedimented Ugnu Clay (RUC) specimens created using recovered material from 3800 ft below the surface of the Alaskan Northern Slope to aid with future ...

  18. New evidence of slope instability in the Outardes Bay delta area, Quebec, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Bernard

    features are in direct relationship with the seismic interpretation of the data collected upslope multibeam sonar (95 kHz) on the slope to provide high-resolution seismic and bathy- metric data. The seismic

  19. Clay mineralogy and its effect on physical properties in the Gulf of Mexico northwestern continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berti, Debora

    2005-02-17

    The clay mineral composition of sediments deposited in the last six oxygen isotope stages in the Gulf of Mexico continental slope was characterized. Smectite and illite were found to be the two major clay minerals of the ...

  20. Scanning-laser glint measurements of sea-surface slope statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Joseph A.

    for the wave slope corre- sponding to solar specular reflection. This tech- nique worked well but required an airplane at about a 600-m altitude during periods of neutral equal air and water temperatures and positive

  1. MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thornton, Melanie 1989-

    2011-05-02

    fulfillment of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON MONITORING STRATIFICATION AND CURRENTS AT THE CONTINENTAL SLOPE OF THE SCOTIA SEA, ANTARCTICA Approved by... of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by MELANIE R. THORNTON iii ABSTRACT Monitoring Stratification and Currents at the Continental Slope of the Scotia Sea, Antarctica. (April 2011...

  2. The relation between the optical spectral slope and the luminosity for 17 Palomar-Green QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. Pu; W. Bian; K. Huang

    2006-07-29

    Using 7.5-year spectroscopic monitoring data of a sample of 17 Palomar-Green QSOs (PG QSOs) (z=0.061-0.371), we obtain the optical spectral slope for each object at all epochs by a power-law fit to the spectra in continuum bands. All of these 17 PG QSOs exhibit obvious spectral slope variability. Most of the 17 objects show anti-correlation between the spectral slope and the rest-frame 5100$\\AA$ continuum flux while five of them exist strong anti-correlation (correlation coefficient R larger than 0.5). For the ensemble of these 17 PG QSOs, a strong anti-correlation between the average spectral slope and the average rest-frame 5100$\\AA$ luminosity is found while no correlation is found between the spectral slope and the Eddington ratio. A median anti-correlation between spectral slope changes and continuum flux variations is also found which indicates a hardening of the spectrum during bright phases. Accretion disk (jet) instability models with other mechanisms associated with changes in the accretion processes are promising.

  3. Geologic reconnaissance of natural fore-reef slope and a large submarine rockfall exposure, Enewetak Atoll

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halley, R.B.; Slater, R.A.

    1987-05-01

    In 1958 a submarine rockfall exposed a cross section through the reef and fore-reef deposits along the northwestern margin of Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands. Removal of more than 10/sup 8/ MT of rock left a cirque-shaped submarine scarp 220 m high, extending back 190 m into the modern reef, and 1000 m along the reef trend. The scarp exposed older, steeply dipping beds below 220 m along which the rockfall detached. They sampled this exposure and the natural fore-reef slope surrounding it in 1984 and 1985 using a manned submersible. The natural slope in this area is characterized by three zone: (1) the reef plate, crest, and near fore reef that extends from sea level to -16 m, with a slope of less than 10/sup 0/, (2) the bypass slope that extends from -16 to -275 m, with slopes of 55/sup 0/ decreasing to 35/sup 0/ near the base, and (3) a debris slope of less than 35/sup 0/ below -275 m. Vertical walls, grooves, and chutes, common on other fore-reef slopes, are sparse on the northwestern slope of Enewetak. The scarp exposes three stratigraphic units that are differentiated by surficial appearance: (1) a near-vertical wall from the reef crest to 76 m that appears rubbly, has occasional debris-covered ledges, and is composed mainly of coral; (2) a vertical to overhanging wall from -76 m to -220 m that is massive and fractured, and has smooth, blocky surfaces; and (3) inclined bedding below -220 m along which the slump block has fractured, exposing a dip slope of hard, dense, white limestone and dolomite that extends below -400 m. Caves occur in all three units. Open cement-lined fractures and voids layered with cements are most common in the middle unit, which now lies within the thermocline. Along the sides of the scarp are exposed fore-reef boulder beds dipping at 30/sup 0/ toward the open sea; the steeper (55/sup 0/) dipping natural surface truncates these beds, which gives evidence of the erosional nature of the bypass slope.

  4. Development of an Integrated Sensor System for Obstacle Detection and Terrain Evaluation for Application to Unmanned Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Development of an Integrated Sensor System for Obstacle Detection and Terrain Evaluation field of view of 50 degrees and 38 degrees, respectively. Two sensor systems were utilized to evaluate., Wexford Pennsylvania ABSTRACT This paper describes the development and performance of a sensor system

  5. Monitoring high-mountain terrain deformation from repeated air-and spaceborne optical data: examples using digital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kääb, Andreas

    Monitoring high-mountain terrain deformation from repeated air- and spaceborne optical data 2002 Abstract High mountains represent one of the most dynamic environments on earth. Monitoring of F 60 m RMS of the ASTER DEM was found for rough high-mountain topography, and F 18 m RMS

  6. Wind assessment in complex terrain with the numeric model Aiolos implementation of the influence of roughness changes and stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    to the influence of roughness changes and the thermal stratification. Wind potential assessments of two sites of roughness changes on the terrain surface and thermal stratification of the at- mosphere are taken a neutral thermal stratification situation is assumed. But for a north eu- ropean situation a light stable

  7. Stability of submerged slopes on the flanks of the Hawaiian Islands, a simplified approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, H.J.; Torresan, M.E.; McArthur, W.

    1994-12-31

    Undersea transmission lines and shoreline AC-DC conversion stations and near-shore transmission lines are being considered as part of a system for transporting energy between the Hawaiian Islands. These facilities will need to be designed so that they will not be damaged or destroyed by coastal or undersea landslides. Advanced site surveys and engineering design of these facilities will require detailed site specific analyses, including sediment sampling and laboratory testing of samples, in situ testing of sediment and rock, detailed charting of bathymetry, and two- or three-dimensional numerical analyses of the factors of safety of the slopes against failure from the various possible loading mechanisms. An intermediate approximate approach can be followed that involves gravity and piston cores, laboratory testing and the application of simplified models to determine a seismic angle of repose for actual sediment in the vicinity of the planned facility. An even simpler and more approximate approach involves predictions of angles of repose using classification of the sediment along a proposed route as either a coarse volcaniclastic sand, a calcareous ooze, or a muddy terrigenous sediment. The steepest slope that such a sediment can maintain is the static angle of repose. Sediment may be found on slopes as steep as these, but it must be considered metastable and liable to fail in the event of any disturbance, storm or earthquake. The seismic angle of repose likely governs most slopes on the Hawaiian Ridge. This declivity corresponds to the response of the slope to a continuing seismic environment. As a long history of earthquakes affects the slopes, they gradually flatten to this level. Slopes that exceed or roughly equal this value can be considered at risk to fail during future earthquakes. Seismic and static angles of repose for three sediment types are tabulated in this report.

  8. Shear Wave Velocity Structure of Southern African Crust: Evidence for Compositional Heterogeneity within Archaean and Proterozoic Terrains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kgaswane, E M; Nyblade, A A; Julia, J; Dirks, P H H M; Durrheim, R J; Pasyanos, M E

    2008-11-11

    Crustal structure in southern Africa has been investigated by jointly inverting receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group velocities for 89 broadband seismic stations spanning much of the Precambrian shield of southern Africa. 1-D shear wave velocity profiles obtained from the inversion yield Moho depths that are similar to those reported in previous studies and show considerable variability in the shear wave velocity structure of the lower part of the crust between some terrains. For many of the Archaean and Proterozoic terrains in the shield, S velocities reach 4.0 km/s or higher over a substantial part of the lower crust. However, for most of the Kimberley terrain and adjacent parts of the Kheis Province and Witwatersrand terrain, as well as for the western part of the Tokwe terrain, mean shear wave velocities of {le} 3.9 km/s characterize the lower part of the crust along with slightly ({approx}5 km) thinner crust. These findings indicate that the lower crust across much of the shield has a predominantly mafic composition, except for the southwest portion of the Kaapvaal Craton and western portion of the Zimbabwe Craton, where the lower crust is intermediate-to-felsic in composition. The parts of the Kaapvaal Craton underlain by intermediate-to-felsic lower crust coincide with regions where Ventersdorp rocks have been preserved, and thus we suggest that the intermediate-to-felsic composition of the lower crust and the shallower Moho may have resulted from crustal melting during the Ventersdorp tectonomagmatic event at c. 2.7 Ga and concomitant crustal thinning caused by rifting.

  9. A water balance study of four landfill cover designs varying in slope for semiarid regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyhan, J.W.; Schofield, T.G.; Salazar, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    The goal of disposing of radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and to the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose a hazard. In order to achieve this, the performance of a landfill cover design without an engineered barrier (Conventional Design) was compared with three designs containing either a hydraulic barrier (EPA Design) or a capillary barrier (Loam and Clay Loam Capillary Barrier Designs). Water balance parameters were measured since 1991 at six-hour intervals for four different landfill cover designs in 1.0- by 10.0-m plots with downhill slopes of 5, 10, 15, and 25%. Whereas runoff generally accounted for only 2-3% of the precipitation losses on these designs, similar values for evapotranspiration ranged from 86% to 91%, with increased evapotranspiration occurring with increases in slope. Consequently, interflow and seepage usually decreased with increasing slope for each landfill cover design. Seepage consisted of up to 10% of the precipitation on the Conventional Design, whereas the hydraulic barrier in the EPA Design effectively controlled seepage at all slopes, and both of the capillary designs worked effectively to eliminate seepage at the higher slopes.

  10. Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    Greater India Basin hypothesis and a two-stage Cenozoic collision between India and Asia Douwe J. J and where India­Asia convergence was accommodated after collision at or be- fore 52 Ma remains a long and 25 Ma. Paleomagnetic data show that this extended continental and oceanic "Greater India" promontory

  11. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  12. Development of an Immersed Boundary Method to Resolve Complex Terrain in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lunquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K; Mirocha, J D

    2007-09-04

    Flow and dispersion processes in urban areas are profoundly influenced by the presence of buildings which divert mean flow, affect surface heating and cooling, and alter the structure of turbulence in the lower atmosphere. Accurate prediction of velocity, temperature, and turbulent kinetic energy fields are necessary for determining the transport and dispersion of scalars. Correct predictions of scalar concentrations are vital in densely populated urban areas where they are used to aid in emergency response planning for accidental or intentional releases of hazardous substances. Traditionally, urban flow simulations have been performed by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes which can accommodate the geometric complexity inherent to urban landscapes. In these types of models the grid is aligned with the solid boundaries, and the boundary conditions are applied to the computational nodes coincident with the surface. If the CFD code uses a structured curvilinear mesh, then time-consuming manual manipulation is needed to ensure that the mesh conforms to the solid boundaries while minimizing skewness. If the CFD code uses an unstructured grid, then the solver cannot be optimized for the underlying data structure which takes an irregular form. Unstructured solvers are therefore often slower and more memory intensive than their structured counterparts. Additionally, urban-scale CFD models are often forced at lateral boundaries with idealized flow, neglecting dynamic forcing due to synoptic scale weather patterns. These CFD codes solve the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and include limited options for representing atmospheric processes such as surface fluxes and moisture. Traditional CFD codes therefore posses several drawbacks, due to the expense of either creating the grid or solving the resulting algebraic system of equations, and due to the idealized boundary conditions and the lack of full atmospheric physics. Meso-scale atmospheric boundary layer simulations, on the other hand, are performed by numerical weather prediction (NWP) codes, which cannot handle the geometry of the urban landscape, but do provide a more complete representation of atmospheric physics. NWP codes typically use structured grids with terrain-following vertical coordinates, include a full suite of atmospheric physics parameterizations, and allow for dynamic synoptic scale lateral forcing through grid nesting. Terrain following grids are unsuitable for urban terrain, as steep terrain gradients cause extreme distortion of the computational cells. In this work, we introduce and develop an immersed boundary method (IBM) to allow the favorable properties of a numerical weather prediction code to be combined with the ability to handle complex terrain. IBM uses a non-conforming structured grid, and allows solid boundaries to pass through the computational cells. As the terrain passes through the mesh in an arbitrary manner, the main goal of the IBM is to apply the boundary condition on the interior of the domain as accurately as possible. With the implementation of the IBM, numerical weather prediction codes can be used to explicitly resolve urban terrain. Heterogeneous urban domains using the IBM can be nested into larger mesoscale domains using a terrain-following coordinate. The larger mesoscale domain provides lateral boundary conditions to the urban domain with the correct forcing, allowing seamless integration between mesoscale and urban scale models. Further discussion of the scope of this project is given by Lundquist et al. [2007]. The current paper describes the implementation of an IBM into the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, which is an open source numerical weather prediction code. The WRF model solves the non-hydrostatic compressible Navier-Stokes equations, and employs an isobaric terrain-following vertical coordinate. Many types of IB methods have been developed by researchers; a comprehensive review can be found in Mittal and Iaccarino [2005]. To the authors knowledge, this is the first IBM approach that is able to

  13. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix H: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.

    1991-08-01

    This report develops and presents estimates for a set of three values that represent a reasonable range for the packaging factors for several waste streams that are potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level waste disposal container divided by the original, as-generated or ``unpackaged,`` volume of the wastes loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors take into account any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. The three values developed represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated volume of waste for disposal, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. Three categories of greater-than-Class C low-level waste are evaluated in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other wastes. Estimates of reasonable packaging factors for the low, base, and high cases for the specific waste streams in each category are shown in Table H-1.

  14. Process of Equiaxed Grains of RE-Al Alloy under Slope Vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie Shikun; Yi Rongxi; Pan Xiaoliang; Zheng Xiaoqiu; Guo Xiuyan [School of Engineering, Jinggangshan University, Ji'an, 343009 (China)

    2010-06-15

    A new technique using slope vibration casting process during heating and isothermal holding period to prepare Al-7Si-2RE alloy has been studied. The small, near-spherical and non-dendritic microstructure with the semi-solid processing requirements has been obtained. Experiments show that the cooling method, pouring process and the convection of melt caused by slope vibration had significant effects on the formation of near-spherical primary gains. The water-cooled copper mold casting with slope vibration at the temperature near liquidus can obtain Al-7Si-2RE alloy with small homogeneous equiaxed grains, the average grain diameter is 48.3 mum, and the average grain roundness is 1.92.

  15. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    A number of blocks off Cape Hatteras have been leased by Mobil Oil, which has requested permission to drill an exploratory well, at 820-m depth, in a block identified as Manteo 467. The proposed well location is 39 miles from the coast of North Carolina. The possibility of extracting gas from the continental slope off the coast of North Carolina, particularly at slope depths, has raised a number of environmental concerns that cannot be addressed from existing data. The present study was developed by the Minerals Management Service to better define the nature of the continental slope benthic communities off Cape Hatteras and to delineate their areal extent. Emphasis was placed on the area around the proposed drill site in the Manteo 467 lease block.

  16. Bringing Alaska North Slope Natural Gas to Market (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    At least three alternatives have been proposed over the years for bringing sizable volumes of natural gas from Alaska's remote North Slope to market in the lower 48 states: a pipeline interconnecting with the existing pipeline system in central Alberta, Canada; a gas-to-liquids (GTL) plant on the North Slope; and a large liquefied natural gas (LNG) export facility at Valdez, Alaska. The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) explicitly models the pipeline and GTL options. The what if LNG option is not modeled in NEMS.

  17. Approximating the Visible Region of a Point on a Terrain Boaz BenMoshe # Paz Carmi + Matthew J. Katz #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Matthew "Matya"

    supporting ray shooting queries from p, due to Cole and Sharir [5], and its running time is O(n log 2 n. Katz # Abstract Given a terrain and a point p on or above it, we wish to compute the region R p that is visible from p. We present a generic radar­like algorithm for computing an approxima­ tion of R p

  18. A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE"?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    A SLIPPERY SLOPE: HOW MUCH GLOBAL WARMING CONSTITUTES "DANGEROUS ANTHROPOGENIC INTERFERENCE on the global warming that can be tolerated without risking dangerous anthropogenic interference with climate. I" mainly as a metaphor for the danger posed by global warming. So I changed "Hell" to "disaster." What

  19. PHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 086604 (2013) Gravity currents shoaling on a slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    water rivers into the saline ocean form surface gravity currents. The study of gravity currents is also spills in the ocean.6 Gravity currents in a channel have been well studied through lockPHYSICS OF FLUIDS 25, 086604 (2013) Gravity currents shoaling on a slope Bruce R. Sutherland,1,2,a

  20. SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ILIAMNA VOLCANO, ALASKA, USING ASTER TIR, SRTM DEM, AND AEROMAGNETIC DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    areas at risk for slope failure, which correlate well to the geologic field studies. These scripts can. al. 1997). These seismic stations work well but require maintenance; after the 1996 seismic swarm risk. Many of these volcanoes will be mapped geologically for the first time during the set up

  1. Process-Based Coastal Erosion Modeling for Drew Point, North Slope, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    Process-Based Coastal Erosion Modeling for Drew Point, North Slope, Alaska Thomas M. Ravens1, Beaufort Sea, Alaska. This coastal setting has experienced a dramatic increase in erosion since the early, coastal erosion/shoreline change model has been developed for a small coastal segment near Drew Point

  2. EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKendry, Ian

    EVIDENCE OF ELEVATED OZONE CONCENTRATIONS ON FORESTED SLOPES OF THE LOWER FRASER VALLEY, BRITISH, hourly average ozone concentrations were mea- sured at three sites of differing elevation (188, 588. Sites experienced ozone concentrations ranging from 0 to 88 ppb in 2001, and 0 to 96 ppb in 2002. Daily

  3. NOWCAST WITH A FORESCAST SNOW COVER SIMULATIONS ON SLOPES Sascha Bellaire

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamieson, Bruce

    NOWCAST WITH A FORESCAST ­ SNOW COVER SIMULATIONS ON SLOPES Sascha Bellaire 1* , Bruce Jamieson 1 of Calgary, AB, Canada ABSTRACT: The snow cover model SNOWPACK simulates the snow cover formation plot. Meteorological key parameters for the snow cover formation and evolution, e.g. precipitation

  4. Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical Jean-Alain FLEURISSON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 GHGT-9 Slope design and implementation in open pit mines; geological and geomechanical approach all natural geological and geomechanical features and the geological structures as well and geomechanical data; 2) determination of the potential mechanisms of deformation and failure, and their numerical

  5. Geophysically consistent values of the perovskite to post-perovskite transition Clapeyron slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geophysically consistent values of the perovskite to post-perovskite transition Clapeyron slope J February 2007; published 15 March 2007. [1] The double-crossing hypothesis posits that post- perovskite in Earth's deep mantle and the temperature of Earth's inner core boundary, we show that a post-perovskite

  6. High-frequency internal waves on a sloping shelf James M. Pringle1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    1 High-frequency internal waves on a sloping shelf James M. Pringle1 and Kenneth H. Brink Woods field propagating across a shelf and hence control the high- frequency variability on the shelf. This analysis exam- ines the evolution of the high-frequency internal wave field on the shelf as it is modified

  7. Down the Slippery Slope: Plastid Genome Evolution in Convolvulaceae Sas a Stefanovic ,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Correspondence to: Sas a Stefanovic´ ; email: sstefano@utm. utoronto.ca J Mol Evol (2005) 61:292­305 DOI: 10Down the Slippery Slope: Plastid Genome Evolution in Convolvulaceae Sas a Stefanovic´ ,1,2 Richard, Canada Received: 30 August 2004 / Accepted: 10 March 2005 [Reviewing Editor: Dr. Debashish Bhattacharya

  8. A chronostratigraphic framework for the northwestern slope of the gulf of mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elston, Kristen Eileen

    2007-04-25

    Sediments from two cores, JPC31 and JPC46, were analyzed to better understand the relationship between climate and sediment deposition on the continental slope of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico. These two cores were selected from a suite of cores...

  9. Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Probabilistic slope stability analysis by finite elements D.V. Griffiths* and Gordon A. Fenton. The advanced method, called the random finite element method (RFEM), uses elasto- plasticity combined nonlinear finite element methods are combined with ran- dom field generation techniques. This method, called

  10. Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms Joseph T. Maestasa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shock wave propagation along constant sloped ocean bottoms Joseph T. Maestasa) Department wave equation (NPE) is a time-domain model used to calculate long- range shock propagation using a wave waves generated by explosives buried beneath mud line. VC 2014 Acoustical Society of America. [http

  11. Runoff and Sedimentation Potentials Influenced by Litter and Slope on a Chaparral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    it essential to better understand the potential on-site runoff-sedimenta- tion relationships. This study varied from 9.2 to 27.1 metric tons per ha (Pase 1972). The physical properties and infiltration but which can be highly erosive on steep slopes because it lacks soil structure. Although the infiltration

  12. The Formation of Nonzonal Jets over Sloped Topography EMMA J. D. BOLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Andrew

    The Formation of Nonzonal Jets over Sloped Topography EMMA J. D. BOLAND The University of Cambridge, in final form 26 March 2012) ABSTRACT Coherent jets are ubiquitous features of the ocean's circulation tilted nonzonal jets that are aligned per- pendicular to the barotropic potential vorticity (PV) gradient

  13. Comparative study of sterols in shelf and slope sediments o northeastern Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huh, Chih-An

    Comparative study of sterols in shelf and slope sediments o northeastern Taiwan Woei-Lih Jenga Editorial handling by B.R.T. Simoneit Abstract Bottom sediments and suspended matter from the shelf(algal sterols/cholesterol) ratios (mean21s) were 1.0020.31 (n = 7) for the shelf sediments, 3.2920.61 (n = 7

  14. Density slope of the nuclear symmetry energy from the neutron skin thickness of heavy nuclei 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Lie-Wen; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Bao-An; Xu, Jun.

    2010-01-01

    of finite nuclei and nuclear matter properties. We find that existing data on neutron skin thickness Delta r(np) of Sn isotopes give an important constraint on the symmetry energy E(sym)(rho(0)) and its density slope L at saturation density rho(0). Combining...

  15. Nesting Range, Spatial Use, Habitat Selection and Sex Identification of the Greater Raodrunner (Geococcyx californianus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montalvo, Andrea

    2012-11-27

    I conducted this study to better understand the greater roadrunner’s (Geococcyx californianus) spatial use, nest site selection, and sexual morphometrics. Data were first collected from a roadrunner population in Fisher County, Texas. I trapped...

  16. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pilot Plant in Carlsbad, N.M. On February 17, 2011, DOE issued the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive...

  17. The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

    2005-01-01

    The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

  18. The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver Regional of Resource Management PROJECT TITLE: The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites opportunities for systems that cogenerate useful heat and electricity. This form of distributed generation

  19. Blasting Our World (Joy to The World) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaperrucca and The Greater Westerly Raging Grannies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Peter

    Blasting Our World (Joy to The World) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaperrucca and The Greater Westerly of the our They Rem- We Blast- Nu- G 2 truth di- leave they king- do dom D world waste war bomb, world

  20. A trapped Philippine Sea plate origin for MORB from the inner slope of the Izu^Bonin trench

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Brian

    A trapped Philippine Sea plate origin for MORB from the inner slope of the Izu^Bonin trench Susan M Pacific plate or a trapped remnant of Philippine Sea plate on which the Izu^Bonin arc was built. Although clearly support a Philippine Sea plate origin. The isotopic signature of the inner trench slope samples

  1. Phreatic flow on sloping soil layers from a finite source: An analytical solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Filley, T.H.

    1991-09-01

    Sloping clay layers beneath percolation ponds can cause infiltrating wastewater to pond and move in directions not predicted by vertical infiltration equations. This report presents a method for estimating the potential of wastewater from percolation sumps located over sloping clay layers to interact with nearby groundwater resources. The analytical solution developed is for steady-state conditions and includes a procedure to estimate the time needed to reach steady state. The fundamental assumption used in the mathematical development requires that elevation-head gradients be much larger than pressure-head gradients. A method for testing the validity of this assumption is also included. An example calculation was performed for percolation sumps on the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 in Elk Hills, California. That analysis showed that, under the assumptions used, the sumps may have enabled oil field wastewater to reach groundwater resources within the adjacent San Joaquin Valley. 9 refs., 10 figs.

  2. Sensitivity of Low Sloped Roofs Designs to Initial Water and Air Leakage 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karagiozis, A.; Desjarlais, A.; Salonvaara, M.

    2002-01-01

    , Espoo, Finland Andre Desjarlais. B.Sc.E Program Manager, Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge TN, 37831-6070 ABSTRACT Liquid water in low sloped roofs almost always causes problems. Roofs are designed only... in Finland (area varying from 200 m2 up to 5 000 m2). A laboratory hot box apparatus (Kouhia and Nieminen, 1999) was also used to further quantify the performance of the grooved roof ventilation system and to show the thermal consequences...

  3. SPECTRAL SLOPE VARIATION AT PROTON SCALES FROM FAST TO SLOW SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruno, R.; Trenchi, L.; Telloni, D.

    2014-09-20

    We investigated the behavior of the spectral slope of interplanetary magnetic field fluctuations at proton scales for selected high-resolution time intervals from the WIND and MESSENGER spacecraft at 1 AU and 0.56 AU, respectively. The analysis was performed within the profile of high-speed streams, moving from fast to slow wind regions. The spectral slope showed a large variability between –3.75 and –1.75 and a robust tendency for this parameter to be steeper within the trailing edge, where the speed is higher, and to be flatter within the subsequent slower wind, following a gradual transition between these two states. The value of the spectral index seems to depend firmly on the power associated with the fluctuations within the inertial range; the higher the power, the steeper the slope. Our results support previous analyses suggesting that there must be some response of the dissipation mechanism to the level of the energy transfer rate along the inertial range.

  4. Optimal tuning and calibration of bendable mirrors with slope measuring profilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKinney, Wayne; Kirschman, Jonathan; MacDowell, Alastair; Warwick, Tony; Yashchuk, Valeriy

    2009-06-22

    We describe a technique to optimally tune and calibrate bendable x-ray optics for sub-micron focusing. The focusing is divided between two elliptically cylindrical reflecting elements, a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) pair. Each optic is shaped by applying unequal bending couples to each end of a flat mirror. The developed technique allowsoptimal tuning of these systems using surface slope data obtained with a slope measuring instrument, the long trace profiler (LTP). Due to the near linearity of the problem, the minimal set of data necessary for the tuning of each bender, consists of only three slope traces measured before and after a single adjustment of each bending couple. The data are analyzed with software realizing a method of regression analysis with experimentally found characteristic functions of the benders. The resulting approximation to the functional dependence of the desired shape provides nearly final settings. Moreover, the characteristic functions of the benders found in the course of tuning, can be used for retuning to a new desired shape without removal from the beamline and re-measuring. We perform a ray trace, using profiler data for the finally tuned optics, predicting the performance to be expected during use of the optics on the beamline.

  5. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ``unpackaged`` volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste.

  6. Radiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) have recommended that estimates of cancer risk for low doseRadiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought Hongning Zhou*, Masao to reconsider the validity of the linear extrapolation in making risk estimates for low dose, high linear

  7. The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that provides district heating for several buildings for example) may be economically viable, even without District By Jeremy Higham B.Sc. (Agr), University of Guelph, 1992 RESEARCH PROJECT SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL in the Greater Vancouver Regional District PROJECT: 240 SUPERVISORY COMMITTEE

  8. Recent experimental data may point to a greater role for osmotic pressures in the subsurface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Recent experimental data may point to a greater role for osmotic pressures in the subsurface C. E large osmotic pressures when highly compacted. In the last few years, additional laboratory and in situ experiments have greatly increased the number of data on osmotic properties of argillaceous formations

  9. Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens Virginia L of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Summary 1. The potential effects of wind energy development on wildlife have received increased attention over the past decade. In Kansas, optimal sites for wind energy

  10. Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development V. L. WINDER,1-Chickens in response to wind energy development. Ecosphere 5(1):3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ ES13-00206.1 Abstract. Wind energy development is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy demand by 2030. In Kansas, optimal sites

  11. Restoration of Cenozoic deformation in Asia and the size of Greater India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    Restoration of Cenozoic deformation in Asia and the size of Greater India Douwe J. J. van 2011. [1] A long standing problem in the geological evolution of the India Asia collision zone is how and where convergence between India and Asia was accommodated since collision. Proposed collision ages vary

  12. Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    1 Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone. Insects and fire have tremendous ecological and economic effects in western forests, yet surprisingly fire hazard in two widespread but contrasting forest types, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Douglas

  13. LYAPOUNOV NORMS FOR RANDOM WALKS IN LOW DISORDER AND DIMENSION GREATER THAN THREE.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Adam

    LYAPOUNOV NORMS FOR RANDOM WALKS IN LOW DISORDER AND DIMENSION GREATER THAN THREE. N. ZYGOURAS, it is shown by Zerner [11] that there exists a nondegenerate norm (·) on Rd such that for P - a.e. disorder decay of it. It turns out that this is governed by the annealed Lyapounov norm (x), x Zd and in analogy

  14. DESCRIPTION OF HOSPITALS IN THE GREATER HARTFORD AREA Connecticut Children's Medical Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 27 DESCRIPTION OF HOSPITALS IN THE GREATER HARTFORD AREA Connecticut Children's Medical Center Connecticut Children's Medical Center (CCMC) is a nationally recognized, 187-bed not-for- profit children's hospital serving as the primary teaching hospital for the University of Connecticut School of Medicine

  15. Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support Crowdsourced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support crowston@syr.edu ABSTRACT We explore the nature of technologies to support citizen science, a method different citizen science platforms may be comprised of widely varying functionalities, yet still support

  16. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  17. The bends in the slopes of radial abundance gradients in the disks of spiral galaxies -- do they exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. S. Pilyugin

    2002-10-17

    Spiral galaxies with a reported bend in the slope of gradient in the oxygen abundances (O/H)_R23, derived with traditionally used R23 - method, were examined. It is shown that the artificial origin of the reported bends can be naturally explained. Two reasons that result in a false bend in the slope of (O/H)_R23 gradient are indicated. It is concluded that at the present time there is no example of a galaxy with an undisputable established bend in the slope of the oxygen abundance gradient.

  18. Macrofaunal community structure on the gulf of mexico continental slope: the role of disturbance and habitat heterogeneity at local and regional scales 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammons, Archie Wood

    2007-09-17

    and reduced particulate organic carbon levels. Upper-slope submarine canyons possess some of the highest abundances. Less mobile macrofauna, such as poriferans, bivalves, and scaphopods, dominate slope communities above the 500 meter contour. Sediments...

  19. 4.9 NON-POINT SOURCE CONTAMINATION IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT OF GREATER VANCOUVER by Kenneth J. Hall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    109 4.9 NON-POINT SOURCE CONTAMINATION IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT OF GREATER VANCOUVER 4.9 by Kenneth, Vancouver, B.C. NON-POINT SOURCE CONTAMINATION IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT OF GREATER VANCOUVER: A CASE STUDY;110 4.9 NON-POINT SOURCE CONTAMINATION IN THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT OF GREATER VANCOUVER THE BRUNETTE RIVER

  20. Hydrology of the Greater Tongonan geothermal system, Philippines, as deduced from geochemical and isotopic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvis-Isidro, R.R.; Solana, R.R.; D`amore, F.; Nuti, S.; Gonfiantini, R.

    1993-10-01

    Fluids in the Greater Tongonan geothermal system exhibit a large positive {sup 18}O shift from the Leyte meteoric water line. However, there is also a significant shift in {sup 2}H. The {delta}{sup 2}H-{delta}{sup 18}O plot shows that the geothermal fluids may be derived by the mixing of meteoric water with local magmatic water. The most enriched water in the Greater Tongonan system, in terms of {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 2}H and Cl, is comprised of approximately 40% magmatic water. Baseline isotope results support a hydrogeochemical model in which there is increasing meteoric water dilution to the southeast, from Mahiao to Sambaloran and towards Malitbog. The Cl-{delta}{sup 18}O plot confirms that the geothermal fluid in Mahanagdong, further southeast, is distinct from that of the Mahiao-Sambaloran-Malitbog system.

  1. Surface circulation in the Gulf of Cadiz: 2. Inflow-outflow coupling and the Gulf of Cadiz slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    that of the atmospheric forcing in driving the upper slope currents. The Mediteranean outflow forces a surface open ocean filaments con- touring Cape St. Vincent and penetrating eastward into the warmer GoC waters that suggest

  2. Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater Westerly Grannies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Peter

    Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater- George ofU Old Drill- Litt- heat lost had need had get E his no more his more belch, ba- Bush, A, Rea Car- Ba- Litt- U Old Drill- B 7 5 bon rack le S Ron- ing more oil, D o we his no more his in ma who we

  3. The shallow geologic features of the upper continental slope, northern Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buck, Arvo Viktor

    1981-01-01

    region of the upper continental slope in the Gulf of Mexico lying immediately west of the Mississippi Trough (Fig. 1). water depths range from 150 m (500 ft) to a maximum of 1200 m (4000 ft). The area is centered on 28 00'N, 90'30'W, with the eastern... extremity being the western margin of the Mississippi Trough. The area is approximately 155 km by 55 km (96 mi by 33 mi) in size. The seismic data within the region were collected along lines of a 6. 4 km by 6. 4 km grid. +30~ 88' 0/I, ' oo goo ooo...

  4. STUDY OF TRANSPORTATION OF GTL PRODUCTS FROM ALASKAN NORTH SLOPE (ANS) TO MARKETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Godwin A. Chukwu, Ph.D., P.E.

    2002-09-01

    The Alaskan North Slope is one of the largest hydrocarbon reserves in the US where Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) technology can be successfully implemented. The proven and recoverable reserves of conventional natural gas in the developed and undeveloped fields in the Alaskan North Slope (ANS) are estimated to be 38 trillion standard cubic feet (TCF) and estimates of additional undiscovered gas reserves in the Arctic field range from 64 TCF to 142 TCF. Transportation of the natural gas from the remote ANS is the key issue in effective utilization of this valuable and abundance resource. The throughput of oil through the Trans Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) has been on decline and is expected to continue to decline in future. It is projected that by the year 2015, ANS crude oil production will decline to such a level that there will be a critical need for pumping additional liquid from GTL process to provide an adequate volume for economic operation of TAPS. The pumping of GTL products through TAPS will significantly increase its economic life. Transporting GTL products from the North Slope of Alaska down to the Marine terminal at Valdez is no doubt the great challenge facing the Gas to Liquids options of utilizing the abundant natural gas resource of the North Slope. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate and assess the economic feasibility of transporting GTL products through the TAPS. Material testing program for GTL and GTL/Crude oil blends was designed and implemented for measurement of physical properties of GTL products. The measurement and evaluation of the properties of these materials were necessary so as to access the feasibility of transporting such materials through TAPS under cold arctic conditions. Results of the tests indicated a trend of increasing yield strength with increasing wax content. GTL samples exhibited high gel strengths at temperatures as high as 20 F, which makes it difficult for cold restart following winter shutdowns. Simplified analytical models were developed to study the flow of GTL and GTL/crude oil blends through TAPS in both commingled and batch flow models. The economics of GTL transportations by either commingled or batching mode were evaluated. The choice of mode of transportation of GTL products through TAPS would depend on the expected purity of the product and a trade-off between loss in product value due to contamination and cost of keeping the product pure at the discharge terminal.

  5. Benthic study of the continental slope off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Volume 3. Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diaz, R.J.; Blake, J.A.; Lohse, D.P.

    1993-03-01

    The Point is an area that supports a most productive pelagic fishery, including tuna, swordfish, marlin, and more. The objective of the study is to analyze video tapes from near the Point, in order to provide data on epibenthic, megafaunal invertebrates including species composition, relative abundances, and large scale (1 km) distribution. The Point is not a defined spot on a chart. Although fishermen do use the steep shelf break for location, they generally look for the west wall of the Gulf Stream. The Point and the oil lease site coincidentally occur where the Gulf Stream parts the continental slope, just north of the eastern-most tip of Cape Hatteras.

  6. The Effects of Roof Membrane Color on Moisture Accumulation in Low-slope Commercial Roof Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kehrer, Manfred [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    The use of highly reflective roof membrane systems is being promoted and in some cases required in energy codes and green building codes and standards. Highly reflective membranes, which typically are light in color, have demonstrated reduced overall energy consumption in cooling dominated climate. These membranes also are theorized to reduce the heat island effect. Concern has been expressed about using highly reflective roof membrane systems in cool to cold climate zones because they potentially increase moisture accumulation in roof systems. Roof membranes are vapor retarders. The theory is that highly reflective membranes reflect the heat that could enter the roof assembly, potentially providing a condensing surface on the cold side of the roof assembly during winter months. The other concern is that roof systems using highly reflective membranes will not get hot enough during the summer months to dry out moisture that may have condensed or otherwise entered the roof assembly. This study focuses on mechanically attached, highly reflective, single-ply roof systems installed on low-slope (less than 2:12) structures in cool to cold climate zones. Three sources of data are considered when determining the moisture accumulation potential of these systems. 1.Test roof cuts taken during the winter months 2.Modeling data from a building envelope model specifically designed to evaluate moisture accumulation 3.Data from previous studies to determine the effects of roof membrane color on the drying rate of low-slope roof assemblies

  7. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from the North Slope Alaska (NSA) Site

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the largest global change research program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary goal of the ARM Program is to improve the treatment of cloud and radiation physics in global climate models in order to improve the climate simulation capabilities of these models. To achieve this goal, ARM scientists and researchers around the world use continuous data obtained through the ARM Climate Research Facility. ARM maintains four major, permanent sites for data collection and deploys the ARM Mobile Facility to other sites as determined. The North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site is a permanent site providing data about cloud and radiative processes at high latitudes. These data are being used to refine models and parameterizations as they relate to the Arctic. Centered at Barrow and extending to the south (to the vicinity of Atqasuk), west (to the vicinity of Wainwright), and east (towards Oliktok), the NSA site has become a focal point for atmospheric and ecological research activity on the North Slope. Approximately 300,000 NSA data sets from 1993 to the present reside in the ARM Archive at http://www.archive.arm.gov/. Users will need to register for a password, but all files are then free for viewing or downloading. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  8. Determination of Limit Cycles Using Both the Slope of Correlation Integral and Dominant Lyapunov Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castillo, Rogelio; Alonso, Gustavo; Palacios, Javier C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (Mexico)

    2004-02-15

    A method for nonlinear analysis of instabilities in boiling water reactors (BWRs) is presented. Both the Dominant Lyapunov Exponent method and the Slope of the Correlation Integral (SOCI) method are used to analyze the average power reactor monitor (APRM) signals from a BWR. The main advantage of using the two methods in a complementary manner is that doing so results in an enhancement of the capability to analyze noisy systems, such as the APRM signals in a BWR. Previously, such nonlinear analysis had been performed using independently either the Dominant Lyapunov Exponent Method or the SOCI method. These two methods are sensitive to noise in a signal and normally require large amounts of data for a reliable analysis.This proposed system for nonlinear analysis is composed first of a home-developed computer program called 'SLOPE', which is based on the SOCI method. Then, the signal analysis is also performed by the 'LENNS' code, which is used to obtain the dominant Lyapunov exponent. Since only the dominant Lyapunov exponent is computed, there is no need to acquire large amounts of data; thus, computational processing time is greatly reduced, even in the case of noisy data.The system was used to analyze BWR signals containing stationary and nonstationary limit cycles. It was found that this method satisfactorily calculates the limit cycles, extracting useful information from noisy signals.

  9. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  10. Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

    2012-02-29

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  11. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  12. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2011-11-01

    At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

  13. Effects of Terrain Heights and Sizes on Island-Scale Circulations and Rainfall for the Island of Hawaii during HaRP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yi-Leng

    of Hawaii during HaRP YANG YANG AND YI-LENG CHEN Department of Meteorology, SOEST, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii (Manuscript received 9 August 2006, in final form 23 April 2007) ABSTRACT Islands in Hawaii have different sizes and terrain heights with notable differences in climate and weather

  14. Assessing Terrain Stability in a GIS using SINMAP Pack, R.T. Research Associate Professor, Tarboton, D.G., Associate Professor1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    Assessing Terrain Stability in a GIS using SINMAP Pack, R.T. Research Associate Professor, Tarboton State University, Logan, UT 84322-5230 Presented at the 15th annual GIS conference, GIS 2001, February 19-22, Vancouver, British Columbia Abstract SINMAP (Stability Index MAPping) is an ArcView GIS

  15. Wave breaking over sloping beaches using a coupled boundary integral-level set method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garzon, M.; Adalsteinsson, D.; Gray, L.; Sethian, J.A.

    2003-12-08

    We present a numerical method for tracking breaking waves over sloping beaches. We use a fully non-linear potential model for in-compressible, irrotational and inviscid flow, and consider the effects of beach topography on breaking waves. The algorithm uses a Boundary Element Method (BEM) to compute the velocity at the interface, coupled to a Narrow Band Level Set Method to track the evolving air/water interface, and an associated extension equation to update the velocity potential both on and off the interface. The formulation of the algorithm is applicable to two and three dimensional breaking waves; in this paper, we concentrate on two-dimensional results showing wave breaking and rollup, and perform numerical convergence studies and comparison with previous techniques.

  16. Physical and Chemical Implications of Mid-Winter Pumping of Trunda Lakes - North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinzman, Larry D.; Lilly, Michael R.; Kane, Douglas L.; Miller, D. Dan; Galloway, Braden K.; Hilton, Kristie M.; White, Daniel M.

    2005-09-30

    Tundra lakes on the North Slope, Alaska, are an important resource for energy development and petroleum field operations. A majority of exploration activities, pipeline maintenance, and restoration activities take place on winter ice roads that depend on water availability at key times of the winter operating season. These same lakes provide important fisheries and ecosystem functions. In particular, overwintering habitat for fish is one important management concern. This study focused on the evaluation of winter water use in the current field operating areas to provide a better understanding of the current water use practices. It found that under the current water use practices, there were no measurable negative effects of winter pumping on the lakes studied and current water use management practices were appropriately conservative. The study did find many areas where improvements in the understanding of tundra lake hydrology and water usage would benefit industry, management agencies, and the protection of fisheries and ecosystems.

  17. Prediction of Seismic Slope Displacements by Dynamic Stick-Slip Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ausilio, Ernesto [University of Calabria (Italy); Costanzo, Antonio [University of Calabria (Italy); Silvestri, Francesco [University of Naples 'Federico II' (Italy); Tropeano, Giuseppe [University of Calabria (Italy)

    2008-07-08

    A good-working balance between simplicity and reliability in assessing seismic slope stability is represented by displacement-based methods, in which the effects of deformability and ductility can be either decoupled or coupled in the dynamic analyses. In this paper, a 1D lumped mass 'stick-slip' model is developed, accounting for soil heterogeneity and non-linear behaviour, with a base sliding mechanism at a potential rupture surface. The results of the preliminary calibration show a good agreement with frequency-domain site response analysis in no-slip conditions. The comparison with rigid sliding block analyses and with the decoupled approach proves that the stick-slip procedure can result increasingly unconservative for soft soils and deep sliding depths.

  18. Hydrology of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal system, Philippines and its implications to field exploitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seastres, J.S. Jr.; Salonga, N.D.; Saw, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field will be operating a total of 694 MWe by July 1997. The field has produced steam for the 112.5 MWe Tongonan I power plant since June 1983. With massive fluid withdrawal starting July 1996, a pre-commissioning hydrology was constructed to assess its implications to field exploitation. Pressure drawdown centered at well 106 in Mahiao was induced by fluid withdrawal at Tongonan-I production field. This drawdown will be accelerated by major steam withdrawal (734 kg/s) upon commissioning of power plants at Mahiao, Sambaloran and Malitbog sectors. To resolve this concern, fluid injection will be conducted at the periphery of Mahiao to provide recharge of reheated reinjection fluids in the reservoir. At Mahanagdong, the acidic fluid breakthrough will unlikely occur since the acidic zone north of this sector is not hydrologically well-connected to the main neutral-pH reservoir as indicated by pressure profiles.

  19. Department of Energy treatment capabilities for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, D.K.; Fischer, D.K.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides brief profiles for 26 low-level and high-level waste treatment capabilities available at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP). Six of the treatments have potential use for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW). They include: (a) the glass ceramic process and (b) the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility incinerator at INEL; (c) the Super Compaction and Repackaging Facility and (d) microwave melting solidification at RFP; (e) the vitrification plant at SRS; and (f) the vitrification plant at WVDP. No individual treatment has the capability to treat all GTCC LLW streams. It is recommended that complete physical and chemical characterizations be performed for each GTCC waste stream, to permit using multiple treatments for GTCC LLW.

  20. Alaska North Slope National Energy Strategy initiative: Analysis of five undeveloped fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, C.P.; Allaire, R.B.; Doughty, T.C.; Faulder, D.D.; Irving, J.S.; Jamison, H.C.; White, G.J.

    1993-05-01

    The US Department of Energy was directed in the National Energy Strategy to establish a federal interagency task force to identify specific technical and regulatory barriers to the development of five undeveloped North Slope Alaska fields and make recommendations for their resolution. The five fields are West Sak, Point Thomson, Gwydyr Bay, Seal Island/Northstar, and Sandpiper Island. Analysis of environmental, regulatory, technical, and economic information, and data relating to the development potential of the five fields leads to the following conclusions: Development of the five fields would result in an estimated total of 1,055 million barrels of oil and 4.4 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and total investment of $9.4 billion in 1992 dollars. It appears that all five of the fields will remain economically marginal developments unless there is significant improvement in world oil prices. Costs of regulatory compliance and mitigation, and costs to reduce or maintain environmental impacts at acceptable levels influence project investments and operating costs and must be considered in the development decision making process. The development of three of the fields (West Sak, Point Thomson, and Gwydyr Bay) that are marginally feasible would have an impact on North Slope production over the period from about 2000 to 2014 but cannot replace the decline in Prudhoe Bay Unit production or maintain the operation of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) beyond about 2014 with the assumption that the TAPS will shut down when production declines to the range of 400 to 200 thousand barrels of oil/day. Recoverable reserves left in the ground in the currently producing fields and soon to be developed fields, Niakuk and Point McIntyre, would range from 1 billion to 500 million barrels of oil corresponding to the time period of 2008 to 2014 based on the TAPS shutdown assumption.

  1. The Wahluke (North) Slope of the Hanford Site: History and present challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M.S.

    1996-04-16

    The Hanford Site was founded in early 1943 for the top secret government mission of producing plutonium for the world`s first atomic weapons. A great deal of land was needed, both to separate various Site facilities from each other, and to provide buffer zones for safety and security purposes. In total, 640 square miles were occupied by the original Hanford Site and its buffer zones. Much of this land had been earmarked for inclusion in the Columbia Basin Irrigation Project (CBP). After World War II ended, a series of national decisions led to a long-term mission for the Hanford Site, and area residents learned that the Site lands they had hoped to farm would be withheld from agricultural production for the foreseeable future. A long set of negotiations commenced between the federal management agency responsible for Hanford (the Atomic Energy Commission -- AEC), and the Bureau of Reclamation (BOR), Department of the Interior that managed the CBP. Some lands were turned back to agriculture, and other compromises made, in the Site`s far northern buffer lands known as the Wahluke Slope, during the 1950s. In the mid-1960s, further negotiations were about to allow farming on lands just north of the Columbia River, opposite Hanford`s reactors, when studies conducted by the BOR found drainage barriers to irrigation. As a result of these findings, two wildlife refuges were created on that land in 1971. Today, after the Hanford Site plutonium production mission has ended and as Site cleanup goes forward, the possibility of total release of Wahluke Slope lands from the control of the Department of Energy (DOE -- a successor agency to the AEC) is under discussion. Such discussion encompasses not just objective and clearly visible criteria, but it resurrects historical debates about the roles of farming and government presence in the Columbia Basin.

  2. Assessment of technologies for constructing self-drying low-slope roofs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, D.M.; Desjarlais, A.O.

    1994-05-01

    Issues associated with removing excessive moisture from low-slope roofs have been assessed. The economic costs associated with moisture trapped in existing roofs have been estimated. The evidence suggests that existing moisture levels cause approximately a 40% overall reduction in the R-value of installed roofing insulation in the United States. Excess operating costs are further increased by a summertime heat transfer mode unique to wet insulation, caused by the daily migration of water within the roof. By itself, this effect can increase peak electrical demand for air conditioning by roughly 15 W/m{sup 2} of roofing, depending on the type of insulation. This effect will increase peak demand capacity required of utilities in any geographic region (e.g., 900 MW in the South). A simple formula has been derived for predicting the effect that self-drying roofs can have upon time-averaged construction costs. It is presumed that time-averaged costs depend predominantly upon (1) actual service life and (2) the likelihood that the less expensive recover membranes can be installed safely over old roofs. For example, an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years should reduce the current cost of roofing ($12 billion/year) by 21%. Another simple formula for predicting the reroofing waste volume indicates that an increase in service life from 15 to 20 years might reduce the current estimated 0.4 billion ft{sup 3}/year of waste by 25%. A finite-difference computer program has been used to study the flow of heat and moisture within typical existing roofs for a variety of US climates. Nearly all publicly available experimental drying data have been consulted. The drying times for most existing low-slope roofs in the United States are controlled largely climate and the permeability of the structural deck to water vapor.

  3. Erosion control on a steeply sloped pipeline right-of-way in southwestern Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zellmer, S.D.; Edgar, D.E. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Isaacson, H.R. (Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The results of precipitation on steeply sloped pipeline rights-of-way (ROWs) during the time between ROW rehabilitation and the establishment of a dense, self-sustaining vegetative ground cover can cause locally severe soil erosion. This erosion results in elevated sediment loads in receiving streams and increases the difficulty and costs of ROW maintenance. A field study was completed that compared the environmental effectiveness of nine treatments on a 28% ROW slope in southwestern Pennsylvania. The six erosion-control methods investigated in the study, selected to represent a wide range in material type and installation cost, were (1) heavy application of straw mulch, (2) light application of straw mulch, (3) processed wood fiber, (4) chemical soil binder, (5) paper strips in netting, and (6) light straw mulch with a tacking agent. Each of the test plots also received the basic treatment of limestone, fertilizer, and a seed mixture commonly used to rehabilitate ROWs in the region. Precipitation, runoff volumes, and sediment yields were measured on each of 51 plots for 45 precipitation events during the 18-month study. Vegetation data were collected by the point-intercept method four times during the study to determine the amount of plant cover and species composition. Differences in sediment yield were observed among methods and between ROW location, but plant cover development was not influenced by erosion-control method or location. The relationship between environmental and cost data indicated that, of the six erosion-control methods tested, a light application of straw mulch was the most effective erosion-control treatment. 19 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  5. Theoretical analysis of reflected ray error from surface slope error and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    Surface slope error of concentrator is one of the main factors to influence the performance of the solar concentrated collectors which cause deviation of reflected ray and reduce the intercepted radiation. This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from slope error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 5 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope error is transferred to the reflected ray in more than 2 folds when the incidence angle is more than 0. The equation for reflected ray error is generally fit for all reflection surfaces, and can also be applied to control the error in designing an abaxial optical system.

  6. Study of biological processes on the US South Atlantic slope and rise. Phase 1: Benthic characterization. Volume 2. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, J.A.; Hecker, B.; Grassle, J.F.; Maciolek-Blake, N.; Brown, B.

    1985-06-01

    Concerns about the potential effects of oil and gas exploration on the U.S. Continental Slope and Rise led to the initiation of a deep-sea characterization study off North Carolina. The biological communities off North Carolina were poorly known, and prior to any drilling activities, a limited regional data base was required. The program included a seasonal characterization of biological and surficial geological properties at a limited number of slope and rise sites, with special emphasis on areas of high oil industry interest. A rich and highly diverse benthic infauna was discovered, with a large percentage of the 877 species being new to science. Annelids were the dominant taxa both in terms of density, numbers of species, and biomass. Foraminiferan tests comprised most of the sand fraction. Hydrographic data indicated some intrusion of colder water on the upper slope benthos from deeper water.

  7. An analysis of cattle-farming in the coffee producing area of the Pacific Slope in Guatemala 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordon, Oscar Humberto

    1967-01-01

    AN ANALYSIS OF CATTLE-FARMING IN THE COFFEE PRODUCING AREA OF THE PACIFIC SLOPE IN GUATEMALA A Thesis By OSCAR HUMBERTO CORDON Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE January 1967 Ma]or Sub]ect: Animal Science AN ANALYSIS OF CATTLE-FARMING IN THE COFFEE PRODUCING AREA OF THE PACIFIC SLOPE IN GUATEMALA A Thesis By OSCAR HUMBERTO CORDON Approved as to style and content by: airman...

  8. The Complex Influences of Backbarrier Deposition, Substrate Slope and Underlying Stratigraphy in Barrier Island Response to Sea Level Rise: Insights from the Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Deborah

    The Complex Influences of Backbarrier Deposition, Substrate Slope and Underlying Stratigraphy stratigraphy on barrier island behavior. Results from late-Holocene sensitivity analyses indicate

  9. The hydrological model of the Mahanagdong sector, Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herras, E.B.; Licup, A.C. Jr.; Vicedo, R.O.

    1996-12-31

    The Mahanagdong sector of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field is committed to supply 180 MWe of steam by mid-1997. An updated hydrological model was constructed based on available geoscientific and reservoir engineering data from a total of 34 wells drilled in the area. The Mahanagdong; resource is derived from a fracture-controlled and volcano hosted geothermal system characterized by neutral to slightly alkali-chloride fluids with reservoir temperatures exceeding 295{degrees}C. A major upflow region was identified in the vicinity of MG-3D, MG-14D and MG-5D. Isochemical contours indicate outflowing fluids with temperatures of 270-275{degrees}C to the south and west. Its southwesterly flow is restricted by the intersection of the impermeable Mahanagdong Claystone near MG-10D, which delimits the southern part of the resource. Low temperature (<200{degrees}C), shallow inflows are evident at the west near MG-4D and MG-17D wells which act as a cold recharge in this sector.

  10. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  11. Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents flowing around bends

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary

    1 Transverse slope of bed and turbid-clear water interface of channelized turbidity currents Production Research Company Houston, Texas USA ABSTRACT Turbidity currents are sediment-laden bottom flows in lakes and the ocean that derive their momentum from the force of gravity acting on the sediment held

  12. DESIGN OF A FAILED LANDFILL SLOPE By: Timothy D. Stark, W. Douglas Evans-, and Paul E. Sherry'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Central Office, Division of Solid and Infectious Waste Management, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency solid waste landfill in which lateral displacements of up to 900 ft (275 m) and vertical settlements.1 million m~) of waste making it the largest slope failure in a municipal solid waste facility

  13. Disaster Mitigation of Debris Flows, Slope Failures and Landslides 159 Estimating Magnitude-Frequency Relationships for Debris Flows on Forested

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Butler, David R. - Department of Geography, Texas State University

    Disaster Mitigation of Debris Flows, Slope Failures and Landslides 159 Estimating Magnitude for the assessment of hazards and risks as well as for the design of e.g., torrent control works or retention basins. 2005a). However, data from tree-ring records have only exceptionally been coupled with data from ground

  14. Landslides and Engineered Slopes Chen et al. (eds) 2008 Taylor & Francis Group, London, ISBN 978-0-415-41196-7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -quality data sets for understanding the initiation and movement of landslides. Typical components of ground applications have determined the groundwater conditions controlling slow- moving landslides, detected 3-D of past slope failures. Such stud- ies, however, reveal little about the dynamics of active landslides

  15. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry wave generation in a laboratory model of oscillating tidal flow on a continental margin. Waves waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  16. Geotechnical in situ characterization of subaquatic slopes: The role of pore pressure transients versus frictional strength in landslide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Geotechnical in situ characterization of subaquatic slopes: The role of pore pressure transients; published 11 April 2007. [1] Mineralogical composition and pore fluid pressure are the crucial controls facilitates an upward pore pressure pulse to the base of the softer, less stable unit. Here, excess pore

  17. Study of biological processes on the US South Atlantic slope and rise. Phase 1: Benthic characterization. Volume 1. Executive Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, J.A.; Hecker, B.; Grassle, J.F.; Maciolek-Blake, N.; Brown, B.

    1985-06-01

    Concerns about the potential effects of oil and gas exploration on the U.S. Continental Slope and Rise led to the initiation of a deep-sea characterization study off North Carolina. The program included a seasonal characterization of biological and surficial geological properties at a limited number of slope and rise sites, with special emphasis on areas of high oil industry interest. A five-station transect was established off Cape Lookout in depths of 600 m, 1000 m, 1500 m, 2000 m and 3000 m. A rich and highly diverse benthic infauna was discovered, with a large percentage of the 877 species being new to science. Faunal density was highest on the upper slope (600 m) and lowest on the continental rise (3000 m). Species diversity values were all higher than 6.0, indicating a very diverse fauna, with the highest values at 3000 m. Foraminiferan tests comprised most of the sand fraction. Hydrographic data indicated some intrusion of colder water on the upper slope benthos from deeper water.

  18. Seasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope in the southeastern Weddell Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    transport of cold, fresh surface waters onto the continental shelf. Offshore, the warmer, saltier Warm DeepSeasonal variability of water masses and transport on the Antarctic continental shelf and slope masses and transport in the region. Rapid fluctuations in temperature and salinity throughout the year

  19. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; et al

    2015-08-28

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 ?m) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the sources of OA are distinctly different. The concentration ofmore »solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC, measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for « less

  20. Steep-Slope Assembly Testing of Clay and Concrete Tile With and Without Cool Pigmented Colors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, William A [ORNL

    2005-11-01

    Cool color pigments and sub-tile venting of clay and concrete tile roofs significantly impact the heat flow crossing the roof deck of a steep-slope roof. Field measures for the tile roofs revealed a 70% drop in the peak heat flow crossing the deck as compared to a direct-nailed asphalt shingle roof. The Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and its affiliate members are keenly interested in documenting the magnitude of the drop for obtaining solar reflectance credits with state and federal "cool roof" building efficiency standards. Tile roofs are direct-nailed or are attached to a deck with batten or batten and counter-batten construction. S-Misson clay and concrete tile roofs, a medium-profile concrete tile roof, and a flat slate tile roof were installed on fully nstrumented attic test assemblies. Temperature measures of the roof, deck, attic, and ceiling, heat flows, solar reflectance, thermal emittance, and the ambient weather were recorded for each of the tile roofs and also on an adjacent attic cavity covered with a conventional pigmented and directnailed asphalt shingle roof. ORNL measured the tile's underside temperature and the bulk air temperature and heat flows just underneath the tile for batten and counter-batten tile systems and compared the results to the conventional asphalt shingle.

  1. Cost-effective temporary microirrigation system for grass establishment on environmentally sensitive steep slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gyasi-Agyei, Y. [University of Central Queensland, Rockhampton, Qld. (Australia). James Goldston Faculty of Engineering & Physical Systems

    2004-05-15

    An advanced technology cost-effective drip irrigation system design and setup on environmentally sensitive elevated steep slopes (batters) of a coal train derailment site in Central Queensland, Australia, are presented. The final profile of the coal burial site consists of six batters and associated berms with a drop in elevation of about 35 m. A small dam constructed downstream of the confluence of the two main drainage channels at the site supplied water for irrigation of the batters to aid the establishment of grass to control erosion. Water was periodically pumped from the small dam to three storage tanks using a petrol (gas) pump. Three solar pumps drew water from the storage tanks and dam to irrigate the top four batters. Contactors, pressure switches and irrigation control valves in turn shared a single solar power source between the solar pumps. Level balls (floating switches) placed in the storage tanks cut the solar power supply to the pumps when the storage tanks were nearly empty. On the whole, the irrigation system worked very well and excellent grass cover was established within 12 weeks. Given the environmental risks associated with the on-site burying of coal, and the estimated cost of about AU$11.73/m{sup 2} (every 10 years) in maintenance if the railway batters are not treated, the estimated total cost of AU$4.61/m{sup 2} of batter area treated with irrigation, including AU$3.08/m{sup 2} in irrigation cost, is justified.

  2. Medical Records in the Greater Los Angeles State Veterans Home: A Unique Opportunity to Improve Quality of Care

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allison Townsend; Galena Kolchugina

    2006-01-01

    of the Office of Asset Management of the Greater Los AngelesGLA Department of Asset Management will benefit most fromby the GLA Office of Asset Management. Recommendation #2: If

  3. The SQUARE-NURSE merger in Greater Manchester : the impact of social and spatial identity on phonological variation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barras, William

    2006-01-01

    This study examines the SQUARE/NURSE merger in three neighbouring locations in Greater Manchester. Several approaches are used to provide explanations for the geographical patterns of variation that are observed. These ...

  4. Evaluation of WRF predicted near hub-height winds and ramp events over a Pacific Northwest site with complex terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Qing; Berg, Larry K.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Stoelinga, Mark; Finley, Cathy

    2013-08-16

    The WRF model version 3.3 is used to simulate near hub-height winds and power ramps utilizing three commonly used planetary boundary-layer (PBL) schemes: Mellor-Yamada-Janji? (MYJ), University of Washington (UW), and Yonsei University (YSU). The predicted winds have small mean biases compared with observations. Power ramps and step changes (changes within an hour) consistently show that the UW scheme performed better in predicting up ramps under stable conditions with higher prediction accuracy and capture rates. Both YSU and UW scheme show good performance predicting up- and down- ramps under unstable conditions with YSU being slightly better for ramp durations longer than an hour. MYJ is the most successful simulating down-ramps under stable conditions. The high wind speed and large shear associated with low-level jets are frequently associated with power ramps, and the biases in predicted low-level jet explain some of the shown differences in ramp predictions among different PBL schemes. Low-level jets were observed as low as ~200 m in altitude over the Columbia Basin Wind Energy Study (CBWES) site, located in an area of complex terrain. The shear, low-level peak wind speeds, as well as the height of maximum wind speed are not well predicted. Model simulations with 3 PBL schemes show the largest variability among them under stable conditions.

  5. Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model under Working Stress and Large Soil Strain Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Backfill Stress and Strain Information within a Centrifuge Geosynthetic-Reinforced Slope Model with a centrifuge test are used to investigate the mobilization of backfill stress and strain within a geosynthetic a centrifuge GRS slope model. Numerical results indicate that soil stress mobilization can be described

  6. Evaluation of Wax Deposition and Its Control During Production of Alaska North Slope Oils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao Zhu; Jack A. Walker; J. Liang

    2008-12-31

    Due to increasing oil demand, oil companies are moving into arctic environments and deep-water areas for oil production. In these regions of lower temperatures, wax deposits begin to form when the temperature in the wellbore falls below wax appearance temperature (WAT). This condition leads to reduced production rates and larger pressure drops. Wax problems in production wells are very costly due to production down time for removal of wax. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a solution to wax deposition. In order to develop a solution to wax deposition, it is essential to characterize the crude oil and study phase behavior properties. The main objective of this project was to characterize Alaskan North Slope crude oil and study the phase behavior, which was further used to develop a dynamic wax deposition model. This report summarizes the results of the various experimental studies. The subtasks completed during this study include measurement of density, molecular weight, viscosity, pour point, wax appearance temperature, wax content, rate of wax deposition using cold finger, compositional characterization of crude oil and wax obtained from wax content, gas-oil ratio, and phase behavior experiments including constant composition expansion and differential liberation. Also, included in this report is the development of a thermodynamic model to predict wax precipitation. From the experimental study of wax appearance temperature, it was found that wax can start to precipitate at temperatures as high as 40.6 C. The WAT obtained from cross-polar microscopy and viscometry was compared, and it was discovered that WAT from viscometry is overestimated. From the pour point experiment it was found that crude oil can cease to flow at a temperature of 12 C. From the experimental results of wax content, it is evident that the wax content in Alaskan North Slope crude oil can be as high as 28.57%. The highest gas-oil ratio for a live oil sample was observed to be 619.26 SCF/STB. The bubblepoint pressure for live oil samples varied between 1600 psi and 2100 psi. Wax precipitation is one of the most important phenomena in wax deposition and, hence, needs to be modeled. There are various models present in the literature. Won's model, which considers the wax phase as a non-ideal solution, and Pedersen's model, which considers the wax phase as an ideal solution, were compared. Comparison indicated that Pedersen's model gives better results, but the assumption of wax phase as an ideal solution is not realistic. Hence, Won's model was modified to consider different precipitation characteristics of the various constituents in the hydrocarbon fraction. The results obtained from the modified Won's model were compared with existing models, and it was found that predictions from the modified model are encouraging.

  7. Assessment of Alaska's North Slope Oil Field Capacity to Sequester CO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umekwe, Pascal; Mongrain, Joanna; Ahmadi, Mohabbat; Hanks, Catherine

    2013-03-15

    The capacity of 21 major fields containing more than 95% of the North Slope of Alaska's oil were investigated for CO{sub 2} storage by injecting CO{sub 2} as an enhanced oil recovery (EOR) agent. These fields meet the criteria for the application of miscible and immiscible CO{sub 2}-EOR methods and contain about 40 billion barrels of oil after primary and secondary recovery. Volumetric calculations from this study indicate that these fields have a static storage capacity of 3 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2}, assuming 100% oil recovery, re-pressurizing the fields to pre-fracturing pressure and applying a 50% capacity reduction to compensate for heterogeneity and for water invasion from the underlying aquifer. A ranking produced from this study, mainly controlled by field size and fracture gradient, identifies Prudhoe, Kuparuk, and West Sak as possessing the largest storage capacities under a 20% safety factor on pressures applied during storage to avoid over-pressurization, fracturing, and gas leakage. Simulation studies were conducted using CO{sub 2} Prophet to determine the amount of oil technically recoverable and CO{sub 2} gas storage possible during this process. Fields were categorized as miscible, partially miscible, and immiscible based on the miscibility of CO{sub 2} with their oil. Seven sample fields were selected across these categories for simulation studies comparing pure CO{sub 2} and water-alternating-gas injection. Results showed that the top two fields in each category for recovery and CO{sub 2} storage were Alpine and Point McIntyre (miscible), Prudhoe and Kuparuk (partially miscible), and West Sak and Lisburne (immiscible). The study concludes that 5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} can be stored while recovering 14.2 billion barrels of the remaining oil.

  8. Effects of refraction on transmission spectra of gas giants: decrease of the Rayleigh scattering slope and breaking of retrieval degeneracies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bétrémieux, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Detection of the signature of Rayleigh scattering in the transmission spectrum of an exoplanet is increasingly becoming the target of observational campaigns because the spectral slope of the Rayleigh continuum enables one to determine the scaleheight of its atmosphere in the absence of hazes. However, this is only true when one ignores the refractive effects of the exoplanet's atmosphere. I illustrate with a suite of simple isothermal clear Jovian H2-He atmosphere models with various abundances of water that refraction can decrease significantly the spectral slope of the Rayleigh continuum and that it becomes flat in the infrared. This mimics a surface, or an optically thick cloud deck, at much smaller pressures than one can probe in the non-refractive case. Although the relative impact of refraction on an exoplanet's transmission spectrum increases with decreasing atmospheric temperatures as well as increasing stellar temperature, it is still quite important from a retrieval's perspective even for a Jovian-...

  9. Assessment of primary production and optical variability in shelf and slope waters near Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Final project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redalje, Donald G.; Lohrenz, Stevern E.

    2001-02-12

    In this project we determined primary production and optical variability in the shelf and slope waters off of Cape Hatteras, N.C. These processes were addressed in conjunction with other Ocean Margins Program investigators, during the Spring Transition period and during Summer. We found that there were significant differences in measured parameters between Spring and Summer, enabling us to develop seasonally specific carbon production and ecosystem models as well as seasonal and regional algorithm improvements for use in remote sensing applications.

  10. Geologic interrelations relative to gas hydrates within the North Slope of Alaska: Task No. 6, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collett, T.S.; Bird, K.J.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Magoon, L.B.

    1988-01-01

    The five primary objectives of the US Geological Survey North Slope Gas Hydrate Project were to: (1) Determine possible geologic controls on the occurrence of gas hydrate; (2) locate and evaluate possible gas-hydrate-bearing reservoirs; (3) estimate the volume of gas within the hydrates; (4) develop a model for gas-hydrate formation; and (5) select a coring site for gas-hydrate sampling and analysis. Our studies of the North Slope of Alaska suggest that the zone in which gas hydrates are stable is controlled primarily by subsurface temperatures and gas chemistry. Other factors, such as pore-pressure variations, pore-fluid salinity, and reservior-rock grain size, appear to have little effect on gas hydrate stability on the North Slope. Data necessary to determine the limits of gas hydrate stability field are difficult to obtain. On the basis of mud-log gas chromatography, core data, and cuttings data, methane is the dominant species of gas in the near-surface (0--1500 m) sediment. Gas hydrates were identified in 34 wells utilizing well-log responses calibrated to the response of an interval in one well where gas hydrates were actually recovered in a core by an oil company. A possible scenario describing the origin of the interred gas hydrates on the North Slope involves the migration of thermogenic solution- and free-gas from deeper reservoirs upward along faults into the overlying sedimentary rocks. We have identified two (dedicated) core-hole sites, the Eileen and the South-End core-holes, at which there is a high probability of recovering a sample of gas hydrate. At the Eileen core-hole site, at least three stratigraphic units may contain gas hydrate. The South-End core-hole site provides an opportunity to study one specific rock unit that appears to contain both gas hydrate and oil. 100 refs., 72 figs., 24 tabs.

  11. Chemical and Microbial Characterization of North Slope Viscous Oils to Assess Viscosity Reduction and Enhanced Recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Mary Beth Leigh

    2008-12-31

    A large proportion of Alaska North Slope (ANS) oil exists in the form of viscous deposits, which cannot be produced entirely using conventional methods. Microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is a promising approach for improving oil recovery for viscous deposits. MEOR can be achieved using either ex situ approaches such as flooding with microbial biosurfactants or injection of exogenous surfactant-producing microbes into the reservoir, or by in situ approaches such as biostimulation of indigenous surfactant-producing microbes in the oil. Experimental work was performed to analyze the potential application of MEOR to the ANS oil fields through both ex situ and in situ approaches. A microbial formulation containing a known biosurfactant-producing strain of Bacillus licheniformis was developed in order to simulate MEOR. Coreflooding experiments were performed to simulate MEOR and quantify the incremental oil recovery. Properties like viscosity, density, and chemical composition of oil were monitored to propose a mechanism for oil recovery. The microbial formulation significantly increased incremental oil recovery, and molecular biological analyses indicated that the strain survived during the shut-in period. The indigenous microflora of ANS heavy oils was investigated to characterize the microbial communities and test for surfactant producers that are potentially useful for biostimulation. Bacteria that reduce the surface tension of aqueous media were isolated from one of the five ANS oils (Milne Point) and from rock oiled by the Exxon Valdez oil spill (EVOS), and may prove valuable for ex situ MEOR strategies. The total bacterial community composition of the six different oils was evaluated using molecular genetic tools, which revealed that each oil tested possessed a unique fingerprint indicating a diverse bacterial community and varied assemblages. Collectively we have demonstrated that there is potential for in situ and ex situ MEOR of ANS oils. Future work should focus on lab and field-scale testing of ex situ MEOR using Bacillus licheniformis as well as the biosurfactant-producing strains we have newly isolated from the Milne Point reservoir and the EVOS environment.

  12. The Java programming language is acheiving greater accep-tance in high-end embedded systems such as cellphones and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharyya, Shuvra S.

    been explored recently. TurboJ [4] speeds up execution by compiling bytecode to native code aheadAbstract The Java programming language is acheiving greater accep- tance in high-end embedded and bytecode. Bytecode is object code that is processed by a program, referred to as the Java Virtual Machine

  13. Chemical reactions at the single molecule level Two molecules may have greater stability as a complex or as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert, Réka

    Chemical reactions at the single molecule level · Two molecules may have greater stability is the more favorable one · For two molecules to undergo a chemical reaction, they must encounter each other. · In a gaseous mixture of two molecular species the average probability that a reaction takes place is = (c dt

  14. Wind Turbine Towers for Greater Hub Heights Why higher wind turbine tower can contribute to increase energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    towers represent 26% of the total WTG (Wind Turbine Generator) cost #12;Why concrete towerWind Turbine Towers for Greater Hub Heights Why higher wind turbine tower can contribute to increase energy output? · Energy output is proportional to the cube of wind velocity, 100m towers (versus

  15. Observations and Tectonic Setting of Historic and Instrumentally Located Earthquakes in the Greater New York CityPhiladelphia Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in the Greater New York City­Philadelphia Area by Lynn R. Sykes, John G. Armbruster, Won-Young Kim, and Leonardo Seeber Abstract A catalog of 383 earthquakes in southeastern New York, southwestern Connecticut, northern New Jersey, and eastern Pennsylvania, including metropolitan New York City and Philadelphia

  16. RENFORCEMENT ET CONTROLE DE PAREMENTS DANS UNE MINE A CffiL OUVERT DE CHARBON REINFORCEMENT AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    AND CONTROL OF FOOTWALL SLOPES IN AN OPEN PIT COAL MINE VERSTÄRKUNG UND KONTROLLE VON STOSSER IM KOHLETAGEBAU to exploit the stephanian coal.TheNorth West area ofthis open pit is composed of an overthrust fold. The coal

  17. Improving single slope ADC and an example implemented in FPGA with 16.7 GHz equivalent counter clook frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Jinyuan; /Fermilab; Odeghe, John; /South Carolina State U.; Stackley, Scott; /Boston U.; Zha, Charles; /Rice U.

    2011-11-01

    Single slope ADC is a common building block in many ASCI or FPGA based front-end systems due to its simplicity, small silicon footprint, low noise interference and low power consumption. In single slope ADC, using a Gray code counter is a popular scheme for time digitization, in which the comparator output drives the clock (CK) port of a register to latch the bits from the Gray code counter. Unfortunately, feeding the comparator output into the CK-port causes unnecessary complexities and artificial challenges. In this case, the propagation delays of all bits from the counter to the register inputs must be matched and the counter must be a Gray code one. A simple improvement on the circuit topology, i.e., feeding the comparator output into the D-port of a register, will avoid these unnecessary challenges, eliminating the requirement of the propagation delay match of the counter bits and allowing the use of regular binary counters. This scheme not only simplifies current designs for low speeds and resolutions, but also opens possibilities for applications requiring higher speeds and resolutions. A multi-channel single slope ADC based on a low-cost FPGA device has been implemented and tested. The timing measurement bin width in this work is 60 ps, which would need a 16.7 GHz counter clock had it implemented with the conventional Gray code counter scheme. A 12-bit performance is achieved using a fully differential circuit making comparison between the input and the ramping reference, both in differential format.

  18. Project test plan for runoff and erosion on fine-soil barrier surfaces and rock-covered side slopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.H.; Hoover, K.A.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1990-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Westinghouse Hanford Company are working together to develop protective barriers to isolate near-surface radioactive waste. The purpose of the barriers is to protect defense wastes at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site from infiltration of precipitation, biointrusion, and surficial erosion for up to 10,000 years without the need for long-term monitoring, maintenance, or institutional control. The barriers will be constructed of layered earth and rock material designed to direct surface and groundwater pathways away from the buried waste. To address soil erosion as it applies to barrier design and long-term stability, a task designed to study this problem has been included in the Protective Barriers Program at PNL. The barrier soil-erosion task will investigate the ability of the soil cover and side slopes to resist the erosional and destabilizing processes from externally applied water. The study will include identification and field testing of the dominant processes contributing to erosion and barrier failure. The effects of rock mulches, vegetation cover on the top fine-grained soil surface, as well as the stability of rock armoring on the side slopes, will be evaluated. Some of the testing will include the effects of animal intrusion on barrier erosion, and these will be coordinated with other animal intrusion studies. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Activities of \\gamma-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleveland, B T; Lawson, I T; Smith, N J T; Vazquez-Jauregui, E

    2012-01-01

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  20. A Methodology for the Assessment of Unconventional (Continuous) Resources with an Application to the Greater Natural Buttes Gas Field, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olea, Ricardo A.; Cook, Troy A.; Coleman, James L.

    2010-12-15

    The Greater Natural Buttes tight natural gas field is an unconventional (continuous) accumulation in the Uinta Basin, Utah, that began production in the early 1950s from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group. Three years later, production was extended to the Eocene Wasatch Formation. With the exclusion of 1100 non-productive ('dry') wells, we estimate that the final recovery from the 2500 producing wells existing in 2007 will be about 1.7 trillion standard cubic feet (TSCF) (48.2 billion cubic meters (BCM)). The use of estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) per well is common in assessments of unconventional resources, and it is one of the main sources of information to forecast undiscovered resources. Each calculated recovery value has an associated drainage area that generally varies from well to well and that can be mathematically subdivided into elemental subareas of constant size and shape called cells. Recovery per 5-acre cells at Greater Natural Buttes shows spatial correlation; hence, statistical approaches that ignore this correlation when inferring EUR values for untested cells do not take full advantage of all the information contained in the data. More critically, resulting models do not match the style of spatial EUR fluctuations observed in nature. This study takes a new approach by applying spatial statistics to model geographical variation of cell EUR taking into account spatial correlation and the influence of fractures. We applied sequential indicator simulation to model non-productive cells, while spatial mapping of cell EUR was obtained by applying sequential Gaussian simulation to provide multiple versions of reality (realizations) having equal chances of being the correct model. For each realization, summation of EUR in cells not drained by the existing wells allowed preparation of a stochastic prediction of undiscovered resources, which range between 2.6 and 3.4 TSCF (73.6 and 96.3 BCM) with a mean of 2.9 TSCF (82.1 BCM) for Greater Natural Buttes. A second approach illustrates the application of multiple-point simulation to assess a hypothetical frontier area for which there is no production information but which is regarded as being similar to Greater Natural Buttes.

  1. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  2. Potential co-disposal of greater-than-class C low-level radioactive waste with Department of Energy special case waste - greater-than-class C low-level waste management program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allred, W.E.

    1994-09-01

    This document evaluates the feasibility of co-disposing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) special case waste (SCW). This document: (1) Discusses and evaluates key issues concerning co-disposal of GTCC LLW with SCW. This includes examining these issues in terms of regulatory concerns, technical feasibility, and economics; (2) Examines advantages and disadvantages of such co-disposal; and (3) Makes recommendations. Research and analysis of the issues presented in this report indicate that it would be technically and economically feasible to co-dispose of GTCC LLW with DOE SCW. However, a dilemma will likely arise in the current division of regulatory responsibilities between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and DOE (i.e., current requirement for disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission). DOE SCW is currently not subject to this licensing requirement.

  3. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix A-2: Timing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinke, W.F.

    1994-09-01

    Planning for the storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste. Timing, or the date the waste will require storage or disposal, is an integral aspect of that planning. The majority of GTCC LLW is generated by nuclear power plants, and the length of time a reactor remains operational directly affects the amount of GTCC waste expected from that reactor. This report uses data from existing literature to develop high, base, and low case estimates for the number of plants expected to experience (a) early shutdown, (b) 40-year operation, or (c) life extension to 60-year operation. The discussion includes possible effects of advanced light water reactor technology on future GTCC LLW generation. However, the main focus of this study is timing for shutdown of current technology reactors that are under construction or operating.

  4. Gas Production From a Cold, Stratigraphically Bounded Hydrate Deposit at the Mount Elbert Site, North Slope, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Silpngarmlert, S.; Reagan, M. T.; Collett, T.S.; Zhang, K.

    2009-09-01

    As part of an effort to identify suitable targets for a planned long-term field test, we investigate by means of numerical simulation the gas production potential from unit D, a stratigraphically bounded (Class 3) permafrost-associated hydrate occurrence penetrated in the ount Elbert well on North Slope, Alaska. This shallow, low-pressure deposit has high porosities, high intrinsic permeabilities and high hydrate saturations. It has a low temperature because of its proximity to the overlying permafrost. The simulation results indicate that vertical ells operating at a constant bottomhole pressure would produce at very low rates for a very long period. Horizontal wells increase gas production by almost two orders of magnitude, but production remains low. Sensitivity analysis indicates that the initial deposit temperature is y the far the most important factor determining production performance (and the most effective criterion for target selection) because it controls the sensible heat available to fuel dissociation.

  5. Theoretical analysis of error transfer from surface slope to refractive ray and their application to the solar concentrated collector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Weidong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the general equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error from optical error through geometry optics, applying the equation to calculate the standard deviation of reflected ray error for 8 kinds of solar concentrated reflector, provide typical results. The results indicate that the slope errors in two direction is transferred to any one direction of the focus ray when the incidence angle is more than 0 for solar trough and heliostats reflector; for point focus Fresnel lens, point focus parabolic glass mirror, line focus parabolic galss mirror, the error transferring coefficient from optical to focus ray will increase when the rim angle increase; for TIR-R concentrator, it will decrease; for glass heliostat, it relates to the incidence angle and azimuth of the reflecting point. Keywords: optic error, standard deviation, refractive ray error, concentrated solar collector

  6. Spectral analysis of the efficiency of vertical mixing in the deep ocean due to interaction of tidal currents with a ridge running down a continental slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibragimov, Ranis N.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-10-29

    Efficiency of mixing, resulting from the reflection of an internal wave field imposed on the oscillatory background flow with a three-dimensional bottom topography, is investigated using a linear approximation. The radiating wave field is associated with the spectrum of the linear model, which consists of those mode numbers n and slope values ?, for which the solution represents the internal waves of frequencies ? = n?0 radiating upwrad of the topography, where ?0 is the fundamental frequency at which internal waves are generated at the topography. The effects of the bottom topography and the earth’s rotation on the spectrum is analyzed analytically and numerically in the vicinity of the critical slope, which is a slope with the same angle to the horizontal as the internal wave characteristic. In this notation, ? is latitude, f is the Coriolis parameter and N is the buoyancy frequency, which is assumed to be a constant, which corresponds to the uniform stratification.

  7. Evaluation of Department of Energy-Held Potential Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01

    A number of commercial facilities have generated potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW), and, through contractual arrangements with the US Department of Energy (DOE) or for health and safety reasons, DOE is storing the waste. This report presents the results of an assessment conducted by the GTCC LLW Management Program to consider specific circumstances under which DOE accepted the waste, and to determine whether disposal in a facility licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or by DOE in a nonlicensed facility, is appropriate. Input from EG&G Idaho, Inc., and DOE Idaho Operations Office legal departments concerning the disposal requirements of this waste were the basis for the decision process used in this report.

  8. Catalog of documents produced by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This catalog provides a ready reference for documents prepared by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste (GTCC LLW) Management Program. The GTCC LLW Management Program is part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The NLLWMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is responsible for assisting the DOE in meeting its obligations under Public Law 99-240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. This law assigns DOE the responsibility of ensuring the safe disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NLLWMP is managed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  9. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-2: Mixed GTCC LLW assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mixed greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (mixed GTCC LLW) is waste that combines two characteristics: it is radioactive, and it is hazardous. This report uses information compiled from Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW 1 14, Revision 1), and applies it to the question of how much and what types of mixed GTCC LLW are generated and are likely to require disposal in facilities jointly regulated by the DOE and the NRC. The report describes how to classify a RCRA hazardous waste, and then applies that classification process to the 41 GTCC LLW waste types identified in the DOE/LLW-114 (Revision 1). Of the 41 GTCC LLW categories identified, only six were identified in this study as potentially requiring regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA. These wastes can be combined into the following three groups: fuel-in decontamination resins, organic liquids, and process waste consisting of lead scrap/shielding from a sealed source manufacturer. For the base case, no mixed GTCC LLW is expected from nuclear utilities or sealed source licensees, whereas only 177 ml of mixed GTCC LLW are expected to be produced by other generators through the year 2035. This relatively small volume represents approximately 40% of the base case estimate for GTCC wastes from other generators. For these other generators, volume estimates for mixed GTCC LLW ranged from less than 1 m{sup 3} to 187 m{sup 3}, depending on assumptions and treatments applied to the wastes.

  10. The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY* AND JONATHAN D. NASH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Cascade of Tidal Energy from Low to High Modes on a Continental Slope SAMUEL M. KELLY 25 March 2012) ABSTRACT The linear transfer of tidal energy from large to small scales is quantified. Observed transfer of tidal energy into high-mode internal tides is quantitatively consistent with observed

  11. Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozgul, Ercin

    2004-09-30

    Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis...

  12. Exports of Alaskan north slope oil. Introduced in the House of Representatives, One Hundred Fourth Congress, First Session, June 15, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The bill addresses H.R. 70 a bill to permit exports of certain domestically produced oil. The background and need for the legislation is provided. The bill would amend the Mineral Leasing Act to allow exports of Alaskan North Slope oil under certain conditions.

  13. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  14. Preliminary identification of potentially disruptive scenarios at the Greater Confinement Disposal Facility, Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzowski, R.V.; Newman, G.

    1993-12-01

    The Greater Confinement Disposal location is being evaluated to determine whether defense-generated transuranic waste buried at this location complies with the Containment Requirements established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. One step in determining compliance is to identify those combinations of events and processes (scenarios) that define possible future states of the disposal system for which performance assessments must be performed. An established scenario-development procedure was used to identify a comprehensive set of mutually exclusive scenarios. To assure completeness, 761 features, events, processes, and other listings (FEPS) were compiled from 11 references. This number was reduced to 205 primarily through the elimination of duplications. The 205 FEPs were screened based on site-specific, goal-specific, and regulatory criteria. Four events survived screening and were used in preliminary scenario development: (1) exploratory drilling penetrates a GCD borehole, (2) drilling of a withdrawal/injection well penetrates a GCD borehole, (3) subsidence occurs at the RWMS, and (4) irrigation occurs at the RWMS. A logic diagram was used to develop 16 scenarios from the four events. No screening of these scenarios was attempted at this time. Additional screening of the currently retained events and processes will be based on additional data and information from site-characterization activities. When screening of the events and processes is completed, a final set of scenarios will be developed and screened based on consequence and probability of occurrence.

  15. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  16. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-02-24

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico is a cost-shared field demonstration project in the US Department of Energy Class II Program. A major goal of the Class III Program is to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geologic, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description is being used as a risk reduction tool to identify ''sweet spots'' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well simulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

  17. Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - preliminary results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vereš, Peter; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; Chastel, Serge; Wainscoat, Richard; Burgett, William; Chambers, Ken; Flewelling, Heather; Kaiser, Nick; Magnier, Eugen; Morgan, Jeff; Price, Paul; Tonry, John; Waters, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of a Monte Carlo technique to calculate the absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) of about 240,000 asteroids observed by the Pan-STARRS1 telescope during the first 15 months of its 3-year all-sky survey mission. The system's exquisite photometry with photometric errors filter and photometric system, allowed us to derive accurate H and G even with a limited number of observations and restricted range in phase angles. Our Monte Carlo method simulates each asteroid's rotation period, amplitude and color to derive the most-likely H and G, but its major advantage is in estimating realistic statistical+systematic uncertainties and errors on each parameter. The method was confirmed by comparison with the well-established and accurate results for about 500 asteroids provided by Pravec et al. (2012) and then applied to determining H and G for the Pan-STARRS1 asteroids using both the Muinonen et al. (2010) and Bowell et al. (1989) phase functions.

  18. Formal deduction of the Saint-Venant-Exner model including arbitrarily sloping sediment beds and associated energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernández-Nieto, E D; Narbona-Reina, G; Zabsonré, J D

    2015-01-01

    In this work we present a deduction of the Saint-Venant-Exner model through an asymptotic analysis of the Navier-Stokes equations. A multi-scale analysis is performed in order to take into account that the velocity of the sediment layer is smaller than the one of the fluid layer. This leads us to consider a shallow water type system for the fluid layer and a lubrication Reynolds equation for the sediment one. This deduction provides some improvements with respect to the classical Saint-Venant-Exner model: (i) the deduced model has an associated energy. Moreover, it allows us to explain why classical models do not have an associated energy and how to modify them in order to recover a model with this property. (ii) The model incorporates naturally a necessary modification that must be taken into account in order to be applied to arbitrarily sloping beds. Furthermore, we show that this modification is different of the ones considered classically, and that it coincides with a classical one only if the solution ha...

  19. Constraining the density slope of nuclear symmetry energy at subsaturation densities using electric dipole polarizability in $^{208}$Pb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen Zhang; Lie-Wen Chen

    2014-12-11

    Nuclear structure observables usually most effectively probe the properties of nuclear matter at subsaturation densities rather than at saturation density. We demonstrate that the electric dipole polarizibility $\\alpha _ {\\text{D}}$ in $^{208}$Pb is sensitive to both the magnitude $E_{\\text{sym}}(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ and density slope $L(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ of the symmetry energy at a subsaturation cross density $\\rho_{\\text{c}} = 0.11$ fm$^{-3}$. Using the experimental data of $\\alpha _ {\\text{D}}$ in $^{208}$Pb from RCNP and the recent accurate constraint of $E_{\\text{sym}}(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ from the binding energy difference of heavy isotope pairs, we extract a value of $L(\\rho_{\\text{c}}) = 47.3 \\pm 7.8$ MeV. The implication of the present constraint of $L(\\rho_{\\text{c}})$ to the symmetry energy at saturation density, the neutron skin thickness of $^{208}$Pb and the core-crust transition density in neutron stars is discussed.

  20. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  1. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  2. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  3. Steep Slope Calculator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Islands Puerto Rico Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington Wisconsin West Virginia Wyoming Canadian Cities Enter A City:...

  4. North Slope of Alaska

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you notHeatMaRIEdioxideUser Work Featured onNewsNews andSites

  5. Using a Neural Network to Determine the Hatch Status of the AERI at the ARM North Slope of Alaska Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zwink, AB; Turner, DD

    2012-03-19

    The fore-optics of the Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) are protected by an automated hatch to prevent precipitation from fouling the instrument's scene mirror (Knuteson et al. 2004). Limit switches connected with the hatch controller provide a signal of the hatch state: open, closed, undetermined (typically associated with the hatch being between fully open or fully closed during the instrument's sky view period), or an error condition. The instrument then records the state of the hatch with the radiance data so that samples taken when the hatch is not open can be removed from any subsequent analysis. However, the hatch controller suffered a multi-year failure for the AERI located at the ARM North Slope of Alaska (NSA) Central Facility in Barrow, Alaska, from July 2006-February 2008. The failure resulted in misreporting the state of the hatch in the 'hatchOpen' field within the AERI data files. With this error there is no simple solution to translate what was reported back to the correct hatch status, thereby making it difficult for an analysis to determine when the AERI was actually viewing the sky. As only the data collected when the hatch is fully open are scientifically useful, an algorithm was developed to determine whether the hatch was open or closed based on spectral radiance data from the AERI. Determining if the hatch is open or closed in a scene with low clouds is non-trivial, as low opaque clouds may look very similar spectrally as the closed hatch. This algorithm used a backpropagation neural network; these types of neural networks have been used with increasing frequency in atmospheric science applications.

  6. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the reasonably foreseeable environmental impacts associated with the proposed development, operation, and long-term management of a disposal facility or facilities for Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste and GTCC-like waste. The Environmental Protection Agency is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS.

  7. New England Real Estate Journal February 21 -27, 2014 11BVisit the paper online nerej.com Connecticut MetroHartford Alliance/Greater Hartford County

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    .com Connecticut MetroHartford Alliance/Greater Hartford County MetroHartford Alliance Sandra Johnson Metro Connecticut-Israel Technology Summit. Thiseventbroughttogether CEO's from Israel who interfaced with Connecticut leaders, venture capitalists, academia and business. These attendees not only flew in from Israel

  8. no pedestrian call during some cycles. It is not a problem if the required vehicle phase split is greater than the pedestrian Walk plus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zong Z.

    no pedestrian call during some cycles. It is not a problem if the required vehicle phase split is greater than the pedestrian Walk plus FDW time. However, if the vehicle demand is low and the pedestrian. The objective of this paper is to incor- porate the stochastic nature of pedestrian call events into the HCM

  9. ERPs to the main-clause verb in both SR and OR sentences showed a greater left anterior negativity than the second verb in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Richard

    ERPs to the main-clause verb in both SR and OR sentences showed a greater left anterior negativity, we would like to point out that the ERP studies cited above also include notable demonstrations large ERP differences between SR and OR sentence types, whereas poorer comprehenders show almost none

  10. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

  11. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    2000-10-25

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool (NDP) is southeast New Mexico is one of the nine projects selected in 1995 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for participation in the Class III Reservoir Field Demonstration Program. The goals of the DOE cost-shared Class Program are to: (1) extend economic production, (2) increase ultimate recovery, and (3) broaden information exchange and technology application. Reservoirs in the Class III Program are focused on slope-basin and deep-basin clastic depositional types.

  12. Study of biological processes on the US South Atlantic slope and rise. Phase 2. Volume 1. Executive summary. Report for November 1985-March 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, J.A.; Hecker, B.; Grassle, J.F.; Brown, B.; Wade, M.

    1987-03-30

    A total of 16 stations were sampled during a 2-year field program designed to characterize the biological, chemical, and sedimentary processes on the slope and rise off North and South Carolina. Box cores were taken along 4 transects at depths of 600-3500 m. The infauna yielded a total of 1202 species, 520 of which were new to science. Annelids were the dominant taxa in terms of density and numbers of species. Species diversity was highest at an 800 m site off Charleston. Higher than normal lead and hydrocarbon inventories suggest enhanced scavenging processes in the area.

  13. Application of Advanced Reservoir Characterization, Simulation, and Production Optimization Strategies to Maximize Recovery in Slope and Basin Clastic Reservoirs, West Texas (Delaware Basin), Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutton, Shirley P.; Flanders, William A.

    2001-11-04

    The objective of this Class III project was demonstrate that reservoir characterization and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) by CO2 flood can increase production from slope and basin clastic reservoirs in sandstones of the Delaware Mountain Group in the Delaware Basin of West Texas and New Mexico. Phase 1 of the project, reservoir characterization, focused on Geraldine Ford and East Ford fields, which are Delaware Mountain Group fields that produce from the upper Bell Canyon Formation (Ramsey sandstone). The demonstration phase of the project was a CO2 flood conducted in East Ford field, which is operated by Orla Petco, Inc., as the East Ford unit.

  14. New Terrain for Rural Politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fox, Jonathan A

    1992-01-01

    sobrevivir en Santa Maria. Democracia social en un sindicato5. Maruja Barrig, "Democracia Emergente y Movimiento dein Movimientos Sociales y Democracia: Lafundacidnde un nuevo

  15. The Evolution of the Galaxy Stellar Mass Function at z= 4-8: A Steepening Low-mass-end Slope with Increasing Redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Mimi; Ashby, Matthew L N; Grazian, A; Lu, Yu; Papovich, Casey; Salmon, Brett; Somerville, Rachel S; Dickinson, Mark; Duncan, K; Faber, Sandy M; Fazio, Giovanni G; Ferguson, Henry C; Fontana, Adriano; Guo, Yicheng; Hathi, Nimish; Lee, Seong-Kook; Merlin, Emiliano; Willner, S P

    2015-01-01

    We present galaxy stellar mass functions (GSMFs) at $z=$ 4-8 from a rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) selected sample of $\\sim$4,500 galaxies, found via photometric redshifts over an area of $\\sim$280 arcmin$^2$ in the CANDELS/GOODS fields and the Hubble Ultra Deep Field. The deepest Spitzer/IRAC data yet-to-date from the Spitzer-CANDELS (26.5 mag, 3$\\sigma$) and the IRAC Ultra Deep Field 2010 (26.4-27.1 mag, 3$\\sigma$) surveys allow us to place robust constraints on the low-mass-end slope of the GSMFs, while the relatively large volume provides a better constraint at higher masses compared to previous space-based studies. Supplemented by a stacking analysis, we find a linear correlation between the rest-frame UV absolute magnitude at 1500\\AA\\ ($M_{\\rm UV}$) and logarithmic stellar mass ($\\log M_*$). We use simulations to validate our method of measuring the slope of the $\\log M_*$-$M_{\\rm UV}$ relation, finding that the bias is minimized with a hybrid technique combining photometry of individual bright galaxies wi...

  16. Phase Behavior, Solid Organic Precipitation, and Mobility Characterization Studies in Support of Enhanced Heavy Oil Recovery on the Alaska North Slope

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirish Patil; Abhijit Dandekar; Santanu Khataniar

    2008-12-31

    The medium-heavy oil (viscous oil) resources in the Alaska North Slope are estimated at 20 to 25 billion barrels. These oils are viscous, flow sluggishly in the formations, and are difficult to recover. Recovery of this viscous oil requires carefully designed enhanced oil recovery processes. Success of these recovery processes is critically dependent on accurate knowledge of the phase behavior and fluid properties, especially viscosity, of these oils under variety of pressure and temperature conditions. This project focused on predicting phase behavior and viscosity of viscous oils using equations of state and semi-empirical correlations. An experimental study was conducted to quantify the phase behavior and physical properties of viscous oils from the Alaska North Slope oil field. The oil samples were compositionally characterized by the simulated distillation technique. Constant composition expansion and differential liberation tests were conducted on viscous oil samples. Experiment results for phase behavior and reservoir fluid properties were used to tune the Peng-Robinson equation of state and predict the phase behavior accurately. A comprehensive literature search was carried out to compile available compositional viscosity models and their modifications, for application to heavy or viscous oils. With the help of meticulously amassed new medium-heavy oil viscosity data from experiments, a comparative study was conducted to evaluate the potential of various models. The widely used corresponding state viscosity model predictions deteriorate when applied to heavy oil systems. Hence, a semi-empirical approach (the Lindeloff model) was adopted for modeling the viscosity behavior. Based on the analysis, appropriate adjustments have been suggested: the major one is the division of the pressure-viscosity profile into three distinct regions. New modifications have improved the overall fit, including the saturated viscosities at low pressures. However, with the limited amount of geographically diverse data, it is not possible to develop a comprehensive predictive model. Based on the comprehensive phase behavior analysis of Alaska North Slope crude oil, a reservoir simulation study was carried out to evaluate the performance of a gas injection enhanced oil recovery technique for the West Sak reservoir. It was found that a definite increase in viscous oil production can be obtained by selecting the proper injectant gas and by optimizing reservoir operating parameters. A comparative analysis is provided, which helps in the decision-making process.

  17. Evaluation of a deposit in the vicinity of the PBU L-106 Site, North Slope, Alaska, for a potential long-term test of gas production from hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Reagan, M.T.; Boyle, K.L.; Zhang, K.

    2010-05-01

    As part of the effort to investigate the technical feasibility of gas production from hydrate deposits, a long-term field test (lasting 18-24 months) is under consideration in a project led by the U.S. Department of Energy. We evaluate a candidate deposit involving the C-Unit in the vicinity of the PBU-L106 site in North Slope, Alaska. This deposit is stratigraphically bounded by impermeable shale top and bottom boundaries (Class 3), and is characterized by high intrinsic permeabilities, high porosity, high hydrate saturation, and a hydrostatic pressure distribution. The C-unit deposit is composed of two hydrate-bearing strata separated by a 30-ft-thick shale interlayer, and its temperatrure across its boundaries ranges between 5 and 6.5 C. We investigate by means of numerical simulation involving very fine grids the production potential of these two deposits using both vertical and horizontal wells. We also explore the sensitivity of production to key parameters such as the hydrate saturation, the formation permeability, and the permeability of the bounding shale layers. Finally, we compare the production performance of the C-Unit at the PBU-L106 site to that of the D-Unit accumulation at the Mount Elbert site, a thinner, single-layer Class 3 deposit on the North Slope of Alaska that is shallower, less-pressurized and colder (2.3-2.6 C). The results indicate that production from horizontal wells may be orders of magnitude larger than that from vertical ones. Additionally, production increases with the formation permeability, and with a decreasing permeability of the boundaries. The effect of the hydrate saturation on production is complex and depends on the time frame of production. Because of higher production, the PBU-L106 deposit appears to have an advantage as a candidate for the long-term test.

  18. Preliminary evaluation of the use of the greater confinement disposal concept for the disposal of Fernald 11e(2) byproduct material at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R.; Brown, T.J.; Stockman, H.W.; Gallegos, D.P.; Conrad, S.H.; Price, L.L.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents a preliminary evaluation of the ability of the greater confinement disposal boreholes at the Nevada Test Site to provide long-term isolation of radionuclides from the disposal of vitrified byproduct material. The byproduct material is essentially concentrated residue from processing uranium ore that contains a complex mixture of radionuclides, many of which are long-lived and present in concentrations greater than 100,000 picoCuries per gram. This material has been stored in three silos at the fernald Environmental Management Project since the early 1950s and will be vitrified into 6,000 yd{sup 3} (4,580 m{sup 3}) of glass gems prior to disposal. This report documents Sandia National Laboratories` preliminary evaluation for disposal of the byproduct material and includes: the selection of quantitative performance objectives; a conceptual model of the disposal system and the waste; results of the modeling; identified issues, and activities necessary to complete a full performance assessment.

  19. Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector. Technical report twelve: Economic analysis of alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    As part of the Altemative Fuels Assessment, the Department of Energy (DOE) is studying the use of derivatives of natural gas, including compressed natural gas and methanol, as altemative transportation fuels. A critical part of this effort is determining potential sources of natural gas and the economics of those sources. Previous studies in this series characterized the economics of unutilized gas within the lower 48 United States, comparing its value for methanol production against its value as a pipelined fuel (US Department of Energy 1991), and analyzed the costs of developing undeveloped nonassociated gas reserves in several countries (US Department of Energy 1992c). This report extends those analyses to include Alaskan North Slope natural gas that either is not being produced or is being reinjected. The report includes the following: A description of discovered and potential (undiscovered) quantities of natural gas on the Alaskan North Slope. A discussion of proposed altemative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. A comparison of the economics of the proposed alternative uses for Alaskan North Slope natural gas. The purpose of this report is to illustrate the costs of transporting Alaskan North Slope gas to markets in the lower 48 States as pipeline gas, liquefied natural gas (LNG), or methanol. It is not intended to recommend one alternative over another or to evaluate the relative economics or timing of using North Slope gas in new tertiary oil recovery projects. The information is supplied in sufficient detail to allow incorporation of relevant economic relationships (for example, wellhead gas prices and transportation costs) into the Altemative Fuels Trade Model, the analytical framework DOE is using to evaluate various policy options.

  20. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT (EECBG) - BETTER BUILDINGS NEIGHBORHOOD PROGRAM AT GREATER CINCINNATI ENERGY ALLIANCE Project Title: Home Performance with Energy Star® and Better Buildings Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training Center, a program that was developed and funded by the Energy Alliance and housed at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Nearly 100 residential and commercial contractors currently participate in the Energy Alliance’s two major programs, which have together served over 2,800 residential and 100 commercial customers. Additionally, the Energy Alliance established loan programs for homeowners, nonprofits and commercial businesses. The GC-HELP program was established to provide up to ten year low interest, unsecured loans to homeowners to cover the energy efficiency products they purchased through the Energy Alliance approved contractor base. To date the Energy Alliance has financed over $1 million in energy efficiency loans for homeowners, without any loans written off. The nonprofit business community is offered five year, fixed-interest rate loans through the Building Communities Loan Fund of $250,000. Additionally, the Energy Alliance has developed GC-PACE, a commercial financing tool that enables buildings owners to finance their energy upgrades through voluntary property assessments deploying low-interest extended-term capital from the bond market. The Energy Alliance and its partners are actively evaluating additional market-based financing solutions.

  1. The galaxy UV luminosity function at z ~ 2 - 4; new results on faint-end slope and the evolution of luminosity density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsa, Shaghayegh; McLure, Ross J; Mortlock, Alice

    2015-01-01

    We present a new, robust measurement of the evolving rest-frame UV galaxy luminosity function (LF) over the key redshift range z = 2 - 4. Our results are based on the high dynamic range provided by combining the HUDF, CANDELS/GOODS-South, and UltraVISTA/COSMOS surveys. We utilise the unparalleled multi-frequency photometry available in this survey `wedding cake' to compile complete galaxy samples at z ~ 2,3,4 via photometric redshifts (calibrated against the latest spectroscopy) rather than colour-colour selection, and to determine accurate rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes from SED fitting. Our new determinations of the UV LF extend from M_{1500} ~ -22 down to M_{1500} = -14.5, -15.5 and -16 at z ~ 2, 3 and 4 respectively (thus reaching ~ 3 - 4 magnitudes fainter than previous blank-field studies at z ~ 2 - 3). At z ~ 2 - 3 we find a much shallower faint-end slope (alpha = -1.32 +- 0.03) than the steeper values (alpha ~ -1.7) reported by Reddy & Steidel (2009) or by Alavi et al. (2014), and show that thi...

  2. Project management plan for low-level mixed wastes and greater-than category 3 waste per Tri-Party Agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-06-17

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-Than-Category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10. The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; and (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the techuical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are summarized in the table below, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  3. Project management plan for low-level mixed waste and greater-than-category 3 waste per tri-party agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-05-20

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-thaw category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10, The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the technical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are tabulated, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  4. Survey of DOE NDA practices for CH-Tru waste certification--illustrated with a greater than 10,000 drum NDA data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.; Smith, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    We have compiled a greater than 10,000 CH-TRU waste drum data base from seven DOE sites which have utilized such multiple NDA measurements within the past few years. Most of these nondestructive assay (NDA) technique assay result comparisons have been performed on well-characterized, segregated waste categories such as cemented sludges, combustibles, metals, graphite residues, glasses, etc., with well-known plutonium isotopic compositions. Waste segregation and categorization practices vary from one DOE site to another. Perhaps the most systematic approach has been in use for several years at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), operated by Rockwell International, and located near Golden, Colorado. Most of the drum assays in our data base result from assays of RFP wastes, with comparisons available between the original RFP assays and PAN assays performed independently at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Solid Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) facility. Most of the RFP assays were performed with hyperpure germanium (HPGe)-based SGS assay units. However, at least one very important waste category, processed first-stage sludges, is assayed at RFP using a sludge batch-sampling procedure, prior to filling of the waste drums. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold [Office of Environmental Management, Office of Disposal Operations-EM-43 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

  6. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste shipping package/container identification and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies a variety of shipping packages (also referred to as casks) and waste containers currently available or being developed that could be used for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level waste (LLW). Since GTCC LLW varies greatly in size, shape, and activity levels, the casks and waste containers that could be used range in size from small, to accommodate a single sealed radiation source, to very large-capacity casks/canisters used to transport or dry-store highly radioactive spent fuel. In some cases, the waste containers may serve directly as shipping packages, while in other cases, the containers would need to be placed in a transport cask. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed that the generator is responsible for transporting the waste to a Department of Energy (DOE) storage, treatment, or disposal facility. Unless DOE establishes specific acceptance criteria, the receiving facility would need the capability to accept any of the casks and waste containers identified in this report. In identifying potential casks and waste containers, no consideration was given to their adequacy relative to handling, storage, treatment, and disposal. Those considerations must be addressed separately as the capabilities of the receiving facility and the handling requirements and operations are better understood.

  7. ARM North Slope of Alaska

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProducts

  8. Source Characterization and Temporal Variation of Methane Seepage from Thermokarst Lakes on the Alaska North Slope in Response to Arctic Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-30

    The goals of this research were to characterize the source, magnitude and temporal variability of methane seepage from thermokarst lakes (TKL) within the Alaska North Slope gas hydrate province, assess the vulnerability of these areas to ongoing and future arctic climate change and determine if gas hydrate dissociation resulting from permafrost melting is contributing to the current lake emissions. Analyses were focused on four main lake locations referred to in this report: Lake Qalluuraq (referred to as Lake Q) and Lake Teshekpuk (both on Alaska?s North Slope) and Lake Killarney and Goldstream Bill Lake (both in Alaska?s interior). From analyses of gases coming from lakes in Alaska, we showed that ecological seeps are common in Alaska and they account for a larger source of atmospheric methane today than geologic subcap seeps. Emissions from the geologic source could increase with potential implications for climate warming feedbacks. Our analyses of TKL sites showing gas ebullition were complemented with geophysical surveys, providing important insight about the distribution of shallow gas in the sediments and the lake bottom manifestation of seepage (e.g., pockmarks). In Lake Q, Chirp data were limited in their capacity to image deeper sediments and did not capture the thaw bulb. The failure to capture the thaw bulb at Lake Q may in part be related to the fact that the present day lake is a remnant of an older, larger, and now-partially drained lake. These suggestions are consistent with our analyses of a dated core of sediment from the lake that shows that a wetland has been present at the site of Lake Q since approximately 12,000 thousand years ago. Chemical analyses of the core indicate that the availability of methane at the site has changed during the past and is correlated with past environmental changes (i.e. temperature and hydrology) in the Arctic. Discovery of methane seeps in Lake Teshekpuk in the northernmost part of the lake during 2009 reconnaissance surveys provided a strong impetus to visit this area in 2010. The seismic methods applied in Lake Teshekpuk were able to image pockmarks, widespread shallow gas in the sediments, and the relationship among different sediment packages on the lake?s bottom, but even boomer seismics did not detect permafrost beneath the northern part of the lake. By characterizing the biogeochemistry of shallow TKL with methane seeps we showed that the radical seasonal shifts in ice cover and temperature. These seasonal environmental differences result in distinct consumption and production processes of biologically-relevant compounds. The combined effects of temperature, ice-volume and other lithological factors linked to seepage from the lake are manifest in the distribution of sedimentary methane in Lake Q during icecovered and ice-free conditions. The biogeochemistry results illustrated very active methanotrophy in TKLs. Substantial effort was subsequently made to characterize the nature of methanotrophic communities in TKLs. We applied stable isotope probing approaches to genetically characterize the methanotrophs most active in utilizing methane in TKLs. Our study is the first to identify methane oxidizing organisms active in arctic TKLs, and revealing that type I methanotrophs and type II methanotrophs are abundant and active in assimilating methane in TKLs. These organisms play an important role in limiting the flux of methane from these sites. Our investigations indicate that as temperatures increase in the Arctic, oxidation rates and active methanotrophic populations will also shift. Whether these changes can offset predicted increases in methanogenesis is an important question underlying models of future methane flux and resultant climate change. Overall our findings indicate that TKLs and their ability to act as both source and sink of methane are exceedingly sensitive to environmental change.

  9. Collaborative Proposal -AnSlope: Cross-slope exchanges at the Antarctic Slope Front I INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into the adjacent deep ocean. This outflow provides the kernel for Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) formation. Onshore transport of relatively warm and saline deep water and surface water and ice exchange across the shelf break- density Antarctic Surface Water to the south from the denser, relatively warm and salty water of the deep

  10. RESOURCE CHARACTERIZATION AND QUANTIFICATION OF NATURAL GAS-HYDRATE AND ASSOCIATED FREE-GAS ACCUMULATIONS IN THE PRUDHOE BAY - KUPARUK RIVER AREA ON THE NORTH SLOPE OF ALASKA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Hunter; Shirish Patil; Robert Casavant; Tim Collett

    2003-06-02

    Interim results are presented from the project designed to characterize, quantify, and determine the commercial feasibility of Alaska North Slope (ANS) gas-hydrate and associated free-gas resources in the Prudhoe Bay Unit (PBU), Kuparuk River Unit (KRU), and Milne Point Unit (MPU) areas. This collaborative research will provide practical input to reservoir and economic models, determine the technical feasibility of gas hydrate production, and influence future exploration and field extension of this potential ANS resource. The large magnitude of unconventional in-place gas (40-100 TCF) and conventional ANS gas commercialization evaluation creates industry-DOE alignment to assess this potential resource. This region uniquely combines known gas hydrate presence and existing production infrastructure. Many technical, economical, environmental, and safety issues require resolution before enabling gas hydrate commercial production. Gas hydrate energy resource potential has been studied for nearly three decades. However, this knowledge has not been applied to practical ANS gas hydrate resource development. ANS gas hydrate and associated free gas reservoirs are being studied to determine reservoir extent, stratigraphy, structure, continuity, quality, variability, and geophysical and petrophysical property distribution. Phase 1 will characterize reservoirs, lead to recoverable reserve and commercial potential estimates, and define procedures for gas hydrate drilling, data acquisition, completion, and production. Phases 2 and 3 will integrate well, core, log, and long-term production test data from additional wells, if justified by results from prior phases. The project could lead to future ANS gas hydrate pilot development. This project will help solve technical and economic issues to enable government and industry to make informed decisions regarding future commercialization of unconventional gas-hydrate resources.

  11. Numerical simulation studies of the long-term evolution of a CO2 plume in a saline aquifer with a sloping caprock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruess, K.; Nordbotten, J.

    2010-12-28

    We have used the TOUGH2-MP/ECO2N code to perform numerical simulation studies of the long-term behavior of CO{sub 2} stored in an aquifer with a sloping caprock. This problem is of great practical interest, and is very challenging due to the importance of multi-scale processes. We find that the mechanism of plume advance is different from what is seen in a forced immiscible displacement, such as gas injection into a water-saturated medium. Instead of pushing the water forward, the plume advances because the vertical pressure gradients within the plume are smaller than hydrostatic, causing the groundwater column to collapse ahead of the plume tip. Increased resistance to vertical flow of aqueous phase in anisotropic media leads to reduced speed of updip plume advancement. Vertical equilibrium models that ignore effects of vertical flow will overpredict the speed of plume advancement. The CO{sub 2} plume becomes thinner as it advances, yet the speed of advancement remains constant over the entire simulation period of up to 400 years, with migration distances of more than 80 km. Our simulations include dissolution of CO{sub 2} into the aqueous phase and associated density increase, and molecular diffusion. However, no convection develops in the aqueous phase because it is suppressed by the relatively coarse (sub-) horizontal gridding required in a regional-scale model. A first crude sub-grid-scale model was developed to represent convective enhancement of CO{sub 2} dissolution. This process is found to greatly reduce the thickness of the CO{sub 2} plume, but, for the parameters used in our simulations, does not affect the speed of plume advancement.

  12. Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01

    Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

  13. New and Improved Data Logging and Collection System for Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility, Tropical Western Pacific, and North Slope of Alaska Sky Radiation, Ground Radiation, and MET Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritsche, M.T.; Holdridge, D.J.; Pearson, R.

    2005-03-18

    Aging systems and technological advances mandated changes to the data collection systems at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) sites. Key reasons for the upgrade include the following: achieve consistency across all ACRF sites for easy data use and operational maintenance; minimize the need for a single mentor requiring specialized knowledge and training; provide local access to real-time data for operational support, intensive operational period (IOP) support, and public relations; eliminate problems with physical packaging (condensation, connectors, etc.); and increase flexibility in programming and control of the data logger.

  14. Pattern classification of terrain during amputee walking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Matthew Todd

    2013-01-01

    In this thesis I study the role of extrinsic (sensors placed on the body) versus intrinsic sensing (instruments placed on an artificial limb) and determine a robust set of sensors from physical and reliability constraints ...

  15. Conservation Assessment of Greater Sage-grouse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    wrote portions of one or more chapters. Jenny Barnett Handford Reach National Monument/Saddle Mountain NWR 3250 Port of Benton Blvd. Richland, WA 99352 Jenny Barnett, After studying sage grouse for her Master's degree, Jenny Barnett has worked as a wildlife b

  16. Greater Rochester Nursing Home Quality Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Agenda 08:15 Registration; Continental Breakfast; Lean Six Sigma Teams' Posters 09:00 Welcome the Impact of Transforming Elder Care 10:15 Lean Six Sigma Team Project Presentations Melissa Allmaier, RN, Six Sigma Master Black Belt John Biuso, BSIE, Six Sigma Black Belt, CPIM Project Team leaders

  17. Promoting greater Federal energy productivity [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Mark; Dudich, Luther

    2003-03-05

    This document is a close-out report describing the work done under this DOE grant to improve Federal Energy Productivity. Over the four years covered in this document, the Alliance To Save Energy conducted liaison with the private sector through our Federal Energy Productivity Task Force. In this time, the Alliance held several successful workshops on the uses of metering in Federal facilities and other meetings. We also conducted significant research on energy efficiency, financing, facilitated studies of potential energy savings in energy intensive agencies, and undertook other tasks outlined in this report.

  18. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Programs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Homewoners can review what energy efficiency upgrades are available and apply for either a 6.99% Whole Home loan  (which requires a Whole Home Energy Assessment) or a 9.99% Improvement Specific...

  19. Clean Cities: Greater Indiana Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 4, 1999 Alternative Fueling Stations: Biodiesel (B20 and above): 5 Natural Gas: 26 Ethanol (E85): 132 Electric: 185 Propane: 138 Petroleum and GHG Savings* Total Gallons...

  20. Failure and Redemption of Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR)/Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) Cloud Screening: Contrasting Algorithm Performance at Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) and Southern Great Plains (SGP) Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Flynn, Connor J.; Koontz, Annette S.; Sivaraman, Chitra; Barnard, James C.

    2013-09-11

    Well-known cloud-screening algorithms, which are designed to remove cloud-contaminated aerosol optical depths (AOD) from AOD measurements, have shown great performance at many middle-to-low latitude sites around the world. However, they may occasionally fail under challenging observational conditions, such as when the sun is low (near the horizon) or when optically thin clouds with small spatial inhomogeneity occur. Such conditions have been observed quite frequently at the high-latitude Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites. A slightly modified cloud-screening version of the standard algorithm is proposed here with a focus on the ARM-supported Multifilter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) and Normal Incidence Multifilter Radiometer (NIMFR) data. The modified version uses approximately the same techniques as the standard algorithm, but it additionally examines the magnitude of the slant-path line of sight transmittance and eliminates points when the observed magnitude is below a specified threshold. Substantial improvement of the multi-year (1999-2012) aerosol product (AOD and its Angstrom exponent) is shown for the NSA sites when the modified version is applied. Moreover, this version reproduces the AOD product at the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site, which was originally generated by the standard cloud-screening algorithms. The proposed minor modification is easy to implement and its application to existing and future cloud-screening algorithms can be particularly beneficial for challenging observational conditions.

  1. Greater solubility usually = greater toxicity Chromium (Cr) Six oxidation states, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    inhibitor · Migration into water supply Metals andMetals and radionuclidesradionuclides #12;Radionuclides (depleted uranium) · 4 oxidation states (+4, +6 most common) · U(VI) water-soluble, U(IV) in-soluble Metals andMetals and radionuclidesradionuclides #12;Bioremediation Bioremediation strategies for metals

  2. ARM - Lesson Plans: North Slope of Alaska

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Room News PublicationsClimate inMakingMoving Water

  3. Slope Electric Coop Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology CoWanpingSilveira deScienceSkySlinger

  4. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 200820087 DOE/NASEONABOE

  5. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 200820087 DOE/NASEONABOEGas

  6. North Slope Co. Northwest Arctic Co.

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 200820087

  7. 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle near the floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    4-36 Ideal Gas 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle

  8. Resisting globalization- ATTAC in France: local discourses, global terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Marie des Neiges

    2007-04-25

    The debate over the "globalization" process has been influenced by the emergence of social movements who deplore this process. This research focuses on the French social movement ATTAC (Action for a Tobin Tax for the Aid of Citizens...

  9. Three dimensional terrain editing in StarLogo TNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Ambrosio, Michael (Michael A.)

    2009-01-01

    StarLogo TNG is a block based programming language designed to create models and simulations that are used to help middle and high school students understand mathematical and scientific concepts. However, there is a desire ...

  10. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene,...

  11. Ultrasensitive directional microphone arrays for military operations in urban terrain.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, Neal A.; Peterson, Kenneth Allen; Parker, Eric Paul; Resnick, Paul James; Okandan, Murat; Serkland, Darwin Keith

    2007-11-01

    Acoustic sensing systems are critical elements in detection of sniper events. The microphones developed in this project enable unique sensing systems that benefit significantly from the enhanced sensitivity and extremely compact foot-print. Surface and bulk micromachining technologies developed at Sandia have allowed the design, fabrication and characterization of these unique sensors. We have demonstrated sensitivity that is only available in 1/2 inch to 1 inch studio reference microphones--with our devices that have only 1 to 2mm diameter membranes in a volume less than 1cm{sup 3}.

  12. Learning to visually predict terrain properties for planetary rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, Christopher Allen, 1978-

    2009-01-01

    For future planetary exploration missions, improvements in autonomous rover mobility have the potential to increase scientific data return by providing safe access to geologically interesting sites that lie in rugged ...

  13. Minimalistic control of biped walking in rough terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iida, Fumiya

    Toward our comprehensive understanding of legged locomotion in animals and machines, the compass gait model has been intensively studied for a systematic investigation of complex biped locomotion dynamics. While most of ...

  14. Pathfinder: A Relational Query Optimizer Explores XQuery Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teubner, Jens

    :outer, pos:pos1, item) ROW# (pos1:pos>/outer) |X| (iter = inner) @ (pos), val: #1 ¶ (outer:iter, sort:pos, inner) ROOTS NUMBER (inner) ELEM (iter, item:pos, item>) ELEM_TAG @ (item), val: item ¶ (iter, pos:pos1, item) @ (pos), val: #1 ROW# (pos1:pos>/iter) ¶ (iter) @ (pos), val: #1 ¶ (iter

  15. Mythical Terrain and the Building of Mexico’s UNAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davids, René

    2008-01-01

    and the Environment in Mexico, 2005. No. 14: Kevin P.Trueba, El Pedregal de San Angel. Mexico City: UniversidadNacional Autónoma de Mexico (1995). 5. See Mario Pani and

  16. The Flat Map: A Perception Approach To Modeling Flat Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Josh

    2009-11-18

    Goals Define a conceptually and computationally compatible definition of flat one based on the perception of flat can be applied globally Test the feasibility of open source software for conducting large-scale geographic analysis Produce a ‘flat...Goals Define a conceptually and computationally compatible definition of flat one based on the perception of flat can be applied globally Test the feasibility of open source software for conducting large-scale geographic analysis Produce a ‘flat...

  17. Multiple Simultaneous Acoustic Source Localization in Urban Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maróti, Miklós

    acoustic sources, eliminate multipath effects, tolerate multiple sensor failures while providing good civilian infrastructure (power and communication network), and robustness against node failures. Figure 1. depicts the acoustic events generated by a typical rifle shot. The muzzle blast produces a spherical wave

  18. Local Terrain Mapping for Obstacle Avoidance using Monocular Vision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langelaan, Jack W.

    a potential field obstacle avoidance routine are presented. Introduction Currently, many unmanned aerial Vehicles Specialist's Forum 1 #12;2 MARLOW AHS UNMANNED VEHICLES SPECIALIST'S FORUM all classes of unmanned unmanned rotorcraft through an unsurveyed envi- ronment consisting of forest and urban canyons. Optical

  19. Performance-Based Rough Terrain Navigation for Nonholonomic Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Lynne E.

    , performance issues (e.g., robot safety, or geometric, time-based, and physics- based criteria) are adequately, such as robot safety, or geometric, time-based, and physics-based criteria. However, where uncertainties exist that by incorporating criterion-optimizing design in each module and organizing them in a behavior-based architecture

  20. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania:HiddenTemperature

  1. PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES IN COMPLEX ARID TERRAIN

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOverPPS Enviro Power Pvt Ltd Jump

  2. ARM - Field Campaign - Cloud, Aerosol, and Complex Terrain Interactions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve4AJ01) (See22,Microphysical PropertiesgovCampaignsCloud Radar IOP

  3. Outline DARTS lab Introduction SimScape Large terrain modeling CLOD visualization Conclusion Scalable Large, Multi-Resolution Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -Time Simulation (DARTS) EDL simulations (DSENDS) Rover simulations (ROAMS) Airship simulations Robotic arm

  4. DOE prepared for Greater Sage-Grouse designation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQ FReportDOE4WellsSignature Properties

  5. Texas: City of San Antonio Demonstrates Value of Greater Investments...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    are successful and viable in the long term. Each project was designed to align and build on the goals and objectives of San Antonio's Mission Verde Sustainability...

  6. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and boost the energy efficiency of public institutions, local governments and industrial sectors. The Department's State Energy Program has a long history in assisting...

  7. Wetlands of Greater Bangalore, India: Automatic Delineation through Pattern Classifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramachandra, T. V.; Kumar, Uttman

    2008-01-01

    natural areas), is ascribed as the urban heat island effect.The urban heat island effect results in increased local100 wards of city conforming heat island phenomenon with the

  8. Setting the Stage for Greater Renewable Energy Penetration |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Penetration January 10, 2013 - 2:27pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the Fourth Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. With the advent of...

  9. DOE Announces $17 Million to Promote Greater Automobile Efficiency...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will be offered as two separate solicitations, one for 14 million to support plug-in hybrid electric vehicle technology and another for 3 million for research to improve E-85...

  10. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Program More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | May 2014 Generating Energy Efficiency Project Leads and Allocating Leads to Contractors Program Automation...

  11. THE GREATER TORONTO AREA TRAVEL DEMAND MODELLING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    by the then Metropolitan Toronto Planning Department and the Ministry of Transportation, Ontario. Support and advice Post-Run Report 32 4.5 Base 1996 Files for Use in Post-Run Utilities 33 #12;GTA Travel Demand Modelling

  12. The Future of Connective Technology: Greater Integration through Semantic Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur and a master's degree in logistics from MIT. #12 to significant improvements in productivity, especially in the areas of logistics, supply chain management of Director, Affiliates Program in Logistics at the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics

  13. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Developing an Evaluation Measurement and Verification Plan for Your Energy Efficiency ProjectProgram Developing an Evaluation Measurement, and Verification Plan: Residential...

  14. THE GREATER TORONTO AREA TRAVEL DEMAND MODELLING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    . Miller Bahen-Tanenbaum Professor Department of Civil Engineering University of Toronto Joint Program Distribution 32 4.5.3 Mode Split 32 4.6 Modelling Socio-Economic Attributes 32 #12;4 TABLE OF CONTENTS, cont with a basic understanding of what the model does, the key assumptions upon which the model is built

  15. Clean Cities: Greater Washington Region Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Columbia University. He completed additional graduate studies in economics and real estate at the University of California, Berkeley. 2000 14th St., NW, DPW-Ste 330 P.O. Box...

  16. Clean Cities: Greater New Haven Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alternative vehicle and fuel consultation and assistance to many organizations in Connecticut and outside the state, including several towns and cities, metropolitan transit...

  17. Wise detections of known QSOs at redshifts greater than six

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blain, Andrew W. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, 1 University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Assef, Roberto; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bridge, Carrie [California Institute of Technology, 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jarrett, Tom [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town (South Africa); Cutri, Roc [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Petty, Sara [Virginia Tech, Department of Physics MC 0435, 910 Drillfield Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Wu, Jingwen; Wright, Edward L., E-mail: ab520@le.ac.uk [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-12-01

    We present WISE All-Sky mid-infrared (IR) survey detections of 55% (17/31) of the known QSOs at z > 6 from a range of surveys: the SDSS, the CFHT-LS, FIRST, Spitzer, and UKIDSS. The WISE catalog thus provides a substantial increase in the quantity of IR data available for these sources: 17 are detected in the WISE W1 (3.4 ?m) band, 16 in W2 (4.6 ?m), 3 in W3 (12 ?m), and 0 in W4 (22 ?m). This is particularly important with Spitzer in its warm-mission phase and no faint follow-up capability at wavelengths longward of 5 ?m until the launch of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). WISE thus provides a useful tool for understanding QSOs found in forthcoming large-area optical/IR sky surveys using PanSTARRS, SkyMapper, VISTA, DES, and LSST. The rest-UV properties of the WISE-detected and the WISE-non-detected samples differ: the detections have brighter i/z-band magnitudes and redder rest-UV colors. This suggests that a more aggressive hunt for very high redshift QSOs by combining WISE W1 and W2 data with red, observed optical colors could be effective at least for a subset of dusty candidate QSOs. Stacking the WISE images of the WISE-non-detected QSOs indicates that they are, on average, significantly fainter than the WISE-detected examples, and are thus not narrowly missing detection in the WISE catalog. The WISE catalog detection of three of our sample in the W3 band indicates that their mid-IR flux can be detected individually, although there is no stacked W3 detection of sources detected in W1 but not W3. Stacking analyses of WISE data for large active galactic nucleus samples will be a useful tool, and high-redshift QSOs of all types will be easy targets for JWST.

  18. Title Homicides in the Greater Toronto Area Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Data, Map & GIS Centre Publisher: University of Toronto Data, Map & GIS Centre Edition: N/A Versions: N and GIS Librarian (gislib@yorku.ca) Citation: University of Toronto. Data, Map & GIS Centre. "Homicides & GIS Centre, 2006- Vendor Link: Toronto Star map http://www3.thestar

  19. Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, B.; Mullins, S.

    2008-01-15

    Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  20. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Verification Plan: Residential Retrofits A Primer on EM&V, Data Collection, Tracking and Reporting of Efficiency Savings, and Supporting Available Tools for EECBG and SEP Grantees...

  1. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    State Energy Program, states and local governments are leading by example - saving taxpayer dollars and curbing the effects of carbon pollution." The competitively-awarded State...

  2. Hydrothermal Convection Systems with Reservoir Temperatures greater than or

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbsequal to 90

  3. Greater Carrollwood, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: EnergyGreat Basin

  4. Greater Northdale, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: EnergyGreat BasinNorthdale, Florida: Energy

  5. Greater Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: EnergyGreat BasinNorthdale, Florida:

  6. Greater Sun Center, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: EnergyGreat BasinNorthdale,

  7. LLNL Predicts Wind Power with Greater Accuracy | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRDEnergyTurbine blades being

  8. Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMember CorpSunvie SASandBuildingCentralEnergy

  9. Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of Renewable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels|ProgramsLakeDepartment ofof Energy Test| Department

  10. Setting the Stage for Greater Renewable Energy Penetration | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool FitsProjectDataSecretary Moniz'sSeparation Programs ReleasesDepartmentEnergy

  11. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping into Funding forFY'17 ProjectsofSharing Know-How

  12. KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:onItron (California)JointJosephine,K.

  13. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementofApril 25,EVthe nextofofEffluent andEfforts by

  14. Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLEStatutory AuthorityTrack A - Energy SystemsIdaho, Other DOE Sites |

  15. Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergyPlan | Department of Energy 1Department ofLithium Battery|Study:

  16. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific2Held in Hiroshima |

  17. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState ofSavings for Specific2Held in Hiroshima |Efficiency,

  18. Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMayBuilding K-25KyleEnergy JanuaryChallenge

  19. Stocks of Distillate Fuel Oil Greater Than 500 ppm Sulfur

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988 1.996Deutsche Bank AG

  20. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979 1.988Prices, SalesMoroccoTurkeyTexas-Louisiana-

  1. Dr. Bill Brinkman: Working Towards Greater Energy Security | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sector FullDOE Office10 Jan2 In theArunPlasma

  2. DOE Announces $17 Million to Promote Greater Automobile Efficiency |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle10 DOE ASSESSMENT SEABDepartment of Energy WASHINGTON,

  3. Numerical errors in the presence of steep topography: analysis and alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, K A; Chow, F K; Lundquist, J K

    2010-04-15

    It is well known in computational fluid dynamics that grid quality affects the accuracy of numerical solutions. When assessing grid quality, properties such as aspect ratio, orthogonality of coordinate surfaces, and cell volume are considered. Mesoscale atmospheric models generally use terrain-following coordinates with large aspect ratios near the surface. As high resolution numerical simulations are increasingly used to study topographically forced flows, a high degree of non-orthogonality is introduced, especially in the vicinity of steep terrain slopes. Numerical errors associated with the use of terrainfollowing coordinates can adversely effect the accuracy of the solution in steep terrain. Inaccuracies from the coordinate transformation are present in each spatially discretized term of the Navier-Stokes equations, as well as in the conservation equations for scalars. In particular, errors in the computation of horizontal pressure gradients, diffusion, and horizontal advection terms have been noted in the presence of sloping coordinate surfaces and steep topography. In this work we study the effects of these spatial discretization errors on the flow solution for three canonical cases: scalar advection over a mountain, an atmosphere at rest over a hill, and forced advection over a hill. This study is completed using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. Simulations with terrain-following coordinates are compared to those using a flat coordinate, where terrain is represented with the immersed boundary method. The immersed boundary method is used as a tool which allows us to eliminate the terrain-following coordinate transformation, and quantify numerical errors through a direct comparison of the two solutions. Additionally, the effects of related issues such as the steepness of terrain slope and grid aspect ratio are studied in an effort to gain an understanding of numerical domains where terrain-following coordinates can successfully be used and those domains where the solution would benefit from the use of the immersed boundary method.

  4. www.ext.vt.edu Produced by Communications and Marketing, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    ? ___________________ 7.SOIL: Type Terrain Drainage Soil-less Mulch q sandy q sloped q good q pinebark q bark chips q clay q level q moderate q peat moss q plastic q loam q low q poor q other _________q other _________ q

  5. West Slope, Oregon: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: Energy Resources JumpChicago,Islip,PointSimsbury,

  6. LESSONS LEARNED FROM A LANDFILL SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protection Agency Division of Solid & Infectious Waste Management Central Office, 122 South Front St Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Division of Solid & Infectious Waste Management Central Office Environmental Engineer Ohio Environmental Protection Agency Division of Solid & Infectious Waste Northeast

  7. LESSONS LEARNED FROM AN IMPOUNDMENT SLOPE FAILURE INVOLVING GEOSYNTHETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    underwent final closure construction in the summer of 1994. The landfill previously accepted an average for the sedimentation pond and the landfill closure was completed by 31 December 1994. The GCL used at this site, Shearbox test, Failure, Landfill, Sedimentation pond AUTHORS: Kyle E. Nay, Environmental Specialist, Ohio

  8. Precision Tiltmeter as a Reference for Slope Measuring Instruments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschman, Jonathan L.; Domning, Edward E.; Morrison, Gregory Y.; Smith, Brian V.; Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2008-01-01

    LSBL-798, (2006). Applied Geomechanics Technical Note: “this volume. Applied Geomechanics 755-1172 Miniature Tiltof a tiltmeter, Applied Geomechanics Model 755-1172, 11 for

  9. The slopes determined by n points in the plane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeremy L.

    2006-01-01

    field k,andletG be a graph with vertices V and edges E.Apicture P of G consists of a point P(v)for each vertex and a line P(e) for each edge, subject to the condition that P(v) ? P(e) whenever v is an endpoint of e.Thusthedataofn points and parenleftbig... n 2 parenrightbig lines described earlier is a picture of the complete graph K n on n vertices. The set of all pictures of G is called the picture space X(G). A picture is generic if the points P(v) are all different; the closure of the locus...

  10. Infragravity energy is dependent on beach slope and incident wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olszewski Jr., Edward A.

    CHAOTIC SWASH FRONT INTERACTIONS Zachary Williams UNC Wilmington Department of Physics and Physical of nonlinearity ·Natural horn appears linear #12;Thank you to.... Dr. Dylan McNamara Dr. Brian Davis Dr. Daniel Guo Dr. John Morrison Dr. Bill Atwill Dr. Russell Herman #12;

  11. Adverse Tunnelling Conditions Arising from Slope Instabilities A Case History

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eberhardt, Erik

    ) has been under con- struction. The project includes a 60.5 m high concrete gravity dam, an underground 17 - 21 June 2001 Davos, Switzerland 2 and an underground power house which will eventually generate of the Hindustan-Tibet-Highway by a rock fall (LEFT). Rock slide at the dam site blocking the Satluj River (RIGHT

  12. Updown numbers and the initial monomials of the slope variety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeremy L.; Wagner, Jennifer D.

    2009-01-01

    . For integers m ? n, we put [n] = {1,2,...,n} and [m,n] = {m,m + 1,...,n}. The set of all permutations of an integer set P will be denoted SP, and the nth symmetric group is Sn (= S[n]). We will write each permutation w ? SP as a word with n = |P| digits, w = w1......wn, where {w1,...,wn} = P. If necessary for clarity, we will separate the digits with commas. Concatenation will also be denoted with commas; for instance, if w = 12 and w? = 34, then (w,w?,5) = 12345. The reversal w? of w1w2...wn?1wn is the word wnwn...

  13. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    ethane, propane or butane. Concentrations of metabolitesacid COO - CH 3 O H 3 C Butane (C 4 H 10 ) H 3 C CH 3 O - O

  14. Oceanic Isopycnal Slope Spectra. Part II: Turbulence JODY M. KLYMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California JAMES N. MOUM College of Oceanic the rate of turbulence dissipation in the ocean, either by direct measurement (Osborn and Cox 1972 of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6, Canada. E-mail: jklymak@ uvic.ca 1232 J O U R N A L

  15. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.

    2010-01-01

    Free Electron Laser (FEL), LCLS, National Synchrotron Light1-3]. The beamlines for LCLS, NSLS-II, and planned upgrade

  16. CRITICAL ITINERARIES OF MAPS WITH CONSTANT SLOPE AND ONE DISCONTINUITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -differentiable transformations, used in digital imaging and 3D printing applications, can be constructed using conjugate pairs

  17. CRITICAL ITINERARIES OF MAPS WITH CONSTANT SLOPE AND ONE DISCONTINUITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­di#erentiable transformations, used in digital imaging and 3D printing applications, can be constructed using conjugate pairs

  18. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    known to exacerbate corrosion of pipeline surfaces (3, 27).Canada. Abstract Corrosion of metallic oilfield pipelines bypipeline failure. In fact, it has long been known that microbes contribute to corrosion

  19. Water budgets of martian recurring slope lineae Robert E. Grimm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    . Stillman Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut St. #300, Boulder, CO 80403, United States a r t i c l e near the equator are reached earlier in the day than measured by orbital flyovers and so it cannot, 2009). However, this code is too slow to examine in detail the parameter space spanning hydraulic

  20. Research Associate, Cambridge University Engineering Department LATERAL SPREADING OF SLOPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haigh, Stuart

    ) 2 Table 3: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-5 5 Table 4: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-8 6 Table 5: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-9 6 Table 6: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-10 7 Table 7: Instrumentation coordinates for test SKH-11 8 Table 8: Instrumentation

  1. BULK MICROMACHINED TITANIUM MICROMIRROR DEVICE WITH SLOPING ELECTRODE GEOMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Noel C.

    micromachining. This has enabled the development large, rigid, highly planar MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS

  2. Biocorrosive Thermophilic Microbial Communities in Alaskan North Slope Oil Facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-01-01

    thermoacetica Methanogenic sludge AMP (AY884087) PS4SGXI910Bacteroidetes Anaerobic sludge gene (AB195893) FJ469332LCFA enrichment Methanogenic sludge High temperature Dagang

  3. Sensitivity of soil loss equations to slope classifications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Hong-Wen

    1995-01-01

    Q is measured as inches of direct runoff when calculating q. Q must be expressed in acre feet when calculating the Rw factor. A storm event having a rainfall intensity of 7. 62 cm (3 inches) per hour was assumed for this study. Under this storm... Calibration of L factor 27 Calibration of S factor. 29 MUSLE. . . . . . . 30 Calibration of Rw factor. 31 Calibration of C factor. 31 Calibration of P factor. . 32 Simulation of soil erosions. . . . . 34 IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. . 35 Representation...

  4. Slopes of overconvergent modular forms Lloyd James Peter Kilford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kilford, Lloyd James Peter

    applied to number theory, in solving problems which can be described concretely* *. It also shows at Imperial College for help* *ful conversations and good company, especially Dan Jacobs and Ed Nevens. I would like also to thank my family, my friends and the members of ICSF, esp* *ecially Vivienne White

  5. Slope County, North Dakota: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSilicium de ProvenceSolar JumpSloan, New York: EnergyCounty,

  6. North Slope Borough Power & Light | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNew Hampshire:source HistoryRoyalton, Ohio: EnergySea, New

  7. ARM Airborne Carbon Measurement on the North Slope

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProducts (VAP) VAP

  8. North Slope of Alaska ARM Climate Research Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNew scholarshipThreeFebruaryMuseum LobbyThousand Cubic3 Emergency

  9. Project Aids Development of Legacy Oilfield on Alaska's North Slope |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy Bills andOrderNATIONALofDefine Review Purpose50(S3TEC )(DOE)

  10. TDX North Slope Generating Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMemberI P Rural Electric Coop JumpTDX

  11. Newly Installed Alaska North Slope Well Will Test Innovative Hydrate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOEDepartmentNew Jersey isDepartment of Energy <SanHZProduction

  12. The 2004 North Slope of Alaska Arctic Winter Radiometric Experiment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S. CoalMexicoConferencePriceshielding evaluation for the2004

  13. north-slope-resources | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorkingLosThe 26th AnnualHistoryMIII:National1-2130 1 ANnopnproliferationNorth

  14. Eight underground designs: underground plans Book No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, M.; Wells, S.G.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different designs are given for earth-sheltered houses. Each design is depicted thoroughly, with floor plans, cross sections, views from the several sides, and some general comments. The plans are intended as a planning tool to be adapted to individual needs, budgets, sites and local ordinances. Each plan expresses a different idea, with terrain varying from flat land to south and north slopes. Conventional and novel construction and design methods are demonstrated.

  15. QLOD: A Data Structure for Interative Terrain Visualization RODRIGO TOLEDO1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    a geographic information system. These models can represent a broad area of the Earth's surface with detailed geographical information. The development of tech- niques and equipment made data collection more precise information, thus yielding very large datasets. For this reason, it is necessary to use a compatible structure

  16. Design and editing 2.5-dimensional terrain in StarLogo TNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wendel, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    StarLogo TNG is "The Next Generation" in block-based decentralized programming for modeling and simulation software. Its aim is to make computer programming more appealing for students in middle school and high school. ...

  17. Active Ankle Response for a 2-D Biped Robot with Terrain Contact Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hitschmann, Francis Lee

    2009-11-18

    . 8. Palm(III), W.J., Mechanical Vibration. 1 ed. 2007, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. 9. Collins, S.H., A Bipedal Walking Robot with Efficient and Human-Like Gait*. 10. Yamaguchi, Multisensor Foot Mechanism with Shock Absorbing Material.... 8. Palm(III), W.J., Mechanical Vibration. 1 ed. 2007, Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 3. 9. Collins, S.H., A Bipedal Walking Robot with Efficient and Human-Like Gait*. 10. Yamaguchi, Multisensor Foot Mechanism with Shock Absorbing Material...

  18. The research and design of a low cost, all terrain, mechanically advantageous wheelchair for developed markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Judge, Benjamin Michael

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents a case for a paradigm shift in the way mobility technology is approached in the United States. Spawning from the research of developing world wheelchair technology, a conceptual design for a capable ...

  19. Human-Inspired Motion Primitives and Transitions for Bipedal Robotic Locomotion in Diverse Terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huihua

    2015-04-27

    This thesis presents a control design approach, which uses human data in the development of bipedal robotic control techniques for multiple locomotion behaviors. Insight into the fundamental behaviors of human locomotion is obtained through...

  20. Parallelized Distributed Embedded Control System for 2D Walking Robot for Studying Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strunk, Gavin

    2010-12-10

    , parallelized, embedded control system was developed to provide the control structure for the Jaywalker. This system was chosen for its ability to execute simultaneous tasks efficiently. The two level control system provides a first level to implement a higher...

  1. A Benthic Terrain Classification Scheme for American Samoa Accepted for publication in Marine Geodesy, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    , invasive species, security training activities, offshore oil and gas exploration, and coral bleaching on earth, continually face destruction from anthropogenic and natural threats. The U.S. Coral Reef Task to increasing coastal populations (Culliton 1998). Natural and anthropogenic processes threaten natural

  2. Improved Fast Replanning for Robot Navigation in Unknown Terrain Sven Koenig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    often operate in domains that are only incom- pletely known, for example, when they have to move from Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30312-0280 skoenig@cc.gatech.edu Maxim Likhachev School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 maxim+@cs.cmu.edu Abstract Mobile robots

  3. Improved Fast Replanning for Robot Navigation in Unknown Terrain Sven Koenig

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mobile robots often operate in domains that are only incom­ pletely known, for example, when they have of Computing Georgia Institute of Technology Atlanta, GA 30312­0280 skoenig@cc.gatech.edu Maxim Likhachev School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213 maxim+@cs.cmu.edu Abstract

  4. Curiosity Based Exploration for Learning Terrain Models Yogesh Girdhar, David Whitney, and Gregory Dudek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudek, Gregory

    . We posit that observation data collected from such paths that seek novelty and maximize information and temporal distribution of the data. Moreover, ROST can process the incoming observation data in real time0E9, Canada {yogesh,dwhitney,dudek}@cim.mcgill.ca Fig. 1. Example of an exploratory path (top

  5. Terrain Influences on Synoptic Storm Structure and Mesoscale Precipitation Distribution during IPEX IOP3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteverdi, John

    , University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah W. James Steenburgh NOAA Cooperative Institute for Regional Prediction and Department of Meteorology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah Justin A. W. Cox NOAA

  6. Adjusting lidar-derived digital terrain models in coastal marshes based on estimated aboveground biomass density

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Medeiros, Stephen; Hagen, Scott; Weishampel, John; Angelo, James

    2015-03-25

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) derived from airborne lidar are traditionally unreliable in coastal salt marshes due to the inability of the laser to penetrate the dense grasses and reach the underlying soil. To that end, we present a novel processing methodology that uses ASTER Band 2 (visible red), an interferometric SAR (IfSAR) digital surface model, and lidar-derived canopy height to classify biomass density using both a three-class scheme (high, medium and low) and a two-class scheme (high and low). Elevation adjustments associated with these classes using both median and quartile approaches were applied to adjust lidar-derived elevation values closer tomore »true bare earth elevation. The performance of the method was tested on 229 elevation points in the lower Apalachicola River Marsh. The two-class quartile-based adjusted DEM produced the best results, reducing the RMS error in elevation from 0.65 m to 0.40 m, a 38% improvement. The raw mean errors for the lidar DEM and the adjusted DEM were 0.61 ± 0.24 m and 0.32 ± 0.24 m, respectively, thereby reducing the high bias by approximately 49%.« less

  7. Vision-based terrain classification and classifier fusion for planetary exploration rovers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halatci, Ibrahim

    2006-01-01

    Autonomous rover operation plays a key role in planetary exploration missions. Rover systems require more and more autonomous capabilities to improve efficiency and robustness. Rover mobility is one of the critical components ...

  8. Building model generation project : generating a model of the MIT campus terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulikov, Vitaliy Y. (Vitaliy Yurievich), 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Possession of a complete, automatically generated and frequently updated model of the MIT campus leads the way to many valuable applications, ranging from three-dimensional navigation to virtual tours. In this thesis, we ...

  9. Effects of climate, physical erosion, parent mineralogy, and dust on chemical erosion rates in mountainous terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrier, Ken

    2009-01-01

    in the Idaho Batholith Abstract Chemical weathering promoteschemical weathering rates over millennial timescales: Measurements at Rio Icacos, Puerto Rico Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .chemical erosion rates: Measurements along two altitudinal transects in the Idaho Batholith Abstract . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  10. Development of a Hybrid Powered 2D Biped Walking Machine Designed for Rough Terrain Locomotion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Bryce C.

    2010-07-28

    Biped robots hold promise as terrestrial explorers because they require a single discrete foothold to place their next step. However, biped robots are multi-input multi-output dynamically unstable machines. This makes ...

  11. Real -Time Rendering of Photo-Textured Terrain Height Fields LUIZ CARLOS GUEDES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Figueiredo, Luiz Henrique

    can be found in Geographical Information Systems and computer games. Both applications share the need requirement in applications such as flight simulators, action games or geographic information systems. Particularly, geographic information systems deal with large scale virtual worlds and require the integration

  12. INVESTIGATION OF A DYNAMIC POWER LINE RATING CONCEPT FOR IMPROVED WIND ENERGY INTEGRATION OVER COMPLEX TERRAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S Myers; Tyler B Phillips; Inanc Senocak; Phil Anderson

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of power line to be based on real-time conductor temperature dependent on local weather conditions. In current practice overhead power lines are generally given a conservative rating based on worst case weather conditions. Using historical weather data collected over a test bed area, we demonstrate there is often additional transmission capacity not being utilized with the current static rating practice. We investigate a new dynamic line rating methodology using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to determine wind conditions along transmission lines at dense intervals. Simulated results are used to determine conductor temperature by calculating the transient thermal response of the conductor under variable environmental conditions. In calculating the conductor temperature, we use both a calculation with steady-state assumption and a transient calculation. Under low wind conditions, steady-state assumption predicts higher conductor temperatures that could lead to curtailments, whereas transient calculations produce conductor temperatures that are significantly lower, implying the availability of additional transmission capacity.

  13. Live Webinar on the Funding Opportunity for Wind Forecasting Improvement Project in Complex Terrain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On April 21, 2014 from 3:00 to 5:00 PM EST the Wind Program will hold a live webinar to provide information to potential applicants for this Funding Opportunity Announcement. There is no cost to...

  14. Local Adjustment of the Background Error Correlation for Surface Analyses over Complex Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capecchi, Mario R.

    , FL Revision Submitted to: Weather and Forecasting August 23, 2004 1. Corresponding author address quantities are of great importance to weather forecasters. The need for analyses of meteorological surface variables (temperature, wind, etc.) over mountainous regions for applications such as forest fire

  15. Rotor and Subrotor Dynamics in the Lee of Three-Dimensional Terrain JAMES D. DOYLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frierson, Dargan

    circulation, where they dissipate and contribute their vorticity toward the maintenance of the main rotor of their intensity, such subrotor circulations likely pose the greatest hazard to aviation. 1. Introduction and shear, and have been sug- gested to contribute to numerous aviation incidents and accidents (e.g., NTSB

  16. Near Optimal Location of Two Landings on Flat, Uniform Terrain Francis E. Greulich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greulich, Francis E.

    to be the originator of the alternate location and allocation algorithm, hereafter referred to as the location-allocation region is a strictly convex function. Parenthetically it is noted that this proof is

  17. TOWARDS SEMANTIC INTERACTION IN HIGH-DETAIL REALTIME TERRAIN AND CITY VISUALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, Sven

    to the availability of huge high-resolution 2.5d digital surface models (Hirschm¨uller, 2005). As sensors also record. Reconstructions from these aerial data will help to match and integrate data obtained from terrestrial sensors (Fr in that they add more and finer semantic categories and metadata (Kolbe et al., 2005). Se- mantic models based

  18. Flight Simulator Evaluation of an Integrated Synthetic and Enhanced Vision System for Terrain Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    to the requirements for route awareness and guidance. 3. Research compared a perspective pathway HUD with a conventional 2-D HUD. The results showed the perspective pathway HUD was better for guidance. Overall, pathway HUDs combine the independent advantages of pathway displays and head-up displays, particularly during

  19. The coupled development of terrain and vegetation : the case of semiarid grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2010-01-01

    The distribution of vegetation in semiarid landscapes organizes as a function of moisture availability, which is often mediated by the form of the land surface. Simultaneously the processes that shape the land surface are ...

  20. Hydrologic modeling using triangulated irregular networks : terrain representation, flood forecasting and catchment response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivoni, Enrique R. (Enrique Rafael), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Numerical models are modern tools for capturing the spatial and temporal variability in the land-surface hydrologic response to rainfall and understanding the physical relations between internal watershed processes and ...

  1. Saving the soil: AgriLife units work to improve traning terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orth, Melanie

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this dissertation is to contribute in three ways to the literature on son preference and fertility through a comparative perspective. First, I examine the impact of son preference on fertility in China and South ...

  2. Coastal Wave Generation and Wave Breaking over Terrain: Two Problems in Mesoscale Wave Dynamics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qian, Tingting

    2010-07-14

    Two problems in mesoscale wave dynamics are addressed: (i) wave-turbulence interaction in a breaking mountain wave and (ii) gravity wave generation associated with coastal heating gradients. The mean and turbulent structures in a breaking mountain...

  3. Analysis, design, and control of an omnidirectional mobile robot in rough terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udengaard, Martin Richard

    2008-01-01

    An omnidirectional mobile robot is able, kinematically, to move in any direction regardless of current pose. To date, nearly all designs and analyses of omnidirectional mobile robots have considered the case of motion on ...

  4. Effects of all-terrain vehicle trails on stream channel characteristics, Ouachita National Forest, Arkansas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrer, Deven Michelle

    2001-01-01

    Research shows that road and trail crossings have negative impacts on forest streams, and that off-road vehicles are detrimental to the environment. However, little information is available concerning the effects of such vehicles on stream channels...

  5. A system to place observers in a polyhedral terrain in polynomial time?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draper, Bruce A.

    was developed focusing on the military context. The Daedalus project 21 has as one of its goals to provide

  6. Placing observers to cover a polyhedral terrain in polynomial time cio Marengoniy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draper, Bruce A.

    on the mili- tary context. The Daedalus project 17 has as one of its goals to provide battle eld commanders

  7. Pathfinder: A Relational Query Optimizer Explores XQuery Terrain Torsten Grust Jan Rittinger Jens Teubner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teubner, Jens

    -Lifting: Turning XQuery into Relational Plans SERIALIZE FRAG_UNION ¶ (iter:outer, pos:pos1, item) EMPTY_FRAG FRAGs ROW# (pos1:pos>/outer) ELEM (iter, item:pos, item>) FRAG_UNION ELEM_TAG FRAG_UNION FRAGs @ (item), val: item ¶ (iter, pos:pos1, item) FRAGs TEXT (res:) ATTR (res:) |X

  8. The effects of cultural noise on controlled source electromagnetic resonses of subsurface fractures in resistive terrain 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Roland Anthony Savio

    2009-05-15

    Page 2.1 Transient smoke ring diffusion into a conducting halfspace, conductivity ? = 0.1 S/m. .............................................................................. 10 2.2 The relation of transmitter current with induced emf... generated by this switch-off is shown in figure 2.2. The magnetic flux threads through the earth and the emf associated with its abrupt switch off generates eddy currents within the subsurface. The geometry of the eddy current distribution is approximated...

  9. Energetically Optimal Travel across Terrain: Visualizations and a New Metric of Geographic Distance with Archaeological Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Zoë J.

    , travel, prehistory, least cost path. Zoë J. Wood2 California Polytechnic State University Brian M. Wood1 the energetically least cost path is shown in blue. This visualization shows how least cost paths often follow of these two paths further illustrate this fact. See figure 2. The overall caloric saving for the least cost

  10. Estimating the spatial and temporal distribution of snow in mountainous terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Musselman, Keith Newton

    2012-01-01

    date error. The cumulative sub-canopy direct beam solar radiationdate error. The cumulative sub-canopy direct beam solar radiationsolar radiation from 29 February to 26 April (i.e. NP DBT snow disappearance date)

  11. Escorted Ethnography: Ethics, the Human Terrain System and American Anthropology in Conflict

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daily, Eric

    2010-01-01

    2008. Moment of Truth in Iraq. United States: Richardand Jessica Delaney. eds. 2007. “Iraq under the surge”. TheIssue 02. April 1. 2008. “Iraq after the surge: Governance

  12. Effects of climate, physical erosion, parent mineralogy, and dust on chemical erosion rates in mountainous terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrier, Ken

    2009-01-01

    rates with cosmogenic nuclides and elemental abundances inin situ cosmogenic nuclides: theory and application.C. , 1999. Cosmogenic nuclides, topography, and the spatial

  13. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Generation and Analysis of Digital Terrain Models with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    * University Rostock, Germany Cornelius DONATH** John Deere, AMS Abstract In Europe more than 10.000 dual. For instance in Europe more than 10.000 dual frequency iTC Starfire GPS- receivers were sold in recent years and machine hours and fuel used, the secondary advantages lie in also saving sees fertilizers and pesticides

  14. High compliance all-terrain transport and heavy cargo hybrid bicycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soto-Fernández, Orlando

    2005-01-01

    A design project was carried out which involved the design, manufacturing, and assembly of a hybrid bicycle. The bicycle was required to operate between two modes, one that permitted fast transport of the operator from one ...

  15. High compliance all-terrain transport and heavy cargo hybrid bicycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pino, Andres (Andres J.)

    2006-01-01

    This research involved the design and manufacture of a prototype for a hybrid bicycle system. The design called for a vehicle capable of being used in a mode where normal bicycle operation is possible while being reconfigurable ...

  16. Submitted for Publication to SOLAR ENERGY PRODUCING SATELLITE-DERIVED IRRADIANCES IN COMPLEX ARID TERRAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    & Ray George NREL 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 drenne / ray_george@nrel.nrel.gov ABSTRACT This paper range management. Ground specular reflectance had been identified as the main source of model inaccuracy in the arid western US and was found to perform adequately (Perez et al., 2002). However, these stations

  17. Effects of climate, physical erosion, parent mineralogy, and dust on chemical erosion rates in mountainous terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrier, Ken

    2009-01-01

    Eruptive history and geochronology of Mount Mazama and themeasurements. Quaternary Geochronology 3, 174–195. Barshad,

  18. Are double trailers cost effective for transporting forest biomass on steep terrain?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamora-Cristales, Rene; Sessions, John

    2015-01-01

    productivities of forest biomass harvesting operations: Ain road assessment for biomass opera- tions in steepinterference in forest biomass recovery operations on steep

  19. Reorganized OSHA poses greater criminal threat to managers, EEI counsel warns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    Power company managers will be more vulnerable to criminal charges under the reorganized Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards, according to an Edison Electric Institute lawyer. The number of willful citations and penalties for employee fatalities is increasing because OSHA is holding corporate executives criminally responsible for deliberate failure to meet the standards. Each company should have an adequate safety program that it can document. A four-step safety program should include a public commitment by management, records, documentation monitoring, and discretion in providing information to OSHA inspectors. Utilities will need to reallocate resources in response to OSHA's new focus on health standards, especially in cancer policy. (DCK)

  20. Effects of Sexual Dimorphism and Landscape Composition on the Trophic Behavior of Greater Prairie-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    , Mario Quevedo1,2 1 Research Unit of Biodiversity, (UO/CSIC/PA), Asturias, Spain, 2 Dpt. Biologi´a de Organismos y Sistemas, A´ rea de Ecologi´a, Universidad de Oviedo, Asturias, Spain, 3 Division of Biology

  1. Energy impacts of heat island reduction strategies in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-01-01

    Energy Effects of Urban Heat Islands and Their Mitigation: aH. Taha. 1990. “Summer Heat Islands, Urban Trees, and WhiteNational Laboratory—Heat Island Group Technical Note. Ber-

  2. GREATER SAGE GROUSE ON THE EDGE OF THEIR RANGE: LEKS AND SURROUNDING LANDSCAPES IN THE DAKOTAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BY Joe T. Smith A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for Master of Science Restoration Fund (Project W-67-R- 40, No. B-V-4); U.S. Forest Service Agreement No. 00-CS- 1102; Bureau of Land Management Contract Agreement ESA000013 Task Order 1; and South Dakota State University. #12;vi

  3. Growth and poverty in the urban fringe : decentralization, dispersion, and inequality in greater Buenos Aires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libertun de Duren, Nora R

    2007-01-01

    This research presents the case of growth in Buenos Aires since the late 1970s, when the decentralization of urban planning powers in the Province of Buenos Aires began, until 2001, when an economic crisis submerged -even ...

  4. Best Practices Case Study: Urbane Homes - Crestwood, KY, Various Locations, Greater Louisville, KY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-09-01

    Case study of Urbane Homes, who worked with Building America to build market rate homes with HERS scores of 57 to 62. Despite a down market they’ve sold every home within 3 weeks of listing, without any advertising.

  5. Greater Energy Savings through Building Energy Performance Policy: Four Leading Policy and Program Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEE Action Existing Commercial Buildings Working Group

    2014-05-30

    This paper lays out recommendations for linking existing policies and developing new policies, such that their success is based on the real energy savings achieved in buildings. This approach has the potential to affect the entire building lifecycle.

  6. Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flachs, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    environmental idealism, and functional food collection andthey can be functional money-savers and food producers,

  7. Snake rivers. The Council also believes the changes would provide greater flexibility to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    prices in the wholesale electricity market as low-cost hydropower is replaced by more expensive forms hydropower, particularly during the winter. In its 2000 Fish and Wildlife Program, the Council committed to developing the plan and said it would include standards for hydrosystem coordination, such as flow regimes

  8. NAMD2: Greater Scalability for Parallel Molecular Dynamics Laxmikant Kale, Robert Skeel, Milind Bhandarkar, Robert Brunner,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunner, Robert

    simulate the behavior of biomolecular systems, leading to insights and understanding of their functions of numerical techniques and algorithms to ensure that energy drifts are minimized, ensuring accuracy in long running calculations. NAMD2 uses a portable run­time framework that also supports interoperability among

  9. Precision wood particle feedstocks with retained moisture contents of greater than 30% dry basis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2014-10-28

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  10. US reliance on Arab oil stronger still: Lower cost, greater distance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-27

    This issue details points of origin of U.S. oil imports, and finds that dependence upon the Eastern Hemisphere, especially upon members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, and most of all Arab nation members, has grown again. U.S. reliance on Eastern Hemisphere exporters has grown from about 43.4% of total imports in 1985 to 56.5% in 1989. This issue also contains the following: (1) ED Refining Netback Data Series for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore as of March 9, 1990; and (2) ED Fuel Price/Tax Series for countries of the Western Hemisphere, March 1990 edition. 10 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. The Walking Renaissance: A Longitudinal Analysis of Walking Travel in the Greater Los Angeles Area, USA 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joh, Kenneth; Chakrabarti, Sandip; Boarnet, Marlon G.; Woo, Ayoung

    2015-07-10

    Promoting walking travel is considered important for reducing automobile use and improving public health. Recent U.S. transportation policy has incentivized investments in alternative, more sustainable transportation modes ...

  12. Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support Crowdsourced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    of inquiry that leverages the power of crowds to collect and analyze scientific data. We evaluate for ornithological research, or plant sunflowers and observe bee pollination at various times during the day visualizations. Supporting scientific goals is critical for virtually all citizen science projects, but some

  13. Distribution, Abundance, and Status of the Greater Sage-Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldridge, Cameron

    of habitat changes, livestock grazing pressure, oil and gas developments, or climate change, all of which low, suggesting that production and overwinter survival of young are the major problems related to the decline. Low chick survival rate, with only 18% surviving to 50 days of age, is the most like- ly

  14. ENJOYING THE RAIN FOREST Nowhere in the world will your eyes observe a greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will see today are the same as those that dazzled the first Spanish explorers more than 500 years ago. You

  15. Spatiotemporal Relationships between Climate and Whitebark Pine Mortality in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    : mountain pine beetle, climate change, grizzly bears, Landsat, enhanced wetness difference index, regression food for wildlife. Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) is an ideal bioindicator of climate the largest outbreak of mountain pine beetle on record, and evidence suggests that a changing climate has

  16. Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flachs, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    As an organic farm using permaculture methods the Jones Farmbelieve that organic and permaculture farming can be a toolof sustainability or permaculture design. However, their

  17. Energy impacts of heat island reduction strategies in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-01-01

    H. Taha. 1990. “Summer Heat Islands, Urban Trees, and WhiteNational Laboratory—Heat Island Group Technical Note. Ber-Savings Calculations for Heat Island Reduction Strategies in

  18. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region(s): Europe, Latin America & Caribbean, Global This paper shows that a decline in car ownership in cities in developed nations can be attributed primarily to people living...

  19. Condition for production of circulating proton beam with intensity greater than space charge limit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vadim Dudnikov

    2002-11-19

    Transverse e-p instability in proton rings could be damped by increasing the beam density and the rate of secondary particles production above the threshold level, with the corresponding decrease of unstable wavelength {lambda} below the transverse beam size h (increase of beam density n{sub b} and ion density n{sub i} above the threshold level: n{sub b} + n{sub i} > {beta}{sup 2}/(r{sub e} h{sup 2}), where r{sub e} = e{sup 2}/mc{sup 2}). Such island of stability can be reached by a fast charge-exchange injection without painting and enhanced generation of secondary plasma, which was demonstrated in a small scale Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. With successful damping of e-p instability, the intensity of circulating proton beam, with a space charge neutralization was increased up to 6 times above a space charge limit. Corresponding tune shift without space charge neutralization should be up to {Delta}v=0.85 x 6 (in the ring with v = 0.85). In this paper, they review experimental observations of transverse instability of proton beams in various rings. they also discuss methods which can be used to damp the instability. Such experimental data could be useful for verification of computer simulation tools developed for the studies of the space charge and instabilities in realistic conditions.

  20. DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    where to safely dispose of GTCC LLW that is currently stored at commercial nuclear power plants and other generator sites across the country. The Energy Policy Act of 2005...

  1. World-Class Energy Assessments: Industrial Action Plans for Greater and More Durable Energy Cost Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes recommendations for improving the impact of industrial energy assessments. This initiative responds to the observation that less than half of recommended energy improvements are implemented as a result of traditional...

  2. An Exploratory Analysis of Transportation Household Expenditures in the Greater Sylhet Area in Bangladesh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalal, Pamela; Sikder, Saiyid Hassan; Goulias, Konstadinos G.

    2008-01-01

    10. The World Factbook – Bangladesh. Central IntelligenceNations Population Fund, Bangladesh. http://www.unfpa-Economic Growth - Growth in Bangladesh. The World Bank.

  3. Aalborg Universitet Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    , telecommunications installations, large industrial and commercial installations, large uninterruptible power supply and drawback for any attempt to scale-up battery cells to the larger sizes as required for high power acceptance; o power and energy capability; o reliability; o lifetime and life cycle cost. Thereof

  4. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation arravt050tiflynn2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications State of...

  5. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting arravt050tiflynn2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  6. Greater severity of new onset asthma in allergic subjects who smoke: a 10-year longitudinal study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    new onset asthma in allergic subjects who smoke: a 10-yearnew onset asthma in allergic subjects who smoke: a 10-yearof clinic-referred allergic subjects who developed new onset

  7. Feb., 1958 CARBONFORRIATIONFROM CARBONMONOXIDE-HYDROGEN RIIXTURES 133 550". Thisispiesuniably connectedwith the greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : CARBON JIOSOSIDE-HYDROGES MIXTURES OVER IRON CAThLYSTS.'s2 I. PROPERTIES OF CARBON FORMED BYP. L. WALKER, University Park, Pennsylvania Raceived April 8, 1965 The properties of carbons formed from various carbon graphite is used as the moderator and carbon dioxide as the coolant. The extent of carbon transfer

  8. Greater than the Sum of its Parts; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01

    NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together a diverse group of experts performing grid integration and optimization R&D activities.

  9. DEPOSITIONAL AND PALEOENVIRONMENTAL SETTINGS OF CRETACEOUS LIMESTONES IN THE GREATER ANTILLES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonilla-Rodrí guez, Alvin J.

    2014-12-31

    ranges. In particular, this study shows the practical uses of strontium isotope stratigraphy in tectonically complex areas that lack good biostratigraphic controls. Our results show similar strontium isotope (87Sr/86Sr) derived ages from the middle...

  10. An analysis of public testimonies on the reintroduction of wolves to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicker, Kristy Joann

    1996-01-01

    Public participation in review of draft environmental impact statements (DEIS) has been problematic. This study focused on public hearings regarding the DEIS for the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho...

  11. From waterfront to watershed : mapping a big idea in the Greater Toronto Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciesielski, Linda C. (Linda Claire)

    2011-01-01

    Today, Toronto is revered among Great Lakes' and waterfront cities for its environmental planning: its massive re-investment in water and stormwater infrastructure; protected headwaters of the region's rivers; realized ...

  12. Greater Sage-Grouse Populations and Energy Development in Wyoming | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainableGlynn County, Georgia:Oregon: EnergyGreat BasinNorthdale, Florida:Energy

  13. Dominican Republic-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOEDixmont, Maine: EnergyOpenDomeOpen Energy

  14. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus,Department ofDepartment

  15. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPLforLDRD Report11, SolarMat 4"Gloria B.CharlesEnergyasEnergy

  16. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWells (MillionProved% ofAlabamaNatural(Million

  17. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWells (MillionProved% ofAlabamaNatural(MillionMeters200

  18. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWells (MillionProved%(Billion Cubic Feet)than 200

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969CentralWells (MillionProved%(Billionthan 200 Meters Deep

  20. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater Mobility? |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to: navigation,Summaries |