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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Terns  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fish where thousands of terns were circling, shrieking and diving into a dense mass of herring driven to the surface by a hungry school of bluefish. There are about 50 species of...

2

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Niger Graphics CO2 Emissions from Niger Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Niger image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Niger...

3

Federal Long Tern Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Program (FLTCIP) Federal Long Tern Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP) The Federal Long Term Care Insurance Program (FLTCIP) provides long term care insurance to help pay for costs...

4

AMF Deployment, Niamey, Niger, West Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

West Africa West Africa Niamey Deployment AMF Home Niamey Home Data Plots and Baseline Instruments RADAGAST Website Rainfall Record (PDF) Publications List, (PDF) Experiment Planning RADAGAST Proposal Outreach Fact Sheets RADAGAST (PDF) Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa (PDF) Posters AMF Poster, French Version We're Going to Sample the Sky in Africa! News Campaign Images AMMA International News AMF Deployment, Niamey, Niger, West Africa In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility is collecting cloud and atmospheric property measurements from a location near the airport in Niamey, Niger, West Africa. Main Site: 13° 28' 39.15" N, 2° 10' 27.62" E Altitude: 205 meters Ancillary Site: 13° 31' 19.14" N, 2° 37' 56.46" E Altitude: 228.29 meters In January 2006, the second deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF)

5

Niger: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niger: Energy Resources Niger: Energy Resources (Redirected from ECOWAS Gateway-Niger) Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":16,"lon":8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Niger: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niger: Energy Resources Niger: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"390px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":16,"lon":8,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

7

Niger - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Africa World. Rank . Niger: Production: 0.0220 , 0.0331 , 0.0496 , 0.1433 , 0.1653 , 0.1664 , 0.1367 ...

8

PRESSURE PREDICTION AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING IN THE DEEPWATER NIGER DELTA.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The mechanisms that cause overpressure can be broadly classified into two categories: loading and unloading. This study looks at eight wells from the deepwater Niger (more)

GOODWYNE, OLAR,KAMAL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

hllGRATOKY NONGAME IllHDS OF IMANAGEMENT CONCERN IN T I E NOXTIIEhST 1 GULL-BILLED TERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hllGRATOKY NONGAME IllHDS OF IMANAGEMENT CONCERN IN T I E NOXTIIEhST 1 GULL-BILLED TERN Sterna, or peach colored, with darker down on the dorsal surfaces. Young usually have nvo dorsal stripes

Duffy, David Cameron

10

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty OilsChapter 9 Niger Seed Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils Chapter 9 Niger Seed Oil Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 9 Niger Seed Oil from the b

11

Feminization of male common tern embryos is not correlated with exposure to specific PCB congeners  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent proposals that reproductive impairment in piscivorous wildlife may be caused by exposure to endocrine-disrupting chemicals present in the environment require further investigation to elucidate critical exposures and cause-effect linkages. Effects reported in some wildlife species include feminization of male embryos and other gonadal pathologies arising during embryonic development. The environmental contaminants cited as possible causative agents include polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and their phenolic metabolites (OH-PCBs). Among the more potent estrogenic agents are 4{prime}-hydroxy-2,4,6-trichlorobiphenyl (4{prime}-OH-PCB30) and 4{prime}-hydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrachlorobiphenyl (r{prime}-Oh-PCB61). However, the parent compounds of these metabolites (PCB30 and PCB61) were not present in Aroclor mixtures, are rare in environmental samples, and have not been reported in wildlife tissues. This paper reports an exploratory study of wild common terns in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts. the authors sought to correlate gonadal pathology in embryos with tissue residues of selected chlorobiphenyls. 12 refs., 1 tab.

Nisbet, I.C.T. [I.C.T. Nisbet & Company, Inc., North Falmouth, MA (United States); Fry, D.M. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Hatch, J.J. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Boston, MA (United States); Lynn, B. [Mississippi State Univ., Mississippi State, MS (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Production of extremophilic bacterial cellulase enzymes in aspergillus niger.  

SciTech Connect

Enzymes can be used to catalyze a myriad of chemical reactions and are a cornerstone in the biotechnology industry. Enzymes have a wide range of uses, ranging from medicine with the production of pharmaceuticals to energy were they are applied to biofuel production. However, it is difficult to produce large quantities of enzymes, especially if they are non-native to the production host. Fortunately, filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger, are broadly used in industry and show great potential for use a heterologous enzyme production hosts. Here, we present work outlining an effort to engineer A. niger to produce thermophilic bacterial cellulases relevant to lignocellulosic biofuel production.

Gladden, John Michael

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Mobile Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Records Annual Facility Records Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa Because dust can block incoming solar energy, and because solar energy drives weather and climate, scientists around the world are looking for ways to better understand these natural phenomena. In 2006, scientists sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility conducted a year-long field campaign in Niamey, Niger, to provide key information for the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses, or AMMA, project. During the 12-month experiment at the airport in Niamey, researchers used a portable atmospheric laboratory, airplanes, and satellites to collect information about clouds, aerosols, and solar and terrestrial energy in the skies above the site. Measurements obtained

14

Oil enclave economy and sexual liaisons in Nigeria's Niger Delta region.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the intersection of oil enclave economy and the phenomenon of sexual liaisons in Nigerias Niger Delta region. The particular focus of this (more)

Gandu, Yohanna Kagoro

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expression profiles. Mol. Genet. Genomics 279:Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus2006. Aspergillusnigergenomics:past,presentandinto

Grigoriev, Igor V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Niger-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Niger UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

17

An Economic Analysis of Research and Technology Transfer of Millet, Sorghum, and Cowpeas in Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper has primarily been funded by the Food Security in Africa Cooperative Agreement (DAN-1190-A-00-4092-00) between Michigan State University and the United States Agency for International Development and has received supplementary funding from the Government of Belgium. The work was carried out by the International Service for National Agricultural Research and the Institut National de la Recherche Agronomique du Niger under contracts with Michigan State University with the supervision of Philip Pardey and Eric Crawford. * Research Policies and System Strategies Program, ISNAR ** Dpartement de Recherches en Economie Rurale, INRAN ii

Cowpeas In Niger; Valentina Mazzucato; Samba Ly; Carl Liedholm; Michael T. Weber

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Characterization of a polyketide synthase in Aspergillus niger whose product is a precursor for both dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) melanin and naphtho-?-pyrone.  

SciTech Connect

The genome sequencing of the fungus Aspergillus niger, an industrial workhorse, uncovered a large cache of genes encoding enzymes thought to be involved in the production of secondary metabolites yet to be identified. Identification and structural characterization of many of these predicted secondary metabolites are hampered by their low concentration relative to the known A. niger metabolites such as the naphtho-?-pyrone family of polyketides. We deleted a nonreducing PKS gene in A. niger strain ATCC 11414, a daughter strain of A. niger ATCC strain 1015 whose genome was sequenced by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. This PKS encoding gene is a predicted ortholog of alb1 from Aspergillus fumigatus which is responsible for production of YWA1, a precursor of fungal DHN melanin. Our results show that the A. niger alb1 PKS is responsible for the production of the polyketide precursor for DHN melanin biosynthesis. Deletion of alb1 elimnates the production of major metabolites, naphtho-?-pyrones. The generation of an A. niger strain devoid of naphtho-?-pyrones will greatly facilitate the elucidation of cryptic biosynthetic pathways in this organism.

Chiang, Yi Ming; Meyer, Kristen M.; Praseuth , Michael; Baker, Scott E.; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wang, Clay C.

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

19

On farm yield and water use response of pearl millet to different management practices in Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pearl millet [Pennisetum glaucum (L.) R.Br.] production under subsistence farmer management on the sandy soils of southwestern Niger is faced with many challenges, including declining soil fertility, highly variable and scarce rainfall and poor resource base of the peasant farmers in the region. This study was conducted to evaluate the potential of management to increase yield and water use efficiency of pearl millet grown on two farmers fields in Niger during two growing seasons, 2003 and 2004. The management practices tested were: 1) Five manure treatments (no manure, transported manure, current corralling, a year after corralling, and two years after corralling); 2) The microdose technology (20 kg di-ammonium phosphate ha-1, and 20 kg di-ammonium phosphate ha-1 + 10 kg urea ha-1); and lastly, 3) Three different pearl millet cultivars (Heini Kirei, Zatib, and ICMV IS 89305). In both growing seasons, manure had the greatest effect on the yield and water use of pearl millet at both sites. In 2003 grain yields were 389 kg ha-1 in the NM treatment and 1495 kg ha-1 in the C0 treatment at Banizoumbou whereas at Bagoua, the NM treatment had 423 kg ha-1 vs. 995 kg ha-1 in the C0 treatment. In 2004, the NM treatment at Banizoumbou had 123 kg ha-1 grain yield and the C0 treatment had 957 kg ha-1 whereas at Bagoua the NM treatment had 506 kg ha-1 vs. 1152 kg ha-1 in the C0 treatment. Residual effects of manure led to grain yields in the C1 and C2 treatments which were more than twice as high as in the NM treatment. The improved cultivars were generally superior for grain yields, whereas the local landrace was superior for straw yields at both sites. Root zone drainage was decreased by between 50 to 100 mm, and water use increased by the same amount in the current corrals at the two sites during the two growing seasons. Increased water use under corralling and presence of residual profile moisture at the end of each of the two seasons suggested that water did not limit pearl millet production at the two sites.

Manyame, Comfort

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

International RADAGAST Experiment in Niamey, Niger: Changes and Drivers of Atmospheric Radiation Balance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sahara desert is notorious as a source of massive dust storms. This dust dramatically influences the Earth-atmosphere energy budget through reflecting and absorbing the incoming sunlight. However, this budget is poorly understood, and in particular, we lack quantitative understanding of how the diurnal and seasonal variation of meteorological variables and aerosol properties influence the propagation of solar irradiance through the desert atmosphere. To improve our understanding of these influences, coincident and collocated observations of fluxes, measured from both space and the surface, are highly desirable. Recently, the unique capabilities of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) Experiment, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF), the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument, and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) were combined effectively as part of a large international project: the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB data and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST), which took place in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. The RADAGAST objectives, instrumentation, and scientific background are presented in [1]. Initial results from RADAGAST documented the strong radiative impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the Earths radiation budget [2]. A special issue of the Journal of Geophysical Research will include a collection of papers with the more complete results from RADAGAST (e.g., [1,3], and references therein). In particular, a year-long time series from RADAGAST are used to investigate (i) the factors that control the radiative fluxes and the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere [3-5], (ii) seasonal changes in the surface energy balance and associated variations in atmospheric constituents (water vapor, clouds, aerosols) [6], and (iii) sensitivity of microphysical, chemical and optical properties of aerosols to their sources and the atmospheric conditions [7]. Here we show retrievals of the aerosol properties from spectrally resolved solar measurements, the simulated and observed radiative fluxes at the surface, and outline factors that control the magnitude and variability of aerosol and radiative properties [8].

Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Turner, David D.; Miller, Mark; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Miller, R.

2009-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tern chlidonias niger" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger  

SciTech Connect

This study presents ground-based remote sensing measurements of aerosol optical properties and corresponding shortwave surface radiative effect calculations for the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Programs Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger during 2006. Aerosol optical properties including aerosol optical depth (AOD), single scattering albedo (SSA), and asymmetry parameter (AP) were derived from multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) measurements during the two dry seasons (Jan-Apr and Oct-Dec) at Niamey. The vertical distribution of aerosol extinction was derived from the collocated micropulse lidar (MPL). The aerosol optical properties and vertical distribution of extinction varied significantly throughout the year, with higher AOD, lower SSA, and deeper aerosol layers during the Jan-Apr time period, when biomass burning aerosol layers were more frequent. Using the retrieved aerosol properties and vertical extinction profiles, broadband shortwave surface fluxes and atmospheric heating rate profiles were calculated. Corresponding calculations with no aerosol were used to estimate the aerosol direct radiative effect at the surface. Comparison of the calculated surface fluxes to observed fluxes for non-cloudy periods indicated that the remote sensing retrievals provided a reasonable estimation of the optical properties, with mean differences between calculated and observed fluxes of less than 5 W/m2 and RMS differences less than 25 W/m2. Sensitivity tests for a particular case study showed that the observed fluxes could be matched with variations of < 10% in the inputs to the radiative transfer model. We estimated the daily-averaged aerosol radiative effect at the surface by subtracting the clear calculations from the aerosol calculations. The average daily SW aerosol radiative effect over the study period was -27 W/m2, which is comparable to values estimated from satellite data and from climate models with sophisticated dust parameterizations.

McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ackerman, Thomas P.

2009-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

Overview of observations from the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger: Meteorology and thermodynamic variables  

SciTech Connect

An overview is presented of the meteorological and thermodynamic data obtained during the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger, in 2006. RADAGAST (Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using ARM Mobile Facility, GERB data and AMMA STations), combined data from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mobile Facility (AMF) at Niamey airport with broadband satellite data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on Meteosat-8. The experiment was conducted in collaboration with the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) project. The focus in this paper is on the variations through the year of key surface and atmospheric variables. The seasonal advance and retreat of the InterTropical Front (ITF) and the seasonal changes in near-surface variables and precipitation in 2006 are discussed and contrasted with the behavior in 2005 and with long-term averages. Observations from the AMF at Niamey airport are used to document the evolution of near-surface variables and of the atmosphere above the site. There are large seasonal changes in these variables, from the arid and dusty conditions typical of the dry season to the much moister and more cloudy wet season accompanying the arrival and intensification of the West African monsoon. Back trajectories show the origin of the air sampled at Niamey and profiles for selected case studies from rawinsondes and from a MicroPulse Lidar at the AMF site reveal details of typical atmospheric structures. Radiative fluxes and divergences are discussed in the second part of this overview and the subsequent papers in this special section explore other aspects of the measurements and of the associated modeling.

Slingo, A.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.; Settle, Jeff; Allan, R. P.; White, H. E.; Lamb, Peter J.; Lele, M.; Turner, David D.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Flynn, Connor J.; Miller, Mark

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

23

Overview of observations from the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger. Part 2: Radiative fluxes and divergences  

SciTech Connect

Broadband shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes observed both at the surface and from space during the RADAGAST experiment in Niamey, Niger in 2006 are presented. The surface fluxes were measured by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Mobile Facility (AMF) at Niamey airport, while the fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) are from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument on the Meteosat-8 satellite. The data are analyzed as daily averages, in order to minimise sampling differences between the surface and top of atmosphere instruments, while retaining the synoptic and seasonal changes that are the main focus of this study. A cloud mask is used to identify days with cloud from those with predominantly clear skies. The influence of temperature, water vapor, aerosols and clouds is investigated. Aerosols are ubiquitous throughout the year and have a significant impact on both the shortwave and longwave fluxes. The large and systematic seasonal changes in temperature and column integrated water vapor (CWV) through the dry and wet seasons are found to exert strong influences on the longwave fluxes. These influences are often in opposition to each other, because the highest temperatures occur at the end of the dry season when the CWV is lowest, while in the wet season the lowest temperatures are associated with the highest values of CWV. Apart from aerosols, the shortwave fluxes are also affected by clouds and by the seasonal changes in CWV. The fluxes are combined to provide estimates of the divergence of radiation across the atmosphere throughout 2006. The longwave divergence is remarkably constant through the year, because of a compensation between the seasonal variations in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and surface net longwave radiation. A simple model of the greenhouse effect is used to interpret this result in terms of the dependence of the normalized greenhouse effect at the TOA and of the effective emissivity of the atmosphere at the surface on the CWV. It is shown that, as the CWV increases, the atmosphere loses longwave energy to the surface with about the same increasing efficiency with which it traps the OLR, thus keeping the atmospheric longwave divergence roughly constant. The shortwave divergence is mainly determined by the CWV and aerosol loadings and the effect of clouds is much smaller than on the component fluxes.

Slingo, A.; White, H. E.; Bharmal, N.; Robinson, G. J.

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

24

High resolution sequence stratigraphic and reservoir characterization studies of D-07, D-08 and E-01 sands, Block 2 Meren field, offshore Niger Delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Meren field, located offshore Niger Delta, is one of the most prolific oil-producing fields in the Niger Delta. The upper Miocene D-07, D-08 and E-01 oil sands comprise a series of stacked hydrocarbon reservoirs in Block 2 of Meren field. These reservoir sandstones were deposited in offshore to upper shoreface environments. Seven depositional facies were identified in the studied interval, each with distinct lithology, sedimentary structures, trace fossils, and wire-line log character. The dominant lithofacies are (1) locally calcite-cemented highly-bioturbated, fine-grained sandstones, (middle to lower shoreface facies); (2) cross-bedded, fine- to medium-grained well-sorted sandstones (upper shoreface facies); (3) horizontal to sub-horizontal laminated, very-fine- to fine-grained sandstone (delta front facies); (4) massive very-fine- to fine-grained poorly-sorted sandstone (delta front facies); (5) muddy silt- to fine-grained wavy-bedded sandstone (lower shoreface facies); (6) very-fine- to fine-grained sandy mudstone (lower shoreface facies); and (7) massive, silty shales (offshore marine facies). Lithofacies have distinct mean petrophysical properties, although there is overlap in the range of values. The highest quality reservoir deposits are cross-bedded sands that were deposited in high-energy upper shoreface environments. Calcite cements in lower shoreface facies significantly reduce porosity and permeability. Integration of core and wire-line log data allowed porosity and permeability to be empirically determined from bulk density. The derived equation indicated that bulk density values could predict 80% of the variance in core porosity and permeability values. Three parasequence sets were interpreted, including one lower progradational and two upper retrogradational parasequence sets. The progradational parasequence set consists of upward-coarsening delta front to upper shoreface facies, whereas the upward-fining retrogradational parasequence sets are composed of middle to lower shoreface deposits overlain by offshore marine shales. The limited amount of core data and the relatively small area of investigation place serious constraints on stratigraphic interpretations. Two possible sequence stratigraphic interpretations are presented. The first interpretation suggests the deposits comprise a highstand systems tract overlain by a transgressive systems tract. A lowstand systems tract is restricted to an incised valley fill at the southeastern end of the study area. The alternate interpretation suggests the deposits comprise a falling stage systems tract overlain by transgressive systems tract.

Esan, Adegbenga Oluwafemi

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Niger - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

US EIA provides data, forecasts, country analysis brief and other analyses, focusing on the energy industry including oil, natural gas and electricity.

26

Maa-Bara : catalyzing change in Nigeria's Niger delta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can architecture catalyze economic growth? This thesis serves as a design contribution to the war against poverty by proving that small-scale architectural interventions can propagate large-scale economic growth. It ...

Okiomah, Ogheneruno E. (Ogheneruno Elo)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

External costs of oil and gas exploration in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this study was to investigate the phenomenal impact of oil and gas exploration on the host communities, with a central focus (more)

Amaefule, Ezewuchi Fidelis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Impact of Launching Surgery at the District Level in Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effects of this training program for generalist physiciansDescription of surgical training program Students chosen toSupervision of these training programs in the different

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Characterization and space/time downscaling of the inundation extent over the Inner Niger Delta using GIEMS and MODIS data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Our objective is to develop downscaling methodologies to obtain long time record of inundation extent at high spatial resolution, based on the existing low spatial resolution results of the Global Inundation Extent from Multi-Satellite dataset. In ...

Filipe Aires; Fabrice Papa; Catherine Prigent; Jean-Franois Crtaux; Muriel Berge-Nguyen

30

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Niamey, Niger for the Radiative Atmospheric Divergence using AMF, GERB and AMMA Stations (RADAGAST)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Office of Biological and Environmental Research in DOE's Office of Science is responsible for the ARM Program. The ARM Archive physically resides at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

31

Emulating the fast-start swimming performance of the Chain Pickerel (Esox niger) using a mechanical fish design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mean maximum start-up accelerations and velocities achieved by the fast-start specialist, northern pike, are reported at 120 ms-2 and 4 ms-1, respectively (Harper and Blake, 1990). In this thesis, a simple mechanical system ...

Watts, Matthew Nicholas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

A geospatial analysis of market integration: the case of the 2004/5 food crisis in Niger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Agricultural Market Information System (SIMA) of Nigerinfrastructure and information may inhibit market integra-the absence of information about how markets are related and

Shin, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

A systems approach to retrofitting residential HVAC systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HVAC System. LBNL 53444. Wendt, R.L. , Ternes, M.P. , Orealized. Other guides (e.g. , Wendt et al. (1997)) are more

McWilliams, J.A.; Walker, I.S.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

that are difficult to predict, such as energy prices, U.S. economic growth, advances in technologies, changes in weather pat- terns, and future public policy decisions. In...

35

--No Title--  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

opposed to arXiv, version for encoding. INSPIRE link PL B712 40 AAD 12AB TERNING S054 Quark and Lep released unknown new TANABASHI 10232012 ATLAS PRL 108 211802 AAD 12AO...

36

GROUND WATER USE FOR COOLING: ASSOCIATED AQUIFER TEMPERATURE CHANGES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expensive or scarce, cooling towers or ponds are employed.~-1), for dry and wet cooling tower systems, respectively.condenser cooling sys terns such as towers or ponds are

Lippmann, Marcelo J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

THE ELECTRON MICROSCOPY OF HYDROCARBON PRODUCTION IN PARTHENIUM ARGENTATUM (GUAYULE)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other drawbacks. First, the fusion reactors currently underproblem of its own. the fusion reactor makes the structuralFusion research (II): Detailed Science, 19l, 38. and small terns reactor

Bauer, T.E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Esscirc 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents the capacitive sensing interface for a vertically-driven X&Y-Axis rate gyroscope fabricated in a monolithic MEMS/circuits technology with 0.81tern CMOS and 61tern thick structuralpolysilicon. The Coriolis-acceleration transducer and the capacitive sensing interface form a continuous-time 2"a-order 1-bit 2/I modulator. The gyroscope achieves 8.6gsec/v/Hz noise floor at atmospheric pressure.

Ea Capacitive Interface; Xuesong Jiang; Sunil A. Bhave; Joseph I. Seeger; Roger T. Howe; Bernhard E. Boser; John Yasaitis

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

2008 Draft Season Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes investigations into predation by piscivorous colonial waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River basin during 2008. East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary again supported the largest known breeding colony of Caspian terns (Hydroprogne caspia) in the world (approximately 10,700 breeding pairs) and the largest breeding colony of double-crested cormorants (Phalacrocorax auritus) in western North America (approximately 10,950 breeding pairs). The Caspian tern colony increased from 2007, but not significantly so, while the double-crested cormorant colony experienced a significant decline (20%) from 2007. Average cormorant nesting success in 2008, however, was down only slightly from 2007, suggesting that food supply during the 2008 nesting season was not the principal cause of the decline in cormorant colony size. Total consumption of juvenile salmonids by East Sand Island Caspian terns in 2008 was approximately 6.7 million smolts (95% c.i. = 5.8-7.5 million). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continued to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony, predation rates were highest on steelhead in 2008; minimum predation rates on steelhead smolts detected passing Bonneville Dam averaged 8.3% for wild smolts and 10.7% for hatchery-raised smolts. In 2007, total smolt consumption by East Sand Island double-crested cormorants was about 9.2 million juvenile salmonids (95% c.i. = 4.4-14.0 million), similar to or greater than that of East Sand Island Caspian terns during that year (5.5 million juvenile salmonids; 95% c.i. = 4.8-6.2 million). The numbers of smolt PIT tags recovered on the cormorant colony in 2008 were roughly proportional to the relative availability of PIT-tagged salmonids released in the Basin, suggesting that cormorant predation on salmonid smolts in the estuary was less selective than tern predation. Cormorant predation rates in excess of 30%, however, were observed for some groups of hatchery-reared fall Chinook salmon released downstream of Bonneville Dam. Implementation of the federal plan 'Caspian Tern Management to Reduce Predation of Juvenile Salmonids in the Columbia River Estuary' was initiated in 2008 with construction by the Corps of Engineers of two alternative colony sites for Caspian terns in interior Oregon: a 1-acre island on Crump Lake in the Warner Valley and a 1-acre island on Fern Ridge Reservoir near Eugene. We deployed Caspian tern social attraction (decoys and sound systems) on these two islands and monitored for Caspian tern nesting. Caspian terns quickly colonized the Crump Lake tern island; about 430 pairs nested there, including 5 terns that had been banded at the East Sand Island colony in the Columbia River estuary, over 500 km to the northwest. No Caspian terns nested at the Fern Ridge tern island in 2008, but up to 9 Caspian terns were recorded roosting on the island after the nesting season. There were two breeding colonies of Caspian terns on the mid-Columbia River in 2008: (1) about 388 pairs nested at the historical colony on Crescent Island in the McNary Pool and (2) about 100 pairs nested at a relatively new colony site on Rock Island in the John Day Pool. Nesting success at the Crescent Island tern colony was only 0.28 young fledged per breeding pair, the lowest nesting success recorded at that colony since monitoring began in 2000, while only three fledglings were raised at the Rock Island tern colony. The diet of Crescent Island Caspian terns consisted of 68% salmonid smolts; total smolt consumption was estimated at 330,000. Since 2004, total smolt consumption by Crescent Island terns has declined by 34%, due mostly to a decline in colony size, while steelhead consumption has increased 10% during this same period. In 2008, approximately 64,000 steelhead smolts were consumed by Caspian terns nesting at Crescent Island. Based on smolt PIT tag recoveries on the Crescent Island Caspian tern colony, the average

Roby, Daniel D. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Oregon State University; Collis, Ken [Real Time Research, Inc.; Lyons, Donald E. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University

2009-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

40

Research, Monitoring, and Evaluation of Avian Predation on Salmonid Smolts in the Lower and Mid-Columbia River, 2006 Final Season Summary.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study investigates predation by piscivorous waterbirds on juvenile salmonids (Oncorhynchus spp.) from throughout the Columbia River Basin. During 2006, study objectives in the Columbia River estuary, work funded by the Bonneville Power Administration, were to (1) monitor and evaluate previous management initiatives to reduce Caspian tern (Hydroprogne caspia) predation on juvenile salmonids (smolts); (2) measure the impact of double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) predation on smolt survival, and assess potential management options to reduce cormorant predation; and (3) monitor large colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds in the estuary (i.e., glaucous-winged/western gulls [Larus glaucescens/occidentalis]) to determine the potential impacts on smolt survival. Study objectives on the mid-Columbia River, work funded by the Walla Walla District of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, were to (1) measure the impact of predation by Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants on smolt survival; and (2) monitor large nesting colonies of other piscivorous waterbirds (i.e., California gulls [L. californicus], ring-billed gulls [L. delawarensis], American white pelicans [Pelecanus erythrorhynchos]) on the mid-Columbia River to determine the potential for significant impacts on smolt survival. Our efforts to evaluate system-wide losses of juvenile salmonids to avian predation indicated that Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants were responsible for the vast majority of smolt losses to avian predators in the Columbia Basin, with most losses occurring in the Columbia River estuary. In 2006, East Sand Island in the Columbia River estuary supported the largest known breeding colonies of Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants in the world. The Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island consisted of about 9,200 breeding pairs in 2006, up slightly (but not significantly so) from the estimate of colony size in 2005 (8,820 pairs). There has not been a statistically significant change in the size of the Caspian tern colony on East Sand Island since 2000. Tern nesting success averaged 0.72 fledglings per breeding pair in 2006, significantly higher than in 2005 (0.37 fledglings per breeding pair), a year of poor ocean conditions. Despite the presumably higher availability of marine forage fishes in 2006, the proportion of juvenile salmonids in diets of Caspian terns (32% of prey items) averaged higher than in 2005 (23% of prey items) and 2004 (18% of prey items). Steelhead smolts were particular vulnerable to predation by East Sand Island terns in 2006, with predation rates as high as 20% on particular groups of PIT-tagged fish reaching the estuary. Consumption of juvenile salmonids by terns nesting at the East Sand Island colony in 2006 was approximately 5.3 million smolts (95% c.i. = 4.4-6.2 million), significantly higher than the estimated 3.6 million smolts consumed in 2005, but still roughly 7 million fewer smolts consumed compared to 1998 (when all terns nested on Rice Island in the upper estuary). Caspian terns nesting on East Sand Island continue to rely primarily on marine forage fishes as a food supply, even in 2005 when availability of marine forage fishes declined due to poor ocean conditions. Further management of Caspian terns to reduce losses of juvenile salmonids would be implemented under the Caspian Tern Management Plan for the Columbia River Estuary; the Records of Decision (RODs) authorizing implementation of the plan were signed in November 2006. The ROD lists as the management goal the redistribution of approximately half of the East Sand Island Caspian tern colony to alternative colony sites in interior Oregon and San Francisco Bay, California (USFWS 2006). Implementation of the management plan is stalled, however, because of the lack of appropriated funds.

Roby, Daniel D. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University; Collis, Ken [Real Time Research, Inc.; Lyons, Donald E. [USGS - Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Oregon State University

2009-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tern chlidonias niger" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) in the Missouri River Mainstem System is a critical habitat element for several federally listed bird species: the endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). The Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River and is responsible under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to take actions within its authorities to conserve listed species. To comply with the 2000 USFWS BiOp and the 2003 amended USFWS BiOp, the Corps has created habitats below Gavins Point Dam using mechanical means. Initial monitoring indicates that constructed sandbars provide suitable habitat features for nesting and foraging least terns and piping plovers. Terns and plovers are using constructed sandbars and successfully reproducing at or above levels stipulated in the BiOp. However, whether such positive impacts will persist cannot yet be adequately assessed at this time.

Duberstein, Corey A.; Downs, Janelle L.

2008-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kenya Lesotho Liberia Libya Madagascar Malawi Mali Mauritania Mauritius Morocco Mozambique Namibia Niger Nigeria Reunion Rwanda Saint Helena Sao Tome and Principe ...

43

Uncertainty analysis of the mud infill prediction of the Olokola LNG terminal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??For a proposed liquefied natural gas export facility, Olokola LNG (OKLNG), located at the western limits of the Niger Delta in Nigeria a 10 km (more)

Bakker, S.A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Moving Images Against The Current: The Aesthetics and Geopolitics of (Im)mobility in Contemporary Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the labor force at the uranium mine in Arlit. 143 SimonesThe French built a uranium mine at Arlit in Niger during the

Bayraktar, Nilgun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Die Jontophorese der mit medikamentö  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flora, 131. N.F. 31, 87--112, 1936. Die bevorzugte Aufnahme saurer Farbstoffe bei hoher Wasserstoffionen- konzentration der die Zellen yon Asperffillus niger...

46

Slide 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

include extended operations in the diverse environments of Niamey, Niger and Germany's Black Forest. Capitalizing on the AMF's continuous record of vertically pointing 95 GHz...

47

DNN Cover(pg1).indd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Mongolia Montenegro Morocco Namibia Nepal Netherlands Nicaragua Niger Nigeria North Korea Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal...

48

Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

nidulans , A. niger Soil, wood rot Cellulomonas fimi Soil Agaricus bisporus Compost Cellvibrio japonicus Soil Coprinus truncorum Soil, compost Cytophaga hutchinsonii ...

49

Non-Photorealistic Volume Rendering Using Stippling Techniques Purdue University  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, if such a pattern even exists. Moreover, most stip- pling systems rely on a random distribution of stipple points to create using stip- ples. For particular illustrations, stippling is the preferred choice because other for regular pat- terns, but the lack of discernible patterns in stip- pling requires using a statistical

Ebert, David S.

50

Climate Dynamics (1997) 13 : 613--634 Multi-fingerprint detection and attribution analysis of greenhouse gas,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of greenhouse gas, greenhouse gas-plus-aerosol and solar forced climate change G. C. Hegerl,* K. Hasselmann, U is by greenhouse gas only, while in the remaining two simulations the direct influence of sulfate aerosols is also greenhouse gas- plus-aerosol simulations, two optimized fingerprint pat- terns are derived by weighting

Hegerl, Gabriele Clarissa "Gabi"

51

RESEARCH OPEN HOUSE University of Iowa College of Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algorithm, AutoFLI Tracker, allows for the quantification of both motion and social interaction pat terns in Drosophila Melanogaster. AutoFLI Tracker allows us to characterize different genotypes based upon their mo, our system can track the active choice of one stimulus over another. Through the development of AutoFLI

Stanier, Charlie

52

Assessing the health risks of natural CO2 seeps in Italy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greenhouse Gas, Cheltenham, United Kingdom), Natural Ana- logues for the Geological Storage of CO2, IEA for assessing the health risks of CO2 leakage from on- shore storage reservoirs. Italian gas seeps have already Italian Gas Seeps. Natural CO2 degassing is most abundant in wes- tern Italy (18­20) (Fig. 1). Here

Haszeldine, Stuart

53

Enzymatic Carboxylation of Ribulose Diphosphate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

wfth authentic glycerfe acf d i n f xir sclsrerit sys terns,o l e s Ph0s~h3- glyceric acf d M l . a t : acid Counts perq u i n m e s , o x a l i c acf d ) , I n longer f f x a t i

Quayle, J.R.; Fuller, R.C.; Benson, A.A.; Calvin, M.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Locality Aware Dynamic Load Management for Massively Multiplayer Games  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hot-spot overload for server 6 and shedding to a remote server is the only option. The net effect with a dynamic load management algorithm enables us to better handle transient crowding by adaptively dispersing MMOG pat- terns, such as, player flocking. Flocking is the movement of many players to one area or hot

Amza, Cristiana

55

Design and Performance of an Object-Oriented Framework for High-Speed Electronic Medical Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Acceptor and Connector pat- terns [9] that decouple the passive and active initialization of services fromSocket SlotSlot AcceptorAcceptor SlotSlot ConnectorConnector SlotSlot SybaseSybase SlotSlot Database

Schmidt, Douglas C.

56

Microsoft PowerPoint - SW Fed Hydro Conference Jun 12 presentation Final [Compatibility Mode]  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Projects Impacting Federal Projects Impacting Federal Power Tulsa District Tulsa District Beau Biffle Beau Biffle 13 June 2012 BUILDING STRONG ® Topics Topics  Interior Least Tern Operations and Habitat Creation  Tulsa Vision 2025  Dam Safety Issues ► Keystone ► Pine Creek ► Tenkiller  Lake Eufaula Advisory Committee  Lake Eufaula Advisory Committee  Tenkiller Downstream Fishery Issues  Broken Bow Seasonal Pool Update - Cultural Broken Bow Seasonal Pool Update Cultural Resources Impacts  Arkansas River Navigation Improvement BUILDING STRONG ®  Oklahoma Comprehensive Water Plan Update Interior Least Tern Operations and H bit t C ti Habitat Creation  2011 Breeding Season Survey Results: - Arkansas River System: 517 adults, 358 fledglings. Season totals exceeded

57

DOE/EA-1374-SA-02: Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (April 2003)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8, 2003 8, 2003 In reply refer to: KEC-4 To: People Interested in the Project to Conduct Research on Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Background: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of 2001. The project involves multi-year research begun in 1996 on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and glaucous-winged gulls. The activities examined in the EA focused on measuring the salmonid smolt consumption rate of tern, cormorant, and gull populations in the lower Columbia River. Additionally, this project measured the impacts of this research on brown pelicans roosting in the area. Action: In 2002, BPA prepared modifications to the original proposal in a Supplement Analysis

58

Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Supplement Analysis (DOE/EA-1374-SA-03)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

March 29, 2004 March 29, 2004 In reply refer to: KEC-4 To: People Interested in the Project to Conduct Research on Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Background: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) and Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) on this project in April of 2001. The project involves multi- year research begun in 1996 on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and glaucous-winged gulls. The activities examined in the EA focused on measuring the salmonid smolt consumption rate of tern, cormorant, and gull populations in the lower Columbia River. Additionally, this project measured the impacts of this research on brown pelicans roosting in the area. Action: In 2002 and 2003, BPA prepared modifications to the original proposal in a Supplement

59

Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem 2004-2009  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River Main Stem Reservoir System. Management of the Missouri River has generally reduced peak river flows that form and maintain emergent sandbar habitat. Emergent sandbars provide non-vegetated nesting habitat for the endangered interior least tern (Sternula antillarum athalassos) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). Since 2000, piping plover nesting habitat within the Gavins Point Reach, Garrison Reach, Lake Oahe, and Lake Sakakawea has fledged the majority of piping plovers produced along the Missouri River system. Habitats within Lewis and Clark Lake have also recently become important plover production areas. Mechanical construction of emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) within some of these reaches within the Missouri River began in 2004. Through 2009, 11 sandbar complexes had been constructed (10 in Gavins Point Reach, 1 in Lewis and Clarke Lake) totaling about 543 ac of piping plover and interior least tern nesting habitat. ESH Construction has resulted in a net gain of tern and plover nesting habitat. Both terns and plovers successfully nest and fledge young on constructed sandbars, and constructed habitats were preferred over natural habitats. Natural processes may limit the viability of constructed sandbars as nesting habitat. Continued research is needed to identify if changes in constructed sandbar engineering and management increase the length of time constructed habitats effectively function as nesting habitat. However, the transfer of information from researchers to planners through technical research reports may not be timely enough to effectively foster the feedback mechanisms of an adaptive management strategy.

Duberstein, Corey A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil ...

Scott W. Powell; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Anil Kumar; Sally A. McFarlane

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tern chlidonias niger" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Radar Observations of Convective System Variability in Relationship to African Easterly Waves during the 2006 AMMA Special Observing Period  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A radar-based analysis of the structure, motion, and rainfall variability of westward-propagating squall-line mesoscale convective systems (SLMCSs) in Niamey, Niger, during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities ...

Williams, Earle R.

62

ARM - Instrument - irt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Niger OLI M1 Browse Data Oliktok Point, Alaska PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF 1 PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA Contact(s) Victor Morris (509) 372-6144...

63

ARM - Instrument - mwrp  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Data Niamey, Niger PGH M1 Browse Data ARIES Observatory, Nainital, Uttarkhand, India PVC M1 Browse Data Highland Center, Cape Cod MA; AMF 1 PYE M1 Browse Data Point Reyes, CA...

64

Diurnal and Seasonal Cycles of Cloud Occurrences, Types, and Radiative Impact over West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study focuses on the occurrence and type of clouds observed in West Africa, a subject that has been neither much documented nor quantified. It takes advantage of data collected above Niamey, Niger, in 2006 with the Atmospheric Radiation ...

Dominique Bouniol; Fleur Couvreux; Pierre-Honor Kamsu-Tamo; Madeleine Leplay; Franoise Guichard; Florence Favot; Ewan J. OConnor

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adieu to Niger, Guten Tag to Germany Bookmark and Share The AMF decommissioning team poses for a group photo at the AMF site near the airport in Niamey. The AMF decommissioning...

66

Radar Observations of Convective System Variability in Relationship to African Easterly Waves during the 2006 AMMA Special Observing Period  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A radar-based analysis of the structure, motion, and rainfall variability of westward-propagating squall-line mesoscale convective systems (SLMCSs) in Niamey, Niger, during the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Activities (AMMA) 2006 special ...

Rosana Nieto Ferreira; Thomas Rickenbach; Nick Guy; Earle Williams

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

PUBLICATIONS RECORD The University of British Columbia -Department of Civil Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

imparting substances in biologically treated pulp mill effluent using Aspergillus niger fungal biomass and requirements for jobs. Water Science and Technology, 59(4): 745-753. 61. Geng, Z., E.R. Hall and P. Bérubé

Froese, Thomas

68

Observations of Saharan Aerosols: Results of ECLATS Field Experiment. Part I: Optical Thicknesses and Aerosol Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of ground-based and airborne observations of desert aerosols, the ECLATS experiment was carried out in December 1980 in the vicinity of Niamey (Niger). This paper deals with aerosol optical thicknesses and size distributions derived from ...

Y. Fouquart; B. Bonnel; M. Chaoui Roquai; R. Santer; A. Cerf

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Soil Moisture Modeling Based on Multiyear Observations in the Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two simple soil moisture models useful for drought monitoring and climate change studies were proposed, based on 4-yr ground observations of root-zone soil moisture in Sahelian Niger. One is a water balance model that calculates soil moisture ...

Y. Yamaguchi; M. Shinoda

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Comparison of the Water Budgets between Clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two field campaigns, the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) and the Tropical Warm PoolInternational Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), took place in 2006 near Niamey, Niger, and Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, providing extensive ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Scott W. Powell; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Paul Ciesielski; Nick Guy; Harold Pierce; Toshihisa Matsui

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

www.eia.gov  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

PU Kenya KE Lesotho LT Liberia LI Libya LY Madagascar MA Malawi MI Mali ML Mauritania MR Mauritius MP Morocco MO Mozambique MZ Namibia WA Niger NG Nigeria NI Reunion ...

72

ARM - Niamey News  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RADAGAST Proposal Outreach Fact Sheets RADAGAST (PDF) Annual Climate Cycle in Niger, Africa (PDF) Posters AMF Poster, French Version We're Going to Sample the Sky in Africa News...

73

Interactions between the Land Surface and Mesoscale Rainfall Variability during HAPEX-Sahel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hydrological Atmospheric Pilot Experiment in the Sahel (HAPEX-Sahel) was designed to investigate landatmosphere interactions in the semiarid conditions of southwest Niger. During the intensive observation period (IOP) in 1992, a pronounced ...

Christopher M. Taylor; Frdrique Sad; Thierry Lebel

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

DOE Joint Genome Institute: Same Fungus, Different Strains: A Comparative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2011 3, 2011 Same Fungus, Different Strains: A Comparative Genomics Approach for Improved "Green" Chemical Production WALNUT CREEK, Calif.-Fungi play key roles in nature and are valued for their great importance in industry. Consider citric acid, a key additive in several foods and pharmaceuticals produced on a large-scale basis for decades with the help of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. While A. niger is an integral player in the carbon cycle, it possesses an arsenal of enzymes that can be deployed in breaking down plant cell walls to free up sugars that can then be fermented and distilled into biofuel, a process being optimized by U.S. Department of Energy researchers. Susannah Tringe Photo: Aspergillus niger conidiospore by Kathie T. Hodges, Cornell.

75

Primer_Summer_2011_061011_v2.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Volume 8 Issue 3 1 Volume 8 Issue 3 For decades, citric acid has been produced on a commercial- scale basis with the help of the fungus Aspergillus niger. Outside industry, A. niger is also known to be involved in the global carbon cycle, and its enzymes can be used to break down plant cell walls and get at the sugars that can in turn be fermented for use as biofuels. "Aspergillus niger is an industrial workhorse for enzymes and small molecules such as organic acids," said Scott Baker of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. "We know that this single organism is used for production of organic acids and for enzymes, and it can degrade plant cell wall matter for sugar production. For biofuels it's a highly relevant organism since it's already been

76

Appendix F Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Human Health Risk Assessment Human Health Risk Assessment Document Number Q0029500 Appendix F This appendix presents the detailed calculations used to estimate risks to human health. It includes the exposure factors, equations, abbreviations, assumptions, and references. Separate spreadsheets for ground water ingestion for the near-term and 20-year assumptio~ls have also been provided. The following spreadsheets are included in this appendix: Overview (Exposure Factors, Equations, Abbreviations, and COPCs) .......................... F-3 * Contaminant Concentrations-Near-Tern1 Ground Water Concentrations .................... F-6 Toxicity Factors ...................................... .. ............................................................ F-8 * Lower Montezuma'creek Exposure Scenario-Reasonable Maximurn Exposure ...... F-10

77

Observation of the Diurnal Cycle in the Low Troposphere of West Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors give an overview of the diurnal cycle of the low troposphere during 2006 at two different sites, Niamey (Niger) and Nangatchori (Benin). This study is partly based on the first observations of UHF wind profilers ever made in West ...

Marie Lothon; Frdrique Sad; Fabienne Lohou; Bernard Campistron

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

License Exceptions Supplement No. 1 to Part 740 page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Group Nuclear Suppliers Group Argentina X X X Australia X X X X Austria1 X X X Belgium X X X X Brazil X Netherlands New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Group D [D: 1] [D: 2] [D: 3] [D: 4] Country National Nuclear Chemical & Missile Security Biological

Bernstein, Daniel

79

Industrial Oil Products Division List  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Name AffiliationCity, State, CountryIndustrial Oil Products Division2013 Members241 Members as of July 1, 2013Abend, SvenKolb Distribution LtdHedingen, SwitzerlandAbraham, TimothyCargill IncHopkins, MN, USAAkinrinade, FrancisNational Open University, Niger

80

Application of Evapoclimatonomy to Monthly Surface Water Balance Calculations at the HAPEX-Sahel Supersites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper a revised verstion of Lettau's evapoclimatonomy model is used to simulate climate in West Africa. The model is applied specifically to the study sites of the HAPEX-Sahel region in Niger, an international regional experiment to study ...

JosA. Marengo; Sharon E. Nicholson; Andrew R. Lare; Bruno A. Monteny; Sylvie Galle

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tern chlidonias niger" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Potential of Infrared Satellite Data for the Retrieval of Saharan-Dust Optical Depth over Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical depth of Saharan dust derived from photometric measurements made during the dry season at a Sahelian site (Niamey, Republic of Niger) is compared with METEOSAT-2 radiance in the 10.512.5 ?m channel for different times of the daily cycle. ...

M. Legrand; J. J. Bertrand; M. Desbois; L. Menenger; Y. Fouquart

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Political Ecology of Hydraulic Fracturing for Natural Gas in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[:] shale gas in the US, sand mines in Wisconsin, oil in the Ecuadoran Amazon, oil in the Niger Delta's Marcellus Shale Laura J. Stroup, Ph.D. Dept. of Geography, Texas State University Michael H. Finewood, Ph ! Background of Marcellus Shale Gas Play ! Current Events: The Case of PA ! Geography of Fracking in Study

Scott, Christopher

83

Effective sea-level rise and deltas: Causes of change and human dimension implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

deltas are the site of significant oil and gas accumulations and extraction as in the Niger, Magdalena rates of wetland loss resulting from ESLR are as high as 100 km2 /yr in the delta. Day et al., 2000 construction on the Volta River. Subsidence in the delta is attributed to the extraction of oil, which provides

New Hampshire, University of

84

CRC handbook of agricultural energy potential of developing countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contents of this book are: Introduction; Kenya; Korea (Republic of); Lesotho; Liberia; Malagasy; Malawi; Mali; Mauritania; Mexico, Mozambique, Nepal; Nicaragua; Niger; Nigeria; Pakistan; Panama; Paraguay; Peru; Philippines; Rwanda; Senegal; Sierra Leone; Somalia; Sri Lanka; Sudana; Surinam; Swaziland; Tanzania; Thailand; Togo; Uganda; Uruguay; Venezuela; Zaire; Zambia; Appendix I. Conventional and Energetic Yields; Appendix II, Phytomass Files; and References.

Duke, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

EA-1374-SA-03: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Supplement Analysis 3: Supplement Analysis EA-1374-SA-03: Supplement Analysis Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing research on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and several species of gulls (glaucous-winged, western, California, and ring-billed) begun in 1996. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of the research in an Environmental Assessment (EA) completed in 2001 (DOE/EA-1374). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze additional research activities proposed as part of that project. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project, Supplement Analysis DOE/EA-1374-SA-03 (April 2003)

86

DOE/EIA-0202(84/2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2QH 2QH Short-Term Energy Outlook Quarterly Projections May 1984 Published: June 1984 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. t rt jrt .ort lort .iort .iort- iort- iort- '.ort- ort- .m .erm Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term Term i-Term rTerm -Term xrm uergy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy Energy ^nergy Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Outlook Short-Tern Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term Short-Term

87

PRESENTATION TITLE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Projects Impacting Federal Projects Impacting Federal Power Tulsa District Dan Brueggenjohann 12 June 2013 BUILDING STRONG ®  Interpretation/Application of CERM-F-2013-18  303(d) Listing of Broken Bow Tailwaters  Interior Least Tern Operations and Habitat Creation  Tulsa Vision 2025  Dam Safety Issues ► Keystone, Pine Creek, Robert S. Kerr, Denison  Lake Eufaula Advisory Committee  Tenkiller Downstream Fishery Issues  Broken Bow Seasonal Pool Update - Cultural Resources Impacts  Arkansas River Navigation Improvement  Oklahoma Comprehensive Water Plan Update BUILDING STRONG ® Interpretation/Application of CERM-F-2013-18  Situation - New Resource Management regulation to increase the capitalization threshold for power marketing agency assets.

88

EA-1374-SA-02: Supplment Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Supplment Analysis 2: Supplment Analysis EA-1374-SA-02: Supplment Analysis Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing research on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and several species of gulls (glaucous-winged, western, California, and ring-billed) begun in 1996. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of the research in an Environmental Assessment (EA) completed in 2001 (DOE/EA-1374). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze additional research activities proposed as part of that project. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project, Supplment Analysis DOE/EA-1374-SA-02 (April 2003)

89

EA-1374-SA-05: Supplement Analysis | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Supplement Analysis 5: Supplement Analysis EA-1374-SA-05: Supplement Analysis Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) is funding ongoing research on Caspian terns, double-crested cormorants, and several species of gulls (glaucous-winged, western, California, and ring-billed) begun in 1996. BPA analyzed environmental impacts of the research in an Environmental Assessment (EA) completed in 2001 (DOE/EA-1374). The purpose of this Supplement Analysis (SA) is to determine if a supplemental EA is needed to analyze additional research activities proposed as part of that project. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project, Supplement Analysis DOE/EA-1374-SA-05 (March 2006)

90

EA-1374: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

74: Final Environmental Assessment 74: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1374: Final Environmental Assessment Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project BPA's underlying need for action is to ensure that regional fish and wildlife managers (the Working Group) have adequate information to assess the impacts of managed and unmanaged bird populations (i.e., terns, cormorants, and gulls) on the survival of juvenile salmonids from the Columbia River Basin, particularly ESA-listed stocks, to help determine effective future management initiatives that will reduce predation impacts. Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River Research Project Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1374 (April 2001) More Documents & Publications EA-1374-SA-01: Supplement Analysis

91

Category:MHK Companies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Companies MHK Companies Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Looking for the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database? The companies below are involved in the Marine and Hydrokinetic energy sector and are considered to be MHK Companies. Pages in category "MHK Companies" The following 200 pages are in this category, out of 291 total. (previous 200) (next 200) A Able Technologies ABS Alaskan Inc AER NY Kinetics LLC AeroVironment Alaska Power Telephone Company AlbaTERN Alternative Energy Engineering Associates LLP Applied Technologies Company Ltd Aqua Magnetics Inc AquaEnergy Aquamarine Power Aquantis Inc Aquaphile sarl Hydro Gen Aquascientific Arlas Invest Arnold Energy Systems Artificial Muscle Inc Atlantis Resources Corporation Atlantisstrom Atmocean Aviation Enterprises Ltd see Marine Current Turbines Ltd

92

Preliminary Compatibility Assessment of Metallic Dispenser Materials for Service in Ethanol Fuel Blends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compatibility of selected metals representative of those commonly used in dispensing systems was evaluated in an aggressive E20 formulation (CE20a) and in synthetic gasoline (Reference Fuel C) in identical testing to facilitate comparison of results. The testing was performed at modestly elevated temperature (nominally 60 C) and with constant fluid flow in an effort to accelerate potential interactions in the screening test. Based on weight change, the general corrosion of all individual coupons exposed in the vapor phase above Reference Fuel C and CE20a as well as all coupons immersed in Reference Fuel C was essentially nil (brass and phosphor bronze), but the associated corrosion films were quite thin and apparently protective. For coupons immersed in CE20a, four different materials exhibited net weight loss over the entire course of the experiment: cartridge brass, phosphor bronze, galvanized steel, and terne-plated steel. None of these exhibited substantial incompatibility with the test fluid, with the largest general corrosion rate calculated from coupon weight loss to be approximately 4 {micro}m/y for the cartridge brass specimens. Selective leaching of zinc (from brass) and tin (from bronze) was observed, as well as the presence of sulfide surface films rich in these elements, suggesting the importance of the role of sulfuric acid in the CE20a formulation. Analysis of weight loss data for the slightly corroded metals indicated that the corrosivity of the test environment decreased with exposure time for brass and bronze and increased for galvanized and terne-plated steel. Other materials immersed in CE20a - type 1020 mild steel, type 1100 aluminum, type 201 nickel, and type 304 stainless steel - each appeared essentially immune to corrosion at the test conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Preliminary Compatibility Assessment of Metallic Dispenser Materials for Service in Ethanol Fuel Blends  

SciTech Connect

The compatibility of selected metals representative of those commonly used in dispensing systems was evaluated in an aggressive E20 formulation (CE20a) and in synthetic gasoline (Reference Fuel C) in identical testing to facilitate comparison of results. The testing was performed at modestly elevated temperature (nominally 60 C) and with constant fluid flow in an effort to accelerate potential interactions in the screening test. Based on weight change, the general corrosion of all individual coupons exposed in the vapor phase above Reference Fuel C and CE20a as well as all coupons immersed in Reference Fuel C was essentially nil (<0.3 {micro}m/y), with no evidence of localized corrosion such as pitting/crevice corrosion or selective leaching at any location. Modest discoloration was observed on the copper-based alloys (cartridge brass and phosphor bronze), but the associated corrosion films were quite thin and apparently protective. For coupons immersed in CE20a, four different materials exhibited net weight loss over the entire course of the experiment: cartridge brass, phosphor bronze, galvanized steel, and terne-plated steel. None of these exhibited substantial incompatibility with the test fluid, with the largest general corrosion rate calculated from coupon weight loss to be approximately 4 {micro}m/y for the cartridge brass specimens. Selective leaching of zinc (from brass) and tin (from bronze) was observed, as well as the presence of sulfide surface films rich in these elements, suggesting the importance of the role of sulfuric acid in the CE20a formulation. Analysis of weight loss data for the slightly corroded metals indicated that the corrosivity of the test environment decreased with exposure time for brass and bronze and increased for galvanized and terne-plated steel. Other materials immersed in CE20a - type 1020 mild steel, type 1100 aluminum, type 201 nickel, and type 304 stainless steel - each appeared essentially immune to corrosion at the test conditions.

Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Janke, Christopher James [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Policy/ProgramDesign | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Policy/ProgramDesign ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Policy/ProgramDesign Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Background → Design → Implementation →

95

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-News | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

News News Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Regional News Renewable Energy News Today-West Africa Renewable Energy News Failed to load RSS feed from http://renewableenergy.einnews.com/xml/west-africa/: Error fetching URL: Operation timed out after 5000 milliseconds with 0 bytes received

96

Gateway:ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo West Africa Organizations, Programs, and Tools Countries (15)

97

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

98

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Transportation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Transportation ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Transportation Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Introduction→ Step 1 Step 2 Step 3 Step 4

99

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-About | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-About ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-About Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo The ECOWAS Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) is

100

Energy System and Scenario Analysis Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo What analysis tools and methods can I use to study my country's energy system? Understanding approaches

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tern chlidonias niger" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Organizations and Networks | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Organizations and Networks ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Organizations and Networks Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo Registered Technical and Research Organizations

102

West African Clean Energy Gateway-Resource Assessment | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

African Clean Energy Gateway-Resource Assessment African Clean Energy Gateway-Resource Assessment Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo SWERA-thumb.jpg The SWERA landing page allows for the quick browsing of global data layers.

103

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8, 2010 [Facility News] 8, 2010 [Facility News] Europeans Keen to Hear About Effects of Dust Using Data from Africa Bookmark and Share In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility joined the AMMA project to obtain data for scientists to study the impact that airborne Saharan dust has on incoming solar radiation. This photo shows the sun setting through a dusty atmosphere near Niamey, Niger, where the mobile facility was deployed for one year. In 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility joined the AMMA project to obtain data for scientists to study the impact that airborne Saharan dust has on incoming solar radiation. This photo shows the sun setting through a dusty atmosphere near Niamey, Niger, where the mobile facility was deployed for one year. Researcher Xiaohong Liu from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was

104

ARM - Datastreams - rad  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamsrad Datastreamsrad Documentation Data Quality Plots ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : RAD Radiation measurements at AMF/Niamey, Niger/S1 Active Dates 2006.01.13 - 2008.12.13 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Radiation Measurements at AMF (RAD) Measurements Only measurements considered scientifically relevant are shown below by default. Show all measurements Measurement Units Variable Altitude above mean sea level m alt Base time in Epoch seconds since 1970-1-1 0:00:00 0:00 base_time Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance Downwelling Longwave Hemispheric Irradiance, Pyrgeometer W/m^2 down_long_hemisp ( time ) Downwelling Pyrgeometer Case Thermistor Resistance Kohms down_long_hemisp_case_resist ( time )

105

Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? Could a Common Household Fungus Reduce Oil Imports? June 21, 2011 - 11:37am Addthis A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus’ DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. A view of Aspergillus niger with the fungus' DNA highlighted in green | Photo Courtesy of: PNNL. Ben Squires Analyst, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy What does this mean for me? The Department's Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are working to harness the natural process that spoils fruits and vegetables as a way to make fuel and other petroleum substitutes from the parts of plants that we can't eat. The genetic bases of the behaviors and abilities of these two industrially relevant fungal strains will allow researchers to exploit

106

Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resilience (PPCR) Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bangladesh, Bolivia, Cambodia, Dominica, Grenada, Haiti, Jamaica, Mozambique, Nepal, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Tajikistan, Tonga, Yemen, Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea

107

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Links | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Links Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png Ivory Coast Liberia Mali Niger Nigeria Senegal Sierra Leone Togo

108

African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) Jump to: navigation, search Name African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF) Agency/Company /Organization African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Compnay (ABREC) Sector Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Biomass, - Biofuels Website http://www.bidc-ebid.com/en/fo Country Benin, Burkina Faso, Cape Verde, Ivory Coast, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa References African Biofuel & Renewable Energy Fund (ABREF)[1]

109

BioCarbon Fund Project Portfolio | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Portfolio Portfolio Jump to: navigation, search Name BioCarbon Fund Project Portfolio Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Land Focus Area Forestry Topics Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Website http://wbcarbonfinance.org/Rou Country Albania, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Honduras, India, Kenya, Madagascar, Mali, Moldova, Nicaragua, Niger, Uganda Southern Europe, Eastern Asia, South America, Central America, Eastern Africa, Central America, Southern Asia, Eastern Africa, Eastern Africa, Western Africa, Eastern Europe, Central America, Western Africa, Eastern Africa References BioFund Projects[1] Background "The BioCarbon Fund provides carbon finance for projects that sequester or conserve greenhouse gases in forests, agro- and other ecosystems. Through

110

National Action Programmes on Desertification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Programmes on Desertification Programmes on Desertification Jump to: navigation, search Name National Action Programmes on Desertification Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, GHG inventory, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unccd.int/actionpro Country Algeria, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Chad, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Tanzania, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, Zambia, Zimbabwe

111

FORMERLY UTILIZED elTEB REMEDIAL ACTION PROORAM [FUSRAP] AND  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

bE8IQM CRITERIA FOR bE8IQM CRITERIA FOR r FORMERLY UTILIZED elTEB REMEDIAL ACTION PROORAM [FUSRAP] AND r 8URPLUS FACIL~TIES MANAOEMENT PROQRAM [SFMPI FEBRUARY 1886 i r s o i - o o - ~ c - o l - 1 ~ R e v . 1 DESIGN CRITERIA FOR FORMERLY UTILIZED Sf TES REMEDIAL' ACTION PROGAM ( PUSRAPL AND . . -- SURPLUS F A C I L I T I E S UANAGEMENT PROGRAM ( SFMP ( I S S U E D FOR CLIENT APPROVAL) SF proved by: 2-24-86 D a t e T e c h n i c a l Services D i v i s i o n A p p r o v e d by: 2-24-86 D a t e C o n s t r u c t i o n a n d E n g i n e e r i n g Oak R i d g e O p e r a t i o n s O f f ice 14SOl-00-PC-01 Rev. 1 PREFACE T O DESIGN CRITERIA These design criteria have been written in a generic form that sunmarizes criteria applicabl'e for remedial action and long-tern ranasenent activities associated with t h e radioactive wastes at the FOSRAP *and SFflP sites. Site-specific information i

112

AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 of2 1 of2 AC PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 13. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE , 5. PROJECT NO (If applicab/e) A193 See Block 16C REQ. NO. NOPR 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than /tern 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12, LLC P.O. Box 2009 MS 8014 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8014 CODE FACILITY CODE 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT/ORDER NO. DE-AC05-000R22800 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) August 31,2000 11. THIS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF SOLICITATIONS .. o The above numbered solicitation IS amended as set forth In Item 14. The hour and date specified for receipt of Offers 0

113

Estimation of clearance potential index and hazard factors of Candu fuel bundle and its validation based on the measurements of radioisotopes inventories from Pickering reactor fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is related to the clearance potential levels, ingestion and inhalation hazard factors of the spent nuclear fuel and radioactive wastes. This study required a complex activity that consisted of more steps such as: the acquisition, setting up, validation and application of procedures, codes and libraries. The paper reflects the validation stage of this study. Its objective was to compare the measured inventories of selected actinide and fission products radionuclides in an element from the Pickering Candu reactor with the inventories predicted using a recent version of the SCALE 5/ORIGEN-ARP code coupled with the time dependent cross sections library for the Candu 28 reactor (produced by the sequence SCALE4.4a/SAS2H and SCALE4.4a/ORIGEN-S). In this way, the procedures, the codes and the libraries for the characterization of radioactive material in terns of radioactive inventories, clearance, and biological hazard factors could be qualified and validated, in support of the safety management of the radioactive wastes. (authors)

Pavelescu, Alexandru Octavian [University 'Politehnica' of Bucharest (Romania); Tinti, Renato; Voukelatou, Konstantina [ENEA FIS-NUC, Bologna (Italy); Cepraga, Dan Gabriel [ENEA FIS-MET, Bologna (Italy)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Avian Predation on Juvenile Salmonids in the Lower Columbia River: 1998 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors initiated a field study in 1997 to assess the impacts of fish-eating colonial waterbirds (i.e., terns, cormorants, and gulls) on the survival of juvenile salmonids in the lower Columbia River. Here the authors present results from the 1998 breeding season, the second field season of work on this project. The research objectives in 1998 were to: (1) determine the location, size, nesting chronology, nesting success, and population trajectories of breeding colonies of fish-eating birds in the lower Columbia River; (2) determine diet composition of fish-eating birds, including taxonomic composition and energy content of various prey types; (3) estimate forage fish consumption rates, with special emphasis on juvenile salmonids, by breeding adults and their young; (4) determine the relative vulnerability of different groups of juvenile salmonids to bird predation; (5) identify foraging range, foraging strategies, and habitat utilization by piscivorous waterbirds; and (6) test the feasibility of various alternative methods for managing avian predation on juvenile salmonids and develop recommendations to reduce avian predation, if warranted by the results.

Collis, Ken; Adamany, Stephanie; Roby, Daniel D.; Craig, David P.; Lyons, Donald E.

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Two Controlled Experiments Assessing the Usefulness of Design Pattern Documentation in Program Maintenance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using design patterns is claimed to improve programmer productivity and software quality. Such improvements may manifest both at construction time (in faster and better program design) and at maintenance time (in faster and more accurate program comprehension). This paper focuses on the maintenance context and reports on experimental tests of the following question: Does it help the maintainer if the design patterns in the program code are documented explicitly (using source code comments), compared to a well-commented pro- gram without explicit reference to design patterns? Subjects performed maintenance tasks on two programs ranging from 360 to 560 LOC including comments. Both programs contained design patterns. The controlled variable was whether the use of de- sign patterns was documented explicitly or not. The experiments thus tested whether pattern com- ment lines (PCL) help during maintenance if pat- terns are relevant and sufficient program comments are already present. It turns out that this question is a challenge for the experimental methodology: a setup leading to relevant results is quite difficult to find. We discuss these issues in detail and suggest a general approach to such situations.

Lutz Prechelt; Barbara Unger; Michael Philippsen; Walter Tichy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

ARM Aerosol Working Group Meeting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and MFRSR Measurements ARM STM 2008 Norfolk, VA Connor Flynn 1 , Annette Koontz 1 , Anne Jefferson 2 , Jim Barnard 1 , Sally McFarlane 1 1 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 2 CIRES, University of Colorado, Boulder Progress towards ARM DOE 2008 Performance Metric 3 & 4 * Produce and make available new continuous time series of aerosol total column depth, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. * Produce and make available new continuous time series of retrieved dust properties, based on results from the AMF deployment in Niger, Africa. 0 100 200 300 400 0 20 40 60 80 100 ITF movement and surface RH % RH day of year (2006) 0 100 200 300 400 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 350 day of year wind direction (N = 0, E = 90) 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Wind speed m/s 0 100 200 300 1.4 1.6 1.8 2 MFRSR Vo for filter2, Niamey

117

PROJECT RULISON  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

17 17 RADIOLOGICAL OPERATIONS I I ' iL ROLLUP PLAN INTRODUCT ION se of t h i s rollup i s t o remove f r & the Rulison s i r e which have radioactive contamination in excess of c l e a n u F ~ r i t e r i a provided by AEC Headquarters and are.not . needed fon future operations a t the s i t e . i I TABLE O F CONTENTS S e c t i o n . T i t l e . R a d i a t i o n Monitoring P l a n A. P e r s o n n e l Monitoring B. M a t e r i a l and Hardware 11. Decontamination and D i s p o s a l ir- A. D i s p o s a l - B. Equipment I jc. S o i l i ! Water D i s p o s a l [ b, F l a r e S t a c k and Shipping Procedures B. ~ r r a n ~ & a ~ s f o r . S h i p p i n g , e t c . \ \ . ' 7 ) Sampling I \ - / A. S o i l B. Water C. V e g e t a t i o n D. A i r Sampling n V. Long-Tern S u r v e i l l h c d d r o g r a m r - V I . F i n a l S i t e Survey and ~ e g ~ r t d I ' 0 , *d 1 1 Appendix A - Rollup and D i s p o s a l Guides '.;I

118

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Particle Data Group Associates and Advisors Aguilar-Benitez, Amsler, Antonelli, Arguin, Armstrong, Artuso, Asner, Babu, Baer, Band, Barberio, Barnett, Battaglia, Bauer, Beringer, Bernardi, Bertl, Besson, Bichsel, Biebel, Bloch, Blucher, Blusk, Bunakov, Burchat, Cahn, Carena, Carone, Casas Serradilla, Casper, Cattai, Ceccucci, Chakraborty, Chen, Chivukula, Copic, Cousins, Cowan, Crawford, Dahl, Dalitz, D'Ambrosio, DeGouvea, DeGrand, Damour, Desler, Dissertori, Dobbs, Dobrescu, Donahue, Doser, Drees, Edwards,A, Edwards, Eidelman, Elvira, Erler, Ezhela, Fasso', Feng, Fetscher, Fields, Filimonov, Foster, Freedman, Froidevaux, Fukugita, Gaisser, Garren, Geer, Gerber, Gerbier, Gherghetta, Gibbons, Gilman, Giudice, Goldhaber, Goodman, Grab, Gritsan, Grivaz, Groom, Grünewald, Gurtu, Gutsche, Haber, Hagiwara, Hagmann, Hanhart, Harper , Hayes, Heltsley, Hernàndez-Rey, Hewett, Hikasa, Hinchliffe, Holder, Höcker, Hogan, Höhler, Holtkamp, Honscheid , Huston , Igo-Kemenes, Jackson, James, Jawahery, Johnson, Junk, Karlen, Kayser, Kirkby, Klein, Kleinknecht, Klempt, Knowles, Kolb, Kolda, Kowalewski, Kreitz, Kreps, Krusche, Kuyanov, Kwon, Lahav, Landua, Langacker , Lepage, Liddle, Ligeti, Lin, Liss, Littenberg, Liu, LoSecco, Lugovsky,K, Lugovsky,S, Lugovsky,V, Lynch, Lys, Mahlke, Mangano, Mankov, Manley, Mannel, Manohar, March-Russell, Marciano, Martin, Masoni, Matthews, Milstead, Miquel, Mönig, Mohr, Morrison, Murayama, Nakada, Nakamura, Narain, Nason, Navas, Nevski, Nicholson, Nir, Olive, Oyanagi, Pape, Patrignani, Peacock, Piepke, Porter, Prell, Punzi, Quadt, Quinn, Raby, Raffelt, Ratcliff, Razuvaev, Renk, Richardson, Roesler, Rolandi, Rolli, Romaniouk , Roos, Rosenberg, Rosner, Sachrajda, Sakai, Salam, Sanda, Sarkar, Sauli, Schaffner, Schindler, Schmitt, Schneider, Scott, Seligman, Shaevitz, Shrock, Silari, Skands, Smith, Sjöstrand, Smoot, Sokolosky, Spanier, Spieler, Spooner, Srednicki, Stahl, Stanev, Stone, Stone,S, Streitmatter, Sumiyoshi, Suzuki, Syphers, Tanabashi, Taylor, Terning, Titov, Tkachenko, Törnqvist, Tovey, Trilling, Trippe, Turner, Valencia, van Bibber, Vincter, Venanzoni, Vogel, Voss, Ward, Watari, Webber, Weiglein, Wells, Whalley, Wheeler, Wohl, Wolfenstein, Womersley, Woody, Workman, Yamamoto, Yao, Youssef, Zenin, Zhang, Zhu, Zyla

119

Energy R and D in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1997, the public and private sectors in Japan invested $90.3 billion in R and D. Japan is the second largest supporter of R and D after the United States. A very large percentage (79.4%) of all R and D in Japan is supported by the private sector. The prolonged economic recession that has plagued the Japanese economy for most of the 1990s has significantly reduced the scale of the Japanese R and D effort compared to what it would have been had the economy been more robust. The Japanese government has recently attempted to bring the economy out of this recession through the use of economic stimulus packages. These stimulus packages have contained significant new funding for R and D, although it is apparent that much of the funding is going to R and D programs and R and D construction projects with very near tern payoff and not to the support of longer term R and D. In 1998, the Japanese government devoted 13.7% of all public R and D funds to the support of energy R and D. The priority accorded to energy R and D in Japan is significantly higher than in any other industrialized nation. The Japanese energy R and D program, which was funded at $2.5 billion in 1997, is overwhelmingly focused on nuclear energy R and D. Nuclear energy R and D (fission and fusion) accounts for 75% of the total national energy R and D budget. The fission energy R and D effort has decreased nearly 24% since 1996 as the government attempts to refocus this program in the face of growing public opposition to the Japanese government's efforts to expand the nuclear power program. Energy efficiency R and D (8% of the total national energy R and D budget) and renewable energy R and D receive relatively modest support from the Japanese government.

J.J. Dooley

1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

High Efficiency, Low Cost Solar Cells Manufactured Using 'Silicon Ink' on Thin Crystalline Silicon Wafers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reported are the development and demonstration of a 17% efficient 25mm x 25mm crystalline Silicon solar cell and a 16% efficient 125mm x 125mm crystalline Silicon solar cell, both produced by Ink-jet printing Silicon Ink on a thin crystalline Silicon wafer. To achieve these objectives, processing approaches were developed to print the Silicon Ink in a predetermined pattern to form a high efficiency selective emitter, remove the solvents in the Silicon Ink and fuse the deposited particle Silicon films. Additionally, standard solar cell manufacturing equipment with slightly modified processes were used to complete the fabrication of the Silicon Ink high efficiency solar cells. Also reported are the development and demonstration of a 18.5% efficient 125mm x 125mm monocrystalline Silicon cell, and a 17% efficient 125mm x 125mm multicrystalline Silicon cell, by utilizing high throughput Ink-jet and screen printing technologies. To achieve these objectives, Innovalight developed new high throughput processing tools to print and fuse both p and n type particle Silicon Inks in a predetermined pat-tern applied either on the front or the back of the cell. Additionally, a customized Ink-jet and screen printing systems, coupled with customized substrate handling solution, customized printing algorithms, and a customized ink drying process, in combination with a purchased turn-key line, were used to complete the high efficiency solar cells. This development work delivered a process capable of high volume producing 18.5% efficient crystalline Silicon solar cells and enabled the Innovalight to commercialize its technology by the summer of 2010.

Antoniadis, H.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tern chlidonias niger" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

ARM - Datastreams - twrcam3m  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Datastreamstwrcam3m Datastreamstwrcam3m Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025311 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : TWRCAM3M Three Meter Tower: video camera Active Dates 2002.03.25 - 2013.07.09 Measurement Categories Surface Properties Originating Instrument Tower Camera (TWRCAM) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Surface condition jpg Locations North Slope Alaska NSA C2 Browse Data Central Facility, Atqasuk AK ARM Mobile Facility FKB M1 Browse Data Black Forest, Germany GRW M1 Browse Data Graciosa Island, Azores, Portugal NIM M1 Browse Data Niamey, Niger

122

Communications: NREL PowerPoint Presentation Template with Light Background  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AMF/GNDRAD Reconfiguration: AMF/GNDRAD Reconfiguration: Moving the White CoolCell ARM Radiative Processes Working Group Analyses by Mary Anderberg & Tom Stoffel March 10, 2008 ACRF Upwelling Irradiances Infrared UIR Shortwave US Pt Reyes, CA Banizoumbou Niger AMF Upwelling Irradiances Warren et al. visits FKB... BCR 01402: Move 7 m before on 10 m Tower AMF Upwelling Irradiances July 14, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances July 15, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances August 1, 2007 UIR US AMF Upwelling Irradiances August 5, 2007 UIR US Surface Albedo (AM) Surface Albedo (PM) Radiometer View Factors * * * 90% Irradiance Contribution Height (AGL) Effective Radius 3 m 9 m 10 m 29 m Radiometer Sensitivities Pyranometer +/- 10 Wm -2 vs 0.4% of 200 Wm-2 (0.8 Wm

123

American Goldfinch  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Goldfinch American Goldfinch Name: Mary-Ellen Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I happened on an American Goldfinch in my yard last week who could not fly. I captured it and now have it living in a large box. I have been feeding it commericial wild finch seed, niger seed and some sunflower seed. I have also provided a small cup of fine sand and a dish of water. Am I missing anything in it's diet? I had hoped to find someone to take it and care for it until it could fly again but have been unsuccessful so I may end up caring for it. It's wing is not visibly injured, however it can only flutter. I have been caring for it for 6 days now and it appears OK. Have also provided it with a small perch (branch) which it seems to use most of the time. Any other suggestions?

124

USAID West Africa Climate Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West Africa Climate Program West Africa Climate Program Jump to: navigation, search Name USAID West Africa Climate Program Agency/Company /Organization U.S. Agency for International Development Sector Energy, Land Focus Area Energy Efficiency, Renewable Energy, Forestry, Agriculture Topics Background analysis Website http://www.usaid.gov/our_work/ Country Ghana, Togo, Benin, Senegal, Niger, Nigeria, Mali, Liberia, Gambia, Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Sierra Leone, Mauritania, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Cameroon, Gabon, Equatorial Guinea, Chad, Sao Tome and Principe, Cape Verde Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Western Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Middle Africa, Western Africa

125

West African Clean Energy Gateway-Software Analysis Tools | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » West African Clean Energy Gateway-Software Analysis Tools Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

126

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Vincent and the Grenadines-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Saint Vincent and the Grenadines UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan

127

Microsoft PowerPoint - Lamb_et_al_Norfolk_Poster  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AMF 2006 Niamey Radiosonde AMF 2006 Niamey Radiosonde Data: Some Preliminary Results Peter J. Lamb 1 , Abdelkrim Ben Mohamed 2 , Mark Miller 3 , Ibrah Seidou Sanda 2 , Hamidou Hama 4 , Abebe Abdou Adam 5 1 University of Oklahoma-CIMMS, 2 Université Abdou Moumouni, 3 Rutgers University, 4 ASECNA-Niger, 5 ACMAD Introduction The 2006 ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) deployment in Niamey in support of the RADAGAST component of the AMMA Programme brought out a more complete picture of the Sahelian atmospheric environment. This poster presents an analysis of the AMF rawinsonde soundings made in Niamey between January 07, 2006 and January 07, 2007. This is a comprehensive study of all soundings considered together and at the principal synoptic observation times (0000, 0600, 1200, and 1800 UTC). The analysis focuses on temperature, humidity,

128

ARM - AMF2 Organization and Contact Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Organization and Contact Information Organization and Contact Information AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 AMF2 Organization and Contact Information The Argonne AMF2 Operations Office manages the operation of the second ARM mobile facility. Basic contact information, phone numbers, email, and shipping information to personnel in this office is available on this page.

129

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa Mobile Climate Monitoring Facility to Sample Skies in Africa January 18, 2006 - 10:47am Addthis WASHINGTON, D.C. -- The U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is placing a new, portable atmospheric laboratory with sophisticated instruments and data systems in Niger, Africa, to gain a better understanding of the potential impacts of Saharan dust on global climate. Dust from Africa's Sahara desert-the largest source of dust on the planet-reaches halfway around the globe. Carried by winds and clouds, the dust travels through West African, Mediterranean, and European skies, and across the Atlantic into North America. Unfortunately, Africa is one of the most under-sampled climate regimes in the world, leaving scientists to

130

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Technology Data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Technology Data Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

131

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

132

ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesSurface Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Surface Aerosol Observing System The ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) is equipped to quantify the interaction between clouds and aerosol particles. A counter-flow virtual impactor (CVI) is used to selectively sample cloud drops. The CVI takes advantage of the

133

W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status W-band ARM Cloud Radar (WACR) Update and Status PopStefanija, Ivan ProSensing, Inc. Mead, James ProSensing Inc. Widener, Kevin Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Category: Instruments Two W-band ARM Cloud Radars (WACR) have been developed for the SGP and the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) by ProSensing. The SGP WACR was successfully deployed in the same shelter as the MMCR in 2005. It is currently collecting co-polarization and cross-polarization spectral moments (reflectivity, Doppler velocity, and spectral width) along with spectra data. The AMF WACR will be deployed with the AMF in Niamey, Niger early in 2006. We will present ingested WACR data formats available from the ARM Archive, a selected comparisons of WACR and MMCR data at SGP, and data from

134

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15, 2006 [Facility News] 15, 2006 [Facility News] Radar Wind Profiler Joins ARM Mobile Facility Instrument Suite Bookmark and Share This spring, a 915 MHz radar wind profiler (RWP) was successfully installed at the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) site in Niamey, Niger, West Africa, for the remainder of the 1-year RADAGAST field campaign which started in January. The RWP will provide information about wind speed, wind direction, and wind shear, and also enable measurements of the turbulence in the lower part of the troposphere. This may be a key variable in determining the vertical distribution of dust in the experimental domain. Gradients in the radar's reflectivity spectrum may also help to provide continuous identification of the depth of the boundary layer in the summer months, when refractive gradients are likely to be maximized by low-level moisture.

135

JeffersonSTM09.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AOS: Measurements of Aerosol Optical and AOS: Measurements of Aerosol Optical and AOS: Measurements of Aerosol Optical and Cloud-forming Properties Cloud-forming Properties Anne Jefferson and John Ogren NOAA Environmental Science Research Laboratory CIRES, University of Colorado ARM STM 2009 Aerosol Observing Systems In-situ surface measurements of aerosol optical, chemical, size, hygroscopic and cloud-forming properties * SGP - ARM central facility Lamont, OK *AMF - Pt Reyes, CA 3/2005 - 9/2005 - Niamey, Niger 12/2005-1/2007 - Murg Valley, Germany 4/2007 -1/2008 - Shouxian China 5/2008 - 12/2008 - Graciosa Island, Azores 4/2009 *BRW/NSA - Barrow Alaska *AMF2 ? Darwin? - What instruments support the science? AMF deployment in Shouxian China, HFE HFE was located at a rural, agricultural area ~120 km from Hefei, ~200 km from Nanking

136

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team JGR-Atmospheres Papers from the RADAGAST Research Team Bharmal, N.A., A. Slingo, G.J. Robinson, and J.J. Settle, 2009: Simulation of surface and top of atmosphere thermal fluxes and radiances from the RADAGAST experiment. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi:10.1029/2008JD010504, in press. Kollias, P., M.A. Miller, K.L. Johnson, M.P. Jensen, and D.T. Troyan, 2009: Cloud, thermodynamic, and precipitation observations in West Africa during 2006. Journal of Geophysical Research- Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010641, in press. McFarlane, S.A., E.I. Kassianov, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and T. Ackerman, 2009: Surface shortwave aerosol forcing during the ARM Mobile Facility deployment in Niamey, Niger. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmospheres, 114, doi: 10.1029/2008JD010491, 17 pages.

137

ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System FacilitiesMobile Aerosol Observing System AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Aerosol Observing System Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, using the ARM Mobile Aerosol Observing System. Intensive aerosol observations conducted on the campus of Brookhaven

138

Impact Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Impact Assessment Toolkit Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

139

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Jump to: navigation, search Name Creating an Evergreen Agriculture in Africa: for Food Security and Environmental Resilience Agency/Company /Organization World Agroforestry Centre Partner Program on Forests Sector Land Focus Area Forestry, Agriculture Topics Co-benefits assessment, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type Publications, Lessons learned/best practices Website http://www.profor.info/profor/ Country Niger, Malawi, Zambia UN Region "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

140

ARM - AMF2 Architecture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Architecture Architecture AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 AMF2 Architecture The core AMF2 instrumentation is designed to operate out of modules; small independent climate controlled systems that house instrument computers, data loggers and other support equipment. This design feature sets the AMF2 apart in its flexibility and mobility at deployment sites.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tern chlidonias niger" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Research Highlight  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Desert Dust Determines Aerial Spread of Thunderstorm Clouds Submitter: Bhattacharya, A., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Area of Research: Cloud Distributions/Characterizations Working Group(s): Cloud Life Cycle Journal Reference: Zeng X, W Tao, SW Powell, RA Houze, P Ciesielski, N Guy, H Pierce, and T Matsui. 2013. "A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE." Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences, 70(2), doi:10.1175/JAS-D-12-050.1. The sun, seen through a dusty atmosphere, sets at Niamey, the capital of Niger, which is located in the African Sahara. Anvil clouds that accompany thunderstorms. Contrasts often provide unique perspectives, and scientists seize any such opportunity-when it arises. In a new research paper, published in the Journal of Atmospheric Sciences,

142

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sunphotometer to Obtain Additional Aerosol Data in Niamey Sunphotometer to Obtain Additional Aerosol Data in Niamey Bookmark and Share Located nearby the AMF ground instruments, the sunphotometer, in the foreground, requires an unobstructed hemispheric view of the sky to obtain its measurements. Located nearby the AMF ground instruments, the sunphotometer, in the foreground, requires an unobstructed hemispheric view of the sky to obtain its measurements. In early August, a new Cimel sunphotometer (CSPHOT) was deployed at the ARM Mobile Facility site in Niamey, Niger, as part of the ongoing RADAGAST field campaign. The CSPHOT measures the solar and sky radiance at various wavelengths in the visible and near-infrared spectrum (340, 380, 440, 500, 670, 870, 936, 1020 nm). From these measurements, a number of aerosol

143

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Finance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Finance Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

144

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dust Properties Derived from Multi-Filter Rotating Dust Properties Derived from Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer Data in Niamey E. Kassianov, T. Ackerman, J. Barnard, C. Flynn, and S. McFarlane Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction One of the key uncertainties in the earth's radiation balance is the effect of dust on radiative fluxes (aerosol radiative forcing), which in turn affects climatic processes on both planetary and local scales (e.g., Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2001; Sokolik et al. 2001). Since Saharan dust is one of the main sources of dust over the globe, its radiative effect has long been the subject of intensive studies. Recently, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) was deployed to Niamey, Niger, to participate in a large field campaign directed at elucidating the radiative effect of Saharan dust

145

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Background Climatology for the Atmospheric Background Climatology for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Mobile Facility Deployment in Niamey: Mean Annual Cycle and 2004-2005 Interannual Variability P.J. Lamb and M. Issa Lélé Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies The University of Oklahoma Norman, Oklahoma Abstract This study is comprised of two parts. The first part provides the long-term mean annual cycle context for the deployment of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Mobile Facility (AMF) in Niamey, Niger, Africa, during the entire year of 2006. Documentation includes the annual cycles (calendar month basis) of the following surface meteorological variables that will be important for the ARM deployment-rainfall, visibility (proxy for atmospheric dust), vapor pressure (proxy for column

146

ARM_Overview_black_43.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- In and Out of Africa - In and Out of Africa Gary Robinson, Tony Slingo, Nazim Bharmal and Jeff Settle Environmental Systems Science Centre, Reading University, UK RADAGAST is a collaborative project, involving UK, US and European scientists, to investigate the radiative divergence across the atmosphere. West Africa was chosen as the study area because the combination of wide range of column water vapour, episodic wind-generated dust events and seasonal aerosols from biomass burning presents a particular challenge to radiative transfer models. The primary data inputs are top-of-atmosphere narrow and broad-band observations from METEOSAT Second Generation (MSG) satellites and surface observations from the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF), which was deployed throughout 2006 at Niamey, Niger, in support of RADAGAST.

147

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2006 [Facility News] January 15, 2006 [Facility News] ARM Mobile Facility Begins Year-Long Deployment in Africa Bookmark and Share Beginning on January 9, the ARM Mobile Facility began officially collecting atmospheric data from a location at the airport in Niamey, Niger, Africa. As part of the RADAGAST field campaign, the AMF will measure the effects of absorbing aerosols from desert dust in the dry season, and the effects of deep convective clouds and associated moisture loadings on the transmission of atmospheric radiation during the summer monsoon. These measurements will be combined with associated satellite data to provide the first well-sampled direct estimates of the energy balance across the atmosphere. This dataset will provide valuable information to an ongoing effort called

148

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility Annual Report 2006  

SciTech Connect

This annual report describes the purpose and structure of the ARM Climate Research Facility and ARM Science programs and presents key accomplishments in 2006. Noteworthy scientific and infrastructure accomplishments in 2006 include: Collaborating with the Australian Bureau of Meteorology to lead the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment, a major international field campaign held in Darwin, Australia Successfully deploying the ARM Mobile Facility in Niger, Africa Developing the new ARM Aerial Vehicles Program (AVP) to provide airborne measurements Publishing a new finding on the impacts of aerosols on surface energy budget in polar latitudes Mitigating a long-standing double-Intertropical Convergence Zone problem in climate models using ARM data and a new cumulus parameterization scheme.

LR Roeder

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

Sunny prospects for heat engines  

SciTech Connect

The world's largest solar power plant is being built at Amilly, France and will be installed next year in Dire, Mali. Its capacity will be 80,000 watts. Each day it will pump 300,000 cubic feet of water up 23 feet from the Niger River to irrigate 37 acres of land. From a well 60 feet deep, it will pump another 21,200 cubic feet daily to supply drinking water for 10,000 people in Dire. It will refrigerate a cold room for an agricultural cooperative and, finally, after sundown, will generate 5 kW of electrical power to light both the cooperative and a 40-room tourist hotel. Jean-Pierre Girardier developed the heat engine utilizing the temperature difference between the hot African sun overhead and the cold water under the ground. (MCW)

Behrman, D.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Alcoholic fermentation of raw sweet potato by a nonconventional method using Endomycopsis fibuligera glucoamylase preparation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, alcoholic fermentation has received much attention as an alternative energy source. In conventional alcoholic fermentation from starchy materials, precooking is necessary for liquefaction and saccharification of the broth, which requires a large amount of heat energy - about 30-40% of all energy spent for alcohol production. Ueda and his co-workers have attempted to produce ethanol from raw starch in a single-step process, which combines liquefaction, saccharification, and yeast fermentation without cooking and autoclaving by using glucoamylase preparation from Aspergillus niger in order to save the cost of energy consumption by cooking. Ueda has also reported alcoholic fermentation of sweet potato without cooking by using Rhizopus glucoamylase preparation. In the present communication, we report the effectiveness of alcoholic fermentation of sweet potato without cooking by using Endomycopsis fibuligers glucoamylase preparation. (Refs. 5).

Saha, B.C.; Ueda, S.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

The AMMA mulid network for aerosol characterization in West Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three ground based portable low power consumption microlidars (MULID) have been built and deployed at three remote sites in Banizoumbou (Niger), Cinzana (Mali) and M'Bour (Senegal) in the framework of the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analyses (AMMA) project for the characterization of aerosols optical properties. A description of the instrument and a discussion of the data inversion method, including a careful analysis of measurement uncertainties (systematic and statistical errors) are presented. Some case studies of typical lidar profiles observed over the Banizoumbou site during 2006 are shown and discussed with respect to the AERONET 7-day back-trajectories and the biomass burning emissions from the Combustion Emission database for the AMMA campaign.

Cavalieri, Olga; Cairo, Francesco; Fierli, Federico; Snels, Marcel; Viterbini, Maurizio; Cardillo, Francesco; Chatenet, Bernadette; Formenti, Paola; Marticorena, Beatrice; Rajot, Jean Louis

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Layout 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Few stop to consider the consequences Few stop to consider the consequences of their daily ablutions, the washing of clothes, the watering of lawns, and the flush of a toilet. However, wastewater treatment-one of the cornerstones of modern civilization-is inside this issue 2. Finishers Convene in NM Spot Awards 3. Termites in Costa Rica 4. Profile: Erika Lindquist 5. Plant Pathogens Decoded OPA Recipients 6. Young Investigator Winner 8. Spotlight on Safety 9. Hazards of Being a Microbiologist 10. All About Webfeeds 11. Eukaryotic Finishing at Stanford 12. Symbiotic Tree Fungus 17. New CSP Targets 19. Pichia stipitis 20. Aspergillus niger PRIMER the October 2006 Volume 3 Issue 2 First Tree Genome Is Published: Poplar Holds Promise as Renewable Bioenergy Resource Wood from a common tree may one day figure prominently in meeting trans-

153

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2005 [Facility News] 31, 2005 [Facility News] Ancillary Site to Provide Key Data from Africa Bookmark and Share In January 2006, the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) begins a year-long field campaign in Africa as part of a multi-year international experiment called the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA). The AMF will be placed at the airport in Niamey, Niger, well within view of the Global Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) geostationary satellite. Cloud and radiative property measurements collected by the AMF will be used in conjunction with GERB data for a greater understanding of the atmosphere than could be gained from either dataset alone. While preparing for the campaign, the science team identified the need for instrumentation at an off-site location to compare radiative measurements from the natural environment of

154

ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Help | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » ECOWAS Clean Energy Gateway-Help Jump to: navigation, search Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Clean Energy Gateway Home | About | News | Links | Help | Countries Benin | Burkina Faso | Cape Verde | Gambia | Ghana | Guinea| Guinea-Bissau | Ivory Coast | Liberia | Mali | Niger | Nigeria | Senegal | Sierra Leone | Togo Countries ECREEE light.JPG FBenin.png FBurkinaFaso.png FCapeVerde.png FGambia.png FGhana.png FGuinea.png FGuinea-Bissau.png Benin Burkina Faso Cape Verde Gambia Ghana Guinea Guinea-Bissau FIvoryCoast.png FLiberia.png FMali.png FNiger.png FNigeria.png FSenegal.png FSierraLeone.png FTogo.png

155

nab-ARM_land2_v5.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

corresponding result can be seen in the corresponding result can be seen in the top-of-atmosphere long-wave flux. Figure 3 shows the modelled OLR and that measured by the ARG product. The difference is postulated to be because the AMF ground measurements are not representative of the area within the ARG pixel. Figure 4 shows the SEVIRI 10.8μm-derived skin temperatures: over the region, the temperature variations can account for an upwelling flux variation of 70 Wm -2 . At the AMF, Niamey airport site itself, the November-averaged skin temperature is ~319K. Figure 2: 0.6μm SEVIRI radiances. Mean of all times during November 2006 without cloud-cover. The dark band is the Niger river. Figure 1: TOA SW fluxes via two products from satellite measurements: ARG and HR. Figure 5: Daily-averaged down-welling LW flux, from AMF

156

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 15, 2010 [Facility News] April 15, 2010 [Facility News] Second Phase of African Scientific Exchange Underway Bookmark and Share Left to right: Dr. Zewdu Segele and Hama Hamidou examine reflectivity measurements made by the W-band ARM cloud radar in Niamey during July 2006. Left to right: Dr. Zewdu Segele and Hama Hamidou examine reflectivity measurements made by the W-band ARM cloud radar in Niamey during July 2006. Continuing an international collaboration that began with the ARM Mobile Facility deployment to Niamey, Niger, in 2006, meteorologist Hama Hamidou from the University of Niamey recently arrived at the Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies at the University of Oklahoma for a six-month scientific exchange. Under the guidance of Dr. Zewdu Segele, a

157

Papua New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Papua New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Papau New Guinea-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Papau New Guinea UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa

158

Austin's Green Building Program: A Tool for Sustainable Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In a new approach to home rating systems, Austin's Green Building Program was designed in 1991 as a marketing approach to encourage builders, architects, and designers to incorporate sustainable building practices, systems, and materials into residential construction. A secondary goal of the program was to encourage "green" business development in the Austin area. A rating system of accumulated points translates to a "sustainability rating" of one to four stars. Four resource areas relating to the home are considered: water, energy, building materials, and solid waste. Seventeen criteria were used to develop points for more than 130 building options listed under the four categories. The criteria for evaluating the options included consideration of the source, process (i.e. from raw material to finished product), use, postlife (recyclability, disposal), integration (with other systems), and difficulty in offering the option. The options are presented in the Green Building Guide, which includes an overview of the program, a discussion of sustainability and local and regional resources, the rating worksheets, and a comprehensive glossary of terns. The Green Building Guide is supplemented by a Sustainable Building Sourcebook which gives more detailed design and source information for each option listed in the Guide. The Green Building Guide is being revised in a simpler format, and the marketing package is being evaluated based upon our experience of the past two years of program operation. The Green Building Program supports participants through general marketing and technical seminars. Response to the Green Building Program has indicated pent-up demand from the market for more environmentally sensitive building practices. Reaction from the building industry has shown a desire for a mechanism to present building and development in a more positive light to an environmentally aware public. The broad acceptance of this strategy was highlighted at the United Nations Conference for Environment and Development (UNCED), called the "Earth Summit," when the Green Building Program was selected as one of twelve finalists worldwide for the United Nations Local Government Honours Programme. The most recent of several awards was the Award for Innovation presented by the Association of Demand Side Management Professionals in November, 1993. This paper will follow the implementation and operation of the Green Building Program, with discussions on the successes, challenges, and modifications of the program since its introduction to the public in early 1992.

Seiter, D. L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bangladesh UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

160

Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Zambia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Zambia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tern chlidonias niger" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Jamaica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Jamaica UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

162

Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Haiti-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Haiti UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

163

Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Saint Lucia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Saint Lucia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

164

Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Grenada-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Grenada UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

165

Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mozambique-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Mozambique UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

166

Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Dominica-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Dominica UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

167

Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Yemen-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Yemen UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

168

Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Samoa-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Samoa UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

169

Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Nepal UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

170

Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tajikistan-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Tajikistan UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

171

Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bolivia-Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Finance, Implementation, Low emission development planning, Market analysis Website http://www.climateinvestmentfu Country Bolivia UN Region Southern Asia References Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR)[1] Contents 1 Overview 2 Programs by Country 2.1 Bangladesh 2.2 Bolivia 2.3 Cambodia 2.4 Dominica 2.5 Grenada 2.6 Haiti 2.7 Jamaica 2.8 Mozambique 2.9 Nepal 2.10 Niger 2.11 Papua New Guinea 2.12 Saint Lucia 2.13 Saint Vincent and the Grenadines 2.14 Samoa 2.15 Tajikistan 2.16 Tonga 2.17 Yemen 2.18 Zambia 3 References Overview "The Pilot Program for Climate Resilience (PPCR), approved in November

172

Tropical Africa: Land Use, Biomass, and Carbon Estimates for 1980 (NDP-055)  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the contents of a digital database containing maximum potential aboveground biomass, land use, and estimated biomass and carbon data for 1980. The biomass data and carbon estimates are associated with woody vegetation in Tropical Africa. These data were collected to reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating historical releases of carbon from land use change. Tropical Africa is defined here as encompassing 22.7 x 10{sup 6} km{sup 2} of the earth's land surface and is comprised of countries that are located in tropical Africa (Angola, Botswana, Burundi, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Benin, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Djibouti, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Ivory Coast, Kenya, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Guinea-Bissau, Zimbabwe (Rhodesia), Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Togo, Uganda, Burkina Faso (Upper Volta), Zaire, and Zambia). The database was developed using the GRID module in the ARC/INFO{trademark} geographic information system. Source data were obtained from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the U.S. National Geophysical Data Center, and a limited number of biomass-carbon density case studies. These data were used to derive the maximum potential and actual (ca. 1980) aboveground biomass values at regional and country levels. The land-use data provided were derived from a vegetation map originally produced for the FAO by the International Institute of Vegetation Mapping, Toulouse, France.

Brown, S.

2002-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

173

Sequencing the Black Aspergilli species complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ~15 members of the Aspergillus section Nigri species complex (the "Black Aspergilli") are significant as platforms for bioenergy and bioindustrial technology, as members of soil microbial communities and players in the global carbon cycle, and as food processing and spoilage agents and agricultural toxigens. Despite their utility and ubiquity, the morphological and metabolic distinctiveness of the complex's members, and thus their taxonomy, is poorly defined. We are using short read pyrosequencing technology (Roche/454 and Illumina/Solexa) to rapidly scale up genomic and transcriptomic analysis of this species complex. To date we predict 11197 genes in Aspergillus niger, 11624 genes in A. carbonarius, and 10845 genes in A. aculeatus. A. aculeatus is our most recent genome, and was assembled primarily from 454-sequenced reads and annotated with the aid of >2 million 454 ESTs and >300 million Solexa ESTs. To most effectively deploy these very large numbers of ESTs we developed 2 novel methods for clustering the ESTs into assemblies. We have also developed a pipeline to propose orthologies and paralogies among genes in the species complex. In the near future we will apply these methods to additional species of Black Aspergilli that are currently in our sequencing pipeline.

Kuo, Alan; Salamov, Asaf; Zhou, Kemin; Otillar, Robert; Baker, Scott; Grigoriev, Igor

2011-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

174

Comparison of Simulated and Observed Continental Tropical Anvil Clouds and Their Radiative Heating Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically pointing millimeter-wavelength radar observations of anvil clouds extending from mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) that pass over an Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) field site in Niamey, Niger, are compared to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model using six different microphysical schemes. The radar data provide the statistical distribution of the radar reflectivity values as a function of height and anvil thickness. These statistics are compared to the statistics of the modeled anvil cloud reflectivity at all altitudes. Requiring the model to be statistically accurate at all altitudes is a stringent test of the model performance. The typical vertical profile of radiative heating in the anvil clouds is computed from the radar observations. Variability of anvil structures from the different microphysical schemes provides an estimate of the inherent uncertainty in anvil radiative heating profiles. All schemes underestimate the optical thickness of thin anvils and cirrus, resulting in a bias of excessive net anvil heating in all of the simulations.

Powell, Scott W.; Houze, R.; Kumar, Anil; McFarlane, Sally A.

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mercury concentrations in Maine sport fishes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess mercury contamination of fish in Maine, fish were collected from 120 randomly selected lakes. The collection goal for each lake was five fish of the single most common sport fish species within the size range commonly harvested by anglers. Skinless, boneless fillets of fish from each lake were composited, homogenized, and analyzed for total mercury. The two most abundant species, brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu, were also analyzed individually. The composite fish analyses indicate high concentrations of mercury, particularly in large and long-lived nonsalmonid species. Chain pickerel Esox niger, smallmouth bass, largemouth bass Micropterus salmoides, and white perch Morone americana had the highest average mercury concentrations, and brook trout and yellow perch Perca flavescens had the lowest. The mean species composite mercury concentration was positively correlated with a factor incorporating the average size and age of the fish. Lakes containing fish with high mercury concentrations were not clustered near known industrial or population centers but were commonest in the area within 150 km of the seacoast, reflecting the geographical distribution of species that contained higher mercury concentrations. Stocked and wild brook trout were not different in length or weight, but wild fish were older and had higher mercury concentrations. Fish populations maintained by frequent introductions of hatchery-produced fish and subject to high angler exploitation rates may consist of younger fish with lower exposure to environmental mercury and thus contain lower concentrations than wild populations.

Stafford, C.P. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States); Haines, T.A. [Geological Survey, Orono, ME (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Use of solar generators in Africa for broadcasting equipment. [For powering educational tv receivers  

SciTech Connect

In Africa, solar cells were used for the first time in 1968 to provide power supply for the TV receivers in Niger. In that country, school television programs are essentially devised for the schools located in regions not provided with power mains. The transmissions are received by the means of TV sets that are especially devised to operate under warm and wet weather conditions. These receivers, model CATEL CI 17, are equipped with 61-cm screens, and are completely solid-state. They can be powered by a d.c. power supply, between 30 and 36 V. Their consumption, extremely modest, ranges around 32 W. The power supply for these receivers had, at the beginning, been provided by high-capacity alkaline electrolyte cells. In order to secure a more practical and less expensive source of energy, an experimental solar cell was installed in 1968. Following a satisfactory operation of this experimental solar cell, a careful study was conducted, after which some twenty installations were set up, using silicon cells and lead-acid batteries. A description of the installations is presented; and maintenance, reliability, and cost of the installations are discussed. (WHK)

Polgar, S.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed a simple 3D compositional reservoir simulation study to examine the possibility of waterflooding the Soku E7 gas-condensate reservoir. This study shows that water injection results in higher condensate recovery than natural depletion. To achieve this recovery, the reservoir should return to natural depletion after four years of water injection, before water invades the producing wells. Factors that affect the effectiveness of water injection in this reservoir include aquifer strength, reservoir property distribution, timing of the start of injection, and intra-reservoir shale thickness and continuity. Sensitivity analyses used to quantify the effects of these factors on condensate recovery indicate the need to acquire more production, pressure and log data to reduce the present large uncertainty on aquifer strength before proceeding on waterflooding this reservoir. The study also shows that the injection scheme should be implemented as soon as possible to avoid further loss of condensate recovery. The result of this study is applicable to other gas condensate reservoirs in the Niger delta with similar depositional environments.

Ajayi, Arashi

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Molecular genetic analysis reveals that a nonribosomal peptide synthetase-like (NRPS-like) gene in Aspergillus nidulans is responsible for microperfuranone biosynthesis  

SciTech Connect

Genome sequencing of Aspergillus species including A. nidulans has revealed that there are far more secondary metabolite biosynthetic gene clusters than secondary metabolites isolated from these organisms. This implies that these organisms can produce additional secondary metabolites have not yet been elucidated. The A. nidulans genome contains twelve nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), one hybrid polyketide synthase/nonribosomal peptide synthetase (PKS/NRPS), and fourteen NRPS-like genes. The only NRPS-like gene in A. nidulans with a known product is tdiA which is involved in terrequinone A biosynthesis. To attempt to identify the products of these NRPS-like genes, we replaced the native promoters of the NRPS-like genes with the inducible alcohol dehydrogenase (alcA) promoter. Our results demonstrated that induction of the single NRPS-like gene AN3396.4 led to the enhanced production of microperfuranone. Furthermore, heterologous expression of AN3396.4 in A. niger confirmed that only one NRPS-like gene, AN3396.4, is necessary for the production of microperfuranone.

Yeh, Hsu-Hua; Chiang, Yi Ming; Entwistle, Ruth; Ahuja, Mammeet; Lee, Kuan-Han; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Wu, Tung-Kung; Oakley, Berl R.; Wang, Clay C.

2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

179

Generation of transgenic wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) accumulating heterologous endo-xylanase or ferulic acid esterase in the endosperm  

SciTech Connect

Endo-xylanase (from Bacillus subtilis) or ferulic acid esterase (from Aspergillus niger) were expressed in wheat under the control of the endosperm specific 1DX5 glutenin promoter. Constructs both with and without the endoplasmic reticulum retention signal KDEL were used. Transgenic plants were recovered in all four cases but no qualitative differences could be observed whether KDEL was added or not. Endo-xylanase activity in transgenic grains was increased between two and three fold relative to wild type. The grains were shriveled and had a 25-33% decrease in mass. Extensive analysis of the cell walls showed a 10-15% increase in arabinose to xylose ratio, a 50% increase in the proportion of water extractable arabinoxylan, and a shift in the MW of the water extractable arabinoxylan from being mainly larger than 85 kD to being between 2 kD and 85 kD. Ferulic acid esterase expressing grains were also shriveled and the seed weight was decreased by 20-50%. No ferulic acid esterase activity could be detected in wild type grains whereas ferulic acid esterase activity was detected in transgenic lines. The grain cell walls had 15-40% increase in water unextractable arabinoxylan and a decrease in monomeric ferulic acid between 13 and 34%. In all the plants the observed changes are consistent with a plant response that serves to minimize the effect of the heterologously expressed enzymes by increasing arabinoxylan biosynthesis and cross-linking.

Harholt, Jesper; Bach, Inga C; Lind-Bouquin, Solveig; Nunan, Kylie J.; Madrid, Susan M.; Brinch-Pedersen, Henrik; Holm, Preben B.; Scheller, Henrik V.

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

180

Atmospheric Properties from the 2006 Niamey Deployment and Climate Simulation with a Geodesic Grid Coupled Climate Model Fourth Quarter 2008  

SciTech Connect

In 2008, the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program and the Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) have been asked to produce joint science metrics. For CCPP, the metrics will deal with a decade-long control simulation using geodesic grid-coupled climate model. For ARM, the metrics will deal with observations associated with the 2006 deployment of the ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to Niamey, Niger. Specifically, ARM has been asked to deliver data products for Niamey that describe cloud, aerosol, and dust properties. The first quarter milestone was the initial formulation of the algorithm for retrieval of these properties. The second quarter milestone included the time series of ARM-retrieved cloud properties and a year-long CCPP control simulation. The third quarter milestone included the time series of ARM-retrieved aerosol optical depth and a three-year CCPP control simulation. This final fourth quarter milestone includes the time-series of aerosol and dust properties and a decade-long CCPP control simulation.

JH Mather; DA Randall; CJ Flynn

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "tern chlidonias niger" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Identifying and characterizing the most significant ?-glucosidase of the novel species Aspergillus saccharolyticus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A newly discovered fungal species, Aspergillus saccharolyticus, was found to produce a culture broth rich in beta-glucosidase activity. In this present work, the main beta-glucosidase of A. saccharolyticus responsible for the efficient hydrolytic activity was identified, isolated, and characterized. Ion exchange chromatography was used to fractionate the culture broth, yielding fractions with high beta-glucosidase activity and only one visible band on an SDS-PAGE gel. Mass spectrometry analysis of this band gave peptide matches to beta-glucosidases from aspergilli. Through a PCR approach using degenerate primers and genome walking, a 2919 base pair sequence encoding the 860 amino acid BGL1 polypeptide was determined. BGL1 of A. saccharolyticus has 91% and 82% identity with BGL1 from Aspergillus aculeatus and BGL1 from Aspergillus niger, respectively, both belonging to Glycoside hydrolase family 3. Homology modeling studies suggested beta-glucosidase activity with preserved retaining mechanism and a wider catalytic pocket compared to other beta-glucosidases. The bgl1 gene was heterologously expressed in Trichoderma reesei QM6a, purified, and characterized by enzyme kinetics studies. The enzyme can hydrolyze cellobiose, pNPG, and cellodextrins. The enzyme showed good thermostability, was stable at 50C, and at 60C it had a half-life of approximately 6 hours.

Sorensen, Anette; Ahring, Birgitte K.; Lubeck, Mette; Ubhayasekera, Wimal; Bruno, Kenneth S.; Culley, David E.; Lubeck, Peter S.

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

HERS experiment cause for confidence.  

SciTech Connect

At last April's Affordable Comfort conference, I conducted a small HERS (home energy ratings) experiment to examine the relative variability of ratings in new and older homes. The experiment grew out of discussions with Oak Ridge National Laboratory Senior Researcher Mark Ternes and EPA Energy Specialist Mia South about how good the HERS tools currently employed in the new homes market are at identifying cost-effective conservation measures in existing homes. Older homes present challenges for raters that may not generally exist in new construction. These include the absence of blueprints, the inability to interview the builder, the difficulty of identifying the operating efficiency of installed equipment, and different envelope characteristics within the home caused by partial remodels over the years. For precisely these reasons, the need for accurate ratings of older homes is acute. The efficacy of ratings in existing homes hinges on two questions: How accurate are the ratings in existing homes? and, How much does accuracy matter to the selection of conservation measures? A small experiment was organized to test the variability of ratings. Two homes were chosen to represent the very broad spectra that raters can find in the new-construction and existing-home housing stock. The new home in Park Ridge, Illinois, is typical in size and layout of the homes being built in the suburbs around Chicago. This four-bedroom, two-story house with finished basement measures slightly more than 4,000 ft{sup 2}, including the basement. The older home is located in Elgin, Illinois, and was built before 1940, probably sometime in the '20s or '30s. This two-bedroom house has a basement in which the furnace, water heater, clothes washer, and dryer are located. The raters disagreed as to whether the basement should be considered part of the conditioned space. Excluding the basement area, the house measurement approximately 1,000 ft{sup 2}. The rating process included a site visit to measure the homes features, inspection of the blueprints for the new home (none existed for the Elgin home), and a blower door test. After the raters completed their analysis, I examined the effect that the variability of ratings for the Elgin home had on choices for energy conservation measures. Although the sample was small, the results of this experiment are valuable. They may be summarized as follows: First, the ratings that different analysts estimated varied more widely for the older home than they did for the new home. Second, for the older home, the identification of cost-effective energy conservation measures was insensitive to the variation in ratings. Clearly, these findings need to be verified in further experiments. But it is noteworthy that the separate ratings of the new home were in such good agreement, and that cost-effective efficiency recommendations can be arrived at even when divergences exist in the absolute rating value. These findings also suggest that it is appropriate to have confidence in ratings as a tool for identifying cost-effective energy measures in older housing stock.

Cavallo, J. D.; Energy Systems

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Total All Countries Exports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Destination: Total All Countries Afghanistan Albania Algeria Andora Angola Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahama Islands Bahrain Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Bermuda Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Pacific Islands Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordon Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Korea, North Kyrgyzstan Kutubu Kuwait Latvia Lebanon Liberia Libya Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands/Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia Soloman Islands South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Tonga Togo Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

184

Total Net Imports of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products into the U.S.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Country: Total All Countries Persian Gulf OPEC Algeria Angola Ecuador Iran Iraq Kuwait Libya Nigeria Qatar Saudi Arabia United Arab Emirates Venezuela Non OPEC Afghanistan Albania Andora Anguilla Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegovina Brazil Brunei Bulgaria Burma Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cayman Islands Chad Chile China Colombia Congo (Brazzaville) Congo (Kinshasa) Cook Islands Costa Rica Croatia Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djbouti Dominica Dominican Republic Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Ethiopia Eritrea Estonia Fiji Finland France French Pacific Islands French Guiana Gabon Georgia, Republic of Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guinea Guyana Haiti Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Ireland Israel Italy Ivory Coast Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Korea, South Kutubu Kyrgyzstan Latvia Lebanon Liberia Lithuania Macau S.A.R. Macedonia Madagascar Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Mauritania Mauritius Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Midway Islands Moldova Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Namibia Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Niue Norway Oman Pakistan Panama Papau New Guinea Paracel Islands Paraguay Peru Philippines Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Romania Russia St. Kitts and Nevis St. Lucia St. Pierre and Miquelon St. Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Senegal Serbia and Montenegro Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia Slovenia South Africa Spain Spratly Islands Sri Lanka Suriname Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syria Taiwan Tanzania Thailand Togo Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Uganda Ukraine United Kingdom Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Vietnam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Yemen Yugoslavia Other Non OPEC Period-Unit: Monthly-Thousand Barrels per Day Annual-Thousand Barrels per Day

185

Aerosol-to-Hydrosol Transfer Stages for use in bioaerosol sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single-Jet and Multi-Jet Aerosol to Hydrosol Transfer Stages (AHTS) with cutpoints of 2 and 0.8 []m AD, respectively, were designed and evaluated. Both devices operate at nominal air sampling flow rate of 1 L/min, 0.1% Tween20, and 0.3 mL/min. collection liquid flow rate. Both systems have an ideal air power consumption of 1.4 mW and 4.5 mW, respectively. The total electrical power consumption, including that needed to heat the airstream and a sampling enclosure, is approximately 55 W at -23C (-10F) outside air temperature. The AHTSs were tested using polystyrene solid and oleic acid liquid aerosol particles to determine the collection efficiencies. The effectiveness of the fractional collection efficiency for the Single-Jet and Multi-Jet are 91% over the size range of 2 to 10 []m AD, and 90% over the size range of 1 to 10 []m AD, respectively. The hydrosol collection efficiency of the Multi-Jet is 95% over the size of 1 to 3 []m AD. The influence of a cleaning solution that was comprised of distilled water and 0.1% Tween20 yielded an average collection efficiency of above 90% for the Single-Jet and 98% for the Multi-Jet. When the liquid flow rate is equal to or greater than 0.3 mL/min, the hydrosol collection efficiency is constant at 90%. The time responses for Single-Jet and Multi-Jet are 1.4 and 0.75 minutes, respectively. Preliminary results of bioaerosol testing with 0.7 []m AD single spores of Bacillus globigii var. niger show efficiencies over 100%. These discrepancies are probably due to the testing procedures at the U.S. Army Research Office, Chemical Biological Center, Edgewood, MD, facilities.

Phan, Huy Ngoc

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Observations of the impact of a major Saharan dust storm on the atmospheric radiation balance  

SciTech Connect

Saharan dust storms transport large quantities of material across the African continent and beyond, causing widespread disruption and hazards to health. The dust may be deposited into the Atlantic Ocean, where it provides an important source of nutrients1, and may be carried as far as the West Indies. Such events may also influence the growth of Atlantic tropical cyclones. Satellite observations have enabled estimates to be made of the effect of the dust on the radiation budget seen from space, but only limited in situ observations have hitherto been made at the surface. Here we present the first simultaneous and continuous observations of the effect of a major dust storm in March 2006 on the radiation budget both at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) and at the surface. We combine data from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) broadband radiometer and the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on the Meteosat-8 weather satellite with remote sensing and in situ measurements from a new Mobile Facility located in Niamey, Niger (13{sup o} 29'N, 2{sup o} 10'E), operated by the US Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. We show that the dust produced major perturbations to the radiation budget seen from space and from the surface. By combining the two datasets, we estimate the impact on the radiation budget of the atmosphere itself. Using independent data from the Mobile Facility, we derive the optical properties of the dust and input these and other information into radiation codes to simulate the radiative fluxes. Comparisons with the observed fluxes provides a stringent test of the ability of the codes to represent the radiative properties of this important component of the global aerosol burden.

Slingo, A.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Allan, R. P.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Robinson, G. J.; Barnard, James C.; Miller, Mark; Harries, J. E.; Russell, J. E.; Dewitte, S.

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing Annual Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Uranium Marketing Annual Report Uranium Marketing Annual Report Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Purchases Weighted- Average Price Australia 12,758 41.59 11,164 52.25 7,112 51.35 6,001 57.47 6,724 51.17 Brazil W W W W W W W W W W Canada 9,791 48.72 8,975 42.25 10,238 50.35 10,832 56.08 13,584 56.75 China 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- W W W W Czech Republic W W W W W W 0 -- 0 -- Germany 0 -- 0 -- W W 0 -- 0 -- Hungary 0 -- 0 -- W W 0 -- 0 -- Kazakhstan 3,818 60.61 4,985 43.41 6,830 47.81 9,728 53.71 6,234 51.69 Malawi 0 -- 0 -- W W 780 65.44 W W Namibia 3,880 54.79 5,732 47.30 4,913 47.90 6,199 56.74 5,986 54.56 Niger W W 2,001 47.55 587 49.00 1,744 54.38 2,133 50.45 Russia 12,080 27.64 7,938 37.98 10,544 50.28 10,199 56.57 7,643 54.40 South Africa 783 27.50 W W W W 1,524 53.62 1,243 56.45 Ukraine 0 -- 0 -- W W W W W W United Kingdom W W 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- 0 -- Uzbekistan

188

Methodology for estimating volumes of flared and vented natural gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The common perception in the United States that natural gas produced with oil is a valuable commodity probably dates from the 1940's. Before that time, most operators regarded natural gas associated with or dissolved in oil as a nuisance. Indeed, most associated/dissolved natural gas produced in the United States before World War II probably was flared or vented to the atmosphere. This situation has changed in the United States, where flaring and venting have decreased dramatically in recent years, in part because of environmental concerns, but also because of the changing view of the value of natural gas. The idea that gas is a nuisance is beginning to change almost everywhere, as markets for gas have developed in Europe, Japan, and elsewhere, and as operators have increasingly utilized or reinjected associated-dissolved gas in their oil-production activities. Nevertheless, in some areas natural gas continues to be flared or vented to the atmosphere. Gas flares in Russia, the Niger Delta, and the Middle East are some of the brightest lights on the nighttime Earth. As we increasingly consider the global availability and utility of natural gas, and the environmental impacts of the consumption of carbon-based fuels, it is important to know how much gas has been flared or vented, how much gas is currently being flared or vented, and the distribution of flaring or venting through time. Unfortunately, estimates of the volumes of flared and vented gas are generally not available. Despite the inconsistency and inavailability of data, the extrapolation method outlined provides a reliable technique for estimating amounts of natural gas flared and vented through time. 36 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

Klett, T.R.; Gautier, D.L. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Newsletter Signup Form  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS EETD NEWSLETTER - MANAGE SUBSCRIPTIONS (red fields are required) Manage subscriptions: Subscribe Unsubscribe Name E-Mail Affiliation Address Address (line 2) City State/Province Zip/Postal Code Country (please select a country) none Afghanistan Albania Algeria American Samoa Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia Bosnia and Herzegowina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d'Ivoire Croatia (Hrvatska) Cuba Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic East Timor Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France France, Metropolitan French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guam Guatemala Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard and Mc Donald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hong Kong Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran (Islamic Republic of) Iraq Ireland Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People's Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macau Macedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Marshall Islands Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Micronesia, Federated States of Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Northern Mariana Islands Norway Oman Pakistan Palau Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Puerto Rico Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint LUCIA Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Slovakia (Slovak Republic) Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands Spain Sri Lanka St. Helena St. Pierre and Miquelon Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Islands Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan, Province of China Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States United States Minor Outlying Islands Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela Viet Nam Virgin Islands (British) Virgin Islands (U.S.) Wallis and Futuna Islands Western Sahara Yemen Yugoslavia Zambia Zimbabwe

190

Tourism development, rural livelihoods, and conservation in the Okavango Delta, Botswana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study analyzed changes in livelihoods before and after tourism development at Khwai, Mababe and Sankoyo villages in the Okavango Delta. Specifically, it analyzed how people interacted with species like giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), sable antelope (Hippotragus niger) and thatching grass (Cymbopogon excavatus) before and after tourism development. This analysis was expected to measure the effectiveness of tourism development as a tool to improve livelihoods and conservation. The concept of social capital, sustainable livelihoods framework and the Community- Based Natural Resource Management (CBNRM) paradigm informed the study. Qualitative and quantitative data were gathered through field-based research, using tools of participant observation, semi-structured interviews, and key informant interviews. Results indicate that local customs and institutions at Khwai, Mababe and Sankoyo ensured the conservation of resources in pre-colonial Botswana. However, British colonial rule (1885-1966) affected traditional institutions of resource use hence the beginning of resource decline. The British colonial rule and the first 15-20 years after Botswanas independence from British rule saw an increase in resource degradation. Results also indicate that since CBNRM began in the 1990s, tourism development has positive and negative effects on rural livelihoods. On the positive side, tourism development in some ways is achieving its goals of improved livelihoods and conservation. Residents attitudes towards tourism development and conservation have also become positive compared to a decade ago when these communities were not involved in tourism development. On the negative side, tourism is emerging as the single livelihood option causing either a decline or abandonment of traditional options like hunting and gathering and agricultural production. Reliance on tourism alone as a livelihood option is risky in the event of a global social, economic and political instability especially in countries where most tourists that visit the Okavango originate or in Botswana itself. There is need, therefore, for communities to diversify into domestic tourism and small-scale enterprises. On the overall, tourism development through CBNRM indicates that it is a viable tool to achieve improved livelihoods and conservation in the Okavango Delta.

Mbaiwa, Joseph Elizeri

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evaluation of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp) genotypes for adaptation to low soil-phosphorus conditions and to rock phosphate application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cowpea (Vigna ungiculata L. Walp) is a major food and fodder legume in poor countries, particularly Sub-Saharan Africa countries. It is generally produced in sandy, acid soils, deficient in phosphorus (P) which severely limits its production. Because processed phosphate fertilizers are expensive and poorly available to farmers, rock phosphate is viewed as a cheap alternative phosphate source. The present study evaluated 696 U.S Core Collection and IITA cowpea accessions for adaptation to low soil P environments and for response to rock phosphate application. Subsequently, organic acid exudation by selected cowpea genotypes as a mechanism for P acquisition from Fe-oxide and Ca bound P was investigated. A low P soil from Nacogdoches pine forest was used to grow plants. There were two P treatments: 0 and 300 mg P/kg of soil as Tahoua (Niger) rock phosphate. At harvest, plant height, shoot and root dry weights were determined and total biomass and shoot-to-root ratios were computed. Shoot P contents of 100 selected accessions were measured. Sixteen accessions reflecting the wide array of responses observed were selected for the organic acid study. Plants were grown in a growth chamber hydroponically with no P and +P nutrient solutions for 3 weeks. Organic acids were collected in a CaCl2-KCl solution. The nature and quantity of the collected organic acids was determined. Cowpea accessions were significantly different in their ability to adapt to Pdeficiency stress and to acquire P from rock phosphate. The parameters most effective in separating the accessions were shoot mass and total biomass. This data will be potentially useful in the selection of cowpea germplasm for (1) adaptation to West African soils of low P fertility, and (2) ability to utilize P from poorly soluble rock phosphate. The predominant organic acid exuded by cowpea roots was a tricarboxylic acid not yet identified. There was surprisingly more exudation of this acid under +P than under P conditions. Exudation was more highly correlated to roots than to shoots.

Mahamane, Sabiou

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Seasonal Contrasts in the Surface Energy Balance of the Sahel  

SciTech Connect

Over most of the world ocean, heating of the surface by sunlight is balanced predominately by evaporative cooling. Even over land, moisture for evaporation is available from vegetation or the soil reservoir. However, at the ARM Mobile Facility in Niamey, Niger, soil moisture is so depleted that evaporation makes a significant contribution to the surface energy balance only at the height of the rainy season, when precipitation has replenished the soil reservoir. Using observations at the Mobile Facility from late 2005 to early 2007, we describe how the surface balances radiative forcing. How the surface compensates time-averaged solar heating varies with seasonal changes in atmospheric water vapor, which modulates the greenhouse effect and the ability of the surface to radiate thermal energy directly to space. During the dry season, sunlight is balanced mainly by longwave radiation and the turbulent flux of sensible heat. The ability of longwave radiation to cool the surface drops after the onset of the West African summer monsoon, when moist, oceanic air flows onshore, increasing local column moisture and atmospheric opacity at these wavelengths. After the monsoon onset, but prior to significant rainfall, solar heating is compensated mainly by the sensible heat flux. During the rainy season, the magnitude of evaporation is initially controlled by the supply of moisture from precipitation. However, by the height of the rainy season, sufficient precipitation has accumulated at the surface that evaporation is related to the flux demanded by solar radiation, and radiative forcing of the surface is balanced comparably by the latent, sensible, and longwave fluxes. Radiative forcing of the surface also varies on a subseasonal time scale due to fluctuations in water vapor, clouds, and aerosol concentration. Except at the height of the rainy season, subseasonal forcing is balanced mainly by sensible heating and longwave anomalies. The efficacy of the sensible heat flux depends upon a positive feedback, where forcing changes mixing within the boundary layer and amplifies the sensible heating anomaly. How the surface responds to radiative forcing is fundamental to the climate response to dust and carbonaceous aerosols.

Miller, Ron; Slingo, A.; Barnard, James C.; Kassianov, Evgueni I.

2009-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

193

Particle Data Group - 2009 Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

08 Edition and 2009 Web Update 08 Edition and 2009 Web Update (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) New authors of 2009 Web Update D. de Florian, 109 G. Dissertori, 31 D. Edwards, 27 S. Golwala, 108 M. Heffner, 45 B. Heltsley, 62 J. Holder, 34 A. Karle, 7 J. Lys, 8 G. Salam, 112 K. Scholberg, 111 M. Syphers, 15 A. Vogt, 110 W. Walkowiak, 113 C. Walter, 111 E. Weinberg, 90 L. Wiencke, 114 Authors of the 2008 Review of Particle Physics C. Amsler et al. (Particle Data Group), Physics Letters B667, 1 (2008) (Also see: PDF format) AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) C. Amsler, 1 M. Doser, 2 M. Antonelli, 3 D. Asner, 4 K.S. Babu, 5 H. Baer, 6 H.R. Band, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 E. Bergren, G. Bernardi, 9 W. Bertl, 10 H. Bichsel, 11 O. Biebel, 12 P. Bloch, 2 E. Blucher, 13 S. Blusk, 14 R.N. Cahn, 8 M. Carena, 15,13,16 C. Caso, 17,* A. Ceccucci, 2 D. Chakraborty, 18 M.-C. Chen, 19 R.S. Chivukula, 20 G. Cowan, 21 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 22 T. Damour, 23 A. de Gouvea, 24 T. DeGrand, 25 B. Dobrescu, 15 M. Drees, 26 A. Edwards, 27 S. Eidelman, 28 V.D. Elvira, 15 J. Erler, 29 V.V. Ezhela, 30 J.L. Feng, 19 W. Fetscher, 31 B.D. Fields, 32 B. Foster, 33 T.K. Gaisser, 34 L. Garren, 15 H.-J. Gerber, 31 G. Gerbier, 35 T. Gherghetta, 36 G.F. Giudice, 2 M. Goodman, 37 C. Grab, 31 A.V. Gritsan, 38 J.-F. Grivaz, 39 D.E. Groom, 8 M. Grünewald, 40 A. Gurtu, 41,2 T. Gutsche, 42 H.E. Haber, 43 K. Hagiwara, 44 C. Hagmann, 45 K.G. Hayes, 46 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 47,¶ K. Hikasa, 48 I. Hinchliffe, 8 A. Höcker, 2 J. Huston, 20 P. Igo-Kemenes, 49 J.D. Jackson, 8 K.F. Johnson, 6 T. Junk, 15 D. Karlen, 50 B. Kayser, 15 D. Kirkby, 19 S.R. Klein, 51 I.G. Knowles, 52 C. Kolda, 53 R.V. Kowalewski, 50 P. Kreitz, 54 B. Krusche, 55 Yu.V. Kuyanov, 30 Y. Kwon, 56 O. Lahav, 57 P. Langacker, 58 A. Liddle, 59 Z. Ligeti, 8 C.-J. Lin, 8 T.M. Liss, 60 L. Littenberg, 61 J.C. Liu, 54 K.S. Lugovsky, 30 S.B. Lugovsky, 30 H. Mahlke, 62 M.L. Mangano, 2 T. Mannel, 63 A.V. Manohar, 64 W.J. Marciano, 61 A.D. Martin, 65 A. Masoni, 66 D. Milstead, 67 R. Miquel, 68 K. Mönig, 69 H. Murayama, 70,71,8 K. Nakamura, 44 M. Narain, 72 P. Nason, 73 S. Navas, 74,¶ P. Nevski, 61 Y. Nir, 75 K.A. Olive, 76 L. Pape, 31 C. Patrignani, 17 J.A. Peacock, 52 A. Piepke, 77 G. Punzi, 78 A. Quadt, 79, S. Raby, 80 G. Raffelt, 81 B.N. Ratcliff, 54 B. Renk, 82 P. Richardson, 65 S. Roesler, 2 S. Rolli, 83 A. Romaniouk, 84 L.J. Rosenberg, 11 J.L. Rosner, 13 C.T. Sachrajda, 85 Y. Sakai, 44 S. Sarkar, 86 F. Sauli, 2 O. Schneider, 87 D. Scott, 88 B. Seligman, 89 M. Shaevitz, 90 T. Sjöstrand, 91 J.G. Smith, 25 G.F. Smoot, 8 S. Spanier, 54 H. Spieler, 8 A. Stahl, 92 T. Stanev, 34 S.L. Stone, 14 T. Sumiyoshi, 93 M. Tanabashi, 94 J. Terning, 95 M. Titov, 96 N.P. Tkachenko, 30 N.A. Törnqvist, 97 D. Tovey, 98 G.H. Trilling, 8 T.G. Trippe, 8 G. Valencia, 99 K. van Bibber, 45 M.G. Vincter, 4 P. Vogel, 100 D.R. Ward, 101 T. Watari, 102 B.R. Webber, 101 G. Weiglein, 65 J.D. Wells, 103 M. Whalley, 65 A. Wheeler, 54 C.G. Wohl, 8 L. Wolfenstein, 104 J. Womersley, 105 C.L. Woody, 61 R.L. Workman, 106 A. Yamamoto, 44 W. -M. Yao, 8 O.V. Zenin, 30 J. Zhang, 107 R.-Y. Zhu 108 P.A. Zyla 8

194

Particle Data Group - Authors  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Edition 8 Edition C. Amsler et al. (Particle Data Group), Physics Letters B667, 1 (2008) Also see: PDF format. AUTHORS: (Click on Author Name to get Email address, phone numbers, etc.) RPP authors C. Amsler, 1 M. Doser, 2 M. Antonelli, 3 D. Asner, 4 K.S. Babu, 5 H. Baer, 6 H.R. Band, 7 R.M. Barnett, 8 J. Beringer, 8 E. Bergren, G. Bernardi, 9 W. Bertl, 10 H. Bichsel, 11 O. Biebel, 12 P. Bloch, 2 E. Blucher, 13 S. Blusk, 14 R.N. Cahn, 8 M. Carena, 15,13,16 C. Caso, 17,* A. Ceccucci, 2 D. Chakraborty, 18 M.-C. Chen, 19 R.S. Chivukula, 20 G. Cowan, 21 O. Dahl, 8 G. D'Ambrosio, 22 T. Damour, 23 A. de Gouvea, 24 T. DeGrand, 25 B. Dobrescu, 15 M. Drees, 26 A. Edwards, 27 S. Eidelman, 28 V.D. Elvira, 15 J. Erler, 29 V.V. Ezhela, 30 J.L. Feng, 19 W. Fetscher, 31 B.D. Fields, 32 B. Foster, 33 T.K. Gaisser, 34 L. Garren, 15 H.-J. Gerber, 31 G. Gerbier, 35 T. Gherghetta, 36 G.F. Giudice, 2 M. Goodman, 37 C. Grab, 31 A.V. Gritsan, 38 J.-F. Grivaz, 39 D.E. Groom, 8 M. Grünewald, 40 A. Gurtu, 41,2 T. Gutsche, 42 H.E. Haber, 43 K. Hagiwara, 44 C. Hagmann, 45 K.G. Hayes, 46 J.J. Hernández-Rey, 47,¶ K. Hikasa, 48 I. Hinchliffe, 8 A. Höcker, 2 J. Huston, 20 P. Igo-Kemenes, 49 J.D. Jackson, 8 K.F. Johnson, 6 T. Junk, 15 D. Karlen, 50 B. Kayser, 15 D. Kirkby, 19 S.R. Klein, 51 I.G. Knowles, 52 C. Kolda, 53 R.V. Kowalewski, 50 P. Kreitz, 54 B. Krusche, 55 Yu.V. Kuyanov, 30 Y. Kwon, 56 O. Lahav, 57 P. Langacker, 58 A. Liddle, 59 Z. Ligeti, 8 C.-J. Lin, 8 T.M. Liss, 60 L. Littenberg, 61 J.C. Liu, 54 K.S. Lugovsky, 30 S.B. Lugovsky, 30 H. Mahlke, 62 M.L. Mangano, 2 T. Mannel, 63 A.V. Manohar, 64 W.J. Marciano, 61 A.D. Martin, 65 A. Masoni, 66 D. Milstead, 67 R. Miquel, 68 K. Mönig, 69 H. Murayama, 70,71,8 K. Nakamura, 44 M. Narain, 72 P. Nason, 73 S. Navas, 74,¶ P. Nevski, 61 Y. Nir, 75 K.A. Olive, 76 L. Pape, 31 C. Patrignani, 17 J.A. Peacock, 52 A. Piepke, 77 G. Punzi, 78 A. Quadt, 79, S. Raby, 80 G. Raffelt, 81 B.N. Ratcliff, 54 B. Renk, 82 P. Richardson, 65 S. Roesler, 2 S. Rolli, 83 A. Romaniouk, 84 L.J. Rosenberg, 11 J.L. Rosner, 13 C.T. Sachrajda, 85 Y. Sakai, 44 S. Sarkar, 86 F. Sauli, 2 O. Schneider, 87 D. Scott, 88 B. Seligman, 89 M. Shaevitz, 90 T. Sjöstrand, 91 J.G. Smith, 25 G.F. Smoot, 8 S. Spanier, 54 H. Spieler, 8 A. Stahl, 92 T. Stanev, 34 S.L. Stone, 14 T. Sumiyoshi, 93 M. Tanabashi, 94 J. Terning, 95 M. Titov, 96 N.P. Tkachenko, 30 N.A. Törnqvist, 97 D. Tovey, 98 G.H. Trilling, 8 T.G. Trippe, 8 G. Valencia, 99 K. van Bibber, 45 M.G. Vincter, 4 P. Vogel, 100 D.R. Ward, 101 T. Watari, 102 B.R. Webber, 101 G. Weiglein, 65 J.D. Wells, 103 M. Whalley, 65 A. Wheeler, 54 C.G. Wohl, 8 L. Wolfenstein, 104 J. Womersley, 105 C.L. Woody, 61 R.L. Workman, 106 A. Yamamoto, 44 W. -M. Yao, 8 O.V. Zenin, 30 J. Zhang, 107 R.-Y. Zhu 108 P.A. Zyla 8

195

Miljoforden Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Miljoforden Website Miljoforden Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Miljoforden Website Focus Area: Natural Gas Topics: Deployment Data Website: www.miljofordon.se/in-english/this-is-miljofordon-se Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/miljoforden-website Language: "English,Swedish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

196

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Overview of China's Vehicle Emission Control Program: Past Successes and Future Prospects Focus Area: Propane Topics: Socio-Economic Website: theicct.org/sites/default/files/publications/Retrosp_final_bilingual.p Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/overview-china's-vehicle-emission-con Language: "English,Chinese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

197

OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Solar Thermal World Portal Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power, - Solar Hot Water User Interface: Website Website: www.solarthermalworld.org/ Cost: Free UN Region: Caribbean, South America Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Proven√ßal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volap√ºk, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

198

Freight Best Practice Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Freight Best Practice Website Freight Best Practice Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Freight Best Practice Website Focus Area: Public Transit Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.freightbestpractice.org.uk/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/freight-best-practice-website Language: "English,Welsh" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

199

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

200

Sustainable Logistics Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sustainable Logistics Website Sustainable Logistics Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Logistics Website Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Best Practices Website: www.duurzamelogistiek.nl/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/sustainable-logistics-website Language: "English,Dutch" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

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201

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canadian National Energy Use Database: Statistics and Analysis Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/corporate/statistics/neud/dpa/home.cfm?attr=24 Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadian-national-energy-use-database Language: "English,French" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

202

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Improved Biomass Cooking Stoves Agency/Company /Organization: various Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Prepare a Plan, Create Early Successes Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Guide/manual, Presentation, Video User Interface: Website Website: ttp://www.bioenergylists.org/ Cost: Free Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

203

Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Handbook of Emission Factors for Road Transport (HBEFA) Focus Area: Clean Transportation Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.hbefa.net/e/index.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/handbook-emission-factors-road-transp Language: "English,French,German" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

204

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Toolkit Website Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Policy Impacts Website: toolkits.reeep.org/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-and-energy-efficienc Language: "English,Chinese,French,Portuguese,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

205

IGES-Market Mechanism Group | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IGES-Market Mechanism Group IGES-Market Mechanism Group Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IGES-Market Mechanism Agency/Company /Organization: Institute for Global Environmental Strategies (IGES) Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Training materials Website: www.iges.or.jp/en/cdm/index.html Cost: Free Language: "English, Japanese" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

206

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Photovoltaics Design and Installation Manual Agency/Company /Organization: Solar Energy International Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Solar, - Solar PV Resource Type: Training materials User Interface: Other Website: www.solarenergy.org/bookstore/photovoltaics-design-installation-manual Cost: Paid Language: "English, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

207

Eco TransIT World | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Eco TransIT World Eco TransIT World Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Eco TransIT World Focus Area: Low Carbon Communities Topics: Opportunity Assessment & Screening Website: www.ecotransit.org/index.en.html Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/eco-transit-world Language: "English,Dutch,French,German,Spanish" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

208

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CRiSTAL Project Management Tool CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CRiSTAL Project Management Tool Agency/Company /Organization: International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land Topics: Implementation Resource Type: Guide/manual, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.iisd.org/cristaltool/ Cost: Free Language: "English, French, Portuguese, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.